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1

Strategies for OPEC`s pricing and output decisions  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines OPEC pricing and output strategies, both to provide an understanding of OPECs unwise price doubling in 1979-80 and also to analyze what strategy might serve it best for the future. We focus on the unavoidable uncertainty regarding the underlying parameters that characterize the world oil market (price elasticities, income growth rates), and the sensitivity of discounted OPEC revenue to changes in these parameters, for various pricing strategies. In 1979-80, OPEC chose a high-price strategy, which could have yielded good results (like many other price-paths) if the market`s underlying parameters had been more favorable. But the price elasticities of demand and non-OPEC supply were much higher than anticipated, so that OPEC did very poorly-not only in absolute terms, but also relative to what it could have achieved if it had set its price more cautiously. We search for a robustly optimal strategy for OPEC in the future, which will serve it well relative to other strategies, regardless of the true parameter values underlying the market (within some plausible range). We conclude that OPEC`s interests will be served best by a policy of moderate output growth, at a rate no faster than that of world income growth. This will require that OPEC slow its rate of output growth since 1985, cutting it at least in half. Slowing its output growth will allow OPEC gradually to regain the market share lost after its disastrous 1979-80 price doubling, but without jeopardizing its revenue, as might a policy of more rapid increases in output. This will yield a consistently good result for OPEC, relative to alternative strategies, over a fairly wide range of demand and supply conditions. 53 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Gately, D. [New York Univ., New York, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

2

Do oil markets work; is OPEC dead  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the authors review what has happened in world oil markets since the 1970s and examine the prospects for OPEC and world oil prices. The paper summarizes the data for the last two decades: by fuel, by product, and by region. It focuses on OPEC and its members, examining the differences in behavior between its members and non-OPEC producers. The authors find that OPEC is clearly still relevant, if no longer very powerful. Its members have collectively reduced output dramatically, in an unsuccessful attempt to defend the price increases. They examine the important institutional changes of the last two decades, in comparison with the industry's stability for much of the century. They suggest an interpretation of OPEC's current situation. The paper summarizes the outlook for OPEC and the world oil market over the next two decades.

Gately, D. (New York Univ., NY (USA). Dept. of Economics)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

OPEC Crude Oil Production 1999-2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

OPEC Crude Oil Production 1999-2001. History. Projections. Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy Outlook, January 2001.

4

OPEC Production Changes Impacted World Crude Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

OPEC has been a major factor behind the recent swing in crude oil prices. As prices fell in 1997 and 1998, OPEC gradually removed supply from the market.

5

OPEC Crude Oil Production 1999-2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 of 17 3 of 17 Notes: After declining in 1999 due to a series of announced production cuts, OPEC 10 (OPEC countries excluding Iraq) production has been increasing during 2000. EIA's projected OPEC production levels for fourth quarter 2000 have been lowered by 300,000 barrels per day from the previous Outlook. Most of this decrease is in OPEC 10 production, which is estimated to be 26.5 million barrels per day. EIA still believes that only Saudi Arabia, and to a lesser degree, the United Arab Emirates, will have significant short-term capacity to expand production. EIA's forecast assumes that OPEC 10 crude oil production will decline by 400,000 barrels per day to 26.1 million barrels per day by mid-2001. Iraqi crude oil production is estimated to have increased from 2.3 million

6

OPEC influence grows with world output in next decade  

SciTech Connect

World crude oil and condensate output will rise to 75 million bopd in 2004, concludes a recently released Petroconsultant study, entitled Worldwide Crude Oil 10-Year Forecast. It also projects that OPEC`s role in supplying demand will simultaneously grow to nearly 50% of total output. In reaching these conclusions, this report analyzed and predicted each of 94 significant producing nations for the 1995--2004 period. Output has been projected separately for the onshore and offshore sectors. Each nation, including the new republics of the former Soviet Union and individual emirates of the United Arab Emirates, is discussed within its regional and global framework; and key aspects of each of the seven major regions have been delineated. The study integrated full-cycle resource analysis, economics, infrastructure, politics, history, consumption levels and patterns, energy balances, and other pertinent data to cover both supply and demand pictures. The entire discovery and production history was used to frame exploration and development maturity. Future discovery potential has been estimated from largely geologic parameters.

Foreman, N.E. [Petroconsultants, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

OPEC Crude Oil Production 1999-2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

EIA assumes in its base case that OPEC 10 production averages about EIA assumes in its base case that OPEC 10 production averages about 0.6 million barrels per day less in the 1st quarter of 2001 than was produced in the 4th quarter of 2000. This is based on the assumption that beginning in February 2001, OPEC 10 production is 1 million barrels per day less than the estimate for December 2000. Over the course of the past year, worldwide oil production has increased by about 3.7 million barrels per day to a level of 77.8 million barrels per day in the last months of 2000. After being nearly completely curtailed in December 2000, EIA's base case assumes that Iraqi oil exports only partially return in January. By February, EIA assumes Iraqi crude oil production reaches 3 million barrels per day, roughly the peak levels reached last year.

8

Higher oil prices: Can OPEC raise prices by cutting production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OPEC's ability to raise prices is evaluated with a model that projects the supply and demand. As part of the model, a new methodology to forecast for the rate of production by non-OPEC nations is developed. A literature review of techniques for estimating oil supply and annual rates of production indicates a new methodology is needed. The new technique incorporates the geological, engineering, and economic aspects of the oil industry by synthesizing curve fitting and econometric techniques. It is used to analyze data for eight regions for non-OPEC oil production: the lower 48 states, Alaska, Canada, Mexico, non-OPEC South America, Western Europe, non-OPEC Africa, and non-OPEC Asia. OPEC's ability to raise prices is examined by tracking the percentage oil US oil demand supplied by imports, the portion of oil demand in Western Europe supplied by local production, the percentage of WOCA oil demand supplied by OPEC and Real OPEC revenues. Results of the model indicate that OPEC can raise oil prices in the early 1990s. OPEC can raise and sustain oil prices near $25 (1982 dollars). Higher oil prices ($35) are not sustainable before 2000 because reduced demand and increased non-OPEC production shrink OPEC revenues below acceptable levels. After 2000, $35 prices are sustainable.

Kaufmann, R.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

OPEC and Non-OPEC Oil Production, 1970-2020  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

New exploration and production ... •OPEC production in 2020 is projected to be almost 24 million barrels per day higher than the 1997 level of nearly 30 ...

10

OPEC Crude Oil Production 1999-2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: EIA assumes in its base case that OPEC 10 production averages about 0.6 million barrels per day less in the 1st quarter of 2001 than was produced in the 4th quarter of 2000. This is based on the assumption that beginning in February 2001, OPEC 10 production is 1 million barrels per day less than the estimate for December 2000. From the fourth quarter of 1999 to the 4th quarter of 2000, worldwide oil production increased by about 3.7 million barrels per day to a level of 77.8 million barrels per day. After being sharply curtailed in December 2000, EIA's base case assumes that Iraqi oil exports only partially return in January. By February, EIA assumes Iraqi crude oil production reaches 3 million barrels per day, roughly the peak levels reached last year.

11

OPEC Crude Oil Production 1998-2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: EIA assumes in its base case that OPEC 10 production averages about 0.6 million barrels per day less in the 1st quarter of 2001 than was produced in the 4th quarter of 2000. This is based on the assumption that beginning in February 2001, OPEC 10 production is 1 million barrels per day less than the estimate for December 2000. From the fourth quarter of 1999 to the 4th quarter of 2000, worldwide oil production increased by about 3.8 million barrels per day to a level of 77.9 million barrels per day. After being sharply curtailed in December and January, EIA's base case assumes that Iraqi oil exports return closer to more normal levels in February. By the second half of 2001, EIA assumes Iraqi crude oil production reaches 3 million barrels per day, roughly the peak levels

12

Most OPEC nations log output gains in 1990  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that total crude oil production by the members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries rose to 23.26 million b/d in 1990 from 21.34 million b/d in 1989, despite the lost production from Iraq and Kuwait during the second half. Those two were the only OPEC members not recording production increases for the year. According to the annual statistical bulletin issued by the OPEC secretariat late last month, the value of total OPEC petroleum exports also jumped markedly, to $147.44 billion from $114.28 billion in 1989. This enabled the organization to end the year with an estimated current account surplus of $13.77 billion, compared with the 1989 surplus of $4.34 billion.

Not Available

1991-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

13

Oil export policy and economic development in OPEC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the 1970s, members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) increased the price of their oil exports by 2000% in nominal terms. The ability of OPEC countries to increase the economic and other benefits they drew from each barrel of oil was a familiar theme of that decade. However, recent developments in the world oil market may not be so encouraging for OPEC. From 1979 to 1983, demand for OPEC crude oil decreased by almost 45%, or from 30.9 to 17.5 million barrels per day (mbd). Despite this dramatic decrease, the news on the price front has not so far been that bad for OPEC. The average OPEC oil price, which had increased from $1.80/bbl (barrel) in 1970 to $36/bbl by 1980, declined to $29/bbl by 1983. OPEC has thus defied many experts by managing to avoid a price collapse. Not surprisingly, these developments have raised arguments about the nature of OPEC and how it operates. OPEC has been characterized variously as a very tight cartel and as a loose and ineffectual organization. This paper tries to shed some light on OPEC, and especially on how the economic development objectives of influential OPEC members affect their oil policies.

Aperjis, D.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Shifting production trends point to more oil from OPEC  

SciTech Connect

Oil production from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and non-OPEC regions has undergone four major phases of change in relation to oil price since 1960. Patterns visible in those phases offer an indication of world-wide production trends in the future. These four phases are described. Overall, demand for oil during 1960--93 has increased from around 20 million b/d in 1960 to as high as 65 million b/d in 1993. The consensus among energy analysts and forecasters is that this demand growth will continue. This will encourage OPEC and non OPEC producers to invest in the oil industry to meet future demand growth. However, since the resource base is larger in OPEC than in non-OPEC areas, and since the cost of developing these resources is lower in OPEC than outside OPEC, the future call on OPEC oil to meet growth in demand will undoubtedly be substantiated as production from the non-OPEC region diminishes or at best stagnates. The paper discusses OPEC production trends, non-OPEC production, natural gas liquids, future production scenarios, and future constraints on production.

Ismail, I.A.H. (Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, Vienna (Austria))

1994-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

15

Is there oil after OPEC : Ecuador's Pasaje  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1973 when Ecuador joined the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, crude oil production increased by nearly half and domestic petroleum consumption has more than tripled. Oil's percent of Gross Domestic Product was just 3% in 1972, peaked at 17.3% in 1974, and has since declined to 11.71% in 1991. In 1992 the national perspective changed and found that OPEC membership was working against, not in favor of, economic growth. This issue addresses Ecuador's status change and its plans for its petroleum and economic future.

Not Available

1992-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

16

Non-OPEC oil production: The key to the future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dramatic increase in non-OPEC oil production that has occurred since the fuel crises of the seventies was accelerated by the subsequent increases in oil prices on world markets. Current moderate world prices are attributable to increased supply in the last decade from these countries. Among those nations whose production has more than doubled since 1973 are China, Mexico, the UK, Norway, Egypt, India, Oman, Brazil, Colombia, Angola, and Syria. In this context, non-OPEC nations include the Communist oil-producing countries, since their ability to meet their own domestic demand has forestalled the day when they will compete for supplies on world markets. The prospect for continued growth in non-OPEC oil production is good. Prospects for additions to reserves continue to be bright in virgin exploration areas and semimature oil-producing provinces. Non-OPEC oil production may reach peak levels in the 1995--2000 time frame. However, production will be increasingly countered by growing demand, especially in South and Central America and Asia. It is almost certain that by the mid-nineties, competition for oil supplies in world markets will elevate the price of oil available from the well endowed OPEC nations. Supply disruptions as well may be in the offing by the turn of the century as surpluses on world markets disappear. 92 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

Borg, I.Y.

1990-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

17

The real prospect of non-OPEC oil supply  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The above analysis does not constitute a forecast of non-OPEC supply. But the picture that emerges from it is so different from the conventional wisdom of the past 10 to 15 years, we believe it deserves careful consideration. There is little evidence that the general historical pattern of regularly finding sufficient oil to meet world demand has changed, or is about to change. Without a clear indication that they have done so, OPEC`s planners should expect more non-OPEC production for the foreseeable future. We all know that higher prices have provided incentives to explore at least the more attractive of the potential targets. But more stable prices, even at low levels ($15 to $18 per barrel) and better technologies will induce more diverse oil suppliers.

Al-Sahlawi, M.A. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Non-OPEC oil supply gains to outpace demand in 1997  

SciTech Connect

Rising oil supplies in 1997 will relax some of the market tightness that drove up crude prices last year. Worldwide demand for petroleum products in 1996 rose faster than anticipated and faster than supply from outside the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. This increased demand for OPEC oil and pushed up prices for crude. At year end, the world export price of crude was up more than 25% from the same period a year earlier. Market conditions will change in 1997. While worldwide economic growth will continue to boost demand for energy and petroleum, non-OPEC petroleum supply will grow even more. Increases in North Sea and Latin American production will help boost non-OPEC output by 1.9 million b/d. And revenues from 1996 production gains will make additional investment possible in exploration and production. The paper discusses world economic growth, world oil demand, worldwide supply, supply outlook, prices and international drilling.

Beck, R.J.

1997-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

19

Ten-year retrospective: OPEC and the world oil market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews the main events in the world oil market since 1973 and some major explanations as to what happened and why (Section I). Then there is a discussion of some projections for the next two decades and of some implications of various theories about OPEC's decisionmaking process (Section II). Section III summarizes what we have learned about modeling OPEC and the world oil market. This includes: the dominant theoretical approach based on the wealth-maximization model of Harold Hotelling (1931); the simulation approach most common in the applied literature, which envisages target-capacity-utilization pricing by OPEC; and the difficult problem of modeling price behavior during disruptions. Finally, Section IV discusses some important unresolved issues, both theoretical and empirical. A variety of contributions to the literature are considered, but the discussion pays special attention to two important recent works. One is the book OPEC Behavior and World Oil Prices (1982) (EAPA 9:3899) edited by James Griffin and David Teece, an important collection of papers on OPEC and world oil, prepared for a 1981 conference at the University of Houston. The other is the 1980 to 1981 world oil study by the Energy Modeling Forum of Stanford Univesity, which involved ten prominent models of the world oil market. 31 references.

Gately, D.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Prospects for OPEC oil in the 1980s  

SciTech Connect

Although OPEC is in a crisis, the world economy will remain dependent on oil, and most importing countries will continue to be largely dependent on OPEC, especially on its Persian Gulf sources of supply, during the 1980s. The concept of the OPEC multiplier explains the pattern of oil production and demand reduction, and is central to understanding the future evolution of the world oil market. The impact of irreversible and reversible conservation and economic recession varies from country to country and is difficult to quantify. This analysis attributes most of the short-term reductions in energy use to the recession, but also notes that all of the reductions in world primary consumption between 1980-1983 have been borne by oil. The author explains the OPEC multiplier effect in this context, and shows how even a small percentage change in world economic activity and primary energy consumption leads to a larger percentage change in world demand for OPEC oil. 2 figures, 4 tables.

Mossavar-Rahmani, B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "opec oil output" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

An oil and gas cartel OPEC in evolution  

SciTech Connect

More than ever before, the Organization of Petroleum Exporting countries is faced with a sophisticated and complex market, a highly charged environmental movement, and new calls for energy conservation and alternative fuels. It has lost a member, Ecuador. However OPEC's future evolves, it will be challenged to change. As non-OPEC oil production continues to decline, OPEC's future could brighten considerably. Natural gas presents a great opportunity to OPEC as many industrial and developing countries utilize gas more extensively because of price and environmental advantages. Whether oil or gas, OPEC will require large amounts of capital to satisfy the world's appetite for petroleum. The loss of Ecuador seems a setback to the Organization, but there are burgeoning Soviet Republics with large reserves in need of development assistance to tap into their natural resources more effectively. On the demand side, many companies are seeking hospitable recipients for their exploratory activities and investment capital. OPEC's role might somehow include the embrace of these developments for the betterment of its individual, unique members.

Not Available

1992-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

22

The oil price and non-OPEC supplies  

SciTech Connect

The design of any effective oil pricing policy by producers depends on a knowledge of the nature and complexity of supply responses. This book examines the development of non-OPEX oil reserves on a field-by-filed basis to determine how much of the increase in non-OPEC production could be attributable to the price shocks and how much was unambiguously due to decisions and developments that preceded the price shocks. Results are presented in eighteen case-studies of non-OPEC producers. This study will be of interest to economists and planners specializing in the upstream and to policy makers both in oil producing and consuming countries.

Seymour, A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Other Non OPEC Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Indonesia withdrew from OPEC in January 2009, Angola joined OPEC in January 2007, Ecuador withdrew from OPEC in January 1993 and rejoined in November ...

24

OPEC and the price of oil in 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is based on a talk given by Mr. Francisco R. Parra - a former Secretary General of OPEC and senior executive of Petroleos de Venezuela - at the Advanced International Petroleum Executive Seminar held by Petroleum Economics Limited in Divonne, from 9 to 11 March 1993. The article first appeared in Middle East Economic Survey 36:26, 29 March 1993. It is reprinted here with permission from the author and MEES. In his talk, he examines the minimal impact of OPEC on world oil prices during the past five years and discusses a number of reasons for this. To reverse this, he concludes that OPEC should limit inventories until prices for crude reach $25/bbl. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Parra, F.R.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

Oil and turmoil: America faces OPEC and the Middle East  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Middle-East expert Rustow traces the chain of events that placed economic power in an unstable region. He recounts how European imperialists acquired and surrendered their positions of domination, how nationalists such as Nasser and Qaddafi sought to manipulate the superpowers, and how leaders such as Sadat and Begin wrestled with war and peace. Meanwhile, the oil industry's Seven Sisters lost their preeminence as OPEC grew from a loose confederacy of oil shiekdoms into a cartel strong enough to shake the world economy. Rustow analyzes the confusion in oil-consuming countries that led to long gasoline lines one year and talk of an oil glut and OPEC's collapse the next. He puts into context Washington's uneven efforts to bring stability to the strife-torn Middle East. 221 references, 3 figures, 7 tables.

Rustow, D.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Structure of the world oil market and the role of OPEC  

SciTech Connect

OPEC members have long been suspected of acting collusively in the market and the object of this dissertation is to estimate the degree of interdependence or the degree of collusion among the large producers in OPEC by analyzing their past output behavior. It is assumed that the oil industry in the non-Communist part of the world consists of a group of small producers acting as price takers and a group of large producers in OPEC setting the price in the market. Large producers may collude or act independently. In order to achieve the objective, a Nash-Cournot non-cooperative model of the world oil market is developed. This model assumes that the world oil industry is composed of a group of small producers acting as price takers (the fringe) and a group of large producers acting independently in the market. Each large producer maximizes his own sum of discounted profits while taking the sales paths of other large producers as well as the sales path of the fringe as given. The solution of the model leads to the optimal production path for an independent large producer, who operates in a market consisting of n independent large producers. This optimal production path, however, is applicable to individual large producers only if they all act independently in the market. Therefore, this optimal production path is modified into a general equation representing the optimal production path for an individual large producer in OPEC, whether he acts independently or colludes with other large producers.

Najafizadeh, A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Non-OPEC supply to fill global 1996 demand gain  

SciTech Connect

Excess capacity brought on by rapidly rising oil production from outside the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, coupled with stabilization of output from the Commonwealth of Independent States, will hamper OPEC`s efforts to balance the oil market in 1996. World demand for oil is projected to move up sharply. But non-OPEC output will increase even more, challenging OPEC to reduce production quotas. This paper reviews data on supply, demand, and production from these non-OPEC countries and the overall effects it will have on OPEC operations and costs.

Beck, R.J.

1996-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

28

Non-OPEC oil supply continues to grow  

SciTech Connect

Global reserves of crude oil remain at 1 trillion bbl, according to OGJ`s annual survey of producing countries. Significant gains are in Brazil, Colombia, Congo, Egypt, Libya, Nigeria, Oman, and Papua New Guinea. Decreases were reported by Indonesia, Norway, the U.K., Iran, Canada, Mexico, and the US. Natural gas reserves slipped to 4.9 quadrillion cu ft. The major production trend is a lasting surge from outside of OPEC. This year`s Worldwide Production report begins with a detailed analysis of this crucial development by an international authority. This article discusses the OECD outlook by region and the turnaround in production in the former Soviet Union.

Knapp, D.H. [International Energy Agency, Paris (France)

1995-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

29

Oil and OPEC: An analysis of United States oil dependency and the changing face of OPEC. Study project  

SciTech Connect

Throughout the twentieth century, major oil companies have been the object of intense scrutiny, suspicion, and mistrust. In their heyday before World War II, they controlled over 90 percent of the world oil production. As the Second World War was coming to an end, it became clear that the United States would not longer continue to be a major exporter of oil and that the Middle East would be called upon to meet the rising needs of the world. In the 1960s and 1970s, the Middle Eastern oil-producing countries (OPEC) wrested more power from the major Western companies either through sweeping new agreements or through nationalization movements. Oil power catapulted these Third World countries into the international arena and into positions of great wealth and influence. Just as oil has enabled nations to accumulate wealth and power, it has also proved that it is a prize that can be overvalued and can lead to a country's demise. Oil imports are impairing or threaten to impair the national security of the United States. The U.S. finds itself more vulnerable to political or economic blackmail because of its reliance on foreign oil supplies.

Simmons, J.J.

1992-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

A supply-demand model for OPEC oil-pricing policies  

SciTech Connect

OPEC and its pricing policies have been subjected to constant international attention as well as criticism since 1973. Consumers find OPEC behavior irrational, while OPEC tries to justify its policies as rational and in accordance with the realities of the international oil market. The focus of this study is to contribute toward an analytical and empirical work on OPEC pricing behavior, and highlight the various factors believed to affect the future oil policies of OPEC member countries. After a survey of literature on the theoretical framework of world oil models in general, and OPEC models in particular, a linear econometric model for pricing OPEC oil is formulated which is a supply-demand equilibrium model comprising of supply, demand, and inflation-rate functions. Estimation of the behavioral equations are carried out by Ordinary and Two-Stage Least Square estimators. Econometric results from the estimation and simulation of the model seem to indicate that OPEC's pricing behavior is market-responsive and may best be explained by employing the theoretical framework of market-equilibrium condition.

Heiat, N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The world oil market and OPEC behavior: The leak-producer price leader model  

SciTech Connect

This is an economic study of the world's oil market in which OPEC plays the central role in determining the oil supply and price. Understanding OPEC's behavior is at the core of understanding the world's oil market. However, oil is a resource belonging to the family of natural resources known as exhaustible. We do not produce oil; we only extract and distribute a fixed amount of the resource over generations. Optimal extraction is a matter of concern to both suppliers and consumers. First, it is shown that using the traditional theory of producers behavior in the conventional commodity markets to explain extractors behavior in exhaustible resource markets is completely wrong. Second, current models of OPEC behavior are reviewed. Third, an alternative model is introduced. Previous authors have not directed their models to give explanations to the peculiar observations in oil market. This model divides the world's oil suppliers into: the free riders (non-OPEC oil producers), the OPEC hawks (a group within OPEC) and the leak-producer price leader (Saudi Arabia). Three factors, namely relatively big oil reserves, no other sources of income, and the avoidance of the so-called backstop technology make Saudi Arabia more interested in lower oil prices than are other oil extractors.

Aboalela, A.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

U.S. Imports from OPEC Countries of Crude Oil and Petroleum ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Imports from OPEC Countries of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 ...

33

U.S. Imports from OPEC Countries of Crude Oil and Petroleum ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Imports from OPEC Countries of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1993: ...

34

OPEC and the United States. The political economy of oil supply  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

World oil markets have fluctuated widely during the decade from 1973 to 1983, resulting in major adjustments in patterns of consumption and in the structure of the energy trade worldwide. This study focuses on the role of OPEC as both a producer and a consumer of energy and examines how the role affects the complex relations between OPEC and the U.S. The authors think that the recent U.S shift to closer markets like Mexico and Venezuela and the resulting unfavorable balance of trade with the Middle East and Africa will, in the long run, hurt the U.S. They predict a resurgence of OPEC as a producer of oil, oil products, and petrochemicals within the next twenty years as well as an increasing sophistication in marketing strategies on the part of OPEC members.

Mallakh, R.E.; Poulson, B.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

OPEC and the United States: The political economy of oil supply  

SciTech Connect

World oil markets have fluctuated widely during the decade from 1973 to 1983, resulting in major adjustments in patterns of consumption and in the structure of the energy trade worldwide. This study focuses on the role of OPEC as both a producer and a consumer of energy and examines how that role affects the complex relations between OPEC and the U.S. The authors think that the recent U.S. shift to closer markets like Mexico and Venezuela and the resulting unfavorable balance of trade with the Middle East and Africa will, in the long run, hurt the U.S. They predict a resurgence of OPEC as a producer of oil, oil products, and petrochemicals within the next twenty years as well as an increasing sophistication in marketing strategies on the part of OPEC members.

Mallakh, R.E.; Poulson, B.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Proposed currency composite approach to pricing OPEC oil: problems and possibilities  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of this dissertation was to explore the nature, purposes, benefits, and barriers of establishing a currency basket for OPEC as an alternative to the use the dollar for international trade in oil. The study included the construction and evaluation of three alternative currency baskets and the evaluation of two other baskets for the protection of the real price of OPEC oil from foreign-exchange fluctuations between 1971 and 1980. A secondary objective was to assess the inflationary impact on the real price of oil. Finally, the purpose was to evaluate the changes of the terms of trade of OPEC during the same period. The findings of the research are as follows: During 1971-1980, inflation and the relative weakness of the dollar have reduced the real price of oil to OPEC. In spite of this, the terms of trade of OPEC have substantially improved. This was because OPEC increased its oil prices much more than sufficient to compensate for inflation and the fluctuation of foreign-exchange rates.

Shaaf, M.B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

OPEC at high noon 1974-1981  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After 1973, oil consumption stagnated worldwide. Non-OPEC output increased, mostly in Alaska, Mexico, and the North Sea, but not because of the price rise. The cartel nations had to assume the whole burden of cutting back ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

OPEC the failing giant  

SciTech Connect

This book discusses about OPEC and the world oil situation. The author contends that OPEC's failure to develop pricing formulas sensitive to fluctuations in the international oil market has made them highly vulnerable.

Ahrari, M.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Statement from Energy Secretary Bodman on OPEC's Decision to Cut Crude Oil  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bodman on OPEC's Decision to Cut Bodman on OPEC's Decision to Cut Crude Oil Production Statement from Energy Secretary Bodman on OPEC's Decision to Cut Crude Oil Production October 19, 2006 - 9:17am Addthis "We continue to believe that it is best for oil producers and consumers alike to allow free markets to determine issues of supply, demand and price. Despite the recent downturn in crude oil prices, they remain at historically high levels, clearly indicating a global demand for petroleum products. And as past experience has shown, market intervention is not beneficial for producing or consuming nations. "While U.S. gasoline prices have fallen, crude inventories are high and our economy remains strong, we must reduce America's dependence on foreign energy sources, as President Bush has said time and again. To do so, we

40

Ten-year retrospective on OPEC and the world oil market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following a review of the main events in the world oil market since 1973 and some of the major explanations of what happened and why, the author discusses projections for the next two decades and considers some implications of various theories of how decisions are made by OPEC. This includes the dominant theoretical approach that uses Hotelling's wealth-maximization model, the simulation approach of target-capacity-utilization pricing by OPEC, and the problem of modeling price behavior during disruptions. The final section discusses some of the important unresolved issues, such as supply and demand uncertainties, the best behavior for OPEC, and the dispute over OPEC's significance to events of the past decade. 31 references.

Gately, D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "opec oil output" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

OPEC and lower oil prices: Impacts on production capacity, export refining, domestic demand and trade balances  

SciTech Connect

The East-West Center received a research grant from the US Department of Energy's Office of Policy, Planning, and Analysis to study the impact of lower oil prices on OPEC production capacity, on export refineries, and the petroleum trade. The project was later expanded to include balance-of-payments scenarios and impacts on OPEC domestic demand. The Department of Energy requested that the study focus on the Persian Gulf countries, as these countries have the largest share of OPEC reserves and production. Since then, staff members from the East-West Center have visited Iran, the United Arab Emirates, and Saudi Arabia and obtained detailed information from other countries. In addition, the East-West Center received from a number of large international oil companies and national governments valuable information on OPEC production capabilities. In order to safeguard the confidential nature of this information, these data have been aggregated in this report. The East-West Center considers the results presented to be the most up-to-date information and analysis available today. This report also provides a major reassessment of the export refining and economic competitiveness of Middle East refineries. As pioneers of the research on OPEC export refineries, the East-West Center has fully reevaluated the performance and outlook of these refineries as of the present. 21 figs., 20 tabs.

Fesharaki, F.; Fridley, D.; Isaak, D.; Totto, L.; Wilson, T.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

The key to better times is Opec pricing discipline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to the author, 1988 proved again that Opec's ability to control world oil markets in tenuous at best. Oil analysts had trouble determining direction of the cartel, with forecasts showing a wide range of possibilities for oil prices. In the last half of the year, concern about a long-term collapse in oil prices sent many U.S. producers to the sidelines with drilling activity languishing at 911 rigs running at the end of November. Most active rigs were looking for natural gas, further complicating U.S. oil reserve replenishment. Opec gradually lost control of world oil markets in 1988. Opec impotence will continue unless non-Opec producers cooperate to cut output, global oil demand increases significantly, or members finally begin to seriously address the critical issue of adhering strictly to production quotas. The author discusses the status of OPEC and U.S. petroleum in regard to current U.S. and worldwide economic conditions.

Crouse, P.C. (Philip C. Crouse and Associates, Inc., Dallas, TX (US))

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Outlook for Non-OPEC Oil Supply in 2010-2011 (Released in the STEO January 2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Two large categories define the world's producing countries of crude oil andother liquid fuels (hereafter liquids): those that are members of theOrganization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and those that areoutside that group (non-OPEC). This article takes a closer look at the lattercategory.

Information Center

2010-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

44

Outlook for Non-OPEC Oil Supply Growth in 2008-2009 (Released in the STEO February 2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In 2008-2009, EIA expects that non-OPEC petroleum supply growth will surpass that inrecent years because of the large number of new oil projects scheduled to come onlineduring the forecast period.

Information Center

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

OPEC Revenues Fact Sheet  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report includes estimates of OPEC net oil export revenues, based on historical estimates and forecasts from the latest EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook.

2013-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

46

Opec squabbling sparks surge in world production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the second half of 1988 Opec member nations began on cheating on their quotas. The resultant 11% surge in Middle Eastern production propelled world output to an average of 58.5 MMbopd. This paper presents an analysis of major oil producing countries of the world and a listing, by country, of world crude oil and condensate production for 1987 and 1988.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Do OPEC Members Know Something the Market Doesn’t? “Fair Price ” Pronouncements and the Market Price of Crude Oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OPEC producers, individually or collectively, often make statements regarding the “fair price ” of crude oil. In some cases, the officials commenting are merely affirming the price prevailing in the crude oil market at the time. In many cases, however, we document that they explicitly disagree with the contemporaneous futures price. A natural question is whether these “fair price ” pronouncements contain information not already reflected in market prices. To find the answer, we collect “fair price ” statements made between 2000 and 2009 by officials from OPEC or OPEC member countries. Visually, the “fair price ” series looks like a sampling discretely drawn (with a lag) from the daily futures market price series. Formally, we use several methodologies to establish that “fair price ” pronouncements have little influence on the market price of crude oil and that they supply little or no new news to oil futures market participants.

Celso Brunetti; Bahattin Büyük?ahin; Michel A. Robe; Kirsten R. Soneson; David Reiffen; Bob Buckley; Rasmus Fatum; Robert L. Losey; Jim Moser; Adam Sieminski; Phil Verlegger; Joe Konizeski

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Is OPEC a cartel? Evidence from cointegration and causality tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One would expect a carter to curb production in order to raise prices of its product as well as to share the market among its members. The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) is no exception, and blamed for the quadrupling of crude oil prices in 1974. However, OPEC could not prevent prices from falling in the 1980s, even after it adopted output rationing in 1982. The author addresses the question of whether OPEC was ever able to increase market price of oil by curbing production, or simply took advantage of high prices caused by political problems and conflicts between members. 17 refs., 1 fig.

Guelen, G. [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

OPEC market to 1985  

SciTech Connect

A forecasting system is developed for determining future imports of real goods and services by OPEC members. The forecasting system permits development of alternative forecasts as better and more accurate information becomes available. The information base of each OPEC country may be modified to generate different projections regarding future oil revenues.

Abolfathi, F.; Kenyon, G.; Hayes, M.D.; Hazelwood, L.A.; Crain, R.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

OPEC at thirty years; What have we learned  

SciTech Connect

This paper is a review of the lessons learned concerning OPEC. It includes: the history of the formation of OPEC, OPEC and the energy crisis of the 1970's, models of the cartel, and pricing and output (production) policies.

Adelman, M.A. (Dept. of Economics and Energy Lab., Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

OPEC Crude Oil Production 1998-2001 - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The pullback in OPEC production in 1998 and 1999 in the face of increasing demand tightened the world petroleum balance and caused prices to rise.

52

Don't count OPEC out  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prediction of OPEC's demise may be premature since the US and the industrial world continue their reliance on Middle East oil. US dependence on imported oil could increase with economic recovery and present OPEC with new opportunities to manipulate prices enough to discourage non-OPEC production and conservation. Analysts predict that a new and stronger OPEC may emerge unless the people are unwilling to delay their own development just to keep the West hooked on cheap oil. 1 figure, 1 table. (DCK)

Eason, H.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

OPEC takes a bow while non-OPEC calls intermission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OPEC's cuts in light crude prices are credited with calming oil market jitters and for saving consuming countries money. Non-OPEC North Sea, Mexico, and other oil exporters, accompanied by OPEC member Venequela in the case of its very heavy crudes, will be reacting individually to economic imperatives, and will be factors in the updated OPEC pricing structure. Citing Energey Detente interviews on spot and futures markets, the author compares value components of both heavy and light crudes and some of the dynamics involved in world oil prices. He develops a scenario of stabilized or reduced heavy oil prices that could stop the erosion of light oil prices and help to stabiliize the overall world oil market. 2 figures.

Not Available

1985-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

54

OPEC Middle East plans for rising world demand amid uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Middle Eastern members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries must plan for huge increases in oil production capacity yet wonder whether markets for the new output will develop as expected. With worldwide oil consumption rising and non-OPEC output likely to reach its resource limits soon, OPEC member countries face major gains in demand for their crude oil. To meet the demand growth, those with untapped resources will have to invest heavily in production capacity. Most OPEC members with such resources are in the Middle East. But financing the capacity investments remains a challenge. Some OPEC members have opened up to foreign equity participation in production projects, and others may eventually do so as financial pressures grow. That means additions to the opportunities now available to international companies in the Middle East. Uncertainties, however, hamper planning and worry OPEC. Chief among them are taxation and environmental policies of consuming-nation governments. This paper reviews these concerns and provides data on production, pricing, capital investment histories and revenues.

Ismail, I.A.H. [Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, Vienna (Austria)

1996-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

55

As the world economy grows - OPEC holds the line  

SciTech Connect

As economic indicators reflect the growth throughout the world following several years of stagnation, energy demand, particularly petroleum, is picking up as well. After enduring historically low oil prices, oil producers welcome the higher demand, but seek higher prices. To accomplish this, OPEC has adopted a long term fundamental strategy in contrast to reacting to short term market volatility in the past. This issue details regional oil demand and output around the world.

Not Available

1994-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

56

Lubricants Imports from Non OPEC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Imports by Country of Origin ... and Gabon withdrew from OPEC in July 1996. Crude oil and petroleum products are reported by the PAD District of entry.

57

How many sisters. OPEC's new directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OPEC's direction for the future is discussed in this article. Some points that will guide OPEC's thinking are: OPEC is still not certain of its oil's share in the energy market, OPEC will allow its unsolicited role as residual supplier to become the stabilizing factor in the oil market, and OPEC countries will continue to develop an integrated international industry, with the principal feature of this strategy being the need of OPEC's national oil companies to optimize crude oil production, refining and transporting operations by using overseas refining and product distribution networks. Issues are discussed that relate to a newly planned long-term strategy, including: protecting the organization's cohesion beyond 2000; increasing their oil and gas resource bases through aggressive exploration at home and abroad; production planning and quota management of demand increases in the market; price administration along previously agreed-upon market shares; avoidance of conflicting political questions other than oil issues; and avoidance of military issues within OPEC. OPEC members are moving from an investment strategy aimed at conserving and protecting the purchasing power of their oil revenues to one of increasing the value of that oil.

Ortiz, R.G.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Non-OPEC oil supply outages remain above year-ago level ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home; Browse by Tag; Most Popular Tags. electricity; oil/petroleum; liquid ... South Sudan has signed an agreement with Sudan on oil export fees and security ...

59

Alternative models of OPEC behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the 1973 oil price jump there has been considerable interest in the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and its role in the international oil market. However, most of the literature on this subject is mainly concerned with either a time-control problem in which the optimality and implication of certain market behavior is analyzed or a simulation of the oil market assuming a particular market behavior by OPEC members. Our objective in this preliminary research is to present a unified framework in which we construct models of viable alternative market behaviors for OPEC members assuming profit-maximization behavior. Each model will be specified as a system of nonlinear simultaneous equations, and for a particular functional forms specification, we present the estimates of the first two models considered.

Al-Sultan, A.M.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

Interdependencies 1989, Part III: Focus on solidarity with OPEC  

SciTech Connect

Several non-OPEC countries, and sometimes elements within countries, have been in dialogue with OPEC about oil market supply, demand, and pricing for the past few years. Recently, some have attended OPEC meetings as observers for the first time. Economists have asked, Will this strengthen OPEC make it into a true cartel Is free oil marketing threatened In this issue a remarkable paper addresses the evolution of relationships between OPEC and non-OPEC producers. This issue also presents the following: (1) ED refining netback data series for the US Gulf and West Coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore as of July 7, 1989; and (2) ED fuel price/tax series for the countries of the Western Hemisphere, July 1989 edition. Includes paper by John Roberts, OPEC and non-OPEC Relations, March 1989. 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1989-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "opec oil output" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Non OPEC Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the U.S.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... California crude oil to Pacific Rim countries. The Persian Gulf includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates.

62

Survival of OPEC, as viewed by a selected sample of OPEC's leaders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A questionnaire was designed and mailed to OPEC members, 60% of whom responded. Their answers, combined with the formation history of the Organization and its eventful life in the past decades were studied and treated in the descriptive historical format. In the first chapter the problem was defined and its background was described. This chapter formulated the research question as: Will OPEC in the opinion of OPEC ministers and directors continue to be an effective organization in the future as it has been in the past. What is the future of OPEC. The second chapter reviewed the literature. Two hypotheses were considered in this study: (1) Hypothesis 1 stated, OPEC members will continue to market their oil, determine proper price for it, and set fair quotas for each member as effectively in the future as in the past. (2) Hypothesis 2 stated, OPEC members will face difficulties in marketing their oil, determining proper oil prices, and setting fair quotas for each member; and the Organization will be weakened or totally destroyed in the future due to the conflicts among members and international pressure. Responding OPEC officials believed that OPEC is an effective organization and will remain so in the future. Their views were in support of hypothesis one. However, based on consideration of other factors, the research concluded that in the long run OPEC will most likely face difficulties in maintaining its solid and powerful operation and marketing strategies.

Assefi Soleimany, S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

OPEC versus the west: a robust equilibrium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Suppose that both OPEC and the West possess stocks of oil which can be extracted at constant and identical cost. Consumption takes place only in the West. Suppose, hypothetically, that the West behaves as a single agent and, more realistically, that OPEC does also. Each agent makes a strategic choice of the pattern of exploitation over time of its own reserve. The Nash equilibrium obtained is ''robust'' in that it is also a ''Stakelberg equilibrium'' in which each agent is ''right for the right reason.'' Further, the equilibrium obtained is equivalent to that obtained when Western oil companies constitute a competitive fringe to the OPEC monopoly. 4 figures, 12 references

Robson, A.J.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

OPEC behavior: a test of alternative hypotheses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since interpretations of past and future oil price patterns depends on the model chosen, the author tests and compares alternative theories of OPEC as a first step in validating the choice on any one model. The results show that among OPEC countries, the partial market-sharing cartel model is the only model not rejected by at least some of the 11 members and gives the best explanation of production. In comparison with 11 non-OPEC countries, the competitive model could not be rejected for 10 of the 11 non-OPEC producers. This raises the question of why, if OPEC is a cartel, Friedman's predictions have not come true, and introduces new questions for future research. 19 references, 3 tables.

Griffin, J.M.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

OPEC production: Untapped reserves, world demand spur production expansion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet projected world oil demand, almost all members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) have embarked on ambitious capacity expansion programs aimed at increasing oil production capabilities. These expansion programs are in both new and existing oil fields. In the latter case, the aim is either to maintain production or reduce the production decline rate. However, the recent price deterioration has led some major OPEC producers, such as Saudi Arabia and Iran, to revise downward their capacity plans. Capital required for capacity expansion is considerable. Therefore, because the primary source of funds will come from within each OPEC country, a reasonably stable and relatively high oil price is required to obtain enough revenue for investing in upstream projects. This first in a series of two articles discusses the present OPEC capacity and planned expansion in the Middle East. The concluding part will cover the expansion plans in the remaining OPEC countries, capital requirements, and environmental concerns.

Ismail, I.A.H. (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, Vienna (Austria))

1994-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

66

OPEC as an actor in world politics: a study in its internal and external dimensions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The OPEC oil price increases of the 1970s and their economic and political effects on the oil-importing and oil-exporting countries have called attention to OPEC as an actor in world politics. This study examines the internal and external aspects of OPEC in light of the following hypotheses: (1) the bargaining power of the major oil companies has been curtailed in favor of OPEC members; (2) potential economic differences and political conflicts among OPEC members raise no real threat to the survival of OPEC; (3) development of alternative sources of energy will not likely restrain OPEC's active role in world politics; and (4) the unbridled power of OPEC to increase oil prices will likely be restrained by the effects of these increases on oil-importing countries. In addition to testing these hypotheses, this study attempts to trace OPEC's origin and explores the role of Saudi Arabia as the residual OPEC supplier. Since the OPEC revolution of October 1973, numerous academic works and press reports have been published on OPEC. The author depended heavily on these sources. In addition, information supplied by some prominent energy institutions during a research trip to Vienna, Austria, and Washington, DC was also used. The findings of this study tend to support the preceding hypotheses.

Al-Hulwah, M.I.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Nigeria`s oil production behavior: Tests of alternative hypotheses  

SciTech Connect

The sudden quadrupling of world oil prices in 1973-1974 marked the beginning of several formal inquiries by economists into the production behavior of members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). Interest in the organization was further heightened in 1979 when nominal oil prices further doubled. However, oil market analysts have differed in their evaluation of OPEC`s role in the determination of world oil prices. Most energy economists have modeled OPEC as a cartel. Morris Adelman has suggested that OPEC`s true nature lies somewhere between two polar cases of a dominant-firm industry and an imperfect, market-sharing cartel. In the former case, one large, dominant firm (i.e., Saudi Arabia) serves as the {open_quotes}swing producer,{close_quotes} allowing other cartel members and non-OPEC oil producers to produce whatever they wished, controlling the market price by itself through its own output adjustments. The latter case of an imperfect market-sharing cartel is a loose collusive arrangement in which all members agree on an acceptable price level and individual output shares for each producer. Adelman believes that OPEC wobbles between these two cases, depending upon market conditions.

Awokuse, T.O.; Jones, C.T.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

International Energy Outlook - World Oil Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Oil Markets World Oil Markets International Energy Outlook 2004 World Oil Markets In the IEO2004 forecast, OPEC export volumes are expected to more than double while non-OPEC suppliers maintain their edge over OPEC in overall production. Prices are projected to rise gradually through 2025 as the oil resource base is further developed. Throughout most of 2003, crude oil prices remained near the top of the range preferred by producers in the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), $22 to $28 per barrel for the OPEC “basket price.” OPEC producers continued to demonstrate disciplined adherence to announced cutbacks in production. Throughout 2003, the upward turn in crude oil prices was brought about by a combination of three factors. First, a general strike against the Chavez regime resulted in a sudden loss of much of Venezuela’s oil exports. Although the other OPEC producers agreed to increase their production capacities to make up for the lost Venezuelan output, the obvious strain on worldwide spare capacity kept prices high. Second, price volatility was exacerbated by internal conflict in Nigeria. Third, prospects for a return to normalcy in the Iraqi oil sector remained uncertain as residual post-war turmoil continued in Iraq.

69

OPEC Production Likely To Remain Low  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: With a background of some weakening demand from weakening economies (being pushed lower by high crude oil prices), OPEC has shown not only a a reluctance to increase production any time soon, but has actually decreased production. OPEC has attempted to reduce production by 3.5 million barrels per day so far this year. The last of these cuts is not to occur until September, which will affect consuming countries the most over the upcoming winter. Tightness in both European (Brent price) and Asian (Dubai price) markets are reflected in the recent strength seen in the marker crude oil for these regions. But with the effect of the 2nd OPEC production cuts just taking effect and the effect of the 3rd production cut yet to come, U.S. crude oil stocks are

70

OPEC's Dr. Subroto examines the market after Gulf war  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on a relatively strong oil market emerging from the Persian Gulf war according to an Opec spokesperson. Opec is expected to remain a viable force, perhaps more cohesive than before, no matter what happens to Kuwait and Iraq.

Not Available

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

OPEC 1991 results reflect hard times  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that low crude oil prices and economic tough times in industrial countries cause a lean 1991 for members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. OPEC's 1991 annual report the member countries reported an overall loss of $12 billion in 1991 on oil revenues that fell 16.2%. Iraq and Kuwait were not included because of their unusual circumstances in the wake of the Persian Gulf war. Reduced oil revenues reflected a slide to $18.66/bbl in 1991 from $22.26/bbl in 1990 for the average price of OPEC basket crudes. As of last June 5 OPEC's basket crude price has averaged only $17.42/bbl this year, OPEC News Agency (Opecna) reported. First quarter 1992 prices averaged $16.77/bbl, compared wit $19.31/bbl in fourth quarter 1991. The average price jumped 52 cent/bbl the first week in June this year to $19.93/bbl, bouyed by Saudi Arabia's move at the end of May to shift its policy from price moderation to one in favor of higher prices, Opecna the. OPEC members increased production 1% in 1991 to an average 23.28 million b/d in spite of negligible production from Iraq and Kuwait and reduced production from Qatar.

Not Available

1992-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

72

Finished Motor Gasoline Imports from OPEC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Indonesia withdrew from OPEC in January 2009, Angola joined OPEC in January 2007, Ecuador withdrew from OPEC in January 1993 and rejoined in November ...

73

OPEC's fortunes ride with the high-flying US dollar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The strong US dollar insulates most of OPEC from painful losses in revenue despite the well-publicized OPEC price cut of March 1983. The steady rise of the dollar has largely reversed the impact of the $5-per-barrel cut in the marker crude oil price. This has helped to reduce internal pressures for further prices cuts. This link is due to three factors: (1) oil is denominated in dollars; (2) OPEC pays for most of its imported goods and services with other currencies; and (3) the dollar has risen 20-49% against most trading currencies since March 1983.

Stauffer, T.

1984-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

74

OPEC as a non-state actor: formation and dynamics  

SciTech Connect

Factors that have promoted the formation of OPEC and the dynamics of its confrontation with the multinational oil companies (MNOCs) are analyzed. The rise of OPEC is examined from the perspective of the growing literature on non-state actors within the international system. The central hypothesis is that OPEC emerged as a collective-bargaining instrument, but has become a non-state actor that impacts upon as well as serves the policies of its member-states. As a corollary it is assumed that the politics of oil in the 1960s can best be understood as the clash of two non-state actors - OPEC and MNOCs, both involved in changing relationships with their home governments. This study utilizes the non-state actor approach to explain the growing importance of OPEC within the international political and economic system. The study concludes that although OPEC did make structural changes in the international oil industry previously concentrated in the hands of the MNOCs, it did not press to the point that the international economic system was threatened. Moreover, OPEC proved to be a responsible international actor in a number of specific respects. It attempted to provide financial aid to those Third World countries adversely affected by the energy crisis of 1973-1974. OPEC members recycled their financial wealth in the international monetary system. On occasion it restrained some members from pushing for higher prices. This benefitting the Western industrial oil-consuming nations. As a result OPEC served as a stabilizing factor in the international oil industry.

Dredi, I.B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

OPEC production: Capital limitations, environmental movements may interfere with expansion plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Obtaining capital is a critical element in the production expansion plans of OPEC member countries. Another issue that may impact the plans is the environmental taxes that may reduce the call on OPEC oil by 5 million b/d in 2000 and about 16 million b/d in the year 2010. This concluding part of a two-part series discusses the expansion possibilities of non-Middle East OPEC members, OPEC's capital requirements, and environmental concerns. Non-Middle East OPEC includes Algeria, Gabon, Indonesia, Libya, Nigeria, and Venezuela.

Ismail, I.A.H. (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, Vienna (Austria))

1994-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

76

OPEC ducks quota issue amid glut worries  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries has ducked the question of reestablishing quotas despite the looming prospect of a second quarter oil price slide. OPEC ministers meeting in Vienna late last month approved continuing free-for-all production in the first quarter and ordered the ministerial monitoring committee to tackle the question of second quarter production levels when it meets in Geneva Feb. 12. Oil markets responded to the lack of action by dropping futures prices.

Not Available

1991-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

77

Rising U.S. oil output leads world oil supply growth  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

is well on its way to topping 8 million barrels per day by 2014. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration expects daily oil output will average 7.3...

78

The ghost of OPEC in energy security policy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy security policy continues to be haunted - at least within the halls of government - by fears of OPEC`s potential ability to curb oil supplies to the United States or to unexpectedly raise prices to economy-damaging levels. OPEC continues to exert (mainly psychological) influence in excess of its market role. Becaue OPEC`s continued existence skews the energy policy debate in the United States and in other oil-consuming countries, and because it complicates otherwise constructive relations between the US and the Arab world, the Clinton administration should confront OPEC and America`s energy security concerns directly. In its forthcoming energy-policy plan, the administration could declare the abolition of OPEC to be a goal of US foreign and trade policy. As a countermeasure, US energy policymakers should abandon the inflammatory frame of reference of energy security. No practical purpose has been served domestically or internationally by adherence to a policy that in the end has simply raised the economic cost of a vital commodity.

Stagliano, V.A.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),Figure 3. Price of crude oil contract maturing December ofbarrels per day. Monthly crude oil production Iran Iraq

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),percent change in real oil price. Figure 3. Price of crude023 Understanding Crude Oil Prices James D. Hamilton June

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "opec oil output" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #109: December 13, 1999 OPEC and OPEC+  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9: December 13, 9: December 13, 1999 OPEC and OPEC+ Market Shares to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #109: December 13, 1999 OPEC and OPEC+ Market Shares on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #109: December 13, 1999 OPEC and OPEC+ Market Shares on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #109: December 13, 1999 OPEC and OPEC+ Market Shares on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #109: December 13, 1999 OPEC and OPEC+ Market Shares on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #109: December 13, 1999 OPEC and OPEC+ Market Shares on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #109: December 13, 1999 OPEC and OPEC+ Market Shares on AddThis.com... Fact #109: December 13, 1999 OPEC and OPEC+ Market Shares

82

What to Watch: Iraq, OPEC and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 of 26 6 of 26 Notes: When keeping an eye on petroleum prices, we watch inventories closely. Recall that inventories measure the balance between supply and demand, and thus signal pressure on stocks. For crude oil, world petroleum inventories are low, and Iraq is probably the largest wild card that could impact prices in the short term. While OPEC will continue to adjust production to support the price of crude oil, the world economy may work against the organization. A slower economy means lower demand, and more OPEC production cutbacks to support prices. We are almost through this winter, so for distillate and propane, we will be watching how low stocks are at the end of the winter, which will indicate how much extra build is needed to start next winter in good shape.

83

OPEC needs help from other exporters to balance market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the past 5 years the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries has been telling oil producers around the world that it can no longer carry the burden of trying to balance supply and demand without outside help. Non-OPEC exporters have, on several occasions, examined the benefits of sharing the burden of production cuts, but rightly have been nervous of close cooperation with an unpredictable and undisciplined competitor. Cooperation will certainly depend on OPEC reaching its own production cutting agreement. That must be done in a way that given non-OPEC countries confidence that any new production and pricing pact will not fall apart during the first half of next year. OPEC exports to the developing world have been trimmed by the advent of new producers. In most of these countries local production only eliminates or reduces imports. Few are in the class of North Yemen where the initial flow could meet local demand and provide a surplus for export.

Vielvoye, R.

1988-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

84

Politactics of international cartels: economic illusions, political realities, and OPEC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research investigates the nature and strategy of international cartels to determine both what constitutes a cartel and the causes of OPEC's longevity. To achieve that end, the study examines the political and economic background that led to the Organization's creation and determined its evolution. The study analyzes the factors underlying changes in the oil market and in the outlook of the oil-producing nations for the purpose of drawing some conclusions concerning the manner in which the contemporary, quasi-cartelistic OPEC system operates, and to set out the far-reaching implications of its emergence. What were the circumstances which have thus far favored cartelization and sustained the cohesiveness and power of OPEC. It is argued that links within OPEC have been forged by a mixture of politics and economics. Economic considerations created OPEC and maintained it through its early years, but political necessity and solidarity helped later to cement the various divergent blocks together. Contrary to expectations, political conflicts among the major members failed to cripple or destroy OPEC. Political links helped override economic disagreements, while economic links helped overcome political ill will.

Daoudi, M.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Microsoft Word - STEO supplement non-OPEC supply Final-2.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

08 08 1 February 2008 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Outlook for Non-OPEC Oil Supply Growth in 2008- 2009 1 Most oil market analysts, including EIA, have pointed to the slow growth in oil supply from countries that are not members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) in recent years as a key cause of the current high oil price environment. The widening gap between growth in world oil consumption and non- OPEC oil supply has led to greater reliance upon production by OPEC and a drawdown in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) commercial inventories. These conditions have contributed to upward pressure on world oil prices in recent years (see Why Are Oil Prices So High?, supplement to the November 2007 Short-

86

As OPEC Ministers Meet, Secretary Chu Stresses the Importance of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

As OPEC Ministers Meet, Secretary Chu Stresses the Importance of As OPEC Ministers Meet, Secretary Chu Stresses the Importance of Energy Independence As OPEC Ministers Meet, Secretary Chu Stresses the Importance of Energy Independence March 15, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - As OPEC ministers held a meeting in Vienna Sunday, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu again stressed the need for energy independence and called for global cooperation on energy, economic and climate challenges. "While OPEC's actions are just one factor among many that go into the market price of oil, I'm pleased that there won't be further production cuts -- which could help to avoid oil price volatility," Secretary Chu said. "However, I continue to believe that we should stay focused on what our country can do to become energy independent -- ending our dependence on

87

U.S. Imports from OPEC - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Indonesia withdrew from OPEC in January 2009, Angola joined OPEC in January 2007, Ecuador withdrew from OPEC in January 1993 and rejoined in November ...

88

Assessment of official development assistance from the OPEC capital-exporting countries (1974-1979)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the study was to assess whether the benefits derived from Official Development Assistance (ODA) from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) exceed the extra costs of imported oil paid by the Oil-Importing Developing Countries (OIDCs) since the fall of 1973. For purposes of analysis, the OIDCs were divided into four regions of Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Latin America. The additional oil expenditures that these four regions had to pay to OPEC were calculated. This was folowed by a derivation of estimates for the total grants disbursed by OPEC to the four regions. The results were then compared to the additional costs for imported oil previously derived. It was found that the additional costs for imported oil exceeded the benefits derived from the ODA of the OPEC capital-exporting countries for the Middle East, Asia and Latin America. In the case of Africa, however, the benefits more than equaled the costs. In conclusion, it was recommended that the area of joint ventures could provide excellent opportunities for the OPEC capital-exporting countries and the OIDCs to explore. However, before joint ventures between the OPEC capital-exporting countries and the OIDSs become an attractive option for channeling OPEC surpluses, there need to be intensive research in making such a co-operation feasible in the future.

Al-Riyami, S.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Drewry: Mideast in firm control of world oil supplies for 1990s  

SciTech Connect

Surging economic growth in the Far East will push up world crude oil demand steadily in the 1990s despite the current economic downturn. It will fall to members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries to meet that increased demand, given the expected decline in non-OPEC production. And because OPEC members in the Persian Gulf region are best positioned to meet the increase, the balance of power in oil markets will shift even more in favor of the Middle East. Seaborne oil exports from the Middle East will jump almost 30% by 1997 from 1991 levels. There will be a worldwide rise of 16% in the volume of seaborne crude oil trade, with a 29% hike in movements of refined products by tanker. Those are among the findings of a report by Drewry Shipping Consultants Ltd., London. Drewry said, It is expected that 1992 will be a low point in non-OPEC output and that production levels will recover steadily from 1993 onward, although not rapidly enough to match the anticipated rise in demand. Drewry estimates non-OPEC production in 1997 at 37.1 million b/d vs. 38.1 million b/d in 1991. With non-OPEC production falling by 2.6% between 1991 and 1997, OPEC producers will have the scope to increase their output by almost 32% over the same period.

Not Available

1993-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

90

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #298: December 15, 2003 OPEC...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coming from OPEC Share of U.S. Imported Petroleum Coming from the Persian Gulf Region Net Oil Imports (thousand barrels per day) 1973 49.7% 14.1% 6,025 1974 55.7% 17.6% 5,892 1975...

91

An alternative model for OPEC stability: The carrot and stick approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) has gone through turbulent times since its inception in 1960. The decade of the 1970s represented the peak of its power; however, the 1980s and 1990s are characterized by the erosion of OPECs position. After a brief exposition of the principles of resource economics and their relevance to OPEC, we review oligopoly theory and its specific application to OPEC. A model of cartel behavior will then be presented and its relevance to OPEC will be emphasized. Our theory is that OPEC can use a trigger price strategy (a punishment phase when overproduction occurs, followed by a resumption phase of full compliance of the quota agreement) to stabilize output. An insurance policy scheme will be presented in combination with the trigger price strategy, the goal of which may improve the stability of OPEC. Finally, we shall show how the present organization may evolve over time into a much smaller entity by the late 1990s composed of the Gulf producers.

Akacem, M.; Fleisher, A.A. III [Metropolitan State College of Denver, CO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

World Oil: Market or Mayhem?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world oil market is regarded by many as a puzzle. Why are oil prices so volatile? What is OPEC and what does OPEC do? Where are oil prices headed in the long run? Is “peak oil” a genuine concern? Why did oil prices ...

Smith, James L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Impact of market structure and political instability on the official price of OPEC crude (1972-83)  

SciTech Connect

Within the empirical literature, political instability was either completely ignored or the assumption was made that its impact was significant. One of the major objectives of this study is to determine whether political instability had a significant impact on the oil market during the 1972-83 period. Secondly, there were very important changes that took place within the market - considerable reduction in the non-communist world's oil consumption, increase in production outside OPEC, reduced OPEC market share and capacity use, increased sale of oil directly by OPEC rather than through the oil multinationals, and nationalization of the asset of the latter within OPEC. Within the empirical literature some attention has been paid to the first four changes. The last two changes, however, have generally been assumed to be insignificant. Consequently, the second objective is to determine whether the change of the distribution of ownership within and direct marketing by OPEC itself have had a significant impact on the official price of OPEC crude. The third objective is improved specification of past models of the world oil market through consideration of the influences mentioned above. Results of the study show that political instability, contrary to popular opinion, did not have a significant impact on the market during the 1972-83 period.

Kendall, P.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Global Oil Geopolitics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Iran-Iraq War . Iranian revolution . Arab Oil Embargo . Asian financial crisis . capacity exhausted . Global financial collapse . 9-11 attacks . OPEC cuts targets 1.7 ...

95

Held Hostage: America and Its Allies Confront OPEC, 1973 - 1981  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The oil shocks of the 1970s, initiated by the first Arab oil embargo in 1973, stunned the industrialized world. The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) controlled a resource that was vital to the national well-being and national security of America and its allies. In the United States, gas lines formed as Americans waited for increasingly costly and scarce fuel. Europeans realized that the energy shortages, which they originally believed to be short-term, might permanently change their lives. This dissertation places the historical debate about the effectiveness of domestic and foreign energy policy within the framework of the global transformations taking place at the end of the twentieth century. The collapse of the Bretton Woods system in 1971 and the advent of petrodollars on world currency markets, the emergence of the Soviet Union as an oil exporter, the rise of OPEC as a regulator of oil prices and the consequent decline in the power of the seven major multinational oil companies, and the growth of a global environmental movement, all contributed to the shifting interplay of forces confronting the United States and its allies in the late twentieth century and shaped the debate over national and international energy policy. America's efforts to work with its allies to develop a cohesive national and international energy policy fell victim to the struggle between political autonomy and interdependence in an era of globalization. The allied response to the Iranian hostage crisis and the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan highlighted these conflicts within the alliance.

Barr, Kathleen

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

World oil flow steady in 1992; stable market ahead for 1993  

SciTech Connect

World crude oil production in 1992 was virtually unchanged from 1991. Production last year averaged 59.96 million b/d, up only 17,000 b/d from 1991. Substantial production declines in the C.I.S. and U.S. were offset by increases among members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and a number of other countries outside the OPEC sphere. Figures from the International Energy Agency (IEA) show world demand for petroleum products moved up 300,000 b/d to 66.9 million b/d. This included an addition to stocks of an estimated 1000,000 b/d. IEA predicts world demand will continue to rise in 1993 and OPEC output will advance to meet this higher level. Even though OPEC production is expected to be up for the year, seasonal swings in demand can cause price fluctuations. The paper describes OPEC production, non-OPEC production, oil prices, the world oil supply, Russian's decline, world demand, and the outlook for 1993.

Beck, R.J.

1993-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

97

Maximum of oil output of a treadle-powered peanut oil press  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The manual processing of food products has become a substantial part of the daily routine of a typical household in the developing world. Consumption of oil is an essential part of an individual's diet and thus, the ...

Patel, Ravi M. (Ravi Mahendra)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

OPEC aid and the challenge of development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The OPEC countries have been a significant source of aid for the developing countries since 1973. They have set up a large number of development aid institutions. One of the most prominent of these, the OPEC Fund for International Development, marked its tenth anniversary last year. This book examines not only how the original vision of the OPEC Fund's founders has been translated into practice, but also looks at the whole spectrum of aid from OPEC countries. It shows how OPEC aid is a unique phenomenon in the history of development co-operation. It discusses the effects of the development aid distributed by the collective agencies and by autonomous member states. It also describes how OPEC countries, apart from providing development assistance, have aimed at adopting a wide and innovative approach to the problems of developing countries. The book addresses a range of seminal issues of development - the scope for South-South Co-operation, the problems of North-South Dialogue and the implications of Third World debt.

Benamara, A.; Ifeagwu, S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #563: March 23, 2009 OPEC Petroleum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3: March 23, 3: March 23, 2009 OPEC Petroleum Imports to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #563: March 23, 2009 OPEC Petroleum Imports on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #563: March 23, 2009 OPEC Petroleum Imports on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #563: March 23, 2009 OPEC Petroleum Imports on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #563: March 23, 2009 OPEC Petroleum Imports on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #563: March 23, 2009 OPEC Petroleum Imports on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #563: March 23, 2009 OPEC Petroleum Imports on AddThis.com... Fact #563: March 23, 2009 OPEC Petroleum Imports In the 1970's, the U.S. imported more petroleum from OPEC than from

100

Crude-oil market report  

SciTech Connect

The crude oil market has been both quieter and thinner during the past few months. Various factors, including OPEC restraints, settlement of the British coal strike, and dollar exchange rates, have been stabilizing, although erratic output by Iran and the Soviet Union have caused fluctuations in prices. Higher gasoline prices have triggered a preference for sweet crudes and a possible shortage during the summer motoring season. Oil stocks appear to be at the bottom now, but restocking activities will probably not cause shortages. The author forecasts a continued weak market. 2 tables.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "opec oil output" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Who Are the Major Players Supplying the World Oil Market?  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Energy in Brief article on the world supply of oil through ownership of national oil companies and, for some governments, their membership in OPEC.

Information Center

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Political Constraints on Government Cartelization: The Case of Oil Production Regulation in Texas and Saudi Arabia by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine government cartelization efforts in crude oil production. Texas and Saudi Arabia are alleged to act as swing producers to maintain the interstate (1933-1972) and OPEC (1973 on) oil cartels respectively. We analyze the political constraints that affected the ability of Texas and Saudi Arabia to act as residual producers within their respective cartels. In the case of Texas, political factors molded individual firm production quotas, advantaging high-cost producers and hence, reducing total cartel net profits. Further, Texas had limited range for adjusting total state production to maintain interstate output at levels consistent with target prices. Saudi Arabia’s role as swing producer within OPEC raises similar questions regarding how cartel output is shared among members, and the extent to which domestic economic and political pressures coming from various member countries may undermine the effectiveness of the cartel. OPEC ‘s coordination problem has been more difficult than that faced by the interstate cartel for a variety of reasons that we explore. Even so, they have not kept the OPEC members in general, and Saudi Arabia in particular, from exerting a strong influence on the level of world oil prices.

Gary D. Libecap; James L. Smith

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Non-OPEC supply to test OPEC`s quota resolve in second half  

SciTech Connect

The paper discusses the oil market, the worldwide outlook for demand, crude oil prices, petroleum product prices, natural gas prices, US outlook, US energy demand, sector demand, US natural gas consumption, US petroleum demand, motor gasoline, distillates, resid, LPG and other products, US petroleum supply, refining, imports, stocks, and Strategic Petroleum Reserve stocks.

Beck, R.J.

1997-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

104

Trade balance instability and the optimal exchange rate regime: The case of OPEC countries  

SciTech Connect

The OPEC members have experienced wide fluctuations in their trade balances. This can be attributed to several factors: (1) heavy dependence of national income and export earnings on a single primary export-oil; (2) instability of price and world demand for oil; and (3) the exchange rate regime practiced in recent years. An exchange rate policy can be used to minimize the fluctuations in trade balance, given the changes in exchange rates of major international currencies. The purpose of this study is two fold; first, examine the effects of fluctuations in trade balance on the OPEC economies, and second, propose appropriate exchange rate regime for selected OPEC members. The study is divided into two parts. The first part demonstrates the impact of trade balance changes on national income and other macroeconomic variables using a Keynesian framework. The second part involves using conventional trade models to search for the appropriate exchange rate regime to minimize the fluctuations in trade balance of each selective country. The study's findings are: first, fluctuations in trade balances had negative effects on the economics of Algeria, Kuwait, Libya, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. Second, the current exchange rate regime of no sample country is optimal in minimizing trade balance fluctuations. Third, in contrast to expectations, U.S. dollar peg did not stabilize the trade balance of any OPEC member. Finally, the results show that the sample OPEC economies could have enjoyed faster - though with different degree - economic growth if they had pegged their currencies to the derived optimal exchange rate regime. These optimal exchange rate regimes are: the SDR for Algeria and the United Arab Emirates, the purchasing power parity for Libya and Saudi Arabia, and the real Yen for Kuwait.

Aljerrah, M.A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Oil price, mean reversion and zone readjustments  

SciTech Connect

Observing OPEC`s short-term price-output ceiling behavior during the late 1980s and 1990s, one can conclude that it attempts to stabilize the market price within a range of its announced target price by controlling the output ceiling. If the price moves within four to five dollars below the target price, it usually reduces the output ceiling and assigns new quotas to its member countries to keep the price close to the target price. In reality, OPEC established a band for the market price positioned round the target price by basically choosing suitable upper and lower limits for the output or, at least in soft markets, it places tolerance zone below the target price in order to restrict the discrepancy between the market price and the target price. The lower limit is particularly needed because it sets a price floor and ensures that the market price stays above the significantly lower marginal cost of oil production. If the limits of these zones are backed by a perfectly credible intervention policy, they can generate an expectations process that should turn the market prices around even before any intervention takes place. While OPEC in some sense observes the target zones for its prices, those zones are neither well defined nor vigorously defended. It can not always or may not be willing to maintain the price within the limits of the desired zone by cutting the output ceiling; it must sometimes readjust the target price and output ceiling, and thus create a new target zone to reflect the market`s new fundamentals. This is particularly true now because OPEC is losing market share to the other oil producers and is contemplating to shift the current band. Actual readjustments in the target price can be so large, as in 1980 and 1985, that the newmarket price must jump as well. They can occur when both the market price is near the limits of the band as well as when it is inside the band but still further away from those limits.

Hammoudeh, S. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

World Oil Price Cases (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

World oil prices in AEO2005 are set in an environment where the members of OPEC are assumed to act as the dominant producers, with lower production costs than other supply regions or countries. Non-OPEC oil producers are assumed to behave competitively, producing as much oil as they can profitability extract at the market price for oil. As a result, the OPEC member countries will be able effectively to set the price of oil when they can act in concert by varying their aggregate production. Alternatively, OPEC members could target a fixed level of production and let the world market determine the price.

Information Center

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #734: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4: July 2, 2012 4: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries Represent Less Than Half of U.S. Petroleum Imports to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #734: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries Represent Less Than Half of U.S. Petroleum Imports on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #734: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries Represent Less Than Half of U.S. Petroleum Imports on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #734: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries Represent Less Than Half of U.S. Petroleum Imports on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #734: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries Represent Less Than Half of U.S. Petroleum Imports on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #734: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries Represent Less Than Half of U.S. Petroleum Imports on Digg

108

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Weimer, D.L. (1984) Oil prices shock, market response,OPEC behavior and world oil prices (pp. 175-185) London:many decades. Recent high oil prices have caused oil-holding

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Sanctions reduced Iran's oil exports and revenues in 2012 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A smaller decline in 2011 resulted mainly from declining production in aging fields. Iran remained the second-largest OPEC crude oil producer on ...

110

Putting the press to the test : effects of temperature on Shea nut oil output  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In northern Ghana, part of a belt reaching from Sub-Saharan Africa to northern Uganda, women collect and process Shea nuts for their valuable oil. This oil is then used in various cosmetic, cooking, and medicinal products. ...

Tacoronte, Lisa Cristina

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Expansion of the commercial output of Estonian oil shale mining and processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economic and ecological preconditions are considered for the transition from monoproduct oil shale mining to polyproduct Estonian oil shale deposits. Underground water, limestone, and underground heat found in oil shale mines with small reserves can be operated for a long time using chambers left after oil shale extraction. The adjacent fields of the closed mines can be connected to the operations of the mines that are still working. Complex usage of natural resources of Estonian oil shale deposits is made possible owing to the unique features of its geology and technology. Oil shale seam development is carried out at shallow depths (40--70 m) in stable limestones and does not require expensive maintenance. Such natural resources as underground water, carbonate rocks, heat of rock mass, and underground chambers are opened by mining and are ready for utilization. Room-and-pillar mining does not disturb the surface, and worked oil shale and greenery waste heaps do not breach its ecology. Technical decisions and economic evaluation are presented for the complex utilization of natural resources in the boundaries of mine take of the ``Tammiku`` underground mine and the adjacent closed mine N2. Ten countries have already experienced industrial utilization of oil shale in small volumes for many years. Usually oil shale deposits are not notable for complex geology of the strata and are not deeply bedded. Thus complex utilization of quite extensive natural resources of Estonian oil shale deposits is of both scientific and practical interest.

Fraiman, J.; Kuzmiv, I. [Estonian Oil Shale State Co., Jyhvi (Estonia). Scientific Research Center

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Crude Oil Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July are likely to not be felt until the very end of August or early September. OPEC crude oil production cuts are not likely to be as great as their cuts in quotas. However, they...

113

Trends in oil production costs in the Middle East, elsewhere  

SciTech Connect

This article focuses on the costs of oil production in the major areas of the world, including OPEC and non-OPEC countries. The question of production costs has become even more important since 1986, when the Saudis unilaterally undercut the oil price. Shaikh Yamani slashed oil prices in 1986 with three clearly articulated objectives: (1) to reduce conservation; (2) to stimulate global economic growth; and (3) to discourage non-OPEC energy supplies of all kinds. Here the authors address the last of those strategic objectives -- squeezing out non-OPEC oil -- by comparing oil production costs around the world. The analysis is framed with respect to five questions: How great is the variation in full costs of production within OPEC itself Are the costs of OPEC and non-OPEC producers radically different Are there producing areas today that are cost-constrained, meaning where E P activity is limited by high costs in relation to expected prices Has the Saudi market share strategy been successful in curbing non-OPEC oil development Is it probably, as is often bruited, that lack of capital for new E P projects might constrain future oil production, especially in the OPEC states

Stauffer, T.R. (Stauffer, (Thomas R.), Washington, DC (United States))

1994-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

114

Microsoft Word - high-oil-price.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Short Term Energy Outlook Short Term Energy Outlook 1 STEO Supplement: Why are oil prices so high? During most of the 1990s, the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price averaged close to $20 per barrel, before plunging to almost $10 per barrel in late 1998 as a result of the Asian financial crisis slowing demand growth while extra supply from Iraq was entering the market for the first time since the Gulf War. Subsequently, as Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) producers more closely adhered to a coordinated production quota and reduced output, crude oil prices not only recovered, but increased to about $30 per barrel as demand grew as Asian economies recovered. The most recent increase in crude oil prices began in 2004, when they almost doubled from 2003 levels, rising from about $30 per barrel at the end

115

Inscrutable OPEC? : behavioral tests of the cartel hypothesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that standard statistical tests of OPEC behavior have very low power across a wide range of alternative hypotheses regarding market structure. Consequently, it is difficult, given the current availability and ...

Smith, James L.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

OPEC and the Third World: the politics of aid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The OPEC states have been the only group of developing countries to acquire enough financial resources to assist other less-fortunate developing countries and to have an impact on international economic, financial, and political relations. This study can help to determine the degree to which common Third World goals affected the behavior of OPEC members, to establish the similarities and differences in their behavior as compared with that of the developed countries, and to illustrate the difficulties faced by developing countries in trying to act upon the international system and achieve their own national objectives. Separate chapters cover the historical framework of OPEC, and the politics, nature, and channels of OPEC aid. Case studies examine the policies of Iran and Saudi Arabia. 400 references, 101 tables.

Hunter, S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

OPEC or a basic problem in source networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of determining the achievable rate region for an arbitrary source network with one "helper" is still unsolved. Csiszár and the author have shown that it reduces to the one-parameter entropy characterization problem (OPEC), treated in ...

J. Korner

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Crude Oil Imports from Mauritania  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Imports by Country of Origin ... and Gabon withdrew from OPEC in July 1996. Crude oil and petroleum products are reported by the PAD District of entry.

119

Crude Oil Imports from Canada  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Imports by Country of Origin ... and Gabon withdrew from OPEC in July 1996. Crude oil and petroleum products are reported by the PAD District of entry.

120

Crude Oil Imports from Azerbaijan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Imports by Country of Origin ... and Gabon withdrew from OPEC in July 1996. Crude oil and petroleum products are reported by the PAD District of entry.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "opec oil output" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

World oil: Market or mayhem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world oil market is regarded by many as a puzzle. Why are oil prices so volatile? What is OPEC and what does OPEC do? Where are oil prices headed in the long run? Is “peak oil ” a genuine concern? Why did oil prices spike in the summer of 2008, and what role did speculators play? Any attempt to answer these questions must be informed and disciplined by economics. Such is the purpose of this essay: to illuminate recent developments in the world oil market from the perspective of economic theory.

James L. Smith; James L. Smith; Larry Debrock; Dwight Lee; John Parsons

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Oilgopoly: a general equilibrium model of the oil-macroeconomy nexus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Saudi Arabia is the largest player in the world oil market. It maintains ample spare capacity, restricts investment in developing reserves, and its output is negatively correlated with other OPEC producers. While this behavior does not …t into the perfect competition paradigm, we show that it can be rationalized as that of a dominant producer with competitive fringe. We build a quantitative general equilibrium model along these lines which is capable of matching the historical volatility of the oil price, competitive and non-competitive oil output, and of generating the observed comovement among the oil price, oil quantities, and U.S. GDP. We use our framework to answer questions on which available models are silent: (1) What are the proximate determinants of the oil price and how do they vary over the cycle? (2) How large are oil pro…ts and what losses do they imply for oil-importers? (3) What do di¤erent fundamental shocks imply for the comovement of oil prices and GDP? (4) What are the general equilibrium e¤ects of taxes on oil consumption or oil production? We …nd, in particular, that the existence of an oil production distortion does not necessarily justify an oil consumption tax di¤erent from zero. 1

Anton Nakov Y; Banco De España; Galo Nuño; Banco De España

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Saudi Arabia's Oil Minister: Address to US independent producers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The issue of Energy Detente is designed to promote better understanding of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) through its self-image and its view of the world. The OPEC News Agency coverage and other OPEC materials are tapped to illustrate some key points in a speech about energy security from Saudi Arabia's Oil Minister. This paper from His Excellency Ibrahim M. Nazer is offered in an effort to share his message from the world's largest oil exporter to the world's largest oil consumer. This issue also provides selected statistics and statements from OPEC, both to put Saudi Arabia's statements in context of its commitment to OPEC and to reveal the striking similarity between the country's and the organization's positions. This issue also contains the following: (1) ED Refining Netback Data Series for the U.S. Gulf and West Coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore as of March 23, 1990; Hemisphere, March 1990 edition. 6 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1990-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

124

Oil Market Simulation model: model documentation report (Task 13). Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the Oil Market Simulation (OMS) model as used by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide forecasts of world oil prices. In addition, the OMS model is used to examine the market responses to changes in oil demand and supply. The current version of the model provides additional OMS simulation capabilities to its predecessor. It performs not only the price and production simulations as before, but also simulations that converge to a user-specified regional demand, supply, or import level. Free world countries are grouped into seven major oil demand regions and eight major oil supply regions. The OMS model consists of three parts: oil demand, non-OPEC oil supply, and OPEC pricing behavior. Regional oil demand in a given year is determined as a function of the average world oil price for the year, the regional level of economic activity for the year, and the oil demand in the previous year. Non-OPEC regional oil supply is specified as a function of world oil price and the regional oil supply in the previous period. OPEC pricing behavior is related to the OPEC capacity utilization rate; OPEC sets the oil price based on the percent utilization of its availabile production capacity and the world oil price in the previous time period. Besides the behavior rules of consumers, non-OPEC producers, and OPEC producers, the OMS model includes some regional demand and supply values that are determined exogenously. These user-determined demand and supply values include: (1) OPEC demand, (2) US Strategic Petroleum reserve fill rates, and (3) the net exports from Centrally Planned Economies. 19 refs., 7 figs., 10 tabs.

Not Available

1985-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

125

Oman: World Oil Report 1991  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that for the sixth consecutive year, Oman should retain its title as the biggest driller in the Middle East in 1991. An accelerated program in 1990 pushed production to an all-time record 700,000 bpd late in the year. Although not a member of Opec, Oman has cooperated with the group in restraining output as needed to support oil prices. Petroleum Development Oman (PDO), a partnership of the government (60%), Royal Dutch Shell (34%), Total (4%) and Partex (2%), remains by far the biggest producer. This year, PDO will begin work on its $500-million effort to boost production from its Lekhwair field from a current 24,000 bpd to 110,000 bpd by 1994. Last year, PDO also drilled 15 horizontal wells, most of which were successful in increasing per well production compared to conventional vertical holes. The horizontal program has been continued this year with two rings.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from OPEC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

127

Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from OPEC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

128

The outlook for US oil dependence  

SciTech Connect

Market share OPEC lost in defending higher prices from 1979-1985 is being steadily regained and is projected to exceed 50% by 2000. World oil markets are likely to be as vulnerable to monopoly influence as they were 20 years ago, as OPEC regains lost market share. The U.S. economy appears to be as exposed as it was in the early 1970s to losses from monopoly oil pricing. A simulated 2-year supply reduction in 2005-6 boosts OPEC revenues by roughly half a trillion dollars and costs the U.S. economy an approximately equal amount. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve appears to be of little benefit against such a determined, multi-year supply curtailment either in reducing OPEC revenues or protecting the U.S. economy. Increasing the price elasticity of oil demand and supply in the U.S. and the rest of the world, however, would be an effective strategy.

Greene, D.L.; Jones, D.W.; Leiby, P.N.

1995-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

129

Oil Dependence: The Value of R{ampersand}D  

SciTech Connect

Over the past quarter century the United States` dependence on oil has cost its economy on the order of $5 trillion. Oil dependence is defined as economically significant consumption of oil, given price inelastic demand in the short and long run and given the ability of the OPEC cartel to use market power to influence oil prices. Although oil prices have been lower and more stable over the past decade, OPEC still holds the majority of the world`s conventional oil resources according to the best available estimates. OPEC`s share of the world oil market is likely to grow significantly in the future,restoring much if not all of their former market power. Other than market share, the key determinants of OPEC`s market power are the long and short run price elasticities of world oil demand and supply. These elasticities depend critically on the technologies of oil supply and demand, especially the technology of energy use in transportation. Research and development can change these elasticities in fundamental ways, and given the nature of the problem,the government has an important role to play in supporting such research.

Greene, D.L.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

The role of OPEC in promoting economic and financial cooperation among developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phenomenon of OPEC aid has, thus, undergone a remarkable evolution in magnitude, in geographical coverage, in the number of channels of such assistance and in its role and impact. The essential feature of OPEC aid has been and continues to be that OPEC aid represents financial flows from one group of developing countries to another group of developing countries. It is, thus, a concrete manifestation of economic and financial cooperation among developing countries born of the natural solidarity which exists between OPEC Member Countries.

Abdulai, Y.S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from Persian Gulf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Imports by Country of Origin ... and Gabon withdrew from OPEC in July 1996. Crude oil and petroleum products are reported by the PAD District of entry.

132

Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from Senegal  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Imports by Country of Origin ... and Gabon withdrew from OPEC in July 1996. Crude oil and petroleum products are reported by the PAD District of entry.

133

Prospects for world oil supply  

SciTech Connect

Surprises lie ahead for world oil supplies, which are expected to increase rapidly throughout the 1990s before leveling off by the end of the century. The extent of this increase could be the major surprise of the decade. Large increases in the capacity in Gulf countries accompanied by smaller increases in the non-Middle East OPEC countries will be augmented by a gradual increase in non-OPEC capacity into the late 1990s. By 2000, declining capacity in the latter two areas will offset continued capacity increases in the Gulf countries. Overall capacity in the non-OPEC countries (excluding China, Eastern Europe, and the Soviet Union), is expected to increase by 1.1 million BOPD from the low point in the early 1990s to a mid 1990s peak. The increase will be led by a large increase in capacity from the United Kingdom and smaller contributions from the non-Middle East OPEC countries and Mexico. In the forecast, emphasis has been placed on a detailed evaluation of recent significant discoveries made in non-OPEC countries and non-Middle East OPEC countries since 1983, which when taken together, are expected to add 8 million BOPD new capacity as soon as 1995. These discoveries have taken place in both existing and evolving exploration hotspots that are expected to receive increasing industry emphasis in the 1990s.

Esser, R.W. (Cambridge Energy Research Associates, MA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The Outlook for U.S. Oil Dependence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Market share OPEC lost in defending higher prices from 1979-1985 is being steadily regained and is projected to exceed 50% by 2000. World oil markets are likely to be as vulnerable to monopoly influence as they were 20 years ago, as OPEC regains lost market share. The US economy appears to be as exposed as it was in the early 1970s to losses from monopoly oil pricing. A simulated 2-year supply reduction in 2005-6 boosts OPEC revenues by roughly half a trillion dollars and costs the US economy an approximately equal amount. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve appears to be of little benefit against such a determined, multi-year supply curtailment either in reducing OPEC revenues or protecting the US economy. Increasing the price elasticity of oil demand and supply in the US and the rest of the world, however, would be an effective strategy.

Greene, D.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Import policy effects on the optimal oil price  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A steady increase in oil imports leaves oil importing countries increasingly vulnerable tofuture oil price shocks. Using a variation of the U.S. EIA`s oil market simulation model, equilibria displaying multiple price shocks is derived endogenously as a result of optimizing behavior on the part of OPEC. Here we investigate the effects that an oil import tariff and a petroleum stock release policy may have on an OPEC optimal price path. It is shown that while both policies can reduce the magnitude of future price shocks neither may be politically or technically feasible. 21 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Suranovic, S.M. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Futures oil market outlook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We expect the broader expansion of global economic activity in 1995 to more than offset the anticipated slowdown in the US economic growth. This should result in worldwide oil demand growth in excess of 1 million barrels per day and firmer oil prices. This comes on the heels of nearly identical growth in 1994 and should be followed by an even larger increase in 1996. This year`s demand growth comes against a backdrop of flat OPEC production and an increase in non-OPEC supplies that will fall short of the expected increase in consumption. Some degree of political upheaval in at least a half dozen important oil exporting nations could also have implication for crude supplies. One major wildcard that remains for global oil markets is the status of the United Nations` sanctions on Iraqi exports and the timing of when these sanctions are to be eased or lifted completely.

Saucer, J. [Smith Barney, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Crude Oil Imports from Singapore  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Indonesia withdrew from OPEC in January 2009, Angola joined OPEC in January 2007, Ecuador withdrew from OPEC in January 1993 and rejoined in November ...

138

World oil and geopolitics to the year 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the interplay of market forces and politics in the world oil market projected to the year 2010. It argues that world oil demand will increase considerably, with Asian demand growing the fastest. Given that the growth of oil supply of producers outside the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) will be trivial, the call on OPEC oil will increase substantially. Yet, given their declining per-capita oil revenues, OPEC members may not be able to make timely investments in required upstream projects. If this happens, the supply constraint will lead to higher prices and intensified international competition for Arabian/Persian Gulf oil. Thus, foreign investment will be needed increasingly in OPEC states if prices are to remain stable. But geopolitical and institutional barriers to foreign investment in many OPEC members hinder foreign investment. It is imperative that major players in the world oil market cooperate to reduce such barriers in time to ensure that supply corresponds to rising demand. 22 refs., 8 figs., 10 tabs.

Amirahmadi, H.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Strong demand growth seen for oil and gas in 1997--99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides historical information on worldwide crude oil productions from 1984 to present and makes predictions on future demand and refinery capacities. It provides information on oil reserves on a world scale and the pricing of these commodities. It breaks reserves, production and capacities down into OPEC and non-OPEC countries. It then provides general energy demand for both developed and developing countries in all energy forms.

Beck, R.J.

1996-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

140

Oil demand continues to grow in the U.S. and worldwide  

SciTech Connect

Rising oil consumption is challenging the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries production quota--but not the group`s ability to meet demand. In the second half of 1995, the oil market will continue to need more oil from OPEC members than the group claims to be willing to produce with its quota at 24.52 million b/d. If the quota really limited supply, ingredients would be in place for a significant price hike. Growth in a non-OPEC production intensities temptations on OPEC members to cheat on quotas and has become a key factor in the market. OPEC producers have seen that if they don`t meet incremental demand at the current price, other producers will. OPEC eventually will have to raise its quota or acknowledge that the artificial production limit lacks meaning. At present, the only real limit to supply is production capacity, which remains in excess relative to demand and which has demonstrated its ability to grow both within and outside of OPEC when prices rise. The paper discusses worldwide trends, pressures on OPEC, world crude prices, US prices, natural gas prices, US energy demand, natural gas use, gas supply, US demand for petroleum products, imports, and inventories.

Tippee, B.; Beck, R.J.

1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #114: January 31, 2000 OPEC...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

42% 62% Oil Reserves 78% 88% Natural Gas Reserves 44% 80% Vented and Flared Gas 73% 78% Oil production, US DOE Energy Information Administration, International Petroleum Monthly,...

142

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook 8/13/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance OPEC Production Likely To Remain Low U.S. Reflects World Market Crude Oil Outlook Conclusions Distillate Prices Increase With Crude Oil Distillate Stocks on the East Coast Were Very Low Entering Last Winter Distillate Demand Strong Last Winter More Supply Possible This Fall than Forecast Distillate Fuel Oil Imports Could Be Available - For A Price Distillate Supply/Demand Balance Reflected in Spreads Distillate Stocks Expected to Remain Low Winter Crude Oil and Distillate Price Outlook Heating Oil Outlook Conclusion Propane Prices Follow Crude Oil

143

International Energy Outlook 2001 - World Oil Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Oil Markets World Oil Markets picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) In the IEO2001 forecast, periodic production adjustments by OPEC members are not expected to have a significant long-term impact on world oil markets. Prices are projected to rise gradually through 2020 as the oil resource base is expanded. Crude oil prices remained above $25 per barrel in nominal terms for most of 2000 and have been near $30 per barrel in the early months of 2001. Prices were influenced by the disciplined adherence to announced cutbacks in production by members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). OPECÂ’s successful market management strategy was an attempt to avoid a repeat of the ultra-low oil price environment of 1998 and early 1999. Three additional factors contributed to the resiliency of oil prices in

144

An economist`s overview: Recent developments affecting future oil supply, prices  

SciTech Connect

This article features a discussion of the production of crude oil in non-OPEC countries compared to OPEC countries and concludes that while OPEC has lost significant market share over a fifteen-year period, it has regained much of that loss over the past five years. Also included is refining netback data as of December 22th for the US Gulf Coast, US West Coast, Singapore, and Rotterdam. Prices and taxes (US$) for fuels in North and South America are also given.

NONE

1995-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

145

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators: From Natural Gas to Petroleum Liquids, 4. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators: From Natural Gas to Petroleum Liquids, by Year of Initial Commercial Operation, 2012 (Megawatts, Percent) Year of Initial Commercial Operation Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity Fuel Switchable Net Summer Capacity Reported to Have No Factors that Limit the Ability to Switch to Petroleum Liquids Pre-1970 318 11,735 7,535 1970-1974 376 18,210 11,033 1975-1979 105 11,031 7,283 1980-1984 46 945 211 1985-1989 107 3,155 413 1990-1994 208 11,738 1,453 1995-1999 134 9,680 2,099 2000-2004 392 39,841 5,098 2005-2009 116 14,791 2,066 2010-2012 78 8,479 320 Total 1,880 129,604 37,510 Notes: Petroleum includes distillate fuel oil (all diesel and No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 fuel oils), residual fuel oil (No. 5 and No. 6 fuel oils and bunker C fuel oil), jet fuel, kerosene, petroleum coke (converted to liquid petroleum, see Technical Notes for conversion methodology), waste oil, and beginning in 2011, synthetic gas and propane. Prior to 2011, synthetic gas and propane were included in Other Gases.

146

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Average Operating Heat Rate for Selected Energy Sources, . Average Operating Heat Rate for Selected Energy Sources, 2002 through 2012 (Btu per Kilowatthour) Year Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Nuclear 2002 10,314 10,641 9,533 10,442 2003 10,297 10,610 9,207 10,422 2004 10,331 10,571 8,647 10,428 2005 10,373 10,631 8,551 10,436 2006 10,351 10,809 8,471 10,435 2007 10,375 10,794 8,403 10,489 2008 10,378 11,015 8,305 10,452 2009 10,414 10,923 8,159 10,459 2010 10,415 10,984 8,185 10,452 2011 10,444 10,829 8,152 10,464 2012 10,498 10,991 8,039 10,479 Coal includes anthracite, bituminous, subbituminous and lignite coal. Waste coal and synthetic coal are included starting in 2002. Petroleum includes distillate fuel oil (all diesel and No. 1 and No. 2 fuel oils), residual fuel oil (No. 5 and No. 6 fuel oils and bunker C fuel oil, jet fuel, kerosene, petroleum coke, and waste oil.

147

U.S. Crude Oil Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Indonesia withdrew from OPEC in January 2009, Angola joined OPEC in January 2007, Ecuador withdrew from OPEC in January 1993 and rejoined in November ...

148

Application of multi-layer recurrent neural network in chaotic time series prediction: a real case study of crude oil distillation capacity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A full customised case-oriented Multi-Layered Recurrent Neural Network (MLRNN) has been proposed to predict the Capacity of Crude Oil Distillation in OPEC Member Countries. Recurrent neural networks use feedback connections and have the potential to ...

Kaveh Khalili-Damghani; Soheil Sadi-Nezhad

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Crude Oil and Gasoline Price Monitoring  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What drives crude oil prices? What drives crude oil prices? November 13, 2013 | Washington, DC An analysis of 7 factors that influence oil markets, with chart data updated monthly and quarterly Crude oil prices react to a variety of geopolitical and economic events November 13, 2013 2 price per barrel (real 2010 dollars, quarterly average) Low spare capacity Iraq invades Kuwait Saudis abandon swing producer role Iran-Iraq War Iranian revolution Arab Oil Embargo Asian financial crisis U.S. spare capacity exhausted Global financial collapse 9-11 attacks OPEC cuts targets 1.7 mmbpd OPEC cuts targets 4.2 mmbpd Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Thomson Reuters 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 imported refiner acquisition cost of crude oil

150

Do oil producers act as [open quotes]oil[close quotes]igopolists  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, I analyze an oligopoly model of exhaustible resource extraction and develop predictions about relative extraction patterns of different producers. Using the [open quotes]oil[close quotes]igopoly model of Loury, one can show that producers with large stocks produce a larger amount, but a smaller percentage, of their stocks than producers with small stocks. I extend Loury's model to cases where extraction costs differ among producers and where costs are a function of cumulative extraction. An increase in extraction costs for a producer causes it to produce less relative to its rivals. When extraction costs rise with cumulative extraction, producers with large reserves tend to have lower extraction costs and a smaller ratio of cumulative production to initial reserves than producers with small reserves. I test the predictions of the model using oil industry data and find that the empirical results are consistent with the predictions of [open quotes]oil[close quotes]igopoly theory. Producers with larger reserves extract a smaller share of their reserves and have lower production costs than producers with smaller reserves. This pattern holds for 73 countries with oil reserves during the time period 1970-1989, and for approximately 400 US oil companies in 1983 and 1984. The observed pattern of production for both OPEC and non-OPEC producers is consistent with [open quotes]oil[close quotes]igopoly theory. OPEC producers do not appear to restrain production given their level of reserves relative to non-OPEC producers. Thus, viewing the oil market as containing one dominant firm (OPEC) with a competitive fringe may be misleading. Further, the pattern of extraction observed in oil markets is inconsistent with the pattern predicted by competitive theory. 29 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

Polasky, S. (Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Do oil producers act as [open quote]oil[close quote]igopolists  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the author analyzes an oligopoly model of exhaustible resource extraction and develop predictions about relative extraction patterns of different producers. Using the [open quote]oil[close quote]igopoly model of Loury, one can show that producers with large stocks produce a larger amount, but a smaller percentage, of their stocks than producers with small stocks. The authors extend Loury's model to cases where extraction costs differ among producers and where costs are a function of cumulative extraction. An increase in extraction costs for a producer causes it to produce less relative to its rivals. When extraction costs rise with cumulative extraction, producers with large reserves tend to have lower extraction costs and a smaller ratio of cumulative production to initial reserves than producers with small reserves. The authors test the predictions of the model using oil industry data and find that the empirical results are consistent with the predictions of [open quotes]oil[close quotes]igopoly theory. Producers with larger reserves extract a smaller share of their reserves and have lower production costs than producers with smaller reserves. This pattern holds for 73 countries with oil reserves during the time period 1970-1989, and for approximately 400 US oil companies in 1983 and 1984. The observed pattern of production for both OPEC and non-OPEC producers is consistent with [open quote]oil[close quote]igopoly theory. OPEC producers do not appear to restrain production given their level of reserves relative to non-OPEC producers. Thus, viewing the oil market as containing one dominant firm (OPEC) with a competitive fringe may be misleading. Further, the pattern of extraction observed in oil markets is inconsistent with the pattern predicted by competitive theory. 29 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

Polasky, S. (Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Statement from Energy Secretary Bodman on OPEC's Decision to...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

determine issues of supply, demand and price. Despite the recent downturn in crude oil prices, they remain at historically high levels, clearly indicating a global demand for...

153

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Carbon Dioxide Uncontrolled Emission Factors 3. Carbon Dioxide Uncontrolled Emission Factors Fuel EIA Fuel Code Source and Tables (As Appropriate) Factor (Pounds of CO2 Per Million Btu)*** Bituminous Coal BIT Source: 1 205.30000 Distillate Fuel Oil DFO Source: 1 161.38600 Geothermal GEO Estimate from EIA, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting 16.59983 Jet Fuel JF Source: 1 156.25800 Kerosene KER Source: 1 159.53500 Lignite Coal LIG Source: 1 215.40000 Municipal Solid Waste MSW Source: 1 (including footnote 2 within source) 91.90000 Natural Gas NG Source: 1 117.08000 Petroleum Coke PC Source: 1 225.13000 Propane Gas PG Sources: 1 139.17800 Residual Fuel Oil RFO Source: 1 173.90600 Synthetic Coal SC Assumed to have the emissions similar to Bituminous Coal. 205.30000

154

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 993 0 116 0 876 2004 2,174 0 735 10 1,429 2005 1,923 0 965 435 522 2006 2,051 0 525 1,094 433 2007 1,988 0 386 1,102 501 2008 1,025 0 454 433 138 2009 793 0 545 176 72 2010 1,623 0 1,195 370 58 2011 3,195 0 2,753 351 91 2012 3,189 0 2,788 340 61 2010 January 118 0 83 30 5 February 110 0 79 27 5 March 132 0 94 32 6 April 131 0 93 33 6 May 132 0 92 34 6 June 139 0 104 30 5 July 140 0 102 33 5 August 132 0 95 32 5 September 148 0 113 30 5

155

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 517 0 111 6 399 2003 763 0 80 9 675 2004 1,043 0 237 8 798 2005 783 0 206 8 568 2006 1,259 0 195 9 1,055 2007 1,262 0 162 11 1,090 2008 897 0 119 9 769 2009 1,007 0 126 8 873 2010 1,059 0 98 11 950 2011 1,080 0 112 6 962 2012 1,346 0 113 11 1,222 2010 January 92 0 10 1 81 February 93 0 10 1 82 March 84 0 12 1 71 April 76 0 9 1 66 May 84 0 10 0 75 June 93 0 8 0 86 July 89 0 8 0 80 August 87 0 2 1 84 September 82 0 2 1 79

156

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 193,120 57,296 105,416 227 30,182 2003 197,827 69,695 92,384 309 35,440 2004 245,389 116,086 90,747 259 38,297 2005 256,441 115,727 111,098 260 29,356 2006 246,687 102,117 98,314 269 45,987 2007 208,198 77,941 81,845 348 48,064 2008 180,034 64,843 79,856 280 35,055 2009 166,449 77,919 52,428 245 35,856 2010 173,078 94,331 41,090 340 37,317 2011 176,349 99,257 40,167 173 36,752 2012 144,266 60,862 24,925 353 58,126 2010 January 14,949 7,995 3,716 38 3,199

157

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 1,005,144 767,803 209,703 1,405 26,232 2003 1,031,778 757,384 247,732 1,816 24,846 2004 1,044,798 772,224 244,044 1,917 26,613 2005 1,065,281 761,349 276,135 1,922 25,875 2006 1,053,783 753,390 273,246 1,886 25,262 2007 1,069,606 764,765 280,377 1,927 22,537 2008 1,064,503 760,326 280,254 2,021 21,902 2009 955,190 695,615 238,012 1,798 19,766 2010 1,001,411 721,431 253,621 1,720 24,638 2011 956,470 689,316 243,168 1,668 22,319 2012 845,066 615,467 208,085 1,450 20,065

158

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 500 0 61 0 439 2004 1,158 0 415 5 738 2005 994 0 519 212 263 2006 1,034 0 267 549 218 2007 985 0 226 532 228 2008 552 0 271 211 70 2009 440 0 313 91 37 2010 847 0 643 174 30 2011 1,635 0 1,422 165 48 2012 1,630 0 1,441 156 32 2010 January 61 0 44 14 3 February 58 0 42 13 3 March 67 0 49 15 3 April 67 0 49 15 3 May 68 0 49 16 3 June 73 0 56 14 3 July 73 0 55 16 2 August 69 0 52 15 3 September 79 0 62 14 3 October 75 0 59 14 2

159

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 17,561 0 2,255 929 14,377 2003 17,720 0 2,080 1,234 14,406 2004 24,275 0 3,809 1,540 18,926 2005 23,833 0 3,918 1,544 18,371 2006 23,227 0 3,834 1,539 17,854 2007 22,810 0 3,795 1,566 17,449 2008 22,168 0 3,689 1,652 16,827 2009 20,507 0 3,935 1,481 15,091 2010 21,727 0 3,808 1,406 16,513 2011 21,532 0 3,628 1,321 16,584 2012 19,333 0 2,790 1,143 15,400 2010 January 1,972 0 371 160 1,440 February 1,820 0 347 139 1,334 March 1,839 0 338 123 1,378 April 2,142 0 284 95 1,764

160

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 29,854 0 10,655 757 18,442 2004 30,228 0 12,055 2,627 15,547 2005 38,010 0 10,275 2,086 25,649 2006 36,966 0 8,561 2,318 26,087 2007 41,757 0 10,294 2,643 28,820 2008 41,851 0 9,674 1,542 30,635 2009 41,810 0 10,355 1,638 29,817 2010 47,153 0 8,436 1,648 37,070 2011 43,483 0 6,460 1,566 35,458 2012 46,863 0 6,914 1,796 38,153 2010 January 4,885 0 1,088 137 3,661 February 4,105 0 943 137 3,025 March 4,398 0 845 136 3,417 April 4,224 0 399 138 3,688

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "opec oil output" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 14,395 0 3,192 179 11,024 2003 21,170 0 2,282 244 18,644 2004 29,342 0 6,768 226 22,347 2005 22,224 0 5,935 228 16,061 2006 38,169 0 5,672 236 32,262 2007 38,033 0 4,710 303 33,019 2008 27,100 0 3,441 243 23,416 2009 29,974 0 3,652 213 26,109 2010 31,303 0 2,855 296 28,152 2011 31,943 0 3,244 153 28,546 2012 38,777 0 3,281 315 35,181 2010 January 2,683 0 285 33 2,365 February 2,770 0 302 29 2,439 March 2,424 0 338 36 2,050 April 2,257 0 255 22 1,980

162

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 64,629 2,456 26,514 5,323 30,337 2004 49,443 2,014 21,294 6,935 19,201 2005 55,862 2,485 17,640 6,763 28,974 2006 54,693 2,611 16,348 6,755 28,980 2007 60,840 2,992 19,155 6,692 32,001 2008 66,139 3,409 22,419 5,227 35,085 2009 66,658 3,679 23,586 5,398 33,994 2010 77,150 3,668 22,884 5,438 45,159 2011 74,255 4,488 22,574 5,382 41,810 2012 77,205 4,191 22,654 5,812 44,548 2010 January 7,109 189 2,166 458 4,295 February 6,441 275 2,151 429 3,586

163

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 7,135,572 2,307,358 3,481,961 75,985 1,270,268 2003 6,498,549 1,809,003 3,450,177 60,662 1,178,707 2004 6,912,661 1,857,247 3,749,945 73,744 1,231,725 2005 7,220,520 2,198,098 3,837,717 69,682 1,115,023 2006 7,612,500 2,546,169 3,847,644 69,401 1,149,286 2007 8,181,986 2,808,500 4,219,827 71,560 1,082,099 2008 7,900,986 2,803,283 4,046,069 67,571 984,062 2009 8,138,385 2,981,285 4,062,633 77,077 1,017,390 2010 8,694,186 3,359,035 4,191,241 87,357 1,056,553

164

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 1,358 0 311 865 182 2004 2,743 0 651 1,628 464 2005 2,719 0 623 1,536 560 2006 2,840 0 725 1,595 520 2007 2,219 0 768 1,136 315 2008 2,328 0 806 1,514 8 2009 2,426 0 823 1,466 137 2010 2,287 0 819 1,316 152 2011 2,044 0 742 1,148 154 2012 1,986 0 522 1,273 190 2010 January 191 0 69 107 14 February 178 0 61 106 11 March 204 0 66 126 12 April 207 0 67 127 13 May 249 0 67 167 15 June 204 0 69 120 14 July 194 0 68 115 11

165

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 137,414 9,168 122,100 3,280 2,865 2004 146,018 11,250 126,584 4,091 4,093 2005 143,822 11,490 124,030 5,232 3,070 2006 162,084 16,617 136,632 7,738 1,096 2007 168,762 17,442 144,490 5,699 1,131 2008 196,802 20,465 170,001 5,668 668 2009 207,585 19,583 181,234 6,106 661 2010 219,954 19,975 193,623 5,905 451 2011 235,990 22,086 183,609 29,820 474 2012 259,564 25,193 204,753 27,012 2,606 2010 January 17,649 1,715 15,406 491 37 February 16,300 1,653 14,198 410 38

166

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 7,353 2,125 3,691 8 1,529 2003 7,067 2,554 3,245 11 1,257 2004 8,721 4,150 3,223 9 1,339 2005 9,113 4,130 3,953 9 1,020 2006 8,622 3,619 3,482 10 1,511 2007 7,299 2,808 2,877 12 1,602 2008 6,314 2,296 2,823 10 1,184 2009 5,828 2,761 1,850 9 1,209 2010 6,053 3,325 1,452 12 1,264 2011 6,092 3,449 1,388 6 1,248 2012 5,021 2,105 869 13 2,034 2010 January 525 283 130 1 110 February 497 258 131 1 106 March 522 308 119 1 94

167

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 13,694 0 3,118 8,858 1,718 2004 19,991 0 4,746 12,295 2,950 2005 20,296 0 4,551 11,991 3,754 2006 21,729 0 5,347 12,654 3,728 2007 16,174 0 5,683 8,350 2,141 2008 18,272 0 6,039 12,174 59 2009 18,785 0 6,229 11,535 1,021 2010 17,502 0 6,031 10,333 1,138 2011 16,766 0 5,807 9,731 1,227 2012 16,310 0 4,180 10,615 1,515 2010 January 1,476 0 518 851 107 February 1,365 0 444 835 86 March 1,572 0 486 992 93 April 1,598 0 495 1,003 100

168

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 12,228 0 286 384 11,558 2003 14,124 0 1,197 512 12,414 2004 20,654 0 1,501 1,203 17,951 2005 20,494 0 1,392 1,004 18,097 2006 14,077 0 1,153 559 12,365 2007 13,462 0 1,303 441 11,718 2008 7,533 0 1,311 461 5,762 2009 8,128 0 1,301 293 6,534 2010 4,866 0 1,086 212 3,567 2011 3,826 0 1,004 168 2,654 2012 3,097 0 992 122 1,984 2010 January 606 0 105 31 470 February 504 0 78 26 401 March 335 0 46 7 281 April 355 0 86 9 260 May 340 0 93 14 232

169

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 885,987 0 267,675 45,359 572,953 2003 762,779 0 250,120 21,238 491,421 2004 1,085,191 0 398,476 40,122 646,593 2005 1,008,404 0 392,842 35,037 580,525 2006 968,574 0 339,047 33,928 595,599 2007 894,272 0 347,181 36,689 510,402 2008 813,794 0 333,197 33,434 447,163 2009 836,863 0 312,553 42,032 482,279 2010 841,521 0 308,246 47,001 486,274 2011 861,006 0 315,411 40,976 504,619 2012 909,087 0 330,354 48,944 529,788 2010 January 74,586 0 27,368 4,148 43,070 February 65,539 0 24,180 3,786 37,573

170

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 2. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2002 40,020 1,319 2,550 214,137 5,961 12,550 4,732 281,269 2003 38,249 5,551 1,828 200,077 9,282 19,785 3,296 278,068 2004 39,014 5,731 2,486 239,416 18,200 17,347 3,822 326,017 2005 39,652 5,571 2,238 239,324 36,694 18,240 3,884 345,605 2006 38,133 4,812 2,253 207,095 22,567 17,284 4,435 296,579 2007 38,260 5,294 1,862 212,705 20,473 19,166 4,459 302,219 2008 37,220 5,479 1,353 204,167 22,109 17,052 4,854 292,234 2009 38,015 5,341 1,445 190,875 19,830 17,625 5,055 278,187

171

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 76,737 0 1,669 3,276 71,788 2003 85,488 0 6,963 3,176 75,349 2004 124,809 0 8,592 7,219 108,997 2005 125,689 0 8,134 6,145 111,410 2006 87,137 0 6,740 3,481 76,916 2007 82,768 0 7,602 2,754 72,412 2008 45,481 0 7,644 2,786 35,051 2009 48,912 0 7,557 1,802 39,552 2010 29,243 0 6,402 1,297 21,545 2011 22,799 0 5,927 1,039 15,833 2012 18,233 0 5,871 746 11,616 2010 January 3,648 0 614 190 2,843 February 3,027 0 422 157 2,447 March 2,015 0 272 43 1,699

172

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 146,643 88,595 39,320 1,210 17,517 2003 189,260 105,319 62,617 1,394 19,929 2004 185,761 103,793 57,843 1,963 22,162 2005 185,631 98,223 63,546 1,584 22,278 2006 87,898 53,529 18,332 886 15,150 2007 95,895 56,910 24,097 691 14,198 2008 61,379 38,995 14,463 621 7,300 2009 51,690 31,847 11,181 477 8,185 2010 44,968 30,806 9,364 376 4,422 2011 31,152 20,844 6,637 301 3,370 2012 25,702 17,521 5,102 394 2,685 2010 January 6,193 4,381 1,188 48 576

173

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 682,060 0 9,585 727 671,747 2003 746,375 0 10,893 762 734,720 2004 1,016,124 0 14,968 1,493 999,663 2005 997,331 0 19,193 1,028 977,111 2006 1,049,161 0 18,814 1,045 1,029,303 2007 982,486 0 21,435 1,756 959,296 2008 923,889 0 18,075 1,123 904,690 2009 816,285 0 19,587 1,135 795,563 2010 876,041 0 18,357 1,064 856,620 2011 893,314 0 16,577 1,022 875,716 2012 883,158 0 19,251 949 862,958 2010 January 73,418 0 1,677 91 71,651 February 67,994 0 1,689 81 66,224

174

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 66,270 3,930 59,149 1,753 1,438 2004 70,489 5,373 60,929 2,098 2,089 2005 68,897 5,650 59,144 2,571 1,532 2006 77,004 8,287 64,217 3,937 563 2007 80,697 8,620 68,657 2,875 544 2008 94,768 10,242 81,300 2,879 346 2009 100,261 9,748 87,086 3,089 337 2010 106,681 10,029 93,405 3,011 236 2011 114,173 11,146 91,279 11,497 251 2012 125,927 12,721 101,379 10,512 1,315 2010 January 8,502 853 7,379 251 19 February 7,882 830 6,823 209 20

175

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Commerical Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 3. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Commerical Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2002 18,477 2,600 143 36,265 0 6,902 4,801 69,188 2003 22,780 2,520 196 16,955 0 8,296 6,142 56,889 2004 22,450 4,118 165 21,851 0 8,936 6,350 63,871 2005 22,601 3,518 166 20,227 0 8,647 5,921 61,081 2006 22,186 2,092 172 19,370 0.22 9,359 6,242 59,422 2007 22,595 1,640 221 20,040 0 6,651 3,983 55,131 2008 22,991 1,822 177 20,183 0 8,863 6,054 60,091 2009 20,057 1,095 155 25,902 0 8,450 5,761 61,420 2010 19,216 845 216 29,791 13 7,917 5,333 63,330 2011 17,234 687 111 24,848 14 7,433 5,988 56,314

176

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 912,218 553,390 243,561 7,229 108,031 2003 1,174,795 658,868 387,341 8,534 120,051 2004 1,156,763 651,712 358,685 11,763 134,603 2005 1,160,733 618,811 395,489 9,614 136,820 2006 546,529 335,130 112,052 5,444 93,903 2007 595,191 355,999 147,579 4,259 87,354 2008 377,848 242,379 87,460 3,743 44,266 2009 315,420 196,346 66,834 2,903 49,336 2010 273,357 188,987 55,444 2,267 26,660 2011 186,753 125,755 39,093 1,840 20,066 2012 153,189 105,179 29,952 2,364 15,695

177

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 860,024 0 263,619 41,435 554,970 2003 721,267 0 225,967 19,973 475,327 2004 1,052,100 0 388,424 39,233 624,443 2005 984,340 0 384,365 34,172 565,803 2006 942,817 0 330,878 33,112 578,828 2007 872,579 0 339,796 35,987 496,796 2008 793,537 0 326,048 32,813 434,676 2009 816,787 0 305,542 41,275 469,970 2010 821,775 0 301,769 46,324 473,683 2011 839,681 0 308,669 39,856 491,155 2012 886,103 0 322,607 47,883 515,613 2010 January 72,867 0 26,791 4,086 41,990

178

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 421,084 0 50,041 23,099 347,944 2003 416,700 0 47,817 28,479 340,405 2004 564,497 0 87,981 34,538 441,978 2005 548,666 0 88,364 34,616 425,685 2006 532,561 0 84,335 34,086 414,140 2007 521,717 0 83,838 34,690 403,189 2008 503,096 0 81,416 36,163 385,517 2009 462,674 0 90,867 32,651 339,156 2010 490,931 0 90,184 30,725 370,022 2011 479,822 0 84,855 28,056 366,911 2012 420,923 0 58,275 23,673 338,975 2010 January 44,514 0 8,627 3,445 32,442 February 40,887 0 8,041 3,024 29,823

179

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 1,287,114 10,659 139,532 1,196 1,135,727 2003 1,265,669 16,545 150,745 1,199 1,097,180 2004 1,360,258 19,973 145,216 1,661 1,193,408 2005 1,352,582 27,373 157,600 1,235 1,166,373 2006 1,399,235 27,455 154,360 1,314 1,216,106 2007 1,335,511 31,568 154,388 2,040 1,147,516 2008 1,262,675 29,150 148,198 1,410 1,083,917 2009 1,136,729 29,565 150,481 1,408 955,276 2010 1,225,571 40,167 155,429 1,338 1,028,637 2011 1,240,937 35,474 146,684 1,504 1,057,275

180

The oil policies of the Gulf Arab Nations  

SciTech Connect

At its heart, Arab oil policy is inseparable from Arab economic and social policy. This holds whether we are talking about the Arab nations as a group or each separately. The seven Arab nations covered in this report-Bahrain, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates--participate in several organizations focusing on regional cooperation regarding economic development, social programs, and Islamic unity, as well as organizations concerned with oil policies. This report focuses on the oil-related activities of the countries that may reveal the de facto oil policies of the seven Persian Gulf nations. Nevertheless it should be kept in mind that the decision makers participating in the oil policy organizations are also involved with the collaborative efforts of these other organizations. Oil policies of five of the seven Arab nations are expressed within the forums of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC). Only Oman, among the seven, is not a member of either OAPEC or OPEC; Bahrain is a member of OAPEC but not of OPEC. OPEC and OAPEC provide forums for compromise and cooperation among their members. Nevertheless, each member state maintains its own sovereignty and follows its own policies. Each country deviates from the group prescription from time to time, depending upon individual circumstances.

Ripple, R.D.; Hagen, R.E.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "opec oil output" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Total Combined Heat and Power (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 1. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Total Combined Heat and Power (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2002 336,848 61,313 11,513 708,738 117,513 571,509 48,263 1,855,697 2003 333,361 68,329 16,934 610,122 110,263 632,366 54,960 1,826,335 2004 351,871 80,824 16,659 654,242 126,157 667,341 45,456 1,942,550 2005 341,806 79,362 13,021 624,008 138,469 664,691 41,400 1,902,757 2006 332,548 54,224 24,009 603,288 126,049 689,549 49,308 1,878,973 2007 326,803 50,882 25,373 554,394 116,313 651,230 46,822 1,771,816 2008 315,244 29,554 18,263 509,330 110,680 610,131 23,729 1,616,931 2009 281,557 32,591 20,308 513,002 99,556 546,974 33,287 1,527,276

182

CRUDE OIL PRICE FLUCTUATIONS AND SAUDI ARABIAN BEHAVIOUR by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The responsibility for the contents of the working paper rests with the author, not the Institute. Since working papers are of a preliminary nature, it may be useful to contact the author of a particular working paper about results or caveats before referring to, or quoting, a paper. Any comments on working papers should be sent directly to the author. CRUDE OIL PRICE FLUCTUATIONS AND SAUDI ARABIAN BEHAVIOUR* This study seeks to explain why crude oil prices fluctuate, the main cause being the quota regime, which characterises the OPEC agreements. Given that the Saudi oil supply is inelastic in the short term, a shock in the oil market is accommodated by an immediate price change. In contrast, a dominant firm behaviour in the long term causes an output change, which is accompanied by a smaller price change. This explains why oil prices overshoot. The results of a general equilibrium model applied to Saudi Arabia support this analysis. They also indicate that Saudi Arabia does not have any incentive in altering the crude oil market equilibrium with either positive or negative supply shocks; and that its behaviour is asymmetric in the presence of world demand shocks, having an incentive (disincentive) in intervening if a negative (positive) demand shock hits the crude oil market. A second set of simulations is designed to understand what might be a correct OECD policy to lower prices. A tax cut would worsen the situation, whereas policies which can increase the price elasticity of demand seem to be very effective. * I have benefited from discussions with Christiane Kasten, Bodo Steiner and Manfred Wiebelt. All errors are my responsibility.

Roberto A. De Santis; Roberto A. De Santis

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Unit of Measure Equivalents 5. Unit of Measure Equivalents Unit Equivalent Kilowatt (kW) 1,000 (One Thousand) Watts Megawatt (MW) 1,000,000 (One Million) Watts Gigawatt (GW) 1,000,000,000 (One Billion) Watts Terawatt (TW) 1,000,000,000,000 (One Trillion) Watts Gigawatt 1,000,000 (One Million) Kilowatts Thousand Gigawatts 1,000,000,000 (One Billion) Kilowatts Kilowatthours (kWh) 1,000 (One Thousand) Watthours Megawatthours (MWh) 1,000,000 (One Million) Watthours Gigawatthours (GWh) 1,000,000,000 (One Billion) Watthours Terawatthours (TWh) 1,000,000,000,000 (One Trillion) Watthours Gigawatthours 1,000,000 (One Million) Kilowatthours Thousand Gigawatthours 1,000,000,000(One Billion Kilowatthours U.S. Dollar 1,000 (One Thousand) Mills U.S. Cent 10 (Ten) Mills Barrel of Oil 42 Gallons

184

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and F. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 161,803 5,766 132,065 21,953 2,020 2004 161,567 3,705 129,562 25,204 3,096 2005 164,635 4,724 131,080 24,914 3,918 2006 168,716 4,078 135,127 25,618 3,893 2007 162,482 4,557 133,509 21,393 3,022 2008 166,723 4,476 136,080 26,108 59 2009 165,755 3,989 132,877 27,868 1,021 2010 162,436 3,322 130,467 27,509 1,138 2011 152,007 3,433 121,648 25,664 1,262 2012 152,045 3,910 117,598 28,923 1,614 2010 January 13,015 244 10,405 2,260 107

185

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Emissions from Energy Consumption at 1. Emissions from Energy Consumption at Conventional Power Plants and Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants 2002 through 2012 (Thousand Metric Tons) Year Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) 2002 2,423,963 10,881 5,194 2003 2,445,094 10,646 4,532 2004 2,486,982 10,309 4,143 2005 2,543,838 10,340 3,961 2006 2,488,918 9,524 3,799 2007 2,547,032 9,042 3,650 2008 2,484,012 7,830 3,330 2009 2,269,508 5,970 2,395 2010 2,388,596 5,400 2,491 2011 2,287,071 4,845 2,406 2012 2,156,875 3,704 2,148 Notes: The emissions data presented include total emissions from both electricity generation and the production of useful thermal output. See Appendix A, Technical Notes, for a description of the sources and methodology used to develop the emissions estimates.

186

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and C. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 22,554 695 18,611 2,952 296 2004 22,330 444 17,959 3,439 488 2005 22,089 560 17,655 3,289 584 2006 22,469 500 18,068 3,356 545 2007 21,796 553 17,885 2,921 437 2008 22,134 509 18,294 3,323 8 2009 22,095 465 17,872 3,622 137 2010 21,725 402 17,621 3,549 152 2011 19,016 388 15,367 3,103 158 2012 18,954 418 14,757 3,577 203 2010 January 1,737 30 1,402 291 14 February 1,562 25 1,276 250 11 March 1,854 36 1,500 306 12

187

Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from Iraq  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Indonesia withdrew from OPEC in January 2009, Angola joined OPEC in January 2007, Ecuador withdrew from OPEC in January 1993 and rejoined in November ...

188

Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from Malaysia  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Indonesia withdrew from OPEC in January 2009, Angola joined OPEC in January 2007, Ecuador withdrew from OPEC in January 1993 and rejoined in November ...

189

Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from Morocco  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Indonesia withdrew from OPEC in January 2009, Angola joined OPEC in January 2007, Ecuador withdrew from OPEC in January 1993 and rejoined in November ...

190

Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from All Countries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Indonesia withdrew from OPEC in January 2009, Angola joined OPEC in January 2007, Ecuador withdrew from OPEC in January 1993 and rejoined in November ...

191

Fairness measures and importance weights for allocating quotas to OPEC member countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author examines the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) behavior by examining the strategic effects of of some of the decisions made by some of its core producers. The paper provides the theoretical background for fairness factors and degrees of fairness. A section is devoted to the estimation and validation of importance weights. Decisional efficiency measures are discussed and policy recommendations are given. 28 refs., 5 tabs.

Alsalem, A.S. [King Saud Univ. (Saudi Arabia); Sharma, S.C.; Troutt, M.D. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Oil price; oil demand shocks; oil supply shocks; dynamic effects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Using a newly developed measure of global real economic activity, a structural decomposition of the real price of crude oil in four components is proposed: oil supply shocks driven by political events in OPEC countries; other oil supply shocks; aggregate shocks to the demand for industrial commodities; and demand shocks that are specific to the crude oil market. The latter shock is designed to capture shifts in the price of oil driven by higher precautionary demand associated with fears about future oil supplies. The paper quantifies the magnitude and timing of these shocks, their dynamic effects on the real price of oil and their relative importance in determining the real price of oil during 1975-2005. The analysis sheds light on the origin of the observed fluctuations in oil prices, in particular during oil price shocks. For example, it helps gauge the relative importance of these shocks in the build-up of the real price of crude oil since the late 1990s. Distinguishing between the sources of higher oil prices is shown to be crucial in assessing the effect of higher oil prices on U.S. real GDP and CPI inflation, suggesting that policies aimed at dealing with higher oil prices must take careful account of the origins of higher oil prices. The paper also quantifies the extent to which the macroeconomic performance of the U.S. since the mid-1970s has been driven by the external economic shocks driving the real price of oil as opposed to domestic economic factors and policies. Key words: JEL:

Lutz Kilian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

First Factor Impacting Distillate Prices: Crude Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: World oil prices have tripled from their low point in December 1998 to August this year, pulling product prices up as well. But crude prices are expected to show a gradual decline as increased oil production from OPEC and others enters the world oil market. We won't likely see much decline this year, however, as prices are expected to end the year at about $30 per barrel. The average price of WTI was almost $30 per barrel in March, but dropped to $26 in April as the market responded to the additional OPEC production. However, prices strengthened again, averaging almost $32 in June, $30 in July, and $31 in August. The continued increases in crude oil prices indicate buyers are having trouble finding crude oil, bidding higher prices to obtain the barrels available.

194

The Differential Effects of Oil Demand and Supply Shocks on the Global Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.6 11.7 51 3.7 World 81.5 100.0 39.0 100.0 1365 100.0 Source: Oil reserve and production data is from the British Petroleum Statistical Review of World Energy and oil export data is from the OPEC Annual Statistical Bulletin. For country groupings see... .g. the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) member states). While the international business cycle is very important for the economic performance of commodity exporters, macroeconomic and political developments 1 in this group of countries also...

Cashin, Paul; Mohaddes, Kamiar; Raissi, Maziar; Raissi, Mehdi

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Oil prices in a new light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a clear picture of how oil prices develop, the author steps away from the price levels to which the world is accustomed, and evaluates scientifically. What makes prices jump from one notch to another The move results from a political or economic shock or the perception of a particular position by the futures market and the media. The shock could range from a war or an assassination to a promise of cooperation among OPEC members (when believed by the market) or to speculation about another failure at an OPEC meeting. In the oil market, only a couple of factual figures can provide a floor to the price of oil. The cost of production of oil in the Gulf is around $2 to $3/bbl, and the cost of production of oil (capital and operating costs) in key non-OPEC areas is well under $10/bbl. With some adjustments for transport and quality, a price range of $13/bbl to $16/bbl would correspond to a reasonable sustainable floor price. The reason for prices above the floor price has been a continuous fear of oil supply interruptions. That fear kept prices above the floor price for many years. The fear factor has now almost fully disappeared. The market has gone through the drama of the Iranian Revolution, the Iran-Iraq war, the tanker war, the invasion of Kuwait, and the expulsions of the Iraqis. And still the oil flowed -- all the time. It has become abundantly clear that fears above the oil market were unjustified. Everyone needs to export oil, and oil will flow under the worst circumstances. The demise of the fear factor means that oil prices tend toward the floor price for a prolonged period.

Fesharaki, F. (East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States))

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

U.S. Imports from OPEC Countries of Crude Oil and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1,954: 1,765: 1985: 1,405: 1,220: 1,505: 1,928: 1,976: 1,690: 1,825: 1,740: 1,802: 1,958: 2,440: 2,430: 1986: 2,298: 1,807: 2,145: 2,576: 2,749: ...

197

OPEC Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the U.S.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

198

Non-OPEC oil supply outages remain above year-ago level - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy.

199

Residual Fuel Oil, 0.31 to 1.00% Sulfur Imports from Non OPEC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

200

The bears come out for summer: A world awash in oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this issue, Energy Detente examines near term oil price and supply prospects. World oil prices have plunged over the last eight weeks to their lowest levels since 1991. This can be attributed to low world oil demand and bearish speculation on world oil markets that the on-again off-again oil export negotiations between Iraq and the United Nations may result in limited amounts of Iraqi crude being added to already swollen oil supplies. To recessionary economics in consuming countries, trends to raise taxes and reduce fuel price subsidies in many countries, and rising costs of environmental protection, producers also scrutinize a concerned Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). OPEC's reactive potentials are heightened in a period of such market uncertainities.

Not Available

1993-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "opec oil output" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Does Ownership Matter? The Performance and Efficiency of State Oil vs. Private Oil (1987-2006)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deflators; the annual average real-terms crude oil price and global refining margin (average of US Gulf Coast, North-West Europe and Singapore), sourced from the BP Statistical Review of World Energy; a dummy variable for countries with OPEC membership... the forms and degree of State Oil vs. Private Oil involvement. For the upstream, the most fundamental decision is between public or private ownership of the subsoil. As of today, the U.S. is the only country to have opted for private ownership – all...

Wolf, C

202

Have we run out of oil yet? Oil Peaking analysis from an optimist's perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 (2006) 515-531 Have we run out of oil yet? Oil peaking analysis from an optimist's perspective $ David L. Greene à , Janet L. Hopson, Jia Li Oak Ridge National Laboratory, National Transportation Research Center, University of Tennessee, 2360 Cherahala Boulevard, Knoxville, TN 37932, USA Available online 27 December 2005 Abstract This study addresses several questions concerning the peaking of conventional oil production from an optimist's perspective. Is the oil peak imminent? What is the range of uncertainty? What are the key determining factors? Will a transition to unconventional oil undermine or strengthen OPEC's influence over world oil markets? These issues are explored using a model combining alternative world energy scenarios with an accounting of resource depletion and a market-based simulation of transition to unconventional oil resources. No political or

203

World Oil Prices and Production Trends in AEO2008 (released in AEO2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

AEO2008 defines the world oil price as the price of light, low-sulfur crude oil delivered in Cushing, Oklahoma. Since 2003, both above ground and below ground factors have contributed to a sustained rise in nominal world oil prices, from $31 per barrel in 2003 to $69 per barrel in 2007. The AEO2008 reference case outlook for world oil prices is higher than in the AEO2007 reference case. The main reasons for the adoption of a higher reference case price outlook include continued significant expansion of world demand for liquids, particularly in non- OECD countries, which include China and India; the rising costs of conventional non-OPEC supply and unconventional liquids production; limited growth in non-OPEC supplies despite higher oil prices; and the inability or unwillingness of OPEC member countries to increase conventional crude oil production to levels that would be required for maintaining price stability. EIA will continue to monitor world oil price trends and may need to make further adjustments in future AEOs.

Information Center

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

204

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Spot WTI crude oil prices broke $35 and even $36 per barrel in November as anticipated boosts to world supply from OPEC and other sources did not show up in actual stocks data. The recent decline in prices seems to be more the result of an unraveling of speculative pressures than a change in underlying fundamentals. Prices had been running higher than supply/demand fundamentals would have indicated throughout the fall months as a result of rising Mideast tensions, concern over the adequacy of distillate supplies, and expectations of Iraqi supply interruptions. But Mideast tensions seemed to ease in December and the market appeared to perceive a quick return of Iraqi crude oil supplies at full capacity. Pledges by Saudi Arabia/OPEC to offset a longer term Iraqi

205

test output enable Veto  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to BIP/FSCC's RESET to (NIM) test output FSCC/COM (NIM) INPUT TRIGGER GLOBAL 0.08­19.5 usec adjustable

Berns, Hans-Gerd

206

An Empirical Growth Model for Major Oil Exporters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

119.7 124.7 1.9 23.3 5 Source: GDP data is from the IMF International Financial Statistics, oil export data is from OPEC Annual Statistical Bulletin, and oil reserve and production data is from the British Petroleum Statistical Review of World Energy... ) argue that it is the volatility of commodity prices rather than abundance per se, that drives the "resource curse" paradox. 3See, for example, Amuzegar (2008) and the British Petroleum Statistical Review of World Energy. 3 Figure 1: Oil Export Revenues...

Esfahani, Hadi Salehi; Mohaddes, Kamiar; Pesaran, M. Hashem

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

207

Diminishing importance of Middle East oil: its future implications. [Monograph  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term structural changes in the oil and energy markets and the reduced dependence of oil importers on Middle East production are the result of better energy-use efficiency, fuel substitution, and an increase in OPEC production. The decision by western countries to lower their demand and reduce stockpiles has had a significant impact on oil-exporting countries in terms of their spending, their economic development, and their aid programs. Political events and disruptions have also affected the Middle East's political, strategic, and economic future. (DCK)

Kanovsky, E.

1982-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

208

LETTER FROM THE CHAIR 2004-2005 AVERY BUSY YEAR!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1882­1973, from the bold Edisonian beginnings of electric systems to the OPEC's first oil price rise growth. However, the post-1973 response to OPEC's high prices shaped the late twentieth- century global Korea, Italy, and France) buy 70% of all shipments (6, 7). Post-1973 slowdown in oil output growth

Gruner, Daniel S.

209

Annual Report Department of Chemical & Biomolecular  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1882­1973, from the bold Edisonian beginnings of electric systems to the OPEC's first oil price rise growth. However, the post-1973 response to OPEC's high prices shaped the late twentieth- century global Korea, Italy, and France) buy 70% of all shipments (6, 7). Post-1973 slowdown in oil output growth

Velev, Orlin D.

210

Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: This graph shows monthly average spot West Texas Intermediate crude oil prices. Spot WTI crude oil prices peaked last fall as anticipated boosts to world supply from OPEC and other sources did not show up in actual stocks data. So where do we see crude oil prices going from here? Crude oil prices are expected to be about $28-$30 per barrel for the rest of this year, but note the uncertainty bands on this projection. They give an indication of how difficult it is to know what these prices are going to do. Also, EIA does not forecast volatility. This relatively flat forecast could be correct on average, with wide swings around the base line. Let's explore why we think prices will likely remain high, by looking at an important market barometer - inventories - which measures the

211

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: Spot WTI prices broke $35 and even $36 per barrel in November as anticipated boosts to world supply from OPEC and other sources did not show up in actual stocks data. The recent decline in prices seems to be more the result of an unraveling of speculative pressures than a change in underlying fundamentals. Prices had been running higher than supply/demand fundamentals would have indicated throughout the fall months as a result of rising Mideast tensions, concern over the adequacy of distillate supplies, and expectations of Iraqi supply interruptions. But Mideast tensions seemed to ease in December and the market appeared to perceive a quick return of Iraqi crude oil supplies at full capacity. Pledges by Saudi Arabia/OPEC to offset a longer term Iraqi

212

The social costs to the US of monopolization of the world oil market, 1972--1991  

SciTech Connect

The partial monopolization of the world oil market by the OPEC cartel has produced significant economic costs to the economies of the world. This paper reports estimates of the costs of monopolization of oil to the US over the period 1972--1991. Two fundamental assumptions of the analysis are, (1) that OPEC has acted as a monopoly, albeit with limited control, knowledge, and ability to act and, (2) that the US and other consuming nations could, through collective (social) action affect the cartel's ability to act as a monopoly. We measure total costs by comparing actual costs for the 1972--1991 period to a hypothetical more competitive'' world oil market scenario. By measuring past costs we avoid the enormous uncertainties about the future course of the world oil market and leave to the reader's judgment the issue of how much the future will be like the past. We note that total cost numbers cannot be used to determine the value of reducing US oil use by one barrel. They are useful for describing the overall size of the petroleum problem and are one important factor in deciding how much effort should be devoted to solving it. Monopoly pricing of oil transfers wealth from US oil consumers to foreign oil producers and, by increasing theeconomic scarcity of oil, reduces the economy's potential to produce. The actions of the OPEC cartel have also produced oil price shocks, both upward and downward, that generate additional costs because of the economy's inherent inability to adjust quickly to a large change in energy prices. Estimated total costs to the United States from these three sources for the 1972--1991 period are put at $4.1 trillion in 1990$($1.2 T wealth transfer, $0.8 T macroeconomic adjustment costs, $2.1 T potential GNP losses). The cost of the US's primary oil supply contingency program is small ($10 B) by comparison.

Greene, D.L.; Leiby, P.N.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

The social costs to the US of monopolization of the world oil market, 1972--1991  

SciTech Connect

The partial monopolization of the world oil market by the OPEC cartel has produced significant economic costs to the economies of the world. This paper reports estimates of the costs of monopolization of oil to the US over the period 1972--1991. Two fundamental assumptions of the analysis are, (1) that OPEC has acted as a monopoly, albeit with limited control, knowledge, and ability to act and, (2) that the US and other consuming nations could, through collective (social) action affect the cartel`s ability to act as a monopoly. We measure total costs by comparing actual costs for the 1972--1991 period to a hypothetical ``more competitive`` world oil market scenario. By measuring past costs we avoid the enormous uncertainties about the future course of the world oil market and leave to the reader`s judgment the issue of how much the future will be like the past. We note that total cost numbers cannot be used to determine the value of reducing US oil use by one barrel. They are useful for describing the overall size of the petroleum problem and are one important factor in deciding how much effort should be devoted to solving it. Monopoly pricing of oil transfers wealth from US oil consumers to foreign oil producers and, by increasing theeconomic scarcity of oil, reduces the economy`s potential to produce. The actions of the OPEC cartel have also produced oil price shocks, both upward and downward, that generate additional costs because of the economy`s inherent inability to adjust quickly to a large change in energy prices. Estimated total costs to the United States from these three sources for the 1972--1991 period are put at $4.1 trillion in 1990$($1.2 T wealth transfer, $0.8 T macroeconomic adjustment costs, $2.1 T potential GNP losses). The cost of the US`s primary oil supply contingency program is small ($10 B) by comparison.

Greene, D.L.; Leiby, P.N.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Input--output capital coefficients for energy technologies. [Input-output model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Input-output capital coefficients are presented for five electric and seven non-electric energy technologies. They describe the durable goods and structures purchases (at a 110 sector level of detail) that are necessary to expand productive capacity in each of twelve energy source sectors. Coefficients are defined in terms of 1967 dollar purchases per 10/sup 6/ Btu of output from new capacity, and original data sources include Battelle Memorial Institute, the Harvard Economic Research Project, The Mitre Corp., and Bechtel Corp. The twelve energy sectors are coal, crude oil and gas, shale oil, methane from coal, solvent refined coal, refined oil products, pipeline gas, coal combined-cycle electric, fossil electric, LWR electric, HTGR electric, and hydroelectric.

Tessmer, R.G. Jr.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Business cycles in oil economies  

SciTech Connect

This study examines the impact of oil price shocks on output fluctuations of several oil-exporting economies. In most studies of business cycles, the role of oil price is ignored; the few studies that use oil price as one of the variables in the system focus on modeling oil-importing economies. The vector autoregression (VAR) technique is used to consider the cases of Norway, Nigeria, and Mexico. Both atheoretical and structural' VARs are estimated to determine the importance of oil price impulses on output variations. The study reports two types of results: variance decomposition and impulse response functions, with particular emphasis on the issues of stationarity and co-integration among the series. The empirical results suggest that shocks to oil price are important in explaining output variations. In most cases, shocks to oil price are shown to explain more than 20% of the forecast variance of output over a 40-quarter horizon.

Al-Mutairi, N.H.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

World's 1993 oil flow slips; demand to move up in 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

World crude oil production in 1993 was down slightly from the year before. Production averaged 59.752 million b/d, off 287,000 b/d from 1992, largely because of production declines in the Commonwealth of Independent States (C.I.S.) and US. Those declines were offset in part by increases among members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries as well as in regions such as the North Sea and other non-OPEC areas. International Energy Agency (IEA) figures show world demand for petroleum products fell 100,000 b/d in 1993 to average 67 million b/d for the year. This included a stock build estimated at 400,000 b/d. IEA expects world demand to move up this year. However, it is still doubtful whether OPEC production will have to expand to meet the higher level of consumption. That will depend on decisions about additions to stocks. The paper discusses OPEC production, OPEC quota, world liquids supply, world demand, and outlook for 1994.

Beck, R.J.

1994-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

217

"Future of oil supplies"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil is so important that publishing reserve (even production) data has become a political act. Most of the dispute between the so-called pessimists (mainly retired geologists) and the optimists (mainly economists) is due to their using different sources of information and different definitions. The pessimists use technical (confidential) data, whereas the optimists use the political (published) data. OPEC quotas are based on the reserves, explaining why its members raised their reserves from 1986 to 1990, adding about 300 Gb of oil reserves when only about 10 Gb was actually discovered during this period. There is consensus on neither the reserve numbers, nor the definition of terms, such as oil, gas, conventional, unconventional, reserves. The latter term may variously refer to current proven values or backdated mean values. The US practice is completely different from that in the rest of the world, being conservative to satisfy bankers and the stockmarket. By contrast, the FSU practice was over-optimistic being based on the maximum theoretical recovery, free of technological or economic constraints. All published data have to be re-worked to be able to compare like with like. Unfortunately confidentiality and politics make it difficult to obtain valid data.

Jean Laherrère; Les Pres Haut

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

OPEC spare capacity in the first quarter of 2012 at lowest ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates that global spare crude oil production capacity averaged about 2.4 million barrels per day (bbl/d) during ...

219

The Social Costs to the U.S. of Monopolization of the World Oil Market, 1972-1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The partial monopolization of the world oil market by the OPEC cartel has produced significant economic costs to the economies of the world. This paper reports estimates of the costs of monopolization of oil to the U.S. over the period 1972-1991. Two fundamental assumptions of the analysis are, (1) that OPEC has acted as a monopoly, albeit with limited control, knowledge, and ability to act and, (2) that the U.S. and other consuming nations could, through collective (social) action affect the cartel's ability to act as a monopoly. We measure total costs by comparing actual costs for the 1972-1991 period to a hypothetical ''more competitive'' world oil market scenario. By measuring past costs we avoid the enormous uncertainties about the future course of the world oil market and leave to the reader's judgment the issue of how much the future will be like the past. We note that total cost numbers cannot be used to determine the value of reducing U.S. oil use by one barrel. They are useful for describing the overall size of the petroleum problem and are one important factor in deciding how much effort should be devoted to solving it. Monopoly pricing of oil transfers wealth from US. oil consumers to foreign oil producers and, by increasing the economic scarcity of oil, reduces the economy's potential to produce. The actions of the OPEC Cartel have also produced oil price shocks, both upward and downward, that generate additional costs because of the economy's inherent inability to adjust quickly to a large change in energy prices. Estimated total costs to the United States from these three sources for the 1972-1991 period are put at $4.1 trillion in 1990$ ($1.2 T wealth transfer, $0.8 T macroeconomic adjustment costs, $2.1 T potential GNP losses). The cost of the US's primary oil supply contingency program is small ($10 B) by comparison.

Greene, D.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Oil, turmoil, and Islam in the Middle East  

SciTech Connect

The turmoil and strife of the Middle East raises serious questions about the security of the world's oil supply. The author argues that OPEC and OAPEC can no longer afford to impose indiscriminate price increases on the marketplace because they hurt not only themselves but oil poor Third World nations as well. The author analyzes the importance of Middle Eastern oil in world politics. He emphasizes that any consideration of the forces influencing development in the Middle East should take Islamic tradition into account. Each chapter is organized around a current Middle Eastern problem: oil politics in relation to international energy needs; the ramifications of the new oil wealth and power of the Middle East; The Iran-Iraq War; Muslim insurgency in Afghanistan; The Arab-Israel conflict; turmoil in Lebanon; Palestinian nationalism; and the Middle East as a superpower.

Sheikh, A.R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "opec oil output" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Accounting for Oil Price Variation and Weakening Impact of the Oil Crisis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent empirical studies reveal that the oil price-output relationship is weakening in the US. After mid 1980s, observed oil price-output correlation is less negative, and output reduction in response to oil price rise is more moderate than before. To see the reason, we develop a DSGE model where oil price and US output are endogenously determined by the exogenous movements of US TFP and the oil supply. Maintaining model speci…cation the same for pre-mid-80’s and post-mid-80’s, the model replicates the actual paths of oil price and output well, and yields the weakening e¤ect of oil price. In contrast to the conventional wisdom that emphasis on the changes in the economic structures, we found that what brings the weakening in the oil price-output relationship are the two changes associated with the way the exogenous variables evolved over the periods. First, oil supply variation has become moderate in recent years. Second, oil supply shortage is no longer followed by a large decline in TFP. We show that less volatile oil supply variation results in less negative oil price-output correlations, and a smaller TFP decline during oil supply shortfall implies a smaller output decline during oil price increases.

Naohisa Hirakata; Nao Sudo Y; Anton Braun; Jordi Galí; Simon Gilchrist; Francois Gourio

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Sensitivity analysis of world oil prices. Analysis report AR/IA/79-47  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of the impact of the political disruption in Iran on the world oil market is presented. During the first quarter of 1979, this disruption caused a loss of approximately 5 million barrels per day (MMBD) of oil production available for export from Iran to the rest of the world. This loss of production and the political climate in Iran have caused much speculation concerning future Iranian oil production and total Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) oil production in the nearterm and midterm. The analysis describes these issues in terms of two critical factors: the world oil price and the level of OPEC oil production in the nearterm and midterm. A detailed comparison of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and Energy Information Agency (EIA) forecasting models of world oil prices is presented. This comparison consists of examining reasons for differences in the price forecasts of the CIA model by using CIA assumptions within the EIA model. The CIA and EIA model structures and major parameters are also compared. It is important to note that this analysis is not all encompassing. In particular, the analysis does not provide data on crude oil prices in the spot market, but does provide information on the average crude oil price; and does not permit rationing of oil, since the market is forced to clear only through changes in oil prices. Throughout this paper, world oil prices are defined in terms of real 1978 dollars per barrel of crude oil delivered to the East Coast of the United States net of any import fees.

Rodekohr, M.; Cato, D.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Have We Run Out of Oil Yet? Oil Peaking Analysis from an Optimist's Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study addresses several questions concerning the peaking of conventional oil production from an optimist's perspective. Is the oil peak imminent? What is the range of uncertainty? What are the key determining factors? Will a transition to unconventional oil undermine or strengthen OPEC's influence over world oil markets? These issues are explored using a model combining alternative world energy scenarios with an accounting of resource depletion and a market-based simulation of transition to unconventional oil resources. No political or environmental constraints are allowed to hinder oil production, geological constraints on the rates at which oil can be produced are not represented, and when USGS resource estimates are used, more than the mean estimate of ultimately recoverable resources is assumed to exist. The issue is framed not as a question of "running out" of conventional oil, but in terms of the timing and rate of transition from conventional to unconventional oil resources. Unconventional oil is chosen because production from Venezuela's heavy-oil fields and Canada's Athabascan oil sands is already underway on a significant scale and unconventional oil is most consistent with the existing infrastructure for producing, refining, distributing and consuming petroleum. However, natural gas or even coal might also prove to be economical sources of liquid hydrocarbon fuels. These results indicate a high probability that production of conventional oil from outside of the Middle East region will peak, or that the rate of increase of production will become highly constrained before 2025. If world consumption of hydrocarbon fuels is to continue growing, massive development of unconventional resources will be required. While there are grounds for pessimism and optimism, it is certainly not too soon for extensive, detailed analysis of transitions to alternative energy sources.

Greene, David L [ORNL; Hopson, Dr Janet L [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Li, Jia [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Oil and the American Way of Life: Don't Ask, Don't Tell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the coming decades, US consumers will face a series of important decisions about oil. To make effective decisions, consumers must confront some disturbing answers to questions they would rather not ask. These questions include: is the US running out of oil, is the world running out of oil, is OPEC increasing its grip on prices, is the US economy reducing its dependence on energy, and will the competitive market address these issues in a timely fashion? Answers to these questions indicate that the market will not address these issues: the US has already run out of inexpensive sources of oil such that rising prices no longer elicit significant increases in supply. The US experience implies that within a couple of decades, the world oil market will change from increasing supply at low prices to decreasing supply at higher prices. As the world approaches this important turning point, OPEC will strengthen its grip on world oil prices. Contrary to popular belief, the US economy continues to be highly dependent on energy, especially inexpensive sources of energy. Together, these trends threaten to undermine the basic way in which the US economy generates a high standard of living.

Kaufmann, Robert (Boston University)

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

8.5. Adding New Outputs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... have fixed values in the Output definition will not ... are a few example Output definitions, extracted from ... an example, illustrating the Energy output and ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

226

Coded output support vector machine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors propose a coded output support vector machine (COSVM) by introducing the idea of information coding to solve multi-class classification problems for large-scale datasets. The COSVM is built based on the support vector regression (SVR) machine ... Keywords: coded output, multi-class classification, number system, parallel implementation, support vector machine (SVM)

Tao Ye; Xuefeng Zhu

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Soviet Union oil sector outlook grows bleaker still  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the outlook for the U.S.S.R's oil sector which grows increasingly bleak and with it prospects for the Soviet economy. Plunging Soviet oil production and exports have analysts revising near term oil price outlooks, referring to the Soviet oil sector's self-destructing and Soviet oil production in a freefall. County NatWest, Washington, citing likely drops in Soviet oil production and exports (OGJ, Aug. 5, p. 16), has jumped its projected second half spot price for West Texas intermediate crude by about $2 to $22-23/bbl. Smith Barney, New York, forecasts WTI postings at $24-25/bbl this winter, largely because of seasonally strong world oil demand and the continued collapse in Soviet oil production. It estimates the call on oil from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries at more than 25 million b/d in first quarter 1992. That would be the highest level of demand for OPEC oil since 1980, Smith Barney noted.

Not Available

1991-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

228

STEO December 2012 - oil production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rise in 2012 U.S. oil production largest since 1859, output in 2013 seen Rise in 2012 U.S. oil production largest since 1859, output in 2013 seen topping 7 million bpd U.S. crude oil production is now expected to rise by about 760,000 barrels per day in 2012, the biggest annual increase in oil output since U.S. commercial crude oil production began in 1859. American oil producers are expected to pump a daily average of 6.4 million barrels of crude oil this year, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administrator's new monthly energy forecast. The annual increase in oil output tops the previous record set in 1951 and marks the largest yearly production increase ever. Most of the increase in crude oil production is driven by drilling activity in shale formations located in Texas, North Dakota and Montana. U.S. crude oil production next year is expected to top 7 million barrels per day for the first time

229

rifsimp_output.html - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Whenever DiffConstraint or UnSolve entries are present in the output, some parts of the algorithm have been disabled by options, and the resulting cases must ...

230

WTI Crude Oil Prices Are Expected To Remain Relatively High Through At  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: As we just saw, one of the primary factors impacting gasoline price is the crude oil price. This graph shows monthly average spot West Texas Intermediate crude oil prices. Spot WTI crude oil prices broke $36 per barrel in November briefly as anticipated boosts to world supply from OPEC and other sources did not show up in actual stocks data. Crude oil prices are expected to be about $30 per barrel for the rest of this year, but note the uncertainty bands on this projection. They give an indication of how difficult it is to know what these prices are going to do. Also, EIA does not forecast volatility. This relatively flat forecast could be correct on average, with wide swings around the base line. With the EIA forecast for crude prices staying high this year,

231

International Energy Outlook 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Liquid fuels Unconventional Total Reference High Oil Price Low Oil Price Non-OPEC conventional OPEC conventional (million barrels per day) U.S. Energy Information ...

232

Mexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and Energy Options for the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A ccelerates Mexico’s crude oil production, which reached a43 percent of Mexico’s crude oil production, compared to 63potential. Estimates of crude oil output and exports in

Shields, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

STEO September 2012 - oil production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

oil production forecast to rise almost 700,000 bpd this oil production forecast to rise almost 700,000 bpd this year, help cut U.S. petroleum imports U.S. crude oil production is expected to average 6.3 million barrels per day in 2012. That's up nearly 700,000 barrels per day from last year and the highest annual oil output since 1997 says the U.S. Energy Information Administration in its new monthly short-term energy outlook for September. EIA analyst Sam Gorgen explains: "Higher oil supplies, especially from North Dakota and Texas, boosted U.S. oil production. The number of on-shore drilling rigs targeting oil nationwide has increased by around 200 so far this year to just under 1,400 rigs." Higher domestic oil production will help cut U.S. petroleum imports. The share of total U.S.

234

Oil from rock  

SciTech Connect

The article discusses first the Green River Formation oil shale projects in the western United States from which conservative estimates have suggested an output of 400,000 to 600,000 bbl/day of crude shale oil by 1990. The western reserves recoverable with present technology are said to exceed 600 billion (10/sup 9/) bbl. Three major considerations could limit the large-scale development of shale oil: availability of water, environmental factors, and socio-economic considerations. Water is used to obtain and process the crude shale oil, and additional water is needed to cool the spent shale and to establish new vegetation on top of it. Nitrogenous compounds and arsenic in crude shale oil are among potential pollutants. Spent shale contains salts that are potentially leachable, as well as organic pyrolytic products. Retorting oil shales may release more CO/sub 2/ through decomposition of carbonate minerals that will subsequently be generated by burning the oil produced. Topographic effects of oil shale mining may raise socio-economic problems. Next the article discusses the conversion of coal to liquid by pyrolysis or hydrogenation, including the Gulf solvent refined coal (SRC) and the Exxon (EDS) liquefaction processes. Also described in the South African SASOL process for producing synthetic fuel from coal. A parallel account is included on the estimated complete cycle of United States and of worldwide crude oil production, forecasting depletion within less than a century. 11 refs.

Walters, S.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Kerosene Imports from OPEC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

236

AEO Early Release 2013 - oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Growing U.S. oil output and rising vehicle fuel economy to cut Growing U.S. oil output and rising vehicle fuel economy to cut U.S. reliance on foreign oil The United States is expected to continue cutting its dependence on petroleum and liquid fuels imports over the rest of this decade because of growing domestic crude oil production and more fuel-efficient vehicles on America's highways. The new long-term outlook from the U.S. Energy Information Administration shows America's dependence on imported petroleum and liquid fuels will decline from 45 percent of domestic demand last year to 34 percent by 2019. U.S. dependence on imported oil had reached 60 percent as recently as 2005. EIA Administrator Adam Sieminski explains: "The United States will be able to meet more of its own energy needs because of two key

237

Crude Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barrels) Product: Crude Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases Distillate Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Oil Still Gas Petroleum Coke Marketable Petroleum Coke Catalyst Petroleum Coke Other...

238

OIL PRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OIL PRODUCTION Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) is a term applied to methods used for recovering oil from a petroleum reservoir beyond that recoverable by primary and secondary methods....

239

Oil Independence: Achievable National Goal or Empty Slogan?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil independence has been a goal of U.S. energy policy for the past 30 years yet has never been rigorously defined. A rigorous, measurable definition is proposed: to reduce the costs of oil dependence to less than 1% of GDP in the next 20 to 25 years, with 95% probability. A simulation model incorporating the possibility of future oil supply disruptions and other sources of uncertainty is used to test whether two alternative energy policy strategies, Business as Usual and an interpretation of the strategy proposed by the National Commission on Energy Policy (NCEP), can achieve oil independence for the United States. Business as Usual does not produce oil independence. The augmented NCEP strategy comes close to achieving oil independence for the U.S. economy within the next 20-25 years but more is needed. The success of the strategy appears to be robust regardless of how the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) responds to it. Expected annual savings are estimated to exceed $250 billion per year by 2030.

Greene, David L [ORNL; Leiby, Paul Newsome [ORNL; Patterson, Philip D [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Planning, Budget and Analysis; Plotkin, Steven E [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Singh, Margaret K [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

EIA - AEO2010 - World oil prices and production trends in AEO2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World oil prices and production trends in AEO2010 World oil prices and production trends in AEO2010 Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 World oil prices and production trends in AEO2010 In AEO2010, the price of light, low-sulfur (or “sweet”) crude oil delivered at Cushing, Oklahoma, is tracked to represent movements in world oil prices. EIA makes projections of future supply and demand for “total liquids,” which includes conventional petroleum liquids—such as conventional crude oil, natural gas plant liquids, and refinery gain—in addition to unconventional liquids, which include biofuels, bitumen, coal-to-liquids (CTL), gas-to-liquids (GTL), extra-heavy oils, and shale oil. World oil prices can be influenced by a multitude of factors. Some tend to be short term, such as movements in exchange rates, financial markets, and weather, and some are longer term, such as expectations concerning future demand and production decisions by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). In 2009, the interaction of market factors led prompt month contracts (contracts for the nearest traded month) for crude oil to rise relatively steadily from a January average of $41.68 per barrel to a December average of $74.47 per barrel [38].

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "opec oil output" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Overload protection circuit for output driver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A protection circuit for preventing excessive power dissipation in an output transistor whose conduction path is connected between a power terminal and an output terminal. The protection circuit includes means for sensing the application of a turn on signal to the output transistor and the voltage at the output terminal. When the turn on signal is maintained for a period of time greater than a given period without the voltage at the output terminal reaching a predetermined value, the protection circuit decreases the turn on signal to, and the current conduction through, the output transistor.

Stewart, Roger G. (Neshanic Station, NJ)

1982-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

242

Optimal Filtering of AC Output Anemometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The output of pulsed and AC output anemometers suffer from discretization noise when such anemometers are sampled at fast rates (>1 Hz). This paper describes the construction of an optimal filter designed to reduce this noise. By comparing the ...

J. C. Barnard; L. L. Wendell; V. R. Morris

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

STEO January 2013 - oil production increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

oil production to increase in 2013 and 2014 oil production to increase in 2013 and 2014 U.S. crude oil production is expected to keep rising over the next two years. America's oil output will jump nearly 900,000 barrels per day in 2013 to an average 7.3 million barrels a day, according to the latest monthly forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This would mark the biggest one-year increase in output since U.S. commercial crude oil production began in 1859. U.S. daily oil production is expected to rise by another 600,000 barrels in 2014 to nearly 8 million barrels a day, the highest level since 1988. Most of America's oil production growth over the next two years will come from more drilling activity in tight shale rock formations located in North Dakota and Texas

244

Muslim oil and gas periphery; the future of hydrocarbons in Africa, southeast Asia and the Caspian. Master`s thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This thesis is a study of the contemporary political, economic, and technical developments and future prospects of the Muslim hydrocarbon exporters of Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Caspian. The established Muslim oil and gas periphery of Africa and Southeast Asia has four members in the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and is systemically increasing its production of natural gas. I analyze US government and corporate policies regarding the countries and the major dilemmas of the Muslim hydrocarbon periphery. The first chapter provides a selective overview of global energy source statistics; the policies, disposition and composition of the major hydrocarbon production and consumption players and communities; a selective background of OPEC and its impact on the globe; and a general portrait of how the Muslim periphery piece fits into the overall Muslim oil and gas puzzle. Chapter two analyzes the established Muslim oil and gas periphery of Africa and Southeast Asia asking the following questions: What are the major political, economic, and technical trends and dilemmas affecting these producer nations. And what are the United States` policies and relationships with these producers. Chapter three asks the same questions as chapter two, but with regard to the newly independent states of the Caspian Sea. I probe the regional petroleum exploration and transportation dilemmas in some detail.

Crockett, B.D.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

OIL PRICES AND THE WORLD ECONOMY 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Oil prices, associated with bouts of inflation and economic instability over the last 30 years, have been rising in recent months. We argue that the inflationary consequences of a rise in oil prices depend upon the policy response of the monetary authorities. They can ameliorate the short term impacts on output, but only at the cost of higher inflation. In the short term the size and distribution of output effects from an increase in oil prices depends on the intensity of oil use in production and on the speed at which oil producers spend their revenue. In the medium term higher oil prices change the terms of trade between the OECD and the rest of the world and hence reduce the equilibrium level of output in the OECD. In this paper we first discuss oil market developments and survey previous studies on the impacts of increases in oil prices. We then use our model, NiGEM, to evaluate the impact of temporary and permanent oil price increases on the world economy under various policy responses, and also analyse the impact of a decline in the speed of oil revenue recycling. 1 This paper has benefited from inputs from a number of colleagues at the Institute, and we would like to thank

Ray Barrell; Olga Pomerantz

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Highlights.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook -- February 2002) 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2002 Overview World Oil Markets. OPEC's stated intention to reduce crude oil output beginning in January has been mostly successful. OPEC-10 crude oil output (OPEC less Iraq) fell by an estimated 1.1 million barrels per day in January, or about 70 percent of the officially announced quota reductions. Compliance rates at these levels tend to validate our expectations for steadily increasing average crude oil prices in 2002 (Figure 1). Weather Update. Very mild winter weather conditions continue to dampen heating season energy demand patterns. Heating degree-days in January 2002 were about 14-17 percent below normal (depending on the region)

247

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Quarterly OPEC spare crude oil capacity and WTI spot prices ,,, Year,Quarter,OPEC spare capacity (million barrels per day),WTI price (real 2010 dollars) ...

248

Oil Exports and the Iranian Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper develops a long run growth model for a major oil exporting economy and derives conditions under which oil revenues are likely to have a lasting impact. This approach contrasts with the standard literature on the "Dutch disease" and the "resource curse", which primarily focus on short run implications of a temporary resource discovery. Under certain regularity conditions and assuming a Cobb Douglas production function, it is shown that (log) oil exports enter the long run output equation with a coefficient equal to the share of capital. The long run theory is tested using a new quarterly data set on the Iranain economy over the period 1979Q1-2006Q4. Building an error correction specification in real output, real money balances, inflation, real exchange rate, oil exports, and foreign real output, the paper finds clear evidence for two long run relations: an output equation as predicted by the theory and a standard real money demand equation with inflation acting as a proxy for the (missing) market interest rate. Real output in the long run is shaped by oil exports through their impact on capital accumulation, and the foreign output as the main channel of technological transfer. The results also show a significant negative long run association between in‡ation and real GDP, which is suggestive of economic inefficiencies. Once the effects of oil exports are taken into account, the estimates support output growth convergence between Iran and the rest of the world. We also find that the Iranian economy adjusts quite quickly to the shocks in foreign output and oil exports, which could be partly due to the relatively underdeveloped nature of Iran’s financial markets.

Hadi Salehi Esfahani; Kamiar Mohaddes; M. Hashem Pesaran

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Energy Input Output Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Input Output Calculator Input Output Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Input-Output Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www2.eere.energy.gov/analysis/iocalc/Default.aspx Web Application Link: www2.eere.energy.gov/analysis/iocalc/Default.aspx OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools Language: English References: EERE Energy Input-Output Calculator[1] The Energy Input-Output Calculator (IO Calculator) allows users to estimate the economic development impacts from investments in alternate electricity generating technologies. About the Calculator The Energy Input-Output Calculator (IO Calculator) allows users to estimate

250

Short-Term Energy Outlook- May 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook May 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. The April 24 meeting of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) raised official quotas for members (excluding Iraq) by 0.9 million barrels per day from the previous (suspended) quota to 25.4 million barrels per day. OPEC members also sought tighter compliance with quotas, calling for production cuts of 2 million barrels per day from April levels. We expect these measures to result in an average total OPEC (including Iraq) crude oil production rate of about 26.7 million barrels per day in the second and third quarters. This production level is not significantly different from our base case assumptions in last month's report. Individual OPEC country shares of these output levels will depend upon the speed with which

251

Oil Exports and the Iranian Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an error-correcting macroeconometric model for the Iranian economy estimated using a new quarterly data set over the period 1979Q1-2006Q4. It builds on a recent paper by the authors, Esfahani et al. (2012), which develops a theoretical long-run growth model for major oil exporting economies. The core variables included in this paper are real output, real money balances, in‡ation, exchange rate, oil exports, and foreign real output, although the role of investment and consumption are also analyzed in a sub-model. The paper …nds clear evidence for the existence of two long-run relations: an output equation as predicted by the theory and a standard real money demand equation with in‡ation acting as a proxy for the (missing) market interest rate. The results show that real output in the long run is in‡uenced by oil exports and foreign output. However, it is also found that in‡ation has a signi…cant negative long-run e¤ect on real GDP, which is suggestive of economic ine ¢ ciencies and is matched by a negative association between in‡ation and the investment-output ratio. Finally, the results of impulse responses show that the Iranian economy adjusts quite quickly to the shocks in foreign output and oil exports, which could be partly due to the relatively underdeveloped nature of Iran’s …nancial markets.

Hadi Salehi Esfahani A; Kamiar Mohaddes; M. Hashem Pesaran Bc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Light output simulation of LYSO single crystal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We used the Geant4 simulation toolkit to estimate the light collection in a LYSO crystal by using cosmic muons and E=105 MeV electrons. The light output as a function of the crystal length is studied. Significant influence of the crystal wrapping in the reflective paper and optical grease coupling to the photodetectors on the light output is demonstrated.

Usubov, Zafar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Energy & Financial Markets - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

OPEC OPEC Crude oil production by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) is an important factor that affects oil prices. This organization seeks to actively manage oil production in its member countries by setting production targets. Historically, crude oil prices have seen increases in times when OPEC production targets are reduced. OPEC production often acts to balance the oil market. Cuts in OPEC production targets tend to lead to price increases. This chart shows changes in OPEC production targets compared to changes in oil prices. Reductions in OPEC production targets often lead to increases in oil prices. OPEC member countries produce about 40 percent of the world's crude oil. Equally important to global prices, OPEC's oil exports represent about 60

254

U.S. crude oil production in July was the highest in more than...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

crude oil production in July was the highest in more than two decades U.S. crude oil production in July reached 7.5 million barrels per day.....the highest output for any month...

255

U.S. crude oil production expected to top 8 million barrels per...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. crude oil production expected to top 8 million barrels per day, highest output since 1988 U.S. crude oil production in 2014 is now expected to top 8 million barrels per day...

256

U.S. monthly oil production tops 8 million barrels per day for...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

barrels per day for the first time in 25 years, according to the new monthly energy forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Rising oil output from tight oil...

257

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pledges by Saudi Arabia/OPEC to offset a longer term Iraqi disruption added to a market sense of oversupply. Relatively mild weather in Europe allowed distillate ...

258

WTI Crude Oil Price: Potential for Volatility Around Base Case  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pledges by Saudi Arabia/OPEC to offset a longer term Iraqi disruption added to a market sense of oversupply. Relatively mild weather in Europe allowed distillate ...

259

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #193: December 3, 2001 Oil...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Persian Gulf, and the United States Notes: Current OPEC members include Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates,...

260

Outlook for enhanced oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews the potential for enhanced oil recovery, the evolutionary nature of the recovery processes being applied in oilfields today, key parameters that describe the technology state-of-the-art for each of the major oil recovery processes, and the nature and key outputs from the current Department of Energy research program on enhanced oil recovery. From this overview, it will be seen that the DOE program is focused on the analysis of ongoing tests and on long-range, basic research to support a more thorough understanding of process performance. Data from the program will be made available through reports, symposia, and on-line computer access; the outputs are designed to allow an independent producer to evaluate his own project as an effort to transfer rapidly the technology now being developed.

Johnson, H.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "opec oil output" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Oil and Oil Derivatives Compliance Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for international connection of oiled residues discharge ... C to + 163°C, fuels, lubricating oils and hydraulic ... fuel of gas turbine, crude oil, lubricating oil ...

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

262

Microsoft Word - appa.docx  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

energy crops, natural gas, coal, extra-heavy oil, bitumen (oil sands), and kerogen (oil shale, not to be confused with shale oiltight oil). Includes both OPEC and non-OPEC...

263

Characterizing output bottlenecks in a supercomputer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supercomputer I/O loads are often dominated by writes. HPC (High Performance Computing) file systems are designed to absorb these bursty outputs at high bandwidth through massive parallelism. However, the delivered write bandwidth often falls well below ...

Bing Xie; Jeffrey Chase; David Dillow; Oleg Drokin; Scott Klasky; Sarp Oral; Norbert Podhorszki

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Dynamical Properties of Model Output Statistics Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamical properties of forecasts corrected using model output statistics (MOS) schemes are explored, with emphasis on the respective role of model and initial condition uncertainties. Analytical and numerical investigations of low-order ...

S. Vannitsem; C. Nicolis

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Ensemble Model Output Statistics for Wind Vectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bivariate ensemble model output statistics (EMOS) technique for the postprocessing of ensemble forecasts of two-dimensional wind vectors is proposed, where the postprocessed probabilistic forecast takes the form of a bivariate normal probability ...

Nina Schuhen; Thordis L. Thorarinsdottir; Tilmann Gneiting

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Oil Markets World Oil Markets In the IEO2003 forecast, periodic production adjustments by OPEC members are not expected to have a significant long-term impact on world oil markets. Prices are projected to rise gradually through 2025 as the oil resource base is further developed. Throughout most of 2002, crude oil prices were solidly within the range preferred by producers in the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), $22 to $28 per barrel for the OPEC “basket price” (see Figure 14). OPEC producers have been demonstrating disciplined adherence to announced cutbacks in production. Early in 2003, a dramatic upward turn in crude oil prices was brought about by a combination of two factors. First, a general strike against the Chavez regime resulted in a sudden drop in Venezuela’s oil exports. Although other OPEC producers agreed to increase production to make up for the lost Venezuelan output, the obvious strain on worldwide spare capacity kept prices high. Second, price volatility was exacerbated by fears of war in Iraq.

267

Short Term Energy Outlook, December 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2002 December 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook December 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: Average crude oil prices fell by about $2.50 per barrel between October and November in response to continued high production levels from OPEC 10 countries (Figure 1). However, by the end of November oil prices had risen to end-October levels as concerns over the situations in Iraq and Venezuela pushed prices up. Oil inventories, which are currently in the lower portion of the previous 5-year range, are poised to rise to more comfortable levels soon if OPEC output continues at or above current levels. OPEC is considering cutbacks from current levels. Heating Fuels Update. As in October, weather was m uch colder than normal in November, boosting

268

Energy & Financial Markets - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Non-OPEC Non-OPEC Oil production from countries outside the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) currently represents about 60 percent of world oil production. Key centers of non-OPEC production include North America, regions of the former Soviet Union, and the North Sea. EIA expects strong growth in non-OPEC production in 2014 and 2015. This chart shows that net increases in non-OPEC production were very small from 2005 to 2008. This lack of additional supplies from non-OPEC countries contributed to tighter markets in this period. In contrast to OPEC oil production, which is subject to central coordination, non-OPEC producers make independent decisions about oil production. Also, in contrast to OPEC, where oil production is mostly in the hands of national oil companies (NOCs), international or investor-owned

269

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

appear to be a good choice as a replacement for traditional fossil fuelscoal, oil, and natural gas. But the energy output-to-input ratio analysis for the crop-to-fuel...

270

Boosting America's Hydropower Output | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Boosting America's Hydropower Output Boosting America's Hydropower Output Boosting America's Hydropower Output October 9, 2012 - 2:10pm Addthis The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. City of Boulder employees celebrate the completion of the Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Modernization project. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. City of Boulder employees celebrate the completion of the Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Modernization project. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado.

271

PV output smoothing with energy storage.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an algorithm, implemented in Matlab/Simulink, designed to reduce the variability of photovoltaic (PV) power output by using a battery. The purpose of the battery is to add power to the PV output (or subtract) to smooth out the high frequency components of the PV power that that occur during periods with transient cloud shadows on the PV array. The control system is challenged with the task of reducing short-term PV output variability while avoiding overworking the battery both in terms of capacity and ramp capability. The algorithm proposed by Sandia is purposely very simple to facilitate implementation in a real-time controller. The control structure has two additional inputs to which the battery can respond. For example, the battery could respond to PV variability, load variability or area control error (ACE) or a combination of the three.

Ellis, Abraham; Schoenwald, David Alan

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Oil Prices and U.S. Aggregate Economic Activity: A Question of Neutrality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research suggests rising oil prices reduced output and increased inflation in the 1970s and early 1980s and falling oil prices boosted output and lowered inflation in the mid- to late 1980s. Stephen P. A. Brown is a senior economist and assistant vice president and Mine K. Yücel is a senior economist and research officer in the

Stephen P. A. Brown; Mine K. Yücel

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Oil reserves  

SciTech Connect

As of March 1988, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve inventory totaled 544.9 million barrels of oil. During the past 6 months the Department of Energy added 11.0 million barrels of crude oil to the SPR. During this period, DOE distributed $208 million from the SPR Petroleum Account. All of the oil was purchased from PEMEX--the Mexican national oil company. In FY 1988, $164 million was appropriated for facilities development and management and $439 million for oil purchases. For FY 1989, DOE proposes to obligate $173 million for facilities development and management and $236 million for oil purchases. DOE plans to postpone all further drawdown exercises involving crude oil movements until their effects on cavern integrity are evaluated. DOE and the Military Sealift Command have made progress in resolving the questions surrounding nearly $500,000 in payments for demurrage charges.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Multiple output timing and trigger generator  

SciTech Connect

In support of the development of a multiple stage pulse modulator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have developed a first generation, multiple output timing and trigger generator. Exploiting Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) Micro Controller Units (MCU's), the timing and trigger generator provides 32 independent outputs with a timing resolution of about 500 ns. The timing and trigger generator system is comprised of two MCU boards and a single PC. One of the MCU boards performs the functions of the timing and signal generation (the timing controller) while the second MCU board accepts commands from the PC and provides the timing instructions to the timing controller. The PC provides the user interface for adjusting the on and off timing for each of the output signals. This system provides 32 output or timing signals which can be pre-programmed to be in an on or off state for each of 64 time steps. The width or duration of each of the 64 time steps is programmable from 2 {micro}s to 2.5 ms with a minimum time resolution of 500 ns. The repetition rate of the programmed pulse train is only limited by the time duration of the programmed event. This paper describes the design and function of the timing and trigger generator system and software including test results and measurements.

Wheat, Robert M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dale, Gregory E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Gas and Oil (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Oil (Maryland) and Oil (Maryland) Gas and Oil (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Maryland Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of the Environment The Department of the Environment has the authority to enact regulations pertaining to oil and gas production, but it cannot prorate or limit the output of any gas or oil well. A permit from the Department is required prior to the drilling of a well for exploration, production, or underground storage of oil or gas. An environmental assessment must be submitted along with the permit application, and the Department may deny permits that propose drilling which may pose a substantial threat to public safety or

276

System dynamics model of construction output in Kenya.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study investigates fluctuations of construction output, and growth of the output in Kenya. Fluctuation and growth of construction activity are matters of concern in… (more)

Mbiti, T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil)...

278

Supply, disposition, and stocks of all oils by P. A. D. districts and imports into the United States, by country, final 1978  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Final annual US supply, disposition, and stocks are detailed for: all oils, petroleum products, crude oil, selected natural gas plant liquids, and net unfinished oils for each of five P.A.D. (Petroleum Administration for Defense) Districts for 1978. Petroleum products include motor gasoline, aviation gasoline, jet engine fuels, ethane, liquefied gases, kerosene, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, petrochemical feedstocks, naphthas, lubricants, wax, coke, asphalt, and other products. Also given is the percentage of refinery yields based on crude and net unfinished oil rerun. Imports of petroleum products and of crude oil into the United States are shown by country and continent, with US totals and subtotals for each P.A.D. District. OPEC (Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries) members are indicated. Data are reported in barrels per day. An accompanying map indicates the US P.A.D. Districts. A brief narrative discusses salient statistics. Prior to the 1978 annual issue, this report was entitled Supply Demand, and Stocks of All Oils by P.A.D. Districts and Imports into the United States, by Country. 1 figure, 6 tables.

Not Available

1980-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

279

Characterizing output bottlenecks in a supercomputer  

SciTech Connect

Supercomputer I/O loads are often dominated by writes. HPC (High Performance Computing) file systems are designed to absorb these bursty outputs at high bandwidth through massive parallelism. However, the delivered write bandwidth often falls well below the peak. This paper characterizes the data absorption behavior of a center-wide shared Lustre parallel file system on the Jaguar supercomputer. We use a statistical methodology to address the challenges of accurately measuring a shared machine under production load and to obtain the distribution of bandwidth across samples of compute nodes, storage targets, and time intervals. We observe and quantify limitations from competing traffic, contention on storage servers and I/O routers, concurrency limitations in the client compute node operating systems, and the impact of variance (stragglers) on coupled output such as striping. We then examine the implications of our results for application performance and the design of I/O middleware systems on shared supercomputers.

Xie, Bing [Duke University; Chase, Jeffrey [Duke University; Dillow, David A [ORNL; Drokin, Oleg [Intel Corporation; Klasky, Scott A [ORNL; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Podhorszki, Norbert [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

UFO - The Universal FeynRules Output  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new model format for automatized matrix-element generators, the so- called Universal FeynRules Output (UFO). The format is universal in the sense that it features compatibility with more than one single generator and is designed to be flexible, modular and agnostic of any assumption such as the number of particles or the color and Lorentz structures appearing in the interaction vertices. Unlike other model formats where text files need to be parsed, the information on the model is encoded into a Python module that can easily be linked to other computer codes. We then describe an interface for the Mathematica package FeynRules that allows for an automatic output of models in the UFO format.

Degrande, Céline; Fuks, Benjamin; Grellscheid, David; Mattelaer, Olivier; Reiter, Thomas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "opec oil output" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

UFO - The Universal FeynRules Output  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new model format for automatized matrix-element generators, the so- called Universal FeynRules Output (UFO). The format is universal in the sense that it features compatibility with more than one single generator and is designed to be flexible, modular and agnostic of any assumption such as the number of particles or the color and Lorentz structures appearing in the interaction vertices. Unlike other model formats where text files need to be parsed, the information on the model is encoded into a Python module that can easily be linked to other computer codes. We then describe an interface for the Mathematica package FeynRules that allows for an automatic output of models in the UFO format.

Céline Degrande; Claude Duhr; Benjamin Fuks; David Grellscheid; Olivier Mattelaer; Thomas Reiter

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

282

Monitoring of Photovoltaic Plant Output and Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems, including variability characteristics, is of increasing interest to utilities as they integrate more solar energy onto the electric grid. This study is part of a multi-year research series to investigate influencing factors that affect PV plant output, variability, and approaches to system management. It explores PV variability both from a grid perspective and through examination of project design aspects that can affect annual power production. ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

283

Single Inductor Dual Output Buck Converter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The portable electronics market is rapidly migrating towards more compact devices with multiple functionalities. Form factor, performance, cost and efficiency of these devices constitute the factors of merit of devices like cell phones, MP3 players and PDA's. With advancement in technology and more intelligent processors being used, there is a need for multiple high integrity voltage supplies for empowering the systems in portable electronic devices. Switched mode power supplies (SMPS's) are used to regulate the battery voltage. In an SMPS, maximum area is taken by the passive components such as the inductor and the capacitor. This work demonstrates a single inductor used in a buck converter with two output voltages from an input battery with voltage of value 3V. The main focus areas are low cross regulation between the outputs and supply of completely independent load current levels while maintaining desired values (1.2V,1.5V) within well controlled ripple levels. Dynamic hysteresis control is used for the single inductor dual output buck converter in this work. Results of schematic and post layout simulations performed in CADENCE prove the merits of this control method, such as nil cross regulation and excellent transient response.

Eachempatti, Haritha

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Characterizing detonator output using dynamic witness plates  

SciTech Connect

A sub-microsecond, time-resolved micro-particle-image velocimetry (PIV) system is developed to investigate the output of explosive detonators. Detonator output is directed into a transparent solid that serves as a dynamic witness plate and instantaneous shock and material velocities are measured in a two-dimensional plane cutting through the shock wave as it propagates through the solid. For the case of unloaded initiators (e.g. exploding bridge wires, exploding foil initiators, etc.) the witness plate serves as a surrogate for the explosive material that would normally be detonated. The velocity-field measurements quantify the velocity of the shocked material and visualize the geometry of the shocked region. Furthermore, the time-evolution of the velocity-field can be measured at intervals as small as 10 ns using the PIV system. Current experimental results of unloaded exploding bridge wire output in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) witness plates demonstrate 20 MHz velocity-field sampling just 300 ns after initiation of the wire.

Murphy, Michael John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Adrian, Ronald J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Pentanes Plus Imports from OPEC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

286

MTBE (Oxygenate) Imports from OPEC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

287

Comparison of CAISO-run Plexos output with LLNL-run Plexos output  

SciTech Connect

In this report we compare the output of the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) 33% RPS Plexos model when run on various computing systems. Specifically, we compare the output resulting from running the model on CAISO's computers (Windows) and LLNL's computers (both Windows and Linux). We conclude that the differences between the three results are negligible in the context of the entire system and likely attributed to minor differences in Plexos version numbers as well as the MIP solver used in each case.

Schmidt, A; Meyers, C; Smith, S

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

288

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, ... Middle East OPEC Total U.S. Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Supply Field Production U.S. Crude Oil ...

289

Modeling the Oil Transition: A Summary of the Proceedings of the DOE/EPA Workshop on the Economic and Environmental Implications of Global Energy Transitions  

SciTech Connect

The global energy system faces sweeping changes in the next few decades, with potentially critical implications for the global economy and the global environment. It is important that global institutions have the tools necessary to predict, analyze and plan for such massive change. This report summarizes the proceedings of an international workshop concerning methods of forecasting, analyzing, and planning for global energy transitions and their economic and environmental consequences. A specific case, it focused on the transition from conventional to unconventional oil and other energy sources likely to result from a peak in non-OPEC and/or global production of conventional oil. Leading energy models from around the world in government, academia and the private sector met, reviewed the state-of-the-art of global energy modeling and evaluated its ability to analyze and predict large-scale energy transitions.

Greene, David L [ORNL

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Middle East: Output expansions boost drilling  

SciTech Connect

Iraqi exports may return to the market in limited fashion, but none of the region`s producers seems particularly concerned. They believe that global oil demand is rising fast enough to justify their additions to productive capacity. The paper discusses exploration, drilling and development, and production in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the Neutral Zone, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Oman, Iran, Iraq, Yemen, Qatar, Syria, Turkey, and Sharjah. The paper also briefly mentions activities in Bahrain, Israel, Jordan, and Ras al Khaimah.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

WEMOS Gas-in-Oil Monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initial work on Taguchi-type metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) sensors indicated that they were sensitive to several of the gases produced by the overheated cellulosic insulation and mineral oil found in transformers, and that their output drifted in time. Modification of the sensors with postmanufacturing surface active treatments achieved improved but not completely satisfactory stability.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Ukraine hobbled by oil, gas shortfall  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that oil and gas shortages have dealt a severe economic blow to Ukraine. The former Soviet republic ranks second behind Russia in population and gross domestic product among members of the Commonwealth of Independent States. Ukraine's hydrocarbon output has fallen sharply since the 1970s, and the republic's fuel problems have been exacerbated by declining coal extraction.

Not Available

1992-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

293

Energy conserving automatic light output system  

SciTech Connect

An energy conserving lighting system is provided wherein a plurality of fluorescent lamps are powered by a poorly regulated voltage source power supply which provides a decreasing supply voltage with increasing arc current so as to generally match the volt-ampere characteristics of the lamps. A transistor ballast and control circuit connected in the arc current path controls the arc current, and hence the light output, in accordance with the total ambient light, i.e., the light produced by the lamps together with whatever further light is produced by other sources such as daylight. In another embodiment, a transistor ballast is utilized in combination with an inductive ballast. The transistor ballast provides current control over a wide dynamic range up to a design current maximum at which maximum the transistor is saturated and the inductive ballast takes over the current limiting function. An operational amplifier is preferably connected in the base biassing circuit of the control transistor of the transistor ballast. In an embodiment wherein two sets of lamps with separate inductive ballasts are provided, the arc currents for the two ballasts are scaled or matched to provide the desired light output.

Widmayer, D.F.

1983-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

294

Running Out of and Into Oil: Analyzing Global Oil Depletion and Transition Through 2050  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a risk analysis of world conventional oil resource production, depletion, expansion, and a possible transition to unconventional oil resources such as oil sands, heavy oil and shale oil over the period 2000 to 2050. Risk analysis uses Monte Carlo simulation methods to produce a probability distribution of outcomes rather than a single value. Probability distributions are produced for the year in which conventional oil production peaks for the world as a whole and the year of peak production from regions outside the Middle East. Recent estimates of world oil resources by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), the World Energy Council (WEC) and Dr. C. Campbell provide alternative views of the extent of ultimate world oil resources. A model of oil resource depletion and expansion for twelve world regions is combined with a market equilibrium model of conventional and unconventional oil supply and demand to create a World Energy Scenarios Model (WESM). The model does not make use of Hubbert curves but instead relies on target reserve-to-production ratios to determine when regional output will begin to decline. The authors believe that their analysis has a bias toward optimism about oil resource availability because it does not attempt to incorporate political or environmental constraints on production, nor does it explicitly include geologic constraints on production rates. Global energy scenarios created by IIASA and WEC provide the context for the risk analysis. Key variables such as the quantity of undiscovered oil and rates of technological progress are treated as probability distributions, rather than constants. Analyses based on the USGS and IIASA resource assessments indicate that conventional oil production outside the Middle East is likely to peak sometime between 2010 and 2030. The most important determinants of the date are the quantity of undiscovered oil, the rate at which unconventional oil production can be expanded, and the rate of growth of reserves and enhanced recovery. Analysis based on data produced by Campbell indicates that the peak of non-Middle East production will occur before 2010. For total world conventional oil production, the results indicate a peak somewhere between 2020 and 2050. Key determinants of the peak in world oil production are the rate at which the Middle East region expands its output and the minimum reserves-to-production ratios producers will tolerate. Once world conventional oil production peaks, first oil sands and heavy oil from Canada, Venezuela and Russia, and later some other source such as shale oil from the United States must expand if total world oil consumption is to continue to increase. Alternative sources of liquid hydrocarbon fuels, such as coal or natural gas are also possible resources but not considered in this analysis nor is the possibility of transition to a hydrogen economy. These limitations were adopted to simplify the transition analysis. Inspection of the paths of conventional oil production indicates that even if world oil production does not peak before 2020, output of conventional oil is likely to increase at a substantially slower rate after that date. The implication is that there will have to be increased production of unconventional oil after that date if world petroleum consumption is to grow.

Greene, D.L.

2003-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

295

Groundwater and Wastewater Remediation Using Agricultural Oils  

agricultural oils to stimulate endogenous microbes which accelerates the cleanup.  The oils tested include canola oil, grapeseed oil, coconut oil, corn oil, cottonseed oil, olive oil, palm oil, palm kernel oil, peanut oil, ...

296

OIl Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investor Flows and the 2008 BoomBust in Oil Prices Kenneth J. Singleton 1 August 10, 2011 1 Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, kenneths@stanford.edu. This research...

297

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating...

298

LBA-ECO DECAF Model Output Data Set Published  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DECAF Model Output Data Set Published The ORNL DAAC announces the publication of the model output data product, Deforestation Carbon Flux (DECAF), from the LBA Land Use-Land Cover...

299

Compact waveguide power divider with multiple isolated outputs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The waveguide power divider comprises an input waveguide of rectangular cross-section coupled to multiple reduced height output waveguides of rectangular cross-section. The input is coupled to the output waveguides by axial slots. The length of the slots is selected such that the wave direction of the input waveguide is preserved in the output waveguides. The width of the output guide is equal to the width of the input waveguide so that the input and output guides have the same cutoff wavelength. Waves will then travel with the same phase velocity in the input and output guides. The unused ends of the input and output guides are terminated in matched loads. The load at the end of the input guide absorbs power that is not coupled to the output guides.

Moeller, C.P.

1986-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

300

Robust MPC with output feedback of integrating systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, it is presented a new contribution to the design of a robust MPC with output feedback, input constraints, and uncertain model. Multivariable predictive controllers have been used in industry to reduce the variability of the process output ...

J. M. Perez; D. Odloak; E. L. Lima

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "opec oil output" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Heavy Oil Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Select Reports from Heavy Oil Projects Project Number Performer Title Heavy Oil Recovery US (NIPERBDM-0225) BDM-Oklahoma, Inc. Feasibility Study of Heavy Oil Recovery in the...

302

Crude Oil Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: Crude oil exports are restricted to: (1) crude oil derived from fields under the State waters of Alaska's Cook Inlet; (2) Alaskan North Slope crude oil; (3) ...

303

3. Crude Oil Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3. Crude Oil Statistics The United States had 21,371 million barrels of crude oil proved reserves as of December 31, 2004. Crude oil proved reserves ...

304

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2003 Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2003 298 OPEC and Persian Gulf Share of U.S. Imports December 15, 2003 297 Imported Crude Oil: Where Does It Come From? December 8, 2003 296 Crude Oil Production: OPEC, the...

305

Higher U.S. oil production in 2013 and 2014 means lower oil imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Higher U.S. oil production in 2013 and 2014 means lower oil Higher U.S. oil production in 2013 and 2014 means lower oil imports U.S. crude oil production topped 7 million barrels per day in November and December for the first time in 20 years, and production is expected to keep rising over the next two years. The U.S. Energy Information Administration's new monthly forecast sees domestic crude oil output averaging 7.3 million barrels per day this year and climbing to 7.9 million barrels next year. Higher crude oil production means America will need less imported oil. U.S. net imports of crude oil and liquid fuels are forecast to drop to 6.0 million barrels per day in 2014, less than half the 12.5 million barrels per day level in 2005. That will push U.S. imports down to just 32 percent of domestic oil consumption, the lowest

306

U.S. crude oil production expected to exceed oil imports later this year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

crude oil production expected to exceed oil imports later crude oil production expected to exceed oil imports later this year U.S. crude oil production is expected to surpass U.S. crude oil imports by the fourth quarter of this year. That would mark the first time since February 1995 that domestic crude oil output exceeds imports, according to the latest monthly energy outlook from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The United States will still need to import crude oil to help meet domestic demand. However, total crude oil imports this year are on track to fall to their lowest level since 1997. U.S. oil production is expected to continue to rise over the next two years as imports fall. As a result, the share of total U.S. petroleum consumption met by net imports is forecast to fall to 32 percent next year, the lowest level since 1985 and nearly half the peak level of 60 percent seen in

307

5 World Oil Trends WORLD OIL TRENDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 World Oil Trends Chapter 1 WORLD OIL TRENDS INTRODUCTION In considering the outlook for California's petroleum supplies, it is important to give attention to expecta- tions of what the world oil market. Will world oil demand increase and, if so, by how much? How will world oil prices be affected

308

Specialty Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing provider for Specialty Oils. Samples tested include Walnut Oil, Pecan Oil, Pistachio Oil, Sesame Seed Oil, Flax Seed Oil, Neem Oil, Safflower Oil, Sunflower Oil. Specialty Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Pro

309

Oil | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Oil Oil Prices, 2000-2008 For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. |...

310

Measuring Energy Security: Can the United States Achieve Oil Independence?  

SciTech Connect

Stochasticsimulationofthedirecteconomiccostsofoildependenceinanuncertainfutureisproposed as ausefulmetricofoildependence.Themarketfailurefromwhichthesecostsariseisimperfect competitionintheworldoilmarket,chieflyasaconsequenceoftheuseofmarketpowerbythe OrganizationofthePetroleumExportingCountries(OPEC)cartel.Oildependencecostscanbe substantial.ItisestimatedthatoildependencecoststotheUSeconomyin2008willexceed$500 billion.Othercosts,suchasmilitaryexpendituresorforeignpolicyconstraintsaredeemedtobelargely derivativeoftheactualorpotentialeconomiccostsofoildependence.Theuseofquantifiableeconomic costs asasecuritymetricleadstoameasurabledefinitionofoilindependence,oroilsecurity,whichcan be usedtotesttheabilityofspecificpoliciestoachieveoilindependenceinanuncertainfuture.

Greene, David L [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

of oil yields from enhanced oil recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO 2 storage capacity in depleted oil reservoirs. The primary goal of the project is to demonstrate that remaining oil can be economically produced using CO 2 -EOR technology in untested areas of the United States. The Citronelle Field appears to be an ideal site for concurrent CO 2 storage and EOR because the field is composed of sandstone reservoirs

312

EIA Oil price timeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, ... Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions.

313

Time-Varying Effects of Oil Supply Shocks on the US Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate how the dynamic effects of oil supply shocks on the US economy have changed over time. We first document a remarkable structural change in the oil market itself, i.e. a considerably steeper, hence, less elastic oil demand curve since the mid-eighties. Accordingly, a typical oil supply shock is currently characterized by a much smaller impact on world oil production and a greater effect on the real price of crude oil, but has a similar impact on US output and inflation as in the 1970s. Second, we find a smaller role for oil supply shocks in accounting for real oil price variability over time, implying that current oil price fluctuations are more demand driven. Finally, while unfavorable oil supply disturbances explain little of the "Great Inflation", they seem to have contributed to the 1974/75, early 1980s and 1990s recessions but also dampened the economic boom at the end of the millennium.

Christiane Baumeister; Gert Peersman

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

A predictive ocean oil spill model  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Initially, the project focused on creating an ocean oil spill model and working with the major oil companies to compare their data with the Los Alamos global ocean model. As a result of this initial effort, Los Alamos worked closely with the Eddy Joint Industry Project (EJIP), a consortium oil and gas producing companies in the US. The central theme of the project was to use output produced from LANL`s global ocean model to look in detail at ocean currents in selected geographic areas of the world of interest to consortium members. Once ocean currents are well understood this information could be used to create oil spill models, improve offshore exploration and drilling equipment, and aid in the design of semi-permanent offshore production platforms.

Sanderson, J.; Barnette, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Papodopoulos, P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schaudt, K. [Marathon Oil Co., Littleton, CO (United States); Szabo, D. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

A Methodology to Assess the Reliability of Hydrogen-based Transportation Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

40 Figure 11. OPEC share of global crude oil41 Figure 12. Persian Gulf share of global crude oil44 Figure 15. Distribution of global crude oil

McCarthy, Ryan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Ecuador - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ecuador is the fifth-largest South American oil producer and a leading source of crude oil imports for ... Central & South America OPEC. ... Crude Oil Production

317

Jamaica - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, ... What is shale gas and why is it important? ... OPEC Revenues Fact Sheet; World Oil Transit Chokepoints;

318

Oil Prices, External Income, and Growth: Lessons from Jordan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper extends the long-run growth model of Esfahani et al. (2012a) to a labour exporting country that receives large in‡ows of external income – the sum of remittances, FDI and general government transfers – from major oil exporting economies. The theoretical model predicts real oil prices to be one of the main long-run drivers of real output. Using quarterly data between 1979 and 2009 on core macroeconomic variables for Jordan and a number of key foreign variables, we identify two long-run relationships: an output equation as predicted by theory and an equation linking foreign and domestic in‡ation rates. It is shown that real output in the long run is shaped by (i) oil prices through their impact on external income and in turn on capital accumulation, and (ii) technological transfers through foreign output. The empirical analysis of the paper con…rms the hypothesis that a large share of Jordan’s output volatility can be associated with ‡uctuations in net income received from abroad (arising from oil price shocks). External factors, however, cannot be relied upon to provide similar growth stimuli in the future, and therefore it will be important to diversify the sources of growth in order to achieve a high and sustained level of income.

Kamiar Mohaddes A; Mehdi Raissi B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy Headquaters Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy...

320

Vsd Oil Free Compressor, Vsd Oil Free Compressor Products, Vsd ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vsd Oil Free Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Vsd Oil Free Compressor Products from Global Vsd Oil Free Compressor Suppliers and Vsd Oil ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "opec oil output" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

OIl Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investor Investor Flows and the 2008 Boom/Bust in Oil Prices Kenneth J. Singleton 1 August 10, 2011 1 Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, kenneths@stanford.edu. This research is the outgrowth of a survey paper I prepared for the Air Transport Association of America. I am grateful to Kristoffer Laursen for research assistance and to Kristoffer and Stefan Nagel for their comments. Abstract This paper explores the impact of investor flows and financial market conditions on returns in crude-oil futures markets. I begin by arguing that informational frictions and the associated speculative activity may induce prices to drift away from "fundamental" values and show increased volatility. This is followed by a discussion of the interplay between imperfect infor- mation about real economic activity, including supply, demand, and inventory accumulation, and speculative

322

Highlights.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

September 2002 September 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: The waxing and waning intensities of concern surrounding potential military action against Iraq and uncertainty over OPEC production policy leading up to their September 19 meeting have contributed to WTI spot crude oil prices bouncing between $26 and $30 per barrel since early August. The average spot WTI price in August was $28.40 per barrel. Developments suggesting an easing of tensions could temporarily send prices lower in the short run. However, a modest measure of restraint with respect to oil output by OPEC would probably keep oil prices closer to $30 per barrel than to $20 through 2003, even if the political and military status quo were maintained. Solid growth in world oil demand this winter (and for 2003 as a whole) is

323

Using the output file from a Gaussian frequency calculation to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... extract the essential data from a Gaussian output file and compute thermodynamic functions at several temperatures. The basic data are also ...

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

324

Today in Energy - Seasonal hydroelectric output drives down ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Increased hydroelectric output in the Pacific Northwest drove daily, on-peak prices of electricity below $10 per megawatthour in late April (see chart above) at the ...

325

Chemically enhanced oil recovery stages a comeback  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nobody knows how much petroleum is left in the ground; estimates range from one trillion to four trillion barrels. Current global production of petroleum is about 85 million barrels/day (bbl/d), or more than 30 billion bbl/year. OPEC (the Organization of t

326

highllights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Summary Based on the results of OPEC's June meeting and the July 3 announcement by Saudi Arabia of its intention to push for an additional 500,000 barrels per day of new output, we conclude that the probability of significant declines in world oil prices by yearend is larger than it was a month ago. We now expect a decline of between $4 and $5 per barrel in average crude oil prices between June and December 2000. Moreover, expected increases in petroleum inventories resulting from the anticipated increases in output from OPEC would tend to bring oil stock levels in industrialized countries much closer to average levels by yearend than was projected in last month's Outlook. However, with world demand growing at between 1.5 and 2.5 percent per year through 2001, in terms of

327

Mapping of Indian computer science research output, 1999---2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research output of India in computer science during 1999---2008 is analyzed in this paper on several parameters including total research output, its growth, rank and global publication share, citation impact, share of international collaborative ... Keywords: Computer science, Information technology, Mapping, Research priorities in computer

B. M. Gupta; Avinash Kshitij; Charu Verma

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

SLAC 16-channel differential TTL output module (Engineering Materials)  

SciTech Connect

The drawings listed on the Drawing List provide the data and specifications for constructing a SLAC 16-channel differential TTL output module as used in the SLAC PEP storage ring instrumentation and control system. It is a CAMAC module used as an output interface module from CAMAC signals.

Not Available

1983-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

329

EIA Report 9/1/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

, 4:00 pm See current , 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) (2pm) 9/1/2008 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 8/25/2008 Year Ago 8/31/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 111.16 115.46 -4.30 115.11 73.98 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 275.10 285.42 -10.32 280.69 196.45 Heating Oil (c/gal) 309.24 319.19 -9.95 317.90 205.74 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.98 8.36 -0.38 7.94 6.46 OPEC Basket ($Bbl) NA 111.23 NA 110.61 69.60 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (RBOB), the base gasoline that needs to be blended with some type of oxygenate, now usually ethanol, to be turned into finished reformulated gasoline (RFG). Ethanol is not blended into the gasoline mixture until just before the gasoline is shipped to the retail stations. Petroleum As of 12:30 pm EDT (11:30 am CDT), August 31, the Minerals Management

330

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World Production of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other Liquids, andWorld Production of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other Liquids, andProduction of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other Liquids, and Re?

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs U.S. Petroleum Use, 1970-2010 Nearly 40% of the oil we use is imported, costing us roughly 300 billion annually. Increased domestic oil production from...

332

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interpretations of China’s foreign oil strategy. Argumentsof aspects of China’s foreign oil activities, they do notits largest directly-run foreign oil project. Supplying 10

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas, Heating Oil and Gasoline,” NBER Working Paper.2006. “China’s Growing Demand for Oil and Its Impact on U.S.and Income on Energy and Oil Demand,” Energy Journal 23(1),

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Oil Spills and Wildlife  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Spills and Wildlife Name: jess Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: what are some effects of oil spills on plants? Replies: The effects of oil spills over the last...

335

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Michael T. Klare, Blood and Oil: The Dangers of America’sDowns and Jeffrey A. Bader, “Oil-Hungry China Belongs at BigChina, Africa, and Oil,” (Council on Foreign Relations,

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the residual quantity of oil that never gets produced.order to purchase a quantity Q barrels of oil at a price P tD t Q t Q t+1 Quantity Figure 5. Monthly oil production for

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is an important oil source for China, yet unlike itsthe United States as a major oil source outside the volatileto be a critical source of oil, and one that is almost

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nations began to seek out oil reserves around the world. 3on the limited global oil reserves and spiking prices. Manyto the largest proven oil reserves, making up 61 percent of

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5. Monthly oil production for Iran, Iraq, and Kuwait, inday. Monthly crude oil production Iran Iraq Kuwait Figure 6.Arabia PRODUCTION QUOTA Iran PRODUCTION QUOTA Venezuela

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China’s domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robertpeak will come around 2020, 24 and that by this point, China’s demand Oil

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "opec oil output" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Crude Oil Affects Gasoline Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil Affects Gasoline Prices. WTI Crude Oil Price. Retail Gasoline Price. Source: Energy Information Administration

342

Highlights.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook August 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: Oil prices remained relatively high in July, averaging close to the expectations reported in the July Outlook. The average spot West Texas Intermediate (WTI) price in July was approximately $27 per barrel. As always, a wide range of possibilities exists for oil price movements over the next year and a half. However, given the amount of growth in world demand expected through 2003, we think that likely scenarios for OPEC and non-OPEC output growth imply continued tightening of markets (lower commercial inventories) and continued support for crude oil prices near or slightly above current levels through mid-2003. The average WTI spot price is expected to edge upward t

343

Microsoft Word - Highlights Bullets Final.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2004 Oil Market Developments (Figures 1 to 5) U.S. spot prices for crude oil (West Texas Intermediate (WTI)), while currently down from the highs above $40 per barrel seen in early June, continue to fluctuate in the upper $30's despite general improvement in crude oil inventories and increases in output by key OPEC producers, including Saudi Arabia. OPEC (excluding Iraq) crude oil production in June was 27.1 million barrels per day, 800,000 barrels per day higher than May levels and only about 1 million barrels per day below capacity. The overall level of petroleum inventories both in the United States and in the rest of the industrialized world remains below normal, particularly when seen in

344

Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow (Rocky Point, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. 62 figures.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

346

Dual output acoustic wave sensor for molecular identification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of identification and quantification of absorbed chemical species by measuring changes in both the velocity and the attenuation of an acoustic wave traveling through a thin film into which the chemical species is sorbed. The dual output response provides two independent sensor responses from a single sensing device thereby providing twice as much information as a single output sensor. This dual output technique and analysis allows a single sensor to provide both the concentration and the identity of a chemical species or permits the number of sensors required for mixtures to be reduced by a factor of two.

Frye, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Device for frequency modulation of a laser output spectrum  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for fast frequency modulating the output spectrum of multimode lasers and single frequency lasers that are not actively stabilized. A piezoelectric transducer attached to a laser cavity mirror is driven in an unconventional manner to excite resonance vibration of the tranducer to rapidly, cyclicly change the laser cavity length. The result is a cyclic sweeping of the output wavelength sufficient to fill the gaps in the laser output frequency spectrum. When a laser is used to excite atoms or molecules, complete absorption line coverage is made possible.

Beene, J.R.; Bemis, C.E. Jr.

1984-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

348

Device for frequency modulation of a laser output spectrum  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for fast frequency modulating the output spectrum of multimode lasers and single frequency lasers that are not actively stabilized. A piezoelectric transducer attached to a laser cavity mirror is driven in an unconventional manner to excite resonance vibration of the transducer to rapidly, cyclicly change the laser cavity length. The result is a cyclic sweeping of the output wavelength sufficient to fill the gaps in the laser output frequency spectrum. When such a laser is used to excite atoms or molecules, complete absorption line coverage is made possible.

Beene, James R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bemis, Jr., Curtis E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

9 Landed Costs of Crude Oil Imports From Selected Countries Total, 1973-2011 By Selected Country, 2011 By Selected OPEC Country, 1973-2011 By Selected Non-OPEC Country,...

350

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 Table 5.19 Landed Costs of Crude Oil Imports From Selected Countries, 1973-2011 (Dollars 1 per Barrel) Year Persian Gulf 3 Selected OPEC 2 Countries Selected Non-OPEC 2 Countries...

351

pmm.vp  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

6 Table 21. F.O.B. a Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country (Dollars per Barrel) Year Month Selected Countries Persian Gulf b Total OPEC c Non OPEC Angola Colombia Mexico...

352

SolarOil Project, Phase I preliminary design report. [Solar Thermal Enhanced Oil Recovery project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preliminary design of the Solar Thermal Enhanced Oil Recovery (SolarOil) Plant is described in this document. This plant is designed to demonstrate that using solar thermal energy is technically feasible and economically viable in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). The SolarOil Plant uses the fixed mirror solar concentrator (FMSC) to heat high thermal capacity oil (MCS-2046) to 322/sup 0/C (611/sup 0/F). The hot fluid is pumped from a hot oil storage tank (20 min capacity) through a once-through steam generator which produces 4.8 MPa (700 psi) steam at 80% quality. The plant net output, averaged over 24 hr/day for 365 days/yr, is equivalent to that of a 2.4 MW (8.33 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr) oil-fired steam generator having an 86% availability. The net plant efficiency is 57.3% at equinox noon, a 30%/yr average. The plant will be demonstrated at an oilfield site near Oildale, California.

Baccaglini, G.; Bass, J.; Neill, J.; Nicolayeff, V.; Openshaw, F.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Algeria: World Oil Report 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that Algeria is positioned to achieve important, new natural gas markets. Over half of its hydrocarbon income is from exports of gas and derived products, liquified petroleum gas (LPG) and condensates, which are not subject to Opec quotas. Officials are moving away from inflexible past policies and are becoming vastly more realistic now that foreign investment laws have been liberalized and there is a need to attract foreign investors. Sonatrach must address three key issues to consolidate recent progress. Sales to existing customers in Europe, like Italy, must be expanded; new customers and markets need to found: and U.S. liquified natural gas (LNG) markets must be revived.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Oil Prices, External Income, and Growth: Lessons from Jordan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The theoretical model predicts real oil prices to be one of the main long-run drivers of real output. Using quarterly data between 1979 and 2009 on core macroeconomic variables for Jordan and a number of key foreign variables, we identify two long...

Mohaddes, Kamiar; Raissi, Mehdi

2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

355

Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

50-47676 March 2010 Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets Final Subcontract Report 15 October 2007 - 15 March 2009 3TIER Seattle, Washington National...

356

Generalized Exponential Markov and Model Output Statistics: A Comparative Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We performed a comparative verification of Model Output Statistics (MOS) against Generalized Exponential Markov (GEM), a single station forecasting technique which uses only the surface observation and climatology as input. The verification was ...

Thomas J. Perrone; Robert G. Miller

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Model-Inspired Predictors for Model Output Statistics (MOS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article addresses the problem of the choice of the predictors for the multiple linear regression in model output statistics. Rather than devising a selection procedure directly aimed at the minimization of the final scores, it is examined ...

Piet Termonia; Alex Deckmyn

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Community Climate System Model (CCSM) Experiments and Output Data  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The CCSM web makes the source code of various versions of the model freely available and provides access to experiments that have been run and the resulting output data.

359

Eco Oil 4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This article describes the processes, challenges, and achievements of researching and developing a biobased motor oil.

Brett Earl; Brenda Clark

2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

360

Subject is oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The article reviews the current financial, legislative and regulatory problems of oil shale development. 2 refs.

Due, M.J.C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "opec oil output" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Oil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil Oil Oil Oil Prices, 2000-2008 For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. Oil is used for heating and transportation -- most notably, as fuel for gas-powered vehicles. America's dependence on foreign oil has declined in recent years, but oil prices have increased. The Energy Department supports research and policy options to increase our domestic supply of oil while ensuring environmentally sustainable supplies domestically and abroad, and is investing in research, technology and

362

Oil Dependencies and Peak Oil's Effects on Oil Consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? During the year of 2007, the world has experienced historically high oil prices both in nominal and in real terms, which has reopened discussions… (more)

Tekin, Josef

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Petroleum Marketing Annual, 1987  

SciTech Connect

In world crude oil markets, 1987 was a year of limited recovery and relative stability after the dramatic price slide of early 1986. Both foreign and domestic crude thereafter, ending the year somewhat higher than a year ago. In contrast, product wholesale markets remained relatively stable throughout the year, while retail prices sustained a fairly steady increase. As has been the case for over a decade, major price movements in international oil markets generally reflected responses to actual or perceived changes in the policies of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and/or its members. The year began with prices on an upward trend, in reaction to the December 1986 OPEC meeting in which the members resolved to return to an official pricing structure (a departure from the market-based pricing of 1986), and to reduce output quotas. Prices continued to rise until August, when evidence of continued OPEC overproduction appeared to outweigh market optimism, triggering a gradual slide that lasted the remainder of the year. Even with the downturn in the fourth quarter, crude oil markets in 1987, as measured by refiner acquisition costs, finished the year above year-end 1986 levels, and considerably above the lows reached in mid-1986. OPEC's struggle to maintain stable prices and production levels in 1987 reflected the organization's difficulties in reaching and enforcing agreements among its politically and economically diverse membership. 11 figs., 49 tabs.

1988-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

... 6 Task 5: Carbon Inputs and Outputs to Gas Hydrate Systems ... 7 Task 6: Numerical Models for...

365

SIXTH RECOGNIZING TEXTUAL ENTAILMENT CHALLENGE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... YES">World oil prices fell further on Tuesday, despite a new hurricane powering towards oil facilities in the Gulf of Mexico, and as OPEC pledged to ...

2010-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

366

MAIN TASK and NOVELTY DETECTION SUBTASK Task ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... YES">World oil prices fell further on Tuesday, despite a new hurricane powering towards oil facilities in the Gulf of Mexico, and as OPEC pledged to ...

2010-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

367

South Africa - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

What is shale gas and ... OPEC Revenues Fact Sheet; World Oil ... South Africa has the second largest crude oil refinery system in Africa and imports the ...

368

Turkey - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

What is shale gas and why is ... OPEC Revenues Fact Sheet; World Oil Transit ... Concurrent with Turkey's economic expansion, its crude oil consumption has increased ...

369

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

What is shale gas and why is it important? ... OPEC Revenues Fact Sheet; World Oil Transit ... Oil and gas development and export is central to Azerbaijan's economic ...

370

Ghana - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

What is shale gas and why is it important? ... OPEC Revenues Fact Sheet; World Oil Transit Chokepoints; Country Analysis Note. After discovering the Jubilee oil field ...

371

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Outlook Briefing for the State Heating Oil and Propane Program Conference Asheville, NC Mike Burdette Petroleum Division, Energy ...

372

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table of Contents. Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook. Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast . Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance

373

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Briefing for the State Heating Oil and Propane Program Conference Wilmington, DE by Douglas MacIntyre

374

Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor, Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor Products from Global Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor Suppliers ...

375

Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor, Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor Products from Global Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor Suppliers ...

376

Incorporating Both Undesirable Outputs and Uncontrollable Variables into DEA: the Performance of Chinese Coal-Fired Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

variables are presented in Table 2. Note that in this study fuel consumption is measured in terms of energy input (or heat input). This is because in almost all Chinese power plants, oil-fired (sometimes gas-fired) equipment is also installed for boiler... -affiliated nursing homes. The first stage comprises a standard DEA using traditional inputs and outputs. In the second stage stochastic frontier analysis (SFA) is used to regress the input slacks (radial plus non-radial) of the first stage against a set...

Yang, Hongliang; Pollitt, Michael G.

377

Effects of petroleum distillate on viscosity, density and surface tension of intermediate and heavy crude oils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental and analytical studies have been carried out to better understand the effects of additives on viscosity, density and surface tension of intermediate and heavy crude oils. The studies have been conducted for the following oil samples: San Francisco oil from Columbia with specific gravity of 28o-29o API, Duri oil with gravity of 19o-21o API, Jobo oil with gravity of 8o-9o API and San Ardo oil gravity of 11o-13o API. The additive used in all of the experiments is petroleum distillate. The experiments consist of using petroleum distillate as an additive for different samples of heavy crude oils. The experiments include making a mixture by adding petroleum distillate to oil samples and measuring surface tension, viscosity and density of pure oil samples and mixtures at different temperatures. The petroleum distillate/oil ratios are the following ratios: 1:100, 2:100, 3:100, 4:100 and 5:100. Experimental results showed that use of petroleum distillate as an additive increases API gravity and leads to reduction in viscosity and surface tension for all the samples. Results showed for all petroleum distillate/oil ratios viscosity and interfacial tension decreases with temperature. As petroleum distillate/oil ratio increases, oil viscosity and surface tension decrease more significantly at lower temperatures than at higher temperatures. After all experiments were completed an analytical correlation was done based on the experiment results to develop “mixing rules”. Using this correlation viscosity, density and surface tension of different petroleum distillate/oil mixtures were obtained (output).These had properties of pure oil and petroleum distillate, mixture ratios and temperatures at which measurement is supposed to be done (output). Using this correlation a good match was achieved. For all of the cases (viscosity, density and surface tension), correlation coefficient (R²) was more than 0.9 which proved to be optimum for a really good match.

Abdullayev, Azer

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The world of quantum noise and the fundamental output process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stationary theory of quantum stochastic processes of second order is outlined. It includes KMS processes in wide sense like the equilibrium finite temperature quantum noise given by the Planck's spectral formula. It is shown that for each stationary noise there exists a natural output process output process which is identical to the noise in the infinite temperature limit, and flipping with the noise if the time is reversed at finite temperature. A canonical Hilbert space representation of the quantum noise and the fundamental output process is established and a decomposition of their spectra is found. A brief explanation of quantum stochastic integration with respect to the input-output processes is given using only correlation functions. This provides a mathematical foundation for linear stationary filtering transformations of quantum stochastic processes. It is proved that the colored quantum stationary noise and its time-reversed version can be obtained in the second order theory by a linear nonadapted filtering of the standard vacuum noise uniquely defined by the canonical creation and annihilation operators on the spectrum of the input-output pair.

V. P. Belavkin; O. Hirota; R. Hudson

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

379

Reliable Gas Turbine Output: Attaining Temperature Independent Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improvements in gas turbine efficiency, coupled with dropping gas prices, has made gas turbines a popular choice of utilities to supply peaking as well as base load power in the form of combined cycle power plants. Today, because of the gas turbine's compactness, low maintenance, and high levels of availability, it is the major option for future power generation. One inherent disadvantage of gas turbines is the degradation of output as the ambient air temperature increases. This reduction in output during times of peak load create a reliability concern as more gas turbines are added to the electric system. A 10% reduction in gas turbine output, when it comprises only 10% of the electric system, does not cause reliability concerns. A 10% reduction in gas turbine output, when it comprises 50% of the electric system, could create reliability and operational problems. This paper explores the potential for maintaining constant, reliable outputs from gas turbines by cooling ambient air temperatures before the air is used in the compressor section of the gas turbine.

Neeley, J. E.; Patton, S.; Holder, F.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Oil-Well Fire Fighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Oil Well Fire Fighting. NIST fire Research NIST Fire Research 2 Oil Well Fire Fighting RoboCrane Model Oil Well Fire Fighting Working Model.

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "opec oil output" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

AN ENGINE OIL LIFE ALGORITHM.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An oil-life algorithm to calculate the remaining percentage of oil life is presented as a means to determine the right time to change the oil… (more)

Bommareddi, Anveshan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Fuel Oil Use in Manufacturing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and residual fuel oils. Distillate fuel oil, the lighter product, is also used for heating of homes and commercial buildings. Residual oil is a much denser, heavier product...

383

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Notes: Spot WTI prices broke $35 and even $36 per barrel in November as anticipated boosts to world supply from OPEC and other sources failed to find much realization in actual stocks data. The idea that stocks are still languishing at below-normal levels is particularly persuasive when one views current levels (for key consuming regions) relative to "normal" values which account for the long-term trend in OECD stocks. We believe that monthly average WTI prices will stay around $30 per barrel for the first part of 2001. This is a noticeable upward shift in our projected average prices from even a month ago. The shift reflects greater emphasis on the lack of stock builds and less emphasis on the assumption that supply from OPEC and non-OPEC suppliers may be exceeding demand by 1-2

384

winfuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 1 Winter Fuels Outlook: 2000-2001 Introduction This winter--defined as the period from October 2000 to March 2001--is expected to bring with it significantly higher heating bills than those seen last winter. The main reasons for this outcome are: 1) expected space-heating fuels requirements larger than those of last winter, the warmest on record; 2) inventories of key heating fuels-- especially heating oil--below normal and substantially below those of the outset of the winter of 1999-2000, and 3) crude-oil prices at relatively high levels. Because of the brisk recovery of Asian economies and continued robust growth in the U.S., neither the production increases announced by OPEC since last winter nor efforts by non-OPEC sources to increase output have been able to stem the increase in crude oil prices.

385

OECD Input-Output Tables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OECD Input-Output Tables OECD Input-Output Tables Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Input-Output Tables Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Market analysis, Co-benefits assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.oecd.org/document/3/0,3343,en_2649_34445_38071427_1_1_1_1,00.html Country: Sweden, Finland, Japan, South Korea, Argentina, Australia, China, Israel, United Kingdom, Portugal, Romania, Greece, Poland, Slovakia, Chile, India, Canada, New Zealand, United States, Denmark, Norway, Spain, Austria, Italy, Netherlands, Ireland, France, Belgium, Brazil, Czech Republic, Estonia, Germany, Hungary, Luxembourg, Mexico, Slovenia, South Africa, Turkey, Indonesia, Switzerland, Taiwan, Russia

386

Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics: Market Analysis Website: cdn.globalccsinstitute.com/sites/default/files/publications/7326/carbo Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carbon-capture-transport-and-storage- Policies: Regulations Regulations: Emissions Mitigation Scheme The Scottish Government published this report to identify regulatory gaps or overlaps in the nation's framework for regulating carbon capture and storage (CCS). The report aims to streamline and better manage CCS regulation. It focuses on evaluating the risks, barriers, information gaps,

387

U.S. boosts natural gas output and use since 2005, while OECD ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. ...

388

Apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale comprises: a vertical type distilling furnace which is divided by two vertical partitions each provided with a plurality of vent apertures into an oil shale treating chamber and two gas chambers, said oil shale treating chamber being located between said two gas chambers in said vertical type distilling furnace, said vertical type distilling furnace being further divided by at least one horizontal partition into an oil shale distilling chamber in the lower part thereof and at least one oil shale preheating chamber in the upper part thereof, said oil shale distilling chamber and said oil shale preheating chamber communication with each other through a gap provided at an end of said horizontal partition, an oil shale supplied continuously from an oil shale supply port provided in said oil shale treating chamber at the top thereof into said oil shale treating chamber continuously moving from the oil shale preheating chamber to the oil shale distilling chamber, a high-temperature gas blown into an oil shale distilling chamber passing horizontally through said oil shale in said oil shale treating chamber, thereby said oil shale is preheated in said oil shale preheating chamber, and a gaseous shale oil is distilled from said preheated oil shale in said oil shale distilling chamber; and a separator for separating by liquefaction a gaseous shale oil from a gas containing the gaseous shale oil discharged from the oil shale preheating chamber.

Shishido, T.; Sato, Y.

1984-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

389

Maximal output purity and capacity for asymmetric unital qudit channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider generalizations of depolarizing channels to maps in which the identity channel is replaced by a convex combinations of unitary conjugations. We show that one can construct unital channels of this type for which the input which achieves maximal output purity is unique. We give conditions under which multiplicativity of the maximal p-norm and additivity of the minimal output entropy. We also show that the Holevo capacity need not equal log d - the minimal entropy as one might expect for a convex combination of unitary conjugations. Conversely, we give examples for which this condition holds, but the channel has no evident covariance properties.

Nilanjana Datta; Mary Beth Ruskai

2005-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

390

Federal Reserve Bank of DallasTime-Varying Oil Price Volatility and Macroeconomic Aggregates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We illustrate the theoretical relation among output, consumption, investment, and oil price volatility in a real business cycle model. The model incorporates demand for oil by a firm, as an intermediate input, and by a household, used in conjunction with a durable good. We estimate a stochastic volatility process for the real price of oil over the period 1986-2011 and utilize the estimated process in a non-linear approximation of the model. For realistic calibrations, an increase in oil price volatility produces a temporary decrease in durable spending, while precautionary savings motives lead investment and real GDP to rise. Irreversible capital and durable investment decisions do not overturn this result.

Michael Plante; Michael Plante; Nora Traum; We Thank Ron Alquist; Sebnem Kalemli-ozcan; Junghoon Lee; James Murray

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of...

392

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils offers new insights into these important (and growing) products of vegetable oils, while also covering developments in biodegradable grease, vegetable oils-based polyols, and the synthesis of surfactants from vegetable oil

393

The Legacy of Oil Spills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a 1979 exploratory oil well blew out and leaked oil foraddicted to oil directly causes spills as well as globalmagnitudes of past oil spills. They are well aware of the

Trevors, J. T.; Saier, M. H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

395

Oil and Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil and Plants Name: Matt Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: If you could please tell me exactly what motor oil (unused) does to plants, and the effects. Does it...

396

Palm oil pundit speaks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dorab E. Mistry, director of Godrej International Ltd. in Mumbai, India, spoke about palm oil on March 15, 2010, during the 2010 Annual Convention of the National Institute of Oilseed Products in Palm Springs, California, USA. Palm oil pundit speaks ...

397

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

21, 2008. Ying, Wang. “ China, Venezuela firms to co-developApril 21, “China and Venezuela sign oil agreements. ” Chinaaccessed April 21, “Venezuela and China sign oil deal. ” BBC

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

well below unity accounts for the broad trends we see in the share of oil purchases in totalWells. ” Middle panel: percent of U.S. total crude oil

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Identification of Wiener systems with binary-valued output observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work is concerned with identification of Wiener systems whose outputs are measured by binary-valued sensors. The system consists of a linear FIR (finite impulse response) subsystem of known order, followed by a nonlinear function with a known parametrization ... Keywords: Binary-valued observations, Identification, Joint identifiability, Parameter estimation, Periodic inputs, Sensor thresholds, Wiener systems

Yanlong Zhao; Le Yi Wang; G. George Yin; Ji-Feng Zhang

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The continuity of the output entropy of positive maps  

SciTech Connect

Global and local continuity conditions for the output von Neumann entropy for positive maps between Banach spaces of trace-class operators in separable Hilbert spaces are obtained. Special attention is paid to completely positive maps: infinite dimensional quantum channels and operations. It is shown that as a result of some specific properties of the von Neumann entropy (as a function on the set of density operators) several results on the output entropy of positive maps can be obtained, which cannot be derived from the general properties of entropy type functions. In particular, it is proved that global continuity of the output entropy of a positive map follows from its finiteness. A characterization of positive linear maps preserving continuity of the entropy (in the following sense: continuity of the entropy on an arbitrary subset of input operators implies continuity of the output entropy on this subset) is obtained. A connection between the local continuity properties of two completely positive complementary maps is considered. Bibliography: 21 titles.

Shirokov, Maxim E [Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "opec oil output" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Asymptotically efficient parameter estimation using quantized output observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies identification of systems in which only quantized output observations are available. An identification algorithm for system gains is introduced that employs empirical measures from multiple sensor thresholds and optimizes their convex ... Keywords: Cramér-Rao bound, Efficient estimator, Quantized observation, System identification

Le Yi Wang; G. George Yin

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

TRICOLOR LIGHT EMITTING DIODE DOT MATRIX DISPLAY SYSTEM WITHAUDIO OUTPUT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 TRICOLOR LIGHT EMITTING DIODE DOT MATRIX DISPLAY SYSTEM WITHAUDIO OUTPUT Grantham Pang, Chi emitting diodes; tricolor display; audio communication. I. Introduction This paper relates to a tricolor broadcasting through the visible light rays transmitted by the display panel or assembly. Keywords: light

Pang, Grantham

403

Choose best option for enhancing combined-cycle output  

SciTech Connect

This article describes several methods available for boosting the output of gas-turbine-based combined-cycle plants during warm-weather operation. The technology comparisons help choose the option that is most appropriate. Amidst the many advantages of gas-turbine (GT) combined cycles (CC), one drawback is that their achievable output decreases significantly as ambient temperature increases. Reason: The lower density of warm air reduces mass flow through the GT. Unfortunately, hot weather typically corresponds to peak power loads in many areas. Thus, the need to meet peak-load and power-sales contract requirements causes many plant developers to compensate for ambient-temperature-related output loss. The three most common methods of increasing output include: (1) injecting water or steam into the GT, (2) precooling GT inlet air, and/or (3) supplementary firing of the heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG). All of these options require significant capital outlays and affect other performance parameters. In addition, they may uniquely impact the operation and/or selection of other components, including boiler feedwater and condensate pumps, valves, steam turbine/generators, condensers, cooling towers, and emissions control systems. Although plant-specific issues will have a significant effect on selecting an option, comparing the performance of different systems based on a theoretical reference plant can be helpful. The comparisons here illustrate the characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages of the major power augmentation technologies now in use.

Boswell, M.; Tawney, R.; Narula, R.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Improved Model Output Statistics Forecasts through Model Consensus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consensus forecasts are computed by averaging model output statistics (MOS) forecasts based on the limited-area fine-mesh (LFM) model and the nested grid model (NGM) for the three-year period 1990–92. The test consists of four weather elements (...

Robert L. Vislocky; J. Michael Fritsch

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

SRC Residual fuel oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

Tewari, Krishna C. (Whitehall, PA); Foster, Edward P. (Macungie, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Oil Peak or Panic?  

SciTech Connect

In this balanced consideration of the peak-oil controversy, Gorelick comes down on the side of the optimists.

Greene, David L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Using Oils As Pesticides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum and plant-derived spray oils show increasing potential for use as part of Integrated Pest Management systems for control of soft-bodied pests on fruit trees, shade trees, woody ornamentals and household plants. Sources of oils, preparing oils for use, application and precautions are discussed.

Bogran, Carlos E.; Ludwig, Scott; Metz, Bradley

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

408

Exploiting heavy oil reserves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the behaviour of oil and gas prices and the fruits of future exploration. The rate of technological progress. How optimistic are you that the North Sea remains a viable source of oil and gas? A) Our new researchNorth Sea investment potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Beneath the waves in 3D Aberdeen

Levi, Ran

409

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a “negative” storage cost for oil in the form of a bene?tin levels. oil for more than your costs, that is, if P t+1 QSaudi oil, and M S the Saudi’s marginal cost of production.

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Biochemical upgrading of oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing in organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

411

Biochemical upgrading of oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed. 121 figs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

412

Gourmet and Health-Promoting Specialty OilsChapter 11 Camellia Oil and Tea Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gourmet and Health-Promoting Specialty Oils Chapter 11 Camellia Oil and Tea Oil Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 11 Camellia Oil and T

413

Short Term Energy Outlook, February 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. World oil markets will likely remain tight through most of 2003, as petroleum inventories and global spare production capacity continue to dwindle amid blasts of cold weather and constrained output from Venezuela. OPEC efforts to increase output to make up for lower Venezuela output has reduced global spare production capacity to only 2 million barrels per day, leaving little room to make up for unexpected supply or demand surprises. Meanwhile, the average West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price increased by $3.50 to $33 per barrel from December to January (Figure 1). For the year 2003, WTI oil prices are expected to remain over $30 per barrel, even though Venezuelan output appears to be moving toward normal sooner than expected. Also,

414

Utah Heavy Oil Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

415

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Quarter,Call on OPEC (World oil demand - non-opec supply - opec ngls) 1Q 2010,28.81365001 2Q 2010,29.30122054 3Q 2010,30.50944263 4Q 2010,29.94627992 1Q 2011,30 ...

416

Oil shale commercialization study  

SciTech Connect

Ninety four possible oil shale sections in southern Idaho were located and chemically analyzed. Sixty-two of these shales show good promise of possible oil and probable gas potential. Sixty of the potential oil and gas shales represent the Succor Creek Formation of Miocene age in southwestern Idaho. Two of the shales represent Cretaceous formations in eastern Idaho, which should be further investigated to determine their realistic value and areal extent. Samples of the older Mesozonic and paleozoic sections show promise but have not been chemically analyzed and will need greater attention to determine their potential. Geothermal resources are of high potential in Idaho and are important to oil shale prospects. Geothermal conditions raise the geothermal gradient and act as maturing agents to oil shale. They also might be used in the retorting and refining processes. Oil shales at the surface, which appear to have good oil or gas potential should have much higher potential at depth where the geothermal gradient is high. Samples from deep petroleum exploration wells indicate that the succor Creek shales have undergone considerable maturation with depth of burial and should produce gas and possibly oil. Most of Idaho's shales that have been analyzed have a greater potential for gas than for oil but some oil potential is indicated. The Miocene shales of the Succor Creek Formation should be considered as gas and possibly oil source material for the future when technology has been perfectes. 11 refs.

Warner, M.M.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Chinese tallow seed oil as a diesel fuel extender  

SciTech Connect

Chinese tallow and stillingia oil are products obtained from the seed of the unmerchantable, but high yielding Chinese tallow tree. Short-term diesel engine performance tests using mixtures 25%:75% and 50%:50% of Chinese tallow tree seed oil and tallow to diesel fuel gave engine power output, brake thermal efficiencies, and fuel consumption rates within 7% of those obtained using pure diesel fuel. Fuel property values of the extended fuels were found to be within limits proposed for diesel engines. 12 references.

Samson, W.D.; Vidrine, C.G.; Robbins, J.W.D.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Conventional Gasoline Imports from Non OPEC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

419

Other Oxygenates Imports from Non OPEC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

420

MTBE (Oxygenate) Imports from Non OPEC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "opec oil output" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

U.S. Imports from Non OPEC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

422

U.S. Imports from OPEC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

423

What to Watch: Iraq, OPEC and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

When keeping an eye on petroleum prices, we watch inventories closely. Recall that inventories measure the balance between supply and demand, and thus signal pressure ...

424

Optical device with conical input and output prism faces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for radially translating radiation in which a right circular cylinder is provided at each end thereof with conical prism faces. The faces are oppositely extending and the device may be severed in the middle and separated to allow access to the central part of the beam. Radiation entering the input end of the device is radially translated such that radiation entering the input end at the perimeter is concentrated toward the output central axis and radiation at the input central axis is dispersed toward the output perimeter. Devices are disclosed for compressing beam energy to enhance drilling techniques, for beam manipulation of optical spatial frequencies in the Fourier plane and for simplification of dark field and color contrast microscopy. Both refracting and reflecting devices are disclosed.

Brunsden, Barry S. (Chicago, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

An Advanced simulation Code for Modeling Inductive Output Tubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the Phase I program, CCR completed several major building blocks for a 3D large signal, inductive output tube (IOT) code using modern computer language and programming techniques. These included a 3D, Helmholtz, time-harmonic, field solver with a fully functional graphical user interface (GUI), automeshing and adaptivity. Other building blocks included the improved electrostatic Poisson solver with temporal boundary conditions to provide temporal fields for the time-stepping particle pusher as well as the self electric field caused by time-varying space charge. The magnetostatic field solver was also updated to solve for the self magnetic field caused by time changing current density in the output cavity gap. The goal function to optimize an IOT cavity was also formulated, and the optimization methodologies were investigated.

Thuc Bui; R. Lawrence Ives

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

426

Current mode instrumentation amplifier with rail-to-rail input and output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Current Mode Instrumentation Amplifier with rail-to-rail input and output is presented. It is based on constant gm input stages, and cascode output stages. Although this CMIA structure has a good Input Common Mode Voltage, it suffers from a poor output ... Keywords: analog integrated circuits, current mode instrumentation amplifier, rail-to-rail input and output

Filipe Costa Beber Vieira; Cesar Augusto Prior; Cesar Ramos Rodrigues; Leonardo Perin; Joao Baptista dos Santos Martins

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Brief paper: Speed regulation with measured output feedback in the control of heavy haul trains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An approach of output regulation with measurement feedback is proposed for the control of heavy haul trains. The objective is to regulate all cars' speeds to a prescribed speed profile. The output regulation problem of nonlinear systems with measurement ... Keywords: ECP braking system, Heavy haul trains, Measured output feedback, Output regulation, Quadratic programming

X. Zhuan; X. Xia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Industrial Oil Products Newsletter April 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read the Industrial Oil Products Newsletter April 2013. Industrial Oil Products Newsletter April 2013 Industrial Oil Products Newsletter April 2013 ...

429

Crude Oil Analysis Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The composition and physical properties of crude oil vary widely from one reservoir to another within an oil field, as well as from one field or region to another. Although all oils consist of hydrocarbons and their derivatives, the proportions of various types of compounds differ greatly. This makes some oils more suitable than others for specific refining processes and uses. To take advantage of this diversity, one needs access to information in a large database of crude oil analyses. The Crude Oil Analysis Database (COADB) currently satisfies this need by offering 9,056 crude oil analyses. Of these, 8,500 are United States domestic oils. The database contains results of analysis of the general properties and chemical composition, as well as the field, formation, and geographic location of the crude oil sample. [Taken from the Introduction to COAMDATA_DESC.pdf, part of the zipped software and database file at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain PDF documents and a large Excel spreadsheet. It will also contain the database in Microsoft Access 2002.

Shay, Johanna Y.

430

Crude Oil Watch - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil Watch April 19, 2000 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil & Gas A large stockbuild in crude oil inventories contributed to blunt crude oil inputs ...

431

Shale oil: process choices  

SciTech Connect

The four broad categories of shale-oil processing are discussed. All of these processes share the basic function of retorting oil-shale rock at high temperature so that the kerogen material in the rocks is thermally decomposed to shale oil and gaseous products. The technologies and the organizations working on their development are: solids-to-solids heating, The Oil Shale Co. (TOSCO) and Lurgi-Rhur; gas-to-solids heating with internal gas combustion, U. S. Bureau of Mines, Development Engineering Inc. and Union Oil of California; gas-to-solid heating with external heat generation, Development Engineering, Union Oil, Petrobas, and Institute of Gas Technology; and in-situ retorting, Occidental Petroleum Corp. The TOSCO II process is considered proven and on the verge of commercialization. (BLM)

1974-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

432

One Hundred Years of Oil Income and the Iranian Economy: A Curse or a Blessing?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the impact of oil revenues on the Iranian economy over the past hundred years, spanning the period 1908–2010. It is shown that although oil has been produced in Iran over a very long period, its importance in the Iranian economy was relatively small up until the early 1960s. It is argued that oil income has been both a blessing and a curse. Oil revenues when managed appropriately are a blessing, but their volatility (which in Iran is much higher than oil price volatility) can have adverse e¤ects on real output, through excessively high and persistent levels of in‡ation. Lack of appropriate institutions and policy mechanisms which act as shock absorbers in the face of high levels of oil revenue volatility have also become a drag on real output. In order to promote growth, policies should be devised to control in‡ation; to serve as shock absorbers negating the adverse e¤ects of oil revenue volatility; to reduce rent seeking activities; and to prevent excessive dependence of government …nances on oil income. We are grateful to Parvin Alizadeh, Hassan Hakimian and conference participants at the University of

Kamiar Mohaddes A; M. Hashem Pesaran B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

A Quantitative Analysis of Oil-Price Shocks, Systematic Monetary Policy, and Economic Downturns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for their comments. The views expressed here are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent Are the recessionary consequences of oil-price shocks due to oil-price shocks themselves or to contractionary monetary policies that arise in response to inflation concerns engendered by rising oil prices? Can systematic monetary policy be used to alleviate the consequences of oil shocks on the economy? This paper builds a dynamic general equilibrium model of monopolistic competition in which oil and money matter to study these questions. The economy's response to oil-price shocks is examined under a variety of monetary policy rules in environments with flexible and sticky prices. We find that easy-inflation policies amplify the negative output response to positive oil shocks and that systematic monetary policy accounts for up to two thirds of the fall in output. On the other hand, we show that a monetary policy that targets the (overall) price level substantially alleviates the impact of oil-price shocks

Sylvan Leduc; Keith Sill; Sylvain Leduc; Keith Sill

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Process of treating oil shale  

SciTech Connect

A process of destructively distilling oil shale is described consisting in subjecting the oil shale containing aluminum to the action of heat and pressure to destructively distill it and separate the light oil constituents. Chlorine gas is simultaneously passed through the hot oil shale countercurrent to the direction of movement of the oil shale.

Egloff, G.

1927-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

435

2 World Oil Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Crude oil prices react to a variety of geopolitical and economic events price per barrel (real 2010 dollars, quarterly average) 140 120 imported refiner acquisition cost of crude oil WTI crude oil price Global financial collapse 100 80 60 U.S. spare capacity exhausted Iran-Iraq War Saudis abandon swing producer role Asian financial crisis 9-11 attacks Low spare capacity

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Crude Oil Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil exports are ...

437

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

438

Oil and Gas (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This division of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources provides information on the regulation of oil and gas exploration, wells and well spacings, drilling, plugging and abandonment, and...

439

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2000 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

440

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "opec oil output" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Crude Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2001 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

442

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disruptions, and the peak in U.S. oil production account foroil increased 81.1% (logarithmically) between January 1979 and the peak

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Residual Fuel Oil Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil exports are ...

444

Oil spill response resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pollution has become one of the main problems being faced by humanity. Preventing pollution from occurring might be the best idea but is not possible in this fast developing world. So the next best thing to do would be to respond to the pollution source in an effective manner. Oil spills are fast becoming pollution sources that are causing the maximum damage to the environment. This is owing to the compounds that are released and the way oil spreads in both water and land. Preventing the oil spill would be the best option. But once the oil has been spilled, the next best thing to do is to respond to the spill effectively. As a result, time becomes an important factor while responding to an oil spill. Appropriate response to contain and cleanup the spill is required to minimize its potential damage to the ecosystem. Since time and money play a very important role in spill response, it would be a great idea if decisions can be made in such a way that a quick response can be planned. The first part of this study deals with the formation of an 'Oil Spill Resources Handbook', which has information on all the important Oil Spill Contractors. The second and the main part of the study, deals with creating a database in Microsoft Access of the Oil Spill Contractors. The third portion of the study deals with planning an oil spill response using a systems approach.

Muthukrishnan, Shankar

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry analysts and academics agree that China’s domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robert Ebel, China’s Energy

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Crude Oil Price Forecast  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

We believe crude oil prices will strengthen somewhat, but prices will rise much more slowly than they fell, and they are expected to remain lower in ...

447

Oil And The Macroeconomy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This paper examines the oil price-macro economy relationship by means of analyzing the impact ofoil price on Industrial production, real effective exchange rate, long… (more)

Al-Ameri, Leyth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

California Crude Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... of different quality crudes vary over time based on the value the market places on such quality attributes. A heavy crude oil has more heavy, ...

449

Improved oil refinery operations and cheaper crude oil to help...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Improved oil refinery operations and cheaper crude oil to help reduce gasoline prices U.S. gasoline prices are expected to fall as more oil refineries come back on line and crude...

450

Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Fall 2013 Topics: Thermodynamics of energy systems; Power Loss; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Power Loss; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3 Due October 10, in class, or before 5pm outside: Thermodynamics of energy systems; Power Loss; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3 Due October 10, in class peripheral buildings; at peak output, the plant generates 185,000 pounds of steam each hour. It has been

Kammen, Daniel M.

451

Determination of Aluminum Rolling Oil and Machinery Oil Residues ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Determination of Aluminum Rolling Oil and Machinery Oil Residues on Aluminum Sheet and Foil by Using Elemental Analysis and Fourier  ...

452

Relaxation studies on oil, pressboard and oil impregnated pressboard.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, a laboratory relaxation study with FDS and RVM was carried out for a period of 3 years with the fabricated oil (OIL),… (more)

Cao, Hongyan.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Why solar oil shale retorting produces more oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solar oil shale retorting process may produce higher oil yield than conventional processing. High oil yield is obtained for three reasons: oil carbonization inside of the shale is reduced, oil cracking outside of the shale is reduced, and oil oxidation is essentially eliminated. Unique capabilities of focused solar energy produce these advantages. An increase in yield will reduce the cost of mining and shale transportation per barrel of oil produced. These cost reductions may justify the increased processing costs that will probably be associated with solar oil shale retorting.

Aiman, W.R.

1981-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

454

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects: Shale Oil Upgrading Utilizing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Companies providing oil samples of at least five (5) gallons include Chevron, Oil Shale Exploration Company (OSEC), and Red Leaf Resources, Inc. Background Work performed...

455

NETL: Oil and Natural Gas: Enhanced Oil Recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that have unconventional characteristics (e.g., oil in fractured shales, kerogen in oil shale, bitumen in tar sands) constitute an enormous potential domestic supply of energy....

456

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 of 18 Notes: Using the Northeast as an appropriate regional focus for heating oil, the typical oil-heated household consumes about 680 gallons of oil during the winter, assuming...

457

Distillate and Crude Oil Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fuel and residential heating oil prices on the East Coast is being driven by higher crude oil prices than last year and higher spreads. Crude oil is projected to average almost...

458

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Oil and Natural Gas Supply > Events Oil and Natural Gas Supply Events The following is a listing of events of interest to the oil and natural gas community....

459

The Legacy of Oil Spills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

010-0527-5 The Legacy of Oil Spills J. T. Trevors & M. H.workers were killed, and oil has been gushing out everday. It is now June, and oil continues to spew forth into

Trevors, J. T.; Saier, M. H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Handbook of Australasian Edible Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book highlights various aspects of Australasian edible oils. Handbook of Australasian Edible Oils Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Soft Bound Books Oils and Fats Specialist

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "opec oil output" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Menhaden Fish Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Physical Characteristics of Oils, Fats, and Waxes Menhaden Oil Specific Gravity (SG) 15.5/15.5°C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.912– 0.930 25/25°C Other SG Refractive Index (RI) 25°C 40°C Other RI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (65) 1

462

Refining of shale oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The refining of shale oil is reviewed to assess the current state-of-the-art, especially as to the avaiability of technology suitable for operation on a commercial scale. Oil shale retorting processes as they affect the quality of the crude shale oil for refining, exploratory research on the character and refining of shale oil, and other published refining background leading to the present status are discussed. The initial refining of shale oil requires the removal of a large concentration of nitrogen, an added step not required for typical petroleum crude oils, and recently published estimates show that the total cost of refining will be high. Specific technoloy is reported by industry to be technically proven and available for commercial-scale refining. Although the refining will be more costly than that of petroleum, the viability of a shale oil industry will also be affected greatly by the technology and costs of producing the crude shale oil, environmental costs, and future price and tax treatment, and these are outside the scope of this study of refining.

Lanning, W.C.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Oil price analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transport has been in the whole history of mankind the basic and determining mover of the human society shape. It determined not only the position of towns, but also their inner design and it was also last but not least the basic element of the economic ... Keywords: GDP, deposit, fuels, history, market equilibrium, oil, oil reserves, price

Zdenek Riha; Viktorie Jirova; Marek Honcu

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Edible Oils Package  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contains four (4) titles regarding frying and edible oils. Edible Oils Package Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Value Packages 1766A8D5F05863694E128DE1C47D07C3 This Value Package includes: ...

465

Method and system for managing an electrical output of a turbogenerator  

SciTech Connect

The system and method manages an electrical output of a turbogenerator in accordance with multiple modes. In a first mode, a direct current (DC) bus receives power from a turbogenerator output via a rectifier where turbogenerator revolutions per unit time (e.g., revolutions per minute (RPM)) or an electrical output level of a turbogenerator output meet or exceed a minimum threshold. In a second mode, if the turbogenerator revolutions per unit time or electrical output level of a turbogenerator output are less than the minimum threshold, the electric drive motor or a generator mechanically powered by the engine provides electrical energy to the direct current bus.

Stahlhut, Ronnie Dean (Bettendorf, IA); Vuk, Carl Thomas (Denver, IA)

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

466

Method and system for managing an electrical output of a turbogenerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The system and method manages an electrical output of a turbogenerator in accordance with multiple modes. In a first mode, a direct current (DC) bus receives power from a turbogenerator output via a rectifier where turbogenerator revolutions per unit time (e.g., revolutions per minute (RPM)) or an electrical output level of a turbogenerator output meet or exceed a minimum threshold. In a second mode, if the turbogenerator revolutions per unit time or electrical output level of a turbogenerator output are less than the minimum threshold, the electric drive motor or a generator mechanically powered by the engine provides electrical energy to the direct current bus.

Stahlhut, Ronnie Dean (Bettendorf, IA); Vuk, Carl Thomas (Denver, IA)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

467

Status of LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid oil shale retort  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated the technical and economic barriers facing the introduction of an oil shale industry and we have chosen Hot-Recycled-Solid (HRS) oil shale retorting as the primary advanced technology of interest. We are investigating this approach through fundamental research, operation of a 4 tonne-per-day, HRS pilot plant and development of an Oil Shale Process (OSP) mathematical model. Over the last three years, from June 1991 to June 1993, we completed a series of runs (H10--H27) using the 4-TPD pilot plant to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the HRS process and answer key scale-up questions. With our CRADA partners, we seek to further develop the HRS technology, maintain and enhance the knowledge base gained over the past two decades through research and development by Government and industry and determine the follow on steps needed to advance the technology towards commercialization. The LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid process has the potential to improve existing oil shale technology. It processes oil shale in minutes instead of hours, reducing plant size. It processes all oil shale, including fines rejected by other processes. It provides controls to optimize product quality for different applications. It co-generates electricity to maximize useful energy output. And, it produces negligible SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions, a non-hazardous waste shale and uses minimal water.

Baldwin, D.E.; Cena, R.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

468

Does the Fed Respond to Oil Price Shocks?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Since Bernanke, Gertler and Watson (1997), a common view in the literature has been that systematic monetary policy responses to the inflation triggered by oil price shocks are an important source of aggregate fluctuations in the U.S. economy. We show that there is no evidence of systematic monetary policy responses to oil price shocks after 1987 and that this lack of a policy response is unlikely to be explained by reduced real wage rigidities. Prior to 1987, according to standard VAR models, the Federal Reserve was not responding to the inflation triggered by oil price shocks, as commonly presumed, but rather to the oil price shocks directly, consistent with a preemptive move by the Federal Reserve to counteract potential inflationary pressures. There are indications that this response is poorly identified, however, and there is no evidence that this policy response in the pre-1987 period caused substantial fluctuations in the Federal Funds rate or in real output. Our analysis suggests that the traditional monetary policy reaction framework explored by BGW and incorporated in subsequent DSGE models should be replaced by DSGE models that take account of the endogeneity of the real price of oil and that allow policy responses to depend on the underlying causes of oil price shocks.

Lutz Kilian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Peak oil: diverging discursive pipelines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Peak oil is the claimed moment in time when global oil production reaches its maximum rate and henceforth forever declines. It is highly controversial as… (more)

Doctor, Jeff

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Oil and Natural Gas - Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Search NETL Oil and Natural Gas Document Information Oil & Natural Gas Document Repository Results will be shown in two categories. "Document Database Results" provides...

471

Balancing oil and environment... responsibly.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Balancing Oil and Environment…Responsibly As the price of oil continues to skyrocket and global oil production nears the brink, pursuing unconventional oil supplies, such as oil shale, oil sands, heavy oils, and oils from biomass and coal has become increasingly attractive. Of particular significance to the American way is that our continent has significant quantities of these resources. Tapping into these new resources, however, requires cutting-edge technologies for identification, production, processing and environmental management. This job needs a super hero or two for a job of this size and proportion…

Weimer, Walter C.; Teske, Lisa

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

472

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 3 Vegetable Oil-Based Engine Oils: Are They Practical?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 3 Vegetable Oil-Based Engine Oils: Are They Practical? Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 3 Vegetable Oil-Based Engine Oils: Are They Practi

473

oil | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

oil oil Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 134, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into Crude oil, dry natural gas. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA end-of-year reserves gas oil Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Oil and Gas End-of-Year Reserves and Annual Reserve Additions- Reference Case (xls, 58.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset

474

Heavy crude oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

The oil crisis of the past decade has focused most of the attention and effort of researchers on crude oil resources, which are accepted as unrecoverable using known technology. World reserves are estimated to be 600-1000 billion metric tons, and with present technology 160 billion tons of this total can be recovered. This book is devoted to the discussion of Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) techniques, their mechanism and applicability to heavy oil reservoirs. The book also discusses some field results. The use of numerical simulators has become important, in addition to laboratory research, in analysing the applicability of oil recovery processes, and for this reason the last section of the book is devoted to simulators used in EOR research.

Okandan, E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Corrosivity Of Pyrolysis Oils  

SciTech Connect

Pyrolysis oils from several sources have been analyzed and used in corrosion studies which have consisted of exposing corrosion coupons and stress corrosion cracking U-bend samples. The chemical analyses have identified the carboxylic acid compounds as well as the other organic components which are primarily aromatic hydrocarbons. The corrosion studies have shown that raw pyrolysis oil is very corrosive to carbon steel and other alloys with relatively low chromium content. Stress corrosion cracking samples of carbon steel and several low alloy steels developed through-wall cracks after a few hundred hours of exposure at 50 C. Thermochemical processing of biomass can produce solid, liquid and/or gaseous products depending on the temperature and exposure time used for processing. The liquid product, known as pyrolysis oil or bio-oil, as produced contains a significant amount of oxygen, primarily as components of water, carboxylic acids, phenols, ketones and aldehydes. As a result of these constituents, these oils are generally quite acidic with a Total Acid Number (TAN) that can be around 100. Because of this acidity, bio-oil is reported to be corrosive to many common structural materials. Despite this corrosive nature, these oils have the potential to replace some imported petroleum. If the more acidic components can be removed from this bio-oil, it is expected that the oil could be blended with crude oil and then processed in existing petroleum refineries. The refinery products could be transported using customary routes - pipelines, barges, tanker trucks and rail cars - without a need for modification of existing hardware or construction of new infrastructure components - a feature not shared by ethanol.

Keiser, James R [ORNL; Bestor, Michael A [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Measurement and Modeling of Solar and PV Output Variability: Preprint  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measurement and Modeling of Measurement and Modeling of Solar and PV Output Variability Preprint M. Sengupta To be presented at SOLAR 2011 Raleigh, North Carolina May 17-21, 2011 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-51105 April 2011 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty,

477

New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors May 3, 2011 -...

478

New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors May 3, 2011 - 12:00am...

479

Fuel Oil Prepared by Blending Heavy Oil and Coal Tar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of temperature, harmonic ration, surfactant and shearing to fuel oil prepared by blending heavy oil and coal tar were detailedly studied. The results show that the viscosity of the blended oil increases gradually with the increase of harmonic ... Keywords: coal tar, heavy oil, blending, surfactant

Guojie Zhang; Xiaojie Guo; Bo Tian; Yaling Sun; Yongfa Zhang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

An informal description of Standard OIL and Instance OIL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An informal description of Standard OIL and Instance OIL 28 November 2000 Sean Bechhofer (1) Jeen to be specified in some language. This paper introduces the newest version of OIL ­ the ontology inference layer of the DAML language, with working name DAML-OIL, was proposed in a message to the rdf-logic mailing list

Ohlbach, Hans Jürgen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "opec oil output" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA estimates that Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), not including Iran, earned about $982 billion in net oil export revenues in 2012, a 5 ...

482

Egypt - Analysis - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Egypt is the largest oil producer in Africa that is not a member of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), and the second largest natural gas ...

483

Highly Efficient eDiscovery Using Adaptive Search Criteria ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... example of 'buy the rumor, sell the fact' was seen Friday when Crude Oil futures sold off on confirmation of OPEC production cuts.”… ….HOLIDAY ...

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

484

National Petroleum Council | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

points: Fundamentally tight market conditions have caused dramatic increases in the price of oil; a slowing of energy demand in OECD countries has prompted OPEC to call for...

485

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Petroleum and Other...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

In 2004, OPEC produced 41 percent of the world's liquids supply. High oil prices, new exploration and production technologies, aggressive cost-reduction programs by industry,...

486

Iran - Analysis - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Exploration and production. Iran's crude oil production fell dramatically in 2012, and, although it remained the second-largest OPEC producer on average during the ...

487

Symbolism in California’s Early Market for Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR).opposed any exploration in ANWR because of the environmentalnoting that oil from ANWR would reduce US dependence on OPEC

Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Turrentine, Tom

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Hong Kong - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

South China Sea; Special Topics; Emerging East Africa Energy; OPEC Revenues Fact Sheet; World Oil Transit Chokepoints; Overview data for Hong Kong

489

Recognising Textual Entailment Focusing on Non-Entailing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 48 Indonesia has revisited its OPEC membership, but decided to stay on to maintain high-level relations with big- time oil powers like Saudi Arabia. ...

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

490

Bayesian Inference with Node Aggregation for Information ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Policies of the US Government 85 Official Corruption in any government 88 Crude Oil Price Trends 89 Downstream investing by OPEC members 90 ...

1998-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

491

Highlights - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

forecasting increasing oil prices for the remainder of 1999 and remaining at relatively high levels throughout 2000. Of course, if OPEC production in 2000 exceeds this

492

Projects Gallery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the two World Wars and the OPEC oil supply disruptions. ... about the cooling in the years 1940-1970. ... so the data seem to demand a monotonically ...

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

493

Microsoft Word - Highlightsfinal.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arabia, Angola, Kuwait, and the United Arab Emirates. The pace of consumption growth, inventory trends, and oil prices will influence OPEC members' production strategy for the...

494

Conclusions - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Low U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Levels. Low OECD Days Supply Increased Risk for Volatility. OPEC? Production Levels? Price Band? Cohesion? Previous slide:

495

Romania - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

OPEC Revenues Fact Sheet; World Oil Transit Chokepoints; ... A moratorium on shale gas exploration had been in place, but expired in December 2012 without being renewed.

496

India - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

What is shale gas and why is it important? ... OPEC Revenues Fact Sheet; World Oil Transit Chokepoints; ... India’s economic growth is driving its energy consumption

497

Peru - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

OPEC Revenues Fact Sheet; World Oil Transit Chokepoints; ... economic growth, and the ... Shale gas has not been previously developed in Peru and Maple Energy is ...

498

Ukraine - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

OPEC Revenues Fact Sheet; World Oil Transit ... Recent discoveries of shale gas deposits in Ukraine provide the country with a possible ... (Btu per 2005 U.S ...

499

chapter 3 american social and economic developments - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

eliminate fraud and waste without cutting the meat and muscle out of our ..... AND ENCOURAGES FRAUD ...... investment in oil production outside OPEC.

500

Oil shale data book  

SciTech Connect

The Oil Shale Data Book has been prepared as a part of its work under DOE Management Support and Systems Engineering for the Naval Oil Shale Reserves Predevelopment Plan. The contract calls for the preparation of a Master Development Plan for the Reserves which comprise some 145,000 acres of oil shale lands in Colorado and Utah. The task of defining the development potential of the Reserves required that the resources of the Reserves be well defined, and the shale oil recovery technologies that are potentially compatible with this resource be cataloged. Additionally, processes associated with shale oil recovery like mining, materials handling, beneficiation, upgrading and spent shale disposal have also been cataloged. This book, therefore, provides a ready reference for evaluation of appropriate recovery technologies and associated processes, and should prove to be valuable for many oil shale activities. Technologies that are still in the process of development, like retorting, have been treated in greater detail than those that are commercially mature. Examples of the latter are ore crushing, certain gas clean-up systems, and pipeline transportation. Emphasis has been on documenting available design information such as, maximum module size, operation conditions, yields, utility requirements, outlet gas compositions, shale oil characteristics, etc. Cost information has also been included where available.

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