National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for opec afghanistan albania

  1. OPEC Revenues Fact Sheet

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2013-01-01

    This report includes estimates of OPEC net oil export revenues, based on historical estimates and forecasts from the latest Energy Information Administration (EIA) Short-Term Energy Outlook.

  2. OPEC agreement and its implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Following lengthy and intensive negotiations, OPEC recently reached agreement on new prices and production quotas. Although the agreement has been met by general skepticism, Bankers Trust believes that the chances of defending the new marker price are reasonably good. Saudi willingness to reduce oil production and earnings to shield less financially secure OPEC members from the full impact of production cuts provides added and much-needed strength to the organization. If indeed the OPEC agreement proves successful, product prices in the important US market may have already bottomed out.

  3. Fact #563: March 23, 2009 OPEC Petroleum Imports | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3: March 23, 2009 OPEC Petroleum Imports Fact 563: March 23, 2009 OPEC Petroleum Imports In the 1970's, the U.S. imported more petroleum from OPEC than from non-OPEC countries....

  4. Do oil markets work; is OPEC dead

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gately, D. (New York Univ., NY (USA). Dept. of Economics)

    1989-01-01

    In this paper the authors review what has happened in world oil markets since the 1970s and examine the prospects for OPEC and world oil prices. The paper summarizes the data for the last two decades: by fuel, by product, and by region. It focuses on OPEC and its members, examining the differences in behavior between its members and non-OPEC producers. The authors find that OPEC is clearly still relevant, if no longer very powerful. Its members have collectively reduced output dramatically, in an unsuccessful attempt to defend the price increases. They examine the important institutional changes of the last two decades, in comparison with the industry's stability for much of the century. They suggest an interpretation of OPEC's current situation. The paper summarizes the outlook for OPEC and the world oil market over the next two decades.

  5. Statement from Energy Secretary Bodman on OPEC's Decision to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statement from Energy Secretary Bodman on OPEC's Decision to Cut Crude Oil Production Statement from Energy Secretary Bodman on OPEC's Decision to Cut Crude Oil Production October...

  6. OPEC at high noon 1974-1981

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adelman, Morris Albert

    1992-01-01

    After 1973, oil consumption stagnated worldwide. Non-OPEC output increased, mostly in Alaska, Mexico, and the North Sea, but not because of the price rise. The cartel nations had to assume the whole burden of cutting back ...

  7. Interdependencies 1989, Part III: Focus on solidarity with OPEC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-07-10

    Several non-OPEC countries, and sometimes elements within countries, have been in dialogue with OPEC about oil market supply, demand, and pricing for the past few years. Recently, some have attended OPEC meetings as observers for the first time. Economists have asked, Will this strengthen OPEC make it into a true cartel Is free oil marketing threatened In this issue a remarkable paper addresses the evolution of relationships between OPEC and non-OPEC producers. This issue also presents the following: (1) ED refining netback data series for the US Gulf and West Coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore as of July 7, 1989; and (2) ED fuel price/tax series for the countries of the Western Hemisphere, July 1989 edition. Includes paper by John Roberts, OPEC and non-OPEC Relations, March 1989. 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Shifting production trends point to more oil from OPEC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ismail, I.A.H. (Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, Vienna (Austria))

    1994-12-26

    Oil production from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and non-OPEC regions has undergone four major phases of change in relation to oil price since 1960. Patterns visible in those phases offer an indication of world-wide production trends in the future. These four phases are described. Overall, demand for oil during 1960--93 has increased from around 20 million b/d in 1960 to as high as 65 million b/d in 1993. The consensus among energy analysts and forecasters is that this demand growth will continue. This will encourage OPEC and non OPEC producers to invest in the oil industry to meet future demand growth. However, since the resource base is larger in OPEC than in non-OPEC areas, and since the cost of developing these resources is lower in OPEC than outside OPEC, the future call on OPEC oil to meet growth in demand will undoubtedly be substantiated as production from the non-OPEC region diminishes or at best stagnates. The paper discusses OPEC production trends, non-OPEC production, natural gas liquids, future production scenarios, and future constraints on production.

  9. OPEC's investments and the international financial system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattione, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    Few events of the past decade have affected the global economic and political landscape as much as the sharp increase in the price of oil in 1973-74 and again in 1979-80. The massive transfer of real resources from mostly Western oil-consuming nations to oil-producing countries, especially to members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, raised widespread fears that actions of OPEC nations could disrupt world financial markets, that oil markets and energy supplies would become unstable, and that a significant shift of political power would increase international tensions. In this study of how OPEC nations have used and learned to invest their wealth, Richard P. Mattione shows that the fears, have not in any significant way been realized. Mattione is the first to analyze in detail the size and distribution of the investments, their effects on the international financial system, and the motivations behind each OPEC member's investment strategy. Analyzing hard-to-find data from a variety of sources, he argues that investments in the United States and elsewhere have been motivated at least as much by conventional financial considerations - the need for liquidity, diversification, safety, and adequate rate of return - as by oil policy, development policy, or political considerations. He also traces the growth of these countries' abilities to absorb funds through internal development, their growing sophistication in financial planning and in moving Arab banks into international financial markets, and their mixed success in using aid to Third World countries to further their foreign policy goals. The book concludes with an analysis of the interplay of oil prices and policy, development needs, and financial strategies and their implication for the investments of each OPEC member in the 1980s. 33 tabs.

  10. Exclusive: OPEC's story - denies it is a cartel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-03-23

    Coverage of OPEC news in the Western press exploded in 1973 during the Arab Oil Embargo and blossomed during the 1979 oil price hike. Since then, however, coverage wanes when OPEC's problems are its own and not widely impacting consuming nations. OPECNA, the OPEC News Agency, was established in 1980 to improve the quantity and quality of world press coverage of OPEC activities. Since then, OPECNA has also been OPEC's historian. It is felt that OPECNA has achieved its principal goal, that of providing reliable and frequent information about OPEC and the activities of its member countries; however, it appears to have little success in restructuring world opinion. Included here is an exclusive interview by Energy Detente with Mr. Gonzalo Plaza, Director of OPECNA. The Energy Detente fuel price/tax series and industrial fuel prices for March 1983 are presented for countries of the Western Hemisphere.

  11. Determinants of official OPEC crude prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verleger, P.K. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    The hypothesis of this paper is that crude oil, like any other unfinished commodity, is valued for the products derived from it; the purpose is to offer an empirical explanation for changes in the crude price charged by the members of OPEC. The model results show that the market-clearing prices reported to prevail for petroleum products on the principal petroleum spot market at Rotterdam are the primary determinants of changes in official crude prices. A systematic relationship between offical and spot prices is argued to have prevailed since 1974. An appendix clarifies five types of data required for the model. 13 references, 4 tables.

  12. OPEC production: Untapped reserves, world demand spur production expansion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ismail, I.A.H. (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, Vienna (Austria))

    1994-05-02

    To meet projected world oil demand, almost all members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) have embarked on ambitious capacity expansion programs aimed at increasing oil production capabilities. These expansion programs are in both new and existing oil fields. In the latter case, the aim is either to maintain production or reduce the production decline rate. However, the recent price deterioration has led some major OPEC producers, such as Saudi Arabia and Iran, to revise downward their capacity plans. Capital required for capacity expansion is considerable. Therefore, because the primary source of funds will come from within each OPEC country, a reasonably stable and relatively high oil price is required to obtain enough revenue for investing in upstream projects. This first in a series of two articles discusses the present OPEC capacity and planned expansion in the Middle East. The concluding part will cover the expansion plans in the remaining OPEC countries, capital requirements, and environmental concerns.

  13. Islamic Republic of Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    of Iran Aghajari Oil & Gas Production Company (AOGPC) B,C,N 20 Islamic Republic of Iran Aluminat Places The World Islamic Front for Jihad against Jews and Crusaders Usama Bin Laden Network Usama Bin of Afghanistan Islamic Republic of Pakistan Ummah Tameer E-Nau (UTN) N 4 United Arab Emirates Energy Global

  14. Islamic Republic of Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    Oil & Gas Production Company (AOGPC) B,C,N 20 Islamic Republic of Iran Aluminat Aluminat Production Places The World Islamic Front for Jihad against Jews and Crusaders Usama Bin Laden Network Usama Bin of Afghanistan Islamic Republic of Pakistan Ummah Tameer E-Nau (UTN) N 4 United Arab Emirates Energy Global

  15. Inscrutable OPEC? : behavioral tests of the cartel hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, James L.

    2003-01-01

    We show that standard statistical tests of OPEC behavior have very low power across a wide range of alternative hypotheses regarding market structure. Consequently, it is difficult, given the current availability and ...

  16. Model of world energy markets and OPEC pricing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choe, B.J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the world energy and petroleum markets, carried out by means of an econometric simulation model. The model accepts a certain pricing path for OPEC crude oil (a price seen as being chosen by OPEC mainly on the basis of its revenue implications) together with assumptions about GDP and population growth, and generates energy balance projections for seven world regions - three industrial country regions and four developing country groups. The demand side of the model consists of three end-use sectors (transportation, industrial and residential/commercial) and one energy transformation sector (thermal power generation). The model presently has an endogenous supply specification only for coal. The performance of the model in simulating the historical period of the 1970s was reasonably satisfactory. Simulation results under a range of assumptions about future economic growth and OPEC pricing portend that world demand for energy and petroleum is likely to remain at relatively low levels throughout the 1980s and the early 1990s. Past and expected petroleum price increases will provide a strong and sustained incentive to substitute away from energy and petroleum; enough to keep the demand for OPEC oil comfortably within OPEC's productive capacity through the early 1990s. Coal will play a key role as a substitute fuel for the next 20 years. About two-thirds of the projected incremental demand for primary energy between 1978 and the year 2000 is accounted for by developing countries. 87 references, 8 figures, 45 tables.

  17. Fact #734: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries Represent Less Than Half...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by Country of Origin, 1973-2011 (million barrels per day) Year Saudi Arabia Venezuela Nigeria Other OPEC Countries Canada Mexico Russia Other Non-OPEC Countries Total 1973 0.49...

  18. Fact #836: September 1, Non-OPEC Countries Supply Nearly Two...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) are shown in shades of blue while non-OPEC countries are shown in shades of green. Petroleum imports rose sharply...

  19. The oil price and non-OPEC supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seymour, A.

    1991-01-01

    The design of any effective oil pricing policy by producers depends on a knowledge of the nature and complexity of supply responses. This book examines the development of non-OPEX oil reserves on a field-by-filed basis to determine how much of the increase in non-OPEC production could be attributable to the price shocks and how much was unambiguously due to decisions and developments that preceded the price shocks. Results are presented in eighteen case-studies of non-OPEC producers. This study will be of interest to economists and planners specializing in the upstream and to policy makers both in oil producing and consuming countries.

  20. Albania-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  1. Sources of records for Albania in Flora Europaea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolowski, Marla

    boundaries some, particularly Albania, Epirus, Macedonia and Thrace transcend post 1945 political boundaries Albanian Alps". Much of this mountain range is in Serbia and Macedonia (particularly the part named !ar that the collection was from Albania when in fact it came from Serbia or Macedonia. Some of these collections are from

  2. Non-OPEC oil supply continues to grow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, D.H. [International Energy Agency, Paris (France)

    1995-12-25

    Global reserves of crude oil remain at 1 trillion bbl, according to OGJ`s annual survey of producing countries. Significant gains are in Brazil, Colombia, Congo, Egypt, Libya, Nigeria, Oman, and Papua New Guinea. Decreases were reported by Indonesia, Norway, the U.K., Iran, Canada, Mexico, and the US. Natural gas reserves slipped to 4.9 quadrillion cu ft. The major production trend is a lasting surge from outside of OPEC. This year`s Worldwide Production report begins with a detailed analysis of this crucial development by an international authority. This article discusses the OECD outlook by region and the turnaround in production in the former Soviet Union.

  3. Desirability and Feasibility of a Policy Neutrality in Afghanistan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andisha, Nasir A.

    2015-07-08

    Bush School Alum, Ambassador Nasir A. Andisha, presents his doctoral thesis on the "Desirability and Feasibility of a Policy of Neutrality in Afghanistan: The Dilemma of Collective Security and Neutrality in Afghanistan."

  4. Macro economic approach to oil production in OPEC countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shojai, S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper uses a macro economic model of oil exporting developing nations (OPEC) in conjunction with a social welfare function approach (optimal control) to derive an optimum level of oil production. The macro model assumes the economy produces only three goods (oil, imported goods, and nontraded goods), and the foreign exchange rate if fixed. There are twelve endogenous and nine exogenous variables. A 2SLS technique is applied to estimate the macro model using pooled data over the period from 1973-1979. Countries included in this study are: Indonesia, Iran, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia, and Venezuela. The estimated macro model is used as a constraint in the process of maximization of a quadratic social welfare function which includes all of some of the endogenous variables of the model as well as the only control variable, namely, oil exports. Optimal oil production for the period 1974-1981 is calculated based on three different scenarios (A, B, and C). The empirical results indicate that oil revenue is an important factor in determination of GNP, government revenues, and expenditures, consumption, and money supply. The price level does not influence imports, consumption, and demand for money balances. Also, the nontraded goods industry seems to be an isolated industry, and distribution of income changes to the detriment of this industry as the economy becomes more open to international trade. The paper concludes that if economic growth is the main objective of policy makers, greater utilization of oil resources is required. Finally, it suggests more reliance on market forces and less subsidy programs.

  5. Non-OPEC oil supply gains to outpace demand in 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, R.J.

    1997-01-27

    Rising oil supplies in 1997 will relax some of the market tightness that drove up crude prices last year. Worldwide demand for petroleum products in 1996 rose faster than anticipated and faster than supply from outside the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. This increased demand for OPEC oil and pushed up prices for crude. At year end, the world export price of crude was up more than 25% from the same period a year earlier. Market conditions will change in 1997. While worldwide economic growth will continue to boost demand for energy and petroleum, non-OPEC petroleum supply will grow even more. Increases in North Sea and Latin American production will help boost non-OPEC output by 1.9 million b/d. And revenues from 1996 production gains will make additional investment possible in exploration and production. The paper discusses world economic growth, world oil demand, worldwide supply, supply outlook, prices and international drilling.

  6. Gays and Lesbians at War: Military Service in Iraq and Afghanistan Under “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell”

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Nathaniel

    2004-01-01

    AT WAR: MILITARY SERVICE IN IRAQ AND AFGHANISTAN UNDER “DON’wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Despite widespread knowledgeused before sites in Iraq and Afghanistan were improved, as

  7. Martinkus docos show reality of Afghanistan war

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wapstra, Erik

    Martinkus docos show reality of Afghanistan war By ShAron Webb Journalist John Martinkus reels off the date he was kidnapped in the Iraq war as if it's perma- nently scratched on his brain. "It happened. It was terrible. I thought: Here we go." It's experiences like this that gave credibility to the television war

  8. Subsalt Depth Seismic Imaging and Structural Interpretation in Dumre Area, Albania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Subsalt Depth Seismic Imaging and Structural Interpretation in Dumre Area, Albania A. Jardin1, F Interpretation in Dumre Area, Albania -- The challenge of seismic exploration in fold and thrust belt settings compte plus importante des données géologiques. Abstract -- Subsalt Depth Seismic Imaging and Structural

  9. Fact #836: September 1, Non-OPEC Countries Supply Nearly Two-thirds of U.S. Petroleum Imports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The figure below shows the volume and source of imported petroleum to the United States from 1960 to 2013. The countries which are members of OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries...

  10. Fact #734: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries Represent Less Than Half of U.S. Petroleum Imports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Even though Saudi Arabia is the world's largest producer of petroleum, and OPEC countries produce much of the oil in the global market, the U.S. imports most of its oil from Canada, Mexico and...

  11. Assessment of Biomass Resources in Afghanistan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R.

    2011-01-01

    Afghanistan is facing many challenges on its path of reconstruction and development. Among all its pressing needs, the country would benefit from the development and implementation of an energy strategy. In addition to conventional energy sources, the Afghan government is considering alternative options such as energy derived from renewable resources (wind, solar, biomass, geothermal). Biomass energy is derived from a variety of sources -- plant-based material and residues -- and can be used in various conversion processes to yield power, heat, steam, and fuel. This study provides policymakers and industry developers with information on the biomass resource potential in Afghanistan for power/heat generation and transportation fuels production. To achieve this goal, the study estimates the current biomass resources and evaluates the potential resources that could be used for energy purposes.

  12. Simulating the Afghanistan-Pakistan opium supply chain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, Jennifer H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MacKerrow, Edward P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Merritt, Terence M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-04-08

    This paper outlines an opium supply chain using the Hilmand province of Afghanistan as exemplar. The opium supply chain model follows the transformation of opium poppy seed through cultivation and chemical alteration to brown heroin base. The purpose of modeling and simulating the Afghanistan-Pakistan opium supply chain is to discover and test strategies that will disrupt this criminal enterprise.

  13. Colombian manufacturing industry during the era of the OPEC price shocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mokate, K.M.

    1984-01-01

    In the first part of this research, an examination of the data on output, value-added, employment and energy use of the Colombian manufacturing industry for the OPEC price shock era shows that the behavior predicted by theory does not describe that industry's reactions to the OPEC price increases. The industry's energy utilization rate does not follow a downward trend, but rather fluctuates throughout the 1970s. The analysis of the production responses provides no evidence of a decline in the energy intensive sectors; all of the manufacturing sectors experienced cyclical fluctuation during the 1970s, regardless of their energy intensity levels. There is no evidence of change in the intrasectoral product mixes or in the technical input coefficients. However, the fluctuations in the energy utilization rate of the manufacturing industry coincide with those of the share of the industry's total output which originated in the energy intensive sectors. In short, the Colombian manufacturing industry has been virtually unresponsive to the increased international oil price. Any technological chage or production response to the oil price increases would be likely to induce change in the functional distribution of industrial income. In the second section of this thesis, then, an input-output methodology for the analysis of the components of this change is introduced; its application to the Colombian case reveals little change in the functional distribution during the 1970s.

  14. Negative margins and OPEC prices: how buyers and sellers are coping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-11-28

    Apparent refining margins are so poor that many US refiners have accelerated their destocking, waiting for market uncertainty to be resolved. Margins based on official OPEC prices continue to be virtually all negative, including very light oils from the Middle East; by now, up to half the world's oil trade may reflect spot marketing, compared to less than 10% a few years ago. In today's buyer's market for crude oil, several sellers are resorting to multi-faceted discounts amounting to as much as US $4.50 or more under official OPEC prices. But meanwhile, US oil importers have learned how not to rely so much on a traditional run of crude oil: they are running reduced crude, resid, cat feed, condensate; and they are blending components for lighter products by importing and swapping whenever even pennies per barrel can be saved. This issue presents: (1) refining netback data, US Gulf and West Coasts, late November 1984 (official/contract vs spot crude prices; (2) asphalt export prices to the US from Canada, N. Antilles, and Venezuela; and (3) the fuel price/tax series and industrial fuel prices as of October 1984 for countries of the Western Hemisphere.

  15. EM Employee Serves Military in Afghanistan, Manages $5.8 Billion Army Task Order

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BAGRAM AIRFIELD, Afghanistan – EM employee James Hawkins is currently serving the U.S. military in Afghanistan, where he is administering a $5.8 billion task order for the Army.

  16. Determinants of IDP Voice--Four Cases from Sierra Leone and Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esser, Daniel

    Using an interview-based case study methodology, this paper investigates how four groups of internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Afghanistan and Sierra Leone engage in existing frameworks of local governance with the aim ...

  17. Press Release: New calculations show as many as 7.3 million Americans know someone killed or injured in Iraq and Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, Sally

    2006-01-01

    know a soldier killed in Iraq, it’s going to make the costSomeone Killed or Injured in Iraq, Afghanistan The socialor injured in the war in Iraq and Afghanistan, according to

  18. A century of oil and gas exploration in Albania: assessment of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORMs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xhixha, Gerti; Callegari, Ivan; Colonna, Tommaso; Hasani, Fadil; Mantovani, Fabio; Shala, Ferat; Strati, Virginia; Kaçeli, Merita Xhixha

    2015-01-01

    Because potential Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORMs) generated from oil and gas extractions in Albania have been disposed without regulatory criteria in many decades, an extensive survey in one of the most productive regions (Vlora-Elbasan) has been performed. Among 52 gamma-ray spectrometry measurements of soil, oil-sand, sludge, produced water and crude oil samples, we discover that relatively low activity concentrations of 226Ra, 228Ra, 228Th and 40K, which are 23 +/- 2 Bq/kg, 23 +/- 2 Bq/kg, 24 +/- 3 Bq/kg and 549 +/- 12 Bq/kg, respectively, come from oil-sand produced by hydrocarbon extraction from molasses formations. The mineralogical characterization together with the 228Ra/40K and 226Ra/40K ratios of these Neogene deposits confirm the geological and geodynamic model that predicts a dismantling of Mesozoic source rocks. The average activity concentrations (+/- standard deviations) of the radium isotopes (226Ra, 228Ra) and of the 228Th and 40K radionuclides in soil samples are determined...

  19. Prevalence of respiratory symptoms and cases suspicious for tuberculosis among public health clinic patients in Afghanistan,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharfstein, Daniel

    , and diagnostic test results were recorded. Correlates of TB-suggestive symptoms (defined as cough >2 weeks children (age 17 or under). The TB-suggestive symptoms of cough >2 weeks and / or haemoptysis were reported workers. keywords Afghanistan, tuberculosis, respiratory symptoms, cough, sputum smear accuracy

  20. Building a state or saving lives? : the processes, motives and politics behind the reconstruction of Afghanistan's health system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tulier, Melody Esther, 1980-

    2005-01-01

    Startlingly poor health statistics in Afghanistan clearly indicate that, in order to enhance the socio-economic status and overall stability of the state, a complete overhaul of its health care system is imperative. However, ...

  1. Mental Health Diagnoses and Utilization of VA Non-Mental Health Medical Services Among Returning Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Beth E.; Gima, Kris; Bertenthal, Daniel; Kim, Sue; Marmar, Charles R.; Seal, Karen H.

    2010-01-01

    Soldiers Returning From the Iraq War. Jama. 2007;298:2141–8.returning from deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan. JAMA.soldiers returning from the Iraq war. JAMA. 2007;298:2141–8.

  2. Effects of Parental Deployment on Children During Wartime: A comparison of World War Two and the Iraq/Afghanistan War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hess, Juliana

    2009-11-09

    An overview of the experiences of children and parents during deployment of a parent to military service in Iraq or Afghanistan. Based on a search of the literature and a small number of interviews with parents on the homefront....

  3. Comparative analysis of Nigerian international oil marketing model (NIOMM) and the models of four selected OPEC members; and a proposed new model for Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Udeke, O.O.

    1986-01-01

    This study demonstrates that NIOMM has deficiencies and, as a result, has affected the progress of Nigeria's political and socio-economic development. One finding is that Nigeria is beset with ineffective planning, lack of marketing expertise, and inadequate marketing strategies. Other findings show that: (1) the Nigerian oil industry (HOI) is suffering from mismanagement stemming from corruption, tribalism, Federal Character Policy, and lack of dedication and patriotism by the Nigerian workers; (2) there is inefficiency in the Nigerian national petroleum corporation (NNPC) but, at the same time, the inefficiency is partly because of the government policies, conflicts, interference by high government officials and politicians, and the enormous size of the oil industry; (3) oil revenues are improperly utilized; (4) neither the multinational oil corporations (MNOCs) nor multinational corporations (MNCs) are assisting the oil producing nations (OPNs) or developing countries (DCs) in their economic development, and MNOCs and MNCs are interested in profit maximization; and (5) MNCs do not transfer the type of technology that meets the needs of DCs, and sometimes the technology creates problems for DCs which ultimately results into conflicts between MNCs and DCs. The inverse of these problems has been a sine qua non for success in the IOMMs of the four OPEC member, especially in Saudi Arabia.

  4. Effect of Weather on the Predicted PMN Landmine Chemical Signature for Kabul, Afghanistan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEBB, STEPHEN W.; PHELAN, JAMES M.

    2002-11-01

    Buried landmines are often detected through the chemical signature in the air above the soil surface by mine detection dogs. Environmental processes play a significant role in the chemical signature available for detection. Due to the shallow burial depth of landmines, the weather influences the release of chemicals from the landmine, transport through the soil to the surface, and degradation processes in the soil. The effect of weather on the landmine chemical signature from a PMN landmine was evaluated with the T2TNT code for Kabul, Afghanistan. Results for TNT and DNT gas-phase and soil solid-phase concentrations are presented as a function of time of the day and time of the year.

  5. Rana Novini ATOC 3500 Open-air pits are used to burn garbage and other wastes at bases in Iraq and Afghanistan that lack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    /aluminum cans Munitions and other unexploded ordnance Petroleum and lubricant products Plastics and styrofoam across the country have filed numerous lawsuits which have been consolidated in the United States, National Guard personnel, contract employees and others serving our country in Iraq and/or Afghanistan

  6. Islamic Republic of Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    Islamic Republic of Iran Ashtian Tablo N 30 Islamic Republic of Iran Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) Sazeman-e Energy Atomi B,C,M,N 2 / 29 #12; Country or Region Company or Organization Also Islamic Republic of Iran Behineh Trading Co. N 37 Islamic Republic of Iran Behnam Sahriyari Trading

  7. HIGH RISK COUNTRIES Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Cape Verde Central African Republic Chad China Columbia Comoros

  8. Country Location AFGHANISTAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /31 $124 BAHRAIN SOUTHWEST ASIA ADMIN SPT UNIT 01/01 12/31 $124 BANGLADESH CHITTAGONG 01/01 12/31 $71 BANGLADESH DHAKA 01/01 12/31 $90 BANGLADESH SYLHET 01/01 12/31 $69 BANGLADESH [OTHER] 01/01 12/31 $71

  9. Country Location AFGHANISTAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ASIA ADMIN SPT UNIT 01/01 12/31 $124 BANGLADESH CHITTAGONG 01/01 12/31 $71 BANGLADESH DHAKA 01/01 12/31 $90 BANGLADESH SYLHET 01/01 12/31 $69 BANGLADESH [OTHER] 01/01 12/31 $71 BARBADOS BARBADOS 04/16 12

  10. Albania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: Energy ResourcesAirAlamo Heights,GameAlatna,Texas:

  11. As OPEC Ministers Meet, Secretary Chu Stresses the Importance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    has discussed is the development of carbon capture and sequestration technology from coal-fired power plants that can significantly lower greenhouse gas emissions. From the U.S....

  12. Evidence of OPEC pricing power: raw materials or refined products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-30

    For eight years, US petroleum and consumer sectors have argued for or against a free-market policy where international trade is concerned. Briefly, between 1982 and 1985, the argument against importation of refined products was almost as heated as the argument against importation of crude. But since the 1986 crude oil price crash, much has changed. Some contemporary thinking is that as long as the US can count on low crude prices, the benefits will outweigh the detriment to the US crude producing sector. This issue also contains the following: (1) ED refining netback data series for the US Gulf and West Coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore for late September 1988; and (2) ED fuel price/tax series for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere, September 1988 edition. 8 figures, 5 tables.

  13. Household energy use in non-OPEC developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, J.C.

    1980-05-01

    Energy use in the residential sector in India, Brazil, Mexico, the Republic of Korea, the Sudan, Pakistan, Malaysia, and Guatemala is presented. Whenever possible, information is included on the commercial fuels (oil, gas, coal, and electricity) and on what are termed noncommercial fuels (firewood, animal dung, and crop residues). Of special interest are the differences in the consumption patterns of urban and rural areas, and of households at different income levels. Where the data allow, the effect of household size on energy consumption is discussed. Section II is an overview of the data for all eight countries. Section III examines those areas (India, Brazil, Mexico City) for which data exist on the actual quantity of energy consumed by households. Korea, the Sudan, and Pakistan, which collect data on household expenditures on fuels, are discussed in Section IV. The patterns of ownership of energy-using durables in Malaysia and Guatemala are discussed in Section V. (MCW)

  14. Held Hostage: America and Its Allies Confront OPEC, 1973 - 1981 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barr, Kathleen

    2012-07-16

    , Honda, and Toyota forced American companies to make cars that could contend with the high gas mileage of the imports. American Motors Corporation bought the exclusive rights to a new two- liter engine from the German company Volkswagen to be installed... with the first Earth Day, and by 1976 ecologists in the United States, Western Europe, and Japan were making their voices heard about issues like the building of the Alaska pipeline and the development of nuclear power. It was within this framework...

  15. Market Power in the World Oil Market: Evidence for an OPEC Cartel and an Oligopolistic Non-OPEC Fringe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    costs (Farzin, 1992; Hanson, 1980; Solow & Wan, 1976), exploration (Pesaran, 1990; Pindyck, 1978; Pindyck, 1980), and drilling activity (Anderson, Kel- logg & Salant, 2014). Cremer and Salehi

  16. Afghanistan Pakistan High Resolution Wind Resource - Datasets...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pakistan High Resolution Wind Resource This shapefile containing 50 meter height data has been validated by NREL and wind energy meteorological consultants. However, the data is...

  17. AFRICA ASIA SOUTH AMERICA Algeria Afghanistan Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Peru Comoros China, Hong Kong SAR Suriname Congo, Dem. Rep. (Kinshasa) China, Macau SAR Uruguay Congo

  18. Extreme VPP - Kandahar, Afghanistan | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of VPP Work Everywhere-Even in a Combat Zone By David Baker When I heard about a new position in the Army Reserve called a "combat safety officer," I wondered who would...

  19. Afghanistan-NREL Mission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendoMassachusetts: EnergyRenewables

  20. Afghanistan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: Energy Resources JumpAdelan1986) |Water and Power LLC

  1. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    | Month | | | Persian | Total | Non | United | | Gulf(1) | OPEC(2) | OPEC | Kingdom | Venezuela| | | ||||| 1978...

  2. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    | Month | | | Persian | Total | Non | United | | Gulf(1) | OPEC(2) | OPEC | Kingdom | Venezuela | | | |||||...

  3. Albania-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendoMassachusetts:RenewableInc Jump& EnergyAlaska

  4. Albania-USAID Climate Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolarOpen5 -Telephone Co Jump to:Elec Coop, IncAlbabio SL

  5. Transportation Fuels Policy Since the OPEC Embargo: Paved with Good Intentions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knittel, Christopher Roland

    A long line of research investigates whether the retail prices of electricity and natural gas send proper signals about scarcity in order to induce efficient consumption. Historically, regulated utilities have not designed ...

  6. Texas, oil estate: How a pre-OPEC producer has changed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-20

    Oil producer, powerful political voice at home, international influence: Texas was and is all of those things. But its role in these arenas has changed dramatically, as this issue of Energy Detente reveals. Herein, ED views Texas' emerging oil and economic profile as something new that could herald some similar changes in other petroleum estates. It is pointed out that, in most recent years, the importance of West Texas Intermediate grade on the New York Mercantile Exchange as an international benchmark is unsurpassed by any other. This issue of ED also presents the following: (1) the ED Refining Netback Data Series for the US Gulf and West Coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore as of Jan. 10, 1992; and (2) the ED Fuel Price/Tax Series for countries of the Western Hemisphere, Jan. 1992 edition.

  7. Changes in exchange rates and oil prices for Saudi Arabia and other OPEC members

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, R.L.

    1994-12-31

    When the U.S. dollar weakens significantly against currencies of other major trading nations, oil-exporting countries often become concerned about both loss of purchasing power for their imports as well as capital losses on dollar-denominated assets. This paper addresses these issues by (1) examining previous studies, (2) reviewing the historical oil price movements of oil denominated in different G-7 currencies, (3) performing a causality test between changes in exchange rates and the price of oil, (4) using an analytical model to relate changes in exchange rates and the price of oil through the world oil market; and (5) evaluating the gains and losses in terms of purchasing power of Saudi Arabia and other members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries for selected historical periods.

  8. Fact #836: September 1, 2014 Non-OPEC Countries Supply Nearly Two-thirds of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n cEnergyNaturaldefinesMay 4, Jeffryand63-2006 AprilConsider- DatasetU.S.

  9. Statement from Energy Secretary Bodman on OPEC's Decision to Cut Crude Oil

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVESDepartmentSpecialCodethe Blue RibbonVisiting

  10. As OPEC Ministers Meet, Secretary Chu Stresses the Importance of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12Power, Inc | Department ofMarketing,1 Articles01

  11. Microsoft Word - STEO supplement non-OPEC supply Final-2.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See(STEO) Highlights11 1April0 15)5)09 108

  12. Non-OPEC oil production set to decline for the first time since 2008

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural GasEIARegionalMethodology

  13. Planning Kabul: The politics of urbanization in Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calogero, Pietro Anders

    2011-01-01

    was just before Dubai became world-famous for its opulence;part of the magical world of Dubai that did get built. I wasWorld Theme Park, to be built in the desert adjacent to the Dubai

  14. HIGH-RESOLUTION SOIL MOISTURE MAPPING IN AFGHANISTAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Brian

    and Brian Borchers New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM 87801 Julie R. Kelley, Stacy Howington and Jerry Ballard and the partition of incoming solar and long-wave radiation between sensible and latent heat fluxes[18, 19

  15. Planning Kabul: The politics of urbanization in Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calogero, Pietro Anders

    2011-01-01

    of urban apartheid? ” Planning theory 8:88-100. Yiftachel,of the colonized. ” City Planning Kabul: BibliographyCalif. : Sage Publications. Planning Kabul: Planning as

  16. Planning Kabul: The politics of urbanization in Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calogero, Pietro Anders

    2011-01-01

    Council (ICC), Building Officials and Code AdministratorsCouncil (ICC), Building Officials and Code Administratorsof Building Officials, and Southern Building Code Congress

  17. Planning Kabul: The politics of urbanization in Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calogero, Pietro Anders

    2011-01-01

    as PM 1933-1946 for Germany, Turkey. Modernization of urbansouth: Britain, Germany, Iran, and Turkey among them. The

  18. Disconnected from Discourse: Women's Radio Listening in Rural Samangan, Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamal, Sarah

    2004-02-15

    Finding and maintaining good access to information is one of the most important coping skills for many Afghans in insecure and rapidly shifting situations. Returning refugee populations face deeply rooted structural problems ...

  19. Afghanistan-NREL Resource Maps and Toolkits | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: Energy Resources JumpAdelan1986) |Water and Power LLC Jump

  20. A preliminary study of gross alpha/beta activity concentrations in drinking waters from Albania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

    Drinking water Á ``fracking'' waste water Introduction Rocks and soils are the primary sources. As the world's demand for energy increases markedly and exploration for and production of new sources become increasingly important, the ways in which these activities impact the environment, health, and quality of life

  1. Table 25. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    OPEC Algeria Canada Indonesia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela Other Countries Arab OPEC a Total OPEC b 1978 ... 14.93 14.41 14.65...

  2. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    OPEC Algeria Indonesia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela Other Countries Arab OPEC b Total OPEC c 1978 ... 14.12 13.61 13.24 14.05...

  3. A Methodology to Assess the Reliability of Hydrogen-based Transportation Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan

    2004-01-01

    OPEC Share of World Production OPEC Crude Oil ProductionShare of World Production Persian Gulf Crude Oil Productioncrude oil production 42 Figure 13. World

  4. War, Trauma, and Technologies of the Self : : The Making of Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Marisa Renee

    R. L. (2004). Combat Duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, Mentalservice members who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. Militaryevaluation of the Virtual Iraq/Afghanistan exposure therapy

  5. Understanding Democratic Congruence: A Demand-Supply Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welzel, Christian; Klingemann, Hans-Dieter

    2007-01-01

    Brazil Norway Moldova NZ Macedonia Switzerlad. AlbaniaPhilippines Colombia Macedonia Turkey Albania GuatemalaIran Argentina Bosnia Macedonia Belarus Algeria Armenia

  6. Countries with "low incidence" of tuberculosis. Students who have resided in any country other than those listed below in the past 5 years must check yes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    to have a tuberculin skin test. Albania Andorra Antigua and Barbuda Australia Austria Bahamas Barbados

  7. Can You Spend Your Way to Victory? The Case of Statebuilding in Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Querze, Alana Renee

    2011-08-31

    . Specifically, the dataset includes information on poppy cultivation, access to electricity, population, population density, election results, and voter turnout. As well, this dataset uses two sources of data which have yet to be exploited in an academic... on their own political understandings and commitments and their belief in the power of institutions to shape political behavior, rather than vice versa” (Wesley, 2008, p.380). For this reason, Wesley argues that, “to be sustainable, agreement on the nature...

  8. Parallels with the Past How the Soviets Lost in Afghanistan, How the Americans are Losing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Pakistan or Iran. Pakistan also became the base for most of the fledgling mujahideen, Muslim guerrilla

  9. Taxonomic study on Capparidaceae and Cruciferae of W. Pakistan, Afghanistan, and N.W. Himalaya 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jafri, S. M. H.

    1954-01-01

    The present work was taken up by me at the suggestion of Professor Sir William Wright Smith and has been done under the guidance and supervision of himself and Dr. P.H.Davis. Taxonomic studies have undergone considerable ...

  10. Remote Sensing Assessment Of Karez Irrigation Systems And Archaeological Resources In Maywand District, Kandahar Province, Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egitto, Antoinette

    2013-12-31

    of appropriate technology that provides renewable and sustainable sources of water. Karezes promote community cohesion over time by promoting and perpetuating indigenous knowledge based on long-term experience. They provide local stakeholders with the tools...

  11. The Coils of the Anaconda: America's First Conventional Battle in Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grau, Les

    2009-05-04

    --a prepared conventional mountain defense designed by a professional military commander. The enemy dug in to have it out on favorable ground. They believed that if they could only kill enough Americans, the US would turn tail and withdraw, as America had...-packed with soldiers who jostled each other while trying to fit themselves, their rucksacks, weapons, radios, and other combat gear into the cramped confines. Most of the soldiers were nervous yet eager. Some were already regretting not making a last...

  12. Afghanistan Wind Power Density at 50-m Above Ground Level GIS...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Power Density at 50-m Above Ground Level GIS Data This dataset was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Agency for International...

  13. Predicting Risk for Incidences of Homelessness Among Veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motupalli, Venkat

    2015-12-18

    screener, with no added time or data collection burden. Further, a freeware script, compatible with all common data collection and storage systems, was developed to provide a baseline for further digital management efforts....

  14. Nation 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Afghanistan 2 1 1 2 1 0 -100%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    % Bangladesh 24 27 26 26 30 33 38% Barbados 7 7 4 8 9 10 43% Bassas da India 0 1 1 0 0 0 0% Belarus 3 9 13 10

  15. REQUIRED BACHELOR DEGREE EQUIVALENTS Afghanistan Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science (Licence/Leicanc) 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    , Education, or Pharmacy Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery ­ 6 years Barbados Bachelor of Fine Arts/Bachelor of Education from Barbados Community College ­ 4 years Bachelor's degree from the University of the West Indies

  16. Dead Babies, Bowel Disturbances, and Other Combat Humor in Afghanistan and Iraq 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madsen, Marissa Torian

    2013-02-18

    are returning with more psychological burdens. Various attempts have been made to decrease the psychological burdens on these American soldiers. However, I believe a missing component of these attempts is a thorough understanding of the military as its own...

  17. A Methodology to Assess the Reliability of Hydrogen-based Transportation Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan

    2004-01-01

    World Production Persian Gulf Crude Oil Production Persian Gulf Share of Globalglobal crude oil production 42 Figure 13. WorldWorld Production OPEC Crude Oil Production Average Production (Thousand bbl/d) OPEC Share of Global

  18. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01

    2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),the Predictive Accuracy of Crude Oil Futures Prices,” EnergyFigure 3. Price of crude oil contract maturing December of

  19. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01

    2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),percent change in real oil price. Figure 3. Price of crude023 Understanding Crude Oil Prices James D. Hamilton June

  20. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyunok; Sumner, Daniel A.; Martin, Philip; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David

    2011-01-01

    is how responsive the demand of oil from OPEC in the oil-caused the import demand of oil from OPEC coun- tries toincrease in global demand for crude oil from 2000 to 2008,

  1. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01

    2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),023 Understanding Crude Oil Prices James D. Hamilton Junedirectly. Understanding Crude Oil Prices* James D. Hamilton

  2. A Methodology to Assess the Reliability of Hydrogen-based Transportation Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan

    2004-01-01

    global crude oil production.global crude oil production11. OPEC share of global crude oil production (EIA). Persian

  3. Problems with Anger and Violence Among United States Military Service Members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worthen, Miranda E.

    2012-01-01

    U.S. veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. Mil Medin support of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Am J PublicPatients Returning From Iraq and Afghanistan. American

  4. What Can Open Access Do for Me? Personal Perspectives of KU Faculty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Greenberg, Marc L.; Torrance, Andrew W.; Goddard, Stephen

    2010-10-21

    , Belgium, Belarus, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bahrain, Austria, Australia, Aruba, Argentina, Algeria, Albania … town@ku.edu ..., Belgium, Belarus, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bahrain, Austria, Australia, Aruba, Argentina, Algeria, Albania … town@ku.edu ...

  5. Are Levels of Democracy Influenced by Mass Attitudes? Testing a Central Premise of the Political Culture Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welzel, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Poland Chile Bulgaria Croatia Albania S. Africa Switzld. S.Bulgaria, Chile, China, Croatia, Czech Rep. , Estonia,

  6. Snowpack and runoff generation using AMSR-E passive microwave observations in the Upper Helmand Watershed, Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for flood forecasting. Published by Elsevier Inc. 1. Introduction Snowmelt is a primary source of water distributed snow information if the questions of accuracy in these regions can be addressed. The primary snow, but is extremely important for water resources management. Without information about the snowpack, these regions

  7. Bâzgasht-i Adabî (Literary Return) and Persianate Literary Culture in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Iran, India, and Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Bunyâd-i Farhang-i Iran, 1348/1970. Habîb, Asadullah. “shi‘r-i Farsî dar Hind. ” Îrân Namah 8.2 (Spring 1369/1990):Farhangistân-i Hunar-i Jumhûrî-i Irân, 1387/2008-9. Qavîm, ‘

  8. >> Business, E1 >> Classifieds, F1 >> Lotteries, A2 >> Movies, D5 >> Obituaries, B4 >> Opinion, B8 >> Outdoors, C14 >> TV, D4 $2 ($2.50 in some areas) SUNDAY, MARCH 15, 2015 I RAIN LIKELY L 54 M 42 I WWW.SPOKESMAN.COM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Baldor Associated Press See AFGHANISTAN, A11 JERUSALEM ­ Deep- ly divided and foul of mood, Israelis

  9. Incorporating stakeholders' perspectives into models of new technology diffusion: The case of fuel-cell vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collantes, Gustavo O

    2007-01-01

    sustained increases in oil demand from growing economies.increasing global demand for oil and changing consumerdemand, and the OPEC may exercise its power to affect oil

  10. The Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the United States. OPEC Organization of the Petroleum...

  11. Products Produced in Countries Other Than Iran

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the United States. OPEC Organization of the Petroleum...

  12. ECUADOR: counting down the barrels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-02-09

    Within the world oil market, OPEC faces a reduced role as supplier and production/price dilemmas. One of its members, Ecuador, faces rapid drawdown of its reserves and ultimate loss of membership in the cartel. But Ecuador is tackling the problem by a variety of means and is still defending OPEC prices, as its OPEC Governor tells Energy Detente. The complete interview with Cesar Guerra Navarrete, the OPEC Governor is presented. The Energy Detente fuel price/tax series and the principal industrial fuel prices as of February 1983 are included for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere.

  13. The Global Impact of the Systemic Economies and MENA Business Cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cashin, Paul; Mohaddes, Kamiar; Raissi, Mehdi

    2012-11-01

    Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) members (see Table 1). Thus, our version of the GVAR model includes 50 countries, covering over 90% of world GDP as opposed to the "standard" 33 country set-up used in the literature, see Smith and Galesi... (2010). Of the 50 countries included in our sample, 17 are oil exporters, of which 10 are current OPEC members and one is a former member (Indonesia left OPEC in January 2009). We were not able to include Angola and Iraq, the remaining two OPEC members...

  14. X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    markets, warm winter tempera- tures in key markets and uncer- tainty about Russia's commitment to export reduc- tions, following the expiration of an agreement with OPEC and other...

  15. Fact #887: August 24, 2015 The United States Supplies 15% of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Countries. The OPEC countries are Algeria, Angola, Ecuador, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, and Venezuela. Fact 887 Dataset...

  16. Fact #578: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumptio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    include Venezuela, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Algeria, Libya, Nigeria, Indonesia, Gabon, and Ecuador. OPEC consumption data are for 2005....

  17. World Oil Price Cases (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    World oil prices in Annual Energy Outlook 2005 are set in an environment where the members of OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) are assumed to act as the dominant producers, with lower production costs than other supply regions or countries. Non-OPEC oil producers are assumed to behave competitively, producing as much oil as they can profitability extract at the market price for oil. As a result, the OPEC member countries will be able effectively to set the price of oil when they can act in concert by varying their aggregate production. Alternatively, OPEC members could target a fixed level of production and let the world market determine the price.

  18. The triumph of pragmatism: Nigeria's role in the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dimah, A.

    1988-01-01

    Formed in 1960, the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) became a key participant in the international oil industry after the so-called oil shock in the early 1970s. OPEC's power in world trade increased tremendously during the 1970s and, as oil prices skyrocketed, literature on OPEC proliferated. Although OPEC's demise has often been predicted since its creation; it has, however, endured. Thus study examines OPEC from distinct vantage points: those of regime theory, oligopoly models, and cartel theory. The aim is to gain insight into the activities of the organization as a whole and in terms of the behavior of one of its members, the Government of Nigeria. The objective is to ascertain which of these theories, or aspects of the theories, best describes OPEC's activities and Nigeria's actions as a member. The review of OPEC and Nigeria's role in its demonstrates that OPEC is difficult to classify. It is more than anything, a fluid coalition of Third World countries seeking to improve their national economies by ensuring better prices for crude oil, their chief export product; and helping other Third World countries focus global awareness on the chronic political and economic inequities in the international system. Therefore, OPEC and Nigeria's role is best explained by coalition theory.

  19. Smyrna's Ashes: Humanitarianism, Genocide, and the Birth of the Middle East

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tusan, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    taking journey to buy raw materials from Albania and partsBurges did what she could. “Raw materials are so scarce and

  20. Jamaica-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  1. Georgia-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  2. South Africa-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  3. Serbia-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  4. Malawi-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  5. Guatemala-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  6. Costa Rica-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  7. Indonesia-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  8. Thailand-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  9. Vietnam-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  10. Zambia-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  11. Colombia-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  12. Malaysia-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  13. Moldova-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  14. Kazakhstan-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  15. Philippines-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  16. WHO Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic 2011: Warning about the dangers of tobacco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WHO

    2011-01-01

    Albania, Australia, Barbados*, Bhutan, Burkina Faso*,countries (Bahamas, Barbados, Iran, Panama, and Trinidad andArgentina Bahamas Barbados Belize Bolivia (Plurinational

  17. The Right to Life with Dignity: Economic and Social Rights Respect in the World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolp, Felicity Ann

    2010-01-01

    Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium BelizeRep. Albania Georgia Belgium Barbados Serbia and MontenegroIsrael Belgium Denmark Barbados Bulgaria France Hungary

  18. Explaining ratification of human rights treaties : signaling for aid during regional crises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Heather Michelle

    2007-01-01

    Europe, Croatia, Bosnia, Macedonia, Serbia and Montenegro,Romania, Croatia, Bosnia, Macedonia, Serbia and Montenegroborders, Albania and Macedonia, both bordering the conflict

  19. How do you convince children that the "army', "terrorists" and the "police" can live together peacefully? : a peace communication assessment model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warshel, Yael

    2009-01-01

    interethnic understanding in Macedonia. Conflict Resolutionand Kosovo), Montenegro. Macedonia, Croatia and Albania toacross these barriers in Macedonia” (Shochat, 2003, p. 81).

  20. Il pensiero meridiano oggi: Intervista e dialoghi con Franco Cassano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cassano, Francesco; Fogu, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    e Brindisi) con Albania, Macedonia, Bulgaria. 7 Negli annirecentemente a Skopje, in Macedonia. Sono partito la mattinagiornata per arrivare in Macedonia. Se ci fosse un volo

  1. Essays on the politics of regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weymouth, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Libya Lithuania Macau Macedonia Madagascar Malawi MalaysiaZambia Albania Slovenia Macedonia Croatia Kyrgyz RepublicCroatia Russia Slovenia Macedonia Yugoslavia Bulgaria

  2. Manni Riccardo Department of Earth Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in several European countries (Albania, France, Germany and Hungary) and Asia Minor (Turkey). He established sequence of Gammarocrinites bakonicus Manni, Nicosia & Szabò 1992. In: Echinoderms. Munich, Germany

  3. Legal and Economic Factors Determining Success and Failure in the Fight against Organized Crime: An Empirical Assessment of the Palermo Convention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buscaglia, Edgardo

    2008-01-01

    Venezuela, R Romania Croatia Brazil Philippines MoldovaHonduras El Salvador Croatia Brazil Philippines MozambiqueTimor Argentina Albania Croatia Brazil Philippines Yemen,

  4. Professional Travel in Pakistan Pakistan is located in the South Asia and is bordered by China to the north, Afghanistan and Iran on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Deming

    1 Professional Travel in Pakistan Pakistan is located in the South Asia and is bordered by China important aspect of life in Pakistan and about 97% of Pakistanis are Muslim. The people of Pakistan shake hands with other females right away. Pakistani women may not interact with strangers. · Pakistan

  5. Accountable to beneficiaries? : the modern development enterprise & its contractors at war : lessons on accountability from Afghanistan to inform the contracting reform agenda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Huma

    2011-01-01

    This thesis will review the most relevant existing and proposed accountability mechanisms for private development and security contractors coming out of the human rights, public administration and anti-corruption fields. ...

  6. Country Analysis Briefs

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2028-01-01

    An ongoing compilation of country energy profiles. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) maintains Country Analysis Briefs (CABs) for specific countries that are important to world energy markets, including members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), major non-OPEC oil producers, major energy transit countries, major energy consumers, and other areas of current interest to energy analysts and policy makers.

  7. Challenging Aspects of MCDM Katta G. Murty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murty, Katta G.

    . Russia which is not a member of OPEC, is the 2nd largest crude oil exporter. Both SA and Russia mainly to such an extent that pretty soon the country will move from an oil importing country to an oil exporting country million barrels/day. Saudi Arabia ( SA ), the leader of OPEC (Oil Producing and Exporting Countries

  8. World Oil: Market or Mayhem?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, James L.

    2008-01-01

    The world oil market is regarded by many as a puzzle. Why are oil prices so volatile? What is OPEC and what does OPEC do? Where are oil prices headed in the long run? Is “peak oil” a genuine concern? Why did oil prices ...

  9. Nigeria`s oil production behavior: Tests of alternative hypotheses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Awokuse, T.O.; Jones, C.T.

    1994-12-31

    The sudden quadrupling of world oil prices in 1973-1974 marked the beginning of several formal inquiries by economists into the production behavior of members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). Interest in the organization was further heightened in 1979 when nominal oil prices further doubled. However, oil market analysts have differed in their evaluation of OPEC`s role in the determination of world oil prices. Most energy economists have modeled OPEC as a cartel. Morris Adelman has suggested that OPEC`s true nature lies somewhere between two polar cases of a dominant-firm industry and an imperfect, market-sharing cartel. In the former case, one large, dominant firm (i.e., Saudi Arabia) serves as the {open_quotes}swing producer,{close_quotes} allowing other cartel members and non-OPEC oil producers to produce whatever they wished, controlling the market price by itself through its own output adjustments. The latter case of an imperfect market-sharing cartel is a loose collusive arrangement in which all members agree on an acceptable price level and individual output shares for each producer. Adelman believes that OPEC wobbles between these two cases, depending upon market conditions.

  10. Fixing Failed States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, John

    2010-01-01

    Republic of the Congo 6. Iraq 7. Afghanistan 8. Centralwars in Afghanistan and Iraq has spent up to $500 billion aMilitary Adventure in Iraq 97 (2006). An army briefing noted

  11. Essays on Impact Evaluation in Labor and Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Garret Smyth

    2011-01-01

    Recruits and Monthly Iraq/Afghanistan Combat Deaths . Statein afghanistan and iraq. NBER Working Paper 16152, JulyThe electoral cost of war: Iraq casualties and the 2004 u.s.

  12. Traumatic Brain Injury and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in OEF/OIF Veterans : : A Combined Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Cortical Thickness Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorg, Scott Francis

    2013-01-01

    R. L. (2004). Combat duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, mentalU.S. soldiers returning from iraq. N.Engl.J.Med. , 358, 453-white matter integrity in Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans.

  13. Optimal tasking of mobile autonomous sensing assets in uncertain adversarial settings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oran, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Iraq and Afghanistan using spy drones. The trouble is, thereyear, a single new Reaper drone will record 10 video feeds

  14. Compiled by James A. Zeidler, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Posters: Iraq/Afghanistan (2007)...............................8-11 Egypt--Operation Bright Star (2009........................21 Country-Specific Web Sites for Iraq, Afghanistan, and Egypt (Revised 2010 among U.S. military personnel and DoD contractors in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Egypt of the importance

  15. Oil demand continues to grow in the U.S. and worldwide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tippee, B.; Beck, R.J.

    1995-07-31

    Rising oil consumption is challenging the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries production quota--but not the group`s ability to meet demand. In the second half of 1995, the oil market will continue to need more oil from OPEC members than the group claims to be willing to produce with its quota at 24.52 million b/d. If the quota really limited supply, ingredients would be in place for a significant price hike. Growth in a non-OPEC production intensities temptations on OPEC members to cheat on quotas and has become a key factor in the market. OPEC producers have seen that if they don`t meet incremental demand at the current price, other producers will. OPEC eventually will have to raise its quota or acknowledge that the artificial production limit lacks meaning. At present, the only real limit to supply is production capacity, which remains in excess relative to demand and which has demonstrated its ability to grow both within and outside of OPEC when prices rise. The paper discusses worldwide trends, pressures on OPEC, world crude prices, US prices, natural gas prices, US energy demand, natural gas use, gas supply, US demand for petroleum products, imports, and inventories.

  16. The outlook for US oil dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.; Jones, D.W.; Leiby, P.N.

    1995-05-11

    Market share OPEC lost in defending higher prices from 1979-1985 is being steadily regained and is projected to exceed 50% by 2000. World oil markets are likely to be as vulnerable to monopoly influence as they were 20 years ago, as OPEC regains lost market share. The U.S. economy appears to be as exposed as it was in the early 1970s to losses from monopoly oil pricing. A simulated 2-year supply reduction in 2005-6 boosts OPEC revenues by roughly half a trillion dollars and costs the U.S. economy an approximately equal amount. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve appears to be of little benefit against such a determined, multi-year supply curtailment either in reducing OPEC revenues or protecting the U.S. economy. Increasing the price elasticity of oil demand and supply in the U.S. and the rest of the world, however, would be an effective strategy.

  17. The Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lower crude oil output from OPEC countries (Tables 2 and 3). * Global surplus crude oil production capacity averaged 1.8 million bbld in July and August, 0.3 million bbld...

  18. The Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    was more than offset by the decrease in total OPEC output (Table 4). Global surplus crude oil production capacity in September and October 2013 averaged 1.8 million bbld, which...

  19. The Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    boosted global liquid fuels production relative to year-ago levels. However, OPEC crude oil production decreased slightly from year-ago levels, as production gains in Libya and...

  20. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyunok; Sumner, Daniel A.; Martin, Philip; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David

    2011-01-01

    produce 42% of the crude-oil production. The organizationfuel prices and crude-oil production but increase overallcrude oil during the same period. Although prices more than qua- drupled, OPEC production

  1. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01

    per day. Monthly crude oil production Iran Iraq KuwaitEIA Table 1.2, “OPEC Crude Oil Production (Excluding Lease2008, from EIA, “Crude Oil Production. ” Figure 16. U.S.

  2. Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leighty, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    and Weimer, D.L. (1984) Oil prices shock, market response,OPEC behavior and world oil prices (pp. 175-185) London:many decades. Recent high oil prices have caused oil-holding

  3. For a "Little Scrap of Paper" 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-03-05

    fitting structure are being investigated. The model developed will be presented to various Natural Gas producing countries such as Iran, Iraq, Russia, and Saudi to name a few and will ultimately be set up the same way that OPEC was....

  4. Clean Energy Producing and Exporting Countries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atighetchi, K.

    2007-01-01

    fitting structure are being investigated. The model developed will be presented to various Natural Gas producing countries such as Iran, Iraq, Russia, and Saudi to name a few and will ultimately be set up the same way that OPEC was....

  5. Simple Laser Accelerator - Optics and Particle Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scully, Marlan O.; Zubairy, M. Suhail.

    1991-01-01

    fitting structure are being investigated. The model developed will be presented to various Natural Gas producing countries such as Iran, Iraq, Russia, and Saudi to name a few and will ultimately be set up the same way that OPEC was....

  6. TABLE24.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    III-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ... 38,701 294 2,258 0 0 0 0 443 0 0 Algeria...

  7. TABLE21.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ... 53,500 1,139 2,258 115 625 0 0...

  8. TABLE22.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    I-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ... 6,171 845 0 115 625 0 0 824 0 0 Algeria...

  9. TABLE23.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    II-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ... 6,219 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait...

  10. Measuring the Costs of U.S. Oil Dependence and the Benefits of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    exporters operating as OPEC." Prof. M. Adelman, MIT, 2004. Algeria Angola Ecuador Iran Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia UAE Venezuela 0 20 40 60 80 100 120...

  11. TABLE39.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Other OPEC ... 2,227 0 0 0 0 0 0 696 0 0 Indonesia ... 2,227 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela...

  12. TABLE44.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0 0 0 Other OPEC ... 11,075 0 784 0 0 494 0 1,059 0 0 Indonesia ... 9,881 0 29 0 0 0 0 215 0 0 Nigeria...

  13. Fact #664: February 28, 2011 2010 U.S. Petroleum Imports by Country

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. imported almost 12 million barrels per day in 2010, according to data for the first ten months of the year. Canada, Mexico and other non-OPEC countries are the top three places from which...

  14. TABLE42.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Other OPEC ... 24,001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Nigeria ... 20,994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela...

  15. Who Are the Major Players Supplying the World Oil Market?

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2013-01-01

    Energy in Brief article on the world supply of oil through ownership of national oil companies and, for some governments, their membership in the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC).

  16. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyunok; Sumner, Daniel A.; Martin, Philip; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David

    2011-01-01

    from oil produc- tion and domestic consumption. Using dataoil revenues due to the introduction of biofuels by increasing domestic fuel consumptionon Gasoline Consumption OPEC U.S. cents per liter All Oil-

  17. The Relations of Terror and Immigration: Preventive Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryder, Frances I.

    2009-09-01

    , the founding of The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), created an alliance of petroleum producing countries to ensure that oil remained a stable market that would produce wealth for member states. Then, in 1973, OPEC embargoed the U... policy has aggravated these situations. In the case of Saudi Arabia, historic imperialism has occurred with the help of international interests in oil, the corrupt Saudi monarchy, Saudi Arabia?s overconfidence in oil revenues beginning with 1973 oil...

  18. Changing structure of the world refining industry: implications for the United States and other major consuming regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-02-01

    There are five chapters in this publication. Chapter I on refining industry in transition covers refining history highlights, and OPEC's downstream operations. Chapter II on demand for oil and oil products discusses supply and demand for OPEC oil, demand for oil products, historical growth trends, future growth trends and the case of East Asia - emergence of a fuel oil glut. Chapter III on the US and other traditional refining centers begins with an introduction on the structure of refining and continues on to cover the refining industry in OECD countries, USA, Western Europe, Japan, Singapore and Caribbean and closes with some conclusions. Chapter IV is on refining expansions in OPEC and the third World Nations. The following are covered: (1) nations of the Gulf (Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Iran, Iraq, Bahrain, Qatar, Oman, United Arab Emirates); (2) OPEC members beyond the Gulf (Indonesia, Africa, Libya, Algeria, Nigeria and Gabon, South America, Venezuela); (3) other major exporters (China, Egypt, Malaysia, Mexico); (4) non-OPEC developing countries - trends in the refining sector. The chapter ends with a short summary on capacity prospects and comparative economics. The final chapter has conclusions and recommendations on: price interactions between crude and products; product exports - impact on OPEC's internal; prices and market influence; importers and exporters - decisions; and course of action of the United States. 18 figures, 40 tables.

  19. Oil Dependence: The Value of R{ampersand}D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.

    1997-07-01

    Over the past quarter century the United States` dependence on oil has cost its economy on the order of $5 trillion. Oil dependence is defined as economically significant consumption of oil, given price inelastic demand in the short and long run and given the ability of the OPEC cartel to use market power to influence oil prices. Although oil prices have been lower and more stable over the past decade, OPEC still holds the majority of the world`s conventional oil resources according to the best available estimates. OPEC`s share of the world oil market is likely to grow significantly in the future,restoring much if not all of their former market power. Other than market share, the key determinants of OPEC`s market power are the long and short run price elasticities of world oil demand and supply. These elasticities depend critically on the technologies of oil supply and demand, especially the technology of energy use in transportation. Research and development can change these elasticities in fundamental ways, and given the nature of the problem,the government has an important role to play in supporting such research.

  20. A Trap At The Escape From The Trap? Demographic-Structural Factors of Political Instability in Modern Africa and West Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Williams G. I. H. 2006. Liberia: The Heart of Darkness.In Albania, Egypt, Liberia, South Korea, and Syria,the year of civil war start Liberia occupied the first place

  1. --No Title--

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    |26.|Ukraine|134|0%| |27.|Indonesia|127|0%| |28.|Dominican Republic|126|0%| |29.|Egypt|124|0%| |30.|Morocco|115|0%| |31.|Argentina|114|0%| |32.|Albania|108|0%|...

  2. ACADEMIC DELEGATION VISITS 2008 -2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Pillo, Gianni

    Total Visits: 38 Europe: Kosovo, Germany, Estonia, Romania, Turkey, Belarus Asia: Kazakhstan, Russia: Austria, Germany, Slovenia, Turkey, United Kingdom, Sweden, Hungary, France, Albania Asia: Kazakhstan: 54 Europe: Turkey, Czech Republic, Germany, Kosovo, Hungary, Romania, Serbia, Netherlands, Croatia

  3. Economics Understanding of Albanian High School Students: Factors Related to Achievement as Measured by Test Scores on the Test of Economic Literacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushati, Dolore

    2010-04-19

    to slow sharply, 2008, para.1). Energy power problems in Albania have continued for a long period of time. Depending mainly on hydro power and using energy from power plants built during the communist era, Albania has suffered from blackouts due... plants along various rivers of the country during 2005-2009. The future will be even better based on the new strategic plan that the government will build more hydro power plants throughout the country and possibly a nuclear power plant (Summary...

  4. Country Zone 0.5 Kg 1 Kg Country Zone 0.5 Kg 1 Kg AFGHANISTAN 7 21.72 26.78 NEW WORK 9 7.20 11.70

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    .72 26.78 COMOROS 7 21.72 26.78 FIJI 6 21.72 26.78 CONGO 7 21.72 26.78 FINLAND 5 9.59 14.65 COOK IS 6

  5. Prevalence and correlates of HIV, syphilis, and hepatitis B and C infection and harm reduction program use among male injecting drug users in Kabul, Afghanistan: A cross-sectional assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Botros BA, Safi N, Earhart KC: Prevalence of HIV, hepatitisC, hepatitis B, and associated risk behaviors amongPJ, Ochoa K, Moss AR: Hepatitis C virus infection and needle

  6. The Right to Life with Dignity: Economic and Social Rights Respect in the World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolp, Felicity Ann

    2010-01-01

    Chad Chile China Colombia Comoros Congo, Dem. Rep. Congo,Bissau Chad Sierra Leone Comoros Vanuatu Afghanistan NigerBissau Freq. Swaziland Comoros Papua New Guinea Yemen, Rep.

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: News: Publications: Lab News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of scholars of the Pat Tillman Foundation, named after the ASU graduate, National Football League player, and soldier who was killed by friendly fire in Afghanistan. "Pat lived...

  8. NREL's Newest PE-Licensed Engineers Commit to Sustainability...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the world, from Alaska to Afghanistan, helping soldiers, airmen, and indigenous peoples save energy while saving taxpayer dollars. Nationwide, about 20% of engineers earn their...

  9. 2012 DOE Sustainability Awards | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    needs in Iraq and Afghanistan, commercial vendors, and the DOE International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor for a planned research project. Total return on investment...

  10. SFS Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oman, Peru, or Singapore); or (3) A least developed country (Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad,...

  11. Microsoft Word - TOC Section I Conformed thru Mod 274.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nicaragua, or Singapore); (3) A least developed country (Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African...

  12. CPFFS Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    General Conditions Page 29 of 33 (3) A least developed country (Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad,...

  13. AES Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oman, Peru, or Singapore); or (3) A least developed country (Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad,...

  14. CI-OFF Ex A (Rev. 0.2, 4/9/13) Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oman, Peru, or Singapore); or (3) A least developed country (Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad,...

  15. South Asia Regional Initiative for Energy Cooperation and Development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.usaid.govourwork Country Afghanistan, Pakistan, Bhutan, India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal, Maldives Southern Asia, Southern Asia, Southern Asia, Southern Asia,...

  16. Beat and Spoken Word Movements: Beating the American Bandwagon Mentality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    Beat and Spoken Word Movements: Beating the Americanmodern times, spoken word poets use the Iraq-Afghanistan Warhow the Beat and spoken word poets comment on American

  17. A SHARED STATE: IRAQI REFUGEES AND AMERICAN VETERANS IN THE AFTERMATH OF WAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolins, Maia

    2013-01-01

    Afghanistan, Palestine, and Iraq. Malden, MA: BlackwellCharles. A History of Iraq. New York: Cambridge UniversityWeb. Also, Glantz, Aaron and Iraq Veterans Against the War.

  18. Rallying around the Flag: Nationalist Emotions in American Mass Politics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feinstein, Yuval

    2012-01-01

    Opinion from World War II to Iraq. Chicago ; London: Thesensitivity and the War in Iraq." International Security 30:interventions in Afghanistan and Iraq." Presidential Studies

  19. Exit Wound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Hunter

    2012-01-01

    under age 35 killed in Iraq or Afghanistan, three die fromthe eye while serving in Iraq. After being told he is no

  20. Joint Statement by President Barack Obama of the United States...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    on a number of shared foreign policy priorities, including Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iran, Middle East Peace, and the Americas. In particular, they reiterated their shared...

  1. 2013 NASFAA 1 Military and Veterans Tips Tip Sheet for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and will be starting college soon. My dad, an Army officer, died in Iraq in 2007. I just filed a FAFSA on the Web programs for students like me? Yes. You may be eligible to receive an Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grant your parent or guardian died as a result of military service in Iraq or Afghanistan after 9/11/01 while

  2. Invasion of Iraq & Looting of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Invasion of Iraq & Looting of the National Museum Army Reserve Major Corine Wegener is mobilized for Everyone (SAFE) develops the DoD Iraq & Afghanistan Heritage Reference Websites. DoD hosts a symposium Iraq/Afghanistan Playing Cards sent to US military locations and in-theatre. CENTCOM Historical

  3. Short-term energy outlook. Volume 1. Quarterly projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-05-01

    World oil consumption is projected to decline in 1983 for the 4th consecutive year. Despite reduced petroleum production by OPEC, weak worldwide demand for petroleum and increased production by non-OPEC countries has put downward pressure on oil prices. As a result, OPEC lowered its official price for Saudi marker crude oil to $29 per barrel in March. The recent declines in world petroleum consumption are projected to end during the second half of 1983 as economic growth resumes in the industrialized countries. In view of the recent firmness in the world petroleum market, it is projected that petroleum prices will stablize near current levels. In the base case forecast, the price of imported crude oil to US refiners is assumed to remain at its current level of an estimated $29.43 per barrel through mid-1984.

  4. Update: Oil protectionism - three views of US vulnerability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-06-30

    World oil prices seem to have stabilized above the US $18 mark, many US publics fear that market power will once again be transferred to the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). When the price was weak, many observers said the weakness reflected victory over OPEC, as if the 1986 oil price crash were a result of the Organization's failure to exert its selfish will. Now that prices are higher, will US dependency on OPEC mushroom, fueling a campaign to protect indigenous crude oil prices through effective import fees. In this issue, latest available official import statistics for three views on how US oil import dependency might be evolving are supplied. This issue also contains: (1) ED refining netback data for the US Gulf and West Coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore for late June 1987; and (2) the ED fuel price/tax series for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere, June 1987 edition. 4 figures, 5 tables.

  5. World oil market outlook: recent history and forecasts of world oil prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    Recent world oil price trends and pricing behavior by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) are examined. An outlook for consumption, production and prices in the world oil market, both for the short-term horizon through 1982 and for the midterm period from 1985 through 1995 is presented. A historical review focuses on OPEC activity in the period from January 1980 to May 1981. Several sensitivity analyses and the impact of supply disruptions are used to determine projections. The appendix provides data on world crude oil prices for each of 23 countries for January, May, and June of 1980 and May of 1981. 22 tables, 9 figures.

  6. Import policy effects on the optimal oil price

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suranovic, S.M. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A steady increase in oil imports leaves oil importing countries increasingly vulnerable tofuture oil price shocks. Using a variation of the U.S. EIA`s oil market simulation model, equilibria displaying multiple price shocks is derived endogenously as a result of optimizing behavior on the part of OPEC. Here we investigate the effects that an oil import tariff and a petroleum stock release policy may have on an OPEC optimal price path. It is shown that while both policies can reduce the magnitude of future price shocks neither may be politically or technically feasible. 21 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Oil Exports and the Iranian Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esfahani, H. S.; Mohaddes, K.; Pesaran, M. Hashem

    in oil exploration and extraction technologies. Figure 1: Oil export revenues to income ratios for major oil exporters 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1980 1987 1994 2001 2008 Saudi Arabia Iran Norway Venezuela Kuwait UAE Qatar Libya Nigeria Algeria Russia... . As Figure 1 shows most other OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) member countries such as Saudi Arabia, Venezuela, Nigeria, Algeria, United Arab Emirates and Kuwait, and a few countries outside OPEC such as Norway and Russia have similar...

  8. The Differential Effects of Oil Demand and Supply Shocks on the Global Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cashin, Paul; Mohaddes, Kamiar; Raissi, Maziar; Raissi, Mehdi

    2012-11-01

    . The GVAR literature almost exclusively focuses on business cycle linkages among ad- vanced and major emerging market economies, with limited attention to growth spillovers to/from major oil exporters (e.g. the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting... it comes to oil supply, the MENA region.5 Of the 50 countries included in our sample, 17 are oil exporters, of which 10 are current members of the OPEC and one is a former member (Indonesia left OPEC in January 2009). We were not able to include Angola...

  9. An Empirical Growth Model for Major Oil Exporters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esfahani, Hadi Salehi; Mohaddes, Kamiar; Pesaran, M. Hashem

    2012-03-21

    . 3See, for example, Amuzegar (2008) and the British Petroleum Statistical Review of World Energy. 3 Figure 1: Oil Export Revenues to Income Ratios for Major Oil Exporters 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1980 1988 1996 2004 2010 Saudi Arabia Iran Norway Venezuela... shows most other OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) member countries such as Saudi Arabia, Venezuela, Nigeria, Algeria, United Arab Emirates and Kuwait, and a few countries outside OPEC such as Norway and Russia have similar oil...

  10. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Emirates 769 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Non OPEC 18,415 0 65 3,136 0 692 692 Argentina 1,437 0 0 0 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 1,186 0 0 0 Australia 629 0 0 0 0 0 0 Brazil 953 0 0 0...

  11. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Emirates 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Non OPEC 19,527 0 10 1,268 0 33 33 Argentina 1,101 0 0 0 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 748 0 0 0 Australia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Brazil 1,973 0 0 0 0...

  12. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela 1,589 0 0 0 0 0 0 Non OPEC 153,258 0 694 13,749 0 7,347 7,347 Argentina 13,500 0 0 0 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 3,304 0 0 0 Australia 1,900 0 44 192 0 0 0 Brazil...

  13. A methodology for assessing the market benefits of alternative motor fuels: The Alternative Fuels Trade Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leiby, P.N.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes a modeling methodology for examining the prospective economic benefits of displacing motor gasoline use by alternative fuels. The approach is based on the Alternative Fuels Trade Model (AFTM). AFTM development was undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of a longer term study of alternative fuels issues. The AFTM is intended to assist with evaluating how alternative fuels may be promoted effectively, and what the consequences of substantial alternative fuels use might be. Such an evaluation of policies and consequences of an alternative fuels program is being undertaken by DOE as required by Section 502(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Interest in alternative fuels is based on the prospective economic, environmental and energy security benefits from the substitution of these fuels for conventional transportation fuels. The transportation sector is heavily dependent on oil. Increased oil use implies increased petroleum imports, with much of the increase coming from OPEC countries. Conversely, displacement of gasoline has the potential to reduce US petroleum imports, thereby reducing reliance on OPEC oil and possibly weakening OPEC`s ability to extract monopoly profits. The magnitude of US petroleum import reduction, the attendant fuel price changes, and the resulting US benefits, depend upon the nature of oil-gas substitution and the supply and demand behavior of other world regions. The methodology applies an integrated model of fuel market interactions to characterize these effects.

  14. Version 28Oct11a Revolution & War: Geopolitics of the Middle East and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, Tom

    ) http://www.cfr.org/ 8) EIA at http://www.eia.doe.gov/ Note the Country Analysis Briefs, CAB 9) IEA at http://www.iea.org/ Especially the World Energy Outlook (WEO) 10) CIA Country Briefs at http) Links to other databases here: UNSD, OPEC, IEF, IEA, EUROSTAT, OLADE 15) IAEE (International Association

  15. The Global Economy and Changes in the Determinants of Cross-National Income Inequality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Theresa M.

    1999-04-01

    economic changes,stemming from the collapse of the Bretton Woods system in 1971 and the OPEC oil crisis in 1973 and 1974, occurred in the global economy. Data from two cohorts of countries are used to test these theories. The first cohort contains thirty...

  16. World oil flow slips in 1991 amid Mideast, U. S. S. R. woes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, R.J.

    1992-03-09

    World crude oil production slipped 0.9% in 1991 to average 59,964 million b/d. This paper reports that production declines related to war damage in Kuwait, United Nations sanctions on exports from Iraq, and oil sector woes in the crumbling U.S.S.R. were almost offset by higher production from other members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. OPEC crude production rose 0.6% in 1991 to average 23.425 million b/d, and non-OPEC output fell 1.9% to average 36.539 million b/d in 1991. Excluding the U.S.S.R., non-OPEC production moved up 1.5% to average 26.239 million b/d. World demand inched up about 200,000 b/d, estimates International Energy Agency, and IEA data show about 300,000 b/d was added to stocks in 1991. World crude prices started 1991 at their highest level, then fell off to average $17.82/bbl, down 16.5% from 1990 levels. Meantime, a slight increase in demand is predicted for 1992, and price stability again hinges on OPEC's ability to limit production.

  17. Energy: A global outlook. Second edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdulhady Hassen Tahea, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of the typical oil and energy related problems faced by various countries and regions of the world, and the divergent viewpoints and interests of the developing and industrialised countries. The need for urgent international cooperation is identified and useful guidelines offered which could contribute to the solution of the world energy problems. Contents (partial): An Economic and Political Evaluation: Historical evolution of the international oil industry. Global energy supply and demand balance. A historical review of OPEC's creation and actions. The rationale for OPEC. Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC). Historical review and rationale of the IEA's creation policies and action. Impact of structural changes on the international energy industries. Petromin, Saudi Arabian oil policies and industrialization through joint ventures. North-South - an international energy dialogue. Structural changes and new strategies. Towards an international energy development programme. Global Primary Energy Statistical and General Information: Global statistical review of primary energy. Energy scenarios for 1985 and 1990. Energy scenarios for the year 2000. The US energy situation. The West European energy situation. The Japanese energy situation. The OPEC developing countries' energy situation. The non-OPEC developing countries' energy situation. The USSR energy situation. The East European energy situation. Energy situation of the People's Republic of China. Energy and the Third World. Oil price fluctuations in perspective. The impact of downstream Arab investment. Statistical Data and Appendices: Statistical tables. Appendices. Bibliography. Index.

  18. Petroleum Marketing Annual, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-10-31

    In world crude oil markets, 1987 was a year of limited recovery and relative stability after the dramatic price slide of early 1986. Both foreign and domestic crude thereafter, ending the year somewhat higher than a year ago. In contrast, product wholesale markets remained relatively stable throughout the year, while retail prices sustained a fairly steady increase. As has been the case for over a decade, major price movements in international oil markets generally reflected responses to actual or perceived changes in the policies of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and/or its members. The year began with prices on an upward trend, in reaction to the December 1986 OPEC meeting in which the members resolved to return to an official pricing structure (a departure from the market-based pricing of 1986), and to reduce output quotas. Prices continued to rise until August, when evidence of continued OPEC overproduction appeared to outweigh market optimism, triggering a gradual slide that lasted the remainder of the year. Even with the downturn in the fourth quarter, crude oil markets in 1987, as measured by refiner acquisition costs, finished the year above year-end 1986 levels, and considerably above the lows reached in mid-1986. OPEC's struggle to maintain stable prices and production levels in 1987 reflected the organization's difficulties in reaching and enforcing agreements among its politically and economically diverse membership. 11 figs., 49 tabs.

  19. Crude price free-fall. Yamanis mission: to prevent it

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-30

    On January 30, 1985, OPEC announced price cuts effective February 1 for very-light and medium-light grades of crude, except for Nigeria's which, already having cut US $2/bbl on its own, increased its price for 37/sup 0/ API Bonny Light by US $0.65. The traditional OPEC marker crude, 34/sup 0/ API Arabian Light, is cut US $1.00 to $28.00/bbl. Arabian Heavy, about 27/sup 0/ API, stays at US $26.50. Prior to the cuts, the maximum spread between extra-light OPEC crude and Arabian Heavy was US $4.00/bbl. The spread between extra-light and the then-benchmark was US $1.50 at most, and between Arabian Heavy and the then-benchmark, US $2.50. Now, the official spreads are: Bonny Light-Arabian Heavy, US $2.15/bbl; Bonny Light-Arabian Light, US $0.65/bbl; Arabian Light-Arabian Heavy, US $1.50/bbl. These decisions have brought OPEC instant credibility, and could calm skeptics still warning of a free-fall in prices. This issue presents the refining netback data, US Gulf and West Coasts, late January 1985. The issue also contains the fuel price/tax series and the principal industrial fuel prices for December 1984 for countries of the Western Hemisphere. Asphalt export prices to the US for each month of 1984 are also listed.

  20. 1/21/13 3:57 PMFactiva Page 1 of 3http://global.factiva.com.libproxy.mit.edu/hp/printsavews.aspx?pp=Print&hc=Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutch, John

    America will have the capacity to be a net exporter of oil and natural gas by the end of this decade time, it would yield a shift in global oil-market power from the traditional producers (OPEC, Russia (Britain, France, Poland, Russia), Latin America (Argentina, Brazil) and Asia (China, Kazakhstan, India

  1. The oil policies of the Gulf Arab Nations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ripple, R.D.; Hagen, R.E.

    1995-03-01

    At its heart, Arab oil policy is inseparable from Arab economic and social policy. This holds whether we are talking about the Arab nations as a group or each separately. The seven Arab nations covered in this report-Bahrain, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates--participate in several organizations focusing on regional cooperation regarding economic development, social programs, and Islamic unity, as well as organizations concerned with oil policies. This report focuses on the oil-related activities of the countries that may reveal the de facto oil policies of the seven Persian Gulf nations. Nevertheless it should be kept in mind that the decision makers participating in the oil policy organizations are also involved with the collaborative efforts of these other organizations. Oil policies of five of the seven Arab nations are expressed within the forums of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC). Only Oman, among the seven, is not a member of either OAPEC or OPEC; Bahrain is a member of OAPEC but not of OPEC. OPEC and OAPEC provide forums for compromise and cooperation among their members. Nevertheless, each member state maintains its own sovereignty and follows its own policies. Each country deviates from the group prescription from time to time, depending upon individual circumstances.

  2. The issue of 'Adverse Effects and the Impacts of Response Measures' in UNFCCC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    of emission reduction activities on energy exporting countries. In negotiations the Organisation of Petroleum. This paper explores the political, economic and legal dimensions of this interlocked adverse effects to the impacts of climate change. This suggests that tacit G77-China support for OPEC's position may therefore

  3. ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS USED IN THIS REPORT Abbreviations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    integrated field file OPEC Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries; includes Algeria, Indonesia, Iran barrels BBL Billion barrels of total petroleum liquids; includes crude oil, condensate, and natural gas petroleum liquids; includes crude oil, condensate, and natural gas liquids BNGL Barrels of natural gas

  4. 1 Executive Summary EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    than the expected growth in worldwide oil production, volatility in world oil prices could result to develop indigenous oil resources. Currently, total world oil production is 66 million barrels a day share of world production. NonOPEC oil production is currently increasing at a faster rate (70 percent

  5. Contact information: Jagadeesh Jagarlamudi, Department of Computer Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, 20742 Email: jags@umiacs.umd.edu; Web: http://www.cs.umd.edu/jags/ Related Work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daume III, Hal

    -in-set knowledge mln mln dlrs bank oil cts tonnes company dollar pct NUM wheat lt exchange year dlrs pct shares stock yen company year prices share rate gas revs opec offer currency crude share dlrs group central, commodity, foreign, exchange, rates Grain grain, wheat, corn, forage, oilseed, silage Crude natural, gas

  6. Hearing on "Three Mile Island: Thirty Years of Lessons Learned" Testimony of Peter A. Bradford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    's successes could not offset the facts that electricity prices had tripled in the U.S. in the 1970s of rising costs and falling demand. Even the very high oil prices and supply uncertainty occasioned by OPEC and that surprising events in the operating plants had caused many cost estimates to double and then double again

  7. Iraq cracks a few heads in the Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, J.

    1990-08-20

    Last month Saddam Hussein charged that oil overproduction by his neighbors was costing Iraq dearly. When an OPEC meeting collapsed last week, he sent 100,000 troops to seize Kuwait, which he had accused of stealing oil. The US is scrambling to organize a Western boycott, but some analysts question just how effective such a more would be.

  8. What's Driving Oil Prices? James L. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, Tom

    1 What's Driving Oil Prices? James L. Smith Cary M. Maguire Chair in Oil & Gas Management Critical Issues in Energy Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas November 2, 2006 The Price of OPEC Oil ($/bbl) $0 $20 $40 $60 $80 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 Real Price ($2005) #12;2 Hubbert's Curve (Peak Oil

  9. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    OPEC 4,184 42 116 134 30 34 64 Algeria 218 24 68 53 0 0 0 Indonesia 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iran 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iraq 443 0 0 10 0 0 0 Kuwait 183 0 0 0 0 0 0 Libya 20 0 0 0 0 0 0 Nigeria...

  10. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Total OPEC 8,771 0 0 0 0 0 0 Algeria 252 0 0 0 0 0 0 Indonesia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iran 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iraq 150 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait 1,264 0 0 0 0 0 0 Libya 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Nigeria...

  11. Ghandi & Lin 1 Do Iran's Buy-Back Service Contracts Lead to Optimal Production?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    Ghandi & Lin 1 Do Iran's Buy-Back Service Contracts Lead to Optimal Production? The Case of Soroosh oil production on Iran's offshore Soroosh and Nowrooz fields, which have been developed by Shell countries' energy policies. Among the OPEC members, Iran, with 137.6 billion barrels of proven oil reserves

  12. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Conventional Total OPEC 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Algeria 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Indonesia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iran 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iraq 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Libya 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Nigeria 0 0 0...

  13. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Total OPEC 9,068 0 0 0 0 0 0 Algeria 827 0 0 0 0 0 0 Indonesia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iran 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iraq 307 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait 481 0 0 0 0 0 0 Libya 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Nigeria...

  14. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    OPEC 26,638 0 871 617 905 1,028 1,933 Algeria 0 0 534 617 0 0 0 Indonesia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iran 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iraq 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Libya 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Nigeria...

  15. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    OPEC 4,762 35 104 108 22 26 48 Algeria 228 17 51 58 0 0 0 Indonesia 19 0 0 3 0 0 0 Iran 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iraq 520 0 0 2 0 0 0 Kuwait 215 0 0 0 0 0 0 Libya 44 0 1 3 0 0 0 Nigeria...

  16. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Total OPEC 4,727 51 69 83 8 41 49 Algeria 212 21 40 48 0 0 0 Indonesia 28 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iran 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iraq 390 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait 268 0 0 0 0 0 0 Libya 34 0 0 0 0 0 0 Nigeria...

  17. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Total OPEC 4,825 37 86 111 22 25 47 Algeria 228 20 53 59 0 0 0 Indonesia 15 0 0 2 0 0 0 Iran 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iraq 524 0 0 1 0 0 0 Kuwait 197 0 0 0 0 0 0 Libya 43 0 1 3 0 0 0 Nigeria...

  18. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Conventional Total OPEC 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Algeria 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Indonesia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iran 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iraq 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Libya 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Nigeria 0 0 0...

  19. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    OPEC 4,816 35 105 109 22 26 48 Algeria 228 17 51 58 0 0 0 Indonesia 19 0 0 3 0 0 0 Iran 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iraq 527 0 0 2 0 0 0 Kuwait 227 0 0 0 0 0 0 Libya 44 0 1 3 0 0 0 Nigeria...

  20. The Secretary-General's High-level Group on Sustainable Energy for All commissioned this document to assess the opportunities for meeting the universal energy access objective set by the Secretary-General. It

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Electrical Energy Research Center, Brazil Faris Hasan OPEC Fund for International#12; The Secretary-General's High-level Group on Sustainable Energy for All commissioned this document to assess the opportunities for meeting the universal energy access objective set by the Secretary

  1. Curriculum Vitae Dr. Thomas Wilfred O'DONNELL, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, Tom

    .S. expert perspectives on German energy vulnerabilities · Freie Univsrsit¨at; Berlin, Germany 2014 Faculty resources, alternatives, technol- ogy and markets--to understand the role of energy in international affairs. Regions of interest include OPEC and other states of Latin America and the Middle East and the energy

  2. School of Engineering and Applied Science University of Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    SINCE THE 1973 OIL CRISIS, WHEN THE OPEC CARTEL SQUEEZED PRODUCTION OF CRUDE OIL TO DRIVE UP PRICES worldwide, experts have recognized the vital need to develop alternative sources of energy. In recent years. Davis said that the use of water-soluble carbohydrates also may lead to advances in chemical technology

  3. 17.953 U.S. Military Budget and Force Planning, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Cindy

    The United States is spending about $400 billion this year on national defense, some $40 billion on homeland security, and $85 billion on military operations and nation-building in Iraq and Afghanistan. This course is for ...

  4. An Update on Avian Flu The virus continues to spread in wild birds and poultry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Myanmar, India, Afghanistan, India, Iraq, Iran, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Turkey, Greece, Romania, Bulgaria-scale and statistically significant efficacy studies of anti-viral drugs like Tamiflu and Relenza against the H5N1 avian

  5. Deployment related mental health care seeking behaviors in the U.S. military and the use of telehealth to mitigate their impacts on access to care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hess, John (John Thomas)

    2012-01-01

    Interviewees report that groups of service members returning from Iraq and Afghanistan often require substantial amounts of mental health care, causing surges in demand at military hospitals. These hospitals have difficulty ...

  6. Computational modeling of blast-induced traumatic brain injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyein, Michelle K. (Michelle Kyaw)

    2010-01-01

    Blast-induced TBI has gained prominence in recent years due to the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, yet little is known about the mechanical effects of blasts on the human head; no injury thresholds have been established ...

  7. Design and evaluation of a wireless electronic health records system for field care in mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirsh, David

    in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan; the coordinated bombings in Madrid1 and London;2 the Tsunami disaster prepares for: a dirty bomb (an explosive-dispersed radiation device) or nuclear-bomb detonation,6

  8. Computational Modeling and Optimization of a Novel Shock Tube to Study Blast Induced Traumatic Brain Injury 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anumolu, Pratima

    2014-08-06

    Over the last decade, soldiers fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan are being exposed to blasts from powerful explosives with improvised detonation techniques. These blasts put them at high risk of closed head non-impact ...

  9. Studying Unexplained Veteran Illnesses at the APS

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Millicent

    2014-06-04

    Researchers from Stony Brook University come to Argonne's Advanced Photon Source to study the potential underlying causes for an unusual increased incidence of pulmonary disease in U.S. soldiers returning from military service in the Middle East and Afghanistan.

  10. Fatty Acid Blood Levels, Vitamin D Status, and Physical Performance and Its Relationship to Resiliency and Mood in Active Duty Soldiers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barringer, Nicholas D

    2015-05-11

    The mental health of soldiers is a growing concern as rates of depression and suicide have increased in soldiers with recently more deaths attributed to suicide than deaths due to combat in Afghanistan in 2012. Previous ...

  11. Cultured men, uncultured women : an exploration of the gendered hierarchy of taste governing Afghan radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamal, Sarah

    2005-01-01

    After years of strict bans on the media, local radio in post-Taliban Afghanistan is undergoing an intense period of reconstruction. This thesis uses a multi-sited ethnographic investigation to examine local Afghan radio's ...

  12. US military expenditures to protect the use of Persian Gulf oil for motor vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

    2008-01-01

    economic costs of the war in Iraq. Working Paper 05-19, AEI-The economic costs of the Iraq War: an appraisal three yearsA. , 2006. The cost of Iraq, Afghanistan, and other global

  13. An All Women's Response to War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    war and aggression in Iraq are on the forefront of manyfifth anniversary of the war in Iraq, the issue Masculinistand occupation of Afghanistan and Iraq; and the use of war,

  14. Paper ID# 901456.PDF Page 1 of 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @satechnologies.com haydee.cuevas@satechnologies.com dan.colombo@statechnologies.com ABSTRACT Recent operations in Iraq will be empowered to make better decisions. Recent operations in Iraq and Afghanistan have confirmed that in order

  15. U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

    2006-01-01

    A. Belasco, The Cost of Iraq, Afghanistan, and Other Globaland After the 2003 Invasion of Iraq: Cluster Sample Survey,”after the 2003 Invasion of Iraq: a Cross-Sectional Cluster

  16. Studying Unexplained Veteran Illnesses at the APS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Millicent

    2014-03-17

    Researchers from Stony Brook University come to Argonne's Advanced Photon Source to study the potential underlying causes for an unusual increased incidence of pulmonary disease in U.S. soldiers returning from military service in the Middle East and Afghanistan.

  17. Special Publication No. 3, Ticks and Tickborne Diseases, IV. Geographical Distribution of Ticks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doss, Mildred A.; Farr, Marion M.; Roach, Katharine F.; Anastos, George

    1978-01-01

    ISLANDS see NEW GUINEA AFGHANISTAN Aponomma latum (Santos Dias, J. ?. ?. , (1961A), 1- 18) AFGHANISTAN -- Continued. Haemaphysalis sulcata (Anastos, G., (1956?), 18-19) Hyalomma aegyptium (Anastos, G., (1954C) 1?.9-174\\ (Chasma-Obeh, Adaraskand...) '' 169"174> Hyalomma aegyptium (Kaiser, M.'N. & Hooestraal, ?., (1963A), 130-139) Argas (Chiropterargas) afghanistaniensis (Santos Dias, J. A. T. , (196??), 1-18) Argas (Chiropterargas) boueti (Nemenz, ?., (1960A), 45-47) Argas persicus (Anastos, G...

  18. st International Conference BiblioWorld: Technology, Resources, Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanchev, Peter

    Totomanova, National Library "St. St. Cyril and Methodius", Sofia 11:45-12:05 New communication aspects access to old European written heritage Adolf Knoll, National Library of the Czech Republic, Prague 14 Library: "dream"and/or "reality" for the Albanian libraries? Dr. Etleva Domi, National Library of Albania

  19. ICTP Public Information Office Page 1 31/03/15 Country Total visitors Female visitors Person-months*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -months* Albania 3 2 4.14 Algeria 50 19 50.37 Argentina 142 53 111.55 Armenia 94 42 39.58 Australia 18 5 5.37 Colombia 49 13 55.76 Costa Rica 44 5 33.80 Côte d'Ivoire 12 2 14.83 Croatia 29 11 10.95 STATISTICAL SUMMARY

  20. NETHERLANDS SWITZERLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN SOUTHERN OCEANSOUTHERN OCEAN SOUTHERN OCEAN SOUTH PACIFIC OCEAN NORTH PACIFIC OCEAN ARCTIC OCEANARCTIC OCEAN NORTH PACIFIC OCEAN SOUTH PACIFIC OCEAN Determining Factors for Medical Threat Levels MACEDONIA ALBANIA MONTENEGRO GREECE AZERBAIJAN ARCTIC OCEAN NORTH ATLANTIC OCEAN SOUTH ATLANTIC OCEAN INDIAN

  1. International energy indicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, E.K. (ed.)

    1980-09-01

    Data are compiled and graphs are presented for Iran: Crude Oil Capacity, Production and Shut-in, 1974-1980; Saudi Arabia: Crude Oil Capacity, Production and Shut-in, 1974-1980; OPEC (Ex-Iran and Saudi Arabia): Capacity, Production and Shut-in, 1974-1980; Non-OPEC Free World and US Production of Crude Oil, 1973-1980; Oil Stocks: Free World, US, Japan and Europe (landed), 1973-1980; Petroleum Consumption by Industrial Countries, 1973-1980; USSR Crude Oil Production, 1974-1980; Free World and US Nuclear Generation Capacity, 1973-1980; US Imports of Crude Oil and Products, 1973-1980; Landed Cost of Saudi Crude in Current and 1974 Dollars; US Trade in Bituminous Coal, 1973-1980; Summary of US Merchandise Trade, 1976-1980; and Energy/GNP Ratio.

  2. Focus on Indonesia: petrolization today

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-10-29

    There is no valid tradition or set of operative conventions when it comes to the negotiating power of oil-exporting, developing countries. The facade of the 1970s, erected in the minds of many Eastern and Western analysts, portraying a powerful OPEC running up world oil prices by manipulating supplies, has crumbled - leaving a newly-erected facade of an OPEC slashing process by manipulating prices. Latest official data shows Indonesia a case in point: Petrolization of a developing economy is not a deliberate political investment, but a consequence of under-development; it is seen as probably benefitting all participants in oil marketing, including consumers. This issue also includes the following: (1) ED refining netback data for US Gulf and West Coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore for late August 1986; and (2) ED fuel price/tax series for countries of the Western and Eastern Hemispheres. 3 figures, 2 tables.

  3. US oil-import dependency growing: but on whom, for what

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-02-24

    During 1987, the US became more dependent on imports for its crude oil requirements. Price and marketing competition among exporters are the causes. A close scrutiny of latest statistics reveals greater US reliance on OPEC, Arab OPEC member countries, and lighter crude oils. These shifts also reflect greater US import reliance on the more-distant sources of supply -- producers with competitive production economics and increasingly competitive marketing operations. Would future higher crude oil prices reverse these developments. This issue also contains the following: (1) ED refining netback data for the US Gulf and West Coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore, for late Feb. 1988; and (2) ED fuel price/tax series for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere, Feb. 1988 edition. In addition, tabular data are also included on US import volume and market share by county (both over and under 25/sup 0/ API), 1986 and 1987. 2 figures, 7 tables.

  4. What else did the price crash do. World oil's new-think

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-06-18

    The pricing of crude oil in relation to its refined product value should probably be viewed not as the cause of the international price crash touched off in late 1985, but as the consequence. Negotiating tables appear more cozy, with smaller distances between what buyers and sellers recognize as market-oriented prices. To an important degree, OPEC now officially prices by the netback system, and many other producers will likely follow soon. In California, an OPEC light crude and two domestics reveal new-think. This issue also includes the following: (1) ED refining netback data for the US Gulf and West Coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore for June 1986; (2) ED fuel price/tax series for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere for May 1986 (unless otherwise indicated); and (3) principal industrial fuel prices for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere for March 1986.

  5. World oil model development. Progress report No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gately, D.

    1981-01-01

    A newly developed model of the world oil market is described in this report. This model has the following features: (1) energy is disaggregated into oil and non-oil; (2) the world is disaggregated as follows: the US, the rest of the OECD, OPEC, and the rest of WOCA; and (3) an energy-economy feedback is included. This satisfies some of the tasks in the Contract's Statement of Work. The model is described in Section II. Illustrative results are presented in Section III, for a single price-path: actual OPEC prices from 1973 to 1981, then constant real price thru 1990. These results are also compared with actual historical data for 1973 to 1980.

  6. The bears come out for summer: A world awash in oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-30

    In this issue, Energy Detente examines near term oil price and supply prospects. World oil prices have plunged over the last eight weeks to their lowest levels since 1991. This can be attributed to low world oil demand and bearish speculation on world oil markets that the on-again off-again oil export negotiations between Iraq and the United Nations may result in limited amounts of Iraqi crude being added to already swollen oil supplies. To recessionary economics in consuming countries, trends to raise taxes and reduce fuel price subsidies in many countries, and rising costs of environmental protection, producers also scrutinize a concerned Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). OPEC's reactive potentials are heightened in a period of such market uncertainities.

  7. Forecasting Using Time Varying Meta-Elliptical Distributions with a Study of Commodity Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sancetta, Alessio; Nikanrova, Arina

    2006-03-14

    products), cartels among producing countries reducing supply (e.g. OPEC), changes in legislations (e.g. import-export tariffs), international war conflicts (e.g. Iraq war), changes in weather conditions (e.g. global warming), the behaviour of commodity... . The commodities studied are crude oil, gas oil (IPE), heating oil, natural gas, propane, un- leaded gas, cocoa, coffee, sugar, orange juice, soybean, corn, rice, oats, wheat and cotton. Assum- ing the data possess suitable ergodic properties, we report sample...

  8. A global perspective on energy markets and economic integration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Arnold Barry

    2006-04-01

    What will be the effect of Iraqi domestic instability on Iraqi oil production Negotiations for Iranian nuclear technology on Iranian oil supplies Saudi commitment to expanded oil production President Putin's policies on Russian oil and natural gas supplies President Chavez's policies on Venezuelan oil supplies Instability in Nigeria Higher oil prices on world economic growth Effect of economic growth on oil demand in China, India, U.S., etc. Higher oil prices on non-OPEC oil supplies

  9. Monthly and Quarterly GDP Estimates for Interwar Britain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, James; Solomou, Solomos; Weale, Martin

    coal consumption, electricity consumption, merchandise on railways, commercial motors in use, postal receipts, building activity, iron and steel for home consumption, raw cotton delivered to mills, imports of raw materials, exports British... ) as OPEC recessions in that they both followed sharp increases in oil prices which were themselves associated with oil embargoes. In the first case the oil embargo followed the war between Israel and Egypt of November 1973.9 In the second case...

  10. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Total OPEC 114,309 0 0 0 0 0 0 Algeria 3,600 0 0 0 0 0 0 Indonesia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iran 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iraq 10,192 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait 8,930 0 0 0 0 0 0 Libya 1,350 0 0 0 0 0 0...

  11. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Total OPEC 84,797 0 0 0 0 0 0 Algeria 2,479 0 0 0 0 0 0 Indonesia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iran 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iraq 7,742 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait 7,173 0 0 0 0 0 0 Libya 1,350 0 0 0 0 0 0...

  12. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Total OPEC 117,889 0 0 0 0 0 0 Algeria 4,118 0 0 0 0 0 0 Indonesia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iran 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iraq 11,629 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait 8,930 0 0 0 0 0 0 Libya 1,350 0 0 0 0 0 0...

  13. World heavy oil and bitumen riches - update 1983: Part one, reserves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-05-25

    The fact that there are several OPEC members with significant non-conventional petroleum reserves, coupled with the economic interdependence of OPEC with oil-importing industrialized countries, means it is very much in OPEC's interest to promote international cooperation on non-conventional oil. The rationale behind the goal of decreasing dependence on conventional oil, particularly in the case of imports, is promotive of reducing pressure not only on oil-importing nations, but exporters as well. Thus it is in the interests of all countries to plan for the heavying up of the petroleum barrel, as this will inevitably accompany the decreases in conventional supplies and any increases of non-petroleum participation in the world energy diet. Although the megaprojects in Canada and Venezuela and other ambitious plans for development of heavy oil and bitumen have been shelved or delayed indefinitely due to lower light oil prices and reduced financial support, it was found that these setbacks have been superficial. Both Canada and Venezuela continue to pursue joint research with foreign countries and private companies. Like conservation, non-conventional petroleum-resource development is seen as internationally constructive. In this updating of reserves, it is noted that the geopolitics are inescapable when most of the light and medium oil is in the Middle East, and most heavy oil and tar sands are in the Western Hemisphere. This issue presents the Energy Detente fuel price/tax series and industrial fuel prices for May 1983 for countries of the Western Hemisphere.

  14. Production and pricing patterns in the international crude oil market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, S.C.

    1985-01-01

    This study focuses on measuring the patterns of production and pricing of the major oil-exporting countries over the past decade. It conducts a series of empirical investigations, relying largely on quarterly data, into the determinants of the distribution of oil liftings in the OPEC areas, including the significance of relative crude oil price incentives, the stability of oil prices and market shares, the components of the residual demand for OPEC oil with emphasis on fluctuations in speculative demand for oil inventories, the impact of effective capacity utilization and speculative demand on major price escalations, and the sensitivity of Saudi Arabian price preferences to evolving net demand reaction to higher oil prices and to the share it is able to retain of the OPEC market. The background for this analysis is provided by a review of the historical evolution of oil and energy consumption, production and development patterns during the postwar era, and the reversal of theoretical frameworks for analyzing the international oil market are described, and the rationale for the noncompetitive view of oil prices and production in major exporting countries is detailed. Finally, the transformation of the structure of crude oil marketing over the past decade is analyzed, emphasizing growing competitive trends in the industry mixed with residual oligopolistic tendencies.

  15. International transmission of oil price effects and the derivation of optimal oil prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marquez, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to study the international transmission of oil-price effects and the derivation of optimal oil prices not as two separate problems but rather as one problem by recognizing that changes in oil prices affect real income of oil importers and thus feed back to the demand for oil faced by OPEC. To study the international transmission of oil price changes, the author develops a three-region world model where real income, prices, and international trade are endogenously determined. With this model he derives the comparative statics of oil price changes. He also analyzes the feedback effect of oil price changes, allowing for counterinflationary policies in oil-importing countries. A modified version of the theoretical model is econometrically estimated with data for 1960-1979. The quantitative dimension of oil price changes using dynamic multipliers is studied. Also studied are the impacts of restrictive fiscal policy in DC's, greater absorption by OPEC, and increased financial transfers to LDC's on real income, in the international oil market, on inflation, and on international trade of manufacturers and raw materials. It was found that not recognizing the feedback effects of oil price increases introduces a significant upward bias in the total price elasticity and in the optimal oil price path, neither of which is consistent with OPEC's best interest.

  16. Energy: A global outlook. Second edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdulhady, H.; Tahar, H.E.

    1983-01-01

    This work presents an authoritative analysis of the typical oil and energy related problems faced by various countries of the regions of the world, and the divergent viewpoints and interests of the developing and industrialised countries. The need for urgent international cooperation is identified and useful guidelines offered which could contribute to the solution of the world energy problems. Contents (partial): An Economic and Political Evaluation: Historical evolution of the international oil industry. Global energy supply and demand balance. A historical review of OPEC's creation and actions. The rationale for OPEC. Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC). Historical review and rationale of the IEA's creation policies and action. Impact of structural changes on the international energy industries. Petromin, Saudi Arabian oil policies and industrialization through joint ventures. North- South--an international energy dialogue. Structural changes and new strategies. Towards an international energy development programme. Global Primary Energy: Statistical and General Information: Global statistical review of primary energy. Energy scenarios for 1985 and 1990. Energy scenarios for the year 2000. The US energy situation. The West European energy situation. The Japanese energy situation. The OPEC developing countries' energy situation. The USSR energy situation. The East European energy situation. Energy situation of the People's Republic of China. Energy and the Third World. Price fluctuations in perspective. The impact of downstream Arab investment. Statistical Data and Appendices: Statistical tables. Appendices. Bibliography. Index.

  17. U. S. oil imports: reliance on American neighbors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-11-23

    U.S. reliance on other American nations for crude oil imports has nearly doubled in less than two years. In 1981, 23% of U.S. crude imports came from Western Hemisphere sources; today, 44% do. For total petroleum imports (crude and refined products combined), that percentage for the Western Hemisphere was 38%, rising to 56% in 1983 to date. In fact, the top three petroleum suppliers to the United States (crude and refine products combined) are Western Hemisphere neighbors: Mexico, Canada, and Venezuela, in that order. This represents a dramatic shift to the West since 1981, when Saudi Arabia was the U.S.'s most important source of foreign crude, and Nigeria second. By 1982, Saudi Arabia was bumped to second place by Mexico, and Nigeria came in third. Since 1982, reliance on members of OPEC has been reduced: about 49.75 of the crude imports came from OPEC suppliers last year, compared to 40.8% for the first eight months of 1983. Furthermore, U.S. reliance on Arab OPEC members has been reduced from 21% of total crude oil imports in 1982 to just 13% in 1983. This issue of Energy Dentente includes the fuel price/tol series and the industrial fuel prices for November 1983 for countries for the Western Hemisphere.

  18. World Oil Prices and Production Trends in AEO2008 (released in AEO2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO) defines the world oil price as the price of light, low-sulfur crude oil delivered in Cushing, Oklahoma. Since 2003, both "above ground" and "below ground" factors have contributed to a sustained rise in nominal world oil prices, from $31 per barrel in 2003 to $69 per barrel in 2007. The AEO2008 reference case outlook for world oil prices is higher than in the AEO2007 reference case. The main reasons for the adoption of a higher reference case price outlook include continued significant expansion of world demand for liquids, particularly in non-OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries, which include China and India; the rising costs of conventional non-OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) supply and unconventional liquids production; limited growth in non-OPEC supplies despite higher oil prices; and the inability or unwillingness of OPEC member countries to increase conventional crude oil production to levels that would be required for maintaining price stability. The Energy Information Administration will continue to monitor world oil price trends and may need to make further adjustments in future AEOs.

  19. Theorizing September 11: Social Theory, History, and Globalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kellner, Douglas

    2002-04-01

    years more of civil war, setting up the present conflict (see Cooley 2000; Rashid 2001; and Ali 2002). While later in the 1990s, certain U.S. interests would be attracted to the oil and gas possibilities in Afghanistan and would cozy up to and support..., which had done a feasibility study for the project. Enron and Unocal had lavishly courted the Taliban and encouraged U.S. support of the regime since they were deemed the group most likely to stabilize Afghanistan and allow the pipeline to be built.11...

  20. Sonny Ramaswamy Director of Agricultural Research Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Source: http://www.eia.doe.gov Petroleum (million barrels/day) USA imports 60% of oil at an annual cost of $250 B The Perfect Storm · September 11, 2001 · Terrorism, Iraq, Afghanistan · Iran, Venezuela, Nigeria · Higher farm income and value · Net energy, CO2, greenhouse gas output in production and use of ethanol

  1. WINTER 2002 19 2001 INDUCTION CEREMONY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Joel E.

    by Peter Fritsch, entitled "Lesson Plan: Religious Schools in Pakistan Fill Void--and Spawn Warriors of Save the Children for Pakistan and Afghanistan, observed that relatively uneducated hard-line groups. On CNN at the end of September, Fritsch reported, Pakistan's military dictator, General Pervez Musharraf

  2. ResearchMICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY > 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    world last year when they made a discovery that could mean it's raining less than we think will focus primarily on better energy development and distribution and on earthquake hazard mitigation. "I and Afghanistan. The people I work with are very smart, but the need to balance competing agendas among different

  3. The United States: The Making of National Security Policy John M. Deutch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutch, John

    as observation or involvement is vast. It begins with Afghanistan and Iraq and extends to China and East Asia. It includes Iran, Africa, the Middle East peace process, Russia, European affairs, functional areas of energy group is with political-military affairs. With other matters, additional agencies may participate

  4. 09/10/2009 17:48Why Chimpanzees Make Bad Suicide Bombers : The Primate Diaries Page 1 of 15http://scienceblogs.com/primatediaries/2009/08/why_chimpanzees_make_bad_suici.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Andy

    Search Recent Posts Afghanistan's Arrow and the Cycle of Imperial Hubris Is Bisphenol-A Turning Our Kids that Religion Really Does Poison Everything Jim Lippard on Is Bisphenol-A Turning Our Kids Nasty? Bob O'H on Evidence that Religion Really Does Poison Everything EMJ on Is Bisphenol-A Turning Our Kids Nasty? Jim

  5. Nepal's Maoists: Purists or Pragmatists?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Crisis Group

    2007-05-18

    , Nepal’s Maoists: Their Aims, Structure and Strategy, ?? ??????? ???? ??????????? ????????? ?????? ????? ????????? ?????? ????? ????????? ??????? ??. ???, Nepal: From People Power to Peace?, ?? ?? ????, ?????? ??? ????? ??????? ??. ???, Nepal’s Peace... ), Communist Party of Afghanistan, Communist Party of Bangladesh (Marxist-Leninist), Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist), Communist Party of Peru, Communist Party of Turkey Marxist-Leninist, Marxist-Leninist Communist Organisation of Tunisia, Maoist Communist...

  6. The G8 must fund the war against poverty: JEFFREY SACHS. By JEFFREY SACHS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMMENT The G8 must fund the war against poverty: JEFFREY SACHS. By JEFFREY SACHS 768 words 7 June outlays in Iraq and Afghanistan. The G8 should start by remembering its promises. The millennium, the G8 and other signatories urged "developed countries that have not done so to make concrete efforts

  7. Workshop on Computational Linguistics and Clinical Psychology: From Linguistic Signal to Clinical Reality, pages 16, Baltimore, Maryland USA, June 27, 2014. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    classifier. 2 Suicide risk and military culture The suicide rate among members of the United States Armed in Iraq and Afghanistan. Sui- cide is now the second-leading cause of death among military personnel). In response to steadily rising suicide rates among military per- sonnel and veterans, researchers, clinicians

  8. Reaching More for Less: Modernizing US International Food Aid Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natsios, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    of International Affairs, is also an executive professor at the Bush School of Government and Public Service. He is a former USAID admin- istrator who managed reconstruction programs in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Sudan. He also served as US special envoy to Sudan...

  9. Geek-Up[09.17.2010]-- Water Blades, Biomass Conversion and Antineutrino Detection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Scientists have engineered a blade of water that’s strong enough and fast enough to penetrate through steel, which will help soldiers in Afghanistan disable deadly IEDs, plus researchers are currently testing an aboveground water-based antineutrino detector that will improve monitoring capabilities at nuclear facilities.

  10. Experts Offer Marines Energy-Efficiency Advice

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    As an early adopter of cutting-edge technologies, the United States military is pioneering energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies in the field. Recently, the Commandant of the United States Marine Corps sent a team to visit bases and camps in Afghanistan to assess and make recommendations on the supply and use of energy and water.

  11. The social costs to the US of monopolization of the world oil market, 1972--1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.; Leiby, P.N.

    1993-03-01

    The partial monopolization of the world oil market by the OPEC cartel has produced significant economic costs to the economies of the world. This paper reports estimates of the costs of monopolization of oil to the US over the period 1972--1991. Two fundamental assumptions of the analysis are, (1) that OPEC has acted as a monopoly, albeit with limited control, knowledge, and ability to act and, (2) that the US and other consuming nations could, through collective (social) action affect the cartel`s ability to act as a monopoly. We measure total costs by comparing actual costs for the 1972--1991 period to a hypothetical ``more competitive`` world oil market scenario. By measuring past costs we avoid the enormous uncertainties about the future course of the world oil market and leave to the reader`s judgment the issue of how much the future will be like the past. We note that total cost numbers cannot be used to determine the value of reducing US oil use by one barrel. They are useful for describing the overall size of the petroleum problem and are one important factor in deciding how much effort should be devoted to solving it. Monopoly pricing of oil transfers wealth from US oil consumers to foreign oil producers and, by increasing theeconomic scarcity of oil, reduces the economy`s potential to produce. The actions of the OPEC cartel have also produced oil price shocks, both upward and downward, that generate additional costs because of the economy`s inherent inability to adjust quickly to a large change in energy prices. Estimated total costs to the United States from these three sources for the 1972--1991 period are put at $4.1 trillion in 1990$($1.2 T wealth transfer, $0.8 T macroeconomic adjustment costs, $2.1 T potential GNP losses). The cost of the US`s primary oil supply contingency program is small ($10 B) by comparison.

  12. The social costs to the US of monopolization of the world oil market, 1972--1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.; Leiby, P.N.

    1993-03-01

    The partial monopolization of the world oil market by the OPEC cartel has produced significant economic costs to the economies of the world. This paper reports estimates of the costs of monopolization of oil to the US over the period 1972--1991. Two fundamental assumptions of the analysis are, (1) that OPEC has acted as a monopoly, albeit with limited control, knowledge, and ability to act and, (2) that the US and other consuming nations could, through collective (social) action affect the cartel's ability to act as a monopoly. We measure total costs by comparing actual costs for the 1972--1991 period to a hypothetical more competitive'' world oil market scenario. By measuring past costs we avoid the enormous uncertainties about the future course of the world oil market and leave to the reader's judgment the issue of how much the future will be like the past. We note that total cost numbers cannot be used to determine the value of reducing US oil use by one barrel. They are useful for describing the overall size of the petroleum problem and are one important factor in deciding how much effort should be devoted to solving it. Monopoly pricing of oil transfers wealth from US oil consumers to foreign oil producers and, by increasing theeconomic scarcity of oil, reduces the economy's potential to produce. The actions of the OPEC cartel have also produced oil price shocks, both upward and downward, that generate additional costs because of the economy's inherent inability to adjust quickly to a large change in energy prices. Estimated total costs to the United States from these three sources for the 1972--1991 period are put at $4.1 trillion in 1990$($1.2 T wealth transfer, $0.8 T macroeconomic adjustment costs, $2.1 T potential GNP losses). The cost of the US's primary oil supply contingency program is small ($10 B) by comparison.

  13. Global production through 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foreman, N.E.

    1996-12-01

    Two companion studies released recently should provide great food for thought among geo-political strategists and various national governments. If predictions contained in these Petroconsultants studies of oil and gas production trends for the next 10 years are realized, there will be great repercussions for net exporters and importers, alike. After analyzing and predicting trends within each of the world`s significant producing nations for the 1996--2005 period, the crude oil and condensate report concludes tat global production will jump nearly 24%. By contrast, worldwide gas output will leap 40%. The cast of characters among producers and exporters that will benefit from these increases varies considerably for each fuel. On the oil side, Russia and the OPEC members, particularly the Persian Gulf nations, will be back in the driver`s seat in terms of affecting export and pricing patterns. On the gas side, the leading producers will be an interesting mix of mostly non-OPEC countries. The reemergence of Persian Gulf oil producers, coupled with an anticipated long-term decline among top non-OPEC producing nations should present a sobering picture to government planners within large net importers, such as the US. They are likely to find themselves in much the same supply trap as was experienced in the 1970s, only this time the dependence on foreign oil supplies will be much worse. Gas supplies will not be similarly constrained, and some substitution for oil is probable. Here, two articles, ``World oil industry is set for transition`` and ``Worldwide gas surges forward in next decade,`` present a summary of the findings detailed in Petroconsultants` recent studies.

  14. A systematic survey for sex-linked cellular antigens in chickens 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, John Willard

    1951-01-01

    ), with absorbed' antieera AC7 indicatee that, the antigenic cotxponent detected may be 16. because the strong rcactionx obtained in the absorbed fioid Ac'f 'and reagent 36 correepoxuix axtd the txeo weak reactions shown by IN)If and II9997 probabIy' represent...XQCre OX the fi&iiIy~ '2'hero arc cover@I quectionabis weak reactions of. AC9 whtich dc not exact hand, the weak react" bnc ch w ~~', ttxc abaox'bcd AC7 flci c~er~ond , perfectiy wi'th tax pattern %Opec~' for, thill 8Ix aIIAI3Ak aegregatixxg...

  15. Economic and energy indicators. Bi-weekly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The EEI provides up-to-date information on changes since 1977 in economic and energy activities of major countries. It consists of tables only. They depict (a) economic indicators (industrial production, unemployment, consumer price inflation, and exchange rate trends) for the Big Seven developed countries (United States, Japan, West Germany, France, United Kingdom, Italy, and Canada); (b) foreign trade and foreign trade prices for the Big Seven; and (c) monthly average prices for selected agricultural products and industrial materials. The energy indicators include tables on petroleum consumption, production, and imports for the Big Seven. A table and chart depict the movement of OPEC average crude oil sales prices since 1973.

  16. Economic and energy indicators. Monthly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The Economic and Energy Indicator provides up-to-date information on changes since 1977 in economic and energy activities of major countries. It consists of tables only. They depict economic indicators (industrial production, unemployment, consumer price inflation, and exchange rate trends) for the Big Seven developed countries (United States, Japan, West Germany, France, United Kingdom, Italy, and Canada); foreign trade and foreign trade prices for the Big Seven; and monthly average prices for selected agricultural products and industrial materials. The energy indicators include tables on petroleum consumption, production, and imports for the Big Seven. A table and chart depict the movement of OPEC average crude oil sales prices since 1973.

  17. Economic and energy indicators. Bi-weekly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Economic and Energy Indicator provides up-to-date information on changes since 1977 in economic and energy activities of major countries. It consists of tables only. They depict economic indicators (industrial production, unemployment, consumer price inflation, and exchange rate trends) for the Big Seven developed countries (United States, Japan, West Germany, France, United Kingdom, Italy, and Canada); foreign trade and foreign trade prices for the Big Seven; and monthly average prices for selected agricultural products and industrial materials. The energy indicators include tables on petroleum consumption, production, and imports for the Big Seven. A table and chart depict the movement of OPEC average crude oil sales prices since 1973.

  18. Economic and Energy Indicators. Bi-weekly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Economic and Energy Indicator provides up-to-date information on changes since 1977 in economic and energy activities of major countries. It consists of tables only. They depict economic indicators (industrial production, unemployment, consumer price inflation, and exchange rate trends) for the Big Seven developed countries (United States, Japan, West Germany, France, United Kingdom, Italy, and Canada); foreign trade and foreign trade prices for the Big Seven; and monthly average prices for selected agricultural products and industrial materials. The energy indicators include tables on petroleum consumption, production, and imports for the Big Seven. A table and chart depict the movement of OPEC average crude oil sales prices since 1973.

  19. The international fuels report. Supply/price trends and forecasts, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swain, C.

    1988-01-01

    This survey of the principal developments in major world energy markets reviews key issues in supply and demand, presents expert opinions on likely developments in the coming year, analyzes pricing prospects, examines world energy requirements, and discusses the outlook for energy consumers and suppliers. Particular emphasis is placed on OECD countries and principal energy suppliers. Tables and graphs of principal energy indicators using the latest available information are included throughout. Providing current data on OPEC price policy and the level of production in the main areas of fossil versus alternative energy sources, this book is a practical planning tool.

  20. Growth, Development and Natural Resources: New Evidence Using a Heterogeneous Panel Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavalcanti, T. V. V.; Mohaddes, K.; Raissi, M.

    which are not endowed with oil, natural gas, minerals and other non-renewable resources. Therefore, resource abun- dance is believed to be an important determinant of economic failure, which implies that oil abundance is a curse and not a blessing... that the results are not driven by a few outliers in the sub-samples, we look at country-speci?c estimations for the OPEC and EX countries. Overall the coe¢ cients 15Bahrain, China, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Egypt, France, India, Iran, Italy, Japan...

  1. Institutions and the Volatility Curse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leong, Weishu; Mohaddes, Kamiar

    2011-07-10

    and 12 can be found in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. Our sample also includes 32 out of the 34 OECD countries and 8 out of the 12 of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). Thus our sample is very comprehensive... -Bissau Netherlands Tanzania Cameroon Guyana New Zealand Thailand Canada Haiti Nicaragua Togo Central African Rep. Honduras Niger Trinidad and Tobago Chad Hungary Nigeria Tunisia Chile India Norway Turkey China, People?s Rep. of Indonesia Oman Uganda Colombia Iran, I...

  2. Changing Trends in the Refining Industry (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    There have been some major changes in the U.S. refining industry recently, prompted in part by a significant decline in the quality of imported crude oil and by increasing restrictions on the quality of finished products. As a result, high-quality crudes, such as the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude that serves as a benchmark for oil futures on the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), have been trading at record premiums to the OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) Basket price.

  3. Oil and development: The case of agriculture in Nigeria and Algeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachrach, E.R.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis explores the relationship between the oil-boom of the 1970s and development outcomes and the prospects in two African OPEC states. The theoretical framework is provided by the political-economy literatures, both domestic and international. The research is carried out as a limited comparative study with a loosely constructed (before-during-after) interrupted time-series design. Algeria's greater success in managing it soil economy suggests further evidence supporting the promise of a mixed political-economy state model. State and societal complexions are identified, with a primarily qualitative methodology, to explain Nigerian and Algerian development outcomes on the heels of the oil decade.

  4. Too Hot To Handle: Climate Change, Geopolitics, and U.S. National Security in 2025 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boggs, Jay W.; Chellinsky, Andrew; Ege, David; Hodges, Allen; Reynolds, Tripp; Williams, Adam

    2007-01-01

    Asia Largest underdeveloped oil and natural gas resources outside of OPEC Caspian Sea has 30 billion barrels of oil Turkmenistan has world’s 4th largest natural gas reserves US strategy for developed based on BTC pipeline and parallel natural gas... influence over Ukraine, Belarus, and Georgia in 2006 by cutting off natural gas until they agreed to price hikes. * What this history and climate change projections mean for Europe? Considerations/Issues: *While Russia has not used its role as Europe’s...

  5. Iraqi oil industry slowly returning to normal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-07

    This paper reports that Iraq is making progress in putting its battered petroleum industry back together 1 1/2 years after the Persian Gulf war ended. OPEC News Agency (Opecna) reported the finish of reconstruction of Iraq's Mina al-Bakr oil terminal on the northern tip of the Persian Gulf, using Iraqi know-how and engineering personnel. The terminal, heavily damaged during the gulf conflict, has been restored to its prewar loading capacity of 1.6 million b/d at a cost of $16 million. Ninety per cent of the port had been damaged.

  6. International bibliography of vegetation maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ku?chler, A. W. (August William)

    1965-01-01

    372 Albania 24 Iceland 397 Andorra 27 Italy .400 Austria 28 Luxembourg 421 Belgium 60 Netherlands 423 British. Isles 89 Norway ...446 Bulgaria 149 Poland 447 Czechoslovakia 152 Portugal 458 Denmark 173 Rumania .467 Finland 176 San Marino 489..., NORWAY AND FINLAND" in color 1:10,600,000 LEGEND 1. Conifers 3. Mixed conifers and hardwods 2. Hardwoods ZON, RAPHAEL and WILLIAM N. SPARHAWK 1923 Forest resources of the world. New York, McGraw-Hill Book Co., Inc., vol. 1, facing p. 102. 1925...

  7. World frontiers beckon oil finders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This paper discusses the international aspects of the petroleum industry. Most who work in the industry agree that the possibilities for huge are found largely in international regions. Something that is helping fuel that possibility is the way countries are increasingly opening their doors to US oil industry involvement. Listed in this paper is a partial list of the reported projects now underway around the world involving US companies. It is not intended to be comprehensive, but rather an indication of how work continues despite a general lull atmosphere for the oil industry. These include Albania, Bulgaria, Congo, Czechoslovakia, Dominican Republic, Ethiopia, Ireland, Malta, Madagascar, Mongolia, Mozambique, Nigeria, Panama, Paraquay, and Senegal.

  8. Oil and the American Way of Life: Don't Ask, Don't Tell

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Kaufmann, Robert [Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States

    2010-01-08

    In the coming decades, US consumers will face a series of important decisions about oil. To make effective decisions, consumers must confront some disturbing answers to questions they would rather not ask. These questions include: is the US running out of oil, is the world running out of oil, is OPEC increasing its grip on prices, is the US economy reducing its dependence on energy, and will the competitive market address these issues in a timely fashion? Answers to these questions indicate that the market will not address these issues: the US has already run out of inexpensive sources of oil such that rising prices no longer elicit significant increases in supply. The US experience implies that within a couple of decades, the world oil market will change from increasing supply at low prices to decreasing supply at higher prices. As the world approaches this important turning point, OPEC will strengthen its grip on world oil prices. Contrary to popular belief, the US economy continues to be highly dependent on energy, especially inexpensive sources of energy. Together, these trends threaten to undermine the basic way in which the US economy generates a high standard of living.

  9. Muslim oil and gas periphery; the future of hydrocarbons in Africa, southeast Asia and the Caspian. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crockett, B.D.

    1997-12-01

    This thesis is a study of the contemporary political, economic, and technical developments and future prospects of the Muslim hydrocarbon exporters of Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Caspian. The established Muslim oil and gas periphery of Africa and Southeast Asia has four members in the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and is systemically increasing its production of natural gas. I analyze US government and corporate policies regarding the countries and the major dilemmas of the Muslim hydrocarbon periphery. The first chapter provides a selective overview of global energy source statistics; the policies, disposition and composition of the major hydrocarbon production and consumption players and communities; a selective background of OPEC and its impact on the globe; and a general portrait of how the Muslim periphery piece fits into the overall Muslim oil and gas puzzle. Chapter two analyzes the established Muslim oil and gas periphery of Africa and Southeast Asia asking the following questions: What are the major political, economic, and technical trends and dilemmas affecting these producer nations. And what are the United States` policies and relationships with these producers. Chapter three asks the same questions as chapter two, but with regard to the newly independent states of the Caspian Sea. I probe the regional petroleum exploration and transportation dilemmas in some detail.

  10. International energy indicators. [International and US statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, E.K. (ed.)

    1980-03-01

    For the international sector, a table of data is first presented followed by corresponding graph of the data for the following: (1) Iran: crude oil capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974 to February 1980; (2) Saudi Arabia (same as Iran); (3) OPEC (ex-Iran and Saudi Arabia); capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974 to January 1980; (4) non-OPEC Free World and US production of crude oil, 1973 to January 1980; (5) oil stocks: Free World, US, Japan, and Europe (landed), 1973 to 1979; (6) petroleum consumption by industrial countries, 1973 to October 1979; (7) USSR crude oil production, 1974 to February 1980; (8) Free World and US nuclear generation capacity, 1973 to January 1980. For the United States, the same data format is used for the following: (a) US imports of crude oil and products 1973 to January 1980; (b) landed cost of Saudi Arabia crude oil in current and 1974 dollars, 1974 to October 1979; (c) US trade in coal, 1973 to 1979; (d) summary of US merchandise trade, 1976 to January 1980; and (e) US energy/GNP ratio (in 1972 dollars), 1947 to 1979.

  11. International energy indicators. [Statistical tables and graphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, E.K. (ed.)

    1980-05-01

    International statistical tables and graphs are given for the following: (1) Iran - Crude Oil Capacity, Production and Shut-in, June 1974-April 1980; (2) Saudi Arabia - Crude Oil Capacity, Production, and Shut-in, March 1974-Apr 1980; (3) OPEC (Ex-Iran and Saudi Arabia) - Capacity, Production and Shut-in, June 1974-March 1980; (4) Non-OPEC Free World and US Production of Crude Oil, January 1973-February 1980; (5) Oil Stocks - Free World, US, Japan, and Europe (Landed, 1973-1st Quarter, 1980); (6) Petroleum Consumption by Industrial Countries, January 1973-December 1979; (7) USSR Crude Oil Production and Exports, January 1974-April 1980; and (8) Free World and US Nuclear Generation Capacity, January 1973-March 1980. Similar statistical tables and graphs included for the United States include: (1) Imports of Crude Oil and Products, January 1973-April 1980; (2) Landed Cost of Saudi Oil in Current and 1974 Dollars, April 1974-January 1980; (3) US Trade in Coal, January 1973-March 1980; (4) Summary of US Merchandise Trade, 1976-March 1980; and (5) US Energy/GNP Ratio, 1947 to 1979.

  12. Oil and gas developments in central and southern Africa in 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, J.B.; Walker, T.L.

    1988-10-01

    Significant rightholding changes took place in central and southern Africa during 1987. Angola, Benin, Congo, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Mauritania, Seychelles, Somali Republic, Tanzania, Zaire, and Zambia announced awards or acreage open for bidding. Decreases in exploratory rightholdings occurred in Cameroon, Congo, Cote d'Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Kenya, Namibia, South Africa, and Tanzania. More wells and greater footage were drilled in 1987 than in 1986. Total wells increased by 18% as 254 wells were completed compared to 217 in 1986. Footage drilled during the year increased by 46% as about 1.9 million ft were drilled compared to about 1.3 million ft in 1986. The success rate for exploration wells in 1987 improved slightly to 36% compared to 34% in 1986. Significant discoveries were made in Nigeria, Angola, Congo, and Gabon. Seismic acquisition in 1987 was the major geophysical activity during the year. Total oil production in 1987 was 773 million bbl (about 2.1 million b/d), a decrease of 7%. The decrease is mostly due to a 14% drop in Nigerian production, which comprises 60% of total regional production. The production share of OPEC countries (Nigeria and Gabon) versus non-OPEC countries of 67% remained unchanged from 1986. 24 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. US imports. Part II. Refined product market shares, then and now

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-07-08

    Unlike imports of crude oil to the US, which were up 45.7% between 1977 and 1986, imports of petroleum products have fallen by about 8.6% during the same period. The crude oil price crash of 1986 deepened US dependency on imports of crude, from 21.4% in 1977 to 25.4% in 1986, but reduced the dependency in the case of total refined products from 11.32% in 1977 to 11.13% in 1986. Comparing the first four months of 1987 with 1986, US dependency on imported petroleum products is down 2.73 percentage points; import dependency on OPEC petroleum products is down 4.60 percentage points; dependency on Arab OPEC countries product imports is down 1.88 percentage points; and for Eastern Hemisphere exporters, that dependency has fallen 2.17 percentage points. This issue also contains: (1) ED refining netback data from the US Gulf and West coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore for early July 1987; and (2) ED fuel price/tax series for countries of the Western Hemisphere, July 1987 edition. 4 figures, 5 tables.

  14. Refining: moods and modes for 1984. [From NPRA meeting, San Antonio, TX 3/84

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-04-11

    Thousands of refining experts met in March in San Antonio, TX at the 82nd meeting of the National Petroleum Refiners Association, including many international oil-industry officials and executives. For major US refiners, the mood was decidedly optimistic, because: (1) for a number of refiners, negative margins on many crude oils that persisted even after the March 1983 price adjustment by OPEC are finally improving as capacities for upgrading residual fuel into more-valuable light products continue to come onstream; and (2) multinational oil companies, while concerned about downstream market penetration by producing countries, nevertheless expressed the feeling that this would probably further reduce the negotiating power of OPEC. For smaller, nonmajor refiners, the mood was one of concern: in the US, 97 refineries have officially closed since 1981, most of them smaller, inefficient facilities. There was optimism by all about environmental and social concerns, specifically acid rain and lead pollution. For the national oil companies of less-developed countries, a vicious circle emerged concerning the economic ramifications of the continuing development of catalysts for cracking heavy feedstock. This issue presents the fuel price/tax series and industrial fuel prices for March 1984 for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere.

  15. Petroleum marketing monthly, July 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-30

    International crude oil spot markets staged a modest recovery in mid-July, although continued high levels of production, particularly within the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), made long term market strength appear unlikely. Crude oil output was held down slightly by temporary situations, including the explosion of the Piper Alpha platform in the North Sea and damage to a Colombian export pipeline. However, production in excess of OPEC quotas by several of its member countries pointed to a continuing surplus of crude oil on world markets in the immediate future. In the United States, the composite refiner acquisition cost of crude oil fell $1.08 per barrel, or 6.9 percent, to an average of $14.63 per barrel for July. Because of the continual slide in crude oil prices throughout June, the late-July price turnaround was not sufficient to result in an increase in the average price for the month. Total refiner sales statistics for the major petroleum products showed a 2.6 percent decrease from June. 12 figs., 53 tabs.

  16. Restacking the old deck: with heavy crude wild cards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-10-02

    OPEC and various other crude oil producers are not playing with a full deck - yet. The OPEC production and price system has yet to take into account truly heavy crude, of the types Venezuela and Mexico export and California and Canada produce for domestic consumption. Generally, analysts providing projections to governments and oil companies fail to address heavy crude's increasing influence on world refining demand. There are indications that high-tech refiner's advantageous buying price spread between heavy and light crude will widen further for the next several years - and that heavy crude producers will enter a new competitive phase. This issue includes the following ED Data: (1) US asphalt import tonnage prices (by area), and tonnages (by country), and prices ($1 bbl.) as imported from N. Antilles, Canada, and Venezuela; (2) refining netback data from the US Gulf and West Coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore as of Sept. 27, 1985; (3) the fuel price/tax series for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere, dates ranging from Jan. 1984 through Oct. 1985; and (4) principal industrial fuel prices for some of these countries as of Sept. 1985.

  17. Country analysis briefs: 1994. Profiles of major world energy producers, consumers, and transport centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-01

    Country Analysis Briefs: 1994 is a compilation of country profiles prepared by the Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division (EMCID) of the Office of Energy Markets and End Use. EMCID maintains Country Analysis Briefs (CABs) for specific countries or geographical areas that are important to world energy markets. As a general rule, CABs are prepared for all members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), major non-OPEC oil producers (i.e., the North Sea, Russia), major energy transit areas (i.e., Ukraine), and other areas of current interest to energy analysts and policy makers. As of January 1995, EMCID maintained over 40 CABs, updated on an annual schedule and subject to revision as events warrant. This report includes 25 CABs updated during 1994. All CABs contain a profile section, a map showing the country`s location, and a narrative section. The profile section includes outlines of the country`s economy, energy sector, and environment. The narrative provides further information and discussion of these topics. Some CABs also include a detailed map displaying locations of major oil and gas fields, pipelines, ports, etc. These maps were created as a result of special individual requests and so are not typically a standard feature of the CABs. They are presented here wherever available as a supplement to the information contained in the CABs.

  18. DoD perspective James Short is a visiting professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Maryland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Anthony F. J.

    % Jet Fuel 53% Auto Diesel 8% 11% #12;6 DoD Energy Use Typical DoD Consumption (by BTUs) Marine Diesel personnel or contractors killed or wounded between FY03-07 in attacks on water and fuel convoys Afghanistan ­ One Marine wounded for every 50 convoys in 2010 The Highest PriceThe Highest Price 4 #12;5 DoD Energy

  19. Energy Independence for North America - Transition to the Hydrogen Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberhardt, J.

    2003-08-24

    The U.S. transportation sector is almost totally dependent on liquid hydrocarbon fuels, primarily gasoline and diesel fuel from conventional oil. In 2002, the transportation sector accounted for 69 percent of the U.S. oil use; highway vehicles accounted for 54 percent of the U.S. oil use. Of the total energy consumed in the U.S., more than 40 percent came from oil. More significantly, more than half of this oil is imported and is projected by the Energy Information Agency (EIA) to increase to 68 percent by 2025 [1]. The supply and price of oil have been dictated by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). In 2002, OPEC accounted for 39 percent of world oil production and this is projected by the EIA to increase to 50 percent in 2025. Of the world's oil reserves, about 80 percent is owned by OPEC members. Major oil price shocks have disrupted world energy markets four times in the past 30 years (1973-74, 1979-80, 1990-1991, and 1999- 2000) and with each came either a recession or slowdown in the GDP (Gross Domestic Product) of the United States. In addition, these market upheavals have cost the U.S. approximately $7 trillion (in 1998 dollars) in total economic costs [2]. Finally, it is estimated that military expenditures for defending oil supplies in the Middle East range from $6 billion to $60 billion per year [3] and do not take into account the costs of recent military operations in Iraq (i.e., Operation Iraqi Freedom, 2003). At the outset of his administration in 2001, President George W. Bush established the National Energy Policy Development (NEPD) Group to develop a national energy policy to promote dependable, affordable, and environmentally sound energy for the future in order to avert potential energy crises. In the National Energy Policy report [4], the NEPD Group urges action by the President to meet five specific national goals that America must meet--''modernize conservation, modernize our energy infrastructure, increase energy supplies, accelerate the protection and improvement of the environment, and increase our nation's energy security.'' It is generally recognized that energy security can be achieved partially by reducing importation of oil from sources that are less politically stable.

  20. Modeling the Oil Transition: A Summary of the Proceedings of the DOE/EPA Workshop on the Economic and Environmental Implications of Global Energy Transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L

    2007-02-01

    The global energy system faces sweeping changes in the next few decades, with potentially critical implications for the global economy and the global environment. It is important that global institutions have the tools necessary to predict, analyze and plan for such massive change. This report summarizes the proceedings of an international workshop concerning methods of forecasting, analyzing, and planning for global energy transitions and their economic and environmental consequences. A specific case, it focused on the transition from conventional to unconventional oil and other energy sources likely to result from a peak in non-OPEC and/or global production of conventional oil. Leading energy models from around the world in government, academia and the private sector met, reviewed the state-of-the-art of global energy modeling and evaluated its ability to analyze and predict large-scale energy transitions.

  1. An Assessment of Energy and Environmental Issues Related to the Use of Gas-to-Liquid Fuels in Transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.

    1999-11-01

    Recent technological advances in processes for converting natural gas into liquid fuels, combined with a growing need for cleaner, low-sulfur distillate fuel to mitigate the environmental impacts of diesel engines have raised the possibility of a substantial global gas-to-liquids (G-T-L) industry. This report examines the implications of G-T-L supply for U.S. energy security and the environment. It appears that a G-T-L industry would increase competitiveness in world liquid fuels markets, even if OPEC states are major producers of G-T-L's. Cleaner G-T-L distillates would help reduce air pollution from diesel engines. Implications for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions could be positive or negative, depending on the sources of natural gas, their alternative uses, and the degree of sequestration that can be achieved for CO2 emissions produced during the conversion process.

  2. Fueling development and the energy sector: Progress, policy, and prices in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-31

    Indonesia's status as developing country and OPEC member imply its long-term commitment to economic development and to secure petroleum supply of customer nations. That is getting harder to rationalize, as the country's booming economy and mushrooming energy consumption meet with still-subsidized domestic fuel prices and only modest oil production increase prospects. This issue examines these trends and some of the early efforts at new solutions. It also presents the following: (1) the ED Refining Netback Data Series for the US Gulf and West Coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore as of Oct. 25, 1991; and (2) the ED Fuel Price/Tax Series for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere, October 1991 edition.

  3. Economics, producer politics will shape oil markets through 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-25

    Two main forces will shape the oil market during the next 3 years. The pace of worldwide economic growth will determine demand growth. Although energy use efficiency has improved, especially in the industrialized world, demand for energy and oil products remains chiefly a function of economic activity. And producing nation politics will have much to say about supply. A crucial and unpredictable variable is when Iraq, now subject to a United Nations trade embargo, resumes exports at significant rates. Demand growth will exceed production increases outside the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, which means an ever-increasing role for the exporters' group. The paper discusses the demand outlook, economic projections, energy intensity, regional energy mixes, world energy mix, petroleum demand, petroleum product demand, supply questions, non-OPEC production, reserves and output capacity, production gains, industry operations (drilling, stocks, refining), prices, price forecasts, and the role of taxes.

  4. International Energy Statistical Review. Monthly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The International Energy Statistical Review provides current information and comparisons with recent years for a variety of topics on international energy; almost all concern some aspect of the petroleum and natural gas industries. Six charts deal respectively with total Free World oil production, OAPEC oil production, non-Arab oil production, Free World and USSR oil production, inland oil consumption, and net oil imports. In general, the time period covers the last four or five years. The remainder of the Review is made up of 31 tables, covering such disparate topics as production, capacity, reserves, trade, consumption and stocks. Areas covered include the world, Free World, OPEC, OAPEC, OECD, selected developed countries, Western Europe, China, USSR, and Eastern Europe.

  5. Economic and Energy Indicators. Bi-weekly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The Economic and Energy Indicator provides up-to-date information on changes since 1977 in economic and energy activities of major countries. It consists of tables only. They depict (a) economic indicators (industrial production, unemployment, consumer price inflation, and exchange rate trends) for the Big Seven developed countries (United States, Japan, West Germany, France, United Kingdom, Italy, and Canada); (b) foreign trade and foreign trade prices for the Big Seven; and (c) monthly average prices for selected agricultural products and industrial materials. The energy indicators include tables on petroleum consumption, production, and imports for the Big Seven. A table and chart depict the movement of OPEC average crude oil sales prices since 1973.

  6. Producers. US independents: exploring for clout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-25

    Are US independent oil producers an emerging voice that will catapult the country towards a new, comprehensive energy policy. Or, are they voices in a quiet wilderness of traditional oil supply at prices posted by the majors. Certainly the independents drill 85% of all new wells and produce 41% of the country's oil. But contemporary pricing practices, accompanied by growing energy interdependencies on a global scale, are realities many independents see at a foggy distance. Will they adopt the New Think of product-price values, as the OPEC countries did many years ago. This issue also presents the following data in tabular form: (1) changes in the number of US producing wells and new wells completed by state, 1985-1987; (2) ED refining netback data for the US Gulf and West Coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore for late May 1988; and (3) ED fuel price/tax series for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere, May 1988 edition. 5 figures, 6 tables.

  7. The response of world energy and oil demand to income growth and changes in oil prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dargay, J. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Transport Studies Unit; Gately, D. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Economics Dept.

    1995-11-01

    This paper reviews the path of world oil demand over the past three decades, and the effects of both the oil price increases of the 1970s and the oil price decreases of the 1980s. Compared with demand in the industrialized countries, demand in the Less Developed Countries (LDC) has been more responsive to income growth, less responsive to price increases, and more responsive to price decreases. The LDC has also exhibited much greater heterogeneity in income growth and is effect on demand. The authors expect a smaller demand response to future price increases than to those of the 1970s. The demand response to future income growth will be not substantially smaller than in the past. Finally, given the prospect of growing dependence on OPEC oil, in the event of a major disruption the lessened price-responsiveness of demand could cause dramatic price increases and serious macroeconomic effects.

  8. US petroleum price trends by channel: a glimpse of the mega-market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-12-23

    The US petroleum market, by far the largest market in the world, has three crude-oil pricing channels and four refined-product pricing channels. All this daily activity goes on under the veneer of final consumer fuels prices, and the lag time is such that sometimes trading price patterns reverse themselves before American consumers ever experience them. Yet, it is these consumers who yield tremendous power over traders, refiners, and OPEC. This issue is an exercise in price-channel tracking, by trading price type and by region of the US This issue also contains the following: (1) ED refining netback data for the US Gulf and West Coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore for late December 1987; and (2) ED fuel price/tax series for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere, December 1987 edition. 5 figures, 4 tables.

  9. Coal reserves in the United States and around the world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jubert, K.; Masudi, H.

    1995-03-01

    There is an urgent need to examine the role that coal might play in meeting world energy needs during the next 20 years. Oil from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) can no longer be relied upon to provide expanding supplies of energy, even with rapidly rising prices. Neither can nuclear energy be planned on for rapid expansion worldwide until present uncertainties about it are resolved. Yet, the world`s energy needs will continue to grow, even with vigorous energy conservation programs and with optimistic rates of expansion in the use of solar energy. Coal already supplies 25% of the world`s energy, its reserves are vast, and it is relatively inexpensive. This study, with the aid of reports from the World Coal Study (WOCOL) examines the needs for coal on a global scale, its availability past and present, and its future prospects.

  10. An Analysis of the Impact of Sport Utility Vehicles in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.; Truett, L.F.

    2000-08-01

    It may be labeled sport utility vehicle, SUV, sport-ute, suburban assault vehicle, or a friend of OPEC (Organization for Petroleum Exporting Countries). It has been the subject of comics, the object of high-finance marketing ploys, and the theme of Dateline. Whatever the label or the occasion, this vehicle is in great demand. The popularity of sport utility vehicles (SUVs) has increased dramatically since the late 1970s, and SUVs are currently the fastest growing segment of the motor vehicle industry. Hoping to gain market share due to the popularity of the expanding SUV market, more and more manufacturers are adding SUVs to their vehicle lineup. One purpose of this study is to analyze the world of the SUV to determine why this vehicle has seen such a rapid increase in popularity. Another purpose is to examine the impact of SUVs on energy consumption, emissions, and highway safety.

  11. An assessment of energy and environmental issues related to the use of gas-to-liquid fuels in transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.

    1999-11-01

    Recent technological advances in processes for converting natural gas into liquid fuels, combined with a growing need for cleaner, low-sulfur distillate fuel to mitigate the environmental impacts of diesel engines have raised the possibility of a substantial global gas-to-liquids (G-T-L) industry. This report examines the implications of G-T-L supply for U.S. energy security and the environment. It appears that a G-T-L industry would increase competitiveness in world liquid fuels markets, even if OPEC states are major producers of G-T-L's. Cleaner G-T-L distillates would help reduce air pollution from diesel engines. Implications for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions could be positive or negative, depending on the sources of natural gas, their alternative uses, and the degree of sequestration that can be achieved for CO{sub 2} emissions produced during the conversion process.

  12. Energy Conservation at Westinghouse R&D 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norelli, P.; Roy, V.

    1981-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-81-04-11.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 21418 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-81-04-11.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ENERGY CONSERVATION... management system consisting Gas Curtailment I '"II =10 3 26000 Eleclri"l Power Curlailm,nt 22000 I TEMPllFIER~ ::0 u ~ I ~ 18000 ,. ~ 14000 10000 v 7010ccu pancY OPEC Cri'i'l 1 6000 801 OccupancYj EIICC:-!i \\ 64 66 68 70 72 74 76 78 80...

  13. The pneumatic conveyor as a continuous-flow mixer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stipe, Dennis Ray

    1964-01-01

    =~+cpc', ' 'ag 4he . ':, '. , '- ?, . de~i"af xcixing caint' out -saxss af the . j&roblsms'. invo1vsd. end':;: ', x, k yx". ~abjures . fox tctisticall3 ts, ting the degree of mixing 'OWKainsdx 1 8 l5 0 H-A P, T E-r4' l, l I T i, QJIPs~~. IFZ SSF9- 'I...? -' '. - ". ': ";:: '-'. aawpagsbls 'fg~:. g'ox, ', &9/i-Was' gj8. tboiiaan4:-be~ d " 'Ibis'ex '-. , ::;. : gaddi~ fiedlot op? patloii- iequXths. :itbot-mm . feed; be:, pea +e'seed and placed before the an&'als io'a;uinL&zw nii. :. bey 'of opec'at'o~s, ' 'we byexattions ia' glw...

  14. Energy projections to the year 2010: a technical report in support of the National Energy Policy Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    Underlying these energy projections are assumptions and results about key variables - world oil prices, economic growth, energy consumption, and production potential - which are described in this document. The projections are based on information available through June 1983. Projecting US energy supply, demand, and prices through the year 2010 is by nature a highly uncertain process. These projections try to account for uncertainty by providing a variety of scenarios that account for alternative future conditions. Results indicate that although the outlook for future world oil prices is highly uncertain, most analysts now agree that, barring a significant oil supply disruption, world oil prices will most likely fall in real terms until the mid 1980's. From 1985 to 1990, prices will most likely increase in real terms. Beyond 1990, the outlook becomes increasingly uncertain. The oil price increases of 1973 to 1974 and 1979 to 1980 have set into motion powerful energy conservation forces that are likely to continue causing energy (especially oil) to be used more efficiently. Consequently, we need to pay continuing attention to analyzing and evaluating energy conservation trends in world economies. The recent decline in world oil prices has added a new dimension to the uncertainty about future market conditions. Prior to 1983, OPEC had never officially reduced the posted price of oil, but rather used the influence of inflation to allow prices to fall gradually in real terms during periods of excess world supply. Now, investment planners must not only be concerned about the potential for oil price shocks, which can send the oil price very high, but also about future price breaks which could send the price very low. Under all but extreme assumptions, both the US and the rest of the world will remain dependent on liquid fuels, including oil supplies from OPEC, throughout at least the next 20 years. 73 references.

  15. Search for a bridge to the energy future: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saluja, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    The alarming effects, concerns, and even the insights into long-range energy planning that grew out of the OPEC oil embargo of 1973 are fading from the view of a shortsighted public. The enthusiastic initiatives taken in many countries for the development of alternative energy sources have withered due to lack of economic and/or ideological incentive. The events since December 1985, when the members of OPEC decided to increase production in an effort to capture their share of market, have brought down the prices of a barrel of crude to less than US $11 and have made any rational analysis very complex. This has made even the proponents of the alternative energy sources pause and think. The US has, as usual, oscillated from panic to complacency. The Libyan crisis, however, has brought the dangers of complacency into sharp focus. The first commercial coal gasification plant, constructed with a capital investment of over US $2 billion, was abandoned by the owners and is being operated by the US Department of Energy temporarily. In their effort to find a private owner, the US Department of Energy has set the date of auction of this prestigious plant for May 28, 1986. And if an appropriate bid is not forthcoming, the plant faces a very uncertain future. Coal, considered by the World Coal Study (WOCOL) at MIT in 1980, to be a bridge to a global energy future, seems to have lost its luster due to the oil glut which we all know is temporary. This was evident when the bill to grant the Right of Eminent Domain for transportation of coal was defeated. This conference was organized to bring together experts in different areas from various countries to discuss the state of the art and the rate of progress in different alternative energy forms. The recent accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in USSR has brought home the need of diversification of the alternative energy sources.

  16. An Analysis of Toponymic Homonyms in Gazetteers: Country-Level Duplicate Names in the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency’s Geographic Names Data Base 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caldwell, Douglas R.

    2008-08-20

    , Thailand, Burma, and Vietnam in the top 25. Outside of Eurasia, Mexico ranked in the top ten and Brazil and Columbia in the top twenty-five. Figure 1. Map of Number of Toponymic Homonyms. Page 6 Rank Country Count Rank Country Count 1 Russia 35392... 14 Poland 5930 2 China 19363 15 South Korea 5559 3 Iran 17386 16 Thailand 5405 4 Indonesia 16504 17 Burma 4844 5 Afghanistan 10461 18 Brazil 4614 6 Pakistan 9221 19 Ukraine 4358 7 Germany 8454 20 Belgium 4181 8 Mexico 8193 21 Peru 3978 9...

  17. World energy consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    Historical and projected world energy consumption information is displayed. The information is presented by region and fuel type, and includes a world total. Measurements are in quadrillion Btu. Sources of the information contained in the table are: (1) history--Energy Information Administration (EIA), International Energy Annual 1992, DOE/EIA-0219(92); (2) projections--EIA, World Energy Projections System, 1994. Country amounts include an adjustment to account for electricity trade. Regions or country groups are shown as follows: (1) Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), US (not including US territories), which are included in other (ECD), Canada, Japan, OECD Europe, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, other Europe, and other OECD; (2) Eurasia--China, former Soviet Union, eastern Europe; (3) rest of world--Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and other countries not included in any other group. Fuel types include oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, and other. Other includes hydroelectricity, geothermal, solar, biomass, wind, and other renewable sources.

  18. Role of Aramco in Saudi Arabian development: a case study of dependent development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawls, L.W.

    1987-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to evaluate whether the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has proceeded along the path toward development while in a dependent relationship with the Arabian American Oil Company, Aramco. Development in a given country is defined as the process by which the living standards of the people who live in that country are raised. That process includes the development of physical and human infrastructure, economic growth, distribution of resources, and the maturation of society (including its ability to weather crisis, whether it be social or economic). Though it is by no means exhaustive on the subject of development in Saudi Arabia, this study focuses on Aramco's involvement in the socio-economic elements of development in Saudi Arabia, as these are the direct impacts of development upon which the Saudi five-year development plans focus. Employing the theoretical framework of dependent development as adapted by Timothy Luke to the OPEC countries' development experience in the international energy regime, this study serves in part as an in-depth case study of Luke's thesis.

  19. Oil Market Simulation model user`s manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The Oil Market Simulation (OMS) model is a LOTUS 1-2-3 spreadsheet that simulates the world oil market. OMS is an annual model that projects the world oil market through the year 2010 from a data base that begins in 1979. The geographic coverage includes all market economies, with net imports from the centrally planned economies taken as an assumption. The model estimates the effects of price changes on oil supply and demand and computes an oil price path over nine that allows supply and demand to remain in balance within the market economies area as a whole. The input assumptions of OMS are highlighted (in color) on the spreadsheet and include the following: The capacity of the OPEC countries to produce petroleum liquids (crude oil, natural gas liquids, condensates, refinery gains); a reference case projection of regional oil supply and demand at some arbitrary reference path of oil prices over time. The reference case provided with this diskette is that used for EIA`s latest base case in the International Energy Outlook 1992 DOE/EIA-0484(92). The demonstration requires an IBM PC (or compatible), preferably with a color monitor. The demonstration diskette is self-contained, with all the files needed to run the demonstration. It does not, however, have the DOS system files, so this diskette cannot be used to start (boot) the computer.

  20. Price crash 1986: the waiting gams: implication for heavy crude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-05-14

    Across the United States, oil producers are betting on price stabilization - because they can do little else. From Alaska to Louisiana, significant production is already uneconomic, but so far, most producers seem convinced it is safer to risk producing too long than to shut in prematurely - sounds like Norway and OPEC. In this issue, ED examines recent US oil-industry papers on production featuring California independents, and arrives at an overview of possible near-term price trends for light and heavy crude. This issue of ED also contains statistical data on: (1) asphalt export prices to the USA from Canada, N Antilles, and Venezuela; (2) USA imports of asphalt by country of origin; (3) refining netback data for the US Gulf and West Coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore; (4) ED fuel price/tax series for countries of both the Eastern and Western Hemispheres; and (5) ED principal industrial fuel prices as of March 1986, for countries of both the Eastern and Western hemispheres.

  1. Domestic petroleum-product prices around the world. Survey: free market or government price controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-01-27

    In this issue, Energy Detente draws from their regular Western and Eastern Hemisphere Fuel Price/Tax Series, each produced monthly, and adds other survey data and analysis for a broad view of 48 countries around the world. They find that seven Latin American nations, including OPEC members Venezuela and Ecuador, are among the ten countries with lowest gasoline prices. In this Fourth Special Price Report, Energy Detente provides a first-time presentation of which prices are government-controlled, and which are free to respond to market forces. South Korea, with fixed prices since 1964, has the highest premium-grade gasoline price in our survey, US $5.38 per gallon. Paraguay, with prices fixed by PETROPAR, the national oil company, has the second highest premium gasoline price, US $4.21 per gallon. Nicaragua, also with government price controls, ranks third highest in the survey, with US $3.38 per gallon for premium gasoline. Kuwait shows the lowest price at US $0.55 per gallon. Several price changes from the previous survey reflect changes in currency exchange as all prices are converted to US dollars. The Energy Detente fuel price/tax series is presented for Western Hemisphere countries.

  2. Impact of growing Asian markets on the world oil industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manning, T.J. [Purvin and Gertz, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Vautrain, J.H. [Purvin and Gertz, Inc., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Adair, P. [Purvin and Gertz, Inc., Singapore (Singapore)

    1996-12-01

    The focus of world petroleum activity has largely shifted from the industrialized OPEC nations to the rapidly developing countries of Asia where new refinery ventures, marketing operations, and trading offices have proliferated. Asia consumed 22% of the world`s petroleum in 1985, but rapid growth in the past decade has raised its share to over 30%. Demand in Asia has grown by an average of 550,000 B/D each year since 1985, accounting for 80% of the world`s total growth in demand. The robust demand growth envisioned for the 1990s cannot last indefinitely. The key factor restricting growth will be the world`s capacity to produce crude oil, which they believe will begin to approach sustainable limits after 2000. When those limits are reached, another oil price shock is likely, and another cycle of conservation and substitution will begin. If growth were to continue at the high rates of the 1990s, crude availability limits would be reached early in the next century. In this paper, they have presented a soft landing path for demand, production, and pricing. They project a gradual slowdown in demand growth, in response to a gradual increase in real crude oil prices. In the real world, a much rougher path is likely, even though both paths start and end at the same point.

  3. Oil Market Simulation model user's manual. [Oil market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The Oil Market Simulation (OMS) model is a LOTUS 1-2-3 spreadsheet that simulates the world oil market. OMS is an annual model that projects the world oil market through the year 2010 from a data base that begins in 1979. The geographic coverage includes all market economies, with net imports from the centrally planned economies taken as an assumption. The model estimates the effects of price changes on oil supply and demand and computes an oil price path over nine that allows supply and demand to remain in balance within the market economies area as a whole. The input assumptions of OMS are highlighted (in color) on the spreadsheet and include the following: The capacity of the OPEC countries to produce petroleum liquids (crude oil, natural gas liquids, condensates, refinery gains); a reference case projection of regional oil supply and demand at some arbitrary reference path of oil prices over time. The reference case provided with this diskette is that used for EIA's latest base case in the International Energy Outlook 1992 DOE/EIA-0484(92). The demonstration requires an IBM PC (or compatible), preferably with a color monitor. The demonstration diskette is self-contained, with all the files needed to run the demonstration. It does not, however, have the DOS system files, so this diskette cannot be used to start (boot) the computer.

  4. U. S. petroleum job corps withering: ARCO chief on industry's despair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-24

    The US continues to exhibit the schizophrenic nature of its petroleum position. As a domestic producer and an importer, and environmentalist and seeker of greater independence from OPEC, the country is still struggling to rationalize positions to achieve a comprehensive energy policy. While debate processes the differences, however, the industry is shrinking fast. This issue of Energy Detente displays employment figures to dramatize the trend, and quotes the powerful remarks of Lodwrick M. Cook, Chairman and CEO of ARCO. Mr. cook recounted an industry job loss of 330,000 and a total 17% decline since 1981, while general employment rose by 17%. He also cited the record low rig count since upstaged by a new 52-yr record low of 596 as of early June. He also identified several proposed environmental policy developments that threaten to further decimate the oil industry. This issue also presents the following: (1) the ED Refining Netback Data Series for the US Gulf and West Coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore as of June 12, 1992; and (2) the ED Fuel Price/Tax Series for countries of the Western Hemisphere, June 1992 Edition.

  5. Oil market simulation model user's manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The Oil Market Simulation (OMS) Model is a LOTUS 1-2-3 Spreadsheet that simulates the world oil market. OMS is an annual model with a data base that begins in 1979 and computes projections through the year 2000. The geographic coverage includes all market economies, with net imports from the centrally planned economies taken as an assumption. The model estimate the effects of price changes on oil supply and demand and computes an oil price path over time that allows supply and demand to remain in balance within the market economics area as a whole. The input assumptions of OMS are highlighted (in color) on the spreadsheet and include the following: 1. The capacity of the OPEC countries to produce petroleum liquids (crude oil, natural gas liquids, condensates, refinery gains); 2. A reference case projection of regional oil supply and demand at some arbitrary reference path of oil prices over time. The reference case provided with this diskette is that used or EIA's latest base case in the International Energy Outlook, 1987 DOE/EIA-0484(87). 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. War without end. Michel T. Halbouty's fight for American energy security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donahue, J.

    1987-01-01

    In these pages are the drama and tension of Halbouty's role as ''Ronald Reagan's Energy Guru'' - his leadership of Candidate Reagan's Energy Policy Advisory group and President-Elect Reagan's Transition Team on Energy. His creation and direction of the Circum-Pacific Council for Energy and Mineral Resources, an organization that has advanced exploration and development of the total energy and mineral wealth of the nations fronting the Pacific, and is credited with creating a rapport between them that the U.S. State Department could not have established. His work on behalf of Indian tribes whose oil lands had been systematically plundered for 20 years. His fight against oil companies' ''Retrenchment'' programs and the so-called ''Corporate Raiders.'' His struggle against an ''Oil Import Tax,'' which he reasoned would be detrimental to America's economy and security. His strong advocacy of his plan to make America energy self-sufficient and free her from OPEC bondage. His enduring affection for and the benefactions of his Alma Mater, Texas A and M University, and students he found worthy of support. His confrontations with and his opinions of the world's ''movers and shakers'' and their varying philosophies. And a potpourri of thoughts, ideas and sentiments of an American original who became a legend in his own time.

  7. The imperfect price-reversibility of world oil demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gately, D. [New York Univ., NY (United States)

    1993-12-31

    This paper examines the price-reversibility of world oil demand, using price-decomposition methods employed previously on other energy demand data. We conclude that the reductions in world oil demand following the oil price increases of the 1970s will not be completely reversed by the price cuts of the 1980s. The response to price cuts in the 1980s is perhaps only one-fifth that for price increases in the 1970s. This has dramatic implications for projections of oil demand, especially under low-price assumptions. We also consider the effect on demand of a price recovery (sub-maximum increase) in the 1990s - due either to OPEC or to a carbon tax-specifically whether the effects would be as large as for the price increases of the 1970s or only as large as the smaller demand reversals of the 1980s. On this the results are uncertain, but a tentative conclusion is that the response to a price recovery would lie midway between the small response to price cuts and the larger response to increases in the maximum historical price. Finally, we demonstrate two implications of wrongly assuming that demand is perfectly price-reversible. First, such an assumption will grossly overestimate the demand response to price declines of the 1980s. Secondly, and somewhat surprisingly, it causes an underestimate of the effect of income growth on future demand. 21 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  8. How can we build an oil reserve without offending the Saudis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madison, C.

    1980-06-28

    Congress has ordered the Department of Energy to resume filling the strategic oil reserves at about the same 100,000 barrels of crude oil a day as the government fields at Elk Hills, California produce. Pressure to increase this amount while a world surplus exists will be strong, even though members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) have threatened to reduce their production if the US takes such action. The concept of a strategic reserve of 750 million barrels (a 90-day supply) first emerged as a way to separate foreign-policy decisions from foreign-oil supplies. The present level of 92 million barrels (12-13-days imports), however, has made the reserve a political issue. Delays were caused by a combination of site problems, budget cuts, market disruptions, and policy changes. The debate centers on timing - when the US should return to the market to continue filling the storage sites. US relations with Saudi Arabia are sensitive to Middle East peace agreements, the security of Saudi Arabian territory, and the security of Saudi Arabian production levels. The foreign-policy implications and their severity are disputed. (DCK)

  9. Resumption of SPR US Strategic Petroleum Reserve fill attached to synfuels bill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-23

    House-Senate conferees approved a bill which would establish a $20 billion US Synthetic Fuels Corp., a $3.1 billion bank to fund energy conservation and solar energy projects, a $1.4 billion biomass-to-energy program, and other energy conservation and production measures. An order requiring the filling of the SPR at a minimum average rate of 100,000 bbl/day beginning 10/1/80 was attached to the bill. If that rate is not achieved, the SPR measure requires that Elk Hills, Calif., field crude be sold or exchanged to acquire other crude for the SPR. Some OPEC members have threatened to reduce their output if the US buys oil for storage. The SPR measure will increase US refiners' crude-acquisition costs by $0.04/gal, which will be passed along to purchasers. The SPR goal is 750 million bbl of crude; current capacity is 250 million bbl, with only 91.7 million bbl in place. A House subcommittee issued a report recommending that the 118,000 bbl/day oil production from US National Petroleum Reserves (NPR) be reserved for the US Department of Defense (DOD) and stored in the SPR, but criticizing DOD for inefficiencies in its energy office, inadequate conversion to coal, and inadequate storage facilities.

  10. Reducing Our Carbon Footprint: A Low-Energy House in Berkeley, Kabul, and Washington DC (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Diamond, Rick

    2011-04-28

    How well can we assess and improve building energy performance in California homes? How much energy-and carbon-do homes use in other parts of the world? Rick Diamond, deputy group leader of the Berkeley Lab Energy Performance of Buildings Group, discusses change, global solutions, and the stories of three houses in Berkeley, Kabul (Afghanistan), and Washington, D.C. Diamond, who is also a senior advisor at the California Institute for Energy and Environment, investigates user interactions with the built environment for improved building energy performance. The group has studied a wide range of issues related to energy use in housing, including duct system efficiency, user behavior, and infiltration and ventilation measurements.

  11. LLNL/LANS mission committee meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, Michael J

    2010-12-06

    Recent events continue to show the national security imperative of the global security mission: (1) Fighting Proliferation - (a) At Yongbyon, 'a modern, industrial-scale U-enrichment facility w/2000 centrifuges' seen Nov. 2010, (b) In Iran, fueling began at Bushehr while P5+1/lran talks delayed to Dec. 2010; (2) Continuing need to support the warfighter and IC - (a) tensions on the Korean peninsula, (b) primitative IEDs a challenge in Afghanistan, (c) cyber command, (d)another Georgian smuggling event; and (3) Countering terrorisms on US soil - (a) toner cartridge bomb, (b) times square bomb, (c) christmas tree bomb. Joint Technical Operations Team (JTOT) and Accident Response Group (ARG) elements deployed to two East Coast locations in November to work a multi-weapon scenario. LANL provided 70% of on-duty field and reconstitution teams for both Marble Challenge 11-01 and JD 11-01. There were a total of 14 deployments in FY10.

  12. Advances in exposure and toxicity assessment of particulate matter: An overview of presentations at the 2009 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunasekar, Palur G.; Stanek, Lindsay W.

    2011-07-15

    The 2009 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference (TRAC) session on 'Advances in Exposure and Toxicity Assessment of Particulate Matter' was held in April 2009 in West Chester, OH. The goal of this session was to bring together toxicology, geology and risk assessment experts from the Department of Defense and academia to examine issues in exposure assessment and report on recent epidemiological findings of health effects associated with particulate matter (PM) exposure. Important aspects of PM exposure research are to detect and monitor low levels of PM with various chemical compositions and to assess the health risks associated with these exposures. As part of the overall theme, some presenters discussed collection methods for sand and dust from Iraqi and Afghanistan regions, health issues among deployed personnel, and future directions for risk assessment research among these populations. The remaining speakers focused on the toxicity of ultrafine PM and the characterization of aerosols generated during ballistic impacts of tungsten heavy alloys.

  13. Petroleum refining industry of developed capitalist countries in the 1990s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prokhorova, A.A.

    1994-07-01

    Crude oil is the principal source of energy today and in the immediate future. The increases in the consumption of crude oil (1.7% per year up to 2005) will be offset mainly by additional supplies from the countries of the Near East. Data on the imports of oil by the developed capitalists countries are presented in Table 2. In the United States, according to a projection made by Conoco, by the year 2000 the volume of imports will be twice the volume of domestic production; according to another prediction, the amount of Near East crude will increase from 34% in 1990 to 42% in 2000. Since the mid-1980s, the energy policy of the USA has been based on importing so-called cheap crude. Laws have been passed to mandate not only energy saving, but also cuts in the oil and gas production on U.S. territory. The volume of U.S. oil production will be 20% lower in 2000 than in 1990. Some 90% of the worldwide demand for oil is met by light and medium-density crudes, but such crudes account for only 25% of the oil resources. Projections indicate that the oil supplied to refiners in the future will be heavier and will have higher sulfur contents. The U.S. production of low-sulfur crude will drop off sharply in the next 10-15 years. The drop in oil production of the CIS [former USSR] and the consequent drop in exports from these countries will have a destabilizing effect on the world market. The average price of the {open_quotes}market basket{close_quotes} of OPEC crudes in 1991 was $149/ton (in 1990 $178/ton), in comparison with a 1992 price of $148/ton. This report presents data on refining process capacities and the ratio of secondary capacity to primary distillation capacity.

  14. Energy vulnerability relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, B.R.; Boesen, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    The US consumption of crude oil resources has been a steadily growing indicator of the vitality and strength of the US economy. At the same time import diversity has also been a rapidly developing dimension of the import picture. In the early 1970`s, embargoes of crude oil from Organization of Producing and Exporting Countries (OPEC) created economic and political havoc due to a significant lack of diversity and a unique set of economic, political and domestic regulatory circumstances. The continued rise of imports has again led to concerns over the security of our crude oil resource but threats to this system must be considered in light of the diversity and current setting of imported oil. This report develops several important issues concerning vulnerability to the disruption of oil imports: (1) The Middle East is not the major supplier of oil to the United States, (2) The US is not vulnerable to having its entire import stream disrupted, (3) Even in stable countries, there exist vulnerabilities to disruption of the export stream of oil, (4) Vulnerability reduction requires a focus on international solutions, and (5) DOE program and policy development must reflect the requirements of the diverse supply. Does this increasing proportion of imported oil create a {open_quotes}dependence{close_quotes}? Does this increasing proportion of imported oil present a vulnerability to {open_quotes}price shocks{close_quotes} and the tremendous dislocations experienced during the 1970`s? Finally, what is the vulnerability of supply disruptions from the current sources of imported oil? If oil is considered to be a finite, rapidly depleting resource, then the answers to these questions must be {open_quotes}yes.{close_quotes} However, if the supply of oil is expanding, and not limited, then dependence is relative to regional supply sources.

  15. Have We Run Out of Oil Yet? Oil Peaking Analysis from an Optimist's Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L; Hopson, Dr Janet L; Li, Jia

    2005-01-01

    This study addresses several questions concerning the peaking of conventional oil production from an optimist's perspective. Is the oil peak imminent? What is the range of uncertainty? What are the key determining factors? Will a transition to unconventional oil undermine or strengthen OPEC's influence over world oil markets? These issues are explored using a model combining alternative world energy scenarios with an accounting of resource depletion and a market-based simulation of transition to unconventional oil resources. No political or environmental constraints are allowed to hinder oil production, geological constraints on the rates at which oil can be produced are not represented, and when USGS resource estimates are used, more than the mean estimate of ultimately recoverable resources is assumed to exist. The issue is framed not as a question of "running out" of conventional oil, but in terms of the timing and rate of transition from conventional to unconventional oil resources. Unconventional oil is chosen because production from Venezuela's heavy-oil fields and Canada's Athabascan oil sands is already underway on a significant scale and unconventional oil is most consistent with the existing infrastructure for producing, refining, distributing and consuming petroleum. However, natural gas or even coal might also prove to be economical sources of liquid hydrocarbon fuels. These results indicate a high probability that production of conventional oil from outside of the Middle East region will peak, or that the rate of increase of production will become highly constrained before 2025. If world consumption of hydrocarbon fuels is to continue growing, massive development of unconventional resources will be required. While there are grounds for pessimism and optimism, it is certainly not too soon for extensive, detailed analysis of transitions to alternative energy sources.

  16. Scientists train honeybees to detect explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2008-03-21

    Members of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Stealthy Insect Sensor Project team have been able to harness the honeybee's exceptional olfactory sense by using the bees' natural reaction to nectar, a proboscis extension reflex (sticking out their tongue) to record an unmistakable response to a scent. Using Pavlovian techniques, researchers were able to train the bees to give a positive detection response via the PER when exposed to vapors from TNT, C4, and TATP explosives. The Stealthy Insect Sensor Project was born out of a global threat from the growing use of improvised explosive devices or IEDs, especially those that present a critical vulnerability for American military troops in Iraq and Afghanistan, and as an emerging danger for civilians worldwide. Current strategies to detect explosives are expensive and, in the case of trained detection dogs, too obtrusive to be used very discreetly. With bees however, they are small and discreet, offering the element of surprise. They're also are inexpensive to maintain and even easier to train than dogs. As a result of this need, initial funding for the work was provided by a development grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

  17. Scientists train honeybees to detect explosives

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-07-24

    Members of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Stealthy Insect Sensor Project team have been able to harness the honeybee's exceptional olfactory sense by using the bees' natural reaction to nectar, a proboscis extension reflex (sticking out their tongue) to record an unmistakable response to a scent. Using Pavlovian techniques, researchers were able to train the bees to give a positive detection response via the PER when exposed to vapors from TNT, C4, and TATP explosives. The Stealthy Insect Sensor Project was born out of a global threat from the growing use of improvised explosive devices or IEDs, especially those that present a critical vulnerability for American military troops in Iraq and Afghanistan, and as an emerging danger for civilians worldwide. Current strategies to detect explosives are expensive and, in the case of trained detection dogs, too obtrusive to be used very discreetly. With bees however, they are small and discreet, offering the element of surprise. They're also are inexpensive to maintain and even easier to train than dogs. As a result of this need, initial funding for the work was provided by a development grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

  18. Unproven screening devices threaten the lives of police and military.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, Dale W.

    2010-07-01

    In a world plagued with improvised explosive devices, drugs and dangerous people, the desire to field technology to protect our police and military is providing a fertile market for the proliferation of protection technologies that range from the unproven to the disproven. The market place is currently being flooded with detection equipment making inflated and inaccurate marketing claims of high reliably, high detection probabilities, and ease of operation - all while offering detection capabilities at safe distances. The manufacturers of these devices have found a willing global marketplace, which includes some of the most dangerous places in the world. Despite a wealth of contradictory performance and testing data available on the Internet, sales of these devices remain brisk and profitable. Rather than enhancing the security of police and military personnel, the reliance on these unproven and disproven devices is creating a sense of false security that is actually lowering the safety of front-line forces in places like Iraq and Afghanistan. This paper addresses the development and distribution history of some of these devices and describes the testing performed by Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, and other reputable testing agencies that illustrate the real danger in using this kind of unproven technology.

  19. Nuclear programs in India and Pakistan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mian, Zia

    2014-05-09

    India and Pakistan launched their respective nuclear programs in the 1940s and 1950s with considerable foreign technical support, especially from the United States Atoms for Peace Program. The technology and training that was acquired served as the platform for later nuclear weapon development efforts that included nuclear weapon testing in 1974 and in 1998 by India, and also in 1998 by Pakistan - which had illicitly acquired uranium enrichment technology especially from Europe and received assistance from China. As of 2013, both India and Pakistan were continuing to produce fissile material for weapons, in the case of India also for nuclear naval fuel, and were developing a diverse array of ballistic and cruise missiles. International efforts to restrain the South Asian nuclear build-up have been largely set aside over the past decade as Pakistani support became central for the U.S. war in Afghanistan and as U.S. geopolitical and economic interests in supporting the rise of India, in part as a counter to China, led to India being exempted both from U.S non-proliferation laws and international nuclear trade guidelines. In the absence of determined international action and with Pakistan blocking the start of talks on a fissile material cutoff treaty, nuclear weapon programs in South Asia are likely to keep growing for the foreseeable future.

  20. Science and Technology in Support of U.S. Policy in Central Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R B

    2003-11-04

    The current war with Iraq, international interventions in Afghanistan, and the continuous and seemingly insolvable problems in the Middle East emphasize the importance of supporting stable, healthy countries throughout the Middle East and South and Central Asia. The political alliances and foreign aid promulgated by the Cold War have been seriously strained, creating a more uncertain and unstable international environment. We must stay engaged with this part of the world. New partnerships must be forged. Central Asia represents a mix of political systems - from totalitarian rule to nascent democracy; of economic resources from natural to human; and of cultures from ancient to modern - making it of strategic importance to U. S. national and economic security. The U.S. must remain committed and proactively engaged in the region to promote open and democratic societies attractive to outside investment and to prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and extremist groups. The U.S is admired for its science and technology and its flexibility in innovation and applying S&T to solve problems. The inherent value that S&T can contribute to advancing U.S. policy goals is the underlying assumption of this report. Science and technology and their applications have much to contribute to social, economic, and environmental sustainability and, therefore, provide a strong foundation for helping the U.S. to implement its policies abroad. The application of concepts such as competition and peer review, open sharing of scientific information through the use of the internet and other information technologies, and the development of international scientific collaborations and networks, can make major contributions to healthy and stable societies in Central Asia. U.S. scientific and technical know-how has much to contribute to U.S. policy goals and easing regional tensions. Science and technology truly can build bridges between nations and cultures while serving the societies in them.

  1. Protein and microRNA biomarkers from lavage, urine, and serum in military personnel evaluated for dyspnea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Joseph N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Brewer, Heather M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Nicora, Carrie D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weitz, Karl K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Morris, Michael J. [San Antonio Military Medical Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Skabelund, Andrew J. [San Antonio Military Medical Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Adkins, Joshua N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Richard D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cho, Ji -Hoon [Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, WA (United States); Gelinas, Richard [Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-10-05

    Background: We have identified candidate protein and microRNA (miRNA) biomarkers for dyspnea by studying serum, lavage fluid, and urine from military personnel who reported serious respiratory symptoms after they were deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan. Methods: Forty-seven soldiers with the complaint of dyspnea who enrolled in the STudy of Active Duty Military Personnel for Environmental Dust Exposure (STAMPEDE) underwent comprehensive pulmonary evaluations at the San Antonio Military Medical Center. The evaluation included fiber-optic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage. The clinical findings from the STAMPEDE subjects pointed to seven general underlying diagnoses or findings including airway hyperreactivity, asthma, low diffusivity of carbon monoxide, and abnormal cell counts. The largest category was undiagnosed. As an exploratory study, not a classification study, we profiled proteins or miRNAs in lavage fluid, serum, or urine in this group to look for any underlying molecular patterns that might lead to biomarkers. Proteins in lavage fluid and urine were identified by accurate mass tag (database-driven) proteomics methods while miRNAs were profiled by a hybridization assay applied to serum, urine, and lavage fluid. Results: Over seventy differentially expressed proteins were reliably identified both from lavage and from urine in forty-eight dyspnea subjects compared to fifteen controls with no known lung disorder. Six of these proteins were detected both in urine and lavage. One group of subjects was distinguished from controls by expressing a characteristic group of proteins. A related group of dyspnea subjects expressed a unique group of miRNAs that included one miRNA that was differentially overexpressed in all three fluids studied. The levels of several miRNAs also showed modest but direct associations with several standard clinical measures of lung health such as forced vital capacity or gas exchange efficiency. Conclusions: Candidate proteins and miRNAs associated with the general diagnosis of dyspnea have been identified in subjects with differing medical diagnoses. Since these markers can be measured in readily obtained clinical samples, further studies are possible that test the value of these findings in more formal classification or case–control studies in much larger cohorts of subjects with specific lung diseases such as asthma, emphysema, or some other well-defined lung disease.

  2. Protein and microRNA biomarkers from lavage, urine, and serum in military personnel evaluated for dyspnea

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Joseph N.; Brewer, Heather M.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Weitz, Karl K.; Morris, Michael J.; Skabelund, Andrew J.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.; Cho, Ji -Hoon; Gelinas, Richard

    2014-10-05

    Background: We have identified candidate protein and microRNA (miRNA) biomarkers for dyspnea by studying serum, lavage fluid, and urine from military personnel who reported serious respiratory symptoms after they were deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan. Methods: Forty-seven soldiers with the complaint of dyspnea who enrolled in the STudy of Active Duty Military Personnel for Environmental Dust Exposure (STAMPEDE) underwent comprehensive pulmonary evaluations at the San Antonio Military Medical Center. The evaluation included fiber-optic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage. The clinical findings from the STAMPEDE subjects pointed to seven general underlying diagnoses or findings including airway hyperreactivity, asthma, low diffusivity of carbonmore »monoxide, and abnormal cell counts. The largest category was undiagnosed. As an exploratory study, not a classification study, we profiled proteins or miRNAs in lavage fluid, serum, or urine in this group to look for any underlying molecular patterns that might lead to biomarkers. Proteins in lavage fluid and urine were identified by accurate mass tag (database-driven) proteomics methods while miRNAs were profiled by a hybridization assay applied to serum, urine, and lavage fluid. Results: Over seventy differentially expressed proteins were reliably identified both from lavage and from urine in forty-eight dyspnea subjects compared to fifteen controls with no known lung disorder. Six of these proteins were detected both in urine and lavage. One group of subjects was distinguished from controls by expressing a characteristic group of proteins. A related group of dyspnea subjects expressed a unique group of miRNAs that included one miRNA that was differentially overexpressed in all three fluids studied. The levels of several miRNAs also showed modest but direct associations with several standard clinical measures of lung health such as forced vital capacity or gas exchange efficiency. Conclusions: Candidate proteins and miRNAs associated with the general diagnosis of dyspnea have been identified in subjects with differing medical diagnoses. Since these markers can be measured in readily obtained clinical samples, further studies are possible that test the value of these findings in more formal classification or case–control studies in much larger cohorts of subjects with specific lung diseases such as asthma, emphysema, or some other well-defined lung disease.« less

  3. The structures of marialite (Me[subscript 6]) and meionite (Me[subscript 93]) in space groups P4[subscript 2]/n and I4/m, and the absence of phase transitions in the scapolite series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antao, Sytle M.; Hassan, Ishmael (West Indies) [West Indies; (Calgary)

    2014-05-28

    The crystal structures of marialite (Me{sub 6}) from Badakhshan, Afghanistan and meionite (Me{sub 93}) from Mt. Vesuvius, Italy were obtained using synchrotron high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction (HRPXRD) data and Rietveld structure refinements. Their structures were refined in space groups I4/m and P42/n, and similar results were obtained. The Me{sub 6} sample has a formula Ca{sub 0.24}Na{sub 3.37}K{sub 0.24}[Al{sub 3.16}Si{sub 8.84}O{sub 24}]Cl{sub 0.84}(CO{sub 3}){sub 0.15}, and its unit-cell parameters are a = 12.047555(7), c = 7.563210(6) {angstrom}, and V = 1097.751(1) {angstrom}{sup 3}. The average (T1-O) distances are 1.599(1) {angstrom} in I4/m and 1.600(2) {angstrom} in P4{sub 2}/n, indicating that the T1 site contains only Si atoms. In P4{sub 2}/n, the average distances of (T2-O) = 1.655(2) and (T3-O) = 1.664(2) {angstrom} are distinct and are not equal to each other. However, the mean (T2,3-O) = 1.659(2) {angstrom} in P4{sub 2}/n and is identical to the (T2-O) = 1.659(1) {angstrom} in I4/m. The (M-O) [7] = 2.754(1) {angstrom} (M site is coordinated to seven framework O atoms) and M-A = 2.914(1) {angstrom}; these distances are identical in both space groups. The Me{sub 93} sample has a formula of Na{sub 0.29}Ca{sub 3.76}[Al{sub 5.54}Si{sub 6.46}O{sub 24}]Cl{sub 0.05}(SO{sub 4}){sub 0.02}(CO{sub 3}){sub 0.93}, and its unit-cell parameters are a = 12.19882(1), c = 7.576954(8) {angstrom}, and V = 1127.535(2) {angstrom}{sup 3}. A similar examination of the Me{sub 93} sample also shows that both space groups give similar results; however, the C-O distance is more reasonable in P4{sub 2}/n than in I4/m. Refining the scapolite structure near Me{sub 0} or Me{sub 100} in I4/m forces the T2 and T3 sites (both with multiplicity 8 in P4{sub 2}/n) to be equivalent and form the T2' site (with multiplicity 16 in I4/m), but (T2-O) is not equal to (T3-O) in P4{sub 2}/n. Using different space groups for different regions across the series implies phase transitions, which do not occur in the scapolite series.

  4. Retrofiting survivability of military vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, Gregory H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In Iraq the terrain was such that vehicles could be distributed horizontally, which reduced the effectiveness of mines. In the mountainous terrain of Pakistan and Afghanistan vehicles are forced to use the few, passable roads, which are dirt and easily seeded with plentiful, cheap, intelligent mines. It is desirable to reduce the losses to such mines, preferably by retrofit means that do not greatly increase weight or cost or reduce maneuverability. V-bottom vehicles - A known approach to reducing vulnerability is the Buffalo, a large vehicle developed by South Africa to address mine warfare. It has large tires, high axles, and a reinforced, v-shaped bottom that deflects the blast from explosions below. It is developed and tested in combat, but is expensive and has reduced off-road mobility. The domestic MRAP has similar cost and mobility issue. The addition of v-shaped blast deflectors to vehicles such as Humvees could act much as the deflector on a Buffalo, but a Humvee is closer to the ground, so the explosive's expansion would be reduced. The deflector would also reduce a Humvee's clearance for rough terrain, and a deflector of adequate thickness to address the blast by itself could further increase cost and reduce mobility. Reactive armor is developed and has proven effective against shaped and explosive charges from side or top attack. It detects their approach, detonates, and defeats them by interfering with jet formation. If the threat was a shaped charge from below, they would be a logical choice. But the bulk of the damage to Humvees appears to be from the blast from high explosive mines for which the colliding shock from reactive armor could increase that from the explosive. Porous materials such as sand can strongly attenuate the kinetic energy and pressure of a strong shock. Figure 1 shows the kinetic energy (KE), momentum (Mu), velocity (u), and mass (M) of a spherically expanding shock as functions of radius for a material with a porosity of 0.5. Over the range from 0.5 to 4.5 cm the shock KE is attenuated by a factor of {approx}70, while its momentum is changed little. The shock and particle velocity falls by a factor of 200 while the mass increases by a factor of 730. In the limit of very porous media u {approx} 1/M, so KE {approx} 1/M, which falls by a factor of {approx}600, while momentum Mu does not change at all. Figure 2 shows the KE, Mu, u, and M for a material with a porosity of 1.05, for which the KE changes little. In the limit of media of very low porosity, u {approx} 1/{radical}M, so KE is constant while Mu {approx} {radical}M, which increases by a factor of 15. Thus, if the goal is to reduce the peak pressure from strong explosions below, very porous materials, which strongly reduce pressure but do not increase momentum, are preferred to non-porous materials, which amplify momentum but do not decrease pressure. These predictions are in qualitative accord with the results of experiments at Los Alamos in which projectiles from high velocity, large caliber cannons were stopped by one to two sandbags. The studies were performed primarily to determine the effectiveness of sand in stopping fragments of various sizes, but could be extended to study sand's effectiveness in attenuating blast pressure. It would also be useful to test the above predictions on the effectiveness of media with higher porosity. Water barriers have been discussed but not deployed in previous retrofit survivability studies for overseas embassies. They would detect the flash from the mine detonation below, trigger a thin layer of explosive above a layer of water, and drive water droplets into the approaching blast wave. The blast loses energy in evaporating the droplets and loses momentum in slowing them. Under favorable conditions that could attenuate the pressure in the blast enough to prevent the penetration or disruption of the vehicle. However, such barriers would depend on prompt and reliable detonation detection and water droplet dispersal, which have not been tested. There is a large literature on the theoretical effec