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Sample records for opec afghanistan albania

  1. OPEC Revenues Fact Sheet

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2013-01-01

    This report includes estimates of OPEC net oil export revenues, based on historical estimates and forecasts from the latest Energy Information Administration (EIA) Short-Term Energy Outlook.

  2. Fact #836: September 1, Non-OPEC Countries Supply Nearly Two...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    OPEC Canada Mexico Russia Other Non-OPEC Nigeria Saudi Arabia Venezuela Other OPEC ... Notes: Petroleum imports include crude oil and petroleum products. Other OPEC Countries ...

  3. OPEC reorganization could spell relief

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crouse, P.C.

    1987-02-01

    Last year proved to be one of carnage in the oil industry, with only the large, vertically integrated, international oil companies showing strength during the oil price collapse. Independent producers and the manufacturing/service sector watched 50% or greater reductions in income. And this year holds little prospect for significant relief during its first half, although the last half could be better if and when Opec decides to once again test its strength. An Iranian victory in the Iran/Iraq war could also cause an upward movement in price. However, price instability should be less than in 1986, as the business heads toward a consensus price via political factors. The U.S. economy again showed improvement through 1986, with moderate growth of 2.6% in Gross National Product (GNP). The ongoing expansion has lasted four years and is already 17 months longer than the average peacetime expansion. However, important energy components did not show strength, and industrial production continued at level rates for the past two years.

  4. Albania-USAID Climate Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    friendly sustainable development in Albania. USAID and its partners and collaborators will assist Albania's current and future efforts in mitigating the effects of...

  5. Fact #563: March 23, 2009 OPEC Petroleum Imports | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3: March 23, 2009 OPEC Petroleum Imports Fact #563: March 23, 2009 OPEC Petroleum Imports In the 1970's, the U.S. imported more petroleum from OPEC than from non-OPEC countries. The oil embargo in the early 1980's changed that. Though the amount of petroleum imports from OPEC has grown, the U.S. has imported more oil from non-OPEC countries each year since 1993. In fact, the amount of petroleum imported from OPEC in 2007 is slightly less than what was imported from OPEC thirty years ago (1977).

  6. OPEC production: Untapped reserves, world demand spur production expansion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ismail, I.A.H. )

    1994-05-02

    To meet projected world oil demand, almost all members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) have embarked on ambitious capacity expansion programs aimed at increasing oil production capabilities. These expansion programs are in both new and existing oil fields. In the latter case, the aim is either to maintain production or reduce the production decline rate. However, the recent price deterioration has led some major OPEC producers, such as Saudi Arabia and Iran, to revise downward their capacity plans. Capital required for capacity expansion is considerable. Therefore, because the primary source of funds will come from within each OPEC country, a reasonably stable and relatively high oil price is required to obtain enough revenue for investing in upstream projects. This first in a series of two articles discusses the present OPEC capacity and planned expansion in the Middle East. The concluding part will cover the expansion plans in the remaining OPEC countries, capital requirements, and environmental concerns.

  7. OPEC: 10 years after the Arab oil boycott

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, M.H.

    1983-09-23

    OPEC's dominance over world oil markets is waning 10 years after precipitating world-wide energy and economic crises. The 1979 revolution in Iran and the start of the Iranian-Iraqi war in 1980 introduced a second shock that caused oil importers to seek non-OPEC supplies and emphasize conservation. No breakup of the cartel is anticipated, however, despite internal disagreements over production and price levels. Forecasters see OPEC as the major price setter as an improved economy increases world demand for oil. Long-term forecasts are even more optimistic. 24 references, 2 figures, 2 tables. (DCK)

  8. OPEC's maximum oil revenue will be $80 billion per year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steffes, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    OPEC's income from oil is less than $80 billion this year, only one fourth its 1981 revenue. The optimum revenue OPEC can expect is 15 MBB/D at $15/barrel. Energy conservation will continue despite falling prices because consumers no longer feel secure that OPEC can deliver needed supplies. Eleven concepts which affect the future world economic outlook include dependence upon petroleum and petroleum products, the condition of capital markets, low energy and commodity prices, the growth in money supply without a corresponding growth in investment, and the high debt level of the US and the developing countries.

  9. Albania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Albania Population 2,821,977 GDP 14,000,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.11 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code AL 3-letter ISO code ALB Numeric ISO...

  10. Fact #836: September 1, 2014 Non-OPEC Countries Supply Nearly...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fact 836: September 1, 2014 Non-OPEC Countries Supply Nearly Two-thirds of U.S. Petroleum Imports - Dataset Excel file with dataset for Fact 836: Non-OPEC Countries Supply Nearly ...

  11. The oil price and non-OPEC supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seymour, A.

    1991-01-01

    The design of any effective oil pricing policy by producers depends on a knowledge of the nature and complexity of supply responses. This book examines the development of non-OPEX oil reserves on a field-by-filed basis to determine how much of the increase in non-OPEC production could be attributable to the price shocks and how much was unambiguously due to decisions and developments that preceded the price shocks. Results are presented in eighteen case-studies of non-OPEC producers. This study will be of interest to economists and planners specializing in the upstream and to policy makers both in oil producing and consuming countries.

  12. As OPEC Ministers Meet, Secretary Chu Stresses the Importance of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Independence | Department of Energy As OPEC Ministers Meet, Secretary Chu Stresses the Importance of Energy Independence As OPEC Ministers Meet, Secretary Chu Stresses the Importance of Energy Independence March 15, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - As OPEC ministers held a meeting in Vienna Sunday, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu again stressed the need for energy independence and called for global cooperation on energy, economic and climate challenges. "While OPEC's actions are

  13. Fact #734: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries Represent Less Than Half of U.S.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Imports | Department of Energy 4: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries Represent Less Than Half of U.S. Petroleum Imports Fact #734: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries Represent Less Than Half of U.S. Petroleum Imports Even though Saudi Arabia is the world's largest producer of petroleum, and OPEC countries produce much of the oil in the global market, the U.S. imports most of its oil from Canada, Mexico and other non-OPEC countries. Petroleum imports from Canada have been increasing since the

  14. Non-OPEC oil supply continues to grow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, D.H.

    1995-12-25

    Global reserves of crude oil remain at 1 trillion bbl, according to OGJ`s annual survey of producing countries. Significant gains are in Brazil, Colombia, Congo, Egypt, Libya, Nigeria, Oman, and Papua New Guinea. Decreases were reported by Indonesia, Norway, the U.K., Iran, Canada, Mexico, and the US. Natural gas reserves slipped to 4.9 quadrillion cu ft. The major production trend is a lasting surge from outside of OPEC. This year`s Worldwide Production report begins with a detailed analysis of this crucial development by an international authority. This article discusses the OECD outlook by region and the turnaround in production in the former Soviet Union.

  15. Total Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the U.S.

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Country: Total All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iran Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Afghanistan Albania Andora Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burma Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Cocos (Keeling)

  16. Afghanistan-NREL Resource Maps and Toolkits | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    partnered with Afghanistan to develop high-resolution wind and solar resource maps and data products for Afghanistan. The data were output in Geographic Information Systems (GIS)...

  17. Non-OPEC oil production set to decline for the first time since 2008

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Non-OPEC oil production set to decline for the first time since 2008 Total oil production from countries outside of OPEC, the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, is expected to decline next year for the first time since 2008. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said it expects non- OPEC oil production to grow by 1.1 million barrels per day this year....and then decline by 300,000 barrels per day next year. As a result, the rate of growth in

  18. Fact #836: September 1, 2014 Non-OPEC Countries Supply Nearly Two-thirds of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Petroleum Imports - Dataset | Department of Energy 6: September 1, 2014 Non-OPEC Countries Supply Nearly Two-thirds of U.S. Petroleum Imports - Dataset Fact #836: September 1, 2014 Non-OPEC Countries Supply Nearly Two-thirds of U.S. Petroleum Imports - Dataset Excel file with dataset for Fact #836: Non-OPEC Countries Supply Nearly Two-thirds of U.S. Petroleum Imports File fotw#836_web.xlsx More Documents & Publications The Next Regulatory Chapter for Commercial Vehicles Residential

  19. Microsoft Word - STEO supplement non-OPEC supply Final-2.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    08 1 February 2008 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Outlook for Non-OPEC Oil Supply Growth in 2008- 2009 1 Most oil market analysts, including EIA, have pointed to the slow growth in oil supply from countries that are not members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) in recent years as a key cause of the current high oil price environment. The widening gap between growth in world oil consumption and non- OPEC oil supply has led to greater reliance upon production

  20. Fact #734: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries Represent Less Than Half...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supporting Information Crude Oil Imported to the U.S. by Country of Origin, 1973-2011 (million barrels per day) Year Saudi Arabia Venezuela Nigeria Other OPEC Countries Canada ...

  1. Afghanistan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    nlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name Afghanistan Population 15,500,000 GDP 21,747,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.02 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code AF 3-letter...

  2. Fact #836: September 1, Non-OPEC Countries Supply Nearly Two-thirds of U.S.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Imports | Department of Energy 6: September 1, Non-OPEC Countries Supply Nearly Two-thirds of U.S. Petroleum Imports Fact #836: September 1, Non-OPEC Countries Supply Nearly Two-thirds of U.S. Petroleum Imports The figure below shows the volume and source of imported petroleum to the United States from 1960 to 2013. The countries which are members of OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) are shown in shades of blue while non-OPEC countries are shown in shades of

  3. Outlook for Non-OPEC Oil Supply in 2010-2011 (Released in the STEO January 2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    Two large categories define the world's producing countries of crude oil and other liquid fuels (hereafter liquids): those that are members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and those that are outside that group (non-OPEC). This article takes a closer look at the latter category.

  4. Statement from Energy Secretary Bodman on OPEC's Decision to Cut Crude Oil

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production | Department of Energy from Energy Secretary Bodman on OPEC's Decision to Cut Crude Oil Production Statement from Energy Secretary Bodman on OPEC's Decision to Cut Crude Oil Production October 19, 2006 - 9:17am Addthis "We continue to believe that it is best for oil producers and consumers alike to allow free markets to determine issues of supply, demand and price. Despite the recent downturn in crude oil prices, they remain at historically high levels, clearly indicating a

  5. Assessment of Biomass Resources in Afghanistan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R.

    2011-01-01

    Afghanistan is facing many challenges on its path of reconstruction and development. Among all its pressing needs, the country would benefit from the development and implementation of an energy strategy. In addition to conventional energy sources, the Afghan government is considering alternative options such as energy derived from renewable resources (wind, solar, biomass, geothermal). Biomass energy is derived from a variety of sources -- plant-based material and residues -- and can be used in various conversion processes to yield power, heat, steam, and fuel. This study provides policymakers and industry developers with information on the biomass resource potential in Afghanistan for power/heat generation and transportation fuels production. To achieve this goal, the study estimates the current biomass resources and evaluates the potential resources that could be used for energy purposes.

  6. Outlook for Non-OPEC Oil Supply Growth in 2008-2009 (Released in the STEO February 2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    In 2008-2009, the Energy Information Administration expects that non-OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) petroleum supply growth will surpass that in recent years because of the large number of new oil projects scheduled to come online during the forecast period.

  7. OPEC and lower oil prices: Impacts on production capacity, export refining, domestic demand and trade balances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fesharaki, F.; Fridley, D.; Isaak, D.; Totto, L.; Wilson, T.

    1988-12-01

    The East-West Center has received a research grant from the US Department of Energy's Office of Policy, Planning, and Analysis to study the impact of lower oil prices on OPEC production capacity, on export refineries, and petroleum trade. The project was later extended to include balance-of-payments scenarios and impacts on OPEC domestic demand. As the study progressed, a number of preliminary presentations were made at the US Department of Energy in order to receive feedback from DOE officials and to refine the focus of our analysis. During one of the presentations on June 4, 1987, the then Director of Division of Oil and Gas, John Stanley-Miller, advised us to focus our work on the Persian Gulf countries, since these countries were of special interest to the United States Government. Since then, our team has visited Iran, the United Arab Emirates, and Saudi Arabia and obtained detailed information from other countries. The political turmoil in the Gulf, the Iran/Iraq war, and the active US military presence have all worked to delay the final submission of our report. Even in countries where the United States has close ties, access to information has been difficult. In most countries, even mundane information on petroleum issues are treated as national secrets. As a result of these difficulties, we requested a one-year no cost extension to the grant and submitted an Interim Report in May 1988. As part of our grant extension request, we proposed to undertake additional tasks which appear in this report. 20 figs., 21 tabs.

  8. EM Employee Serves Military in Afghanistan, Manages $5.8 Billion Army Task Order

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BAGRAM AIRFIELD, Afghanistan – EM employee James Hawkins is currently serving the U.S. military in Afghanistan, where he is administering a $5.8 billion task order for the Army.

  9. Analysis of changes in OPEC's crude oil prices, current account, and surplus investments, with emphasis upon oil-revenue purchasing power - 1973 through 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tadayon, S.

    1984-01-01

    The study sought to provide a comprehensive investigation of changes in the Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) crude oil prices, current-account balance, and current-account surplus investments abroad. The study emphasized analysis and, to some extent, quantification of the real value, or purchasing power, of OPEC oil revenues. The research approach was descriptive-elemental to expand upon characteristics of variables identified for the study. Research questions were answered by direct findings for each question. The method utilized for the study included document research and statistical analyses of data derived. The aim was to obtain complete and accurate information. The study compiled documented data regarding OPEC's crude oil prices, current-account balance, and current-account surplus investments abroad and analyzed the purchasing power of oil revenues as time passed and events occurred over the eight years from 1973 through 1980.

  10. Property:Iso3166Alpha2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Afghanistan + AF + Albania + AL + Algeria + DZ + American Samoa + AS + Andorra + AD + Angola + AO + Anguilla + AI + Antigua and Barbuda + AG + Argentina + AR + Armenia + AM +...

  11. Property:NumberOfPrograms | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    25) A Afghanistan + 5 + Albania + 5 + Algeria + 6 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 1 + Anguilla + 1 + Antigua and Barbuda + 6 + Argentina + 12 + Armenia + 6 + Aruba +...

  12. Property:NumberOfDOELabPrograms | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    25) A Afghanistan + 3 + Albania + 0 + Algeria + 1 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 0 + Anguilla + 1 + Antigua and Barbuda + 1 + Argentina + 1 + Armenia + 0 + Aruba + 1...

  13. Property:NumberOfLowCarbonPlanningPrograms | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    25) A Afghanistan + 0 + Albania + 1 + Algeria + 1 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 1 + Anguilla + 0 + Antigua and Barbuda + 2 + Argentina + 5 + Armenia + 2 + Aruba + 0...

  14. Property:NumberOfResourceAssessmentsEnergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    25) A Afghanistan + 1 + Albania + 0 + Algeria + 1 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 0 + Anguilla + 0 + Antigua and Barbuda + 1 + Argentina + 0 + Armenia + 1 + Aruba + 0...

  15. Property:NumberOfResourceAssessmentsLand | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    25) A Afghanistan + 0 + Albania + 0 + Algeria + 0 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 0 + Anguilla + 0 + Antigua and Barbuda + 0 + Argentina + 0 + Armenia + 0 + Aruba + 0...

  16. Property:NumberOfLowCarbonPrograms | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    25) A Afghanistan + 0 + Albania + 0 + Algeria + 0 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 0 + Anguilla + 0 + Antigua and Barbuda + 0 + Argentina + 0 + Armenia + 0 + Aruba + 0...

  17. Property:NumberOfCLEANPrograms | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    25) A Afghanistan + 0 + Albania + 0 + Algeria + 0 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 0 + Anguilla + 0 + Antigua and Barbuda + 0 + Argentina + 0 + Armenia + 0 + Aruba + 0...

  18. Property:NumberOfLowCarbonPlanningProgramsAgriculture | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    25) A Afghanistan + 0 + Albania + 0 + Algeria + 0 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 1 + Anguilla + 0 + Antigua and Barbuda + 1 + Argentina + 4 + Armenia + 2 + Aruba + 0...

  19. Property:NumberOfSolarResources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    25) A Afghanistan + 1 + Albania + 0 + Algeria + 1 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 0 + Anguilla + 0 + Antigua and Barbuda + 0 + Argentina + 1 + Armenia + 0 + Aruba + 0...

  20. East Coast (PADD 1) Imports from All Countries

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Import Area: East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Albania Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Bosnia and

  1. Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from All Countries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Albania Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Cameroon Canada Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador

  2. U.S. Imports from All Countries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Import Area: U.S. Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Albania Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Cameroon Canada Chad Chile China

  3. Extreme VPP- Kandahar, Afghanistan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When I heard about a new position in the Army Reserve called a “combat safety officer,” I wondered who would have to tell people in combat to be safe. It seemed pretty self-evident, especially to this OSHA compliance officer who’s built a career around safety and health. I quickly signed on for the job.

  4. Total All Countries Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Destination Destination: Total All Countries Afghanistan Albania Algeria Andora Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bangladesh Bahama Islands Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burma Bermuda Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic

  5. Status of U.S. Nuclear Outages - U.S. Energy Information Administration

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (EIA) R Give Us Your Feedback We welcome your feedback and insights on this project. Your Country: United States Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Angola Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas, The Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burma (Myanmar) Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central

  6. International - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Projects published on Beta are not final and may contain programming errors. They are for public testing and comment only. We welcome your feedback. For final products, please visit www.eia.gov. Read our feedback policy. Project Feedback R Give Us Your Feedback We welcome your feedback and insights on this project. Your Country: United States Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Angola Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas, The Bahrain

  7. Eia.gov BETA - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration (EIA) N Give Us Your Feedback We welcome your feedback and insights on this project. Your Country: United States Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Angola Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas, The Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burma (Myanmar) Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde

  8. Eia.gov BETA - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Petroleum Trade: Imports From OPEC

  9. Afghanistan Pakistan High Resolution Wind Resource - Datasets...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pakistan High Resolution Wind Resource This shapefile containing 50 meter height data has been validated by NREL and wind energy meteorological consultants. However, the data is...

  10. Afghanistan-NREL Mission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Company Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Buildings, Solar, Wind Topics Background analysis Program Start 2009...

  11. Albania-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    illustrates the U.S. perspective on LEDS: Integrated development goals and objectives, national greenhouse gas inventory, and economic and resource data Long-term projections of...

  12. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    | Month | | | Persian | Total | Non | United | | Gulf(1) | OPEC(2) | OPEC | Kingdom | Venezuela | | | |||||...

  13. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    | Month | | | Persian | Total | Non | United | | Gulf(1) | OPEC(2) | OPEC | Kingdom | Venezuela| | | ||||| 1978...

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    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    | | | || | | Year | | | | | Month | | | Persian | Total | Non | United | | Gulf(1) | OPEC(2) | OPEC | Kingdom | Venezuela | | | |...

  15. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    | | | Year | | | | | Month | | | Persian | Total | Non | United | | Gulf(1) | OPEC(2) | OPEC | Kingdom | Venezuela| | | |||...

  16. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    | | Year | | | | | Month | | | Persian | Total | Non | United | | Gulf(1) | OPEC(2) | OPEC | Kingdom | Venezuela| | | ||||...

  17. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    | | Year | | | | | Month | | | Persian | Total | Non | United | | Gulf(1) | OPEC(2) | OPEC | Kingdom | Venezuela | | | |||...

  18. Eia.gov BETA - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    d Petroleum Trade: Imports From Non-OPEC

  19. Total Crude Oil and Products Exports by Destination

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History Total All Countries 153,972 141,476 146,514 143,463 144,525 163,526 1981-2015 Afghanistan 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997-2015 Albania 0 116 1998-2015 Algeria 0 0 237 1 0 305 1996-2015 Andora 0 2005-2015 Angola 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995-2015 Anguilla 0 0 0 0 0 1 2005-2015 Antigua and Barbuda 517 394 156 208 0 365 1995-2015 Argentina 2,253 1,628 846 1,408 1,871 2,235 1993-2015 Armenia 2005-2015 Aruba 1,425 2,444 1,582 900 851 1,089 2005-2015 Australia 170 139 218

  20. Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Exports by Destination

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History Total All Countries 59 39 48 58 48 63 2010-2015 Afghanistan 2010-2010 Albania 2013-2015 Angola 2011-2014 Anguilla 2010-2010 Antigua and Barbuda 2010-2015 Argentina 0 0 2010-2015 Aruba 2010-2013 Australia 0 0 0 0 2010-2015 Bahama Islands 0 0 0 0 2010-2015 Bahrain 2010-2014 Barbados 0 2010-2015 Belgium 0 0 0 0 2 2010-2015 Belize 0 0 2010-2015 Benin 2014-2014 Bolivia 2015-2015 Brazil 4 1 0 0 5 2010-2015 Bulgaria 2010-2013 Burma 2014-2014

  1. Total Crude Oil and Products Exports by Destination

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Total All Countries 858,685 1,089,848 1,172,965 1,321,787 1,524,170 1,733,771 1981-2015 Afghanistan 4 3 7 3 1 1 1997-2015 Albania 0 0 166 276 467 267 1998-2015 Algeria 4 1,226 219 2,690 430 982 1996-2015 Andora 0 1 0 2005-2015 Angola 7 27 12 157 75 6 1995-2015 Anguilla 1 5 2 2 66 3 2005-2015 Antigua and Barbuda 146 231 634 10 254 6,080 1995-2015 Argentina 6,951 14,632 19,097 18,027 22,407 23,035 1993-2015 Armenia 0 0 0 0 0 2005-2015 Aruba 2,578 2,835

  2. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OPEC Algeria Indonesia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela Other Countries Arab OPEC b Total OPEC c 1978 ... 14.12 13.61 13.24 14.05...

  3. Table 25. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OPEC Algeria Canada Indonesia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela Other Countries Arab OPEC a Total OPEC b 1978 ... 14.93 14.41 14.65...

  4. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    OPEC would increase production quotas (and thus production) when they meet in Osaka, Japan on September 19, statements from some OPEC oil ministers are adding doubt into the...

  5. Energy & Financial Markets - U.S. Energy Information Administration...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    OPEC Crude oil production by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) is an important factor that affects oil prices. This organization seeks to actively manage ...

  6. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 Petroleum Net Imports by Country of Origin, 1960-2011 Total, OPEC, and Non-OPEC By Selected Country Total Net Imports as Share of Consumption Net Imports From OPEC 132 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Note: OPEC=Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries. Source: Table 5.7. OPEC Non-OPEC Saudi Arabia Canada and Mexico 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Million Barrels per Day 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995

  7. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in non-OPEC production in recent years as a key cause of the current high oil price environment. The imbalance between growth in world oil consumption and non-OPEC oil...

  8. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    in 2016 is expected to be in the United States. Non-OPEC production is forecast to decrease by an additional 0.1 million bd in 2017. Changes in non-OPEC production are...

  9. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    outside of the OPEC accounts for most of the world's production (59 percent in 2011), making prospects for non-OPEC production critical to the outlook for world oil markets....

  10. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2014 Expected growth in non-OPEC production reduces the call on OPEC crude required to balance the market On June 11, the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries...

  11. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    over the coming year. EIA projections regarding the call on OPEC reflect our assessment of world oil demand and net supply changes from non-OPEC producers. Projected world...

  12. Energy & Financial Markets - U.S. Energy Information Administration...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... Iraq invades Kuwait 7: Asian financial crisis 8: OPEC cuts production targets 1.7 mmbpd 9: 9-11 attacks 10: Low spare capacity 11: Global financial collapse 12: OPEC cuts ...

  13. Energy Technology Systems Analysis Program (MARKAL) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Switzerland, Albania, Australia, Austria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Colombia, Croatia, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, New Zealand, China, Philippines,...

  14. Complex Queries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electricity Markets Afghanistan-NREL Mission Afghanistan-NREL Resource Maps and Toolkits China-NREL Cooperation Dominica Island-NREL Cooperation Egypt-NREL Energy Activities...

  15. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Table 5.7 Petroleum Net Imports by Country of Origin, Selected Years, 1960-2011 Year Persian Gulf 2 Selected OPEC 1 Countries Selected Non-OPEC 1 Countries Total Net Imports Total Net Imports as Share of Consumption 5 Net Imports From OPEC 1 Algeria Nigeria Saudi Arabia 3 Venezuela Total OPEC 4 Canada Mexico United Kingdom U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico Total Non-OPEC 4 Share of Total Net Imports 6 Share of Consumption 7 Thousand Barrels per Day Percent 1960 NA 8 ( ) 9 ( ) 84 910 1,232 86

  16. Table 5.7 Petroleum Net Imports by Country of Origin, 1960-2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Net Imports by Country of Origin, 1960-2011 Year Persian Gulf 2 Selected OPEC 1 Countries Selected Non-OPEC 1 Countries Total Net Imports Total Net Imports as Share of Consumption 5 Net Imports From OPEC 1 Algeria Nigeria Saudi Arabia 3 Venezuela Total OPEC 4 Canada Mexico United Kingdom Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico Total Non-OPEC 4 Share of Total Net Imports 6 Share of Consumption 7 Thousand Barrels Percent 1960 NA [8] [9] 30,786 333,046 450,799 31,454 -620 -4,267 12,553 139,406

  17. Energy & Financial Markets - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Non-OPEC Oil production from countries outside the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) currently represents about 60 percent of world oil production. Key centers of non-OPEC production include North America, regions of the former Soviet Union, and the North Sea. Changes in non-OPEC production can affect oil prices Download Data in CSV This chart shows that net increases in non-OPEC production were very small from 2005 to 2008.

  18. Highlights.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook -- February 2002) 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2002 Overview World Oil Markets. OPEC's stated intention to reduce crude oil output beginning in January has been mostly successful. OPEC-10 crude oil output (OPEC less Iraq) fell by an estimated 1.1 million barrels per day in January, or about 70 percent of the officially announced quota reductions. Compliance rates at these levels tend to validate our expectations for steadily

  19. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - December 2007 1 December 2007 Short-Term Energy Outlook December 11, 2007 Release Highlights Global oil markets will likely remain tight through the forecast period. EIA projects that world oil demand will grow much faster than oil supply outside of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), leaving OPEC and inventories to offset the resultant upward pressure on prices. However, at last week's meeting in Abu Dhabi, OPEC decided to maintain its existing production quotas, noting

  20. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and Motor oc- tane numbers, was developed. OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries): An intergovernmental organization whose stated objective is to...

  1. Glossary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Excludes ram-jet and petroleum rocket fuels. OPEC: Organization of Petroleum Exporting Coun- tries, oil-producing and exporting countries that have organized for the...

  2. The Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the United States. OPEC Organization of the Petroleum...

  3. Products Produced in Countries Other Than Iran

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the United States. OPEC Organization of the Petroleum...

  4. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pressure on prices. In November of 1997, OPEC, rather than cutting oil production in this environment of declining consumption, increased production. The result: an unanticipated...

  5. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    current projections. Chief among these is the responsiveness of supply to the lower price environment. Despite OPEC's recent decision to leave its crude oil production target at 30...

  6. TABLE29.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9. Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country, (Thousand Barrels per Day) January 1998 Arab OPEC ... 1,726 37...

  7. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    weaker-than-expected demand in Russia, China, or elsewhere would put further downward pressure on prices. EIA estimates that non-OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting...

  8. DOE Awards up to $5.5 Million for X PRIZE to Promote Clean, Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Funding will also support expanded outreach and education efforts that will focus on ... Challenge to Jump Start Young Entrepreneurship As OPEC Ministers Meet, Secretary ...

  9. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Release: June 15, 2011 A real downturn or just a pause? Projected increases in world oil consumption may require higher production from OPEC countries World benchmark crude...

  10. Fact #578: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumptio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supporting Information World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2007 Crude oil ... United Arab Emirates, Algeria, Libya, Nigeria, Indonesia, Gabon, and Ecuador. OPEC ...

  11. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) met and released their oil market assessment, indicating that the world is currently well supplied through the first quarter of...

  12. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook June 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: May marked the third consecutive month that the OPEC basket price averaged above $22 per barrel, the lower end of OPEC's target range for the OPEC basket price. The OPEC basket price has been above $22 per barrel since March 8, and is projected to remain within the target range throughout the forecast period, with prices rising at end-2002 and early 2003 before declining again in mid-2003. The price of West Texas Intermediate

  13. Microsoft Word - HighlightsFin.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 2003 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook October 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. EIA's outlook is for world oil prices to remain near $30 per barrel through the coming winter of 2003/2004. Prices remain firm rather than declining primarily because of OPEC's decision to lower oil production quotas. OPEC's decision to cut its production targets reduces the chances for a large end-of-year stockbuild that OPEC feared could undermine oil prices. Even before OPEC's decision to lower quotas, EIA had

  14. World Oil Price Cases (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    World oil prices in Annual Energy Outlook 2005 are set in an environment where the members of OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) are assumed to act as the dominant producers, with lower production costs than other supply regions or countries. Non-OPEC oil producers are assumed to behave competitively, producing as much oil as they can profitability extract at the market price for oil. As a result, the OPEC member countries will be able effectively to set the price of oil when they can act in concert by varying their aggregate production. Alternatively, OPEC members could target a fixed level of production and let the world market determine the price.

  15. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. Total OPEC Includes Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar,...

  16. Microsoft Word - master.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nuclear electricity generation forecasts are provided by Diane Jackson (202-426-1176); ... Figure 10. OPEC Oil Production and Capacity weapons inspectors. As of the writing of this ...

  17. Albanian Centre for Energy Regulation and Conservation - ACERC...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the WBs & Albania. Its practices comprise specialize legal support, strategic business counsel as well as research project development and management. ACERC services...

  18. Property:Iso3166Numeric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + 004 + Albania + 008 + Algeria + 012 + American Samoa + 016 + Andorra + 020 + Angola + 024 + Anguilla + 660 + Antigua and Barbuda + 028 + Argentina + 032 + Armenia + 051 +...

  19. Property:AdvancedEconomy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    false + Albania + false + Algeria + false + American Samoa + false + Andorra + false + Angola + false + Anguilla + false + Antigua and Barbuda + false + Argentina + false + Armenia...

  20. Property:Iso3166Alpha3 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + AFG + Albania + ALB + Algeria + DZA + American Samoa + ASM + Andorra + AND + Angola + AGO + Anguilla + AIA + Antigua and Barbuda + ATG + Argentina + ARG + Armenia + ARM +...

  1. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. 3 Other Europe and Eurasia Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan,...

  2. Country Analysis Briefs

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2028-01-01

    An ongoing compilation of country energy profiles. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) maintains Country Analysis Briefs (CABs) for specific countries that are important to world energy markets, including members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), major non-OPEC oil producers, major energy transit countries, major energy consumers, and other areas of current interest to energy analysts and policy makers.

  3. Asian Development Outlook 2010 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, China, South Korea, Mongolia, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Laos, Vietnam,...

  4. Short-Term Energy Outlook- May 2003

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook May 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. The April 24 meeting of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) raised official quotas for members (excluding Iraq) by 0.9 million barrels per day from the previous (suspended) quota to 25.4 million barrels per day. OPEC members also sought tighter compliance with quotas, calling for production cuts of 2 million barrels per day from April levels. We expect these measures to result in an average total OPEC

  5. Word Pro - S11

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    67 Table 11.1b World Crude Oil Production: Persian Gulf Nations, Non-OPEC, and World (Thousand Barrels per Day) Persian Gulf Nations b Selected Non-OPEC a Producers Total Non- OPEC a World Canada China Egypt Mexico Norway Former U.S.S.R. Russia United Kingdom United States 1973 Average .................... 20,668 1,798 1,090 165 465 32 8,324 NA 2 9,208 26,018 55,679 1975 Average .................... 18,934 1,430 1,490 235 705 189 9,523 NA 12 8,375 27,039 52,828 1980 Average ....................

  6. Word Pro - S3

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    / Monthly Energy Review February 2016 53 Table 3.3a Petroleum Trade: Overview Imports From Persian Gulf a Imports From OPEC b Imports Exports Net Imports Products Supplied As Share of Products Supplied As Share of Total Imports Imports From Persian Gulf a Imports From OPEC b Imports Net Imports Imports From Persian Gulf a Imports From OPEC b Thousand Barrels per Day Percent 1950 Average .................... NA NA 850 305 545 6,458 NA NA 13.2 8.4 NA NA 1955 Average .................... NA NA

  7. Word Pro - S3

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    b Petroleum Trade: Imports (Million Barrels per Day) Overview, 1949-2015 OPEC and Non-OPEC, 1960-2014 From Selected Countries, November 2015 Note: OPEC=Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries. Web Page: http http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#petroleum. Sources: Tables 3.3b-3.3d. . 54 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review February 2016 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 Crude Oil Petroleum Products

  8. Highlights.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: World oil price markers fell in June, with both Brent crude oil and the OPEC basket prices averaging $1.00 - $1.50 per barrel below May averages. Nevertheless, June marked the fourth consecutive month that the OPEC basket price averaged above $22 per barrel, the lower end of OPEC's target range. The basket price has been above $22 per barrel since March 8 and is projected to remain within the target range ($22-28 per

  9. Highlights.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook May 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: World oil prices continued to rise in April, with OPEC Basket and Brent prices rising by $2 per barrel on average from March levels. April marked the second consecutive month that the OPEC basket price finished above $22 per barrel, the lower end of the target range for the OPEC basket price. The U.S. benchmark West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price averaged over $26 per barrel in April, and closed over $27 per

  10. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Value of Crude Oil Imports Total, 1973-2011 Totals, 2011 By Selected Country, 2011 164 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. Note: OPEC=Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries. Source: Table 5.20. 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 Billion Dollars¹ 335 170 165 73 Total Non-OPEC OPEC Persian Gulf 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 Billion Dollars¹

  11. dec01

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    December 2001) 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook December 2001 Overview World Oil Markets. As major producing countries have jockeyed over the issue of production cutbacks, world oil prices have languished below the stated range preferred by OPEC ($22-$28 for the OPEC basket). OPEC has reported that their basket price averaged about $17.60 per barrel in November, following a $19.60 average in October and $24.30 in September. Spot prices for West Texas Intermediate averaged about $19.60 per barrel in

  12. jul01

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 2001) 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2001 Overview OPEC and World Oil Prices Since it is clear that OPEC does not intend to increase production quotas at this time, we presume that the weakening in oil prices that has developed since mid-June is likely to diminish and that prices may strengthen over the course of the rest of the summer. Such a development seems likely even though Iraq has agreed to resume U.N.-supervised exports. We assume for the base case projection that total OPEC

  13. U.S. monthly oil production tops 8 million barrels per day for the first time since 1988

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    World oil supply more than adequate to meet demand over next 2 years Rising U.S. crude oil production will help non-OPEC supply growth exceed global demand growth for the next two years. Non-OPEC petroleum and other liquids supply is expected to increase 1.9 million barrels per day this year, while oil consumption will grow just 1.3 million barrels per day, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's new monthly forecast. Next year....non-OPEC supply is expected to rise another 1.5

  14. Microsoft Word - nonopec_supplement.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 1 January 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Outlook for Non-OPEC Supply in 2010-2011 1 Summary Two large categories define the world's producing countries of crude oil and other liquid fuels 2 (hereafter "liquids"): those that are members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and those that are outside that group (non-OPEC). This article takes a closer look at the latter category. After growing by 630,000 barrels per day (bbl/d) in 2009, EIA

  15. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    in July, down from 1.5 million bbld in April. Additional deterioration in the security environment in Iraq or Libya could further reduce OPEC production in the short term. In...

  16. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of global economic growth, the responsiveness of non-OPEC oil production to the low price environment, and any unplanned production outages. As the price of crude oil changes,...

  17. The outlook for US oil dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.; Jones, D.W.; Leiby, P.N.

    1995-05-11

    Market share OPEC lost in defending higher prices from 1979-1985 is being steadily regained and is projected to exceed 50% by 2000. World oil markets are likely to be as vulnerable to monopoly influence as they were 20 years ago, as OPEC regains lost market share. The U.S. economy appears to be as exposed as it was in the early 1970s to losses from monopoly oil pricing. A simulated 2-year supply reduction in 2005-6 boosts OPEC revenues by roughly half a trillion dollars and costs the U.S. economy an approximately equal amount. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve appears to be of little benefit against such a determined, multi-year supply curtailment either in reducing OPEC revenues or protecting the U.S. economy. Increasing the price elasticity of oil demand and supply in the U.S. and the rest of the world, however, would be an effective strategy.

  18. The Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lower crude oil output from OPEC countries (Tables 2 and 3). * Global surplus crude oil production capacity averaged 1.8 million bbld in July and August, 0.3 million bbld...

  19. The Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    was more than offset by the decrease in total OPEC output (Table 4). Global surplus crude oil production capacity in September and October 2013 averaged 1.8 million bbld, which...

  20. The Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    boosted global liquid fuels production relative to year-ago levels. However, OPEC crude oil production decreased slightly from year-ago levels, as production gains in Libya and...

  1. Measuring the Costs of U.S. Oil Dependence and the Benefits of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    exporters operating as OPEC." Prof. M. Adelman, MIT, 2004. Algeria Angola Ecuador Iran Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia UAE Venezuela 0 20 40 60 80 100 120...

  2. TABLE21.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ... 53,500 1,139 2,258 115 625 0 0...

  3. TABLE24.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    III-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ... 38,701 294 2,258 0 0 0 0 443 0 0 Algeria...

  4. TABLE23.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    II-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ... 6,219 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait...

  5. TABLE22.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    I-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ... 6,171 845 0 115 625 0 0 824 0 0 Algeria...

  6. Table 5.20 Value of Crude Oil Imports From Selected Countries, 1973-2011 (Thousand Dollars )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Value of Crude Oil Imports From Selected Countries, 1973-2011 (Thousand Dollars 1) Year Persian Gulf 3 Selected OPEC 2 Countries Selected Non-OPEC 2 Countries Total 5 Kuwait Nigeria Saudi Arabia Venezuela Total OPEC 4 Canada Colombia Mexico Norway United Kingdom Total Non-OPEC 4 1973 1,729,733 W 1,486,278 904,979 753,195 5,237,483 1,947,422 W – 0 0 2,351,931 7,589,414 1974 4,419,410 W 3,347,351 1,858,788 1,309,916 11,581,515 3,314,999 0 W – 0 4,054,475 15,635,990 1975 5,169,811 W 3,457,766

  7. TABLE38.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    OPEC ... 72,086 1,138 9,203 1,472 417 19 404 571 0 74 Angola ... 1,474 0 80 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina...

  8. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    per day from a base production level of 27.5 million barrels per day (excluding Angola and Iraq), have firmed oil markets. Although OPEC did not achieve total compliance,...

  9. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    in 2011 and 2012 Leading projected increases in non-OPEC oil production are China, Brazil, and Canada, each of which EIA expects to show average production growth of 120,000 to...

  10. 2015_05_04_Columbia University_FINAL[2].pptx (Read-Only)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 May 2015 Most significant contributors to non-OPEC crude and lease condensate production: Canada, Brazil, U.S., Kazakhstan, Russia 0 6 12 18 24 Canada United States Mexico...

  11. International Energy Outlook 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    significant contributors to non-OPEC crude and lease condensate production: Canada, Brazil, U.S., Kazakhstan, Russia 0 6 12 18 24 Canada United States Mexico Brazil Kazakhstan...

  12. International Energy Outlook 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 2015 Most significant contributors to non-OPEC crude and lease condensate production: Canada, Brazil, U.S., Kazakhstan, Russia 0 6 12 18 24 Canada United States Mexico...

  13. Filling the Strategic Petroleum Reserve

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Established in 1975 in the aftermath of the OPEC oil embargo, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve was originally intended to hold at least 750 million barrels of crude oil as an insurance policy...

  14. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    had to rely more heavily on stock draws and production from other OPEC suppliers to balance demand. Thanks to easing market conditions, the EIA now expects the average cost...

  15. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    in position may enable OPEC to reap a higher price than might be indicated based on fundamentals alone. Of course, ultimately, these positions will be liquidated; it is just a...

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    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Oils, It Now Only Holds a Premium Over the OPEC Basket In short, tightening global fundamentals have already propelled oil prices relatively close to year-ago levels, with the...

  17. X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    resolution 1447, renewing the "oil-for-food" deal with Iraq for the thirteenth 180-day phase of the program, and OPEC announced new pro- duction levels, the most significant issue...

  18. Who Are the Major Players Supplying the World Oil Market?

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2013-01-01

    Energy in Brief article on the world supply of oil through ownership of national oil companies and, for some governments, their membership in the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC).

  19. Filling the Strategic Petroleum Reserve | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Established in 1975 in the aftermath of the OPEC oil embargo, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve was originally intended to hold at least 750 million barrels of crude oil as an ...

  20. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    20. An OPEC agreement to reduce production quotas by 1 million barrels per day helped prop-up crude oil prices. As of Friday, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate was...

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    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20. An OPEC agreement to reduce production quotas by 1 million barrels per day helped prop-up crude oil prices. As of Friday, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate was...

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    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    week even more interesting is that OPEC oil ministers are currently gathering in Osaka, Japan to discuss whether to increase production quotas for the first time in nearly two...

  3. Clean Development Mechanism | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fri, 19 Jun 2015 00:00:00 +0000 10086: Hydropower station Murdhari 1&2 (Hydroelectric Power Station Murdhari in Albania)

    Period for requesting review ...

  4. high

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Highlights International Oil Markets Prices. We have raised our world oil price projection by about $2 per barrel for this month because of assumed greater compliance by OPEC to targeted cuts, especially for the second quarter of 2000 (Figure 1). The expected decline in world petroleum inventories continues (Figure 2), and, given the generally stiff resolve of OPEC members to maintain production cuts, any sign of a turnaround in stocks may be postponed until later this year than previously

  5. upd1297.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December 1997 (Released December 8, 1997) Energy Information Administration Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook -- December 1997 Overview Prices Crude Oil. Higher OPEC oil production quotas, agreed to over the Thanksgiving weekend, along with the lessened uncertainty that Iraq's oil-for-food deal with the United Nations will be significantly interrupted have resulted in expected crude oil prices somewhat lower than those projected last month. OPEC agreed to raise their

  6. No Slide Title

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Summer Transportation Fuels Outlook U.S. Energy Information Administration April 6, 2010 Source: Short-Term Energy Outlook, April 2010 1) Stronger economic recovery in emerging economies 2) High inventories 3) Slowing growth in non-OPEC production 4) Higher OPEC surplus crude oil production capacity Together these factors contribute to relatively stable but rising prices for crude oil and petroleum products. Key factors driving the Short-Term Outlook Source: Short-Term Energy Outlook, April 2010

  7. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3b : Non-OPEC Petroleum and Other Liquids Supply (Million Barrels per Day) Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player - = no data available OPEC = Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries: Algeria, Angola, Ecuador, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Venezuela. Notes: The approximate

  8. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c : OPEC Crude Oil (excluding condensates) Supply (Million Barrels per Day) Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player a Includes lease condensate, natural gas plant liquids, other liquids, and refinery prodessing gain. Includes other unaccounted-for liquids. - = no data available Only regional projections are available for OPEC production,

  9. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 1 December 2006 Short-Term Energy Outlook December 12, 2006 Release (Next Update: January 9, 2007) Highlights Production cuts by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) that began in November, combined with the recent erosion in surplus U.S. product inventories and the expected increase in petroleum demand during the winter heating season drove spot prices for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot prices above $60 per barrel in the last week of November. OPEC oil

  10. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 1 January 2008 Short-Term Energy Outlook January 8, 2008 Release Highlights This edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) includes forecasts through 2009. Global oil markets will likely remain tight through 2008, then ease moderately in 2009. EIA projects that world oil demand will continue to grow faster than oil supply outside of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) in 2008, leaving OPEC and inventories to offset the upward pressure on prices. In 2009, higher

  11. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 1 November 2007 Short-Term Energy Outlook November 6, 2007 Release Highlights Global oil markets will likely remain stretched, as world oil demand has continued to grow much faster than oil supply outside of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), putting pressure on OPEC and inventories to bridge the gap. Additional fundamental factors contributing to price volatility include ongoing geopolitical risks, OECD inventory tightness, and worldwide refining bottlenecks. As a

  12. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 1 ` September 2007 Short-Term Energy Outlook September 11, 2007 Release Highlights * Oil market fundamentals will likely remain tight reflecting continued production restraint by members of OPEC, rising consumption, moderate growth in non- OPEC supply, and falling inventories. Barring a slowdown in oil demand growth, continued high demand and low surplus capacity leave the market vulnerable to unexpected supply disruptions through 2008. * The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil

  13. Secretary Chu Announces Winning Startup Companies for "America...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - like those used by wounded veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan - to military vehicle components, biomedical implants, aerospace fasteners and chemical plant valves. ...

  14. Joint Statement by President Barack Obama of the United States...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... In particular, they reiterated their shared commitment to helping the Afghan government prevent Afghanistan from again becoming a base for terrorism and they restated U.S. and ...

  15. File:NREL-afg-10km-tilt.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    tilt.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Afghanistan - Annual Flat Plate Tilted at Latitude Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full resolution...

  16. Microsoft Word - TOC Section I Conformed thru Mod 274.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nicaragua, or Singapore); (3) A least developed country (Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African...

  17. Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - like those used by wounded veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan - to military vehicle components, biomedical implants, aerospace fasteners and chemical plant valves....

  18. International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Centre for International Mountain Development (ICIMOD) Resource Type Training materials, Lessons learnedbest practices Website http:www.icimod.org Country Afghanistan,...

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - 1_Cruz_Import Export_NMMSS 2013 Presentation...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    to restricted destinations - a specific license may be required: Afghanistan Andorra Angola Burma Djibouti India Israel Libya Pakistan South Sudan 12 Nameaddress of...

  20. NREL's Newest PE-Licensed Engineers Commit to Sustainability...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the world, from Alaska to Afghanistan, helping soldiers, airmen, and indigenous peoples save energy while saving taxpayer dollars. Nationwide, about 20% of engineers earn their...

    1. 2012 DOE Sustainability Awards | Department of Energy

      Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

      needs in Iraq and Afghanistan, commercial vendors, and the DOE International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor for a planned research project. Total return on investment...

    2. File:NREL-afg-10km-dir.pdf | Open Energy Information

      Open Energy Info (EERE)

      search File File history File usage Afghanistan - Annual Direct Normal Solar Radiation Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full resolution (1,650 1,275 pixels,...

    3. File:NREL-afg-10km-glo.pdf | Open Energy Information

      Open Energy Info (EERE)

      search File File history File usage Afghanistan - Annual Global Horizontal Solar Radiation Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full resolution (1,650 1,275 pixels,...

    4. TABLE22.CHP:Corel VENTURA

      Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

      2. PAD District I-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ................................... 6,171 845 0 115 625 0 0 824 0 0 Algeria ....................................... 0 845 0 115 0 0 0 824 0 0 Saudi Arabia .............................. 6,171 0 0 0 625 0 0 0 0 0 Other OPEC .................................. 13,975 0 280 588 1,644 776 715 2,024 3 0 Nigeria ....................................... 8,825 0 0 0 0 0 0 166 0 0 Venezuela

    5. TABLE23.CHP:Corel VENTURA

      Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

      3. PAD District II-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ................................... 6,219 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ....................................... 1,253 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia ............................. 4,966 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Other OPEC .................................. 4,136 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Nigeria ...................................... 540 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela ................................. 3,596 0 0

    6. TABLE24.CHP:Corel VENTURA

      Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

      4. PAD District III-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ................................... 38,701 294 2,258 0 0 0 0 443 0 0 Algeria ....................................... 0 294 1,174 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ........................................ 5,270 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia .............................. 33,431 0 1,084 0 0 0 0 443 0 0 Other OPEC .................................. 41,555 0 1,652 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Nigeria

    7. TABLE25A.CHP:Corel VENTURA

      Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

      PAD District V PAD District IV January 1998 Non OPEC .................................... 3,980 424 0 0 13 0 140 0 0 0 Canada ..................................... 3,980 424 0 0 13 0 140 0 0 0 Total .............................................. 3,980 424 0 0 13 0 140 0 0 0 Arab OPEC .................................. 2,409 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iraq ........................................... 1,110 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ....................................... 1,299 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia

    8. Word Pro - S11

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      International Petroleum Figure 11.1a World Crude Oil Production Overview (Million Barrels per Day) World Production, 1973-2014 World Production, Monthly Selected Producers, 1973-2014 Selected Producers, Monthly 164 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review February 2016 United States 2013 2014 2015 2013 2014 2015 Non-OPEC J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 20 40 60 80 100 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 20 40 60 80 Non-OPEC

    9. Word Pro - S11

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      a World Crude Oil Production Overview (Million Barrels per Day) World Production, 1973-2014 World Production, Monthly Selected Producers, 1973-2014 Selected Producers, Monthly 164 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review February 2016 United States 2013 2014 2015 2013 2014 2015 Non-OPEC J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 20 40 60 80 100 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 20 40 60 80 Non-OPEC World 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005

    10. Word Pro - S3

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      6 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review February 2016 Table 3.3c Petroleum Trade: Imports From OPEC Countries (Thousand Barrels per Day) Algeria a Angola b Ecuador c Iraq Kuwait d Libya e Nigeria f Saudi Arabia d Vene- zuela Other g Total OPEC 1960 Average ...................... a ( ) b ( ) c ( ) 22 182 e ( ) f ( ) 84 911 34 1,233 1965 Average ...................... a ( ) b ( ) c ( ) 16 74 42 f ( ) 158 994 155 1,439 1970 Average ...................... 8 b ( ) c ( ) - 48

    11. Word Pro - S3

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      7 Table 3.3d Petroleum Trade: Imports From Non-OPEC Countries (Thousand Barrels per Day) Brazil Canada Colombia Mexico Nether- lands Norway Russia a United Kingdom U.S. Virgin Islands Other Total Non-OPEC 1960 Average ...................... 1 120 42 16 NA NA - (s) NA NA 581 1965 Average ...................... - 323 51 48 1 - - (s) - 606 1,029 1970 Average ...................... 2 766 46 42 39 - 3 11 189 1,027 2,126 1975 Average ...................... 5 846 9 71 19 17 14 14 406 1,052 2,454 1980

    12. Word Pro - S9

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      4 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review February 2016 Table 9.2 F.O.B. Costs of Crude Oil Imports From Selected Countries (Dollars a per Barrel) Selected Countries Persian Gulf Nations b Total OPEC c Total Non-OPEC c Angola Colombia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela 1973 Average d ................. W W - 7.81 3.25 - 5.39 3.68 5.43 4.80 1975 Average .................. 10.97 - 11.44 11.82 10.87 - 11.04 10.88 11.34 10.62 1980 Average ..................

    13. highlights.html

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      998 Highlights Oil Prices/Supply The recent production cuts announced by OPEC and other producers have stabilized prices in the $12 to $13 per barrel range, but the market is a long way from achieving the $17 "target price" being talked about in OPEC circles. Prior to the recent cuts, oil prices had been near $11.50 to $ 12 per barrel. Unless prices rebound by October, the upcoming winter heating season may not be sufficient to increase prices given the current stock overhang. Our

    14. highlightsx.PDF

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      6, 1999 Highlights World Oil Markets/Prices Prices. World oil prices for the remainder of 1999 and all of 2000 are now forecasted to be $2-$3 per barrel higher than they were in last month's forecast (Figure 1). This reflects a change in our assumptions concerning OPEC crude oil production. Previously, we had expected compliance with OPEC agreed cuts to peak in May or June 1999, before falling as higher prices triggered more production. Although we still expect this to occur, we have delayed the

    15. Fact #664: February 28, 2011 2010 U.S. Petroleum Imports by Country |

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Department of Energy 4: February 28, 2011 2010 U.S. Petroleum Imports by Country Fact #664: February 28, 2011 2010 U.S. Petroleum Imports by Country The U.S. imported almost 12 million barrels per day in 2010, according to data for the first ten months of the year. Canada, Mexico and other non-OPEC countries are the top three places from which the U.S. imported petroleum. Saudi Arabia, Nigeria, and Venezuela - which are all OPEC nations - each provided the U.S. with about one million barrels

    16. Microsoft Word - Highlights Bullets Final.doc

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      4 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2004 Oil Market Developments (Figures 1 to 5) U.S. spot prices for crude oil (West Texas Intermediate (WTI)), while currently down from the highs above $40 per barrel seen in early June, continue to fluctuate in the upper $30's despite general improvement in crude oil inventories and increases in output by key OPEC producers, including Saudi Arabia. OPEC (excluding Iraq) crude oil production in June was 27.1 million barrels per day, 800,000 barrels per day

    17. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      6 1 May 2006 Short-Term Energy Outlook May 9, 2006 Release Overview Crude oil prices surged in April and have now almost doubled over the last 2 years. While rising crude oil prices have slowed world petroleum demand growth, world consumption nevertheless rose by 3.8 million barrels per day (bbl/d) over this period. In 2004 production in both Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and non-OPEC countries increased to meet growing demand. In 2005 all of the increase in world

    18. Microsoft Word - Highlightsfinal.doc

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      8 1 February 2008 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 12, 2008 Release Highlights The outlook over the next 2 years points to an easing of the oil market balance in 2008. Higher production outside of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and planned additions to OPEC capacity should more than offset expected moderate world oil demand growth and relieve some of the tightness in the market. Surplus production capacity is projected to grow from its current level of less than 2

    19. Studying Unexplained Veteran Illnesses at the APS

      ScienceCinema (OSTI)

      Schmidt, Millicent

      2014-06-04

      Researchers from Stony Brook University come to Argonne's Advanced Photon Source to study the potential underlying causes for an unusual increased incidence of pulmonary disease in U.S. soldiers returning from military service in the Middle East and Afghanistan.

    20. SRR Staff Send the Holidays to Soldiers Overseas

      Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

      A request for razors from a U.S. Army private serving in Afghanistan transformed into a full-scale holiday gift rescue operation by employees of the Savannah River Site’s liquid waste contractor,...

    1. File:NREL-afg-wind.pdf | Open Energy Information

      Open Energy Info (EERE)

      afg-wind.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Afghanistan 50 m Wind Power (PDF) Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full resolution (1,650 1,275...

    2. A methodology for assessing the market benefits of alternative motor fuels: The Alternative Fuels Trade Model

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Leiby, P.N.

      1993-09-01

      This report describes a modeling methodology for examining the prospective economic benefits of displacing motor gasoline use by alternative fuels. The approach is based on the Alternative Fuels Trade Model (AFTM). AFTM development was undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of a longer term study of alternative fuels issues. The AFTM is intended to assist with evaluating how alternative fuels may be promoted effectively, and what the consequences of substantial alternative fuels use might be. Such an evaluation of policies and consequences of an alternative fuels program is being undertaken by DOE as required by Section 502(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Interest in alternative fuels is based on the prospective economic, environmental and energy security benefits from the substitution of these fuels for conventional transportation fuels. The transportation sector is heavily dependent on oil. Increased oil use implies increased petroleum imports, with much of the increase coming from OPEC countries. Conversely, displacement of gasoline has the potential to reduce US petroleum imports, thereby reducing reliance on OPEC oil and possibly weakening OPEC`s ability to extract monopoly profits. The magnitude of US petroleum import reduction, the attendant fuel price changes, and the resulting US benefits, depend upon the nature of oil-gas substitution and the supply and demand behavior of other world regions. The methodology applies an integrated model of fuel market interactions to characterize these effects.

    3. The oil policies of the Gulf Arab Nations

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Ripple, R.D.; Hagen, R.E.

      1995-03-01

      At its heart, Arab oil policy is inseparable from Arab economic and social policy. This holds whether we are talking about the Arab nations as a group or each separately. The seven Arab nations covered in this report-Bahrain, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates--participate in several organizations focusing on regional cooperation regarding economic development, social programs, and Islamic unity, as well as organizations concerned with oil policies. This report focuses on the oil-related activities of the countries that may reveal the de facto oil policies of the seven Persian Gulf nations. Nevertheless it should be kept in mind that the decision makers participating in the oil policy organizations are also involved with the collaborative efforts of these other organizations. Oil policies of five of the seven Arab nations are expressed within the forums of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC). Only Oman, among the seven, is not a member of either OAPEC or OPEC; Bahrain is a member of OAPEC but not of OPEC. OPEC and OAPEC provide forums for compromise and cooperation among their members. Nevertheless, each member state maintains its own sovereignty and follows its own policies. Each country deviates from the group prescription from time to time, depending upon individual circumstances.

    4. Word Pro - Untitled1

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      5 Table 5.20 Value of Crude Oil Imports From Selected Countries, 1973-2011 (Billion Dollars 1 ) Year Persian Gulf 3 Selected OPEC 2 Countries Selected Non-OPEC 2 Countries Total 5 Kuwait Nigeria Saudi Arabia Venezuela Total OPEC 4 Canada Colombia Mexico Norway United Kingdom Total Non-OPEC 4 1973 1.7 W 1.5 0.9 0.8 5.2 1.9 W - 0.0 0.0 2.4 7.6 1974 4.4 W 3.3 1.9 1.3 11.6 3.3 .0 W - .0 4.1 15.6 1975 5.2 W 3.5 3.2 1.8 14.9 2.8 .0 .3 .1 - 4.1 19.0 1976 8.7 W 5.1 5.8 1.0 22.2 1.8 - .4 .2 W 3.6 25.8

    5. untitled

      Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

      Emirates 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela 1,042 0 0 0 0 0 0 Non OPEC 38,164 55 4,512 0 0 94 94 Angola 950 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Australia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0...

    6. untitled

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      32,182 276 57 993 905 708 1,613 Non OPEC 146,826 378 6,754 20,047 7,776 10,220 17,996 Angola 13,518 0 0 374 0 0 0 Argentina 1,437 0 0 202 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 3,914 0 0 0 Australia...

    7. untitled

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      Emirates 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela 1,098 0 0 0 0 0 0 Non OPEC 36,529 43 2,659 0 0 22 22 Angola 479 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Australia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0...

    8. untitled

      Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

      36,670 267 595 1,098 240 942 1,182 Non OPEC 163,069 81 8,967 13,895 5,736 9,208 14,944 Angola 13,189 0 0 300 0 0 0 Argentina 1,101 0 91 0 0 165 165 Aruba 0 0 0 3,407 0 0 0...

    9. untitled

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela 33,726 267 595 724 0 0 0 Non OPEC 76,663 0 1,458 10,669 0 710 710 Angola 7,241 0 0 300 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 91 0 0 3 3 Aruba 0 0 0 2,659 0 0 0 Australia 0 0 0 0...

    10. untitled

      Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

      0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela 25,725 276 0 993 0 0 0 Non OPEC 59,194 322 2,858 14,288 60 540 600 Angola 5,113 0 0 374 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 0 21 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 1,846 0 0 0 Australia 0 0 0 0...

    11. untitled

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela 10,326 0 0 0 0 0 0 Non OPEC 319,072 328 25,168 627 0 316 316 Angola 12,287 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina 150 0 0 0 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 294 0 0 0 Australia 314 0 0 0...

    12. untitled

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      0 Venezuela 5,359 0 57 0 905 708 1,613 Non OPEC 24,214 0 822 2,623 7,716 8,966 16,682 Angola 6,120 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 0 181 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 882 0 0 0 Australia 0 0 0 0 0...

    13. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela 13,880 0 0 0 0 0 0 Non OPEC 435,408 483 39,774 627 0 877 877 Angola 14,731 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina 150 0 0 0 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 294 0 0 0 Australia 314 0 0 0...

    14. untitled

      Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

      0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela 13,730 0 0 0 0 0 0 Non OPEC 428,008 483 36,692 627 0 877 877 Angola 14,726 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina 150 0 0 0 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 294 0 0 0 Australia 314 0 0 0...

    15. Petroleum Supply Monthly

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      2 December 2015 Table 42. PAD District 2 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, December 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 1,337 - - - - - - - - - Algeria ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Angola

    16. Petroleum Supply Monthly

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      0 December 2015 Table 44. PAD District 4 and 5 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, December 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total PAD District 4 OPEC ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Algeria ................................ - - - - - -

    17. Petroleum Supply Annual

      U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

      8.PDF Table 28. PAD District 2 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 1,552 - - - - - - - - - Algeria ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Angola

    18. Petroleum Supply Annual

      U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

      0.PDF Table 30. PAD District 4 and 5 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total PAD District 4 OPEC ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Algeria ................................ - - - - - - - - - -

    19. untitled

      U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

      PAD District 2 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 12,302 - - - - - - - - - Algeria ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Angola ................................ -

    20. untitled

      U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

      PAD District 4 and 5 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total PAD District 4 OPEC ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Algeria ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Angola

    1. F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Area

      U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

      2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History Average 57.78 74.19 101.66 99.78 96.56 85.65 1973-2014 Persian Gulf 59.53 75.65 106.47 105.45 100.62 94.03 1973-2014 Total OPEC 58.53...

    2. untitled

      Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

      F.O.B. a Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country (Dollars per Barrel) Year Month Selected Countries Persian Gulf b Total OPEC c Non OPEC Angola Colombia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela 1983 ............................. 28.14 - 25.20 29.81 27.53 29.91 21.48 27.70 28.46 27.20 1984 ............................. 27.46 - 26.39 29.51 27.67 28.87 24.23 27.48 27.79 27.45 1985 ............................. 26.30 - 25.33 28.04 22.04 27.64 23.64 23.31 25.67 25.96 1986

    3. untitled

      Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

      Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country (Dollars per Barrel) Year Month Selected Countries Persian Gulf a Total OPEC b Non OPEC Angola Canada Colombia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela 1983 ............................. 29.31 25.63 - 25.78 30.85 29.27 30.87 22.94 29.37 29.84 28.08 1984 ............................. 28.49 26.56 - 26.85 30.36 29.20 29.45 25.19 29.07 29.06 28.14 1985 ............................. 27.39 25.71 - 25.63 28.96 24.72 28.36 24.43 25.50

    4. Word Pro - S11

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      66 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review February 2016 Table 11.1a World Crude Oil Production: OPEC Members (Thousand Barrels per Day) Algeria Angola Ecuador Iran Iraq Kuwait a Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia a United Arab Emirates Vene- zuela Total OPEC b 1973 Average .................... 1,097 162 209 5,861 2,018 3,020 2,175 2,054 570 7,596 1,533 3,366 29,661 1975 Average .................... 983 165 161 5,350 2,262 2,084 1,480 1,783 438 7,075 1,664 2,346 25,790 1980

    5. Word Pro - S9

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      5 Table 9.3 Landed Costs of Crude Oil Imports From Selected Countries (Dollars a per Barrel) Selected Countries Persian Gulf Nations b Total OPEC c Total Non-OPEC c Angola Canada Colombia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela 1973 Average d ............... W 5.33 W - 9.08 5.37 - 5.99 5.91 6.85 5.64 1975 Average ................ 11.81 12.84 - 12.61 12.70 12.50 - 12.36 12.64 12.70 12.70 1980 Average ................ 34.76 30.11 W 31.77 37.15 29.80 35.68 25.92 30.59 33.56 33.99 1985

    6. East Coast (PADD 1) Distillate Fuel Oil Imports

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History All Countries 104 104 76 92 133 130 1981-2015 Persian Gulf 1995-2015 OPEC* 10 1993-2015 Algeria 1994-2010 Angola 1995-2003 Kuwait 1995-2012 Libya 2013-2013 Nigeria 10 1993-2015 Qatar 1995-2015 Saudi Arabia 1995-2015 United Arab Emirates 1995-2014 Venezuela 1993-2014 Non OPEC* 104 104 76 92 133 120 1993-2015 Argentina 1995-2015 Aruba 2005-2012 Bahamas 1994-2014 Bahrain 1995-2007 Belarus 2006-2009 Belgium 1995-2015 Brazil 1994-2014 Cameroon

    7. International energy indicators

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Bauer, E.K.

      1980-09-01

      Data are compiled and graphs are presented for Iran: Crude Oil Capacity, Production and Shut-in, 1974-1980; Saudi Arabia: Crude Oil Capacity, Production and Shut-in, 1974-1980; OPEC (Ex-Iran and Saudi Arabia): Capacity, Production and Shut-in, 1974-1980; Non-OPEC Free World and US Production of Crude Oil, 1973-1980; Oil Stocks: Free World, US, Japan and Europe (landed), 1973-1980; Petroleum Consumption by Industrial Countries, 1973-1980; USSR Crude Oil Production, 1974-1980; Free World and US Nuclear Generation Capacity, 1973-1980; US Imports of Crude Oil and Products, 1973-1980; Landed Cost of Saudi Crude in Current and 1974 Dollars; US Trade in Bituminous Coal, 1973-1980; Summary of US Merchandise Trade, 1976-1980; and Energy/GNP Ratio.

    8. TABLE29.CHP:Corel VENTURA

      Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

      9. Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country, (Thousand Barrels per Day) January 1998 Arab OPEC .................................. 1,726 37 20 0 (s) 41 -3 (s) 296 391 2,116 Algeria ...................................... 0 37 0 0 0 27 0 0 252 316 316 Iraq ........................................... 36 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 36 Kuwait ....................................... 252 0 0 0 0 0 0 (s) (s) (s) 252 Qatar ........................................ 0 0 0 0 0 0

    9. A global perspective on energy markets and economic integration.

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Baker, Arnold Barry

      2006-04-01

      What will be the effect of Iraqi domestic instability on Iraqi oil production Negotiations for Iranian nuclear technology on Iranian oil supplies Saudi commitment to expanded oil production President Putin's policies on Russian oil and natural gas supplies President Chavez's policies on Venezuelan oil supplies Instability in Nigeria Higher oil prices on world economic growth Effect of economic growth on oil demand in China, India, U.S., etc. Higher oil prices on non-OPEC oil supplies

    10. STEONOV2000Rev1

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      November 2000 Overview Oil prices are defying gravity, remaining well above $30.00 per barrel ($33.10 for WTI in October and similar levels for the first week of November). This situation persists despite estimates of significant world production above demand requirements and despite another round of announced OPEC increases. Israeli/Palestinian tensions notwithstanding, we do not see how prices can remain detached from the corrective forces of the world market if production is as high as is

    11. Short Term Energy Outlook ,October 2002

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      October 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook October 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: Continued high oil prices are the result of declining OECD commercial oil inventories, worries over a potential clash with Iraq, and OPEC's decision to leave production quotas unchanged at its September meeting. Solid growth in world oil demand this winter (and for 2003 as a whole) is likely to tighten world oil markets and reduce commercial oil inventories. The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price

    12. Short Term Energy Outlook, February 2003

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. World oil markets will likely remain tight through most of 2003, as petroleum inventories and global spare production capacity continue to dwindle amid blasts of cold weather and constrained output from Venezuela. OPEC efforts to increase output to make up for lower Venezuela output has reduced global spare production capacity to only 2 million barrels per day, leaving little room to make up for unexpected supply or demand

    13. Highlights.doc

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: Average crude oil prices moved up strongly in March, rising nearly $4 from the average February level to $24.50 per barrel for West Texas Intermediate (WTI). A stronger sentiment on the side of OPEC production discipline, a growing sense by the market that economic growth may accelerate more rapidly than previously thought, and continued uncertainty surrounding tensions in the Middle East have elevated near-term prices above

    14. Highlights.doc

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      September 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: The waxing and waning intensities of concern surrounding potential military action against Iraq and uncertainty over OPEC production policy leading up to their September 19 meeting have contributed to WTI spot crude oil prices bouncing between $26 and $30 per barrel since early August. The average spot WTI price in August was $28.40 per barrel. Developments suggesting an easing of tensions could temporarily

    15. Presentation title: This can be up to 2 lines

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      Developments in Energy Benchmarks EIA 2013 Workshop on Financial & Physical Oil Market Linkage September 23, 2013 | Washington, D.C. By Lynn D. Westfall Director, Energy Markets and Financial Analysis Presentation Outline * History of Oil Pricing * Review of Current Oil Price Benchmarks * Future Challenges 2013 Workshop on Financial & Physical Oil Market Linkage September 23, 2013 2 History of Oil Pricing 3 7 Sisters- Posted Prices Rise of OPEC- OSP 1950's 60's 70's 80's 90's Present

    16. untitled

      Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

      949 6,731 1,029 508 1,537 Non OPEC 926,975 3,672 21,367 123,756 710 10,270 10,980 Angola 79,399 10 1,979 1,426 0 0 0 Argentina 2,486 1 2,703 167 0 248 248 Aruba 0 0 0 23,145 0...

    17. untitled

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      8,039 6,921 14,960 Non OPEC 1,932,132 4,376 78,202 165,474 79,551 123,093 202,644 Angola 164,183 10 1,979 1,526 0 0 0 Argentina 20,608 1 2,831 788 0 2,955 2,955 Aruba 0 0 0...

    18. untitled

      Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

      Venezuela 1,902 0 0 374 240 942 1,182 Non OPEC 19,630 0 2,479 1,958 5,736 8,371 14,107 Angola 4,219 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 0 0 0 162 162 Aruba 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Australia 0 0 0 0 0...

    19. untitled

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      0 57 0 5,851 5,134 10,985 Non OPEC 197,938 0 10,786 17,578 59,937 74,447 134,384 Angola 35,359 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 128 553 0 2,213 2,213 Aruba 0 0 0 1,163 0 0 0...

    20. untitled

      Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

      4,528 5,851 5,134 10,985 Non OPEC 1,444,745 3,761 54,586 121,039 60,051 87,331 147,382 Angola 116,243 6 347 1,126 0 0 0 Argentina 16,136 1 2,740 574 0 2,213 2,213 Aruba 0 0 0...

    1. untitled

      Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

      0 175 374 7,010 6,413 13,423 Non OPEC 258,924 0 16,230 23,572 78,841 103,992 182,833 Angola 53,254 0 0 100 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 128 621 0 2,707 2,707 Aruba 0 0 0 1,163 0 0 0...

    2. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

      Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

      4,395 949 6,731 1,029 744 1,773 Non OPEC 928,991 3,672 19,941 130,776 874 9,600 10,474 Angola 81,615 10 1,979 1,923 0 0 0 Argentina 2,486 1 2,703 167 0 646 646 Aruba 0 0 0 23,145 0...

    3. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      0 175 374 7,010 6,188 13,198 Non OPEC 259,980 0 17,385 23,792 78,059 104,593 182,652 Angola 53,254 0 0 100 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 128 621 0 2,707 2,707 Aruba 0 0 0 1,163 0 0 0...

    4. untitled

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      297,683 3,346 243 4,528 0 0 0 Non OPEC 696,402 3,302 16,063 89,085 114 5,161 5,275 Angola 55,477 6 347 1,126 0 0 0 Argentina 2,486 1 2,612 21 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 16,193 0 0 0...

    5. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      8,039 6,932 14,971 Non OPEC 1,938,257 4,376 81,256 172,714 78,933 123,273 202,206 Angola 166,404 10 1,979 2,023 0 0 0 Argentina 20,608 1 2,831 788 0 3,353 3,353 Aruba 0 0 0...

    6. jan02

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      (Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook -- January 2002) 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2002 Overview World Oil Markets. OPEC's decision to go forward with an additional oil production quota cut of 1.5 million barrels per day beginning January 1 revealed the Cartel's preference for price support over market share maintenance in the face of weak near-term world oil demand conditions. The strategy, ostensibly to be reviewed at the next ministerial meeting in March, may

    7. No Slide Title

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      Fuels Outlook Guy Caruso Administrator Energy Information Administration EIA 2008 Energy Conference 30 Years of Energy Information and Analysis April 8, 2008 Washington, DC EIA, Short-Term Energy Outlook, April 2008 1) Rising world oil consumption 2) Low global surplus oil production capacity 3) Insufficient non-OPEC oil supply growth relative to demand 4) Supply concerns in international oil markets Together these factors contribute to high prices for petroleum products. Key Factors Driving the

    8. No Slide Title

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      Summer Transportation Fuels Outlook Howard Gruenspecht Acting Administrator Energy Information Administration 2009 Summer Energy Outlook Conference April 14, 2009 Washington, DC EIA, Short-Term Energy Outlook, April 2009 1) Global economic slowdown and falling world oil consumption 2) High inventories, and 3) Rising global surplus oil production capacity Together these factors contribute to lower prices for crude oil and petroleum products. Recent OPEC production cuts stopped the price decline

    9. Petroleum Supply Monthly

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      50 December 2015 Table 39. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country of Origin, December 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 95,282 - - 3,175 - 83 83 - 1,278 1,278 Algeria ................................ - - -

    10. Petroleum Supply Monthly

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      58 December 2015 Table 41. PAD District 1 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, December 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 8,215 - - - - 83 83 - 1,278 1,278 Algeria ................................ - - - - - - - - -

    11. Petroleum Supply Monthly

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      6 December 2015 Table 43. PAD District 3 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, December 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 66,463 - - 3,175 - - - - - - Algeria ................................ - - - 2,282 - - - - - -

    12. Petroleum Supply Monthly

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      4 December 2015 Table 45. PAD District 1 - Year-to-Date Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, January-December 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 63,102 - - 3,602 - 1,051 1,051 280 15,140 15,420 Algeria

    13. Petroleum Supply Monthly

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      8 December 2015 Table 46. PAD District 2 - Year-to-Date Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, January-December 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 12,557 - - 380 - - - - - - Algeria ................................ - - -

    14. Petroleum Supply Monthly

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      2 December 2015 Table 47. PAD District 3 - Year-to-Date Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, January-December 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 665,547 789 - 35,259 - - - - 421 421 Algeria

    15. Petroleum Supply Monthly

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      6 December 2015 Table 48. PAD District 4 and 5 - Year-to-Date Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, January-December 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total PAD District 4 OPEC ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Algeria

    16. Petroleum Supply Monthly

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      0 December 2015 Table 53. Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country, December 2015 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 3,074 - -33 71 - -42 -42 - 17 17 Algeria ................................ - - - 74 - -10

    17. Petroleum Supply Monthly

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      4 December 2015 Table 54. Year-to-Date Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country, January-December 2015 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 2,679 2 -34 81 - -39 -39 1 35 36 Algeria

    18. Presentation title: This can be up to 2 lines

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      April 12, 2011 2011 Summer Transportation Fuels Outlook Key factors driving the short-term outlook 2 2011 Summer Transportation Fuels Outlook * Disruption of crude oil and liquefied natural gas supply from Libya and uncertainty over security of supply from other countries in the Middle East and North Africa region * Strong growth in world consumption, driven by growth in emerging economies * Slow growth in non-OPEC production * Reliance on drawdown of inventories and increasing oil production

    19. Presentation title: This can be up to 2 lines

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      8, 2014 2014 Summer Fuels Outlook Key factors driving the short-term outlook * World liquid fuels consumption growth driven by emerging economies, with continuing consumption declines in OECD countries. * Non-OPEC supply growth, particularly in North America, expected to keep pace with world liquid fuels consumption growth and contribute to modest declines in world crude oil prices. * Brent crude oil prices fall gradually over the forecast, averaging, from $109 per barrel in 2013 to $105 per

    20. Petroleum Supply Annual

      U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

      6.PDF Table 26. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country of Origin, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 99,127 - - 2,384 - - - - 1,652 1,652 Algeria ................................ - - - 2,119 - - - - -

    1. Petroleum Supply Annual

      U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

      7.PDF Table 27. PAD District 1 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 5,672 - - - - - - - 1,652 1,652 Algeria ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Angola

    2. Petroleum Supply Annual

      U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

      9.PDF Table 29. PAD District 3 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 69,917 - - 2,005 - - - - - - Algeria ................................ - - - 1,740 - - - - - - Angola

    3. Petroleum Supply Annual

      U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

      3.PDF Table 33. Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 3,198 0 -27 60 - -36 -36 0 52 52 Algeria ................................ - - - 68 - - - - - - Angola

    4. untitled

      U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

      Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country of Origin, 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 1,096,816 418 13 40,869 - 536 536 80 20,430 20,510 Algeria ................................ 2,091 - 13 34,898 - 3 3 14 112

    5. untitled

      U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

      PAD District 1 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 82,359 - 13 3,730 - 536 536 80 20,053 20,133 Algeria ................................ 2,091 - 13 1,951 - 3 3 14 112 126 Angola

    6. untitled

      U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

      PAD District 3 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 747,650 418 - 29,849 - - - - 377 377 Algeria ................................ - - - 25,860 - - - - - - Angola

    7. untitled

      U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

      Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country, 2014 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 3,005 1 -17 78 - -48 -48 0 50 50 Algeria ................................ 6 - 0 96 - 0 0 0 0 0 Angola

    8. Fact #578: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption,

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      2007 | Department of Energy 8: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2007 Fact #578: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2007 The United States was responsible for 8% of the world's petroleum production, held 2% of the world's crude oil reserves, and consumed 24% of the world's petroleum consumption in 2007. The Organization for Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) held 69% of the world's crude oil reserves and produced 41% of world

    9. Microsoft Word - Highlights Bullets.doc

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      August 2004 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook August 2004 Outlook Summary (Figures 1 to 4) Higher OPEC oil output during the second quarter has so far failed to dampen upward price pressure as West Texas Intermediate (WTI) prices reached the mid $40's per barrel level in early August. With rising consumption and little global surplus production capacity, near-term prices remain volatile and sensitive to news relating to possible reductions in oil production. Some reduction in prices is likely if

    10. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      March 2007 1 March 2007 Short-Term Energy Outlook March 6, 2007 Release (Next Update: April 10, 2007) Highlights * World oil markets tightened in recent weeks in response to production cuts by members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and the return of cold winter weather in North America. February's cold weather and higher demand for heating fuels reduced petroleum inventories (both crude and product) more than expected and raised spot prices for crude oil and natural

    11. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2013_summer_fuels.pptx

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      S F l O tl k 2013 Summer Fuels Outlook April 9, 2013 www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis Key factors driving the short-term outlook * World liquid fuels consumption growth driven by emerging economies, with continuing consumption declines in OECD economies, with continuing consumption declines in OECD countries. * Non-OPEC supply growth, particularly in North America, pp y g , p y , expected to keep pace with world liquid fuels consumption

    12. Winners and losers from cheaper oil

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Boyer, E.

      1984-11-26

      Oil prices are slipping despite OPEC's efforts to prop them up by cutting production. Abundant oil and slack demand will press prices into a substantial drop. That portends more growth, less inflation, and good news for industries, especially the airline and automobile industries. Banks and some oil companies could be hurt, but chemical and steel companies will benefit. Concerns that the country will drop conservation efforts overlook the efficiency improvements already embedded in new machinery and automobiles and the insulation installed in buildings.

    13. The Next Regulatory Chapter for Commercial Vehicles | Department of Energy

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Regulatory Chapter for Commercial Vehicles The Next Regulatory Chapter for Commercial Vehicles R&D partnerships and regulations worked together to establish near zero emissions standards and fuel economy/greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) standards for commercial vehicles PDF icon deer11_mormino.pdf More Documents & Publications Intra-catalyst Reductant Chemistry in Lean NOx Traps: A Study on Sulfur Effects Fact #836: September 1, 2014 Non-OPEC Countries Supply Nearly Two-thirds of U.S.

    14. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      5. World other liquids by fuel type, 2010-40 million barrels per day Source 2010 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Average annual percent change 2010-40 OPEC NGPL 3.27 3.97 4.25 4.51 4.89 5.43 1.7 Biofuelsa 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 -- Coal-to-liquids 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 -- Gas-to-liquids 0.01 0.27 0.30 0.35 0.40 0.42 14.1 Kerogen 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 -- Refinery gain 0.04 0.04 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.9 Total OPEC 3.32 4.28 4.60 4.91 5.33 5.91 1.9 Non-OPEC NGPL 5.13 5.92 6.40 6.69

    15. World Oil Prices and Production Trends in AEO2008 (released in AEO2008)

      Reports and Publications (EIA)

      2008-01-01

      Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO) defines the world oil price as the price of light, low-sulfur crude oil delivered in Cushing, Oklahoma. Since 2003, both "above ground" and "below ground" factors have contributed to a sustained rise in nominal world oil prices, from $31 per barrel in 2003 to $69 per barrel in 2007. The AEO2008 reference case outlook for world oil prices is higher than in the AEO2007 reference case. The main reasons for the adoption of a higher reference case price outlook include continued significant expansion of world demand for liquids, particularly in non-OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries, which include China and India; the rising costs of conventional non-OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) supply and unconventional liquids production; limited growth in non-OPEC supplies despite higher oil prices; and the inability or unwillingness of OPEC member countries to increase conventional crude oil production to levels that would be required for maintaining price stability. The Energy Information Administration will continue to monitor world oil price trends and may need to make further adjustments in future AEOs.

    16. Geek-Up[09.17.2010]-- Water Blades, Biomass Conversion and Antineutrino Detection

      Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

      Scientists have engineered a blade of water that’s strong enough and fast enough to penetrate through steel, which will help soldiers in Afghanistan disable deadly IEDs, plus researchers are currently testing an aboveground water-based antineutrino detector that will improve monitoring capabilities at nuclear facilities.

    17. Experts Offer Marines Energy-Efficiency Advice

      Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

      As an early adopter of cutting-edge technologies, the United States military is pioneering energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies in the field. Recently, the Commandant of the United States Marine Corps sent a team to visit bases and camps in Afghanistan to assess and make recommendations on the supply and use of energy and water.

    18. The social costs to the US of monopolization of the world oil market, 1972--1991

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Greene, D.L.; Leiby, P.N.

      1993-03-01

      The partial monopolization of the world oil market by the OPEC cartel has produced significant economic costs to the economies of the world. This paper reports estimates of the costs of monopolization of oil to the US over the period 1972--1991. Two fundamental assumptions of the analysis are, (1) that OPEC has acted as a monopoly, albeit with limited control, knowledge, and ability to act and, (2) that the US and other consuming nations could, through collective (social) action affect the cartel`s ability to act as a monopoly. We measure total costs by comparing actual costs for the 1972--1991 period to a hypothetical ``more competitive`` world oil market scenario. By measuring past costs we avoid the enormous uncertainties about the future course of the world oil market and leave to the reader`s judgment the issue of how much the future will be like the past. We note that total cost numbers cannot be used to determine the value of reducing US oil use by one barrel. They are useful for describing the overall size of the petroleum problem and are one important factor in deciding how much effort should be devoted to solving it. Monopoly pricing of oil transfers wealth from US oil consumers to foreign oil producers and, by increasing theeconomic scarcity of oil, reduces the economy`s potential to produce. The actions of the OPEC cartel have also produced oil price shocks, both upward and downward, that generate additional costs because of the economy`s inherent inability to adjust quickly to a large change in energy prices. Estimated total costs to the United States from these three sources for the 1972--1991 period are put at $4.1 trillion in 1990$($1.2 T wealth transfer, $0.8 T macroeconomic adjustment costs, $2.1 T potential GNP losses). The cost of the US`s primary oil supply contingency program is small ($10 B) by comparison.

    19. The social costs to the US of monopolization of the world oil market, 1972--1991

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Greene, D.L.; Leiby, P.N.

      1993-03-01

      The partial monopolization of the world oil market by the OPEC cartel has produced significant economic costs to the economies of the world. This paper reports estimates of the costs of monopolization of oil to the US over the period 1972--1991. Two fundamental assumptions of the analysis are, (1) that OPEC has acted as a monopoly, albeit with limited control, knowledge, and ability to act and, (2) that the US and other consuming nations could, through collective (social) action affect the cartel's ability to act as a monopoly. We measure total costs by comparing actual costs for the 1972--1991 period to a hypothetical more competitive'' world oil market scenario. By measuring past costs we avoid the enormous uncertainties about the future course of the world oil market and leave to the reader's judgment the issue of how much the future will be like the past. We note that total cost numbers cannot be used to determine the value of reducing US oil use by one barrel. They are useful for describing the overall size of the petroleum problem and are one important factor in deciding how much effort should be devoted to solving it. Monopoly pricing of oil transfers wealth from US oil consumers to foreign oil producers and, by increasing theeconomic scarcity of oil, reduces the economy's potential to produce. The actions of the OPEC cartel have also produced oil price shocks, both upward and downward, that generate additional costs because of the economy's inherent inability to adjust quickly to a large change in energy prices. Estimated total costs to the United States from these three sources for the 1972--1991 period are put at $4.1 trillion in 1990$($1.2 T wealth transfer, $0.8 T macroeconomic adjustment costs, $2.1 T potential GNP losses). The cost of the US's primary oil supply contingency program is small ($10 B) by comparison.

    20. Global production through 2005

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Foreman, N.E.

      1996-12-01

      Two companion studies released recently should provide great food for thought among geo-political strategists and various national governments. If predictions contained in these Petroconsultants studies of oil and gas production trends for the next 10 years are realized, there will be great repercussions for net exporters and importers, alike. After analyzing and predicting trends within each of the world`s significant producing nations for the 1996--2005 period, the crude oil and condensate report concludes tat global production will jump nearly 24%. By contrast, worldwide gas output will leap 40%. The cast of characters among producers and exporters that will benefit from these increases varies considerably for each fuel. On the oil side, Russia and the OPEC members, particularly the Persian Gulf nations, will be back in the driver`s seat in terms of affecting export and pricing patterns. On the gas side, the leading producers will be an interesting mix of mostly non-OPEC countries. The reemergence of Persian Gulf oil producers, coupled with an anticipated long-term decline among top non-OPEC producing nations should present a sobering picture to government planners within large net importers, such as the US. They are likely to find themselves in much the same supply trap as was experienced in the 1970s, only this time the dependence on foreign oil supplies will be much worse. Gas supplies will not be similarly constrained, and some substitution for oil is probable. Here, two articles, ``World oil industry is set for transition`` and ``Worldwide gas surges forward in next decade,`` present a summary of the findings detailed in Petroconsultants` recent studies.

    1. Oil prices in a new light

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Fesharaki, F. )

      1994-05-01

      For a clear picture of how oil prices develop, the author steps away from the price levels to which the world is accustomed, and evaluates scientifically. What makes prices jump from one notch to another The move results from a political or economic shock or the perception of a particular position by the futures market and the media. The shock could range from a war or an assassination to a promise of cooperation among OPEC members (when believed by the market) or to speculation about another failure at an OPEC meeting. In the oil market, only a couple of factual figures can provide a floor to the price of oil. The cost of production of oil in the Gulf is around $2 to $3/bbl, and the cost of production of oil (capital and operating costs) in key non-OPEC areas is well under $10/bbl. With some adjustments for transport and quality, a price range of $13/bbl to $16/bbl would correspond to a reasonable sustainable floor price. The reason for prices above the floor price has been a continuous fear of oil supply interruptions. That fear kept prices above the floor price for many years. The fear factor has now almost fully disappeared. The market has gone through the drama of the Iranian Revolution, the Iran-Iraq war, the tanker war, the invasion of Kuwait, and the expulsions of the Iraqis. And still the oil flowed -- all the time. It has become abundantly clear that fears above the oil market were unjustified. Everyone needs to export oil, and oil will flow under the worst circumstances. The demise of the fear factor means that oil prices tend toward the floor price for a prolonged period.

    2. TABLE21.CHP:Corel VENTURA

      Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

      1. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC .................................. 53,500 1,139 2,258 115 625 0 0 1,267 0 0 Algeria ...................................... 0 1,139 1,174 115 0 0 0 824 0 0 Iraq ........................................... 1,110 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ....................................... 7,822 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia ............................. 44,568 0 1,084 0 625 0 0 443 0 0 Other

    3. Short Term Energy Outlook ,November 2002

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      November 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook November 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: During the past 3-4 months, OPEC 10 production has risen more quickly than projected, thus reducing upward pressure on prices. More specifically, while the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price averaged $28.84 in October, about $6.70 per barrel above the year-ago level (Figure 1), the WTI average price for fourth quarter 2002 is now projected to soften to $28.20, which is about $2 per barrel below

    4. Short Term Energy Outlook, December 2002

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      December 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook December 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: Average crude oil prices fell by about $2.50 per barrel between October and November in response to continued high production levels from OPEC 10 countries (Figure 1). However, by the end of November oil prices had risen to end-October levels as concerns over the situations in Iraq and Venezuela pushed prices up. Oil inventories, which are currently in the lower portion of the previous 5-year range, are poised to

    5. Highlights.doc

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      2 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook August 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: Oil prices remained relatively high in July, averaging close to the expectations reported in the July Outlook. The average spot West Texas Intermediate (WTI) price in July was approximately $27 per barrel. As always, a wide range of possibilities exists for oil price movements over the next year and a half. However, given the amount of growth in world demand expected through 2003, we think that likely scenarios for OPEC and

    6. highlight

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      0 Highlights International Oil Markets World Oil Prices - How High Will They Go? Our forecast this month is that the world oil price should remain high for most of the year as inventories are expected to remain low, even with an assumed increase in OPEC production of 1 million barrels per day beginning in April. The average cost per barrel of crude oil imported into the United States and delivered to U.S. refiners (the benchmark price used in this forecast) is expected to increase from $26.65

    7. highlights

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Highlights International Oil Markets International Oil Supply: This forecast assumes that OPEC 10 (Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries excluding Iraq) crude oil production will be 25.2 million barrels per day in the second quarter, 0.9 million barrels per day above first quarter production levels (Figure 1). This is about 0.5 million barrels per day above their production target of 24.69 million barrels per day. The forecast then assumes another 0.1 million barrels per day increase in

    8. highllights

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Summary Based on the results of OPEC's June meeting and the July 3 announcement by Saudi Arabia of its intention to push for an additional 500,000 barrels per day of new output, we conclude that the probability of significant declines in world oil prices by yearend is larger than it was a month ago. We now expect a decline of between $4 and $5 per barrel in average crude oil prices between June and December 2000. Moreover, expected increases in petroleum inventories resulting from the

    9. master.PDF

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      1998 ES1 April 1998 Highlights World Oil Prices: Weak Fundamentals May be Difficult to Counteract Proposals by major producers inside and outside of OPEC to reduce the burgeoning surplus may keep oil prices from sliding to new record lows this year, but, compared to 1997, price levels are still expected to be down throughout 1998, with corresponding impacts on petroleum product prices. U.S. refiner costs for imported oil are now expected to average about $14.70 per barrel this year, compared to

    10. Petroleum Supply Monthly

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      4 December 2015 Table 40. Year-to-Date Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country of Origin, January-December 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 977,729 789 - 44,168 - 1,051 1,051 280 15,561 15,841 Algeria

    11. Fact #632: July 19, 2010 The Costs of Oil Dependence | Department of Energy

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      2: July 19, 2010 The Costs of Oil Dependence Fact #632: July 19, 2010 The Costs of Oil Dependence The United States has long recognized the problem of oil dependence and the economic problems that arise from it. According to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers Greene and Hopson, oil dependence is a combination of four factors: (1) a noncompetitive world oil market strongly influenced by the OPEC cartel, (2) high levels of U.S. imports, (3) the importance of oil to the U.S. economy,

    12. Microsoft Word - Highlights Bullets.doc

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      September 2004 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2004 Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Figures 1 to 5) The average WTI spot price for August 2004 was $44.90 per barrel, about $3 above the average projected for August in last month's Outlook. The baseline WTI price projections have been raised slightly in the near term so that a monthly average price below $40 per barrel is not expected until about midway through 2005. Oil prices remain high even though OPEC is producing at its highest

    13. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      6 1 November 2006 Short-Term Energy Outlook November 7, 2006 Release (Next Update: December 12, 2006) Overview The recent announcement of plans for a 1.2 million barrels per day (bbl/d) cut in oil production by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) has not yet made much of an impact on world oil prices, as the market awaits evidence of substantial compliance. Recent spot prices for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil are the lowest since February 2005. Demand for petroleum

    14. Changing Trends in the Refining Industry (released in AEO2006)

      Reports and Publications (EIA)

      2006-01-01

      There have been some major changes in the U.S. refining industry recently, prompted in part by a significant decline in the quality of imported crude oil and by increasing restrictions on the quality of finished products. As a result, high-quality crudes, such as the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude that serves as a benchmark for oil futures on the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), have been trading at record premiums to the OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) Basket price.

    15. Microsoft PowerPoint - GuyCaruso oilmarketmar2010.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Despite Excess Spare Capacity, Reduced Demand and Increased OPEC Production volumes, High , g Prices Persist.... 8 160 mmb/d US$/barrel 5 6 7 8 100 120 140 160 2 3 4 5 40 60 80 100 0 1 2 0 20 40 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 www.csis.org | 1 Source: IEA OMR September 2009, EIA Prices Surplus Capacity If the Fundamentals are so Bad, What's Driving Oil Prices to Increase? * Questionable Data ? What is really happening in non- OECD/China? Stocks and Line Fill? Cold Weather? *

    16. World frontiers beckon oil finders

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Not Available

      1991-09-01

      This paper discusses the international aspects of the petroleum industry. Most who work in the industry agree that the possibilities for huge are found largely in international regions. Something that is helping fuel that possibility is the way countries are increasingly opening their doors to US oil industry involvement. Listed in this paper is a partial list of the reported projects now underway around the world involving US companies. It is not intended to be comprehensive, but rather an indication of how work continues despite a general lull atmosphere for the oil industry. These include Albania, Bulgaria, Congo, Czechoslovakia, Dominican Republic, Ethiopia, Ireland, Malta, Madagascar, Mongolia, Mozambique, Nigeria, Panama, Paraquay, and Senegal.

    17. Muslim oil and gas periphery; the future of hydrocarbons in Africa, southeast Asia and the Caspian. Master`s thesis

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Crockett, B.D.

      1997-12-01

      This thesis is a study of the contemporary political, economic, and technical developments and future prospects of the Muslim hydrocarbon exporters of Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Caspian. The established Muslim oil and gas periphery of Africa and Southeast Asia has four members in the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and is systemically increasing its production of natural gas. I analyze US government and corporate policies regarding the countries and the major dilemmas of the Muslim hydrocarbon periphery. The first chapter provides a selective overview of global energy source statistics; the policies, disposition and composition of the major hydrocarbon production and consumption players and communities; a selective background of OPEC and its impact on the globe; and a general portrait of how the Muslim periphery piece fits into the overall Muslim oil and gas puzzle. Chapter two analyzes the established Muslim oil and gas periphery of Africa and Southeast Asia asking the following questions: What are the major political, economic, and technical trends and dilemmas affecting these producer nations. And what are the United States` policies and relationships with these producers. Chapter three asks the same questions as chapter two, but with regard to the newly independent states of the Caspian Sea. I probe the regional petroleum exploration and transportation dilemmas in some detail.

    18. Oil and gas developments in central and southern Africa in 1987

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Hartman, J.B.; Walker, T.L.

      1988-10-01

      Significant rightholding changes took place in central and southern Africa during 1987. Angola, Benin, Congo, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Mauritania, Seychelles, Somali Republic, Tanzania, Zaire, and Zambia announced awards or acreage open for bidding. Decreases in exploratory rightholdings occurred in Cameroon, Congo, Cote d'Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Kenya, Namibia, South Africa, and Tanzania. More wells and greater footage were drilled in 1987 than in 1986. Total wells increased by 18% as 254 wells were completed compared to 217 in 1986. Footage drilled during the year increased by 46% as about 1.9 million ft were drilled compared to about 1.3 million ft in 1986. The success rate for exploration wells in 1987 improved slightly to 36% compared to 34% in 1986. Significant discoveries were made in Nigeria, Angola, Congo, and Gabon. Seismic acquisition in 1987 was the major geophysical activity during the year. Total oil production in 1987 was 773 million bbl (about 2.1 million b/d), a decrease of 7%. The decrease is mostly due to a 14% drop in Nigerian production, which comprises 60% of total regional production. The production share of OPEC countries (Nigeria and Gabon) versus non-OPEC countries of 67% remained unchanged from 1986. 24 figs., 5 tabs.

    19. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      4. World liquid fuels production in the Reference case, 2010-40 million barrels per day Source 2010 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Average annual percent change 2010-40 OPEC Crude and lease condensatea 32.0 34.4 36.1 39.5 42.9 46.2 1.2 Natural gas plant liquids 3.3 4.0 4.2 4.5 4.9 5.4 1.7 Biofuelsb 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Coal-to-liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Gas-to-liquids 0.0 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 14.1 Kerogen 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Refinery gain 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.9 Total OPEC 35.4

    20. Country analysis briefs: 1994. Profiles of major world energy producers, consumers, and transport centers

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      1995-05-01

      Country Analysis Briefs: 1994 is a compilation of country profiles prepared by the Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division (EMCID) of the Office of Energy Markets and End Use. EMCID maintains Country Analysis Briefs (CABs) for specific countries or geographical areas that are important to world energy markets. As a general rule, CABs are prepared for all members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), major non-OPEC oil producers (i.e., the North Sea, Russia), major energy transit areas (i.e., Ukraine), and other areas of current interest to energy analysts and policy makers. As of January 1995, EMCID maintained over 40 CABs, updated on an annual schedule and subject to revision as events warrant. This report includes 25 CABs updated during 1994. All CABs contain a profile section, a map showing the country`s location, and a narrative section. The profile section includes outlines of the country`s economy, energy sector, and environment. The narrative provides further information and discussion of these topics. Some CABs also include a detailed map displaying locations of major oil and gas fields, pipelines, ports, etc. These maps were created as a result of special individual requests and so are not typically a standard feature of the CABs. They are presented here wherever available as a supplement to the information contained in the CABs.

    1. Petroleum Marketing Monthly

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      F.O.B.[a] costs of imported crude oil by selected country dollars per barrel Year month Selected countries Persian Gulf[b] Total OPEC[c] Non OPEC Angola Colombia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela 1990 20.23 20.75 19.26 22.46 20.36 23.43 19.55 18.54 20.40 20.32 1991 18.47 18.49 15.37 20.29 14.62 20.81 14.91 15.22 16.99 16.77 1992 18.41 18.02 15.26 19.98 15.85 19.61 14.39 16.35 16.87 16.66 1993 16.23 15.87 13.74 17.79 13.77 16.64 12.46 14.21 14.78 14.65 1994 15.40 14.99 13.68

    2. Petroleum Marketing Monthly

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      Landed costs of imported crude oil by selected country dollars per barrel Year month Selected countries Persian Gulf[a] Total OPEC[b] Non OPEC Angola Canada Colombia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela 1990 21.51 20.48 22.34 19.64 23.33 21.82 22.65 20.31 20.55 21.23 20.98 1991 19.90 17.16 19.55 15.89 21.39 17.22 21.37 15.92 17.34 18.08 17.93 1992 19.36 17.04 18.46 15.60 20.78 17.48 20.63 15.13 17.58 17.81 17.67 1993 17.40 15.27 16.54 14.11 18.73 15.40 17.92 13.39 15.26 15.68

    3. International energy indicators. [International and US statistics

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Bauer, E.K.

      1980-03-01

      For the international sector, a table of data is first presented followed by corresponding graph of the data for the following: (1) Iran: crude oil capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974 to February 1980; (2) Saudi Arabia (same as Iran); (3) OPEC (ex-Iran and Saudi Arabia); capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974 to January 1980; (4) non-OPEC Free World and US production of crude oil, 1973 to January 1980; (5) oil stocks: Free World, US, Japan, and Europe (landed), 1973 to 1979; (6) petroleum consumption by industrial countries, 1973 to October 1979; (7) USSR crude oil production, 1974 to February 1980; (8) Free World and US nuclear generation capacity, 1973 to January 1980. For the United States, the same data format is used for the following: (a) US imports of crude oil and products 1973 to January 1980; (b) landed cost of Saudi Arabia crude oil in current and 1974 dollars, 1974 to October 1979; (c) US trade in coal, 1973 to 1979; (d) summary of US merchandise trade, 1976 to January 1980; and (e) US energy/GNP ratio (in 1972 dollars), 1947 to 1979.

    4. International energy indicators. [Statistical tables and graphs

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Bauer, E.K.

      1980-05-01

      International statistical tables and graphs are given for the following: (1) Iran - Crude Oil Capacity, Production and Shut-in, June 1974-April 1980; (2) Saudi Arabia - Crude Oil Capacity, Production, and Shut-in, March 1974-Apr 1980; (3) OPEC (Ex-Iran and Saudi Arabia) - Capacity, Production and Shut-in, June 1974-March 1980; (4) Non-OPEC Free World and US Production of Crude Oil, January 1973-February 1980; (5) Oil Stocks - Free World, US, Japan, and Europe (Landed, 1973-1st Quarter, 1980); (6) Petroleum Consumption by Industrial Countries, January 1973-December 1979; (7) USSR Crude Oil Production and Exports, January 1974-April 1980; and (8) Free World and US Nuclear Generation Capacity, January 1973-March 1980. Similar statistical tables and graphs included for the United States include: (1) Imports of Crude Oil and Products, January 1973-April 1980; (2) Landed Cost of Saudi Oil in Current and 1974 Dollars, April 1974-January 1980; (3) US Trade in Coal, January 1973-March 1980; (4) Summary of US Merchandise Trade, 1976-March 1980; and (5) US Energy/GNP Ratio, 1947 to 1979.

    5. Oil and the American Way of Life: Don't Ask, Don't Tell

      ScienceCinema (OSTI)

      Kaufmann, Robert [Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States

      2010-01-08

      In the coming decades, US consumers will face a series of important decisions about oil. To make effective decisions, consumers must confront some disturbing answers to questions they would rather not ask. These questions include: is the US running out of oil, is the world running out of oil, is OPEC increasing its grip on prices, is the US economy reducing its dependence on energy, and will the competitive market address these issues in a timely fashion? Answers to these questions indicate that the market will not address these issues: the US has already run out of inexpensive sources of oil such that rising prices no longer elicit significant increases in supply. The US experience implies that within a couple of decades, the world oil market will change from increasing supply at low prices to decreasing supply at higher prices. As the world approaches this important turning point, OPEC will strengthen its grip on world oil prices. Contrary to popular belief, the US economy continues to be highly dependent on energy, especially inexpensive sources of energy. Together, these trends threaten to undermine the basic way in which the US economy generates a high standard of living.

    6. Afghan Sees Opportunity in Nation's Recovery from War - News Releases |

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      NREL Afghan Sees Opportunity in Nation's Recovery from War Reconstruction Can Allow Country to Develop Sustainable Practices, Deputy Minister Will Tell World Renewable Energy Congress June 28, 2004 Golden, Colo. - The rebuilding of Afghanistan should be an opportunity to develop sustainable standards and practices in construction and energy production and use, Dr. Pir Mohammed Azizi, deputy minister of Irrigation, Water Resources and Environment, is expected to tell participants in the

    7. Voluntary Protection Program - Business Case for Safety | Department of

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Energy Business Case for Safety Voluntary Protection Program - Business Case for Safety Business Case for Safety - $ DOE is Benchmark for DoD: Department of Defense Benchmarks VPP in Visit to Hanford Department of Defense Representatives Visit Hanford to Benchmark Safety Extreme VPP - Kandahar, Afghanistan VPP Expanding Throughout European Union Navy Follows DOE Lead in Using VPP to Enhance Safety Ireland Work Site Earns VPP Recognition U.S. Recordable Injury and Illness Rates and Lost

    8. Modeling the Oil Transition: A Summary of the Proceedings of the DOE/EPA Workshop on the Economic and Environmental Implications of Global Energy Transitions

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Greene, David L

      2007-02-01

      The global energy system faces sweeping changes in the next few decades, with potentially critical implications for the global economy and the global environment. It is important that global institutions have the tools necessary to predict, analyze and plan for such massive change. This report summarizes the proceedings of an international workshop concerning methods of forecasting, analyzing, and planning for global energy transitions and their economic and environmental consequences. A specific case, it focused on the transition from conventional to unconventional oil and other energy sources likely to result from a peak in non-OPEC and/or global production of conventional oil. Leading energy models from around the world in government, academia and the private sector met, reviewed the state-of-the-art of global energy modeling and evaluated its ability to analyze and predict large-scale energy transitions.

    9. U.S. Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Imports

      Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

      Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History All Countries 41 367 505 213 498 228 1993-2015 Ecuador 2007-2007 Non OPEC* 41 367 505 213 498 228 2004-2015 Argentina 2006-2006 Belgium 2012-2012 Brazil 32 361 498 209 492 223 2004-2015 Canada 9 6 7 4 6 5 2004-2015 China 2006-2006 Congo (Brazzaville) 2006-2006 Costa Rica 2004-2013 El Salvador 2004-2013 Guatemala 2012-2014 Jamaica 2004-2013 Netherlands 2006-2014 Nicaragua 2012-2014 Pakistan 2006-2006 Singapore 2014-2014 Trinidad and Tobago

    10. Stochastic Energy Deployment System (SEDS) World Oil Model (WOM)

      Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

      2009-08-07

      The function of the World Oil Market Model (WOMM) is to calculate a world oil price. SEDS will set start and end dates for the forecast period, and a time increment (assumed to be 1 year in the initial version). The WOMM will then randomly select an Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) oil price case and calibrate itself to that case. As it steps through each year, the WOMM will generate a stochastic supply shock tomore » OPEC output and accept a new estimate of U.S. petroleum demand from SEDS. The WOMM will then calculate a new oil market equilibrium for the current year. The world oil price at the new equilibrium will be sent back to SEDS. When the end year is reached, the process will begin again with the selection of a new AEO forecast. Iterations over forecasts will continue until SEDS has completed all its simulation runs.« less

    11. U.S. Crude Oil Imports

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      Import Area: U.S. Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Import Area Country Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History All Countries 227,255 236,785 216,669 220,747 221,117 244,915 1920-2015 Persian Gulf 44,894 38,268 38,247 47,365 49,210 54,496 1993-2015 OPEC* 84,162 77,660 78,078 84,447 86,981 95,282 1993-2015 Algeria 1993-2015 Angola 3,356 3,167 5,467 5,598 5,725 4,761 1993-2015

    12. Net Imports of Total Crude Oil and Products into the U.S. by Country

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Total All Countries 9,441 8,450 7,393 6,237 5,065 4,651 1973-2015 Persian Gulf 1,705 1,842 2,149 1,988 1,861 1,496 1993-2015 OPEC* 4,787 4,429 4,093 3,483 2,996 2,652 1993-2015 Algeria 510 355 241 108 109 105 1993-2015 Angola 393 346 233 215 154 136 1993-2015 Ecuador 135 147 117 153 116 104 1993-2015 Iran 0 0 1993-2014 Iraq 415 459 476 341 369 229 1996-2015 Kuwait 197 191 305 328 311 206 1993-2015 Libya 70 15 60 58 5 7 2004-2015 Nigeria 1,006 803 419

    13. Weekly Petroleum Status Report

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      2 Table 10. U.S. World Crude Oil Prices (Dollars per Barrel) Country Type/API Gravity 11/11/2011 11/4/2011 1/7/2011 1/1/2010 1/2/2009 1/4/2008 1/5/2007 1/6/1978 OPEC Abu Dhabi Murban 39° ................................ 113.19 109.59 93.29 77.70 38.97 94.85 61.39 13.26 Algeria Saharan Blend 44° .................... 114.75 110.30 94.53 76.72 37.44 98.28 59.77 14.10 Angola 1 Cabinda 32° ............................... 114.10 109.68 91.79 75.82 35.04 92.29 54.93 - Dubai Fateh 32°

    14. Appendix A. Reference case projections

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2014 High Oil Price case projections Table B4. World petroleum and other liquids production by region and country, High Oil Price case, 2009-40 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-40 2009 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 34.1 35.4 35.7 33.1 34.5 37.8 41.0 43.7 0.7 Middle East 23.2 24.3 25.9 22.6 23.6 26.6 29.4 31.8 0.9 North Africa 3.8 3.7 2.4 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.6 3.7

    15. Appendix A. Reference case projections

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2014 High Oil Price case projections Table B6. World other liquid fuels a production by region and country, High Oil Price case, 2009-40 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-40 2009 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC b 3.1 3.3 3.5 4.6 4.9 5.3 5.8 5.9 1.9 Natural gas plant liquids 3.1 3.3 3.4 4.3 4.6 4.9 5.3 5.3 1.6 Biofuels c 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -

    16. Appendix A. Reference case projections

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2014 Low Oil Price case projections Table C4. World petroleum and other liquids production by region and country, Low Oil Price case, 2009-40 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-40 2009 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 34.1 35.4 35.7 43.3 48.7 54.6 59.9 65.3 2.1 Middle East 23.2 24.3 25.9 30.4 34.5 38.9 43.0 47.3 2.2 North Africa 3.8 3.7 2.4 3.7 4.0 4.3 4.7 4.9

    17. Appendix A. Reference case projections

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2014 Low Oil Price case projections Table C6. World other liquid fuels a production by region and country, Low Oil Price case, 2009-40 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-40 2009 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC b 3.1 3.3 3.5 4.3 4.5 4.8 5.1 5.0 1.4 Natural gas plant liquids 3.1 3.3 3.4 4.0 4.2 4.4 4.8 4.7 1.2 Biofuels c 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -

    18. An assessment of energy and environmental issues related to the use of gas-to-liquid fuels in transportation

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Greene, D.L.

      1999-11-01

      Recent technological advances in processes for converting natural gas into liquid fuels, combined with a growing need for cleaner, low-sulfur distillate fuel to mitigate the environmental impacts of diesel engines have raised the possibility of a substantial global gas-to-liquids (G-T-L) industry. This report examines the implications of G-T-L supply for U.S. energy security and the environment. It appears that a G-T-L industry would increase competitiveness in world liquid fuels markets, even if OPEC states are major producers of G-T-L's. Cleaner G-T-L distillates would help reduce air pollution from diesel engines. Implications for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions could be positive or negative, depending on the sources of natural gas, their alternative uses, and the degree of sequestration that can be achieved for CO{sub 2} emissions produced during the conversion process.

    19. Demand for oil and energy in developing countries

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Wolf, C. Jr.; Relles, D.A.; Navarro, J.

      1980-05-01

      How much of the world's oil and energy supply will the non-OPEC less-developed countries (NOLDCs) demand in the next decade. Will their requirements be small and thus fairly insignificant compared with world demand, or large and relatively important. How will world demand be affected by the economic growth of the NOLDCs. In this report, we try to develop some reasonable forecasts of NOLDC energy demands in the next 10 years. Our focus is mainly on the demand for oil, but we also give some attention to the total commercial energy requirements of these countries. We have tried to be explicit about the uncertainties associated with our forecasts, and with the income and price elasticities on which they are based. Finally, we consider the forecasts in terms of their implications for US policies concerning the NOLDCs and suggest areas of future research on NOLDC energy issues.

    20. U.S. Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      Import Area: U.S. Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Import Area Country Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History All Countries 294,833 302,821 280,042 272,798 273,770 301,517 1981-2015 Persian Gulf 45,401 38,664 38,707 47,680 49,847 54,969 1993-2015 OPEC* 89,785 85,277 85,626 90,481 95,080 101,480 1993-2015 Algeria 3,374 3,751 4,364 2,341 3,707 2,282 1993-2015 Angola 3,356 3,167

    1. An Analysis of the Impact of Sport Utility Vehicles in the United States

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Davis, S.C.; Truett, L.F.

      2000-08-01

      It may be labeled sport utility vehicle, SUV, sport-ute, suburban assault vehicle, or a friend of OPEC (Organization for Petroleum Exporting Countries). It has been the subject of comics, the object of high-finance marketing ploys, and the theme of Dateline. Whatever the label or the occasion, this vehicle is in great demand. The popularity of sport utility vehicles (SUVs) has increased dramatically since the late 1970s, and SUVs are currently the fastest growing segment of the motor vehicle industry. Hoping to gain market share due to the popularity of the expanding SUV market, more and more manufacturers are adding SUVs to their vehicle lineup. One purpose of this study is to analyze the world of the SUV to determine why this vehicle has seen such a rapid increase in popularity. Another purpose is to examine the impact of SUVs on energy consumption, emissions, and highway safety.

    2. EIA Report 9/1/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Markets , 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) (2pm) 9/1/2008 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 8/25/2008 Year Ago 8/31/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 111.16 115.46 -4.30 115.11 73.98 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 275.10 285.42 -10.32 280.69 196.45 Heating Oil (c/gal) 309.24 319.19 -9.95 317.90 205.74 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.98 8.36 -0.38 7.94 6.46 OPEC Basket ($Bbl) NA 111.23 NA 110.61 69.60 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate

    3. War curbs oil exports by Iran and Iraq

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Not Available

      1980-09-29

      A discussion of the effects of the war between Iran and Iraq on oil exports from the area covers damage (extent unknown) to the Abadan, Iran, and Basra, Iraq, oil refineries, to the Iraqi petrochemical complex under construction at Basra, to oil export terminals at Kharg Island and Mina-al-Bakr, and to other oil facilities; war-caused reductions in oil production, refining, shipping, and export, estimated at 2.05-3.35 million bbl/day; the possible effects of the war on OPEC's decisions concerning oil production and pricing; the significance of the Strait of Hormuz for the export of oil by several countries in addition to the belligerents; the U.S. and non-Communist oil stocks which might enable the world to avoid an oil shortage if the war is ended in the near future; and the long-term effects of the war on Iran's and Iraq's oil industries.

    4. U.S. Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

      U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

      Import Area: U.S. Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Import Area Country 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History All Countries 4,304,533 4,174,210 3,878,852 3,598,454 3,372,904 3,431,210 1981-2015 Persian Gulf 624,638 679,403 789,082 733,325 684,235 550,046 1993-2015 OPEC* 1,790,811 1,662,720 1,563,273 1,357,907 1,181,458 1,058,209 1993-2015 Algeria 186,019 130,723 88,487 42,014 40,193 39,478

    5. Appendix A. Reference case projections

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2014 Reference case projections Table A4. World petroleum and other liquids production by region and country, Reference case, 2009-40 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-40 2009 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 34.1 35.4 35.7 38.7 40.7 44.4 48.2 52.1 1.3 Middle East 23.2 24.3 25.9 27.1 28.8 32.2 35.5 38.8 1.6 North Africa 3.8 3.7 2.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 4.1 0.3 West

    6. Appendix A. Reference case projections

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2014 Reference case projections Table A6. World other liquid fuels a production by region and country, Reference case, 2009-40 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-40 2009 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC b 3.1 3.3 3.5 4.3 4.6 4.9 5.3 5.9 1.9 Natural gas plant liquids 3.1 3.3 3.4 4.0 4.2 4.5 4.9 5.4 1.7 Biofuels c 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 - Coal-to-liquids 0.0

    7. East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      Import Area: East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Import Area Country Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History All Countries 54,019 56,394 49,770 49,022 45,969 51,354 1981-2015 Persian Gulf 2,561 2,752 930 3,300 3,057 2,079 1993-2015 OPEC* 8,253 8,366 7,680 9,641 11,059 10,466

    8. Search for a bridge to the energy future: Proceedings

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Saluja, S.S.

      1986-01-01

      The alarming effects, concerns, and even the insights into long-range energy planning that grew out of the OPEC oil embargo of 1973 are fading from the view of a shortsighted public. The enthusiastic initiatives taken in many countries for the development of alternative energy sources have withered due to lack of economic and/or ideological incentive. The events since December 1985, when the members of OPEC decided to increase production in an effort to capture their share of market, have brought down the prices of a barrel of crude to less than US $11 and have made any rational analysis very complex. This has made even the proponents of the alternative energy sources pause and think. The US has, as usual, oscillated from panic to complacency. The Libyan crisis, however, has brought the dangers of complacency into sharp focus. The first commercial coal gasification plant, constructed with a capital investment of over US $2 billion, was abandoned by the owners and is being operated by the US Department of Energy temporarily. In their effort to find a private owner, the US Department of Energy has set the date of auction of this prestigious plant for May 28, 1986. And if an appropriate bid is not forthcoming, the plant faces a very uncertain future. Coal, considered by the World Coal Study (WOCOL) at MIT in 1980, to be a bridge to a global energy future, seems to have lost its luster due to the oil glut which we all know is temporary. This was evident when the bill to grant the Right of Eminent Domain for transportation of coal was defeated. This conference was organized to bring together experts in different areas from various countries to discuss the state of the art and the rate of progress in different alternative energy forms. The recent accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in USSR has brought home the need of diversification of the alternative energy sources.

    9. ANNUAL REPORT FY2010 I N D U S T R I A L S A N D I A N A T I

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      10 I N D U S T R I A L S A N D I A N A T I O N A L L A B O R A T O R I E S Saving Lives in Afghanistan About the cover: An Airman demonstrates placement of Stingray, a water disruptor developed at Sandia, near its target in a simulated village used to train soldiers heading overseas. More on pages 18 and 19. 3 4 Introduction 6 Strategic Industrial Partnerships Offer Big Pluses for All Concerned Payoffs Come to Labs, Partners, the Public, the Economy 8 Goodyear, Sandia Have Strong Grip on Their

    10. Advances in exposure and toxicity assessment of particulate matter: An overview of presentations at the 2009 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Gunasekar, Palur G.; Stanek, Lindsay W.

      2011-07-15

      The 2009 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference (TRAC) session on 'Advances in Exposure and Toxicity Assessment of Particulate Matter' was held in April 2009 in West Chester, OH. The goal of this session was to bring together toxicology, geology and risk assessment experts from the Department of Defense and academia to examine issues in exposure assessment and report on recent epidemiological findings of health effects associated with particulate matter (PM) exposure. Important aspects of PM exposure research are to detect and monitor low levels of PM with various chemical compositions and to assess the health risks associated with these exposures. As part of the overall theme, some presenters discussed collection methods for sand and dust from Iraqi and Afghanistan regions, health issues among deployed personnel, and future directions for risk assessment research among these populations. The remaining speakers focused on the toxicity of ultrafine PM and the characterization of aerosols generated during ballistic impacts of tungsten heavy alloys.

    11. LLNL/LANS mission committee meeting

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Burns, Michael J

      2010-12-06

      Recent events continue to show the national security imperative of the global security mission: (1) Fighting Proliferation - (a) At Yongbyon, 'a modern, industrial-scale U-enrichment facility w/2000 centrifuges' seen Nov. 2010, (b) In Iran, fueling began at Bushehr while P5+1/lran talks delayed to Dec. 2010; (2) Continuing need to support the warfighter and IC - (a) tensions on the Korean peninsula, (b) primitative IEDs a challenge in Afghanistan, (c) cyber command, (d)another Georgian smuggling event; and (3) Countering terrorisms on US soil - (a) toner cartridge bomb, (b) times square bomb, (c) christmas tree bomb. Joint Technical Operations Team (JTOT) and Accident Response Group (ARG) elements deployed to two East Coast locations in November to work a multi-weapon scenario. LANL provided 70% of on-duty field and reconstitution teams for both Marble Challenge 11-01 and JD 11-01. There were a total of 14 deployments in FY10.

    12. Reducing Our Carbon Footprint: A Low-Energy House in Berkeley, Kabul, and Washington DC (LBNL Science at the Theater)

      ScienceCinema (OSTI)

      Diamond, Rick

      2011-04-28

      How well can we assess and improve building energy performance in California homes? How much energy-and carbon-do homes use in other parts of the world? Rick Diamond, deputy group leader of the Berkeley Lab Energy Performance of Buildings Group, discusses change, global solutions, and the stories of three houses in Berkeley, Kabul (Afghanistan), and Washington, D.C. Diamond, who is also a senior advisor at the California Institute for Energy and Environment, investigates user interactions with the built environment for improved building energy performance. The group has studied a wide range of issues related to energy use in housing, including duct system efficiency, user behavior, and infiltration and ventilation measurements.

    13. Appendix A. Reference case projections

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      44 Appendix B Table B5. World crude and lease condensate a production by region and country, High Oil Price case, 2009-40 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-40 2009 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC b 31.0 32.0 32.2 28.5 29.6 32.5 35.2 37.9 0.6 Middle East 20.8 21.7 23.0 19.1 19.9 22.6 25.2 27.5 0.8 North Africa 3.3 3.2 2.0 2.6 2.6 2.7 2.7 2.7 -0.6 West Africa 4.1 4.4 4.3 4.3 4.5 4.6 4.8 4.8 0.3 South America 2.8 2.7 2.8 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.6

    14. Appendix A. Reference case projections

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      6 Appendix C Table C5. World crude and lease condensate a production by region and country, Low Oil Price case, 2009-40 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-40 2009 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC b 31.0 32.0 32.2 39.0 44.2 49.9 54.8 60.2 2.1 Middle East 20.8 21.7 23.0 27.1 31.0 35.3 39.3 43.6 2.3 North Africa 3.3 3.2 2.0 3.2 3.4 3.6 3.8 4.1 0.8 West Africa 4.1 4.4 4.3 5.4 6.0 6.7 7.0 7.3 1.7 South America 2.8 2.7 2.8 3.3 3.7 4.2 4.6

    15. East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History All Countries 922,432 859,818 727,383 661,835 605,839 627,574 1981-2015 Persian Gulf 32,645 36,655 49,578 36,276 39,750 28,276 1993-2015 OPEC* 297,725 276,478 216,695 191,739 122,057 96,004 1993-2015 Algeria 28,538 27,871 29,164 9,781 6,440 4,234 1993-2015 Angola 44,554 45,631 30,832 30,371 25,299 17,880 1993-2015 Ecuador 550 347 1,813 1,223 411 931 1995-2015 Iraq 8,024 12,382 17,247 3,260 15,112 8,123 1995-2015 Kuwait 325 250 605 591 1995-2014 Libya

    16. Domestic petroleum-product prices around the world. Survey: free market or government price controls

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Not Available

      1983-01-27

      In this issue, Energy Detente draws from their regular Western and Eastern Hemisphere Fuel Price/Tax Series, each produced monthly, and adds other survey data and analysis for a broad view of 48 countries around the world. They find that seven Latin American nations, including OPEC members Venezuela and Ecuador, are among the ten countries with lowest gasoline prices. In this Fourth Special Price Report, Energy Detente provides a first-time presentation of which prices are government-controlled, and which are free to respond to market forces. South Korea, with fixed prices since 1964, has the highest premium-grade gasoline price in our survey, US $5.38 per gallon. Paraguay, with prices fixed by PETROPAR, the national oil company, has the second highest premium gasoline price, US $4.21 per gallon. Nicaragua, also with government price controls, ranks third highest in the survey, with US $3.38 per gallon for premium gasoline. Kuwait shows the lowest price at US $0.55 per gallon. Several price changes from the previous survey reflect changes in currency exchange as all prices are converted to US dollars. The Energy Detente fuel price/tax series is presented for Western Hemisphere countries.

    17. War without end. Michel T. Halbouty's fight for American energy security

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Donahue, J.

      1987-01-01

      In these pages are the drama and tension of Halbouty's role as ''Ronald Reagan's Energy Guru'' - his leadership of Candidate Reagan's Energy Policy Advisory group and President-Elect Reagan's Transition Team on Energy. His creation and direction of the Circum-Pacific Council for Energy and Mineral Resources, an organization that has advanced exploration and development of the total energy and mineral wealth of the nations fronting the Pacific, and is credited with creating a rapport between them that the U.S. State Department could not have established. His work on behalf of Indian tribes whose oil lands had been systematically plundered for 20 years. His fight against oil companies' ''Retrenchment'' programs and the so-called ''Corporate Raiders.'' His struggle against an ''Oil Import Tax,'' which he reasoned would be detrimental to America's economy and security. His strong advocacy of his plan to make America energy self-sufficient and free her from OPEC bondage. His enduring affection for and the benefactions of his Alma Mater, Texas A and M University, and students he found worthy of support. His confrontations with and his opinions of the world's ''movers and shakers'' and their varying philosophies. And a potpourri of thoughts, ideas and sentiments of an American original who became a legend in his own time.

    18. Vulnerability to closing of Hormuz

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Not Available

      1984-03-07

      Tankers carrying roughly 8-million barrels per day (mmb/d) of crude oil, or some 16% of the non-communist world's oil supply, pass through the Strait of Hormuz. Experts agree that just 3-mmb/d of that could be exported through alternate routes. If the war between Iran and Iraq should result in their completely halting each other's production, this relatively limited supply curtailment would reduce world oil production by over 3.4-mmb/d. Since the two have not caused such mutual disaster during four years of war, many observers believe there has been a deliberate avoidance of the jugular squeeze. Nevertheless, the two combatants appear capable not only of cutting off their oil production, but escalating fighting to the point where Gulf traffic would be impeded. Potential results from a prolonged Iran-Iraq crisis are viewed in three scenarios. Also included in this issue are brief summaries of: (1) Mexico's new energy plan, internationalism, and OPEC; (2) update on Argentina's energy resource developments; (3) Venezuela: belt tightening; (4) Western Hemisphere oil production declines; (5) (6) days of oil supply for Canada, USA, Japan, France, Italy, and UK; and (6) US Department of Defense fuel consumption. The Energy Detente fuel price/tax series and principal industrial fuel prices are included for March for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere.

    19. Assessing world energy in the wake of the Iran/Iraq war: an oil shortage proves elusive. [Monograph

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Randol, W.L.; Verleger, P.K. Jr.; Clayman, M.

      1981-01-01

      A reassessment of world energy supplies was made in the wake of curtailed exports during the Iran/Iraq war and the corresponding increase in world oil prices, the drop in oil consumption, the widening economic recession, and US decontrol of oil. The report concludes that present worldwide levels of oil production are adequate to satisfy projected levels of consumption through 1981. This leaves the world energy system in balance even if oil exports from Iran and Iraq remain at minimal levels for the year. Past overestimation of demand makes it more likely that this year's consumption will fall short of the projection. The way in which Saudi Arabia's output is cut will be the key to oil pricing in 1981, the authors feel, but the likely approach will be a gradual reduction in production that will allow the Saudis to regain control of OPEC. The effects of a receding demand for oil have been intensified by high US interest rates and the spreading recession. The effect of immediate decontrol of petroleum is likely to compound the trend for reduced consumption and a corresponding increase in efficiency. 2 figures, 2 tables.

    20. International energy indicators

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Bauer, E.K.

      1981-02-01

      Extensive data are compiled for energy on the international scene and for the US. Data are indicated from the date given and into 1980 as far as available. Data are given for the international scene on: world crude oil production, 1975-to date; Iran: crude oil capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974-to date; Saudi Arabia: crude oil capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974-to date; OPEC (Ex-Iran and Saudi Arabia): capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974-to date; oil stocks: Free World, US, Japan, and Europe (landed), 1973-to date; petroleum consumption by industrial countries, 1973-to date; USSR crude oil production, 1974-to date; Free World and US nuclear generation capacity, 1973-to date. Data are supplied specifically for the US on US gross imports of crude oil and products, 1973-to date; landed cost of Saudi crude in current and 1974 dollars; US trade in bituminous coal, 1973-to date; summary of US merchandise trade, 1976-to date; and energy/GNP ratio.

    1. World crude output overcomes Persian Gulf disruption

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Not Available

      1992-02-01

      Several OPEC producers made good on their promises to replace 2.7 MMbpd of oil exports that vanished from the world market after Iraq took over Kuwait. Even more incredibly, they accomplished this while a breathtaking 1.2- MMbopd reduction in Soviet output took place during the course of 1991. After Abu Dhabi, Indonesia, Iran, Libya, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela turned the taps wide open, their combined output rose 2.95 MMbopd. Put together with a 282,000-bopd increase by Norway and contributions from smaller producers, this enabled world oil production to remain within 400,000 bopd of its 1990 level. The 60.5-MMbopd average was off by just 0.7%. This paper reports that improvement took place in five of eight regions. Largest increases were in Western Europe and Africa. Greatest reductions occurred in Eastern Europe and the Middle East. Fifteen nations produced 1 MMbopd or more last year, compared with 17 during 1990.

    2. Worry grows as Iran/Iraq war lingers

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Not Available

      1980-11-03

      Despite the Iran/Iraq war and the prospect of greater disruption of Persian Gulf oil deliveries, the international crude market has adjusted to the loss of supplies and remains stable, partly because some nonwarring members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries have boosted production to make up losses and partly because the industrialized nations have maintained high levels of crude and product stocks. These stocks would be draw-depleted in nine months if used at the rate of 1.8 million bbl/day; this and a 2 million bbl/day increase in OPEC production would make up for the entire war-caused shortfall. If the Strait of Hormuz were closed, the shortfall would be 17 million bbl/day, which would deplete stocks in less than one month. Patterns of supply and demand in non-Communist western countries in 1978-79 and 1979-80; the International Energy Agency oil-sharing plan which would go into effect in the case of a major oil shortage; and the prospects for a surge in prices in the international oil markets, are discussed.

    3. Appendix A. Reference case projections

      Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

      2 Appendix A Table A5. World crude and lease condensate a production by region and country, Reference case, 2009-40 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-40 2009 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC b 31.0 32.0 32.2 34.4 36.1 39.5 42.9 46.2 1.2 Middle East 20.8 21.7 23.0 23.8 25.2 28.4 31.5 34.5 1.6 North Africa 3.3 3.2 2.0 2.9 2.9 2.9 2.9 3.0 -0.3 West Africa 4.1 4.4 4.3 4.9 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 0.6 South America 2.8 2.7 2.8 2.9 2.9 3.0 3.2 3.5

    4. Energy vulnerability relationships

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Shaw, B.R.; Boesen, J.L.

      1998-02-01

      The US consumption of crude oil resources has been a steadily growing indicator of the vitality and strength of the US economy. At the same time import diversity has also been a rapidly developing dimension of the import picture. In the early 1970`s, embargoes of crude oil from Organization of Producing and Exporting Countries (OPEC) created economic and political havoc due to a significant lack of diversity and a unique set of economic, political and domestic regulatory circumstances. The continued rise of imports has again led to concerns over the security of our crude oil resource but threats to this system must be considered in light of the diversity and current setting of imported oil. This report develops several important issues concerning vulnerability to the disruption of oil imports: (1) The Middle East is not the major supplier of oil to the United States, (2) The US is not vulnerable to having its entire import stream disrupted, (3) Even in stable countries, there exist vulnerabilities to disruption of the export stream of oil, (4) Vulnerability reduction requires a focus on international solutions, and (5) DOE program and policy development must reflect the requirements of the diverse supply. Does this increasing proportion of imported oil create a {open_quotes}dependence{close_quotes}? Does this increasing proportion of imported oil present a vulnerability to {open_quotes}price shocks{close_quotes} and the tremendous dislocations experienced during the 1970`s? Finally, what is the vulnerability of supply disruptions from the current sources of imported oil? If oil is considered to be a finite, rapidly depleting resource, then the answers to these questions must be {open_quotes}yes.{close_quotes} However, if the supply of oil is expanding, and not limited, then dependence is relative to regional supply sources.

    5. Have We Run Out of Oil Yet? Oil Peaking Analysis from an Optimist's Perspective

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Greene, David L; Hopson, Dr Janet L; Li, Jia

      2005-01-01

      This study addresses several questions concerning the peaking of conventional oil production from an optimist's perspective. Is the oil peak imminent? What is the range of uncertainty? What are the key determining factors? Will a transition to unconventional oil undermine or strengthen OPEC's influence over world oil markets? These issues are explored using a model combining alternative world energy scenarios with an accounting of resource depletion and a market-based simulation of transition to unconventional oil resources. No political or environmental constraints are allowed to hinder oil production, geological constraints on the rates at which oil can be produced are not represented, and when USGS resource estimates are used, more than the mean estimate of ultimately recoverable resources is assumed to exist. The issue is framed not as a question of "running out" of conventional oil, but in terms of the timing and rate of transition from conventional to unconventional oil resources. Unconventional oil is chosen because production from Venezuela's heavy-oil fields and Canada's Athabascan oil sands is already underway on a significant scale and unconventional oil is most consistent with the existing infrastructure for producing, refining, distributing and consuming petroleum. However, natural gas or even coal might also prove to be economical sources of liquid hydrocarbon fuels. These results indicate a high probability that production of conventional oil from outside of the Middle East region will peak, or that the rate of increase of production will become highly constrained before 2025. If world consumption of hydrocarbon fuels is to continue growing, massive development of unconventional resources will be required. While there are grounds for pessimism and optimism, it is certainly not too soon for extensive, detailed analysis of transitions to alternative energy sources.

    6. Scientists train honeybees to detect explosives

      ScienceCinema (OSTI)

      None

      2014-07-24

      Members of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Stealthy Insect Sensor Project team have been able to harness the honeybee's exceptional olfactory sense by using the bees' natural reaction to nectar, a proboscis extension reflex (sticking out their tongue) to record an unmistakable response to a scent. Using Pavlovian techniques, researchers were able to train the bees to give a positive detection response via the PER when exposed to vapors from TNT, C4, and TATP explosives. The Stealthy Insect Sensor Project was born out of a global threat from the growing use of improvised explosive devices or IEDs, especially those that present a critical vulnerability for American military troops in Iraq and Afghanistan, and as an emerging danger for civilians worldwide. Current strategies to detect explosives are expensive and, in the case of trained detection dogs, too obtrusive to be used very discreetly. With bees however, they are small and discreet, offering the element of surprise. They're also are inexpensive to maintain and even easier to train than dogs. As a result of this need, initial funding for the work was provided by a development grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

    7. Unproven screening devices threaten the lives of police and military.

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Murray, Dale W.

      2010-07-01

      In a world plagued with improvised explosive devices, drugs and dangerous people, the desire to field technology to protect our police and military is providing a fertile market for the proliferation of protection technologies that range from the unproven to the disproven. The market place is currently being flooded with detection equipment making inflated and inaccurate marketing claims of high reliably, high detection probabilities, and ease of operation - all while offering detection capabilities at safe distances. The manufacturers of these devices have found a willing global marketplace, which includes some of the most dangerous places in the world. Despite a wealth of contradictory performance and testing data available on the Internet, sales of these devices remain brisk and profitable. Rather than enhancing the security of police and military personnel, the reliance on these unproven and disproven devices is creating a sense of false security that is actually lowering the safety of front-line forces in places like Iraq and Afghanistan. This paper addresses the development and distribution history of some of these devices and describes the testing performed by Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, and other reputable testing agencies that illustrate the real danger in using this kind of unproven technology.

    8. Nuclear programs in India and Pakistan

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Mian, Zia

      2014-05-09

      India and Pakistan launched their respective nuclear programs in the 1940s and 1950s with considerable foreign technical support, especially from the United States Atoms for Peace Program. The technology and training that was acquired served as the platform for later nuclear weapon development efforts that included nuclear weapon testing in 1974 and in 1998 by India, and also in 1998 by Pakistan - which had illicitly acquired uranium enrichment technology especially from Europe and received assistance from China. As of 2013, both India and Pakistan were continuing to produce fissile material for weapons, in the case of India also for nuclear naval fuel, and were developing a diverse array of ballistic and cruise missiles. International efforts to restrain the South Asian nuclear build-up have been largely set aside over the past decade as Pakistani support became central for the U.S. war in Afghanistan and as U.S. geopolitical and economic interests in supporting the rise of India, in part as a counter to China, led to India being exempted both from U.S non-proliferation laws and international nuclear trade guidelines. In the absence of determined international action and with Pakistan blocking the start of talks on a fissile material cutoff treaty, nuclear weapon programs in South Asia are likely to keep growing for the foreseeable future.

    9. Science and Technology in Support of U.S. Policy in Central Asia

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Knapp, R B

      2003-11-04

      The current war with Iraq, international interventions in Afghanistan, and the continuous and seemingly insolvable problems in the Middle East emphasize the importance of supporting stable, healthy countries throughout the Middle East and South and Central Asia. The political alliances and foreign aid promulgated by the Cold War have been seriously strained, creating a more uncertain and unstable international environment. We must stay engaged with this part of the world. New partnerships must be forged. Central Asia represents a mix of political systems - from totalitarian rule to nascent democracy; of economic resources from natural to human; and of cultures from ancient to modern - making it of strategic importance to U. S. national and economic security. The U.S. must remain committed and proactively engaged in the region to promote open and democratic societies attractive to outside investment and to prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and extremist groups. The U.S is admired for its science and technology and its flexibility in innovation and applying S&T to solve problems. The inherent value that S&T can contribute to advancing U.S. policy goals is the underlying assumption of this report. Science and technology and their applications have much to contribute to social, economic, and environmental sustainability and, therefore, provide a strong foundation for helping the U.S. to implement its policies abroad. The application of concepts such as competition and peer review, open sharing of scientific information through the use of the internet and other information technologies, and the development of international scientific collaborations and networks, can make major contributions to healthy and stable societies in Central Asia. U.S. scientific and technical know-how has much to contribute to U.S. policy goals and easing regional tensions. Science and technology truly can build bridges between nations and cultures while serving the societies in them.

    10. Anatomy of success in oil and gas exploration in Pakistan, 1915--94

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Quadri, V.N.; Quadri, S.M.G.J.

      1996-05-13

      Pakistan, flanked by Iran, Afghanistan, China, and India, is the size of Texas and Louisiana combined. The Indus and Baluchistan basins cover 80% of Pakistan`s total area. The country also has 230,000 sq km of marine Exclusive Economic Zone. The law regarding E and P activity was promulgated in 1986, replacing the previous Petroleum (Production) Rules of 1949. As a result of the new Petroleum Policy implemented in March 1994 and streamlining of the bid review and award process, acreage leased including reconnaissance during 1994 was 355,541 sq km onshore and 120,640 sq km offshore, with the number of operating groups also a record high of 46. Although complex and disturbed as a result of collision tectonics, Pakistan`s geology is as fascinating as the surface geomorphology, from the complex compressional thrusted to the relatively simple extensional rifted, salt related to transform fault associated, the reefs, too, all impressive traps for petroleum, at times almost textbook examples. However, domestic oil production at yearend 1994 was about 53,251 b/d of oil and 1.7 bcfd of gas. Oil and gas have been found in the Potwar/Upper Indus basin and Lower Indus basin, and mainly gas with one gas/condensate discovery in the Sulaiman/Middle Indus basin. This article attempts to present brief case history outlines of typical, significant oil and gas discoveries of Pakistan 1915--94 with respect to the two main productive basins, their source and reservoir sequences, in order to determine the anatomy of success in exploration in Pakistan.

    11. Transportation Energy Survey Data Book 1.1

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Gurikova, T

      2002-06-18

      The transportation sector is the major consumer of oil in the United States. In 2000, the transportation sector's share of U.S. oil consumption was 68 percent (U.S. DOE/EIA, 2001a, Table 2.5, p. 33, Table 1.4, p.7). As a result, the transportation sector is one of the major producers of greenhouse gases. In 2000, the transportation sector accounted for one-third (33 percent) of carbon emissions (U.S. DOE/EIA, 2000b, Table 5, p.28). In comparison, the industrial sector accounted for 32 percent and residential and commercial sector for 35 percent of carbon emissions in 2000. Carbon emissions, together with other gases, constitute greenhouse gases that are believed to cause global warming. Because that the transportation sector is a major oil consumer and producer of greenhouse gases, the work of the Analytic Team of the Office of Transportation Technologies (OTT) focuses on two main objectives: (1) reduction of U.S. oil dependence and (2) reduction of carbon emissions from vehicles. There are two major factors that contribute to the problem of U.S. oil dependence. First, compared to the rest of the world, the United States does not have a large oil reserve. The United States accounts for only 9 percent of oil production (U.S. DOE/EIA, 2001c, Table 4.1C). In comparison, the Organization for Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) produces 42 percent of oil, and the Persian Gulf accounts for 28 percent. (U.S. DOE/EIA, 2001c, Table 1.1A). More than half (54 percent) of oil consumed in the United States is imported (U.S. DOE/EIA, 2001a, Table 1.8, p. 15). Second, it is estimated that the world is approaching the point at which half of the total resources of conventional oil believed to exist on earth will have been used up (Birky et. al., 2001, p. 2). Given that the United States is highly dependent on imported oil and that half of the world's conventional oil reserves will have been used up in the near future, the OTT's goal is to ensure an adequate supply of fuel for vehicles. There are three ways to achieve this goal: efficiency, substitution, or less travel. A reduction in oil usage will result in a reduction of carbon emissions. Successful transition to alternative types of fuel and advanced technology vehicles may depend on awareness of U.S. dependence on imported oil and the U.S. energy situation. Successful transition may also depend on knowledge of alternative types of fuels and advanced technologies. The ''Transportation Energy Survey Data Book 1.1'' examines the public's knowledge, beliefs and expectations of the energy situation in the United States and transportation energy-related issues. The data presented in the report have been drawn from multiple sources: surveys conducted by the Opinion Research Corporation International (ORCI) for National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that are commissioned and funded by OTT, Gallup polls, ABC News/Washington Post polls, NBC News/Wall Street Journal polls, polls conducted by the Ipsos-Reid Corporation, as well articles from The Washington Post (2001) and other sources. All surveys are telephone interviews conducted with randomly selected national samples of adults 18 years of age and older. Almost all surveys were conducted before the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, with the only exceptions being the November 2001 ORCI survey and the November 2001 survey conducted by the Ipsos-Reid Corporation.

    12. The complete mitochondrial genome of a gecko and the phylogeneticposition of the Middle Eastern teratoscincus keyserlingii

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Macey, J. Robert; Fong, Jonathan J.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Shafiei,Soheila; Ananjeva, Natalia B.; Papenfuss, Theodore J.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

      2005-04-22

      Sqamate reptiles are traditionally divided into six groups: Iguania, Anguimorpha, Scincomorpha, Gekkota (these four are lizards), Serpentes (snakes), and Amphisbaenia (the so-called worm lizards). Currently there are complete mitochondrial genomes from two representatives of the Iguania (Janke et al., 2001; Kumazawa, 2004), three from the Anguimorpha (Kumazawa, 2004; Kumazawa and Endo, 2004), two from the Scincomorpha (Kumazawa and Nishida, 1999; Kumazawa, 2004), two from Serpentes (Kumazawa et al., 1998; Kumazawa, 2004) and 12 from Amphisbaenia (Macey et al., 2004). The only traditional group of Squamata from which a complete mitochondrial genome has not been sequenced is the Gekkota. Here we report the complete mitochondrial genome of Teratoscincus keyserlingii, a Middle Eastern representative of the Gekkota. The gekkonid lizard genus Teratoscincus is distributed throughout the deserts of central and southwest Asia as shown in figure 1, with five species currently recognized (Macey et al. 1997a, 1999b). Included in this figure are the positions of mountain ranges discussed in the text; see also figure 1 in Macey et al. (1999b). Two species, T. bedriagai and T. microlepis, are restricted to Southwest Asia south of the Kopet Dagh and Hindu Kush in Iran, Afghanistan, and Pakistan (Anderson, 1999). Two species are found in the deserts of western China and Mongolia, with T. przewalskii occurring in the Taklimakan and lowland Gobi deserts, and T. roborowskii restricted to the Turpan Depression. The fifth species, T. scincus, is sometimes considered to be restricted to the Caspian Basin in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzistan, Tadjikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. Alternatively, Teratoscincus populations in Southwest Asia, primarily on the Iranian Plateau, situated directly north of the Arabian Plate, are sometimes considered to be a subspecies of T. scincus or, otherwise, to constitute a sixth species, T. keyserlingii. Macey et al. (1999b) assessed the phylogenetic relationships of four Teratoscincus species with mitochondrial DNA sequences from a {approx}1800 base-pair segment spanning from nad1 to cox1. Phylogenetic analysis places T. microlepis in a basal position to a clade containing T. scincus, T. przewalskii and T. roborowskii, with the later two as sister taxa. This phylogenetic arrangement suggests that tectonic plate movements in Southwest Asia and western China due to the Indian and Arabian collisions caused speciation among Teratoscincus species. No molecular phylogenetic study has included the putative species T. keyserlingii.

    13. Protein and microRNA biomarkers from lavage, urine, and serum in military personnel evaluated for dyspnea

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Brown, Joseph N.; Brewer, Heather M.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Weitz, Karl K.; Morris, Michael J.; Skabelund, Andrew J.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.; Cho, Ji -Hoon; Gelinas, Richard

      2014-10-05

      Background: We have identified candidate protein and microRNA (miRNA) biomarkers for dyspnea by studying serum, lavage fluid, and urine from military personnel who reported serious respiratory symptoms after they were deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan. Methods: Forty-seven soldiers with the complaint of dyspnea who enrolled in the STudy of Active Duty Military Personnel for Environmental Dust Exposure (STAMPEDE) underwent comprehensive pulmonary evaluations at the San Antonio Military Medical Center. The evaluation included fiber-optic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage. The clinical findings from the STAMPEDE subjects pointed to seven general underlying diagnoses or findings including airway hyperreactivity, asthma, low diffusivity of carbonmore » monoxide, and abnormal cell counts. The largest category was undiagnosed. As an exploratory study, not a classification study, we profiled proteins or miRNAs in lavage fluid, serum, or urine in this group to look for any underlying molecular patterns that might lead to biomarkers. Proteins in lavage fluid and urine were identified by accurate mass tag (database-driven) proteomics methods while miRNAs were profiled by a hybridization assay applied to serum, urine, and lavage fluid. Results: Over seventy differentially expressed proteins were reliably identified both from lavage and from urine in forty-eight dyspnea subjects compared to fifteen controls with no known lung disorder. Six of these proteins were detected both in urine and lavage. One group of subjects was distinguished from controls by expressing a characteristic group of proteins. A related group of dyspnea subjects expressed a unique group of miRNAs that included one miRNA that was differentially overexpressed in all three fluids studied. The levels of several miRNAs also showed modest but direct associations with several standard clinical measures of lung health such as forced vital capacity or gas exchange efficiency. Conclusions: Candidate proteins and miRNAs associated with the general diagnosis of dyspnea have been identified in subjects with differing medical diagnoses. Since these markers can be measured in readily obtained clinical samples, further studies are possible that test the value of these findings in more formal classification or case–control studies in much larger cohorts of subjects with specific lung diseases such as asthma, emphysema, or some other well-defined lung disease.« less

    14. Protein and microRNA biomarkers from lavage, urine, and serum in military personnel evaluated for dyspnea

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Brown, Joseph N.; Brewer, Heather M.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Weitz, Karl K.; Morris, Michael J.; Skabelund, Andrew J.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.; Cho, Ji -Hoon; Gelinas, Richard

      2014-10-05

      Background: We have identified candidate protein and microRNA (miRNA) biomarkers for dyspnea by studying serum, lavage fluid, and urine from military personnel who reported serious respiratory symptoms after they were deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan. Methods: Forty-seven soldiers with the complaint of dyspnea who enrolled in the STudy of Active Duty Military Personnel for Environmental Dust Exposure (STAMPEDE) underwent comprehensive pulmonary evaluations at the San Antonio Military Medical Center. The evaluation included fiber-optic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage. The clinical findings from the STAMPEDE subjects pointed to seven general underlying diagnoses or findings including airway hyperreactivity, asthma, low diffusivity of carbon monoxide, and abnormal cell counts. The largest category was undiagnosed. As an exploratory study, not a classification study, we profiled proteins or miRNAs in lavage fluid, serum, or urine in this group to look for any underlying molecular patterns that might lead to biomarkers. Proteins in lavage fluid and urine were identified by accurate mass tag (database-driven) proteomics methods while miRNAs were profiled by a hybridization assay applied to serum, urine, and lavage fluid. Results: Over seventy differentially expressed proteins were reliably identified both from lavage and from urine in forty-eight dyspnea subjects compared to fifteen controls with no known lung disorder. Six of these proteins were detected both in urine and lavage. One group of subjects was distinguished from controls by expressing a characteristic group of proteins. A related group of dyspnea subjects expressed a unique group of miRNAs that included one miRNA that was differentially overexpressed in all three fluids studied. The levels of several miRNAs also showed modest but direct associations with several standard clinical measures of lung health such as forced vital capacity or gas exchange efficiency. Conclusions: Candidate proteins and miRNAs associated with the general diagnosis of dyspnea have been identified in subjects with differing medical diagnoses. Since these markers can be measured in readily obtained clinical samples, further studies are possible that test the value of these findings in more formal classification or casecontrol studies in much larger cohorts of subjects with specific lung diseases such as asthma, emphysema, or some other well-defined lung disease.