Sample records for opacity monitors rhode

  1. Microprocessor Based Combustion Monitoring and Control Systems Utilizing in Situ Opacity, Oxygen and CO Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molloy, R. C.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , self-diagnostics, field programmable memory, and improved operator interface. By measuring the products of combustion utilizing the latest In Situ Opacity, Oxygen, and CO Monitoring technology, the fuel air mixture ratio of industrial fuel burning...

  2. Method and apparatus of periodically obtaining accurate opacity monitor readings of an exhaust gas stream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, K.L.; Bellows, J.C.

    1990-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes in an opacity monitor associated with an exhaust stack, the monitor having a transmitter and a receiving which cooperate to measure a quantity of particulate matter in an exhaust gas stream, a method of periodically obtaining opacity monitor readings. It comprises: shielding the monitor from the exhaust gas stream by placing two windows adjacent to the monitor, a first window being placed between the transmitter and the exhaust gas stream and a second window being placed between the receiver and the exhaust gas stream; cleaning at least one of the windows for a first predetermined time period by spraying a volatile nonflammable cleaning solvent onto the window by means of a sprayer intermittently operable during the first predetermined time period while wiping the window with a reciprocating wiper arm in resilient engagement therewith; then obtaining an opacity monitor reading by directing a light beam across the exhaust stack from the transmitter via the first window through the exhaust gas stream to the receiver via the second window; and alternately repeating the step of cleaning the window with the step of obtaining an opacity monitor reading.

  3. CEMS (continuous emission monitoring systems) pilot project: evaluation of opacity CEMS reliability and QA (quality assurance) procedures. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peeler, J.W.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was conducted in Missouri to evaluate the reliability of opacity-monitoring data and to facilitate the development and evaluation of QA procedures for opacity CEMS's. The study included opacity CEMS's installed on six coal-fired electric utility generating units at four generating stations, each owned by a different company. The sources were representative of a wide range of monitoring applications and conditions, and were equipped with contemporary opacity monitoring instrumentation. For each station, monitor- and source-specific opacity CEMS QA procedures were developed and CEMS audits were conducted at the beginning of the study. Plant personnel implemented and revised the QA procedures and conducted a performance audit during a 6- to 8-month period. Performance audits were also conducted at the end of the study. The report presents evaluations both of opacity CEMS reliability (i.e., accuracy, precision, and availability) and of the QA procedures that were used in the study. In summary, appropriate and effective QA procedures can be developed and implemented for a variety of opacity monitoring equipment and applications without imposing an undue burden on the monitor operators. Such procedures are inherently source- and monitor-specific. Reliable opacity monitoring data are obtained when appropriate QA procedures are implemented.

  4. Opacity meter for monitoring exhaust emissions from non-stationary sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dec, John Edward (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for determining the opacity of exhaust plumes from moving emissions sources. In operation, a light source is activated at a time prior to the arrival of a diesel locomotive at a measurement point, by means of a track trigger switch or the Automatic Equipment Identification system, such that the opacity measurement is synchronized with the passage of an exhaust plume past the measurement point. A beam of light from the light source passes through the exhaust plume of the locomotive and is detected by a suitable detector, preferably a high-rate photodiode. The light beam is well-collimated and is preferably monochromatic, permitting the use of a narrowband pass filter to discriminate against background light. In order to span a double railroad track and provide a beam which is substantially stronger than background, the light source, preferably a diode laser, must provide a locally intense beam. A high intensity light source is also desirable in order to increase accuracy at the high sampling rates required. Also included is a computer control system useful for data acquisition, manipulation, storage and transmission of opacity data and the identification of the associated diesel engine to a central data collection center.

  5. Oxygen and Opacity Stack Emission Monitoring Systems To Optimize Combustion Efficiency and Meet EPA Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molloy, R. C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    monitoring systems. REFERENCES 1. KVB, Inc. Report to FEA, Contract No. C-04-50085-00. Assessment of the Potential for Energy Conservation through Improved Industrial Boiler Efficiency, Final Report, Volume I. 2. Everything you Need to Know About...

  6. Interconnection Guidelines (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rhode Island enacted legislation (HB 6222) in June 2011 to standardize the application process for the interconnection of customer-sited renewable-energy systems to the state’s distribution grid....

  7. Forestry Policies (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rhode Island's forests cover over half of the state's land area, and are managed by the Department of Environmental Management, Division of Forest Environment. The State issued its "Forest...

  8. Rhode Island Stormwater Design and Installation Standards Manual (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rhode Island's stormwater design and installation standards manual has been developed to describe mandatory and suggested stormwater design and performance criteria for applicants to the Department...

  9. Small-Scale Solar Grants (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation (RIEDC) provides incentives for renewable-energy projects. Incentive programs are funded by the Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund (RIREF) and...

  10. Rhodes Hall Ross Heart Hospital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Emergency 315 315 26 Rhodes Hall Ross Heart Hospital James Cancer Hospital Martha Morehouse.m. James Cancer Hospital 7:10 a.m. Rhodes Hall 7:13 a.m. Ross Heart Hospital 7:15 a.m. Martha Morehouse

  11. Utility stack opacity troubleshooting guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keeth, R.J. (United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., Denver, CO (USA). Stearns-Roger Div.); Balfour, D.A.; Meserole, F.M.; Defries, T. (Radian Corp., Austin, TX (USA))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stack plume visibility, otherwise defined as plume opacity, has become a concern to the utility industry. This concern stems from the fact that some coal-fired stations with operating FGD systems have been cited for opacity in excess of the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) even though the particulate mass emissions are within regulated limits. Postulated causes for the unacceptable opacities include scrubber-generated particulate matter, condensible particulate matter such as sulfuric acid mist, fine particles penetrating the particulate control device, and/or colored gases such as nitrogen dioxide in the flue gas. It is important that the underlying cause of the plume opacity be identified to determine if it is possible to reduce plume opacity. This report presents a troubleshooting methodology developed during field tests at four utilities experiencing high stack opacities. Results from these field tests are presented as case studies to demonstrate how this methodology can be applied by a utility to determine the cause of their plume opacity. 10 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Helioseismic determination of opacity corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. C. Tripathy; Sarbani Basu; J. Christensen-Dalsgaard

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effect of localized opacity modifications on the sound-speed profile of solar models. The sound-speed difference between the Sun and a solar model is used to deduce the opacity correction that would be required to bring the model into agreement with the Sun. We test this procedure on artificial data for a pair of solar models and apply it to the solar sound speed as inferred from inversion of LOWL observed frequencies. We show that a solar model constructed with the appropriately modified opacity has a sound-speed profile very similar to that of the Sun.

  13. Climate Action Plan (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In the fall of 2001, the Department of Environmental Management (DEM), the RI State Energy Office (SEO), and the Governor's office convened the Rhode Island Greenhouse Gas Stakeholder Project in...

  14. Solar opacity, neutrino signals and helioseismology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Ricci

    1996-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In connection with the recent suggestion by Tsytovich et al. that opacity in the solar core could be overestimated, we consider the following questions: i) What would a 10\\% opacity reduction imply for the solar neutrino puzzle? ii) Is there any hope of solving the solar neutrino puzzle by changing opacity? iii) Is a 10\\% opacity reduction testable with helioseismological data?

  15. Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund (RIREF)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rhode Island's Public Utilities Restructuring Act of 1996 created the nation's first public benefits fund (PBF) for renewable energy and demand-side management (DSM). The Rhode Island Renewable...

  16. Commercial-Scale Renewable-Energy Grants (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation (RIEDC) provides incentives for renewable-energy projects. Incentive programs are funded by the Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund (RIREF) and...

  17. Rhode Island Natural Gas Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia" "EmissionDecadeElements)per3.79

  18. Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Rhode Island as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific...

  19. TBU-0058- In the Matter of Donald R. Rhodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Donald R. Rhodes (Rhodes or the complainant) appeals the dismissal of his August 25, 2006 complaint of retaliation filed under 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee...

  20. TOPS Opacities: Opacities of mixtures (calculated by TOPS« using LEDCOP« elemental opacities) and LEDCOP« Astrophysical Opacities mixed by TOPS«) from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The LANL T-4 Group develops methods for and perform calculations of atomic structure, scattering cross sections, opacities, exotic atoms, and quantum and nonlinear optics, including effects of high energy density environments and interaction with external electromagnetic fields. The Opacity databases allow User chosen mixtures and/or elements and provide precalculated astrophysical mixtures.

    The Astrophysical Opacity data base contains opacity information for all elements from hydrogen to zinc, over a temperature range from 0.5 eV to 100 keV and a density range from 10-10 to 10+9 gm/cc. Every element has approximately 1500 (T-h) points, where T is the temperature and h is the electron degeneracy parameter, which characterizes the electron pressure of the plasma at the ion-plasma boundary. [Copied from LANL T-4 Opacity Web Page, Norman H. Magee, Jr. (T-4) and Robert E. H. Clark (X-CI), a Theoretical Self-Assessment Special Feature, May,1999. See LA-UR-99-336] (Specialized Interface)

  1. Opacity reduction using hydrated lime injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, D.E.; Seaba, J.P. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this investigation is to study the effects of injecting dry hydrated lime into flue gas to reduce sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}) concentrations and consequently stack opacity at the University of Missouri, Columbia power plant. Burning of high sulfur coal (approx. 4% by weight) at the power plant resulted in opacity violations. The opacity problem was due to sulfuric acid mist (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) forming at the stack from high SO{sub 3} concentrations. As a result of light scattering by the mist, a visible plume leaves the stack. Therefore, reducing high concentrations of SO{sub 3} reduces the sulfuric acid mist and consequently the opacity problem. The current hydrated lime injection system has reduced the opacity to acceptable limits. To reduce SO{sub 3} concentrations, dry hydrated lime is injected into the flue gas upstream of a particulate collection device (baghouse) and downstream of the induced draft fan. The lime is periodically injected into the flue via a pneumatic piping system. The hydrated lime is transported down the flue and deposited on the filter bags in the baghouse. As the hydrated lime is deposited on the bags a filter cake is established. The reaction between the SO{sub 3} and the hydrated lime takes place on the filter bags. The hydrated lime injection system has resulted in at least 95% reduction in the SO{sub 3} concentration. Low capital equipment requirements and operating cost coupled with easy installation and maintenance makes the system very attractive to industries with similar problems. This paper documents the hydrated lime injection system and tests the effectiveness of the system on SO{sub 3} removal and subsequent opacity reduction. Measurements Of SO{sub 3} concentrations, flue gas velocities, and temperatures have been performed at the duct work and baghouse. A complete analysis of the hydrated lime injection system is provided.

  2. Microcomputer programs for particulate control: section failure; baghouse; plume opacity prediction; and in-stack opacity calculator. Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparks, L.E.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IBM-PC usable versions of several computer models useful in particulate control are provided. The models were originally written for the TRS-80 Model I-III series of microcomputers and have been translated to run on the IBM-PC. The documentation for the TRS-80 versions applies to the IBM-PC versions. The programs are written in FORTRAN and are provided in both source (FORTRAN) and executable form. Some small machine language routines are used to format the screen for data entry. These routines limit the programs to IBM-PC and close clones. The minimum hardware requirements are 256K IBM-PC or close clone, a monochrome monitor, and a disk drive. A printer is useful but not required. The following computer programs are provided in the four-disk package: (1) ESP section failure model, (2) GCA/EPA baghouse model, (3) Plume opacity prediction model, and (4) In-stack opacity calculator. All the models are documented in EPA report Microcomputer Programs for Particulate Control, EPA-600/8-85-025a (PB86-146529). The models provide useful tools for those involved in particulate control.

  3. Fly ash system technology improves opacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Unit 3 of the Dave Johnston Power Plant east of Glenrock, WY, USA had problems staying at or below the opacity limits set by the state. The unit makes use of a Lodge Cottrell precipitator. When the plant changed to burning Power River Basin coal, ash buildup became a significant issue as the fly ash control system was unable to properly evacuate hoppers on the unit. To overcome the problem, the PLC on the unit was replaced with a software optimization package called SmartAsh for the precipitator fly ash control system, at a cost of $500,000. After the upgrade, there have been no plugged hoppers and the opacity has been reduced from around 20% to 3-5%. 2 figs.

  4. TI-59 programmable calculator programs for in-stack opacity, venturi scrubbers, and electrostatic precipitators. User manual Jul 78-Jul 79

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowen, S.J.; Ensor, D.S.; Sparks, L.E.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report explains the basic concepts of in-stack opacity as measured by in-stack opacity monitors. Also included are calculator programs that model the performance of venturi scrubbers and electrostatic precipitators. The effect of particulate control devices on in-stack opacity can be predicted by using these programs. The size distribution data input can be either in lognormal or histogram format. The opacity is calculated using Deirmendjian's approximation to Mie series to obtain extinction efficiencies. An alternative opacity program employing the exact Mie series solution is also described. The running time for this program is about 8 hours; that for the approximation program is 30 minutes. The accuracy of these programs is as good as the measured data input.

  5. Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications: Environmental Monitoring Program. Baseline sampling program report: Volume 2, Appendix sections 1--7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart, L.M.

    1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains no text. It consist entirely of results monitoring stack opacity, benzene surveys, chemical effluent in wastewater, etc.

  6. OPserver: interactive online-computations of opacities and radiative accelerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Mendoza; M. J. Seaton; P. Buerger; A. Bellorin; M. Melendez; J. Gonzalez; L. S. Rodriguez; F. Delahaye; E. Palacios; A. K. Pradhan; C. J. Zeippen

    2007-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Codes to compute mean opacities and radiative accelerations for arbitrary chemical mixtures using the Opacity Project recently revised data have been restructured in a client--server architecture and transcribed as a subroutine library. This implementation increases efficiency in stellar modelling where element stratification due to diffusion processes is depth dependent, and thus requires repeated fast opacity reestimates. Three user modes are provided to fit different computing environments, namely a web browser, a local workstation and a distributed grid.

  7. Rhodes and Marshall Scholarships Campus Level Competition --Cover Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straight, Aaron

    Rhodes and Marshall Scholarships Campus Level Competition -- Cover Sheet Please submit this form with your Rhodes/Marshall Campus Application by Sept 3, 2013 to the Overseas Resource Center, Bechtel Address Permanent Phone MARSHALL Applicants Region through which you will apply Choice of universities

  8. Rhode Island/Geothermal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant of Access(CaliforniaProductionKGRA, Idaho.DeepwaterRhode

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICE OFFuelsPropane Tank Overfill SafetyVehicleRhode Island

  10. INTERPLAY OF NEUTRINO OPACITIES IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lentz, Eric J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Mezzacappa, Anthony; Hix, W. Raphael [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6354 (United States); Messer, O. E. Bronson [National Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6164 (United States); Bruenn, Stephen W., E-mail: elentz@utk.edu [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments using spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics with the code Agile-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of modern neutrino opacities on the development of supernova simulations. We test the effects of opacities by removing opacities or by undoing opacity improvements for individual opacities and groups of opacities. We find that improvements to electron capture (EC) on nuclei, namely EC on an ensemble of nuclei using modern nuclear structure models rather than the simpler independent-particle approximation (IPA) for EC on a mean nucleus, plays the most important role during core collapse of all tested neutrino opacities. Low-energy neutrinos emitted by modern nuclear EC preferentially escape during collapse without the energy downscattering on electrons required to enhance neutrino escape and deleptonization for the models with IPA nuclear EC. During shock breakout the primary influence on the emergent neutrinos arises from non-isoenergetic scattering (NIS) on electrons. For the accretion phase, NIS on free nucleons and pair emission by e {sup +} e {sup -} annihilation have the largest impact on the neutrino emission and shock evolution. Other opacities evaluated, including nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung and especially neutrino-positron scattering, have little measurable impact on neutrino emission or shock dynamics. Modern treatments of nuclear EC, e {sup +} e {sup -}-annihilation pair emission, and NIS on electrons and free nucleons are critical elements of core-collapse simulations of all dimensionality.

  11. Development and application of a microcomputer based model for acid plume opacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K.T. (National Cheng Kung Univ., (TW))

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many stationary sources discharge visible emission into the atmosphere. A visible plume can be a problem either from the viewpoint of particulate emission standards or of aesthetics and public concern. In recent years, with the installation of high efficiency particulate emission control devices on utility and industrial boilers, detached plumes have become more of a problem because formerly the emission of primary particulate matter obscured and/or served as a condensing surface for the condensable material. In order to better understand the phenomenon of detached plumes, a model is formulated to describe in mathematical terms the relationship between the particle suspension leaving the stack and the particulate composition of the plume as it evolves downwind of the stack. This model provides a means of relating parameters that govern plum opacity which is not feasible from a monitoring standpoint. Input parameters can be put into the model to investigate the effects on resulting plume opacity levels.

  12. Rules and Regulations for Sewage Sludge Management (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of these rules and regulations is to ensure that sewage sludge that is treated, land applied, disposed, distributed, stockpiled or transported in the State of Rhode Island is done so in...

  13. THE UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND FRINGE BENEFIT AVERAGE RATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    THE UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND FRINGE BENEFIT AVERAGE RATE FY 2015 Allocation Cost or Classified.2% URI Budget & Financial Planning Office 9.17.14 Office:fringebenefits:office of sponsored projects: FY2015 Allocation #12;

  14. Rules and Regulations for Groundwater Quality (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations provide standards for groundwater quality in the state of Rhode Island. The rules are intended to protect and restore the quality of the state's groundwater resources for use as...

  15. NLTE Opacities of Mid- and High-Z Cocktails

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherrill, Manolo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abdallah, Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Honglin, Zhang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fontes, Christopher J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kilcrease, David P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we report on the development of a new method for computing mid-and high-Z NLTE opacities. A study has been performed using this method to assess the EOS and opacity sensitivities to the radiation field for both single species Au and multi-species SnNb and U{sub 3}Au plasma cocktails with an emphasis on moderately to highly ionized systems. Developed as a benchmark tool to assess both current and future in line NLTE opacity capabilities, we have applied this new approach to assess XSN spectral fidelity for Au at commonly expected NIF hohlraum conditions.

  16. Options for controlling condensation aerosols to meet opacity standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damle, A.S.; Ensor, D.S.; Sparks, L.E.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The article gives results of an analysis of the condensing aerosol problem and an evaluation of possible control approaches to reduce the downwind detached plume opacity. The opacity of such plumes may be reduced by reducing the concentration of condensible vapors, the in-stack concentration of fine particles, or both. Results of the analysis indicate that, for low concentrations of condensible vapors, the detached-plume opacity may be adequately controlled by reducing the in-stack fine-particulate concentration alone. For high concentrations of condensible vapors, however, reduction of in-stack fine particulate concentration alone may not be effective: reduction of vapor concentration may be necessary along with particulate removal for adequate reduction of plume opacity. Different combinations of levels of reduction of vapor concentration and particulate-phase concentration are possible to achieve a desired result; and thus may be optimized to obtain a cost-effective combination.

  17. Solar opacities constrained by solar neutrinos and solar oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, A.N.

    1989-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This review discusses the current situation for opacities at the solar center, the solar surface, and for the few million kelvin temperatures that occur below the convection zone. The solar center conditions are important because they are crucial for the neutrino production, which continues to be predicted about 4 times that observed. The main extinction effects there are free-free photon absorption in the electric fields of the hydrogen, helium and the CNO atoms, free electron scattering of photons, and the bound-free and bound-bound absorption of photons by iron atoms with two electrons in the 1s bound level. An assumption that the iron is condensed-out below the convection zone, and the opacity in the central regions is thereby reduced, results in about a 25 percent reduction in the central opacity but only a 5 percent reduction at the base of the convection zone. Furthermore, the p-mode solar oscillations are changed with this assumption, and do not fit the observed ones as well as for standard models. A discussion of the large effective opacity reduction by weakly interacting massive particles also results in poor agreement with observed p-mode oscillation frequencies. The much larger opacities for the solar surface layers from the Los Alamos Astrophysical Opacity Library instead of the widely used Cox and Tabor values show small improvements in oscillation frequency predictions, but the largest effect is in the discussion of p-mode stability. Solar oscillation frequencies can serve as an opacity experiment for the temperatures and densities, respectively, of a few million kelvin and between 0.1 and 10 g/cm/sup 3/. Current oscillation frequency calculations indicate that possibly the Opacity Library values need an increase of typically 15 percent just at the bottom of the convection zone at 3 /times/ 10/sup 6/K. 41 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  18. arXiv:astro-ph/0508261v111Aug2005 THE OPACITY OF SPIRAL GALAXY DISKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kruit, Piet van der

    Figure 2 shows the stacked radial opacity profile of our entire sample of 32 HST/WFPC2 fields. FromarXiv:astro-ph/0508261v111Aug2005 THE OPACITY OF SPIRAL GALAXY DISKS Dust opacity from calibrated Abstract The opacity of foreground spiral disks can be probed from the number of distant galaxies seen

  19. Correlation of plume opacity with particles and sulfates from boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lou, J.C.; Lee, M.; Chen, K.S. [National Sun Yat-Sen Univ., Kaohsiung (Taiwan, Province of China). Inst. of Environmental Engineering

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of emission concentrations of particulate matters and sulfates on plume opacity are investigated by in situ measurements. The studies are conducted for three processes of two coal-fired plants and one oil-fired that are all equipped with electrostatic precipitators. Flue-gas sampling and analysis include the concentrations of particles and total water soluble sulfates, particle size distribution, and flue-gas composition; while in-stack and out-of-stack opacities are determined by a transmissometer and certified smoke inspectors, respectively. Experimental results show that plume opacity outside the stack linearly correlates well with the in-stack opacity. The mixing of hot flue gas with cold ambient air would result in the condensation of hygroscopic sulfuric acid aerosols and an increase about 1.6% out of typical 15--25% measured opacity. An empirical equation similar to the Beer-Lambert-Bouger form is derived for predicting the plume opacity in terms of the stack diameter and the concentrations of particles and total water soluble sulfates. Good comparisons are achieved between predictions by the empirical equation and other available field data.

  20. The Rhode Island state house--the competition (1890-1892)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Hilary A. (Hilary Ann)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a study of the design competition for the new State House in Providence, Rhode Island, which began in 1890 and ended in 1892. The competition was supervised by the Rhode Island State House Commission, a body formed ...

  1. UWMadison Campus Nomination Process for Rhodes, Marshall and Mitchell Scholarships Information for Recommenders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    UWMadison Campus Nomination Process for Rhodes, Marshall and Mitchell Scholarships Information to the Rhodes Scholarship, Marshall Scholarship, and/or Mitchell Scholarship from UWMadison. These scholarships fund postbaccalaureate study at the University of Oxford (Rhodes), any university in the UK (Marshall

  2. Options for controlling condensation aerosols to meet opacity standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damle, A.S.; Ensor, D.S.; Sparks, L.E.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The opacity of detached plumes formed by condensation of vapors depends upon both the concentration of condensible vapors and the in-stack concentration of fine, submicron, particulate matter. This paper provides an analysis of the condensing aerosol problem and an evaluation of possible control approaches to reduce the downwind detached plume opacity. The opacity of such plumes may be reduced by reducing the concentration of condensible vapors or the in-stack concentration of fine particles or both. The results of the analysis indicate that for low concentrations of condensible vapors the detached plume opacity may be adequately controlled by reducing the in-stack fine particulate concentration alone. For high concentrations of condensible vapors, however, reduction of in-stack fine particulate concentration alone may not be effective, and reduction of vapor concentration may be necessary along with particular removal for adequate reduction of plume opacity. Different combinations of levels of reduction of vapor concentration and particulate phase concentration are possible to achieve a desired result; and thus may be optimized to obtain a cost-effective combination.

  3. Interplay of Neutrino Opacities in Core-collapse Supernova Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lentz, Eric J [ORNL; Mezzacappa, Anthony [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Hix, William Raphael [ORNL; Bruenn, S. W. [Florida Atlantic University

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments using spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics with the code Agile-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of including, and improving, the calculation of neutrino opacities on the development of supernova simulations by removing, or replacing, each opacity individually, or removing opacities in groups. We find that during core collapse improvements to electron capture (EC) on nuclei, namely EC on an ensemble of nuclei based on the hybrid model, relative to the simpler independent-particle approximation (IPA) for a mean nucleus, plays the most important role of all tested neutrino opacities. Low-energy neutrinos emitted by nuclear EC preferentially escape during collapse leading to larger deleptonization of the collapsing core, without the energy downscattering via non-isoenergetic scattering (NIS) on electrons required for the models with IPA nuclear EC. During shock breakout the primary influence on the emergent neutrinos arises from NIS on electrons. For the accretion phase NIS on free nucleons and pair emission by $e^+e^-$-annihilation have the largest impact on the neutrino emission and shock evolution. Other opacities evaluated including nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung and especially neutrino-positron scattering have little measurable impact on neutrino emission or shock dynamics. Modern treatments of nuclear electron capture, $e^+e^-$-annihilation pair emission, and non-isoenergetic scattering on electrons and free nucleons are critical elements of core-collapse simulations of all dimensionality.

  4. Rhode Island Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia"Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode

  5. renewable energy from waste 1730 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE, NW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    renewable energy from waste 1730 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE, NW SUITE 700 WASHINGTON, DC 20036 WWW Energy and Security Act of 2009 that was released as a discussion draft on March 31. While waste-to-energy gas reductions and renewable energy provided by waste-to-energy and if it implemented policies

  6. University of Rhode Island inAdvance March 29, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    University of Rhode Island inAdvance March 29, 2007 Volume 4, Issue 7 Is today your lucky day? If you renew your membership in (or join) the URI Alumni Association before April 6, your name: Two season tickets for the 2007-2008 URI Men's Basketball home games; two season tickets for the 2007

  7. University of Rhode Island inAdvance March 31, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    . To protect your privacy, log in is required. Thank you for taking the time to vote! Please URI first public family to their newly built home The URI College of Human Science and Services and South County HabitatUniversity of Rhode Island inAdvance March 31, 2005 Volume 2, Issue 7 There's no place like home

  8. New solar opacities, abundances, helioseismology, and neutrino fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John N. Bahcall; Aldo M. Serenelli; Sarbani Basu

    2005-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct solar models with the newly calculated radiative opacities from the Opacity Project (OP) and recently determined (lower) heavy element abundances. We compare results from the new models with predictions of a series of models that use OPAL radiative opacities, older determinations of the surface heavy element abundances, and refinements of nuclear reaction rates. For all the variations we consider, solar models that are constructed with the newer and lower heavy element abundances advocated by Asplund et al. (2005) disagree by much more than the estimated measuring errors with helioseismological determinations of the depth of the solar convective zone, the surface helium composition, the internal sound speeds, and the density profile. Using the new OP radiative opacities, the ratio of the 8B neutrino flux calculated with the older and larger heavy element abundances (or with the newer and lower heavy element abundances) to the total neutrino flux measured by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is 1.09 (0.87) with a 9% experimental uncertainty and a 16% theoretical uncertainty, 1 sigma errors.

  9. Per-pixel Opacity Modulation for Feature Enhancement in Volume Rendering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strasbourg, Université de

    1 Per-pixel Opacity Modulation for Feature Enhancement in Volume Rendering Stéphane Marchesin Abstract-- Classical direct volume rendering techniques accu- mulate color and opacity contributions using the standard volume rendering equation approximated by alpha blending. However, such standard rendering

  10. Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides apparatus and methods which facilitate movement of an instrument relative to an item or location being monitored and/or the item or location relative to the instrument, whilst successfully excluding extraneous ions from the detection location. Thus, ions generated by emissions from the item or location can successfully be monitored during movement. The technique employs sealing to exclude such ions, for instance, through an electro-field which attracts and discharges the ions prior to their entering the detecting location and/or using a magnetic field configured to repel the ions away from the detecting location.

  11. Fractal dimension of interstellar clouds: opacity and noise effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nestor Sanchez; Emilio J. Alfaro; Enrique Perez

    2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    There exists observational evidence that the interstellar medium has a fractal structure in a wide range of spatial scales. The measurement of the fractal dimension (Df) of interstellar clouds is a simple way to characterize this fractal structure, but several factors, both intrinsic to the clouds and to the observations, may contribute to affect the values obtained. In this work we study the effects that opacity and noise have on the determination of Df. We focus on two different fractal dimension estimators: the perimeter-area based dimension (Dper) and the mass-size dimension (Dm). We first use simulated fractal clouds to show that opacity does not affect the estimation of Dper. However, Dm tends to increase as opacity increases and this estimator fails when applied to optically thick regions. In addition, very noisy maps can seriously affect the estimation of both Dper and Dm, decreasing the final estimation of Df. We apply these methods to emission maps of Ophiuchus, Perseus and Orion molecular clouds in different molecular lines and we obtain that the fractal dimension is always in the range 2.6 2.3) average fractal dimension for the interstellar medium, as traced by different chemical species.

  12. EIS-0006: Wind Turbine Generator System, Block Island, Rhode Island

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of installing and operating a large experimental wind turbine, designated the MOD-OA, which is proposed to be installed on a knoll in Rhode Island's New Meadow Hill Swamp, integrated with the adjacent Block Island Power Company power plant and operated to supply electricity to the existing utility network.

  13. South Jersey Energy Company (Rhode Island) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar PowerstoriesNrelPartnerTypePonsa,HomeIndiana:Rhode Island References: EIA Form

  14. Pascoag, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,Orleans County,PPPSolarParagonThisParkman,910625°,Pascoag, Rhode

  15. Direct Energy Services (Rhode Island) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (The followingDirect Energy Services Place: MarylandServices (Rhode

  16. Providence, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacity Jump to:USGSMeanReservoirTemp JumpProterra JumpProvidence, Rhode

  17. CSER 2007 Shah, Rhodes, Hastings 2007 MIT Slide 1 Systems of Systems and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    CSER 2007 Shah, Rhodes, Hastings © 2007 MIT Slide 1 Systems of Systems and Emergent System Context MIT Slide 2 Agenda · What is a system of systems (SOS)? · What is the context of a system? · What;CSER 2007 Shah, Rhodes, Hastings © 2007 MIT Slide 3 What is a systems of systems? Much greater

  18. Quantification of Uncertainties Due to Opacities in a Laser-Driven Radiative-Shock Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hetzler, Adam C

    2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    ......................................................................... 44 3.2 Introduction to Uncertain Parameters in Opacity Calculations ......................... 45 3.3 Analysis of Relevant Uncertain Data Used in the CRASH Code ..................... 45 3.3.1 Evaluation of Oscillator Strengths... with Adjusted Xenon Opacity .......... 71 5.1.3 Results Using Oscillator Strengths ............................................................ 80 5.1.4 Results Using Oscillator Strengths with Adjusted Xenon Opacity ........... 89 5.2 Results for the 1-D...

  19. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Rhode Island | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:JuneNovember 26,EnergyOregonRMOTC Categorical ExclusionRhode

  20. Cumberland Hill, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003)Crowley County, Colorado:Cumberland CountyRhode Island:

  1. East Greenwich, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified asThis article is aAg ProductsEnergyGreenwich, Rhode

  2. O. E. Rhodes, Jr. | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohnSecurityControls |NavyNuclearLife Users andO.Rhodes

  3. Rhode Island Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia" "Emission Type",.7 1,030 1,029

  4. Rhode Island Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia" "Emission Type",.7

  5. Rhode Island Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia" "Emission Type",.7Decade Year-0

  6. Rhode Island Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia" "Emission Type",.7Decade

  7. Rhode Island Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia" "Emission Type",.7Decade,735

  8. Rhode Island Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia" "Emission Type",.7Decade,735Cubic

  9. Rhode Island Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia" "Emission

  10. Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia" "EmissionDecade Year-0 Year-1Additions

  11. Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia" "EmissionDecade Year-0

  12. Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia" "EmissionDecade Year-0Feet)

  13. Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia" "EmissionDecade

  14. Rhode Island Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia"

  15. Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia"Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

  16. Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia"Total Consumption (Million Cubic

  17. Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia"Total Consumption (Million Cubic(Million

  18. Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia"Total Consumption (Million

  19. Rhode Island Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia"Total Consumption (MillionDecade Year-0

  20. Rhode Island Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia"Total Consumption (MillionDecade Year-0Year

  1. Rhode Island Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia"Total Consumption (MillionDecade(Dollars per

  2. Energy Incentive Programs, Rhode Island | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergyIDIQBusinessin Jamaica,Idaho EnergyMontanaOregon EnergyRhode Island

  3. Light element opacities of astrophysical interest from ATOMIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colgan, J.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Magee, N. H. Jr.; Armstrong, G. S. J.; Abdallah, J. Jr.; Sherrill, M. E. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Fontes, C. J.; Zhang, H. L.; Hakel, P. [Computational Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new calculations of local-thermodynamic-equilibrium (LTE) light element opacities from the Los Alamos ATOMIC code for systems of astrophysical interest. ATOMIC is a multi-purpose code that can generate LTE or non-LTE quantities of interest at various levels of approximation. Our calculations, which include fine-structure detail, represent a systematic improvement over previous Los Alamos opacity calculations using the LEDCOP legacy code. The ATOMIC code uses ab-initio atomic structure data computed from the CATS code, which is based on Cowan's atomic structure codes, and photoionization cross section data computed from the Los Alamos ionization code GIPPER. ATOMIC also incorporates a new equation-of-state (EOS) model based on the chemical picture. ATOMIC incorporates some physics packages from LEDCOP and also includes additional physical processes, such as improved free-free cross sections and additional scattering mechanisms. Our new calculations are made for elements of astrophysical interest and for a wide range of temperatures and densities.

  4. Continuous particulate monitoring for emission control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bock, A.H. (BHA Group, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States))

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical continuous particle monitoring system has been developed to overcome common problems associated with emissions monitoring equipment. Opacity monitors generally use a single- or double-pass system to analyze the presence of dust particles in the flue gas stream. The particles scatter and absorb light as it passes through the stack. As the particle content in the gas stream increases due to bag failure or some other problem, the amount of light that is blocked also increases. The opacity monitor compares the amount of lost light energy to the total energy of the light available and translates the signal to percentage of opacity. Opacity monitors are typically installed to meet the requirements set forth by pollution control agencies. Most opacity monitors are designed to meet all of the requirements of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 40 CFR, Part 60, Appendix B, Performance Specification. The new continuous particle monitor (CPM) increases the accuracy of emission monitoring and overcomes typical problems found in conventional emission monitoring devices. The CPM is an optically based, calibratible, continuous dust monitor that uses a microprocessor, transmitter head, and receiver head. When calibrated with an isokinetic sample, a continuous readout of particulate concentration (in mg/m[sup 3]) in the exhaust gas is provided. The system can be used as a filter bag failure system or a long-term emission trend analyzer. Formal testing was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the optically based CPM. The monitor was calibrated using particles of a range of compositions, size distributions, and concentrations. The feasibility of using the instrument to measure particle concentration as low as 10 mg/m[sup 3] was examined.

  5. Plume opacity investigation at a stoker-fired power generating station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, G.H.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A public utility contacted the Conoco Coal Research Division through Consolidation Coal Company and requested technical assistance in determining the cause of a high plume opacity at one of their stoker-fired power generating stations. The sporadic occurrence of a high opacity plume (>20%) had been reported for several years. Although the utility was burning low sulfur coal, sulfuric acid mist had been suspected as the cause of the plume opacity; therefore, anhydrous ammonia had been injected into the flue gas at the ESP inlet plenums to control the plume opacity with some degree of success. However, for the last two years, the high plume opacity has occurred more frequently. The possible causes of the high plume opacity investigated were: 1) organic species emissions, 2) particulate mass loading, 3) particle size distribution, and 4) sulfuric acid emissions. The investigation included detailed sampling inside the boiler, stack, and plume areas. It was determined that the major cause of the high plume opacity was submicron particle growth at the stack exit due to sulfuric acid/water condensation. The larger particles more efficiently scattered light which resulted in the visible plume at the stack exit. The organic emissions and particulate mass loading in the stack flue gas had minimal effect on the high plume opacity. The fly ash size distribution would also have had minimal effect if the sulfuric acid had not been present.

  6. Passive remote smoke plume opacity sensing: a technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lilenfeld, P.; Woker, G.; Stern, R.; McVay, L.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new passive technique for the remote measurement of the visual opacity of plumes emerging from smokestacks is presented. It is based on the detection of the attenuation of the polarized component of Rayleigh-scattered background skylight as it traverses a smoke plume. A two-color difference measurement of the polarization of skylight through the plume is compared with a similar measurement of the unattenuated sky-light adjacent to the plume. This method is independent of the intrinsic brightness of the plume resulting from the scattering of sunlight and cancels white-light polarization effects of plume-scattered radiation. A prototype instrument incorporating this method has been successfully field tested on an EPA smoke school generator and a power plant stack plume.

  7. An approach to reduce start-up opacity on a coal-fired cycling unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costello, P.A. (Illinois Power Co., Havana Power Station, Havana, IL (US))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by the need to prevent stack emission discharges even during start-up, an operations program was initiated to reduce opacity on a coal-fired cycling unit. The measurement basis is a numeric comparison of annual start-ups and yearly totals for reportable opacity six-minute averages. The unit of interest has been in commercial operation since 1978 and has experienced more than 1600 cycles of operation. The 46 gross megawatt fossil fuel unit has shown a rising capacity factor as cycling frequency has increased during the past years. This paper examines the effectiveness of the opacity reduction program and the experiences and methods required to achieve the results. 1986 reference data showed 122 reportable opacity occurrences for 145 unite start-ups. Combined 1988-89 records tabulated to 48 reportable opacity occurrences for 303 cycling operations.

  8. Limestone/adipic acid FGD and stack opacity reduction pilot plant tests at Big Rivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laslo, D.; Bakke, E.; Chisholm, E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Big Rivers Electric Corporation (BREC) contracted Peabody Process Systems, Inc. (PPSI) to install a flue gas cleaning (FGC) pilot plant at the BREC R.D. Green Station Unit No. 2 located at Sebree, KY. A six month test program was completed demonstrating technology for: alternatives to using lime as an alkali; methods for improving cake dewatering; identification of the causes of high stack opacity; and methods for the reduction of high stack opacity. This paper presents highlights extracted from the reports submitted by PPSI to BREC on this test program. BREC was primarily interested in reduction of operating costs, if possible, by using an alkali less expensive than lime, and by improving the poor dewatering characteristic inherent in a dolomitic lime system. BREC was also within compliance for particulate emissions and opacity in the duct after the dry electrostatic precipitator, but not in compliance with the stack opacity regulation, and therefore wanted to investigate methods for stack opacity reduction.

  9. REACTOR DOSIMETRY STUDY OF THE RHODE ISLAND NUCLEAR SCIENCE CENTER.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOLDEN, N.E.,; RECINIELLO, R.N.; HU, J.-P.

    2005-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC), located on the Narragansett Bay Campus of the University of Rhode Island, is a state-owned and US NRC-licensed nuclear facility constructed for educational and industrial applications. The main building of RINSC houses a two-megawatt (2 MW) thermal power critical reactor immersed in demineralized water within a shielded tank. As its original design in 1958 by the Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission focused on the teaching and research use of the facility, only a minimum of 3.85 kg fissile uranium-235 was maintained in the fuel elements to allow the reactor to reach a critical state. In 1986 when RINSC was temporarily shutdown to start US DOE-directed core conversion project for national security reasons, all the U-Al based Highly-Enriched Uranium (HEU, 93% uranium-235 in the total uranium) fuel elements were replaced by the newly developed U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al based Low Enriched Uranium (LEU, {le}20% uranium-235 in the total uranium) elements. The reactor first went critical after the core conversion was achieved in 1993, and feasibility study on the core upgrade to accommodate Boron Neutron-Captured Therapy (BNCT) was completed in 2000 [3]. The 2-MW critical reactor at RINSC which includes six beam tubes, a thermal column, a gamma-ray experimental station and two pneumatic tubes has been extensive utilized as neutron-and-photon dual source for nuclear-specific research in areas of material science, fundamental physics, biochemistry, and radiation therapy. After the core conversion along with several major system upgrade (e.g. a new 3-MW cooling tower, a large secondary piping system, a set of digitized power-level instrument), the reactor has become more compact and thus more effective to generate high beam flux in both the in-core and ex-core regions for advance research. If not limited by the manpower and operating budget in recent years, the RINSC built ''in concrete'' structure and control systems should have been systematically upgraded to a 5 Mw power facility to further enhance its experimental capability while still maintaining its safe margin as designed.

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Rhode Island.

  11. Promoting Independence in Rhode Island: Weatherization Assistance Close-Up Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D& R International

    2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Rhode Island demonstrates its commitment to technology and efficiency through the Weatherization Program. Weatherization uses advanced technologies and techniques to reduce energy costs for low-income families by increasing the energy efficiency of their homes.

  12. High opacity white plumes from coal-fired and oil-fired sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K.T. (National Cheng Kung Univ. (TW))

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, with the installation of high efficiency particulate emission control devices on utility and industrial boilers, high-opacity white plumes have become more of a problem because formerly the emissions of primary particulate matter obscured and/or served as a condensing surface for the condensable material. The problem common to some of these installations is the violation of opacity standards due to the presence of a high-opacity persistent plume that emits from the stack. Oil fired boilers violating opacity standards typically comply with mass emission standards while coal fired boilers typically violate visual emission standards when simultaneously violating mass emission standards. The investigation reported here focuses on the atypical case when in-situ transmissometer measurements show compliance but plume opacity as measured by Reference Method 9 or LIDAR exceeds opacity standards. This case comes about due to gas phase reactions that produce fine aerosols, vapor phase condensation and physical agglomeration of sub-micron sized clusters and particles. The plume opacity control technology applicable to these aerosols which are created and/or grown in white plume is discussed in this paper.

  13. Field Performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters in the Northeast, Massachusetts and Rhode Island (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) are finally entering the mainstream residential water heater market. Potential catalysts are increased consumer demand for higher energy efficiency electric water heating and a new Federal water heating standard that effectively mandates use of HPWHs for electric storage water heaters with nominal capacities greater than 55 gallons. When compared to electric resistance water heating, the energy and cost savings potential of HPWHs is tremendous. Converting all electric resistance water heaters to HPWHs could save American consumers 7.8 billion dollars annually ($182 per household) in water heating operating costs and cut annual residential source energy consumption for water heating by 0.70 quads. Steven Winter Associates, Inc. embarked on one of the first in situ studies of these newly released HPWH products through a partnership with two sponsoring electric utility companies, National Grid and NSTAR, and one sponsoring energy efficiency service program administrator, Cape Light Compact. Recent laboratory studies have measured performance of HPWHs under various operating conditions, but publicly available field studies have not been as available. This evaluation attempts to provide publicly available field data on new HPWHs by monitoring the performance of three recently released products (General Electric GeoSpring, A.O. Smith Voltex, and Stiebel Eltron Accelera 300). Fourteen HPWHs were installed in Massachusetts and Rhode Island and monitored for over a year. Of the 14 units, ten were General Electric models (50 gallon units), two were Stiebel Eltron models (80 gallon units), and two were A.O. Smith models (one 60-gallon and one 80-gallon unit).

  14. A simple method to verify the opacity and equation of state of high-Z plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Guangwei [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 10094 (China) [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 10094 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Beijing 10088 (China); Li, Jinghong [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 10094 (China) [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 10094 (China); Laboratory of Computational Physics, Beijing 100088 (China); Yang, Jiamin; Zhu, Tuo [Research Center of Laser Fusion, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [Research Center of Laser Fusion, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zou, Shiyang; Wang, Min [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 10094 (China)] [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 10094 (China); Zhang, Weiyan [National Hi-Tech Inertial Confinement Fusion Committee of China, Beijing 100088 (China)] [National Hi-Tech Inertial Confinement Fusion Committee of China, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate opacity and equation of state (EOS) data are important parameters for reliable modeling and understanding many phenomena of high energy density physics. However, they are difficult to obtain either theoretically or experimentally especially for high-Z plasmas. In this paper, we proposed a simple method to verify the opacity and EOS of high-Z plasmas in rarefactive states, which is build on the two key aspects of ablation processes, i.e., the propagation of heatwave into materials and the hydrodynamic expansion of the blow-off plasmas. Based on the integrated analysis of the Au foil burnthrough and foam-confined plasma expansion experiments performed on the Shenguang II and Shenguang III prototype laser facilities, we suggested two semi-empirical multipliers to adjust the opacity and EOS of Au plasma. These adjusted opacity and EOS may then provide a foundation for other radiation hydrodynamic simulations under similar drive conditions.

  15. Measuring Nighttime Atmospheric Opacity Using Images From the Mars Exploration Rovers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bean, Keri M

    2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric opacity, otherwise known as optical depth, is the measurement of the amount of radiation reaching the surface through the atmosphere. The spatial and temporal patterns in optical depth tell us about the aerosol and cloud cycles...

  16. Correlation between smoke opacities as determined by transmissometer readings and visual observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, John Herschel

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    he devised a system and simple apparatus (the "Ringelmann Chart" ) to determine the opacity of plumes from the stacks of coal-fired, and eventually oil-fired, furnaces. He had no interest in pollution oontrol, but rather was interested in cor..., or with the aid of a pyrheliometer. Various degrees of success have been reported for this method. ~ It is also possible to estimate plume opacity by laboratory methods. A known volume of stack gas is colleoted and the entrained particulates separated...

  17. Alpha Dithering to Correct Low-Opacity 8 Bit Compositing Errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, P L; Frank, R J; LaMar, E C

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes and analyzes a dithering technique for accurately specifying small values of opacity ({alpha}) that would normally not be possible because of the limited number of bits available in the alpha channel of graphics hardware. This dithering technique addresses problems related to compositing numerous low-opacity semitransparent polygons to create volumetric effects with graphics hardware. The paper also describes the causes and a possible solution to artifacts that arise from parallel or distributed volume rendering using bricking on multiple GPU's.

  18. Trade-offs between NO{sub x} heat rate and opacity at Morgantown Unit 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D`Agostini, M.; Walsh, R.; Eskenazi, D.; Levy, E. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In work carried out at Morgantown Unit 2, PEPCO and Lehigh University developed techniques for optimizing the operation of an ABB-CE LNCFS III low NO{sub x} firing system. Because of marginal ESP capacity, the ability to reduce NO{sub x} is limited by opacity excursions at this unit. Using a parametric boiler testing approach, and guided by neural network techniques for analysis of the data, control settings were identified which minimize the full load heat rate as a function of the target NO{sub x} level, subject to a stack opacity constraint.

  19. EUTROPHICATION A J Gold, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gold, Art

    EUTROPHICATION A J Gold, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA J T Sims, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, USA Ă? 2005, Elsevier Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Introduction Eutrophication describes in nutrient inputs. Phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) are the nutrients that drive most eutrophication processes

  20. Image-Based Volume Rendering with Opacity Light Fields Miriah Meyer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Miriah

    Image-Based Volume Rendering with Opacity Light Fields Miriah Meyer1 Hanspeter Pfister2 Charles hardware has proven valuable for volume rendering, large datasets continue to overwhelm the capabilities of the graphics cards, reducing the inter- activity of volume rendering utilizing such hardware. We present

  1. Image-Based Volume Rendering with Opacity Light Miriah Meyer, Hanspeter Pfister, Charles Hansen, Chris Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    1 Image-Based Volume Rendering with Opacity Light Fields Miriah Meyer, Hanspeter Pfister, Charles valuable for volume rendering, large datasets continue to overwhelm the capabilities of the graphics cards, reducing the interactivity of volume rendering utilizing such hardware. We present a novel, image

  2. Rules for the Discharge of Non-Sanitary Wastewater and Other Fluids To or Below the Ground Surface (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of these rules to protect and preserve the quality of the groundwater of the State of Rhode Island (the “State”) and to prevent contamination of groundwater resources from the discharge...

  3. Assistant Professor, Ocean Engineering The Department of Ocean Engineering at the University of Rhode Island (URI) invites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Assistant Professor, Ocean Engineering The Department of Ocean Engineering at the University of Rhode Island (URI) invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position in ocean energy systems

  4. Transitions in Medieval Mediterranean Shipbuilding: A Reconstruction of the Nave Quadra of the Michael of Rhodes Manuscript

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valenti, Vincent N.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of Italy, particularly Venice. In most cases, though, this body of evidence is given only a cursory examination or is altogether overlooked. One may highlight various reasons why this appears to be the general trend, the most significant of which...) Page CHAPTER Shipbuilding Treatises of Medieval Venice .................................. 55 V THE MICHAEL OF RHODES MANUSCRIPT????????.. 63 The Service of Michael of Rhodes and the Formation of His Manuscript...

  5. Introduction to continuous emission monitoring programs. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peeler, J.W.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a general introduction to continuous emission monitoring for those persons not previously involved in this field. Information is presented on continuous opacity monitoring, as well as instrumental and alternative monitoring techniques for SO2 and NOx (i.e., continuous wet-chemical measurement methods and fuel sampling and analysis methods). This document presents an outline and review of the fundamental concepts, terminology, and procedures used in a continuous emission monitoring program. Also presented are selected technical details necessary to understand the operation of emission monitors, the use of continuous emission monitoring data by air pollution control agencies, and references to other available documents which provide additional information.

  6. CEMs turn monitoring giant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, J.R. (KVB/Analect, Irvine, CA (United States))

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crucial to complying with environmental regulations is selecting appropriate pollution control equipment to capture or destroy regulated pollutants. But just as important is selecting a continuous emissions monitoring system (CEM). CEMs play a dual role in an overall compliance strategy. On one hand, they identify the type and quantity of emissions at a source as a first step for determining which regulatory requirements and control technologies are applicable. They also provide ongoing emissions data to demonstrate compliance with air and other environmental regulations. Facilities are required to monitor their processes with CEMs, or a comparable technology, under several titles of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. CEMs meet regulatory requirements if they include a SO[sub 2] concentration monitor, nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) concentration monitor, volumetric flow monitor, opacity monitor, diluent gas monitor and data acquisition and handling system. The entire system and each subsystem has to be installed and certified before it can be used for compliance. A written quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) plan for the CEMs must accompany the permit application. The acid rain rules also impose performance standards and frequent calibration checks to ensure the integrity of CEMs data.

  7. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Rhode Island) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: EnergyPowerInformation Rhode Island References: EIA

  8. Control of nitric acid plant stack opacity during start-up and shutdown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.B.; Gasper, J.A.; Stash, P.J.

    1989-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes an improvement in a process for the production of nitric acid wherein air and ammonia are mixed and combusted in an ammonia burner to produce an effluent containing nitrogen oxides. The effluent is cooled, condensed and separated into a liquid weak acid stream and gas stream. The liquid weak acid and vapor streams are fed into an absorber tower wherein they are countercurrently contacted with water to produce a nitric acid stream and an overhead with a reduced nitrogen oxides content. The overhead is combusted with a fuel in the presence of a catalyst in a catalytic combustor to produce a combustor exhaust, work expanded in an expander to recover energy and vented to the atmosphere as stack exhaust. The improvement involves controlling the opacity of the stack opacity during shutdown of the process.

  9. Found: The missing blue opacity in atmosphere models of cool hydrogen white dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. M. Kowalski; D. Saumon

    2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the importance of the far red wing of the Lyman $ \\alpha$ line of hydrogen in the atmospheres of cool white dwarfs of pure hydrogen composition. We find that this absorption process dominates all important sources of opacity in the blue part of the optical spectrum of these stars. Our successful fits to the spectra of cool DA/DC white dwarfs indicate that the far red wing of the $\\rm Ly \\alpha$ line is the source of opacity that had been missing in the models. The observed sequence of cool white dwarfs in color-color diagrams is very well reproduced by our new pure hydrogen atmosphere models, suggesting that the atmospheric composition of the coolest DC white dwarfs must be revisited.

  10. An Analysis of Source Tilting and Sub-cell Opacity Sampling for IMC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollaeger, Ryan T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbatsch, Todd J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wollaber, Allan B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Densmore, Jeffery D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) is a stochastic method for solving the radiative transfer equations for multiphysics application with the material in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The IMC method employs a fictitious scattering term that is computed from an implicit discretization of the material temperature equation. Unfortunately, the original histogram representation of the temperature and opacity with respect to the spatial domain leads to nonphysically fast propagation of radiation waves through optically thick material. In the past, heuristic source tilting schemes have been used to mitigate the numerical teleportation error of the radiation particles in IMC that cause this overly rapid radiation wave propagation. While improving the material temperature profile throughout the time duration, these tilting schemes alone do not generally alleviate the teleportation error to suitable levels. Another means of potentially reducing teleportation error in IMC is implementing continuous sub-cell opacities based on sub-cell temperature profiles. We present here an analysis of source tilting and continuous sub-cell opacity sampling applied to various discretizations of the temperature equation. Through this analysis, we demonstrate that applying both heuristics does not necessarily yield more accurate results if the discretization of the material equation is inconsistent with the Monte Carlo sub-cell transport.

  11. White dwarf atmosphere models with Ly-$?$ opacity in the analysis of the white dwarf cooling sequence of NGC 6397

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr M. Kowalski

    2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the importance of pure hydrogen white dwarf atmosphere models with Ly-$\\rm \\alpha$ far red wing opacity in the analysis of the white dwarf cooling sequence of the globular cluster NGC 6397. Our recently improved atmosphere models account for the previously missing opacity from the Ly-$\\rm \\alpha$ hydrogen line broadened by collisions of the absorbing hydrogen atoms with molecular and atomic hydrogen. These models are the first that well reproduce the UV colors and spectral energy distributions of cool white dwarfs with $T_{\\rm eff}white dwarf cooling sequence using atmosphere models that do not include the correct Ly-$\\alpha$ opacity is underestimated by $\\sim 0.5$ Gyr. Our analysis shows that it is essential to use white dwarf atmosphere models with Ly-$\\rm \\alpha$ opacity for precise dating of old stellar populations from white dwarf cooling sequences.

  12. Long term performance of 137 stack gas continuous emission monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hebert, R.P. (Scott Environmental Tech., Inc., San Bernardino, CA); Mitchell, W.J.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance data were obtained on 137 monitors representing a total operating time of 1,600,000 hours. The monitors were classified as follows: 74 NO/sub x/, 37 SO/sub 2/, 7 combination NO/sub x//SO/sub 2/, 8 O/sub 2/, and 11 opacity. Results show that data processor failure accounted for 84% of O/sub 2/, 74% of the opacity, and 61% of the combination SO/sub 2//NO/sub x/ continuous emission monitor malfunctions. Each of these three types of moniters had the same average malfunction time (17 hours). Data from one source, a refinery, estimated operation, calibration, and maintenance costs to be $70,000/yr/monitor. (JMT)

  13. Presented at 2012 IEEE Systems and Information Engineering Design Symposium, University of Virginia, April 27, 2012 Abstract--The water quality in the West and Rhode Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presented at 2012 IEEE Systems and Information Engineering Design Symposium, University of Virginia, April 27, 2012 Abstract-- The water quality in the West and Rhode Rivers (WRR), two mezohaline sub be the most cost-effective and sustainable alternative. I. INTRODUCTION HE West and Rhode rivers are two sub

  14. Rhode Island Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Rhode Island homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Rhode Island homeowners will save $11,011 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $629 for the 2012 IECC.

  15. Beyond Nuclear Pasta: Phase Transitions and Neutrino Opacity of Non-Traditional Pasta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo N. Alcain; Pedro A. Giménez Molinelli; Claudio O. Dorso

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we focus on different length scales within the dynamics of nucleons in conditions according to the neutron star crust, with a semiclassical molecular dynamics model, studying isospin symmetric matter at subsaturation densities. While varying the temperature, we find that a solid-liquid phase transition exists, that can be also characterized with a morphology transition. For higher temperatures, above this phase transition, we study the neutrino opacity, and find that in the liquid phase, the scattering of low momenta neutrinos remain high, even though the morphology of the structures differ significatively from those of the traditional nuclear pasta.

  16. Rhode Island Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia" "Emission Type",.7 1,030

  17. Rhode Island Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia" "EmissionDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2

  18. Rhode Island Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia" "EmissionDecade Year-0Feet) Lease

  19. Rhode Island Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia" "EmissionDecadeElements) (Million

  20. Rhode Island Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia" "EmissionDecadeElements)

  1. Rhode Island Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia" "EmissionDecadeElements)per

  2. Rhode Island Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia"Total Consumption (MillionDecade

  3. Rhode Island Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia"Total Consumption (MillionDecade(Dollars

  4. Rhode Island Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadoreConnecticutPhotos of AEC SiteEnvironmental ResearchRhode Island

  5. Rhode Island Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadoreConnecticutPhotos of AEC SiteEnvironmental ResearchRhode

  6. A Direct Measurement of the IGM Opacity to HI Ionizing Photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prochaska, J Xavier; O'Meara, John M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new method to directly measure the opacity from HI Lyman limit (LL) absorption k_LL along quasar sightlines by the intergalactic medium (IGM). The approach analyzes the average (``stacked'') spectrum of an ensemble of quasars at a common redshift to infer the mean free path (MFP) to ionizing radiation. We apply this technique to 1800 quasars at z=3.50-4.34 drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), giving the most precise measurements on k_LL at any redshift. From z=3.6 to 4.3, the opacity increases steadily as expected and is well parameterized by MFP = (48.4 +/- 2.1) - (38.0 +/- 5.3)*(z-3.6) h^-1 Mpc (proper distance). The relatively high MFP values indicate that the incidence of systems which dominate k_LL evolves less strongly at z>3 than that of the Lya forest. We infer a mean free path three times higher than some previous estimates, a result which has important implications for the photo-ionization rate derived from the emissivity of star forming galaxies and quasars. Finally, our ana...

  7. Analysis of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the Rhode Island/Massachusetts Wind Energy Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to BOEM on the identification and delineation of offshore leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM in 2012. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of BOEM's Rhode Island/Massachusetts (RIMA) WEA leasing areas. The objective of the NREL evaluation was to assess the proposed delineation of the two leasing areas and determine if the division is reasonable and technically sound. Additionally, the evaluation aimed to identify any deficiencies in the delineation. As part of the review, NREL performed the following tasks: 1. Performed a limited review of relevant literature and RIMA call nominations. 2. Executed a quantitative analysis and comparison of the two proposed leasing areas 3. Conducted interviews with University of Rhode Island (URI) staff involved with the URI Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) 4. Prepared this draft report summarizing the key findings.

  8. Systems of Systems and Emergent System Context Nirav B. Shah Dr. Donna H. Rhodes Prof. Daniel E. Hastings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Paper #85 Systems of Systems and Emergent System Context Nirav B. Shah Dr. Donna H. Rhodes Prof of systems of systems (SOS) is the emergent na- ture of the context of the SOS. In the spirit of Herbert that create the environment for goal attainment of a system. As SOS are sys- tems, they too have contexts

  9. Development of a stack plume opacity index for subbituminous coal-fired utility boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galbreath, K.C.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; McCollor, D.P.; Toman, D.L. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Powder River Basin subbituminous coals were burned using conventional and low-NO{sub x} combustion conditions in a drop-tube furnace equipped with a multicyclone ash collection device. Fine ash fractions (< 2 {micro}m in diameter) collected during the tests were analyzed using computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSEM). Advances in particulate sample preparation methods enabled the CCSEM analysis of individual ash particles with submicron diameters as small as 0.1 {micro}m. The fine ash samples produced from the conventional combustion of coal consisted of discrete spherical particles, whereas particle agglomerates were characteristic of the low-NO{sub x} ash samples. Particle-size distributions of the low-NO{sub x} fine ash fractions were coarser because of the agglomeration. Theoretical light-scattering calculations indicate that for a given coal, the ash produced in low-NO{sub x} conditions causes less opacity as compared to conventional combustion conditions. The following phases were abundant in the ashes: Ca aluminosilicate, Ca aluminate, aluminosilicate, silica, (Ca, Mg)O, CaSO{sub 4}, Na{sub 2} SO{sub 4}, and (Na, K)Cl. Primary mechanisms that produced the fine ash include the thermal metamorphism of small (0.1 to 5 {micro}m) mineral grains and the vaporization and subsequent condensation of organically bound Na, Mg, and Ca, Empirical equations for estimating the concentration of fine ash produced from burning subbituminous coals were formulated into an opacity index based on CCSEM coal mineral and fine ash analyses and on drop-tube furnace testing results. The effects of ash electrical resistivity on electrostatic precipitator collection efficiency are also considered in the index.

  10. Certification of flow monitors for utility boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bensink, J.; Beachler, D.; Joseph, J.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of CEMS for measuring opacity, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} concentration was well proven prior to implementing the Part 75 CEMS program. However, the use of continuous flue gas flow monitoring devices is a relatively new instrumental technique. Limited operating data for flow monitors were available and little or no certification relative accuracy data were available prior to the Summer of 1993. However, because of the Part 75 requirements, utility companies contracted with CEMS vendors to install, start-up and certify flow monitors on Phase 1 and Phase 2 units. This paper presents the certification history of three different types of flow monitors (ultrasonic, pressure differential ({Delta}p) and thermal) installed at various utilities in the US. The data and experience was obtained from approximately 100 Phase 1 CEMS units and 200 Phase 1 CEMS units.

  11. 47th AIAA Structures, Structural Dynamics and Materials Conference, May 1-4, 2006 Newport, Rhode Island Comparative Analysis of Computational Methods for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jameson, Antony

    in turbomachinery, helicopter blades in forward flight, wind turbines, flapping flight, flow control using synthetic47th AIAA Structures, Structural Dynamics and Materials Conference, May 1-4, 2006 Newport, Rhode

  12. The Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center conversion from HEU to LEU fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tehan, Terry

    2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2-MW Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC) open pool reactor was converted from 93% UAL-High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to 20% enrichment U3Si2-AL Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The conversion included redesign of the core to a more compact size and the addition of beryllium reflectors and a beryllium flux trap. A significant increase in thermal flux level was achieved due to greater neutron leakage in the new compact core configuration. Following the conversion, a second cooling loop and an emergency core cooling system were installed to permit operation at 5 MW. After re-licensing at 2 MW, a power upgrade request will be submitted to the NRC.

  13. Control and diagnosis of temperature, density, and uniformity in x-ray heated iron/magnesium samples for opacity measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagayama, T.; Bailey, J. E.; Loisel, G.; Hansen, S. B.; Rochau, G. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Mancini, R. C. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States)] [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); MacFarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I. [Prism Computational Sciences, Madison, Wisconsin 53703 (United States)] [Prism Computational Sciences, Madison, Wisconsin 53703 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental tests are in progress to evaluate the accuracy of the modeled iron opacity at solar interior conditions, in particular to better constrain the solar abundance problem [S. Basu and H. M. Antia, Phys. Rep. 457, 217 (2008)]. Here, we describe measurements addressing three of the key requirements for reliable opacity experiments: control of sample conditions, independent sample condition diagnostics, and verification of sample condition uniformity. The opacity samples consist of iron/magnesium layers tamped by plastic. By changing the plastic thicknesses, we have controlled the iron plasma conditions to reach (1) T{sub e}?=?167?±?3?eV and n{sub e}?=?(7.1?±?1.5)×?10{sup 21}?cm{sup ?3}, (2) T{sub e}?=?170?±?2?eV and n{sub e}?=?(2.0?±?0.2)?×?10{sup 22}?cm{sup ?3}, and (3) T{sub e}?=?196?±?6?eV and n{sub e}?=?(3.8?±?0.8)?×?10{sup 22}?cm{sup ?3}, which were measured by magnesium tracer K-shell spectroscopy. The opacity sample non-uniformity was directly measured by a separate experiment where Al is mixed into the side of the sample facing the radiation source and Mg into the other side. The iron condition was confirmed to be uniform within their measurement uncertainties by Al and Mg K-shell spectroscopy. The conditions are suitable for testing opacity calculations needed for modeling the solar interior, other stars, and high energy density plasmas.

  14. THE COLUMN DENSITY DISTRIBUTION AND CONTINUUM OPACITY OF THE INTERGALACTIC AND CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM AT REDSHIFT (z) = 2.4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudie, Gwen C.; Steidel, Charles C. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Shapley, Alice E. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90024 (United States); Pettini, Max, E-mail: gwen@astro.caltech.edu [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new high-precision measurements of the opacity of the intergalactic and circumgalactic medium (IGM; CGM) at (z) = 2.4. Using Voigt profile fits to the full Ly{alpha} and Ly{beta} forests in 15 high-resolution high-S/N spectra of hyperluminous QSOs, we make the first statistically robust measurement of the frequency of absorbers with H I column densities 14{approx}< log (N{sub H{sub I}}/cm{sup -2}){approx}<17.2. We also present the first measurements of the frequency distribution of H I absorbers in the volume surrounding high-z galaxies (the CGM, 300 pkpc), finding that the incidence of absorbers in the CGM is much higher than in the IGM. In agreement with Rudie et al., we find that there are fractionally more high-N{sub H{sub I}} absorbers than low-N{sub H{sub I}} absorbers in the CGM compared to the IGM, leading to a shallower power law fit to the CGM frequency distribution. We use these new measurements to calculate the total opacity of the IGM and CGM to hydrogen-ionizing photons, finding significantly higher opacity than most previous studies, especially from absorbers with log (N{sub H{sub I}}/cm{sup -2}) < 17.2. Reproducing the opacity measured in our data as well as the incidence of absorbers with log (N{sub H{sub I}}/cm{sup -2})>17.2 requires a broken power law parameterization of the frequency distribution with a break near N{sub H{sub I}} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. We compute new estimates of the mean free path ({lambda}{sub mfp}) to hydrogen-ionizing photons at z{sub em} = 2.4, finding {lambda}{sub mfp} = 147 {+-} 15 Mpc when considering only IGM opacity. If instead, we consider photons emanating from a high-z star-forming galaxy and account for the local excess opacity due to the surrounding CGM of the galaxy itself, the mean free path is reduced to {lambda}{sub mfp} = 121 {+-} 15 Mpc. These {lambda}{sub mfp} measurements are smaller than recent estimates and should inform future studies of the metagalactic UV background and of ionizing sources at z Almost-Equal-To 2-3.

  15. HELIOS-K: An Ultrafast, Open-source Opacity Calculator for Radiative Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimm, Simon L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an ultrafast opacity calculator for application to exoplanetary atmospheres, which we name HELIOS-K. It takes a line list as an input, computes the shape of each spectral line (e.g., a Voigt profile) and provides an option for grouping an enormous number of lines into a manageable number of bins. We implement a combination of Algorithm 916 and Gauss-Hermite quadrature to compute the Voigt profile, write the code in CUDA and optimise the computation for graphics processing units (GPUs). We use the k-distribution method to reduce $\\sim 10^5$ to $10^8$ lines to $\\sim 10$ to $10^4$ wavenumber bins, which may then be used for radiative transfer, atmospheric retrieval and general circulation models. We demonstrate that the resampling of the k-distribution function, within each bin, is an insignificant source of error across a broad range of wavenumbers and column masses. By contrast, the choice of line-wing cutoff for the Voigt profile is a significant source of error and affects the value of the compute...

  16. TRS-80 in-stack opacity computer programs: user and programmer manual. Report for April 1982-June 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowen, S.J.; Ensor, D.S.; Sparks, L.E.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual describes a microcomputer program written to estimate instack opacity from ducted sources. Input data required to run the program are the particle-size distribution, particle refractive index, mass emission concentration, wavelength of light, particle density, and stack diameter. The particle-size distribution may be entered either as a histogram of particle diameter and fraction-greater-than-stated diameter or as log normal particle size distribution. The program calculates and displays the in-stack opacity. The program is written in the BASIC computer language and is specifically designed for the TRS-80 Model I, II, and IV computers. A moderate effort will be required to convert the programs to the IBM-PC and similar computers.

  17. Opacity and gradients in aluminum wire array z-pinch implosions on the Z pulsed power facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ampleford, D. J., E-mail: damplef@sandia.gov; Hansen, S. B.; Jennings, C. A.; Jones, B.; Coverdale, C. A.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Rochau, G. A.; Dunham, G.; Moore, N. W.; Harding, E. C.; Cuneo, M. E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Chong, Y.-K.; Clark, R. W.; Ouart, N.; Thornhill, J. W.; Giuliani, J.; Apruzese, J. P. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)] [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum wire array z pinches imploded on the Z generator are an extremely bright source of 1–2?keV radiation, with close to 400?kJ radiated at photon energies >1?keV and more than 50?kJ radiated in a single line (Al Ly-?). Opacity plays a critical role in the dynamics and K-shell radiation efficiency of these pinches. Where significant structure is present in the stagnated pinch this acts to reduce the effective opacity of the system as demonstrated by direct analysis of spectra. Analysis of time-integrated broadband spectra (0.8–25?keV) indicates electron temperatures ranging from a few 100?eV to a few keV are present, indicative of substantial temperature gradients.

  18. EFFECT OF A HIGH OPACITY ON THE LIGHT CURVES OF RADIOACTIVELY POWERED TRANSIENTS FROM COMPACT OBJECT MERGERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, Jennifer; Kasen, Daniel [Departments of Physics and Astronomy, 366 LeConte Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The coalescence of compact objects is a promising astrophysical source of detectable gravitational wave signals. The ejection of r-process material from such mergers may lead to a radioactively powered electromagnetic counterpart signal which, if discovered, would enhance the science returns. As very little is known about the optical properties of heavy r-process elements, previous light-curve models have adopted opacities similar to those of iron group elements. Here we consider the effect of heavier elements, particularly the lanthanides, which increase the ejecta opacity by several orders of magnitude. We include these higher opacities in time-dependent, multi-wavelength radiative transport calculations to predict the broadband light curves of one-dimensional models over a range of parameters (ejecta masses {approx}10{sup -3}-10{sup -1} M{sub Sun} and velocities {approx}0.1-0.3 c). We find that the higher opacities lead to much longer duration light curves which can last a week or more. The emission is shifted toward the infrared bands due to strong optical line blanketing, and the colors at later times are representative of a blackbody near the recombination temperature of the lanthanides (T {approx} 2500 K). We further consider the case in which a second mass outflow, composed of {sup 56}Ni, is ejected from a disk wind, and show that the net result is a distinctive two component spectral energy distribution, with a bright optical peak due to {sup 56}Ni and an infrared peak due to r-process ejecta. We briefly consider the prospects for detection and identification of these transients.

  19. Relationship of fly ash composition, refractive index, and density to in-stack opacity. Final report, June 1981-May 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowen, S.J.; Ensor, D.S.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report gives results of an investigation of the refractive index, density, and composition of fly ash from coal-fired boilers, aimed at determining: (1) the interrelationship of refractive index and composition, and (2) the significance of ash properties on in-stack plume opacity. A survey was made of 14 ash samples representing a wide range of coals. Light absorption was measured using the Integrating Plate Method, which compares light absorption through a clean filter to that through a filter with a single layer of aerosol. Only absorption is measured, while scattered light is integrated equally for both cases. This technique requires fine particles (volume absorbers) for easy interpretation of results. The technique was calibrated using an aerosol, methylene blue, with known absorption characteristics. The real part of the refractive index was measured by an oil immersion technique. The real refractive index and density were found to be highly correlated with composition with a multilinear regression equation. The absorbing refractive index was well correlated with ash carbon content. The modeling of in-stack opacity showed a weak dependence on ash optical properties for the range of ashes studied. The effect of the real part of the refractive index on opacity tends to be counterbalanced by particle density effects. Furthermore, most fly ash absorbs relatively little light.

  20. Health-Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 85-150-1767, Warwick Fire Department, Warwick, Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keenlyside, R.A.; House, L.A.; Kent, G.; Durand, J.M.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In answer to a request from the International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF), an evaluation was made of health complaints noted by fire fighters exposed to plastic products and pesticides during two separate fires attended to by the Warwick Fire Department, located in Warwick, Rhode Island. Questionnaires were administered to 43 persons who were only present at the plastics fire and 46 who were only present at the pesticide fire and to 13 present at both fires. The men who fought the plastic products fire and the pesticide fire apparently experienced acute symptoms related to smoke and chemical inhalation during the fires, including headache, cough, sore throat, wheezing, shortness of breath, rash, dizziness, nausea, blurred vision, and numbness. The authors conclude that fire fighters at these two fires experienced acute irritant symptoms from smoke and chemical inhalation. The authors recommend use of protective clothing, use of protective equipment, prefire planning, implementation of medical surveillance for all fire fighters, and the proper cleanup of protective clothing and equipment after fires.

  1. National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot, Massachusetts and Rhode Island (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Between December, 2009 and December, 2012 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a DER pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 37 of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while 5 were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. The 42 DER projects represent 60 units of housing. The comprehensive projects all implemented a consistent "package" of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Projects exhibited some variations in the approach to implementing the retrofit package. Pre- and post-retrofit air leakage measurements were performed for each of the projects. Each project also reported information about project costs including identification of energy-related costs. Post-retrofit energy-use data was obtained for 29 of the DER projects. Post-retrofit energy use was analyzed based on the net energy used by the DER project regardless of whether the energy was generated on site or delivered to the site. Homeowner surveys were returned by 12 of the pilot participants. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average. Larger to medium sized homes that successful implement these retrofits can be expected to achieve source EUI that is comparable to Passive House targets for new construction. The community of DER projects show post-retrofit airtightness below 1.5 ACH50 to be eminently achievable.

  2. Performance Results for Massachusetts and Rhode Island Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gates, C.; Neuhauser, K.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Between December, 2009 and December, 2012 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a DER pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 37 of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while 5 were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. The 42 DER projects represent 60 units of housing. The comprehensive projects all implemented a consistent 'package' of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Projects exhibited some variations in the approach to implementing the retrofit package. Pre- and post-retrofit air leakage measurements were performed for each of the projects. Each project also reported information about project costs including identification of energy-related costs. Post-retrofit energy-use data was obtained for 29 of the DER projects. Post-retrofit energy use was analyzed based on the net energy used by the DER project regardless of whether the energy was generated on site or delivered to the site. Homeowner surveys were returned by 12 of the pilot participants. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average. Larger to medium sized homes that successful implement these retrofits can be expected to achieve source EUI that is comparable to Passive House targets for new construction. The community of DER projects show post-retrofit airtightness below 1.5 ACH50 to be eminently achievable.

  3. Performance Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimization Performance Monitoring Performance Monitoring A redirector page has been set up without anywhere to redirect to. Last edited: 2014-08-25 14:37:27...

  4. Monitoring materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide techniques for effectively implementing alpha and/or beta and/or gamma monitoring of items or locations as desired. Indirect alpha monitoring by detecting ions generated by alpha emissions, in conjunction with beta and/or gamma monitoring is provided. The invention additionally provides for screening of items prior to alpha monitoring using beta and/or gamma monitoring, so as to ensure that the alpha monitoring apparatus is not contaminated by proceeding direct to alpha monitoring of a heavily contaminated item or location. The invention provides additional versatility in the emission forms which can be monitored, whilst maintaining accuracy and avoiding inadvertent contamination.

  5. Permit compliance monitoring for the power generation industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macak, J.J. III [Mostardi-Platt Associates, Inc., Elmhurst, IL (United States); Platt, T.B. [Commonwealth Edison Company, Waukegan, IL (United States); Miller, S.B. [Commonwealth Edison Company, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 authorized EPA to develop regulations requiring facilities to monitor the adequacy of emission control equipment and plant operations. Furthermore, under the CAAA, EPA is required to issue regulations to require owners and operators of large industrial facilities to enhance air pollution monitoring and certify compliance with air pollution regulations. The fossil-fueled power generation industry has been targeted with the promulgation of the Acid Rain Program regulations of 40 CFR 72, and the Continuous Emissions Monitoring requirements of 40 CFR 75. The Part 75 regulations, with a few exceptions, establish requirements for monitoring, recordkeeping, and reporting of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon dioxide emissions, volumetric flow, and opacity data from affected units under the Acid Rain Program. Depending upon the type of unit and location, other applicable emission limitations may apply for particulate emissions (both total and PM-10), carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds and sulfuric acid mist.

  6. Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  7. Wind turbine generator interaction with conventional diesel generators on Block Island, Rhode Island. Volume 1. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilreker, V.F.; Stiller, P.H.; Scott, G.W.; Kruse, V.J.; Smith, R.F.

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the primary results of a three-part study involving the effects of connecting a MOD-OA wind turbine generator to an isolated diesel power system. The subject utility is that owned and operated by the Block Island Power Company (BIPCO). The MOD-OA installation here was the third of four experimental nominal 200 kW wind turbines connected to various utilities under the Federal Wind Energy Program. The BIPCO installation was characterized by the highest wind energy penetration levels of four sites and, as such, was adjudged the best candidate for conducting the data acquisition and analysis effort that is the subject of this study. The three-phases of the study analysis address: (1) fuel displacement, (2) dynamic interaction, and (3) three modes of reactive power control. These analyses all have as their basis the results of the data acquisition program conducted during 1982 from February into April on Block Island, Rhode Island.

  8. Wind turbine generator interaction with conventional diesel generators on Block Island, Rhode Island. Volume II. Data analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilreker, V.F.; Stiller, P.H.; Scott, G.W.; Kruse, V.J.; Smith, R.F.

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to assess the performance of a MOD-OA horizontal axis wind turbine when connected to an isolated diesel utility, a comprehensive data measurement program was conducted on the Block Island Power Company installation on Block Island, Rhode Island. This report presents the detailed results of that program focusing on three principal areas of (1) fuel displacement (savings), (2) dynamic interaction between the diesel utility and the wind turbine, (3) effects of three modes of wind turbine reactive power control. The approximate two month duration of the data acquisition program conducted in the winter months (February into April 1982) revealed performance during periods of highest wind energy penetration and hence severity of operation. It is concluded that even under such conditions fuel savings were significant resulting in a fuel reduction of 6.7% while the MOD-OA was generating 10.7% of the total electrical energy. Also, electrical disturbance and interactive effects were of an acceptable level.

  9. RADIATION MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, R.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

  10. Sulfate formation in oil-fired power plant plumes. Volume 1. Parameters affecting primary sulfate emissions and a model for predicting emissions and plume opacity. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dietz, R.N.; Wieser, R.F.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High sulfuric acid emissions with concomitant acid smuts and plume opacity concerns at oil fired utility boilers has been associated with combustion of high sulfur-, high vanadium-containing fuel. The purpose of this program was to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the formation of flue gas H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and metal sulfates (MSO/sub 4/) and to determine the extent by which operating and controls parameters as well as the composition of the fuel affected those emissions. More than 200 flue gas measurements were made at a number of oil fired units and one coal fired unit, providing emissions levels of SO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, MSO/sub 4/, total suspended particulate, and NO/sub x/. Parameters shown to significantly affect H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and MSO/sub 4/ emissions were furnace O/sub 2/ level, sulfur and vanadium content of the fuel, the amount of corrosion inhibitor added to the oil, power level, and the composition of the fly ash. Correlations were developed which related the H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and MSO/sub 4/ emissions at oil fired units with the parameters above; predictions of emissions appear to be accurate to within +-25%. Based on limited data from the literature, the correlations were extended to include a means for predicting plume opacity and in-stack opacity. Recommendations for controlling the levels of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and MSO/sub 4/ emissions as well as maintaining utility units in compliance with opacity regulations were made. Future research needs were indicated, including more studies relating H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ levels in flue gas with plume opacity and emissions studies at coal fired units. 85 references, 27 figures, 23 tables.

  11. Acid rain program: CEMS submission instructions for monitoring plans, certification test notifications, and quarterly reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Acid Rain Program regulations require all affected utility units to continuously measure, record and report SO2, NOx, volumetric flow data and CO2 emissions. All affected units also must continuously measure and record opacity, and must report opacity exceedances to the appropriate State or Local Agency. To ensure that your CEMS and fuel flowmeters are performing at an acceptable level, and providing quality assured data, you are required under 40 CFR 75.53, 75.62 (a) to submit a monitoring plan and certification test data for acid rain CEM certificaton. The purpose of this handbook is to help you fulfill your requirements under the Acid Rain Program. This handbook will walk you through the necessary steps for gaining CEMS certification, including filling out and mailing the proper forms, administering the required tests, and applying for certification and sending in electronic data to EPA.

  12. Review of concurrent mass emission and opacity measurements for coal-burning utility and industrial boilers. Final report Aug 79-Feb 80

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, R.J.; Dennis, R.; Roeck, D.R.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report gives results of concurrent particulate emissions and opacity measurements based on visual observations and/or in-stack transmissometry for more than 400 compliance, acceptance, or experimental tests on coal-fired utility and industrial boilers. The sampling, which includes a capacity range of a few to several hundred megawatts and typical firing methods (pulverized, stoker, and cyclone), in most cases reflects flyash control by electrostatic precipitation, although filters or mechanical collectors were used at a few installations. All opacity measurements were standardized to their equivalent values for a 4 m (13.0 ft) diameter stack before being compared with their corresponding particulate emissions, the latter expressed as actual grams per cubic meter. No discernible correlations applicable to all sources were observed, although some modest (but apparently significant) correlations were noted on an individual source basis. Report findings were sufficiently encouraging to warrant further analyses relating to in-stack transmissometer measurements.

  13. Ion Monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for significantly reducing capacitance effects in detector electrodes arising due to movement of the instrument relative to the item/location being monitored in ion detection based techniques. The capacitance variations are rendered less significant by placing an electrically conducting element between the detector electrodes and the monitored location/item. Improved sensitivity and reduced noise signals arise as a result. The technique also provides apparatus and method suitable for monitoring elongate items which are unsuited to complete enclosure in one go within a chamber. The items are monitored part by part as the pass through the instrument, so increasing the range of items or locations which can be successfully monitored.

  14. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 11/11)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Generators Definition and Visual Determination of Opacity With regards to stack emissions, opacitySafe Operating Procedure (Revised 11/11) OPACITY OF EMISSIONS FROM COMBUSTION SOURCES (opacity) from combustion sources. Opacity monitoring & measurements are taken in accordance

  15. Electrostatic monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Cumbria, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Cumbria, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Cumbria, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for more simply measuring alpha and/or beta emissions arising from items or locations. The technique uses indirect monitoring of the emissions by detecting ions generated by the emissions, the ions being attracted electrostatically to electrodes for discharge of collection. The apparatus and method employ a chamber which is sealed around the item or location during monitoring with no air being drawn into or expelled from the chamber during the monitoring process. A simplified structure and operations arises as a result, but without impairing the efficiency and accuracy of the detection technique.

  16. Survey your options: Continuous emissions monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, J.R. [KVB/Analect, Irvine, CA (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the US the public`s growing concern for air quality over the last twenty-five years has led to a complex patchwork of federal, state and local regulations aimed at controlling the emissions of pollutants from manufacturing facilities, power plants and municipal waste-incineration facilities. Like a shadow on the heels of a sprinter, the continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) industry has developed as a direct result of these regulations. In just two and a half decades, the CEM market has grown from a few specialized instrument firms to a billion-dollar business today--a remarkable feat considering there were few true CEM systems in existence prior to the enactment of the original US Clean Air Act of 1970. Despite the emergence of so many vendors offering so many different monitoring techniques, operators still face a host of complex issues when trying to select the right CEM. For facilities operating in today`s competitive, highly regulated environment, cost and performance pressures are stronger than ever. These pressures have forced CEM developers toward innovation to improve performance while containing capital and plant operating costs. This article provides an overview of the current status of CEM systems, and provides a glimpse at some of the new developments that will affect future monitoring configurations. Noteworthy new techniques include continuous emissions monitoring using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analyzers, laser-based opacity monitors, and the growing use of software-based, predictive CEMs. Also discussed is a new approach that overcomes the problems associated with measuring SO{sub 2} in fluegas streams downstream of NOx-reduction systems that use ammonia or urea injection.

  17. Rhode Island Pretreatment Regulations (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations set standards for water pretreatment prior to release to Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTWs), and require effluent data including the identity, amount, frequency, concentration...

  18. Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    Levinson, D. (2000) Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity p. 165-181 in Land Market Monitoring for Smart Urban) task. Monitoring infrastructure capacity is at least as complex as monitoring urban land markets Levinson, D. (2000) Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity p. 165-181 in Land Market Monitoring for Smart Urban

  19. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a monitoring well which includes an enclosure defining a cavity and a water reservoir enclosed within the cavity and wherein the reservoir has an inlet and an outlet. The monitoring well further includes a porous housing borne by the enclosure and which defines a fluid chamber which is oriented in fluid communication with the outlet of the reservoir, and wherein the porous housing is positioned in an earthen soil location below-grade. A geophysical monitoring device is provided and mounted in sensing relation relative to the fluid chamber of the porous housing; and a coupler is selectively moveable relative to the outlet of reservoir to couple the porous housing and water reservoir in fluid communication. An actuator is coupled in force transmitting relation relative to the coupler to selectively position the coupler in a location to allow fluid communication between the reservoir and the fluid chamber defined by the porous housing.

  20. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

  1. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

    1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

  2. Tritium monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chastagner, P.

    1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream. 1 fig.

  3. Tritium monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chastagner, Philippe (Augusta, GA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

  4. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring Area sampler Control measures (best management practices) installed at the Site Monitoring Area Structures such as...

  5. Final report of the Rhode Island State Energy Office on residential no. 2 heating oil and propane prices [SHOPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClanahan, Janice

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary report on residential No.2 heating oil and propane prepared under grant. Summarizes the monitoring and analysis of heating oil and propane prices from October 2000 through March 2001.

  6. Comprehensive monitoring program for fossil fuel utility boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moffett, J.W.; Garcia, A.M.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kentucky Utilities Company (KUCo) is an investor-owned electric utility serving customers in 78 Kentucky counties and through a subsidiary, Old Dominion Power Company, serves customers in five counties in southwestern Virginia. Over 99 percent of all electricity generated is from coal. KUCo has five coal-fired generating stations with a total generating capacity of 2,530,000 kilowatts. According to regulations adopted by the Kentucky Division of Air Pollution (DAP), each existing, indirect heat exchanger having a capacity factor greater than thirty percent is required to install, operate and maintain continuous opacity and sulfur dioxide monitoring equipment. Newer units already had continuous emission monitors (CEM's) and they were also required to monitor for nitrogen oxides. When the CEM retro-fit project was started in the spring of 1980, the operating status, as well as the manufacturer and model numbers of existing equipment, were identified. Approximately 80 percent of the existing equipment was manufactured by Lear Siegler, Inc. (LSI). Most of the LSI equipment was operable and it was determined that LSI equipment would be used for the retro-fit project. Existing equipment was renovated to include recent design changes and improvements and some equipment supplied by others was replaced.

  7. Utility Monitor September 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utility Monitor September 2010 Why monitor utility syntax? Enforce and Maintain Company-Wide DB2 Utility Standards. Jennifer Nelson Product Specialist, Rocket Software © 2010 IBM Corporation © 2010............................................................................................................... iv 1 Why Monitor DB2 Utility Syntax

  8. HP Steam Trap Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pascone, S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STEAM MONITORING HP Steam Trap Monitoring HP Steam Trap Monitoring ? 12-18 months payback! ? 3-5% permanent reduction in consumption ? LEED Pt.? Innovation in Operations EB O&M ? Saved clients over $1,000,000 Annual consumption... Steam Trap Monitoring ? Real-time monitoring for high-pressure critical traps (>15 PSIG) ? Average total system cost $25K - $50K ? Web-Based or Modbus/BMS Integration Basic Installation Wireless Signal Transmitter Receiver Repeater...

  9. Corrosion monitoring apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Hugh S. (Shoreham, NY); Weeks, John R. (Stony Brook, NY)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion monitoring device in an aqueous system which includes a formed crevice and monitoring the corrosion of the surfaces forming the crevice by the use of an a-c electrical signal.

  10. Multidimensionality of parental monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Secrest, Laura A

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This study explored the construct of parental monitoring and its relation to antisocial behavior in children. The factor structure of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire Poor Monitoring/Supervision Scale (Frick, 1991) was examined to determine...

  11. Monitoring jobs with qs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jobs Monitoring jobs with qs Monitoring jobs with qs qs is an alternative tool to the SGE-provided qstat for querying the queue status developed at NERSC. qs provides an...

  12. Opacity of iron, nickel, and copper plasmas in the x-ray wavelength range: Theoretical interpretation of 2p-3d absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blenski, T.; Loisel, G.; Poirier, M.; Thais, F.; Arnault, P.; Caillaud, T.; Fariaut, J.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J.-C.; Porcherot, Q.; Reverdin, C.; Silvert, V.; Villette, B.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Turck-Chieze, S.; Foelsner, W.; Gaufridy de Dortan, F. de [CEA, IRAMIS, Service 'Photons, Atomes et Molecules', Centre d'Etudes de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); LULI, UMR No. 7605 CNRS - Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); CEA, IRFU, Service d'Astrophysique, Centre d'Etudes de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain and Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA-Paritech-Polytechnique, Chemin de la Huniere, F-91671 Palaiseau (France)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with theoretical studies on the 2p-3d absorption in iron, nickel, and copper plasmas related to LULI2000 (Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, 2000J facility) measurements in which target temperatures were of the order of 20 eV and plasma densities were in the range 0.004-0.01 g/cm{sup 3}. The radiatively heated targets were close to local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The structure of 2p-3d transitions has been studied with the help of the statistical superconfiguration opacity code sco and with the fine-structure atomic physics codes hullac and fac. A new mixed version of the sco code allowing one to treat part of the configurations by detailed calculation based on the Cowan's code rcg has been also used in these comparisons. Special attention was paid to comparisons between theory and experiment concerning the term features which cannot be reproduced by sco. The differences in the spin-orbit splitting and the statistical (thermal) broadening of the 2p-3d transitions have been investigated as a function of the atomic number Z. It appears that at the conditions of the experiment the role of the term and configuration broadening was different in the three analyzed elements, this broadening being sensitive to the atomic number. Some effects of the temperature gradients and possible non-LTE effects have been studied with the help of the radiative-collisional code scric. The sensitivity of the 2p-3d structures with respect to temperature and density in medium-Z plasmas may be helpful for diagnostics of LTE plasmas especially in future experiments on the {Delta}n=0 absorption in medium-Z plasmas for astrophysical applications.

  13. Seismic Imaging and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

  14. Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.

  15. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory annual environmental monitoring report. Calendar Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the three KAPL sites resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each site and at off-site background locations. KAPL environmental controls are subject to applicable state and federal regulations governing use, emission, treatment, storage and/or disposal of solid, liquid and gaseous materials. Some non-radiological water and air emissions are generated and treated on-site prior to discharge to the environment. Liquid effluents and air emissions are controlled and monitored in accordance with permits issued by the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CTDEP) for the Windsor Site and by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) for the Knolls and Kesselring Sites. The liquid effluent monitoring data show that KAPL has maintained a high degree of compliance with permit requirements. Where required, radionuclide air emission sources are authorized by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The non-radiological air emissions, with the exception of opacity for the boilers, are not required to be monitored.

  16. Power consumption monitoring using additional monitoring device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tru?c?, M. R. C., E-mail: radu.trusca@itim-cj.ro; Albert, ?., E-mail: radu.trusca@itim-cj.ro; Tudoran, C., E-mail: radu.trusca@itim-cj.ro; Soran, M. L., E-mail: radu.trusca@itim-cj.ro; F?rca?, F., E-mail: radu.trusca@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Abrudean, M. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, emphasis is placed on reducing power consumption. Computers are large consumers; therefore it is important to know the total consumption of computing systems. Since their optimal functioning requires quite strict environmental conditions, without much variation in temperature and humidity, reducing energy consumption cannot be made without monitoring environmental parameters. Thus, the present work uses a multifunctional electric meter UPT 210 for power consumption monitoring. Two applications were developed: software which carries meter readings provided by electronic and programming facilitates remote device and a device for temperature monitoring and control. Following temperature variations that occur both in the cooling system, as well as the ambient, can reduce energy consumption. For this purpose, some air conditioning units or some computers are stopped in different time slots. These intervals were set so that the economy is high, but the work's Datacenter is not disturbed.

  17. Environmental monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, R.C.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. 52 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Compliance with revised acid rain monitoring requirements for gas and oil fired units: Appendix D and E of Part 75

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppard, M.; Culligan, K. [EPA, Washington, DC (United States). Acid Rain Div.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    EPA`s CEM rule (40 CFR Part 75) implements the monitoring provisions of Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. In most cases Part 75 requires utilities to monitor sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) and carbon dioxide emissions (CO{sub 2}), and volumetric flow and opacity using Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS). Appendix D and E of 40 CFR Part 75 provide alternatives to using Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS) to comply with the monitoring requirements of Title IV of the Clean Air Act. EPA is considering a number of changes to Part 75, including significant changes to Appendix D and E. Part 75 was originally promulgated on January 11, 1993. Due to both experience gained in the implementation of Phase 1 and the early implementation of Phase 2 and petitions filed by several groups, EPA has prepared a number of changes to Part 75. This paper discusses what EPA anticipates these changes will be and how EPA anticipates that these changes will affect the regulated community. In addition, it discusses EPA`s expectations for certification applications for units using Appendix D and E.

  19. Transmission Line Security Monitor

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transmission Line Security Monitor is a multi-sensor monitor that mounts directly on high-voltage transmission lines to detect, characterize and communicate terrorist activity, human tampering and threatening conditions around support towers. For more information about INL's critical infrastructure protection research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  20. High-temperature Pump Monitoring - High-temperature ESP Monitoring...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    7 4.4.4 High-temperature Pump Monitoring - High-temperature ESP Monitoring Presentation Number: 018 Investigator: Dhruva, Brindesh (Schlumberger Technology Corp.) Objectives: To...

  1. Environmental monitoring plan - environmental monitoring section. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilt, G.C. [ed.; Tate, P.J.; Brigdon, S.L. [and others

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the environmental monitoring plan for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A site characterization is provided along with monitoring and measurement techniques and quality assurance measures.

  2. ORISE: Media Analysis and Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Media Analysis and Monitoring The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) uses comprehensive media analysis and monitoring tools to define media interest and the...

  3. Structural Health Monitoring Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security, LLC 1 LA-CC-10-032 LA-UR 10-01259 1 Introduction to SHMTools SHMTools is a MATLAB package that facilitates the construction of structural health monitoring (SHM)...

  4. Monitored Retrievable Storage Background

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    `The U.S. Government is seeking a site for a monitored retrievable storage facility (MRS). Employing proven technologies used in this country and abroad, the MRS will be an Integral part of the...

  5. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 2, Radiation Monitoring and Sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The FRMAC Monitoring and Sampling Manual, Volume 2 provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for field radiation monitoring and sample collection activities that are performed by the Monitoring group during a FRMAC response to a radiological emergency.

  6. Monitoring Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eulinger, R. D.

    -line performance not new concepts. Many recently designed power plants include monitoring systems more attractive and accessible. By using an extensive computer-based on-line data acquistion system to such a system, plant operators can improve plant heat rate... are collected manually by operating or test A performance monitoring system needs pressure, personnel. Data reduction, analysis, and temperature, flow, power, and fuel data to calculate heat rate performance calculations are also manually and heat rate...

  7. Structure function monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGraw, John T. (Placitas, NM); Zimmer, Peter C. (Albuquerque, NM); Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

  8. Rhodes College February 17, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Biology? Implementation of engineering principles and mathematical modeling to the design and construction of biological parts, devices, and systems with applications in energy, medicine, and technology. www.bio of Medicines 10¢ per pill Tuesday, February 18, 2014 #12;Biofuels from Algae CO -neutral2 1,000,000 gallons

  9. Water Quality Regulations (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of these regulations is to establish water quality standards for the state's surface waters. These standards are intended to restore, preserve and enhance the physical, chemical and...

  10. Rhode Island Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in NonproducingAdditions to Capacity on CokersA2. ForJanuary403,972Year10.05 8.22

  11. The Enterprise Zone (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Enterprise Zone offers tax incentives to business expanding their workforce by 5% at facilities in designated enterprise zones. The tax credit is equal to 50% of the annual wages paid to a new...

  12. Monitoring: The missing piece

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorkland, Ronald, E-mail: r_bjorkland@hotmail.com

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 heralded in an era of more robust attention to environmental impacts resulting from larger scale federal projects. The number of other countries that have adopted NEPA's framework is evidence of the appeal of this type of environmental legislation. Mandates to review environmental impacts, identify alternatives, and provide mitigation plans before commencement of the project are at the heart of NEPA. Such project reviews have resulted in the development of a vast number of reports and large volumes of project-specific data that potentially can be used to better understand the components and processes of the natural environment and provide guidance for improved and efficient environmental protection. However, the environmental assessment (EA) or the more robust and intensive environmental impact statement (EIS) that are required for most major projects more frequently than not are developed to satisfy the procedural aspects of the NEPA legislation while they fail to provide the needed guidance for improved decision-making. While NEPA legislation recommends monitoring of project activities, this activity is not mandated, and in those situations where it has been incorporated, the monitoring showed that the EIS was inaccurate in direction and/or magnitude of the impact. Many reviews of NEPA have suggested that monitoring all project phases, from the design through the decommissioning, should be incorporated. Information gathered though a well-developed monitoring program can be managed in databases and benefit not only the specific project but would provide guidance how to better design and implement future activities designed to protect and enhance the natural environment. -- Highlights: • NEPA statutes created profound environmental protection legislative framework. • Contrary to intent, NEPA does not provide for definitive project monitoring. • Robust project monitoring is essential for enhanced environmental management. • Adaptive database framework is needed to accommodate project-monitoring data.

  13. Photon beam position monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuzay, T.M.; Shu, D.

    1995-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A photon beam position monitor is disclosed for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade ''shadowing''. Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation. 18 figs.

  14. High Performance Network Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, Jesse E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Network Monitoring requires a substantial use of data and error analysis to overcome issues with clusters. Zenoss and Splunk help to monitor system log messages that are reporting issues about the clusters to monitoring services. Infiniband infrastructure on a number of clusters upgraded to ibmon2. ibmon2 requires different filters to report errors to system administrators. Focus for this summer is to: (1) Implement ibmon2 filters on monitoring boxes to report system errors to system administrators using Zenoss and Splunk; (2) Modify and improve scripts for monitoring and administrative usage; (3) Learn more about networks including services and maintenance for high performance computing systems; and (4) Gain a life experience working with professionals under real world situations. Filters were created to account for clusters running ibmon2 v1.0.0-1 10 Filters currently implemented for ibmon2 using Python. Filters look for threshold of port counters. Over certain counts, filters report errors to on-call system administrators and modifies grid to show local host with issue.

  15. Neutral beam monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fink, Joel H. (Livermore, CA)

    1981-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for monitoring characteristics of a high energy neutral beam. A neutral beam is generated by passing accelerated ions through a walled cell containing a low energy neutral gas, such that charge exchange neutralizes the high energy ion beam. The neutral beam is monitored by detecting the current flowing through the cell wall produced by low energy ions which drift to the wall after the charge exchange. By segmenting the wall into radial and longitudinal segments various beam conditions are further identified.

  16. Monitoring Jobs on Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8Mistakes toMolecularMonitoring Jobs Monitoring

  17. Monitoring jobs with qs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8Mistakes toMolecularMonitoring JobsMonitoring

  18. Monitoring your job

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8Mistakes toMolecularMonitoring JobsMonitoringJobs

  19. Luminosity monitor at PEP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, J.D.; Franklin, M.E.B.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The luminosity monitor system utilized by the MKII Detector and by the PEP operators is described. This system processes information from 56 photomultipliers and calculates independent luminosities for each of the 3 colliding bunches in PEP. Design considerations, measurement techniques, and sources of error in the luminosity measurement are discussed.

  20. Monitoring informs management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Tristram O.

    2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved regional monitoring and reporting of greenhouse-gas emissions depends on accurate estimates of emissions from different land-use regimes. An analysis suggests that measuring emissions per crop yield may be an optimum metric for refining land-management decisions.

  1. Rack protection monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Stanley G. (Wheaton, IL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

  2. A network security monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heberlein, L.T.; Dias, G.V.; Levitt, K.N.; Mukherjee, B.; Wood, J.; Wolber, D. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of security in computer networks is a rapidly growing area of interest because of the proliferation of networks and the paucity of security measures in most current networks. Since most networks consist of a collection of inter-connected local area networks (LANs), this paper concentrates on the security-related issues in a single broadcast LAN such as Ethernet. Specifically, we formalize various possible network attacks and outline methods of detecting them. Our basic strategy is to develop profiles of usage of network resources and then compare current usage patterns with the historical profile to determine possible security violations. Thus, our work is similar to the host-based intrusion-detection systems such as SRI's IDES. Different from such systems, however, is our use of a hierarchical model to refine the focus of the intrusion-detection mechanism. We also report on the development of our experimental LAN monitor currently under implementation. Several network attacks have been simulated and results on how the monitor has been able to detect these attacks are also analyzed. Initial results demonstrate that many network attacks are detectable with our monitor, although it can surely be defeated. Current work is focusing on the integration of network monitoring with host-based techniques. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices, and associated methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCown, Steven H; Derr, Kurt W; Rohde, Kenneth W

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices include a communications module for receiving wireless communications of a wireless device. Processing circuitry is coupled with the communications module and configured to process the wireless communications to determine whether the wireless device is authorized or unauthorized to be present at the monitored area based on identification information of the wireless device. Methods of monitoring for the presence and identity of wireless devices are also provided.

  4. Rulison Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Project Rulison Monitoring Plan has been developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management's mission to protect human health and the environment. The purpose of the plan is to monitor fluids from gas wells for radionuclides that would indicate contamination is migrating from the Rulison detonation zone to producing gas wells, allowing action to be taken before the contamination could pose a risk. The Monitoring Plan (1) lists the contaminants present and identifies those that have the greatest potential to migrate from the detonation zone (radionuclide source term), (2) identifies locations that monitor the most likely transport pathways, (3) identifies which fluids will be sampled (gas and liquid) and why, (4) establishes the frequency of sampling, and (5) specifies the most practical analyses and where the analysis results will be reported. The plan does not affect the long-term hydrologic sampling conducted by DOE since 1972, which will continue for the purpose of sampling shallow groundwater and surface water near the site. The Monitoring Plan was developed in anticipation of gas wells being drilled progressively nearer the Rulison site. DOE sampled 10 gas wells in 1997 and 2005 at distances ranging from 2.7 to 7.6 miles from the site to establish background concentrations for radionuclides. In a separate effort, gas industry operators and the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) developed an industry sampling and analysis plan that was implemented in 2007. The industry plan requires the sampling of gas wells within 3 miles of the site, with increased requirements for wells within 1 mile of the site. The DOE plan emphasizes the sampling of wells near the site (Figure 1), specifically those with a bottom-hole location of 1 mile or less from the detonation, depending on the direction relative to the natural fracture trend of the producing formation. Studies indicate that even the most mobile radionuclides created by the test are unlikely to migrate appreciable distances (hundreds of feet) from the detonation zone (Cooper et al. 2007, 2009). The Monitoring Plan was developed to provide a cautious and comprehensive approach for detecting any potential contaminant migration from the Rulison test site. It also provides an independent confirmation of results from the industry sampling and analysis plan while effectively increasing the sampling frequency of wells near the site.

  5. Online circuit breaker monitoring system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djekic, Zarko

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    inspection and maintenance of the circuit breakers. An automated online circuit breaker monitoring system is proposed to monitor condition, operation and status of high and medium voltage circuit breakers. By tracking equipment condition, this system could...

  6. Online circuit breaker monitoring system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djekic, Zarko

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    inspection and maintenance of the circuit breakers. An automated online circuit breaker monitoring system is proposed to monitor condition, operation and status of high and medium voltage circuit breakers. By tracking equipment condition, this system could...

  7. Monitoring and Managing PDSF Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monitoring and Managing Jobs Monitoring and Managing Jobs Commonly Used Commands Action How to do it Comment Get a summary of all batch jobs sgeusers Shows a tally of all jobs for...

  8. Condition Monitoring System for Reinforced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    containing dissolved ionic species such as chlorides. Since concrete is a porous material, with timeCondition Monitoring System for Reinforced Concrete Structures PROBLEM THIS TECHNOLOGY SOLVES: Patent pending concrete condition monitoring system providing `real-time' information on temperature

  9. Corrosion Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Russ Braunling

    2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Corrosion Monitoring System (CMS) program developed and demonstrated a continuously on-line system that provides real-time corrosion information. The program focused on detecting pitting corrosion in its early stages. A new invention called the Intelligent Ultrasonic Probe (IUP) was patented on the program. The IUP uses ultrasonic guided waves to detect small defects and a Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) algorithm to provide an image of the pits. Testing of the CMS demonstrated the capability to detect pits with dimensionality in the sub-millimeter range. The CMS was tested in both the laboratory and in a pulp and paper industrial plant. The system is capable of monitoring the plant from a remote location using the internet.

  10. Cycle isolation monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svensen, L.M. III; Zeigler, J.R.; Todd, F.D.; Alder, G.C. [Santee Copper, Moncks Corner, SC (United States)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many factors to monitor in power plants, but one that is frequently overlooked is cycle isolation. Often this is an area where plant personnel can find 'low hanging fruit' with great return on investment, especially high energy valve leakage. This type of leakage leads to increased heat rate, potential valve damage and lost generation. The fundamental question to ask is 'What is 100 Btu/kW-hr of heat rate worth to your plant? On a 600 MW coal-fired power plant, a 1% leakage can lead to an 81 Btu/kW-hr impact on the main steam cycle and a 64 Btu/kW-hr impact on the hot reheat cycle. The article gives advice on methods to assist in detecting leaking valves and to monitor cycle isolation. A software product, TP. Plus-CIM was designed to estimate flow rates of potentially leaking valves.

  11. Scintillator spent fuel monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, C.E.; Nixon, K.V.; Bernard, W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitor for rapidly measuring the gross gamma-ray flux immediately above spent fuel assemblies in underwater storage racks has been developed. It consists of a plastic scintillator, photomultiplier, collimator, and a small battery-powered electronics package. The crosstalk from an isolated fuel assembly to an adjacent void is only about 2%. The mean difference between the measured gamma-ray flux and the flux estimated from the declared burnup and cooling time with a simple formula is 22%.

  12. Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Reliable and cost-effective monitoring, verification and accounting...

  13. 1984 environmental monitoring report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day, L.E.; Miltenberger, R.P.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The environmental monitoring program has been designed to ensure that BNL facilities operate such that the applicable environmental standards and effluent control requirements have been met. A listing, as required by DOE Order 5484.1 of BNL facilities, of environmental agencies and permits is provided in the Environmental Program Information Section 3.0, Table B. Since the aquifer underlying Long Island has been designated a ''sole source'' aquifer, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Drinking Water Standards have been used in the assessment of ground water data. However, the limits prescribed in the regulations are not directly applicable to the monitoring well data since (1) the standards apply to a community water supply system, i.e., one serving more than 25 individuals, and (2) the standards represent an annual average concentration. Since the monitoring wells are not components of the Laboratory's water supply system, the EPA drinking water standards are employed as reference criteria to which the surveillance well data is compared. The standards also serve as guidance levels for any appropriate remedial action. 36 refs., 9 figs., 40 tabs.

  14. Personal continuous air monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, Ronald G. (Los Alamos, NM); Salazar, Samuel A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A personal continuous air monitor capable of giving immediate warning of the presence of radioactivity has a filter/detector head to be worn in the breathing zone of a user, containing a filter mounted adjacent to radiation detectors, and a preamplifier. The filter/detector head is connected to a belt pack to be worn at the waist or on the back of a user. The belt pack contains a signal processor, batteries, a multichannel analyzer, a logic circuit, and an alarm. An air pump also is provided in the belt pack for pulling air through the filter/detector head by way of an air tube.

  15. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

    1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

  16. Monitoring of tritium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corbett, James A. (Turtle Creek, PA); Meacham, Sterling A. (Greensburg, PA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fluid from a breeder nuclear reactor, which may be the sodium cooling fluid or the helium reactor-cover-gas, or the helium coolant of a gas-cooled reactor passes over the portion of the enclosure of a gaseous discharge device which is permeable to hydrogen and its isotopes. The tritium diffused into the discharge device is radioactive producing beta rays which ionize the gas (argon) in the discharge device. The tritium is monitored by measuring the ionization current produced when the sodium phase and the gas phase of the hydrogen isotopes within the enclosure are in equilibrium.

  17. Monitoring international nuclear activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, R.B.

    2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The LBNL Table of Isotopes website provides primary nuclearinformation to>150,000 different users annually. We have developedthe covert technology to identify users by IP address and country todetermine the kinds of nuclear information they are retrieving. Wepropose to develop pattern recognition software to provide an earlywarning system to identify Unusual nuclear activity by country or regionSpecific nuclear/radioactive material interests We have monitored nuclearinformation for over two years and provide this information to the FBIand LLNL. Intelligence is gleaned from the website log files. Thisproposal would expand our reporting capabilities.

  18. Milliwave melter monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daniel, William E. (North Augusta, SC); Woskov, Paul P. (Bedford, MA); Sundaram, Shanmugavelayutham K. (Richland, WA)

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A milliwave melter monitoring system is presented that has a waveguide with a portion capable of contacting a molten material in a melter for use in measuring one or more properties of the molten material in a furnace under extreme environments. A receiver is configured for use in obtaining signals from the melt/material transmitted to appropriate electronics through the waveguide. The receiver is configured for receiving signals from the waveguide when contacting the molten material for use in determining the viscosity of the molten material. Other embodiments exist in which the temperature, emissivity, viscosity and other properties of the molten material are measured.

  19. Monitoring Jobs on Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8Mistakes toMolecularMonitoring Jobs

  20. Monitors.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8Mistakes toMolecularMonitoring

  1. APS Building Monitors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations2AP-XPS MeasuresIrradiation ofMonitors For

  2. Lithium niobate explosion monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bundy, C.H.; Graham, R.A.; Kuehn, S.F.; Precit, R.R.; Rogers, M.S.

    1990-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier. 8 figs.

  3. Lithium niobate explosion monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bundy, Charles H. (Clearwater, FL); Graham, Robert A. (Los Lunas, NM); Kuehn, Stephen F. (Albuquerque, NM); Precit, Richard R. (Albuquerque, NM); Rogers, Michael S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier.

  4. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically.

  5. Packet personal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, J.E.

    1988-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiatonevents, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible ''chirp''. The rate of the ''chirps'' is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field. 2 figs.

  6. Packet personal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, James E. (Knoxville, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiation events, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible "chirp". The rate of the "chirps" is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field.

  7. Well Monitoring System for EGS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EGS well monitoring tools offer a unique set of solutions which will lower costs and increase confidence in future geothermal projects.

  8. Monitoring SERC Technologies — Solar Photovoltaics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A webinar by National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Market Transformation Center electrical engineer Peter McNutt about Solar Photovoltaics and how to properly monitor its installation.

  9. Well Monitoring System for EGS

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Peer Review Well Monitoring Systems for EGS Principal Investigator Randy Normann Perma Works LLC May 19, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or...

  10. Radiological Monitoring Continues at WIPP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Monitoring and Research Center (CEMRC) found some trace amounts of americium and plutonium from a sampling station located on the WIPP access road. This is...

  11. Enhanced safeguards via solution monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burr, T.; Wangen, L.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solution monitoring is defined as the essentially continuous monitoring of solution level, density, and temperature in all tanks in the process that contain, or could contain, safeguards-significant quantities of nuclear material. This report describes some of the enhancements that solution monitoring could make to international safeguards. The focus is on the quantifiable benefits of solution monitoring, but qualitatively, solution monitoring can be viewed as a form of surveillance. Quantitatively, solution monitoring can in some cases improve diversion detection probability. For example, the authors show that under certain assumptions, solution monitoring can be used to reduce the standard deviation of the annual material balance, {sigma}{sub MB}, from approximately 17 kg to approximately 4 kg. Such reduction in {sigma}{sub MB} will not always be possible, as they discuss. However, in all cases, solution monitoring would provide assurance that the measurement error models are adequate so that one has confidence in his estimate of {sigma}{sub MB}. Some of the results in this report were generated using data that were simulated with prototype solution monitoring software that they are developing. An accompanying document describes that software.

  12. Cylinder monitoring program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alderson, J.H. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in storage at the Department of Energy (DOE) gaseous diffusion plants, managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are being evaluated to determine their expected storage life. Cylinders evaluated recently have been in storage service for 30 to 40 years. In the present environment, the remaining life for these storage cylinders is estimated to be 30 years or greater. The group of cylinders involved in recent tests will continue to be monitored on a periodic basis, and other storage cylinders will be observed as on a statistical sample population. The program has been extended to all types of large capacity UF{sub 6} cylinders.

  13. Electron launching voltage monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mendel, C.W.; Savage, M.E.

    1992-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron launching voltage monitor measures MITL voltage using a relationship between anode electric field and electron current launched from a cathode-mounted perturbation. An electron launching probe extends through and is spaced from the edge of an opening in a first MITL conductor, one end of the launching probe being in the gap between the MITL conductor, the other end being adjacent a first side of the first conductor away from the second conductor. A housing surrounds the launching probe and electrically connects the first side of the first conductor to the other end of the launching probe. A detector detects the current passing through the housing to the launching probe, the detected current being representative of the voltage between the conductors. 5 figs.

  14. Steam trap monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, M.J.

    1987-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (a hot finger) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellow in providing an indication of total energy (steam + condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the hot and cold fingers subtracts the former from the latter to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning. 2 figs.

  15. Groundwater monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ames, Kenneth R. (Pasco, WA); Doesburg, James M. (Richland, WA); Eschbach, Eugene A. (Richland, WA); Kelley, Roy C. (Kennewick, WA); Myers, David A. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A groundwater monitoring system includes a bore, a well casing within and spaced from the bore, and a pump within the casing. A water impermeable seal between the bore and the well casing prevents surface contamination from entering the pump. Above the ground surface is a removable operating means which is connected to the pump piston by a flexible cord. A protective casing extends above ground and has a removable cover. After a groundwater sample has been taken, the cord is disconnected from the operating means. The operating means is removed for taking away, the cord is placed within the protective casing, and the cover closed and locked. The system is thus protected from contamination, as well as from damage by accident or vandalism.

  16. Clark county monitoring program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conway, Sheila [Urban Environmental Research, 10100 W. Charleston Boulevard Las Vegas, 89135 (United States); Auger, Jeremy [Applied Analysis, 10100 West Charleston Blvd, Suite 200, Las Vegas, Nevada 89135 (United States); Navies, Irene [Clark County, Department of Comprehensive Planning, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Since 1988, Clark County has been one of the counties designated by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) as an 'Affected Unit of Local Government' (AULG). The AULG designation is an acknowledgement by the federal government that could be negatively impacted to a considerable degree by activities associated with the Yucca Mountain High Level Nuclear Waste Repository. These negative effects would have an impact on residents as individuals and the community as a whole. As an AULG, Clark County is authorized to identify 'any potential economic, social, public health and safety, and environmental impacts' of the potential repository (42 USC Section 10135(C)(1)(B)(1)). Toward this end, Clark County has conducted numerous studies of potential impacts, many of which are summarized in the Clark County's Impact Assessment Report that was submitted by the DOE and the president of the United States in February 2002. Given the unprecedented magnitude and duration of the DoE's proposal, as well as the many unanswered questions about the number of shipments and the modal mix, the estimate of impacts described in these studies are preliminary. In order to refine these estimates, Clark County Comprehensive Planning Department's Nuclear Waste Division is continuing to assess potential impacts. In addition, the County has implemented a Monitoring Program designed to capture changes to the social, environmental, and economic well-being of its residents resulting from the Yucca Mountain project and other significant events within the County. The Monitoring Program acts as an 'early warning system' that allows Clark County decision makers to proactive respond to impacts from the Yucca Mountain Project. (authors)

  17. Annual Monitoring Results A REPORT OF THE REGIONAL MONITORING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grainsize 33 Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and Total Nitrogen (TN)33 Trace Metals34 Trace Organics34 Quality Assurance / Quality Control (QA/QC) 37 QA/QC of Percent Solids37 QA/QC of Grain Size 37 QA/QC of TotalAnnual Monitoring Results 2012 A REPORT OF THE REGIONAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR WATER QUALITY

  18. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G M; Bertoldo, N A; Blake, R G; Campbell, C G; Grayson, A R; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K R; Jones, H E

    2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. Specifically, environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring is also a major component of compliance demonstration for permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. LLNL prepares the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that environmental monitoring work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 458.1, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies.

  19. Successes in School Energy Management - Energy Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corbitt, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Successes in School Energy Management ? Energy Monitoring Chad Corbitt, CEM, ATEM Energy Manager, Klein ISD jcorbitt1@kleinisd.net Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Keys to Energy Monitoring ? Develop an Energy Monitoring plan ? Define... the why, what, how and who of the plan ? Implement the Energy Monitoring plan ? Personnel, data system, reporting ? One Experience in Energy Monitoring Developing an Energy Monitoring Plan ? Why do we need to monitor energy? ? What information...

  20. OWNER'S MANUAL IPS LED MONITOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ott, Albrecht

    www.lg.com OWNER'S MANUAL IPS LED MONITOR (LED LCD MONITOR) 27EA83 27EA83R Please read the safety different licenses. Visit www.lg.com for more information on the license. VESA, VESA logo, Display Port of the Video Electronics Standards Association. The terms HDMI and HDMI High-Definition Multimedia Interface

  1. INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    participation processes to the circumstances, of investing considerable time in designing a fair and integrated in the design of institutional arrangements for monitoring. It stresses the importance of tailoring the challenges encountered would be beneficial to guide future monitoring initiatives. #12;iv A mis padres

  2. Vapor spill pipe monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bianchini, G.M.; McRae, T.G.

    1983-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote ir gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote ir sensor which measures the gas composition.

  3. Fatigue monitoring desktop guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, K. [InnoTech Engineering Solutions, LLC (United States); Thomas, K. [Nebraska Public Power District (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a program for managing material aging (MMG) in the nuclear industry requires a new and different perspective. The classical method for MMG is cycle counting, which has been shown to have limited success. The classical method has been successful in satisfying the ductile condition per the America Society of Mechanical Engineers' (ASME) design criteria. However, the defined material failure mechanism has transformed from through-wall cracking and leakage (ASME) to crack initiation (NUREG-6909). This transformation is based on current industry experience with material degradation early in plant life and can be attributed to fabrication issues and environment concerns where cycle counting has been unsuccessful. This new perspective provides a different approach to cycle counting that incorporates all of the information about the material conditions. This approach goes beyond the consideration of a static analysis and includes a dynamic assessment of component health, which is required for operating plants. This health definition should consider fabrication, inspections, transient conditions and industry operating experience. In addition, this collection of information can be transparent to a broader audience that may not have a full understanding of the system design or the potential causes of early material degradation. This paper will present the key points that are needed for a successful fatigue monitoring desktop guide. (authors)

  4. Optical oxygen concentration monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kebabian, Paul (Acton, MA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen's A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest.

  5. Steam trap monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, Michael J. (Plainfield, IL)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (the combination of a hot finger and thermocouple well) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellows in providing an indication of total energy (steam+condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the thermocouple well hot and cold fingers subtracts the condensate energy as measured by the hot finger and thermocouple well from the total energy as measured by the cold finger to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning.

  6. Gap and stripline combined monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yin, Yan (Palo Alto, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined gap and stripline monitor device (10) for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchotron radiation facility. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions (11a, 11b) with an axial gap (12) therebetween. An outer pipe (14) cooperates with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips (23a-d) cooperate with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length.

  7. Gap and stripline combined monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yin, Y.

    1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined gap and stripline monitor device for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchrotron radiation facility is disclosed. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions with an axial gap therebetween. An outer pipe cooperates with the first beam pipe portion to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips cooperate with the first beam pipe portion to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length. 4 figs.

  8. Texas Rangeland Monitoring: Level Two

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanselka, C. Wayne; Hart, Charles R.; McGinty, Allan

    2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    are best used for monitoring herbaceous plant communities. Belt transects can be used for monitoring the woody plant commu- nity. Line transect To use a line transect, stretch a 100-foot to 300-foot measuring tape across the monitoring site, carefully... plant rooted closest to each foot mark along the line. If using a 300-foot line, every other foot mark may be used. At least 100 plants should be identi- fied and recorded for each line transect installed. The math for calculating species com...

  9. Monitoring Plan for Weatherization Assistance Program, State...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Monitoring Plan for Weatherization Assistance Program, State Energy Program and Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants Monitoring Plan for Weatherization Assistance...

  10. Texas Rangeland Monitoring: Level Three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanselka, C. Wayne; Hart, Charles R.; McGinty, Allan

    2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Rangeland health is the degree to which the integrity of the soil, vegetation, water, air and ecological processes are balanced and sustained. In this leaflet, you will learn techniques for monitoring processes such as nutrient cycling, energy flow...

  11. New technologies for item monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, J.A. [EG & G Energy Measurements, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Waddoups, I.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report responds to the Department of Energy`s request that Sandia National Laboratories compare existing technologies against several advanced technologies as they apply to DOE needs to monitor the movement of material, weapons, or personnel for safety and security programs. The authors describe several material control systems, discuss their technologies, suggest possible applications, discuss assets and limitations, and project costs for each system. The following systems are described: WATCH system (Wireless Alarm Transmission of Container Handling); Tag system (an electrostatic proximity sensor); PANTRAK system (Personnel And Material Tracking); VRIS (Vault Remote Inventory System); VSIS (Vault Safety and Inventory System); AIMS (Authenticated Item Monitoring System); EIVS (Experimental Inventory Verification System); Metrox system (canister monitoring system); TCATS (Target Cueing And Tracking System); LGVSS (Light Grid Vault Surveillance System); CSS (Container Safeguards System); SAMMS (Security Alarm and Material Monitoring System); FOIDS (Fiber Optic Intelligence & Detection System); GRADS (Graded Radiation Detection System); and PINPAL (Physical Inventory Pallet).

  12. Solar Power Systems Web Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Bimal Aklesh

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All over the world the peak demand load is increasing and the load factor is decreasing year-by-year. The fossil fuel is considered insufficient thus solar energy systems are becoming more and more useful, not only in terms of installation but monitoring of these systems is very crucial. Monitoring becomes very important when there are a large number of solar panels. Monitoring would allow early detection if the output falls below required level or one of the solar panel out of 1000 goes down. In this study the target is to monitor and control a developed solar panel by using available internet foundation. This web-enabled software will provide more flexibility over the system such as transmitting data from panel to the host computer and disseminating information to relevant stake holders barring any geographical barrier. The software would be built around web server with dynamic HTML and JAVA, this paper presents the preliminary design of the proposed system.

  13. Energy Management Programs- Monitoring Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauls, S. P.; Shamy, M. D.

    ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS - MONITORING PERFORMANCE Stanley P. Pauls Mustafa D. Shamy Merck & Co., Inc. Rahway, N. J. ABSTRACT of the historical energy consumption records. Energy use standards have been established to Steam Model monitor... energy conservation performance in bulk pharmaceutical plants. The model considers The basic steam model for most industrial process, comfort heating, and fixed loads. operations is made up of the following components: As the oil crisis developed...

  14. PEM fuel cell monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meltser, Mark Alexander (Pittsford, NY); Grot, Stephen Andreas (West Henrietta, NY)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for monitoring the performance of H.sub.2 --O.sub.2 PEM fuel cells. Outputs from a cell/stack voltage monitor and a cathode exhaust gas H.sub.2 sensor are corrected for stack operating conditions, and then compared to predetermined levels of acceptability. If certain unacceptable conditions coexist, an operator is alerted and/or corrective measures are automatically undertaken.

  15. Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, A.; Hart, C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TR- 272 2004 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project C. Hart A. McDonald Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University - 146 - 2003 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project... Charles R. Hart, Extension Range Specialist, Fort Stockton Alyson McDonald, Extension Assistant – Hydrology, Fort Stockton SUMMARY The Pecos River Ecosystem Project is attempting to minimize the negative impacts of saltcedar on the river ecosystem...

  16. PEM fuel cell monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meltser, M.A.; Grot, S.A.

    1998-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for monitoring the performance of H{sub 2}--O{sub 2} PEM fuel cells. Outputs from a cell/stack voltage monitor and a cathode exhaust gas H{sub 2} sensor are corrected for stack operating conditions, and then compared to predetermined levels of acceptability. If certain unacceptable conditions coexist, an operator is alerted and/or corrective measures are automatically undertaken. 2 figs.

  17. Stack Monitor Operating Experience Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stack monitors are used to sense radioactive particulates and gases in effluent air being vented from rooms of nuclear facilities. These monitors record the levels and types of effluents to the environment. This paper presents the results of a stack monitor operating experience review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database records from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly described. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. DOE and in engineering literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Electrical faults, radiation instrumentation faults, and human errors are the three leading causes of failures. A representative “all modes” failure rate is 1E-04/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 17.5 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 160 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of stack monitors in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER project.

  18. OPAC Brown Bag Luncheon D. Clive Winn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Tony R.

    became an FBI agent in Salt Lake City, Houston, and Chicago. After retiring from the FBI, Brother Winn

  19. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G M; Blake, R G; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Coty, J; Folks, K; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K

    2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program. Specifically, in conformance with DOE Order 450.1A, Attachment 1, paragraph 1(b)(5), environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring also serves to demonstrate compliance with permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality. (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work. (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until its cancellation in January 2003, DOE Order 5400.1 required the preparation of an environmental monitoring plan. Neither DOE Order 450.1A nor the ISO 14001 standard are as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, in that neither expressly requires an EMP. However, LLNL continues to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that this work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, and DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 450.1A, DOE Order 5400.5, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies. (See LLNL [1992] and LLNL [2008] for information about LLNL's CERCLA activities).

  20. CONMOW: Condition Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwin Wiggelinkhuizen; Theo Verbruggen; Henk Braam; Luc Rademakers; Miguel Catalin Tipluica; Andrew Maclean; Axel Juhl Christensen; Edwin Becker; Pr?ftechnik Cm Gmbh (d; Dirk Scheffler; Nordex Energy Gmbh (d

    practice the European project CONMOW (Condition Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms) was started in November

  1. Grantee Checklist for the Inspection & Monitoring Requirement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document walks Grantees through the Inspection & Monitoring requirement of the Quality Work Plan.

  2. Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Data Reporting Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Instructions for preparing occupational exposure data for submittal to the Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) repository.

  3. Wind Turbine Drivetrain Condition Monitoring (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, S.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation details the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Condition Monitoring program at NREL.

  4. Method & apparatus for monitoring plasma processing operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith Jr., Michael Lane; Ward, Pamela Denise; Stevenson, Joel O'Don

    2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention generally relates to various aspects of a plasma process and, more specifically, to the monitoring of such plasma processes. One aspect relates to a plasma monitoring module that may be adjusted in at least some manner so as to re-evaluate a previously monitored plasma process. For instance, optical emissions data on a plasma process that was previously monitored by the plasma monitoring module may be replayed through the plasma monitoring module after making at least one adjustment in relation to the plasma monitoring module.

  5. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joanne L. Knight

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  6. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joanne L. Knight

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  7. Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joanne L. Knight

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  8. Shared performance monitor in a multiprocessor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiu, George; Gara, Alan G; Salapura, Valentina

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A performance monitoring unit (PMU) and method for monitoring performance of events occurring in a multiprocessor system. The multiprocessor system comprises a plurality of processor devices units, each processor device for generating signals representing occurrences of events in the processor device, and, a single shared counter resource for performance monitoring. The performance monitor unit is shared by all processor cores in the multiprocessor system. The PMU is further programmed to monitor event signals issued from non-processor devices.

  9. INTEC Groundwater Monitoring Report 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. R. Forbes

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes 2006 perched water and groundwater monitoring activities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During 2006, groundwater samples were collected from a total of 22 Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA) monitoring wells, plus six aquifer wells sampled for the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) monitoring program. In addition, perched water samples were collected from 21 perched wells and 19 suction lysimeters. Groundwater and perched water samples were analyzed for a suite of radionuclides and inorganic constituents. Laboratory results in this report are compared to drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Such comparison is for reference only and it should be noted that the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision does not require that perched water comply with drinking water standards.

  10. Guidelines for Retrofit Performance Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ternes, M. P.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    equipment capable of monitoring 12 or more channels and utilizing a variety of different sensors is often required and typically used. Two such data loggers have been used successfully at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in field monitoring... of this equipment can still be significant, however, ranging from $500 to $1 800. Equipment of this type has not been used by ORNL in field tests. A partial listing of data loggers in this price range can be obtained from the author. TEMPERATURE RECORDING...

  11. Whole facility energy use monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzucchi, R.P.; Jo, J.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting numerous field monitoring studies of the induces of energy in buildings. Energy use monitoring techniques have been developed to provide reliable empirical measurements of energy consumption according to enduse and time of day. These measurements are analyzed in conjunction with climate and site characteristics data to determine energy use efficiencies and identify energy conservation and load management opportunities. This paper draws upon this experience to advance an approach to minimize the cost and maximize the benefits of field data collection projects for entire facilities.

  12. Monitoring and Managing PDSF Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8Mistakes toMolecularMonitoring JobsMonitoring and

  13. Relating to monitoring ion sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM); Bounds, John Alan (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide techniques for monitoring the position on alpha contamination in or on items or locations. The technique is particularly applicable to pipes, conduits and other locations to which access is difficult. The technique uses indirect monitoring of alpha emissions by detecting ions generated by the alpha emissions. The medium containing the ions is moved in a controlled manner frog in proximity with the item or location to the detecting unit and the signals achieved over time are used to generate alpha source position information.

  14. MACHINE MONITORING USING PROBABILITY THRESHOLDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, Stephen

    MACHINE MONITORING USING PROBABILITY THRESHOLDS AND SYSTEM OPERATING CHARACTERISTICS Stephen M a discrete-part production machine, with the objective of effectively determining when to shut the machine analysis: a) There is an underlying time interval that characterizes the operation of the machine, most

  15. Intelligent Radio Frequency (RF) Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimbrough, B.

    ? Intelligent Radio Frequency (RF) Monitoring ? 2009 Armstrong International, Inc. www.armstronginternational.com 2 ?Expect many enjoyable experiences!? David M. Armstrong Present Process Challenges ? Identifying a failure ? Procedure.... Armstrong Steam Trap Challenges ? Identifying a failure ? Manpower ? Location ? Magnitude of failure ? Energy loss ? Loss of heat transfer ? Justification for repair ? ?Speed of Implementation? ? Environmental concerns Manpower Location 4...

  16. Quality monitored distributed voting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skogmo, D.

    1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A quality monitoring system can detect certain system faults and fraud attempts in a distributed voting system. The system uses decoy voters to cast predetermined check ballots. Absent check ballots can indicate system faults. Altered check ballots can indicate attempts at counterfeiting votes. The system can also cast check ballots at predetermined times to provide another check on the distributed voting system. 6 figs.

  17. Surfactant monitoring by foam generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mullen, Ken I. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for monitoring the presence or absence of active surfactant or other surface active agents in a solution or flowing stream based on the formation of foam or bubbles is presented. The device detects the formation of foam with a light beam or conductivity measurement. The height or density of the foam can be correlated to the concentration of the active surfactant present.

  18. 2002 WIPP Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE | facility to prepare an environmental management plan (EMP). This document is | prepared for WIPP in accordance with the guidance contained in DOE Order 5400.1; DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment; applicable sections of Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T; DOE, 1991); and the Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 834, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment'' (draft). Many sections of DOE Order 5400.1 have been replaced by DOE Order 231.1, which is the driver for the annual Site Environmental Report (SER) and the guidance source for preparing many environmental program documents. The WIPP Project is operated by Westinghouse TRU Solutions (WTS) for the DOE. This plan defines the extent and scope of WIPP's effluent and environmental | monitoring programs during the facility's operational life and also discusses WIPP's quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program as it relates to environmental monitoring. In addition, this plan provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at WIPP including: A summary of environmental programs, including the status of environmental monitoring activities A description of the WIPP Project and its mission A description of the local environment, including demographics An overview of the methodology used to assess radiological consequences to the public, including brief discussions of potential exposure pathways, routine and accidental releases, and their consequences Responses to the requirements described in the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

  19. Applications guide to pedestrian SNM monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehlau, P.E.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The applications guide introduces readers to the pedestrian special nuclear material (SNM) monitors that provide nuclear material control at DOE contractor facilities. It explains the principles of operation, the strong and weak points, and steps for calibration and maintenance of the monitors. Administrators and security specialists will find an overview of pedestrain monitor application and upkeep in Part 1 of the guide and a descriptive catalog of present-day monitors in Part 3. Technically oriented readers will be interested in the more detailed discussion of SNM monitoring physics and SNM monitor design principles found in Part 2. 18 refs., 33 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. Environmental Monitoring Plan: Environmental Monitoring Section. Appendix A, Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents information about the environmental monitoring program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Topics discussed include: air sampling; air tritium calibrations; storm water discharge; non-storm water discharge; sampling locations; ground water sampling; noise and blast forecasting; analytical laboratory auditing; document retention; procedure writing; quality assurance programs for sampling; soil and sediment sampling; sewage sampling; diversion facility tank sampling; vegetation and foodstuff sampling; and radiological dose assessments.

  1. Irrigation Monitoring with Soil Water Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enciso, Juan; Porter, Dana; Peries, Xavier

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring soil water content is essential if growers want to optimize production, conserve water, reduce environmental impacts and save money. This publication illustrates how soil moisture monitoring can improve irrigation decisions and how...

  2. Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2003 #12;Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2003 Published: 13 May 2004 Prepared: Michael Bech

  3. Use of sensors in monitoring civil structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daher, Bassam William, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis surveys the use of sensors and sensor networks in monitoring civil structures, with particular emphasis on the monitoring of bridges and highways using fiber optic sensors. Following a brief review of the most ...

  4. Evaluation of continuous glucose monitoring systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Guang, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been much hype in the research and development of continuous glucose monitoring technologies, driven by the enormous and rapidly expanding glucose monitoring market and the large and growing base of diabetes ...

  5. Ormolu : generating runtime monitors from alloy models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeves, Dwayne Lloyd

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents Ormolu, a runtime monitor used for monitoring distributed systems. Given an Alloy model, Ormolu generates a database schema and translates the constraints of the model to queries over the database. The ...

  6. Wind Turbine Drivetrain Condition Monitoring - An Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, S; Veers, P.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of wind turbine drivetrain condition monitoring based on presentations from a condition monitoring workshop organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in 2009 and on additional references.

  7. Ultralow-Power Electronics for Cardiac Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turicchia, Lorenzo

    Ultralow-power electronics for cardiac monitoring make possible the development of new light-weight and low-cost devices that are ideal for long-term medical measurements and home-based tele-monitoring services. Nowadays, ...

  8. Biomedical System for Monitoring Pressure Ulcer Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Frank Tinghwa

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF C ALIFORNIA Los Angeles Biomedical System for MonitoringOF THE D ISSERTATION Biomedical System for Monitoringto the design of a biomedical sys- tem for the monitoring of

  9. UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND HEALTH SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    . PLEASE REVIEW IT CAREFULLY. URI Health Services is committed to protecting the privacy of your health or received about your past, present, or future health or condition, the provision of health care to you, or the payment for this health care that can be used to identify you. We provide you with this notice about our

  10. OF RHODE ISLAND Office of International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    or lockout in the course of a labor dispute at the place of employment. The Labor Condition Application

  11. FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Providence, Rhode Island | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Tuesday, April 13, 2010 FUPWG held a utility energy service contract (UESC) workshop prior to the Spring 2010 meeting. The workshop materials are...

  12. University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Total 010699 Envir Hort & Turf Mgmt - BS Bacc EL_EHTM_BS ELSCI RDV 1 EL_WCB_BS ELSCI RDV 1 5 12 2 5 15 20 040601 Landscape Architecture Bacc EL_LDA_BLA ELSCI RDV 1 1 13 1

  13. University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Total 010699 Envir Hort & Turf Mgmt - BS 5 EL_EHTM_BS ELSCI RDV 17 3_WCB_BS ELSCI RDV 1 1 4 11 2 5 14 19 040601 Landscape Architecture 5 EL_LDA_BLA ELSCI RDV 10 3 4 1 14 4 18

  14. University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Women Men Women Total 010699 Envir Hort & Turf Mgmt - BS 5 EL_EHTM_BS ELSCI RDV 10 1 10 1 11 010901 RDV 1 4 7 2 1 7 8 15 040601 Landscape Architecture 5 EL_LDA_BLA ELSCI RDV 14 7 3 17 7 24 050201

  15. University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Total 010699 Envir Hort & Turf Mgmt - BOS 5 EL_EHTM_BS ELSCI RDV 1 RDV 5 9 4 5 13 18 040601 Landscape Architecture 5 EL_LDA_BLA ELSCI RDV 1 10 2 10 3 13 050201 African

  16. University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Total 010699 Envir Hort & Turf Mgmt - BS 5 EL_EHTM_BS ELSCI RDV 13 1 Conservation Biol- BS 5 EL_WCB_BS ELSCI RDV 3 18 1 3 19 22 040601 Landscape Architecture 5 EL_LDA_BLA ELSCI RDV

  17. University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Total 010699 Envir Hort & Turf Mgmt - BS 5 EL_EHTM_BS ELSCI RDV 18 4_WCB_BS ELSCI RDV 1 1 8 7 1 9 9 18 040601 Landscape Architecture 5 EL_LDA_BLA ELSCI RDV 1 9 7 9 8 17 050201

  18. Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar PowerstoriesNrelPartnerType Jump to:CoStrategies (EC-LEDS) |

  19. Bluewater Wind Rhode Island | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHIS PAGE ISJumpSphere Corp JumpBlueWave

  20. Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant of Access(CaliforniaProductionKGRA,Island/Wind

  1. Rhode Island Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousand Cubic Feet)2009 2010 2011 2012(MillionDecade24,103

  2. Rhode Island Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousand Cubic Feet)2009 2010 2011Thousand Cubic Feet)

  3. Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginia Blue Ridge AndREIIReykjanes Geothermal AreaRezacLoading map...

  4. University of Rhode Island | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,Save Energy NowNew Hampshire Address Chase Ocean

  5. Recovery Act State Memos Rhode Island

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartment ofList?Department09Jersey For questionsOregonPuerto

  6. GEXA Corp. (Rhode Island) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (TheEtelligence (SmartHomeFremont,usingGEO2 Technologies

  7. Building Energy Monitoring and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Feng, Wei; Lu, Alison; Xia, Jianjun; Yang, Le; Shen, Qi; Im, Piljae; Bhandari, Mahabir

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project aimed to develop a standard methodology for building energy data definition, collection, presentation, and analysis; apply the developed methods to a standardized energy monitoring platform, including hardware and software, to collect and analyze building energy use data; and compile offline statistical data and online real-time data in both countries for fully understanding the current status of building energy use. This helps decode the driving forces behind the discrepancy of building energy use between the two countries; identify gaps and deficiencies of current building energy monitoring, data collection, and analysis; and create knowledge and tools to collect and analyze good building energy data to provide valuable and actionable information for key stakeholders.

  8. Timber Mountain Precipitation Monitoring Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyles Brad,McCurdy Greg,Chapman Jenny,Miller Julianne

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A precipitation monitoring station was placed on the west flank of Timber Mountain during the year 2010. It is located in an isolated highland area near the western border of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), south of Pahute Mesa. The cost of the equipment, permitting, and installation was provided by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) project. Data collection, analysis, and maintenance of the station during fiscal year 2011 was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration, Soils Activity. The station is located near the western headwaters of Forty Mile Wash on the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). Overland flows from precipitation events that occur in the Timber Mountain high elevation area cross several of the contaminated Soils project CAU (Corrective Action Unit) sites located in the Forty Mile Wash watershed. Rain-on-snow events in the early winter and spring around Timber Mountain have contributed to several significant flow events in Forty Mile Wash. The data from the new precipitation gauge at Timber Mountain will provide important information for determining runoff response to precipitation events in this area of the NNSS. Timber Mountain is also a groundwater recharge area, and estimation of recharge from precipitation was important for the EMSI project in determining groundwater flowpaths and designing effective groundwater monitoring for Yucca Mountain. Recharge estimation additionally provides benefit to the Underground Test Area Sub-project analysis of groundwater flow direction and velocity from nuclear test areas on Pahute Mesa. Additionally, this site provides data that has been used during wild fire events and provided a singular monitoring location of the extreme precipitation events during December 2010 (see data section for more details). This letter report provides a summary of the site location, equipment, and data collected in fiscal year 2011.

  9. Refrigeration monitor and alarm system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branz, M.A.; Renaud, P.F.

    1986-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitor is described for a refrigeration system including a heat reclaiming system coupled therewith, comprising: a sensor positioned to detect the level of liquid state refrigerant in the system and provide an electrical output signal therefrom; a digital display for displaying the refrigerant level; first circuit means coupling the digital display to the sensor for actuating the digital display; and lockout means coupled with the sensor for deactivating the heat reclaiming system when a preselected refrigerant level is reached.

  10. Corral Monitoring System assessment results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filby, E.E.; Haskel, K.J.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of a functional and operational assessment of the Corral Monitoring Systems (CMS), which was designed to detect and document accountable items entering or leaving a monitored site. Its development was motivated by the possibility that multiple sites in the nuclear weapons states of the former Soviet Union might be opened to such monitoring under the provisions of the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. The assessment was performed at three levels. One level evaluated how well the planned approach addressed the target application, and which involved tracking sensitive items moving into and around a site being monitored as part of an international treaty or other agreement. The second level examined the overall design and development approach, while the third focused on individual subsystems within the total package. Unfortunately, the system was delivered as disassembled parts and pieces, with very poor documentation. Thus, the assessment was based on fragmentary operating data coupled with an analysis of what documents were provided with the system. The system design seemed to be a reasonable match to the requirements of the target application; however, important questions about site manning and top level administrative control were left unanswered. Four weaknesses in the overall design and development approach were detected: (1) poor configuration control and management, (2) inadequate adherence to a well defined architectural standard, (3) no apparent provision for improving top level error tolerance, and (4) weaknesses in the object oriented programming approach. The individual subsystems were found to offer few features or capabilities that were new or unique, even at the conceptual level. The CMS might possibly have offered a unique combination of features, but this level of integration was never realized, and it had no unique capabilities that could be readily extracted for use in another system.

  11. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Draft Work Plan - February 4, 2008 More...

  12. Virtual Machine Monitors 36.1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    36 Virtual Machine Monitors 36.1 Introduction Years ago, IBM sold mainframes to large organizations, and a problem arose: what if the organization wanted to run different operating systems on the machine? (some yet another level of indirection in the form of a virtual machine monitor, or VMM or just monitor

  13. SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW J. E. Santos1, G. B. Savioli2, J. M. Carcione3, D´e, Argentina SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW ­ p. #12;Introduction. I Storage of CO2). SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW ­ p. #12;Introduction. II CO2 is separated from natural

  14. Standard hydrogen monitoring system equipment installation instructions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, T.C.

    1996-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the technical specifications for the equipment fabrication, installation, and sitework construction for the Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System. The Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System is designed to remove gases from waste tank vapor space and exhaust headers for continual monitoring and remote sample analysis.

  15. Transformative monitoring approaches for reprocessing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cipiti, Benjamin B.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The future of reprocessing in the United States is strongly driven by plant economics. With increasing safeguards, security, and safety requirements, future plant monitoring systems must be able to demonstrate more efficient operations while improving the current state of the art. The goal of this work was to design and examine the incorporation of advanced plant monitoring technologies into safeguards systems with attention to the burden on the operator. The technologies examined include micro-fluidic sampling for more rapid analytical measurements and spectroscopy-based techniques for on-line process monitoring. The Separations and Safeguards Performance Model was used to design the layout and test the effect of adding these technologies to reprocessing. The results here show that both technologies fill key gaps in existing materials accountability that provide detection of diversion events that may not be detected in a timely manner in existing plants. The plant architecture and results under diversion scenarios are described. As a tangent to this work, both the AMUSE and SEPHIS solvent extraction codes were examined for integration in the model to improve the reality of diversion scenarios. The AMUSE integration was found to be the most successful and provided useful results. The SEPHIS integration is still a work in progress and may provide an alternative option.

  16. Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8Mistakes toMolecular StructureMomentum

  17. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2010 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, D.J.; Anderson, D.C.; Hall, D.B.; Greger, P.D.; Ostler, W.K.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2010. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2010, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  18. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2012 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent; Hansen, Dennis J.

    2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2012. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2012, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  19. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2011 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, D. J., Anderson, D. C., Hall, D. B., Greger, P. D., Ostler, W. K.

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2011. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2011, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  20. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2008 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis J. Hansen, David C. Anderson, Derek B. Hall, Paul D. Greger, W. Kent Ostler

    2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2008. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

  1. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2009 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis J. Hansen, David C. Anderson, Derek B. Hall, Paul D. Greger, and W. Kent Ostler

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2009. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2009, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  2. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The deep hard rock drilling environment induces severe vibrations into the drillstring, which can cause reduced rates of penetration (ROP) and premature failure of the equipment. The only current means of controlling vibration under varying conditions is to change either the rotary speed or the weight-on-bit (WOB). These changes often reduce drilling efficiency. Conventional shock subs are useful in some situations, but often exacerbate the problems. The objective of this project is development of a unique system to monitor and control drilling vibrations in a ''smart'' drilling system. This system has two primary elements: (1) The first is an active vibration damper (AVD) to minimize harmful axial, lateral and torsional vibrations. The hardness of this damper will be continuously adjusted using a robust, fast-acting and reliable unique technology. (2) The second is a real-time system to monitor drillstring vibration, and related parameters. This monitor adjusts the damper according to local conditions. In some configurations, it may also send diagnostic information to the surface via real-time telemetry. The AVD is implemented in a configuration using magnetorheological (MR) fluid. By applying a current to the magnetic coils in the damper, the viscosity of the fluid can be changed rapidly, thereby altering the damping coefficient in response to the measured motion of the tool. Phase I of this program entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype. Phase I of the project was completed by the revised end date of May 31, 2004. The objectives of this phase were met, and all prerequisites for Phase II have been completed.

  3. Restoration of the USS Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krop, David (Conservation Project Manager, Mariner' [Conservation Project Manager, Mariner'; s Museum

    2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    David Krop will discuss the ongoing efforts to conserve and exhibit the iconic Civil War ironclad USS Monitor at The Mariners' Museum (http://www.mariner.org/). The presentation will cover past conservation accomplishments by conservators and NOAA specialists, current activities in the lab, and future plans to bring back to life one of the world's most famous warships. Learn about the complex methods and procedures used to treat the ship's revolving gun turret, steam engine, Dahlgren guns and carriages, as well as numerous small artifacts like personal items from the crew.

  4. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. EPA requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard and must consider inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  5. Radiological Monitoring Continues at WIPP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome to theNewsCenter forQualityRSSRadiological Monitoring

  6. An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. Abstract: Infrared (IR) spectroscopy...

  7. SOUTHERN FINE PARTICULATE MONITORING PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report presents results and analysis of continuous onsite ambient fine particulate data at the North Birmingham sampling site during the January-March, 2002 study period. The continuous data include PM{sub 2.5} mass concentrations measured by TEOM, particle sulfate using the R&P 8400S monitor, particle size distributions measured by SMPS and APS monitors, and PM{sub 2.5} light scattering extinction coefficient as measured by nephelometer. Some instrumental issues were noted with the upgrade of the APS model 3320 are described in the report, as well as preliminary performance indications for the upgraded instrument. During the quarter preliminary data analysis and modeling studies were conducted to test the potential of the North Birmingham site data for source attribution analyses. Our initial assessment has continued to be optimistic in this regard due to the location of the site relative to several important classes of local and midrange emission sources. We anticipate that these analyses will provide good separations of the effects of major source classes and spatial source clusters, and will provide useful information relevant to PM{sub 2.5} implementation strategies.

  8. Host Event Based Network Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan Chugg

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of INL’s research on this project is to demonstrate the feasibility of a host event based network monitoring tool and the effects on host performance. Current host based network monitoring tools work on polling which can miss activity if it occurs between polls. Instead of polling, a tool could be developed that makes use of event APIs in the operating system to receive asynchronous notifications of network activity. Analysis and logging of these events will allow the tool to construct the complete real-time and historical network configuration of the host while the tool is running. This research focused on three major operating systems commonly used by SCADA systems: Linux, WindowsXP, and Windows7. Windows 7 offers two paths that have minimal impact on the system and should be seriously considered. First is the new Windows Event Logging API, and, second, Windows 7 offers the ALE API within WFP. Any future work should focus on these methods.

  9. Apparatus for monitoring crystal growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sachs, Emanual M. (Watertown, MA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method are disclosed for monitoring the growth of a crystalline body from a liquid meniscus in a furnace. The system provides an improved human/machine interface so as to reduce operator stress, strain and fatigue while improving the conditions for observation and control of the growing process. The system comprises suitable optics for forming an image of the meniscus and body wherein the image is anamorphic so that the entire meniscus can be viewed with good resolution in both the width and height dimensions. The system also comprises a video display for displaying the anamorphic image. The video display includes means for enhancing the contrast between any two contrasting points in the image. The video display also comprises a signal averager for averaging the intensity of at least one preselected portions of the image. The value of the average intensity, can in turn be utilized to control the growth of the body. The system and method are also capable of observing and monitoring multiple processes.

  10. Method of monitoring crystal growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sachs, Emanual M. (Watertown, MA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method are disclosed for monitoring the growth of a crystalline body from a liquid meniscus in a furnace. The system provides an improved human/machine interface so as to reduce operator stress, strain and fatigue while improving the conditions for observation and control of the growing process. The system comprises suitable optics for forming an image of the meniscus and body wherein the image is anamorphic so that the entire meniscus can be viewed with good resolution in both the width and height dimensions. The system also comprises a video display for displaying the anamorphic image. The video display includes means for enhancing the contrast between any two contrasting points in the image. The video display also comprises a signal averager for averaging the intensity of at least one preselected portions of the image. The value of the average intensity, can in turn be utilized to control the growth of the body. The system and method are also capable of observing and monitoring multiple processes.

  11. Straddle Carrier Radiation Portal Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, Eric S.; Samuel, Todd J.; Mullen, O Dennis

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is the primary enforcement agency protecting the nation’s ports of entry. CBP is enhancing its capability to interdict the illicit import of nuclear and radiological materials and devices that may be used by terrorists. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is providing scientific and technical support to CBP in their goal to enable rapid deployment of nuclear and radiation detection systems at U. S. ports of entry to monitor 100% of the incoming international traffic and cargo while not adversely impacting the operations or throughput of the ports. The U.S. ports of entry include the following vectors: land border crossings, seaports, airports, rail crossings, and mail and express consignment courier facilities. U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) determined that a screening solution was needed for Seaport cargo containers being transported by Straddle Carriers (straddle carriers). A stationary Radiation Portal Monitor (RPM) for Straddle Carriers (SCRPM) is needed so that cargo containers can be scanned while in transit under a Straddle Carrier. The Straddle Carrier Portal operational impacts were minimized by conducting a time-motion study at the Port, and adaptation of a Remotely Operated RPM (RO-RPM) booth concept that uses logical lighting schemes for traffic control, cameras, Optical Character Recognition, and wireless technology.

  12. Building Energy Monitoring and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Feng, Wei; Lu, Alison; Xia, Jianjun; Yang, Le; Shen, Qi; Im, Piljae; Bhandari, Mahabir

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. and China are the world’s top two economics. Together they consumed one-third of the world’s primary energy. It is an unprecedented opportunity and challenge for governments, researchers and industries in both countries to join together to address energy issues and global climate change. Such joint collaboration has huge potential in creating new jobs in energy technologies and services. Buildings in the US and China consumed about 40% and 25% of the primary energy in both countries in 2010 respectively. Worldwide, the building sector is the largest contributor to the greenhouse gas emission. Better understanding and improving the energy performance of buildings is a critical step towards sustainable development and mitigation of global climate change. This project aimed to develop a standard methodology for building energy data definition, collection, presentation, and analysis; apply the developed methods to a standardized energy monitoring platform, including hardware and software, to collect and analyze building energy use data; and compile offline statistical data and online real-time data in both countries for fully understanding the current status of building energy use. This helps decode the driving forces behind the discrepancy of building energy use between the two countries; identify gaps and deficiencies of current building energy monitoring, data collection, and analysis; and create knowledge and tools to collect and analyze good building energy data to provide valuable and actionable information for key stakeholders.

  13. Comparative testing of slurry monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hylton, T.D.; Bayne, C.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Anderson, M.S. [Ames Lab., IA (United States); Van Essen, D.C. [Advanced Integrated Management Services, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of radioactive liquid and sludge wastes that must be retrieved from underground storage tanks, transferred to treatment facilities, and processed to a final waste form. The wastes will be removed from the current storage tanks by mobilizing the sludge wastes and mixing them with the liquid wastes to create slurries. Each slurry would then be transferred by pipeline to the desired destination. To reduce the risk of plugging a pipeline, the transport properties (e.g., density, suspended solids concentration, viscosity, particle size range) of the slurry should be determined to be within acceptable limits prior to transfer. These properties should also be monitored and controlled within specified limits while the slurry transfer is in progress. The DOE issued a call for proposals for developing on-line instrumentation to measure the transport properties of slurries. In response to the call for proposals, several researchers submitted proposals and were funded to develop slurry monitoring instruments. These newly developed DOE instruments are currently in the prototype stage. Before the instruments were installed in a radioactive application, the DOE wanted to evaluate them under nonradioactive conditions to determine if they were accurate, reliable, and dependable. The goal of this project was to test the performance of the newly developed DOE instruments along with several commercially available instruments. The baseline method for comparison utilized the results from grab-sample analyses.

  14. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, VOL. 24, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2009 2639 An Online Stability Margin Monitor for Digitally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, VOL. 24, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2009 2639 An Online Stability in part at the Power Electronics Specialists Conference, Rhodes, Greece, June 2008. Recommended En- gineering, Colorado Power Electronics Center, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 USA (e

  15. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2013 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2013. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed activity sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, and (f) habitat restoration monitoring. During 2013, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  16. Deer monitoring at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fledderman, P.D.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To protect public health, all deer and feral hogs harvested at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during controlled hunts are monitored for Cs-137. A new monitoring program has been developed by the Environmental Monitoring Section (EMS). To provide increased confidence in dose data and compliance with regulations, many changes have been made to the deer and hog monitoring program. Using field count information, a computerized database determines Cs-137 concentration and calculates the committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) resulting from consumption of the animal. The database then updates each hunter's cumulative CEDE in real time. Also, enhancements to the instrument calibration and quality control portions of the monitoring program were implemented. These include improved monitor calibration, intercomparison of field results from the same animal using different detectors, and regular use of check sources to verify equipment performance. With these program changes, EMS can produce more accurate and verifiable dose data.

  17. Deer monitoring at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fledderman, P.D.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To protect public health, all deer and feral hogs harvested at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during controlled hunts are monitored for Cs-137. A new monitoring program has been developed by the Environmental Monitoring Section (EMS). To provide increased confidence in dose data and compliance with regulations, many changes have been made to the deer and hog monitoring program. Using field count information, a computerized database determines Cs-137 concentration and calculates the committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) resulting from consumption of the animal. The database then updates each hunter`s cumulative CEDE in real time. Also, enhancements to the instrument calibration and quality control portions of the monitoring program were implemented. These include improved monitor calibration, intercomparison of field results from the same animal using different detectors, and regular use of check sources to verify equipment performance. With these program changes, EMS can produce more accurate and verifiable dose data.

  18. Monitoring transients in low inductance circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guilford, R.P.; Rosborough, J.R.

    1985-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The instant invention relates to methods of and apparatus for monitoring transients in low inductance circuits and to a probe utilized to practice said method and apparatus. More particularly, the instant invention relates to methods of and apparatus for monitoring low inductance circuits, wherein the low inductance circuits include a pair of flat cable transmission lines. The instant invention is further directed to a probe for use in monitoring pairs of flat cable transmission lines.

  19. Radionuclide Sensors for Environmental Monitoring: From Flow...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Equilibration-Based Radionuclide Sensors for Environmental Monitoring: From Flow Injection Solid-Phase Absorptiometry to Equilibration-Based Abstract: The development...

  20. Monitoring SERC Technologies — Solar Hot Water

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A webinar by National Renewable Energy Laboratory analyst Eliza Hotchkiss on Solar Hot Water systems and how to properly monitor their installation.

  1. Electrochemical NOx Sensors for Monitoring Diesel Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    x Sensors for Monitoring Diesel Emissions This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract...

  2. Participatory Carbon Monitoring: Operational Guidance for National...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Participatory Carbon Monitoring: Operational Guidance for National REDD+ Carbon Accounting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Participatory Carbon...

  3. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAUM,M.; DORSCH,WM.; FRY,J.; GREEN,T.; LEE,R.; NAIDU,J.; PAQUETTE,D.; SCARPITTA,S.; SCHROEDER,G.

    1999-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Triennial update that describes the BNL Environmental Monitoring Program for all media (air, surface water, ground water, etc.) in accordance with DOE ORDER 5400.5

  4. Monitoring Ankle Rehabilitation With Wii Fit.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laperle, Ryan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? The purpose of this research was to experimentally examine if the Wii Fit® (WF) could be used to monitor progress of a rehabilitation protocol… (more)

  5. SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    santos

    SEISMIC MONITORING OF. CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW. J. E. Santos. 1. , G. B. Savioli. 2. , J. M. Carcione. 3. , D. Gei. 3. 1. CONICET, IGPUBA, Fac.

  6. Hanford site seismic monitoring instrumentation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, S.P.

    1996-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a plan to comply with the seismic monitoring provisions of US DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards.

  7. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Nordstrom

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan provides a high-level summary of environmental monitoring performed by various organizations within and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and DOE Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, Guide DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance, and in accordance with 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants. The purpose of these orders is to 1) implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations, and 2) to establish standards and requirements for the operations of DOE and DOE contractors with respect to protection of the environment and members of the public against undue risk from radiation. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL Site, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. Detailed monitoring procedures, program plans, or other governing documents used by contractors or agencies to implement requirements are referenced in this plan. This plan covers all planned monitoring and environmental surveillance. Nonroutine activities such as special research studies and characterization of individual sites for environmental restoration are outside the scope of this plan.

  8. Recording of SERC Monitoring Technologies- Solar Photovoltaics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document provides a transcript of the of SERC Monitoring Technologies - Solar Photovoltaics webinar, presented on 10/20/2011 by Peter McNutt.

  9. Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2004 Published: 21 April-2004................................................. 48 Wind farm area (Turbine), Reference area (Ref

  10. ICDP Complex Groundwater Monitoring Plan REV 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahn, L. S.

    2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This Groundwater Monitoring Plan, along with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions, constitutes the sampling and analysis plan for groundwater and perched water monitoring at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF). A detection monitoring system was installed in the Snake River Plan Aquifer to comply with substantive requirements of "Releases from Solid Waste Management Units" of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This detection monitoring wells constructed in the Snake River Plain Aquifer.

  11. Wind Turbine Manufacturing Process Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waseem Faidi; Chris Nafis; Shatil Sinha; Chandra Yerramalli; Anthony Waas; Suresh Advani; John Gangloff; Pavel Simacek

    2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    To develop a practical inline inspection that could be used in combination with automated composite material placement equipment to economically manufacture high performance and reliable carbon composite wind turbine blade spar caps. The approach technical feasibility and cost benefit will be assessed to provide a solid basis for further development and implementation in the wind turbine industry. The program is focused on the following technology development: (1) Develop in-line monitoring methods, using optical metrology and ultrasound inspection, and perform a demonstration in the lab. This includes development of the approach and performing appropriate demonstration in the lab; (2) Develop methods to predict composite strength reduction due to defects; and (3) Develop process models to predict defects from leading indicators found in the uncured composites.

  12. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  13. Urea biosensor for hemodialysis monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, R.S.

    1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This research discloses an electrochemical sensor capable of detecting and quantifying urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures. The sensor is based upon measurement of the pH change produced in an aqueous environment by the products of the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of urea. The sensor may be fabricated using methods amenable to mass fabrication, resulting in low-cost sensors and thus providing the potential for disposable use. In a typical application, the sensor could be used in treatment centers, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. The sensor can also be utilized to allow at-home testing to determine if dialysis was necessary. Such a home monitor is similar, in principle, to devices used for blood glucose testing by diabetics, and would require a blood droplet sample by using a finger prick. 9 figs.

  14. Urea biosensor for hemodialysis monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical sensor capable of detecting and quantifying urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures. The sensor is based upon measurement of the pH change produced in an aqueous environment by the products of the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of urea. The sensor may be fabricated using methods amenable to mass fabrication, resulting in low-cost sensors and thus providing the potential for disposable use. In a typical application, the sensor could be used in treatment centers, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. The sensor can also be utilized to allow at-home testing to determine if dialysis was necessary. Such a home monitor is similar, in principle, to devices used for blood glucose testing by diabetics, and would require a blood droplet sample by using a finger prick.

  15. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  16. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  17. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  18. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  19. Seismic monitoring at The Geysers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majer, E.L.; Romero, A.; Vasco, D.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Peterson, J.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Zucca, J.J.; Hutchings, L.J.; Kasameyer, P.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last several years Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have been working with industry partners at The Geysers geothermal field to evaluate and develop methods for applying the results of microearthquake (MEQ) monitoring. It is a well know fact that seismicity at The Geysers is a common occurrence, however, there have been many studies and papers written on the origin and significance of the seismicity. The attitude toward MEQ data ranges from being nothing more than an curious artifact of the production activities, to being a critical tool in evaluating the reservoir performance. The purpose of the work undertaken b y LBL and LLNL is to evaluate the utility, as well as the methods and procedures used in of MEQ monitoring, recommend the most cost effective implementation of the methods, and if possible link physical processes and parameters to the generation of MEQ activity. To address the objectives above the MEQ work can be categorized into two types of studies. The first type is the direct analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of MEQ activity and studying the nature of the source function relative to the physical or chemical processes causing the seismicity. The second broad area of study is imaging the reservoir/geothermal areas with the energy created by the MEQ activity and inferring the physical and/or chemical properties within the zone of imaging. The two types of studies have obvious overlap, and for a complete evaluation and development require high quality data from arrays of multicomponent stations. Much of the effort to date at The Geysers by both DOE and the producers has concentrated establishing a high quality data base. It is only within the last several years that this data base is being fully evaluated for the proper and cost effective use of MEQ activity. Presented here are the results to date of DOE`s effort in the acquisition and analysis of the MEQ data.

  20. Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particles in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements.

  1. Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particle s in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements.

  2. ORR Environmental Monitoring Program 7-1 7. ORR Environmental Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    the environmental impact of DOE operations on the entire reservation and the surrounding area. Dose assessmentORR Environmental Monitoring Program 7-1 7. ORR Environmental Monitoring Program In addition to environmental monitoring conducted at the three major Oak Ridge DOE installations, reservation-wide surveillance

  3. ORR Environmental Monitoring Program 6-1 6. ORR Environmental Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    the environmental impact of DOE operations on the entire reservation and the surrounding area. Dose assessmentORR Environmental Monitoring Program 6-1 6. ORR Environmental Monitoring Program In addition to environmental monitoring conducted at the three major Oak Ridge DOE installations, reservation-wide surveillance

  4. ORR Environmental Monitoring Programs 7-1 7. ORR Environmental Monitoring Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    to the facilities. Data from the ORR surveillance programs are analyzed to assess the environmental impact of DOEORR Environmental Monitoring Programs 7-1 7. ORR Environmental Monitoring Programs In addition to environmental monitoring conducted at the three major Oak Ridge DOE installations, reservation-wide surveillance

  5. ORR Environmental Monitoring Program 6-1 6. ORR Environmental Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    are analyzed to assess the environmental impact of DOE operations on the entire reservation and the surroundingORR Environmental Monitoring Program 6-1 6. ORR Environmental Monitoring Program In addition to environmental monitoring conducted at the three major Oak Ridge DOE installations, reservation

  6. Scalable Statistical Monitoring of Fleet , Dimitry Gorinevsky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LLC, Palo Alto, CA e-mail: dimitry@mitekan.com Abstract: This paper considers the problem of fitting monitoring of data from a fleet (population) of similar units. A fleet-wide extension of the multivariable historical cruise flight data. 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Population monitoring problems This paper considers

  7. Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Durham, M.D.; Schlager, R.J.; Sappey, A.D.; Sagan, F.J.; Marmaro, R.W.; Wilson, K.G.

    1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber. 15 figs.

  8. Bioindicators for Monitoring Radioactive Pollution of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    * IK s Dfc2looX|o Risø-R-443 Bioindicators for Monitoring Radioactive Pollution of the Marine-R-443 BIOINDICATORS FOR MONITORING RADIOACTIVE POLLUTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT Experiments Dahlgaard Abstract. Mussels (Mytilus edulis) are globally used as bio- indicators for pollution of coastal

  9. Monitoring and Evaluation Plan For The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,617 acres of wetland habitat and the inundation of 8,900 acres of deep-water marsh. Estimated wildlifeDRAFT Monitoring and Evaluation Plan For The Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project (BPA Project on vegetation monitoring. Their contributions to this project are greatly appreciated. #12;1 Introduction

  10. TMV Technology Capabilities Brake Stroke Monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TMV Technology Capabilities Brake Stroke Monitor Brake monitoring systems are proactive maintenance This technology allows for CMV operators to have knowledge of their steer, drive, and tandem axle group weights setup is required. Current Safety/Enforcement Technologies EOBR (electronic on-board recorder) On

  11. Characterization monitoring & sensor technology crosscutting program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program (CMST-CP) is to deliver appropriate characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology (CMST) to the OFfice of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60).

  12. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2007 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Hansen, David Anderson, Derek Hall, Paul Greger, W. Kent Ostler

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program', the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) requires ecological monitoring and biological compliance support for activities and programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Ecological Services has implemented the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program to provide this support. EMAC is designed to ensure compliance with applicable laws and regulations, delineate and define NTS ecosystems, and provide ecological information that can be used to predict and evaluate the potential impacts of proposed projects and programs on those ecosystems. This report summarizes the EMAC activities conducted by NSTec during calendar year 2007. Monitoring tasks during 2007 included eight program areas: (a) biological surveys, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) biological monitoring at the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). The following sections of this report describe work performed under these eight areas.

  13. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problems; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) explains the rationale and design criteria for the environmental monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of EMPs is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

  14. The monitoring and verification of nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garwin, Richard L., E-mail: RLG2@us.ibm.com [IBM Fellow Emeritus, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper partially reviews and updates the potential for monitoring and verification of nuclear weapons, including verification of their destruction. Cooperative monitoring with templates of the gamma-ray spectrum are an important tool, dependent on the use of information barriers.

  15. Monitoring change in biodiversity through composite indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckland, Steve

    Monitoring change in biodiversity through composite indices S.T. Buckland1,*, A.E. Magurran2 , R Zealand The need to monitor trends in biodiversity raises many technical issues. What are the features of a good biodiversity index? How should trends in abundance of individual species be estimated? How should

  16. Reactor monitoring with Neutrinos Michel Cribier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    it the automatic and non intrusive monitoring of nuclear reactor by its antineutrino signal could be very valuable, but also book keeping of the fuel element composition before and after their use in the nuclear powerReactor monitoring with Neutrinos Michel Cribier Astroparticule & Cosmologie 10, rue Alice Domon et

  17. HELIUM COMPRESSOR MONITORING SYSTEM Donna Kubik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Compressor #9 Connectors Compressor #10 Connectors Compressor #11 Connector (LEDs) LED Timer and LED PowerHELIUM COMPRESSOR MONITORING SYSTEM Donna Kubik Arecibo Observatory #12;1 CONTENTS 1. Design goals 3 1.1 Features of the compressor monitoring system 4 2. EDAS: The basis of data acquisition 5 2

  18. CFMRI Physiological Monitoring System Operator's Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    and lead wires (MRI compatible) can cause patient heating or burn if not used properly. To minimize in Figure 1) · Invivo millennia® 3155MVS remote monitor (#9 in Figure 1) · BioPac System - Respiratory Belt) Turn on the Invivo 3155MVS remote monitor located in the control room. · Invivo 3155MVS should

  19. Facility effluent monitoring plan for WESF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FEMP for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) provides sufficient information on the WESF effluent characteristics and the effluent monitoring systems so that a compliance assessment against applicable requirements may be performed. Radioactive and hazardous material source terms are related to specific effluent streams that are in turn, related to discharge points and, finally are compared to the effluent monitoring system capability.

  20. Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Durham, Michael D. (Castle Rock, CO); Schlager, Richard J. (Aurora, CO); Sappey, Andrew D. (Golden, CO); Sagan, Francis J. (Lakewood, CO); Marmaro, Roger W. (Littleton, CO); Wilson, Kevin G. (Littleton, CO)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber.

  1. Best practice techniques for environmental radiological monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Best practice techniques for environmental radiological monitoring Science Report ­ SC030308/SR SCHO0407BMNL-E-P #12;ii Science Report Best Practice Techniques for Environmental Radiological #12;iv Science Report Best Practice Techniques for Environmental Radiological Monitoring Executive

  2. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problem; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) has been written to contain the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document any proposed changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of Environmental Monitoring Plans is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance. The plan will be effective when it is approved by the appropriate Head of Field Organization or their designee. The plan discusses major environmental monitoring and hydrology activities at the WIPP and describes the programs established to ensure that WIPP operations do not have detrimental effects on the environment. This EMP is to be reviewed annually and updated every three years unless otherwise requested by the DOE or contractor.

  3. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2005-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Work during this quarter centered on the rebuilding of the prototype using the improved valve design described in the last report. Most of the components have been received and assembly has begun. Testing is expected to resume in August. In April, a paper was presented at the American Association of Drilling Engineers National Technical Conference in Houston. The paper was well received, and several oilfield service and supply companies sent inquiries regarding commercial distribution of the system. These are currently being pursued, but none have yet been finalized.

  4. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006, and the final report was issued. Work on Phase III of the project began during the previous quarter. Efforts this quarter have focused on the manufacture of the prototype and precommercial parts, field test planning and commercialization. The current extreme lead times quoted by oilfield machine shops for collar components, will delay the deployment of the field prototypes. The delivery date for five critical parts from one supplier has slipped to late November, which will preclude deployment for a field test before late December or early January. We are exploring whether we can take the partially made parts and complete them earlier in our own shop.

  5. Regulations for the Rhode Island Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations aim to protect surface water from pollutant discharges. They describe allowable discharges in the state that are subject to permits, discharges which may be made without permits,...

  6. A plasma process monitor/control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevenson, J.O.; Ward, P.P.; Smith, M.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Markle, R.J. [Advanced Micro Devices, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a system to monitor plasma processes for control of industrial applications. The system is designed to act as a fully automated, sand-alone process monitor during printed wiring board and semiconductor production runs. The monitor routinely performs data collection, analysis, process identification, and error detection/correction without the need for human intervention. The monitor can also be used in research mode to allow process engineers to gather additional information about plasma processes. The plasma monitor can perform real-time control of support systems known to influence plasma behavior. The monitor can also signal personnel to modify plasma parameters when the system is operating outside of desired specifications and requires human assistance. A notification protocol can be selected for conditions detected in the plasma process. The Plasma Process Monitor/Control System consists of a computer running software developed by Sandia National Laboratories, a commercially available spectrophotometer equipped with a charge-coupled device camera, an input/output device, and a fiber optic cable.

  7. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006. The month of January was devoted to the final preparations for, and conducting of testing of the DVMCS at TerraTek laboratories in Salt Lake City. This testing was concluded on January 27, 2006. Much of the effort in this period was then devoted to the analysis of the data and the preparation of the Phase II final report. The report was issued after the close of the period. Work on Phase III of the project began during this quarter. It has consisted of making some modifications in the prototype design to make it more suitable for field testing an more practical for commercial use. This work is continuing. The redesign effort, coupled with the current extreme lead times quoted by oilfield machine shops for collar components, will delay the deployment of the field prototypes. The precommercial prototypes are being developed in parallel, so the project should be completed per the current schedule.

  8. Downhole Vibration Monitoring & Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in a drilling laboratory. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006, and the Phase II final report was issued. Work on Phase III of the project began during the first quarter, 2006. Efforts the current quarter have continued to focus on the manufacture of the prototype and precommercial parts, field test planning and commercialization. The continued extreme lead times quoted by oilfield machine shops for collar components significantly delayed the deployment of the prototype and precommercial units. All parts have now been received for two units, and all but one for the third. Mechanical assembly of the first two systems is complete and the electronics installation and laboratory testing will be finished in April. We have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with a major US oilfield equipment supplier, which calls for their assisting with our field tests, in cash and in kind. We are close to signing a definitive agreement which includes the purchase of the three precommercial units. We had also signed a CRADA with the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (RMOTC), and scheduled a test at their site, The RMOTC drilling schedule continues to slip, and the test cannot begin until the first week of May. Based on these factors, we have requested a no-cost extension to July 31, 2007.

  9. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2005-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. As a result of the lower than expected performance of the MR damper noted last quarter, several additional tests were conducted. These dealt with possible causes of the lack of dynamic range observed in the testing: additional damping from the oil in the Belleville springs; changes in properties of the MR fluid; and, residual magnetization of the valve components. Of these, only the last was found to be significant. By using a laboratory demagnetization apparatus between runs, a dynamic range of 10:1 was achieved for the damper, more than adequate to produce the needed improvements in drilling. Additional modeling was also performed to identify a method of increasing the magnetic field in the damper. As a result of the above, several changes were made in the design. Additional circuitry was added to demagnetize the valve as the field is lowered. The valve was located to above the Belleville springs to reduce the load placed upon it and offer a greater range of materials for its construction. In addition, to further increase the field strength, the coils were relocated from the mandrel to the outer housing. At the end of the quarter, the redesign was complete and new parts were on order. The project is approximately three months behind schedule at this time.

  10. Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR and MEQ Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR and MEQ Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir...

  11. REMOTE AREA RADIATION MONITORING (RARM) ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NELSON RL

    2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote Area Radiation Monitoring (RARM) system will be used to provide real-time radiation monitoring information to the operations personnel during tank retrieval and transfer operations. The primary focus of the system is to detect potential anomalous (waste leaks) or transient radiological conditions. This system will provide mobile, real-time radiological monitoring, data logging, and status at pre-selected strategic points along the waste transfer route during tank retrieval operations. The system will provide early detection and response capabilities for the Retrieval and Closure Operations organization and Radiological Control personnel.

  12. SciTech Connect: Anticipatory Monitoring and Control of Complex...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anticipatory Monitoring and Control of Complex Systems using a Fuzzy based Fusion of Support Vector Regressors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anticipatory Monitoring...

  13. UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill gas project activities Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring...

  14. aerial surveying radiation monitoring: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    measurement system, in-core neutron monitor, medical radiation diagnostic device, nondestructive inspection device, environmental radiation monitoring, cosmic-ray measurement,...

  15. PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    monitoring birds, bats, and aquatic animals such as marine mammals, sea turtles, and fish in the offshore wind farm environment. Informed by monitoring results and research...

  16. Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    provides direct monitoring of the progress of fluid pressure into the natural fracture network or surrounding formation. * Objectives: - Improve monitoring of fluid...

  17. An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. Abstract: Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is one of several...

  18. Energy Storage Monitoring System and In-Situ Impedance Measurement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Monitoring System and In-Situ Impedance Measurement Modeling Energy Storage Monitoring System and In-Situ Impedance Measurement Modeling 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program...

  19. Load Monitoring CEC/LMTF Load Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Lesieutre, B.; Yang, Steve; Ellis, A.; Meklin, A.; Wong, B.; Gaikwad, A.; Brooks, D.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Phillips, John; Kosterev, Dmitry; Hoffman, M.; Ciniglio, O.; Hartwell, R.; Pourbeik, P.; Maitra, A.; Lu, Ning

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This white paper addresses the needs, options, current practices of load monitoring. Recommendations on load monitoring applications and future directions are also presented.

  20. Monitoring bat and bird fatalities at the Casselman Wind Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Monitoring bat and bird fatalities at the Casselman Wind Energy Center in Pennsylvania Monitoring bat and bird fatalities at the Casselman Wind Energy Center in Pennsylvania...

  1. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted in the first quarter of 1990. It includes the analytical data, field data, well activity data, and the other documentation for this program and provides a record of the program's activities and rationale and an official document of the analytical results. The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells, environmental soil borings, development of the sampling and analytical schedule, collection and analyses of groundwater samples, review of the analytical data and other data, maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data and related data, quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance, and reports of results to waste-site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD.

  2. Online Raman spectroscopy for bioprocess monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gil, Gustavo Adolfo

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Online monitoring of bioprocesses is essential to expanding the potential of biotechnology. In this thesis, a system to estimate concentrations of chemical components of an Escherichia Coli fermentation growth medium via ...

  3. Autonomous Robotic Monitoring of Underground Cable Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamishev, Alexander

    and maintenance methods as lower cost, higher measurement accuracy, and greater reliability of system operation, Member, IEEE Abstract-- Maintenance of distributed infrastructures requires periodic measurement of many development of autonomous robots for monitoring and maintenance of distributed infrastructures is becoming

  4. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted in the fourth quarter of 1990. It includes the analytical data, field data, well activity data, and other documentation for this program, provides a record of the program's activities and rationale, and serves as an official document of the analytical results. The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells, environmental soil borings, development of the sampling and analytical schedule, collection and analyses of groundwater samples, review of analytical and other data, maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data, quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance, and reports of results to waste-site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD.

  5. Integrated nuclear radiation detector and monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biehl, B.L.; Lieberman, S.I.

    1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A battery powered device which can continuously monitor and detect nuclear radiation utilizing fully integrated circuitry and which is provided with an alarm which alerts persons when the radiation level exceeds a predetermined threshold.

  6. Surface Water Monitoring and Assessment (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This law establishes criteria for three levels of credible data for a surface water quality monitoring and assessment program and establishes the necessary training and experience for persons to...

  7. Blenddown Monitoring System for HEU transparency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Enriched Uranium (HEU) Purchase Agreement between the US and the Russian Federation (RF) provides for the monitoring of the blending of highly enriched uranium (500 metric tons) with low enrichment blend stock uranium (LEU) to produce commercial reactor-grade material for use in US reactors. A Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) has been developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to provide unattended monitoring of the HEU blending operations at the Russian facilities. It is configured to monitor the mass flow rate developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and {sup 235}U isotopic enrichment developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) of gaseous UF{sub 6} in three separate flow streams at a blending tee.

  8. Safety Monitor Joint Working Group (JWG) Tour

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Joint Working Group of the U.S.-Japan Coordinating Committee of Fusion Energy on Safety in Inter-Institutional Collaborations (U.S.-Japan Safety Monitoring Program) Meeting...

  9. Wireless, automated monitoring for potential landslide hazards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garich, Evan Andrew

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes research efforts toward the development of a wireless sensor node, which can be employed in durable and expandable wireless sensor networks for remote monitoring of soil conditions in areas conducive to slope stability failures...

  10. Alpha-environmental continuous air monitor inlet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind deceleration and protective shroud that provides representative samples of ambient aerosols to an environmental continuous air monitor (ECAM) has a cylindrical enclosure mounted to an input on the continuous air monitor, the cylindrical enclosure having shrouded nozzles located radially about its periphery. Ambient air flows, often along with rainwater flows into the nozzles in a sampling flow generated by a pump in the continuous air monitor. The sampling flow of air creates a cyclonic flow in the enclosure that flows up through the cylindrical enclosure until the flow of air reaches the top of the cylindrical enclosure and then is directed downward to the continuous air monitor. A sloped platform located inside the cylindrical enclosure supports the nozzles and causes any moisture entering through the nozzle to drain out through the nozzles.

  11. Automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Langner, G.H. Jr.

    1993-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor is provided which includes a housing having an aperture allowing radon entry, and a filter that excludes the entry of radon daughters into the housing. A flexible track registration material is located within the housing that records alpha-particle emissions from the decay of radon and radon daughters inside the housing. The flexible track registration material is capable of being spliced such that the registration material from a plurality of monitors can be spliced into a single strip to facilitate automatic processing of the registration material from the plurality of monitors. A process for the automatic counting of radon registered by a radon monitor is also provided.

  12. Recommendations for Improvement of RMP Sediment Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , OR Prepared For Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances San Francisco Estuary Institute 1325 S. 46th in the Atlas of Sediment Contamination, Toxicity, and Benthic Assemblages (Thompson and Daum, in prep.). #12

  13. Version Auteur Monitoring the International Standardization Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    organizations are in charge of global security management. To address this issue, ISO (International Standards Organization), the main international organization for technical standardization, has launched a set of studiesVersion Auteur Monitoring the International Standardization Process Theoretical Choices

  14. SNL/VNIIEF Storage Monitoring Collaboration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barkanov, Boris P.; Bartberger, Jack C.; Blagin, Sergei V.; Croessmann, C. Dennis; Gruda, Jeffrey D.; Lupsha, Vitali A.; Moroskin, Dimitri V.; Nilsen, Curt A.

    1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Russian Federal Nuclear Center-All Russian Research Institute for Experimental Physics (VNIIEF)(also know as Arzamas-16) are collaborating on ways to assure the highest standards on safety, security, and international accountability of fissile material. This includes systems used to reduce the need for human access to fissile material, reduce radiation exposure, and provide prompt safety-related information, and provide continuous international accountability information while reducing the need for intrusive, on-site visits. This paper will report on the ongoing SNL/VNIIEF efforts to develop technologies and monitoring systems to meet these goals. Specific topics covered will include: the Smart Bolt tag/seal development, development and testing of electronic sensor platforms (U.S. T-1 ESP and VNIIEF Radio Tag) for monitoring and transportation applications, the ''Magazine-to-Magazine'' remote monitoring system field test, and the ''Facility-to-Facility'' storage monitoring system field trial.

  15. Annual Environmental Monitoring Report Released | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    radioactivity. Visit http:www.cemp.dri.edu for more information on the off-site air monitoring program. "Each year, we use this report as one of our tools to inform the...

  16. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM CURRENT MONITOR ELECTRONICS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KESSELMAN, M.

    2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to be constructed at ORNL is a collaboration of six laboratories. Beam current monitors for SNS will be used to monitor H-minus and H-plus beams ranging from the 15 mA (tune-up in the Front End and Linac) to over 60 A fully accumulated in the Ring. The time structure of the beams to be measured range from 645 nsec ''mini'' bunches, at the 1.05 MHz ring revolution rate, to an overall 1 mS long macro pulse. Beam current monitors (BCMs) for SNS have requirements depending upon their location within the system. The development of a general approach to satisfy requirements of various locations with common components is a major design objective. This paper will describe the development of the beam current monitors and electronics.

  17. Industrial Conservation Technology Energy Savings Monitoring System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowell, J. J.; Phipps, H. R., Jr.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described which monitors actual market penetration and energy savings of Department of Energy sponsored industrial conservation commercial technologies. The procedure to implement a new, technology into the Impact Scoreboard System (ISS...

  18. 300 area TEDF permit compliance monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERNESKI, L.D.

    1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the permit compliance monitoring plan for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). It addresses the compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and Department of Natural Resources Aquatic Lands Sewer Outfall Lease.

  19. Electrical energy monitoring in an industrial plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorhofer, Frank Joseph

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents an investigation into the actual electrical energy and demand use of a large metal fabrication facility located in Houston, Texas. Plant selection and the monitoring system are covered. The influence of a low power factor...

  20. Achieving a "SIL 1" TCR Monitoring System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartolomé, R; Scibile, L; Grau, S

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SIL 1 (Safety Integrity Level 1) refers to the quantification and measurement of the availability, reliability, maintenance and safety of the monitoring system. In the last few years the computer infrastructure used to acquire and to diffuse data to the TCR has evolved very rapidly. A number of measures in hardware, software and management have been introduced to cope with this situation. These include: the Multipurpose Monitoring Device (MMD), a standard data acquisition platform used in the renovation of old front end monitoring equipment, the Smart Equipment Controller (Dsec), a driver that reduces the layers in the data diffusion pyramid, the multiplatform monitoring software to integrate the different SCADA systems, a software configuration tool (RAZOR) for problem tracking and version control, and a complete development environment reproducing a real installation for thorough testing of any changes. To achieve SIL 1 objectives, while mastering the evolution of our systems will be the challenge for the c...

  1. Mercury Continuous Emmission Monitor Calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster; Joseph Rovani

    2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMs) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks throughput the U.S. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor calibrators/generators. These devices are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 and vacated by a Federal appeals court in early 2008 required that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Despite the vacature, mercury emissions regulations in the future will require NIST traceable calibration standards, and EPA does not want to interrupt the effort towards developing NIST traceability protocols. The traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued a conceptual interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The EPA traceability protocol document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of calibrator models by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the calibrators that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ID/ICP/MS) performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD. The outputs of mercury calibrators are compared to one another using a nesting procedure which allows direct comparison of one calibrator with another at specific concentrations and eliminates analyzer variability effects. The qualification portion of the EPA interim traceability protocol requires the vendors to define calibrator performance as affected by variables such as pressure, temperature, line voltage, and shipping. In 2007 WRI developed and conducted a series of simplified qualification experiments to determine actual calibrator performance related to the variables defined in the qualification portion of the interim protocol.

  2. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  3. Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, J.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During fourth quarter 1997, eleven constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility. No constituents exceeded final PDWS in samples from upgradient monitoring wells. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

  4. An instrumentation package for monitoring tractor performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Malcolm Kirk

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of performance for most current tractor models was engine speed. Since overall tractor performance was influenced by several operating variables, not just engine speed, additional monitors and displays of performance were needed. Tractor performance monitors... Rotational Sp D' fferential Speed Measurement Draft Measurement Rear Axle Torque Measurement Fuel Consumption Measurement Campbell CR5 Digital Recorder Field Test Design and Procedures Data Requirements Test Site and Field Variables Travel Speed...

  5. Monitoring Energy Efficiency in Sophisticated Process Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenney, W. F.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MONITORING ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN SOPHISTICATED PROCESS PLANTS William F. Kenney Exxon Chemical Company Florham Park, New Jersey The proper operation of existing facilities is needed if design improvements are to be reduced to practice.... ETCI ? HELPS IDENTIFY CORRECTIVE ACTION ? SUITABLE FOR FREQUENT MONITORING BY PLANT OPERATIONS o :::l o o a: Cl. t: z :::l " o W N -l ..... :::l > (D a: w z w ~-OPERATING DATA POINTS INCENTIVE FOR IMPROVED OPERATION...

  6. Monitoring and Management of Refinery Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelham, R. O.; Moriarty, R. D.; Hudgens, P. D.

    MONITORING AND MANAGEMENT OF REFINERY ENERGY CONSUMPTION Roger O. Pelham Richard D. Moriarty Patrie D. Hudgens Profimatics, Inc. Thousand Oaks, California ABSTRACT Since 1972, the u.s. refining industry has made much progress in reduci... ng energy consumption. Lately, falling energy prices have de-emphasized the need to appropriate new capital for additional energy conservation projects. One area neglected in most refineries is the need to monitor and man age the daily use...

  7. Self-monitoring and leadership emergence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Brett Alan

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    's personal approach to the group accordingly. This description is almost identi- cal to the description of the high self-monitoring individual. Per- haps, rather than discarding the trait theories we merely need to reconceptualize our approach. Maybe... of this effect. One factor which may prevent the high self-monitoring individual from emerging as the leader would be the existence of prior status differences within the group. Status generalization theory maintains that status charac- teristics which...

  8. Variability in continuous traffic monitoring data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, T.; Hu, P.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Young, J. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each state in the United States can be viewed as a universe of road segments. For each road segment in each state, it is desired to know various traffic characteristics based on count data, classification count data, and weigh-in-motion data. These data are absolutely essential for highway design, maintenance, safety, and planning. Given no cost constraints, each road segment would be continuously monitored every day of the year. However, in practice, a few road segments are monitored continuously every day of the year to produce annual characteristics of traffic flow. The remaining road segments are monitored for one or two days each year, and this resulting data are `adjusted` (using factors based on data collected from the continuously monitored road segments) to produce estimates of annual characteristics. With this general approach, each state strives to provide estimates of annual characteristics for each road segment within its jurisdiction. In 1985, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) published the Traffic Monitoring Guide to assist states in achieving this end. As with almost any data collection effort, the monitoring data suffers from errors from many sources. In this paper, we report some empirical findings in a research project sponsored by the FHWA. This research project studied the variability in the traffic data from the continuously monitored road segments from state(s) and, the extent to which this variability is transferred to and affects the precision of the data produced from the road segments which are monitored only one or two days each year. The ultimate hope is that states will eventually be able to not only publish an estimate of a characteristic such as Average Annual Daily Traffic (AADT) for each road segment, but also that each estimate will be accompanied by a statement expressing how good the estimate is in terms of its estimated variability or precision, which will likely be expressed as a coefficient of variation.

  9. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berka, Randy (Davis, CA); Bachkirova, Elena (Davis, CA); Rey, Michael (Davis, CA)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  10. Ultrasonic techniques for process monitoring and control.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chien, H.-T.

    1999-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrasonic techniques have been applied successfully to process monitoring and control for many industries, such as energy, medical, textile, oil, and material. It helps those industries in quality control, energy efficiency improving, waste reducing, and cost saving. This paper presents four ultrasonic systems, ultrasonic viscometer, on-loom, real-time ultrasonic imaging system, ultrasonic leak detection system, and ultrasonic solid concentration monitoring system, developed at Argonne National Laboratory in the past five years for various applications.

  11. The Savannah River Site's groundwater monitoring program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1990 (July through September) EPD/EMS conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. All analytical results from third quarter 1990 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all site custodians. One or more analytes exceeded Flag 2 in 87 monitoring well series. Analytes exceeded Flat 2 for the first since 1984 in 14 monitoring well series. In addition to groundwater monitoring, EPD/EMS collected drinking water samples from SRS drinking water systems supplied by wells. The drinking water samples were analyzed for radioactive constituents.

  12. September 2007 monitoring results for Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater is being sampled twice yearly (for a recommended period of two years) for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 10 monitoring wells and 6 piezometers (Figure 1.1), at locations approved by the KDHE (Argonne 2006a). The results of groundwater sampling and VOCs analyses in September-October 2005, March 2006, September 2006, and March 2007 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a,b, 2007a). The results have demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a broad groundwater plume that has shown little movement. This report presents the results of the groundwater sampling at Centralia in September 2007, performed in accord with the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b). The September 2007 sampling represents the fifth and final monitoring event performed under the recommended two-year monitoring program approved by the KDHE.

  13. BaBar Note 302 Monitoring Requirements of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    monitoring of background radiation levels for diagnostic and detector-protection purposes, monitoring-dependent Sensors : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 27 5 Humidity Monitoring 27 6 Schedule 28 2 #12;1 General-II interaction region and the SVT. The space available for sensors and readout cables for SVT monitoring

  14. Standard-C hydrogen monitoring system, system design description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, T.C., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Standard-C cabinet arrangement system design description for the Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System.

  15. Explore Online: Question-Driven Coral-Reef Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcilwain, Jenny

    variance, statistical power, survey designs Ambiguities between monitoring protocols and man- agement

  16. Optimal Location of a Mobile Sensor Continuum for Environmental Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    air pollution monitoring, seismic monitoring, or monitoring of large infrastructures in civil is proposed for the goal of optimal location of a mobile sensor continuum. The monitoring of pollution on a 2D or track distributed environmental phenomena (weather, seismic events, wildfires, air, soil or river

  17. October 2007 monitoring results for Morrill, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) initiated periodic sampling of groundwater in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Morrill, Kansas. On the basis of available information, the CCC/USDA believes that one or more third parties operated this facility after termination of the CCC/USDA's lease in 1971. The sampling at Morrill is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at this site (Argonne 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater has been sampled twice yearly for a recommended period of two years. The samples are analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as for selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 12 monitoring wells and 3 private wells (Figure 1.1), at locations approved by the KDHE. The scope of the originally approved monitoring has been expanded to include vegetation sampling (initiated in October 2006) and surface water and stream bed sediment sampling (initiated in March 2007). The analytical results for groundwater sampling events at Morrill in September 2005, March 2006, September 2006, and March 2007 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a, 2007c,e). The results have demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level (5.0 {micro}g/L) for this compound, in a groundwater plume extending generally south-southeastward from the former CCC/USDA facility, toward Terrapin Creek at the south edge of the town. Little clear pattern of change in the concentrations observed at the individual monitoring points and little plume migration have been observed in previous monitoring events. Low levels ({le} 1.3 {micro}g/L) of carbon tetrachloride have persistently been detected at monitoring well MW8S, however, along an intermittent tributary to Terrapin Creek. This observation suggests a possible risk of contamination of the surface waters of the creek. In light of these findings, in 2006 the CCC/USDA recommended expansion of the approved monitoring program to include the collection and analysis of surface water samples along Terrapin Creek (Argonne 2007e). At the request of the KDHE (KDHE 2007a), locations for both surface water and shallow sediment sampling were discussed with the KDHE in January 2007. An addendum to the existing monitoring plan and a standard operating procedure (SOP AGEM-15) for sediment sampling were submitted to the KDHE on the basis of these discussions (Argonne 2007a,b). This report presents the results of groundwater, surface water, and sediment sampling performed at Morrill in October 2007, in accord with the monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b) and the addendum to that plan (Argonne 2007a). To supplement these studies, Argonne also sampled natural vegetation along Terrapin Creek in October 2006, April 2007, and July 2007 for analyses for VOCs. The results of the plant tissue analyses are included in this report. The October 2007 groundwater sampling at Morrill represents the fifth and final monitoring event performed under the recommended two-year monitoring program approved by the KDHE.

  18. March 2008 monitoring results for Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater is being sampled twice yearly (for a recommended period of two years) for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 10 monitoring wells and 6 piezometers (Figure 1.1), at locations approved by the KDHE (Argonne 2006a). The results of groundwater sampling and VOCs analyses in September-October 2005, March 2006, September 2006, March 2007, and September 2007 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a,b, 2007a, 2008). The results have demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a broad groundwater plume that has shown little movement. This report presents the results of the groundwater sampling at Centralia in March 2008, performed in accord with the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b). The September 2007 sampling represented the fifth and final monitoring event performed under the recommended two-year monitoring program approved by the KDHE. The March 2008 sampling begins an extension of the approved monitoring that is to continue until the final site remedy has been implemented and a comprehensive program of performance and compliance monitoring has been established at Centralia (KDHE 2008a).

  19. Body monitoring and imaging apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-acoustic pulse-echo radar monitor is employed in the repetitive mode, whereby a large number of reflected pulses are averaged to produce a voltage that modulates an audio oscillator to produce a tone that corresponds to the heart motion. The antenna used in this monitor generally comprises two flat copper foils, thus permitting the antenna to be housed in a substantially flat housing. The monitor converts the detected voltage to an audible signal with both amplitude modulation and Doppler effect. It further uses a dual time constant to reduce the effect of gross sensor-to-surface movement. The monitor detects the movement of one or more internal body parts, such as the heart, lungs, arteries, and vocal chords, and includes a pulse generator for simultaneously inputting a sequence of pulses to a transmit path and a grating path. The pulses transmitted along the transmit path drive Oh impulse, generator and provide corresponding transmit pulses that are applied to a transmit antenna. The gating path includes a range delay generator which generates timed gating pulses. The timed gating pulses cause the receive path to selectively conduct pulses reflected from the body parts and received by a receive antenna. The monitor output potential can be separated into a cardiac output indicative of the physical movement of the heart, and a pulmonary output indicative of the physical movement of the lung. The impulse generator in the transmit path can be replaced with a pulsed RF generator.

  20. Body monitoring and imaging apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-acoustic pulse-echo radar monitor is employed in the repetitive mode, whereby a large number of reflected pulses are averaged to produce a voltage that modulates an audio oscillator to produce a tone that corresponds to the heart motion. The antenna used in this monitor generally comprises two flat copper foils, thus permitting the antenna to be housed in a substantially flat housing. The monitor converts the detected voltage to an audible signal with both amplitude modulation and Doppler effect. It further uses a dual time constant to reduce the effect of gross sensor-to-surface movement. The monitor detects the movement of one or more internal body parts, such as the heart, lungs, arteries, and vocal chords, and includes a pulse generator for simultaneously inputting a sequence of pulses to a transmit path and a grating path. The pulses transmitted along the transmit path drive Oh impulse, generator and provide corresponding transmit pulses that are applied to a transmit antenna. The gating path includes a range delay generator which generates timed gating pulses. The timed gating pulses cause the receive path to selectively conduct pulses reflected from the body parts and received by a receive antenna. The monitor output potential can be separated into a cardiac output indicative of the physical movement of the heart, and a pulmonary output indicative of the physical movement of the lung. The impulse generator in the transmit path can be replaced with a pulsed RF generator. 13 figs.

  1. Body monitoring and imaging apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-acoustic pulse-echo radar monitor is employed in the repetitive mode, whereby a large number of reflected pulses are averaged to produce a voltage that modulates an audio oscillator to produce a tone that corresponds to the heart motion. The antenna used in this monitor generally comprises two flat copper foils, thus permitting the antenna to be housed in a substantially flat housing. The monitor converts the detected voltage to an audible signal with both amplitude modulation and Doppler effect. It further uses a dual time constant to reduce the effect of gross sensor-to-surface movement. The monitor detects the movement of one or more internal body parts, such as the heart, lungs, arteries, and vocal chords, and includes a pulse generator for simultaneously inputting a sequence of pulses to a transmit path and a gating path. The pulses transmitted along the transmit path drive an impulse generator and provide corresponding transmit pulses that are applied to a transmit antenna. The gating path includes a range delay generator which generates timed gating pulses. The timed gating pulses cause the receive path to selectively conduct pulses reflected from the body parts and received by a receive antenna. The monitor output potential can be separated into a cardiac output indicative of the physical movement of the heart, and a pulmonary output indicative of the physical movement of the lung. 12 figs.

  2. Body monitoring and imaging apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-acoustic pulse-echo radar monitor is employed in the repetitive mode, whereby a large number of reflected pulses are averaged to produce a voltage that modulates an audio oscillator to produce a tone that corresponds to the heart motion. The antenna used in this monitor generally comprises two flat copper foils, thus permitting the antenna to be housed in a substantially flat housing. The monitor converts the detected voltage to an audible signal with both amplitude modulation and Doppler effect. It further uses a dual time constant to reduce the effect of gross sensor-to-surface movement. The monitor detects the movement of one or more internal body parts, such as the heart, lungs, arteries, and vocal chords, and includes a pulse generator for simultaneously inputting a sequence of pulses to a transmit path and a gating path. The pulses transmitted along the transmit path drive an impulse generator and provide corresponding transmit pulses that are applied to a transmit antenna. The gating path includes a range delay generator which generates timed gating pulses. The timed gating pulses cause the receive path to selectively conduct pulses reflected from the body parts and received by a receive antenna. The monitor output potential can be separated into a cardiac output indicative of the physical movement of the heart, and a pulmonary output indicative of the physical movement of the lung.

  3. Shared performance monitor in a multiprocessor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiu, George; Gara, Alan G.; Salapura, Valentina

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A performance monitoring unit (PMU) and method for monitoring performance of events occurring in a multiprocessor system. The multiprocessor system comprises a plurality of processor devices units, each processor device for generating signals representing occurrences of events in the processor device, and, a single shared counter resource for performance monitoring. The performance monitor unit is shared by all processor cores in the multiprocessor system. The PMU comprises: a plurality of performance counters each for counting signals representing occurrences of events from one or more the plurality of processor units in the multiprocessor system; and, a plurality of input devices for receiving the event signals from one or more processor devices of the plurality of processor units, the plurality of input devices programmable to select event signals for receipt by one or more of the plurality of performance counters for counting, wherein the PMU is shared between multiple processing units, or within a group of processors in the multiprocessing system. The PMU is further programmed to monitor event signals issued from non-processor devices.

  4. Development of conformal respirator monitoring technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonka, J.J.; Weismann, J.J.; Logan, R.J. [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a Small Business Innovative Research Phase II project to develop a modular, surface conforming respirator monitor to improve upon the manual survey techniques presently used by the nuclear industry. Research was performed with plastic scintillator and gas proportional modules in an effort to find the most conducive geometry for a surface conformal, position sensitive monitor. The respirator monitor prototype developed is a computer controlled, position-sensitive detection system employing 56 modular proportional counters mounted in molds conforming to the inner and outer surfaces of a commonly used respirator (Scott Model 801450-40). The molds are housed in separate enclosures and hinged to create a {open_quotes}waffle-iron{close_quotes} effect so that the closed monitor will simultaneously survey both surfaces of the respirator. The proportional counter prototype was also designed to incorporate Shonka Research Associates previously developed charge-division electronics. This research provided valuable experience into pixellated position sensitive detection systems. The technology developed can be adapted to other monitoring applications where there is a need for deployment of many traditional radiation detectors.

  5. Transmission Line Security Monitor: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Svoboda

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Transmission Line Security Monitor System Operational Test is a project funded by the Technical Support Working Group (TSWG). TSWG operates under the Combating Terrorism Technical Support Office that functions under the Department of Defense. The Transmission Line Security Monitor System is based on technology developed by Idaho National Laboratory. The technology provides a means for real-time monitoring of physical threats and/or damage to electrical transmission line towers and conductors as well as providing operational parameters to transmission line operators to optimize transmission line operation. The end use is for monitoring long stretches of transmission lines that deliver electrical power from remote generating stations to cities and industry. These transmission lines are generally located in remote transmission line corridors where security infrastructure may not exist. Security and operational sensors in the sensor platform on the conductors take power from the transmission line and relay security and operational information to operations personnel hundreds of miles away without relying on existing infrastructure. Initiated on May 25, 2007, this project resulted in pre-production units tested in realistic operational environments during 2010. A technology licensee, Lindsey Manufacturing of Azusa California, is assisting in design, testing, and ultimately production. The platform was originally designed for a security monitoring mission, but it has been enhanced to include important operational features desired by electrical utilities.

  6. Monitoring the Monitor: An Approach towards Trustworthiness in Service Oriented Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajan, Hridesh

    Monitoring the Monitor: An Approach towards Trustworthiness in Service Oriented Architecture {mahantesh, harish, hridesh}@cs.iastate.edu ABSTRACT The key notion in service-oriented architecture of the service requests. In this work, we describe an extension of the service-oriented architecture

  7. L. Evers, Infrasound monitoring in the Netherlands 1 Infrasound Monitoring in the Netherlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evers, Läslo G.

    L. Evers, Infrasound monitoring in the Netherlands 1 journaal nr. 176 sept. 2005 Infrasound Monitoring in the Netherlands Läslo Evers Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute KNMI, PO Box 201, 3730 AE De Bilt, the Netherlands +31-30-2206335, evers@kmni.nl Abstract The Royal Netherlands

  8. An Integrated Framework for Optimizing Automatic Monitoring Systems in Large IT Infrastructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tao

    and cost. IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) addresses monitoring as a con- tinual cycle of monitoring

  9. COMMUNITY SPACE MONITOR (CSM) APPLICATION Thank you for applying for the Community Space Monitor position with the Residence Life department.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMMUNITY SPACE MONITOR (CSM) APPLICATION Thank you for applying for the Community Space Monitor, .docx) and PDF (.pdf) format only. #12;Residence Life Updated August 2014 -1 of 3- Community Space Monitor: Job Description IDENTIFICATION Position Title: Community Space Monitor Department: Residence Life

  10. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1991 EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Beginning in 1991, the flagging criteria are based on EPA drinking water standards and method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from second quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

  11. Solar Powered Radioactive Air Monitoring Stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, J. M.; Bisping, Lynn E.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental monitoring of ambient air for radioactive material is required as stipulated in the PNNL Site radioactive air license. Sampling ambient air at identified preferred locations could not be initially accomplished because utilities were not readily available. Therefore, solar powered environmental monitoring systems were considered as a possible option. PNNL purchased two 24-V DC solar powered environmental monitoring systems which consisted of solar panels, battery banks, and sampling units. During an approximate four month performance evaluation period, the solar stations operated satisfactorily at an on-site test location. They were subsequently relocated to their preferred locations in June 2012 where they continue to function adequately under the conditions found in Richland, Washington.

  12. High resolution in situ ultrasonic corrosion monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Robert J. (Schenectady, NY)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrasonic corrosion monitor is provided which produces an in situ measurement of the amount of corrosion of a monitoring zone or zones of an elongate probe placed in the corrosive environment. A monitoring zone is preferably formed between the end of the probe and the junction of the zone with a lead-in portion of the probe. Ultrasonic pulses are applied to the probe and a determination made of the time interval between pulses reflected from the end of the probe and the junction referred to, both when the probe is uncorroded and while it is corroding. Corresponding electrical signals are produced and a value for the normalized transit time delay derived from these time interval measurements is used to calculate the amount of corrosion.

  13. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1989 (October--December), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from fourth quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  14. Enhancing regional security agreements through cooperative monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pregenzer, A.L.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes that strengthening regional capabilities for formulating and implementing arms control and confidence-building measures is a tangible method of enhancing regional security. It discusses the importance of developing a regional infrastructure for arms control and confidence building and elucidates the role of technology in facilitating regional arms control and confidence-building agreements. In addition, it identifies numerous applications for regional cooperative monitoring in the areas of arms control, resource management, international commerce and disaster response. The Cooperative Monitoring Center at Sandia National Laboratories, whose aim is to help individual countries and regions acquire the tools they need to develop their own solutions to regional problems, is discussed briefly. The paper ends with recommendations for establishing regional cooperative monitoring centers.

  15. Monitoring the usage of a computer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, D.J.

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Controlling the usage of computer systems particularly those operated for the federal government, is an important topic today. Audit requirements have grown to the point where they can be a significant burden to the proprietors of the system. The paper briefly mentions several proposals for responding to increased audit requirements and for monitoring a system to detect unauthorized activity. A technique is proposed for situations where the proscribed or the intended activity can be characterized in terms of program or system performance parameters. The design of a usage monitoring system is outlined. The design is based on enhancing the audit data provided by the monitored system, capturing the audit data in a separate system to protect it from user access, and implementing one of the audit trail analysis systems currently under development.

  16. Comparison Measurements of Silicon Carbide Temperature Monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Rempe; K. G. Condie; D. L. Knudson; L. L. Snead

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the efforts initiated through the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) program to make Silicon Carbide (SiC) temperature monitors available, a capability was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to complete post-irradiation evaluations of these monitors. INL selected the resistance measurement approach for detecting peak irradiation temperature from SiC temperature monitors. To demonstrate this new capability, comparison measurements were completed by INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on identical samples subjected to identical irradiation conditions. Results reported in this paper indicate that the resistance measurement approach can yield similar peak irradiation temperatures if appropriate equipment is used and appropriate procedures are followed.

  17. Wireless boundary monitor system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haynes, Howard D. (Knoxville, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wireless boundary monitor system used to monitor the integrity of a boundary surrounding an area uses at least two housings having at least one transmitting means for emitting ultrasonic pressure waves to a medium. Each of the housings has a plurality of receiving means for sensing the pressure waves in the medium. The transmitting means and the receiving means of each housing are aimable and communicably linked. At least one of the housings is equipped with a local alarm means for emitting a first alarm indication whereby, when the pressure waves propagating from a transmitting means to a receiving means are sufficiently blocked by an object a local alarm means or a remote alarm means or a combination thereof emit respective alarm indications. The system may be reset either manually or automatically. This wireless boundary monitor system has useful applications in both indoor and outdoor environments.

  18. Electronics of LHCb calorimeter monitoring system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konoplyannikov, A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All calorimeter sub-detectors in LHCb, the Scintillator Pad Detector (SPD), the Preshower detector (PS), the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) and the Hadron Calorimeter (HCAL) are equipped with the Hamamatsu photomultiplier tubes (PMT) as devices for light to electrical signal conversion [1]. The PMT gain behaviour is not stable in a time, due to changes in the load current and due to ageing. The calorimeter light emitting diode (LED) monitoring system has been developed to monitor the PMT gain over time during data taking. Furthermore the system will play an important role during the detector commissioning and during LHC machine stops, in order to perform tests of the PMTs, cables and FE boards and measurements of relative time alignment. The aim of the paper is to describe the LED monitoring system architecture, some technical details of the electronics implementation based on radiation tolerant components and to summarize the system performance.

  19. High resolution in situ ultrasonic corrosion monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, R.J.

    1984-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrasonic corrosion monitor is provided which produces an in situ measurement of the amount of corrosion of a monitoring zone or zones of an elongate probe placed in the corrosive environment. A monitoring zone is preferably formed between the end of the probe and the junction of the zone with a lead-in portion of the probe. Ultrasonic pulses are applied to the probe and a determination made of the time interval between pulses reflected from the end of the probe and the junction referred to, both when the probe is uncorroded and while it is corroding. Corresponding electrical signals are produced and a value for the normalized transit time delay derived from these time interval measurements is used to calculate the amount of corrosion.

  20. Wireless boundary monitor system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haynes, H.D.; Ayers, C.W.

    1997-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A wireless boundary monitor system used to monitor the integrity of a boundary surrounding an area uses at least two housings having at least one transmitting means for emitting ultrasonic pressure waves to a medium. Each of the housings has a plurality of receiving means for sensing the pressure waves in the medium. The transmitting means and the receiving means of each housing are aimable and communicably linked. At least one of the housings is equipped with a local alarm means for emitting a first alarm indication whereby, when the pressure waves propagating from a transmitting means to a receiving means are sufficiently blocked by an object a local alarm means or a remote alarm means or a combination thereof emit respective alarm indications. The system may be reset either manually or automatically. This wireless boundary monitor system has useful applications in both indoor and outdoor environments. 4 figs.

  1. Periscope pop-in beam monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, E.D.; Graves, W.S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source; Robinson, K.E. [STI Optronics, Bellevue, WA (United States)

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have built monitors for use as beam diagnostics in the narrow gap of an undulator for an FEL experiment. They utilize an intercepting screen of doped YAG scintillating crystal to make light that is imaged through a periscope by conventional video equipment. The absolute position can be ascertained by comparing the electron beam position with the position of a He:Ne laser that is observed by this pop-in monitor. The optical properties of the periscope and the mechanical arrangement of the system mean that beam can be spatially determined to the resolution of the camera, in this case approximately 10 micrometers. The experience with these monitors suggests improvements for successor designs, which they also describe.

  2. FY-2010 Process Monitoring Technology Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orton, Christopher R.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Casella, Amanda J.; Hines, Wes; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; henkell, J.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Jordan, Elizabeth A.; Lines, Amanda M.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Peterson, James M.; Verdugo, Dawn E.; Christensen, Ronald N.; Peper, Shane M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During FY 2010, work under the Spectroscopy-Based Process Monitoring task included ordering and receiving four fluid flow meters and four flow visible-near infrared spectrometer cells to be instrumented within the centrifugal contactor system at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Initial demonstrations of real-time spectroscopic measurements on cold-stream simulants were conducted using plutonium (Pu)/uranium (U) (PUREX) solvent extraction process conditions. The specific test case examined the extraction of neodymium nitrate (Nd(NO3)3) from an aqueous nitric acid (HNO3) feed into a tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/ n-dodecane solvent. Demonstration testing of this system included diverting a sample from the aqueous feed meanwhile monitoring the process in every phase using the on-line spectroscopic process monitoring system. The purpose of this demonstration was to test whether spectroscopic monitoring is capable of determining the mass balance of metal nitrate species involved in a cross-current solvent extraction scheme while also diverting a sample from the system. The diversion scenario involved diverting a portion of the feed from a counter-current extraction system while a continuous extraction experiment was underway. A successful test would demonstrate the ability of the process monitoring system to detect and quantify the diversion of material from the system during a real-time continuous solvent extraction experiment. The system was designed to mimic a PUREX-type extraction process with a bank of four centrifugal contactors. The aqueous feed contained Nd(NO3)3 in HNO3, and the organic phase was composed of TBP/n-dodecane. The amount of sample observed to be diverted by on-line spectroscopic process monitoring was measured to be 3 mmol (3 x 10-3 mol) Nd3+. This value was in excellent agreement with the 2.9 mmol Nd3+ value based on the known mass of sample taken (i.e., diverted) directly from the system feed solution.

  3. Electrical condition monitoring method for polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, Jr. Kenneth S. (Dahlonega, GA); Morris, Shelby J. (Hampton, VA); Masakowski, Daniel D. (Worcester, MA); Wong, Ching Ping (Duluth, GA); Luo, Shijian (Boise, ID)

    2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical condition monitoring method utilizes measurement of electrical resistivity of a conductive composite degradation sensor to monitor environmentally induced degradation of a polymeric product such as insulated wire and cable. The degradation sensor comprises a polymeric matrix and conductive filler. The polymeric matrix may be a polymer used in the product, or it may be a polymer with degradation properties similar to that of a polymer used in the product. The method comprises a means for communicating the resistivity to a measuring instrument and a means to correlate resistivity of the degradation sensor with environmentally induced degradation of the product.

  4. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the environmental monitoring program for CY83 for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. Besides the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) and Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX), PPPL's largest tokamak, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) had a full year of operation. A phased approach has been planned to assure the proper level of monitoring to coincide with the TFTR program. During CY83 there were no adverse effects to the environment resulting from any operational program at PPPL and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations.

  5. Class 3 Tracking and Monitoring System Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safely, Eugene; Salamy, S. Phillip

    1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of Class 3 tracking system are to assist DOE in tracking and performance and progress of these projects and to capture the technical and financial information collected during the projects' monitoring phase. The captured information was used by DOE project managers and BDM-Oklahoma staff for project monitoring and evaluation, and technology transfer activities. The proposed tracking system used the Class Evaluation Executive Report (CLEVER), a relation database for storing and disseminating class project data; GeoGraphix, a geological and technical analysis and mapping software system; the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS) database; and MS-Project, a project management software system.

  6. Geothermal progress monitor report No. 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal Progress Monitor Report No. 6 presents a state-by-state summary of the status of geothermal leasing, exploration, and development in major physiographic regions where geothermal resource potential has been identified. Recent state-specific activities are reported at the end of each state status report, while recent activities of a more general nature are summarized briefly in Part II of the report. A list of recent publications of potential interest to the geothermal community and a directory of contributors to the geothermal progress monitoring system are also included.

  7. Water-Level Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.R. Newcomer; J.P. McDonald; M.A. Chamness

    1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the water-level monitoring plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project, conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Water-level monitoring of the groundwater system beneath the Hanford Site is performed to fulfill the requirements of various state and federal regulations, orders, and agreements. The primary objective of this monitoring is to determine groundwater flow rates and directions. To meet this and other objectives, water-levels are measured annually in monitoring wells completed within the unconfined aquifer system, the upper basalt-confined aquifer system, and in the lower basalt-confined aquifers for surveillance monitoring. At regulated waste units, water levels are taken monthly, quarterly, semi-annually, or annually, depending on the hydrogeologic conditions and regulatory status of a given site. The techniques used to collect water-level data are described in this document along with the factors that affect the quality of the data and the strategies employed by the project to minimize error in the measurement and interpretation of water levels. Well networks are presented for monitoring the unconfined aquifer system, the upper basalt-confined aquifer system, and the lower basalt-confined aquifers, all at a regional scale (surveillance monitoring), as well as the local-scale well networks for each of the regulated waste units studied by this project (regulated-unit monitoring). The criteria used to select wells for water-table monitoring are discussed. It is observed that poor well coverage for surveillance water-table monitoring exists south and west of the 200-West Area, south of the 100-F Area, and east of B Pond and the Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). This poor coverage results from a lack of wells suitable for water-table monitoring, and causes uncertainty in representation of the regional water-table in these areas. These deficiencies are regional in scale and apply to regions outside of the operational areas, so these deficiencies do not in anyway reflect on the adequacy of the local-scale well networks used for regulated-unit monitoring. The sediments comprising the unconfined aquifer system have been subdivided into nine hydro-geologic units. The specific hydrogeologic units present within the saturated open interval of each onsite well used for water-level measurements are identified. This was accomplished by geologic interpretation at individual wells combined with extrapolation to nearby wells using a three-dimensional, regional-scale conceptual model of the Hanford Site hydrostratigraphy.

  8. Wide-area, real-time monitoring and visualization system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Budhraja, Vikram S. (Los Angeles, CA); Dyer, James D. (La Mirada, CA); Martinez Morales, Carlos A. (Upland, CA)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

  9. Wide-area, real-time monitoring and visualization system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Budhraja, Vikram S.; Dyer, James D.; Martinez Morales, Carlos A.

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

  10. Real-time performance monitoring and management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Budhraja, Vikram S. (Los Angeles, CA); Dyer, James D. (La Mirada, CA); Martinez Morales, Carlos A. (Upland, CA)

    2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

  11. Scientific Opportunities for Monitoring at Environmental Remediation Sites (SOMERS): Integrated Systems-Based Approaches to Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunn, Amoret L.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elizabeth L.; Truex, Michael J.; Peterson, Mark; Freshley, Mark D.; Pierce, Eric M.; McCord, John; Young, Michael H.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Miller, Rick; Miracle, Ann L.; Kaback, Dawn; Eddy-Dilek, Carol; Rossabi, Joe; Lee, Michelle H.; Bush, Richard P.; Beam , Paul; Chamberlain, G. M.; Marble, Justin; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Gerdes, Kurt D.; Collazo, Yvette

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Through an inter-disciplinary effort, DOE is addressing a need to advance monitoring approaches from sole reliance on cost- and labor-intensive point-source monitoring to integrated systems-based approaches such as flux-based approaches and the use of early indicator parameters. Key objectives include identifying current scientific, technical and implementation opportunities and challenges, prioritizing science and technology strategies to meet current needs within the DOE complex for the most challenging environments, and developing an integrated and risk-informed monitoring framework.

  12. Wireless device monitoring methods, wireless device monitoring systems, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCown, Steven H. (Rigby, ID); Derr, Kurt W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Rohde, Kenneth W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Wireless device monitoring methods, wireless device monitoring systems, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, a wireless device monitoring method includes accessing device configuration information of a wireless device present at a secure area, wherein the device configuration information comprises information regarding a configuration of the wireless device, accessing stored information corresponding to the wireless device, wherein the stored information comprises information regarding the configuration of the wireless device, comparing the device configuration information with the stored information, and indicating the wireless device as one of authorized and unauthorized for presence at the secure area using the comparing.

  13. NON-STATIONARY CONDITION MONITORING THROUGH EVENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in large diesel engines used for propulsion and power generation. Such operation involves frequent changes the technique for non-stationary condition monitoring of large diesel engines based on acoustical emission that cannot be separated from alarms originating from real faults. MAN B&W Diesel has conducted experiments

  14. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted during the first quarter of 1992. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

  15. Infrared system for monitoring movement of objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valentine, Kenneth H. (San Diego, CA); Falter, Diedre D. (Knoxville, TN); Falter, Kelly G. (Knoxville, TN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for monitoring moving objects, such as the flight of honeybees and other insects, using a pulsed laser light source. This system has a self-powered micro-miniaturized transmitting unit powered, in the preferred embodiment, with an array solar cells. This transmitting unit is attached to the object to be monitored. These solar cells provide current to a storage energy capacitor to produce, for example, five volts for the operation of the transmitter. In the simplest embodiment, the voltage on the capacitor operates a pulse generator to provide a pulsed energizing signal to one or more very small laser diodes. The pulsed light is then received at a receiving base station using substantially standard means which converts the light to an electrical signal for processing in a microprocessor to create the information as to the movement of the object. In the case of a unit for monitoring honeybees and other insects, the transmitting unit weighs less than 50 mg, and has a size no larger than 1.times.3.times.5 millimeters. Also, the preferred embodiment provides for the coding of the light to uniquely identify the particular transmitting unit that is being monitored. A "wake-up" circuit is provided in the preferred embodiment whereby there is no transmission until the voltage on the capacitor has exceeded a pre-set threshold. Various other uses of the motion-detection system are described.

  16. Robotic Platform for Monitoring Underground Cable Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamishev, Alexander

    created by subsidiary equipment and negotiate transmission towers using an arc-shaped arm that acts. to traverse and monitor fiber-optic overhead ground transmission wires (OPGW) above 66kV power transmission in Japan to inspect the power transmission lines in 1991 [6]. The robot could maneuver around obstructions

  17. Portable Intelligent Tritium in Air Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purghel, L. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (Romania); Calin, M.R. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (Romania); Bartos, D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (Romania); Serbia, L. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (Romania); Lupu, A. [S.C. TEHNOPLUS S.R.L. (Romania); Lupu, F. [S.C. TEHNOPLUS S.R.L. (Romania); Lupu, D. [S.C. TEHNOPLUS S.R.L. (Romania)

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The tritium detection method used for this monitor is original, patented in Romania. The detection unit consists of a single ionization chamber, a special fast preamplifier and a dedicated software associated to the detection unit, for signals processing. Some results concerning the tritium in relative strong gamma-ray fields are presented.

  18. SEPEMO-Build SEasonal PErformance MOnitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    · Etten-Leur is to achieve energy-neutral building for new developments by 2020. · Schoenmakershoek and energy-neutral development · From the onset of the project heat pumps are an integral part of this visionSEPEMO-Build SEasonal PErformance MOnitoring Roger Nordman, roger.nordman@sp.se SP Sveriges

  19. The Savannah River Site's groundwater monitoring program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted by EPD/EMS in the first quarter of 1991. In includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program, provides a record of the program's activities and rationale, and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

  20. Monitoring Energy Consumption In Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turau, Volker

    Monitoring Energy Consumption In Wireless Sensor Networks Matthias Witt, Christoph Weyer, it may impair the ability of the sensor network to function. Therefore, minimizing energy consumption energy consumption in both standby and active modes is the basis of wireless networks. Energy preserving

  1. Wireless sensor networks and environmental monitoring applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Borgne, Yann-AĂ«l

    by the Human Resources and Mobility program of the European community (MEST-CT-2004-505079) #12;ULB Machine Radio: 4kbps, 180m Sensors: Light and accelerometer Energy: Solar powered Golem and deputy dust 16mm3 ­ Remote or non invasive monitoring ·... #12;Solbosch greenhouses ·Greenhouses used by different research

  2. Wearable metabolic physical activity and lifestyle monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheikh, Yaser Ajmal

    and monitor energy expenditure, physical activity, lifestyle and quality of life, behavior, stress level your local BodyMedia distributor. A BodyMedia® product, made in the USA. Today Daily Energy Expenditure display your patients' energy expenditure (caloriesburned), duration and level of physical activity

  3. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy, procedures, authorities, and requirements for the establishment of a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), as set forth in the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP). This directive does not cancel another directive. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

  4. Method and apparatus for monitoring machine performance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F. (Loudon, TN); Castleberry, Kimberly N. (Harriman, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Machine operating conditions can be monitored by analyzing, in either the time or frequency domain, the spectral components of the motor current. Changes in the electric background noise, induced by mechanical variations in the machine, are correlated to changes in the operating parameters of the machine.

  5. Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    explored the use of geophysical approaches for monitoring the spatiotemporal distribution of hydrological and biogeochemical transformations associated with a Cr(VI) bioremediation experiment performed at Hanford, WA. We: the spatial distribution of injected electron donor; the evolution of gas bubbles; variations in total

  6. Satellite Monitoring of the Brazilian Amazon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Symposium Foz do Iguaçu, November 4-7, 2008 #12;Context of Brazilian Amazonia Deforestation PRODES DETER PALSAR Amazon Deforestation Monitoring State of the Forest(logging and degradation) Summary #12;Context: The birth of a deforestation culture Brazilian original vegetation cover (IBGE) #12;Present population

  7. Design and analysis of environmental monitoring programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Design and analysis of environmental monitoring programs Søren Lophaven Kongens Lyngby 2004 IMM­PHD­2004­138 #12; Technical University of Denmark Informatics and Mathematical Modelling Building 321, DK they could equally well be applied within areas such as soil and air pollution. #12; ii #12; Resumâ??e Denne Ph

  8. Design and analysis of environmental monitoring programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Design and analysis of environmental monitoring programs Søren Lophaven Kongens Lyngby 2004 IMM-PHD-2004-138 #12;Technical University of Denmark Informatics and Mathematical Modelling Building 321, DK they could equally well be applied within areas such as soil and air pollution. #12;ii #12;Resum´e Denne Ph

  9. Brownsberg Nature Park RESEARCH & MONITORING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norconk, Marilyn A.

    Brownsberg Nature Park ECOLOGICAL RESEARCH & MONITORING PROGRAM 2001-2006 Kelly A. Fitzgerald Bart in Suriname Research Department of STINASU, Stichting Natuurbehoud Suriname Cornelis Jongbawstraat 14, P.O. Box 12252, Paramaribo, SURINAME Phone (597) 427102 / 427103 Fax (597) 421850 Email research

  10. CALIFORNIA ENERGY Small HVAC Database Of Monitored

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Small HVAC Database Of Monitored Information Database of Compiled of the Integrated Design of Small Commercial HVAC Systems research project. The reports are a result of funding: Productivity and Interior Environments Integrated Design of Large Commercial HVAC Systems Integrated Design

  11. a Wireless Sensor Network for Environmental Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gburzynski, Pawel

    transmitters #12;Sample sensors: #12;Sample sensors: PAR: Photosynthetically Active (solar) Radiation sensora Wireless Sensor Network for Environmental Monitoring a Wireless Sensor Network for Environmental technology: a truly self configurable, low-cost, maintenance-free, ad-hoc sensor network (not based on Zig

  12. Infrared system for monitoring movement of objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valentine, K.H.; Falter, D.D.; Falter, K.G.

    1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for monitoring moving objects, such as the flight of honeybees and other insects, using a pulsed laser light source. This system has a self-powered micro-miniaturized transmitting unit powered, in the preferred embodiment, with an array of solar cells. This transmitting unit is attached to the object to be monitored. These solar cells provide current to a storage energy capacitor to produce, for example, five volts for the operation of the transmitter. In the simplest embodiment, the voltage on the capacitor operates a pulse generator to provide a pulsed energizing signal to one or more very small laser diodes. The pulsed light is then received at a receiving base station using substantially standard means which converts the light to an electrical signal for processing in a microprocessor to create the information as to the movement of the object. In the case of a unit for monitoring honeybees and other insects, the transmitting unit weighs less than 50 mg, and has a size no larger than 1[times]3[times]5 millimeters. Also, the preferred embodiment provides for the coding of the light to uniquely identify the particular transmitting unit that is being monitored. A wake-up' circuit is provided in the preferred embodiment whereby there is no transmission until the voltage on the capacitor has exceeded a pre-set threshold. Various other uses of the motion-detection system are described. 4 figures.

  13. SEISMIC INTERFEROMETRY FOR TEMPORAL MONITORING Norimitsu Nakata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    SEISMIC INTERFEROMETRY FOR TEMPORAL MONITORING by Norimitsu Nakata #12;c Copyright by Norimitsu Seismic interferometry, where one computes coherency of waves between two or more receivers and averages from the first study related to seismic interferometry (although the name of seismic interferometry has

  14. Bacterial Monitoring for the Buck Creek Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The “Bacterial Monitoring for the Buck Creek Watershed” project was developed in response to the creek’s listing on the Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List due to a bacterial impairment and subsequent total maximum daily load (TMDL...

  15. Energy Monitoring of Software project-team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefèvre, Laurent

    Energy Monitoring of Software Systems project-team Romain Rouvoy Aurélien Bourdon Adel Noureddine Lionel Seinturier firstname.lastname@inria.fr #12;ICT & Energy 2% of the global energy consumption in 2007 [1] [1] Gartner #12;ICT & Energy [1] 2008 ICT report, Ecology Ministry 13.5% of the electricity

  16. Towards the global monitoring of biodiversity change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pereira, Henrique Miguel

    at biodiversity conservation inside and outside protected areas [4­6] and at limiting the causes of biodiversityTowards the global monitoring of biodiversity change Henrique M. Pereira1,2,* and H. David Cooper3, Canada, H2Y1N9 Governments have set the ambitious target of reducing biodiversity loss by the year 2010

  17. Monitoring the forest carbon changes Osamu Ochiai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the project ·Forest change and its global monitoring from the space is the issue for the global environmental are participating ·Global warming and estimation of the terrestrial carbon JERS-1 1992~1998 L-HH ALOS 2006~ L Concentration change(CO2CH4) National Carbon Absorption and Emission (CO2CH4) Measuring Verification Total

  18. Algorithms for optimizing Placement of Stationary Monitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    (The terms “monitors” and “sensors” can be used interchangeably, although we .... An adversary can enter the area at any node (1,j) in the first column. ...... objective function is not ascending in our search direction at a stepsize of µ, and µ is ...

  19. EFFECTIVE STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING WITH ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    will be presented for components that can be processed by additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing. The origin structures. KEYWORDS : structural health monitoring methodology, 3D printing, additive manufacturing, fatigue, intelligent structure INTRODUCTION Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D Printing or Rapid

  20. Semantic Online Tourism Market Monitoring Norbert Walchhofera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semantic Online Tourism Market Monitoring Norbert Walchhofera , Milan Hronskýa , Michael Poettlerb the functionality and utility of the approach in the domain of e-tourism, with a focus on the type of reports intelligence, domain model, e-tourism, data aggregation 1 Introduction In the Internet-based economy