Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

California--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) California--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

2

,"California Onshore Natural Gas Processed in California (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Onshore Natural Gas Processed in California (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Lates...

3

California Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids Production Extracted in California (Million Cubic Feet) California Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in California (Million Cubic Feet) Decade...

4

California Onshore Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted in California...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Liquids Extracted in California (Thousand Barrels) California Onshore Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted in California (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

5

California Onshore Natural Gas Processed in California (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Processed in California (Million Cubic Feet) California Onshore Natural Gas Processed in California (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

6

Property:PotentialOnshoreWindArea | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialOnshoreWindArea PotentialOnshoreWindArea Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialOnshoreWindArea Property Type Quantity Description The area of potential onshore wind in a place. Use this type to express a quantity of two-dimensional space. The default unit is the square meter (m²). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Area Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: Square Meters - 1 m²,m2,m^2,square meter,square meters,Square Meter,Square Meters,Sq. Meters,SQUARE METERS Square Kilometers - 0.000001 km²,km2,km^2,square kilometer,square kilometers,square km,square Kilometers,SQUARE KILOMETERS Square Miles - 0.000000386 mi²,mi2,mi^2,mile²,square mile,square miles,square mi,Square Miles,SQUARE MILES Square Feet - 10.7639 ft²,ft2,ft^2,square feet,square foot,FT²,FT2,FT^2,Square Feet, Square Foot

7

California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 77 1980's 81 57 124 117 105 120 109 107 101 95 1990's 86 75 83 85 75 80 80 82 58 60 2000's 64 52 68 78 95 112 100 103 97 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 CA, San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves as of Dec.

8

California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 334 350 365 1980's 299 306 362 381 265 256 255 238 215 222 1990's 217 216 203 189 194 153 156 164 106 192 2000's 234 177 190 167 189 268 206 205 146 163 2010's 173 165 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 CA, Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of 12/31 (Summary)

9

California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 255 178 163 1980's 193 154 96 107 156 181 142 148 151 137 1990's 106 115 97 102 103 111 109 141 149 168 2000's 193 187 207 187 174 176 153 144 75 84 2010's 87 97 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of 12/31 (Summary)

10

California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 176 1980's 207 163 104 115 163 188 149 155 158 141 1990's 110 120 103 108 108 115 112 146 154 174 2000's 204 195 218 196 184 186 161 154 81 91 2010's 92 102 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of

11

California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1 1980's 0 1 1 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 2000's 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved

12

California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 395 1980's 330 325 384 405 284 277 275 255 232 238 1990's 232 231 215 201 205 163 168 176 118 233 2000's 244 185 197 174 196 277 214 212 151 169 2010's 180 173 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec.

13

Louisiana--South Onshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Louisiana--South Onshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 263 1980's 267 253 243 238 229 220 208 194 193 196 1990's 182 175 151 133 123 136 127 134 138 142 2000's 159 141 107 82 66 65 65 71 64 74 2010's 68 64 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Lease Condensate Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 LA, South Onshore Lease Condensate Proved Reserves, Reserve Changes, and Production

14

Louisiana - South Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 18,580 17,755 13,994 1980's 13,026 12,645 11,801 11,142 10,331 9,808 9,103 8,693 8,654 8,645 1990's 8,171 7,504 6,693 5,932 6,251 5,648 5,704 5,855 5,698 5,535 2000's 5,245 5,185 4,224 3,745 3,436 3,334 3,335 3,323 2,799 2,844 2010's 2,876 2,519 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 LA, South Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves

15

California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 307 1980's 265 265 325 344 256 254 261 243 220 233 1990's 228 220 196 135 145 109 120 129 116 233 2000's 244 185 197 173 188 269 208 211 150 168 2010's 178 172 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

16

California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 175 1980's 207 162 103 114 162 185 149 155 158 141 1990's 110 120 100 108 108 115 112 143 153 174 2000's 203 194 218 196 184 186 161 154 81 91 2010's 92 102 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

17

Federal Onshore Oil and Gas Leasing Reform Act of 1987 (FOOGLRA) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Federal Onshore Oil and Gas Leasing Reform Act of 1987 (FOOGLRA) Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Federal Onshore Oil and Gas Leasing Reform Act of 1987 (FOOGLRA) Year 1987 Url FederalOnshore1987.jpg Description Another amendment to the Mineral Leasing Act, The Federal Onshore Oil and Gas Leasing Reform Act of 1987 granted the USDA Forest Service the authority to make decisions and implement regulations concerning the leasing of public domain minerals on National Forest System lands containing oil and gas. References Federal Onshore Oil and Gas Leasing Reform Act of 1987 (FOOGLRA)[1] Federal Onshore Oil and Gas Leasing Reform Act of 1987 (FOOGLRA) (30 U.S.C. § 181 et seq.) - Another amendment to the Mineral Leasing Act, The Federal

18

California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 4,037 1980's 4,434 4,230 4,058 3,964 3,808 3,716 3,404 3,229 3,033 2,899 1990's 2,775 2,703 2,511 2,425 2,130 2,018 1,864 2,012 2,016 2,021 2000's 2,413 2,298 2,190 2,116 2,306 2,831 2,470 2,430 2,249 2,609 2010's 2,447 2,685 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

19

Louisiana - South Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 14,580 1980's 13,407 13,049 12,153 11,553 10,650 10,120 9,416 9,024 8,969 8,934 1990's 8,492 7,846 7,019 6,219 6,558 6,166 6,105 6,137 5,966 5,858 2000's 5,447 5,341 4,395 3,874 3,557 3,478 3,473 3,463 2,916 2,969 2010's 2,995 2,615 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

20

Louisiana - South Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 12,276 1980's 11,273 11,178 10,364 9,971 9,162 8,328 7,843 7,644 7,631 7,661 1990's 7,386 6,851 6,166 5,570 5,880 5,446 5,478 5,538 5,336 5,259 2000's 4,954 4,859 3,968 3,506 3,168 3,051 3,058 2,960 2,445 2,463 2010's 2,496 2,125 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,253 1980's 2,713 2,664 2,465 2,408 2,270 2,074 2,006 2,033 1,947 1,927 1990's 1,874 1,818 1,738 1,676 1,386 1,339 1,304 1,494 1,571 1,685 2000's 1,665 1,463 1,400 1,365 1,549 2,041 1,701 1,749 1,632 2,002 2010's 1,949 2,179 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014

22

Production of Onshore Lower-48 Oil and Gas-model methodology and data description. [PROLOG  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the methodology and data used in the Production of Onshore Lower-48 Oil and Gas (PROLOG) model. The model forecasts annual oil and natural gas production on a regional basis. A linear program is used to select drilling activities for conventional oil and gas on the basis of their economic merit, subject to constraints on available rotary rigs and constraints based on historical drilling patterns. Using an exogenously specified price path, net present values are computed for fixed amounts of drilling activity for oil and gas, and for exploration and development in each of six onshore regions. Forecasts of drilling for enhanced gas recovery (EGR) are exogenously determined, and this drilling is included when considering the constraints on drilling rigs. The report is organized as follows. Chapter 2 is a general overview of the model, describing the major characteristics of the methodology and the logical interaction of the various modules. Chapter 3 specifies the structure of the linear program including the equations for the objective function and the constraints. The details of the methodology used to model exploratory, developmental, and deep gas drilling are presented in Chapters 4-6, respectively. Chapter 7 presents a discussion of the economic evaluation which takes place in each discounted cash flow calculation performed by the model. Cost equations are presented, and various user-specified options as to how to incorporate these costs are discussed. Methodological details and equations used to model finding rates and revisions are given in Chapter 8. Possible areas of future enhancements to the PROLOG model are presented in Chapter 9.

Carlson, M.; Kurator, W.; Mariner-Volpe, B.; O'Neill, R.; Trapmann, W.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) 2 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 955 1980's 921 806 780 747 661 570 517 512 428 430 1990's 407 352 308 288 299 245 252 235 204 202 2000's 115 65 70 81 76 109 118 137 72 72 2010's 134 924 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

24

Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) 4 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,416 1980's 1,292 1,005 890 765 702 684 596 451 393 371 1990's 301 243 228 215 191 209 246 368 394 182 2000's 176 140 150 136 165 148 110 117 127 96 2010's 91 61 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

25

Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 231 1980's 216 230 265 285 270 260 237 241 208 213 1990's 181 208 211 253 254 272 289 286 246 226 2000's 209 226 241 207 221 226 234 271 196 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves as of Dec.

26

Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 248 1980's 252 260 289 292 295 269 281 277 260 260 1990's 279 273 272 278 290 287 323 347 363 422 2000's 406 378 370 287 326 309 333 327 310 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves as of Dec.

27

CA, Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

151 169 180 173 305 284 1979-2013 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 1 1 2 1 2 2 1979-2013 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 150 168...

28

CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

81 91 92 102 98 90 1979-2013 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2013 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 81 91 92 102...

29

Model methodology and data description of the Production of Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas model  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the methodology and data used in the Production of Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas (PROLOG) model. The model forecasts annual oil and natural gas production on a regional basis. Natural gas is modeled by gas category, generally conforming to categories defined by the Natural Gas Policy Act (NGPA) of 1978, as well as a category representing gas priced by way of a spot market (referred to as ''spot'' gas). A linear program is used to select developmental drilling activities for conventional oil and gas and exploratory drilling activities for deep gas on the basis of their economic merit, subject to constraints on available rotary rigs and constraints based on historical drilling patterns. Using exogenously specified price paths for oil and gas, net present values are computed for fixed amounts of drilling activity for oil and gas development and deep gas exploration in each of six onshore regions. Through maximizing total net present value, the linear program provides forecasts of drilling activities, reserve additions, and production. Oil and shallow gas exploratory drilling activities are forecast on the basis of econometrically derived equations, which are dependent on specified price paths for the two fuels. 10 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

Not Available

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Alabama Onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

120,666 1992-2013 From Gas Wells 33,462 33,294 29,961 32,602 27,009 27,182 1992-2013 From Oil Wells 6,368 5,758 6,195 5,975 10,978 8,794 1992-2013 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0...

31

California Onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

219,386 1992-2013 From Gas Wells 89,592 80,500 71,189 62,083 76,704 73,493 1992-2013 From Oil Wells 72,281 76,456 106,442 80,957 49,951 51,625 1992-2013 From Shale Gas Wells 55,344...

32

Louisiana Onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

From Gas Wells 1,206,498 1,027,728 848,745 819,264 707,705 757,241 1992-2013 From Oil Wells 57,526 53,930 57,024 61,727 43,936 44,213 1992-2013 From Shale Gas Wells...

33

CA, San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,249 2,609 2,447 2,685 1,650 1,574 1979-2013 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 617 607 498 506 269 245 1979-2013 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After...

34

Louisiana - South Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) South Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,304 1980's 2,134 1,871 1,789 1,582 1,488 1,792 1,573 1,380 1,338 1,273 1990's 1,106 995 853 649 678 720 627 599 630 599 2000's 492 483 427 368 389 427 415 503 471 506 2010's 499 490 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

35

California Onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

281,088 258,983 273,136 237,388 214,509 219,386 1992-2013 From Gas Wells 89,592 80,500 71,189 62,083 76,704 73,493 1992-2013 From Oil Wells 72,281 76,456 106,442 80,957 49,951...

36

Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) 2 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,079 1980's 1,645 1,920 1,785 1,890 1,965 1,895 1,760 1,861 1,703 1,419 1990's 1,418 1,127 1,176 1,137 1,169 1,126 1,178 1,497 1,516 1,772 2000's 1,930 1,798 1,797 1,768 1,858 2,066 2,048 2,249 2,292 1,837 2010's 2,101 2,766 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014

37

Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) 4 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 7,143 1980's 7,074 7,251 7,802 7,847 8,094 7,825 7,964 7,317 6,891 7,009 1990's 7,473 7,096 6,813 7,136 7,679 7,812 7,877 8,115 8,430 9,169 2000's 9,942 10,206 9,711 8,919 8,902 8,956 8,364 8,210 7,803 6,961 2010's 7,301 9,993 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014

38

Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3,162 2,976 2,974 1980's 2,502 2,629 2,493 2,534 2,512 2,358 2,180 2,273 2,037 1,770 1990's 1,737 1,393 1,389 1,321 1,360 1,251 1,322 1,634 1,614 1,881 2000's 1,980 1,801 1,782 1,770 1,844 2,073 2,060 2,255 2,238 1,800 2010's 2,090 3,423 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC District 2 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves

39

Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 9,621 9,031 8,326 1980's 8,130 8,004 8,410 8,316 8,525 8,250 8,274 7,490 7,029 7,111 1990's 7,475 7,048 6,739 7,038 7,547 7,709 7,769 8,099 8,429 8,915 2000's 9,645 9,956 9,469 8,763 8,699 8,761 8,116 7,963 7,604 6,728 2010's 7,014 9,458 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC District 4 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves

40

Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3,034 1980's 2,566 2,726 2,565 2,637 2,626 2,465 2,277 2,373 2,131 1,849 1990's 1,825 1,479 1,484 1,425 1,468 1,371 1,430 1,732 1,720 1,974 2000's 2,045 1,863 1,867 1,849 1,934 2,175 2,166 2,386 2,364 1,909 2010's 2,235 3,690 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 8,559 1980's 8,366 8,256 8,692 8,612 8,796 8,509 8,560 7,768 7,284 7,380 1990's 7,774 7,339 7,041 7,351 7,870 8,021 8,123 8,483 8,824 9,351 2000's 10,118 10,345 9,861 9,055 9,067 9,104 8,474 8,327 7,930 7,057 2010's 7,392 10,054 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

42

Reducing Onshore Natural Gas and Oil Exploration and Production Impacts Using a Broad-Based Stakeholder Approach  

SciTech Connect

Never before has the reduction of oil and gas exploration and production impacts been as important as it is today for operators, regulators, non-governmental organizations and individual landowners. Collectively, these stakeholders are keenly interested in the potential benefits from implementing effective environmental impact reducing technologies and practices. This research project strived to gain input and insight from such a broad array of stakeholders in order to identify approaches with the potential to satisfy their diverse objectives. The research team examined three of the most vital issue categories facing onshore domestic production today: (1) surface damages including development in urbanized areas, (2) impacts to wildlife (specifically greater sage grouse), and (3) air pollution, including its potential contribution to global climate change. The result of the research project is a LINGO (Low Impact Natural Gas and Oil) handbook outlining approaches aimed at avoiding, minimizing, or mitigating environmental impacts. The handbook identifies technical solutions and approaches which can be implemented in a practical and feasible manner to simultaneously achieve a legitimate balance between environmental protection and fluid mineral development. It is anticipated that the results of this research will facilitate informed planning and decision making by management agencies as well as producers of oil and natural gas. In 2008, a supplemental task was added for the researchers to undertake a 'Basin Initiative Study' that examines undeveloped and/or underdeveloped oil and natural gas resources on a regional or geologic basin scope to stimulate more widespread awareness and development of domestic resources. Researchers assessed multi-state basins (or plays), exploring state initiatives, state-industry partnerships and developing strategies to increase U.S. oil and gas supplies while accomplishing regional economic and environmental goals.

Amy Childers

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

43

Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the study are: to perform resource assessment of the in-place deep (>15,000 ft) natural gas resource of the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling and to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the in-place deep gas resource that is potentially recoverable and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and petroleum system identification. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on data compilation and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on petroleum system identification.

Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

2004-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

44

Effects of increasing filing fees for noncompetitive onshore oil and gas leases  

SciTech Connect

The Government Accounting Office (GAO) examined the impact of increasing the fee charged to applicants for noncompetitive onshore oil and gas leases from $25.00 to $75.00. Interior believes the increased filing fee will: (1) reduce casual speculation and multiple filings, thereby reducing fraud potential, development delays caused by assignments, and administrative burden; and (2) generate significant additional revenue. Interior's analysis is, of necessity, based largely on conjecture, but the possibility that the positive results foreseen may not materialize to the degree projected cannot be ruled out. For example, while it is likely that the $75 fee will generate additional revenue over what was obtainable under either the $10 or $25 rate, Interior's projections of at least a million filings annually and $150 million in revenues are far from certain. GAO was also unable in the time available to determine the degree to which the problems the Department desires to overcome exist, or that they will be resolved through a fee increase. Results suggest that: reducing the number of filings is not necessarily the total or only solution to reducing the administrative burden; the casual speculator is not having that great an adverse effect on development, and in fact has certain positive aspects; and the true extent of fraud in the SOG may not be as great as initially supposed. In addition, there are possible adverse effects that may not have been fully considered. For example, the increased filing fee, when coupled with the increased rental, could adversely affect industry's exploration activities, particularly that of the smaller independent. GAO suggests, now that the increase is in effect, that the Interior Department and the Congress closely watch the results, and be prepared to take remedial action if deemed necessary.

Not Available

1982-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

45

RESOURCE ASSESSMENT OF THE IN-PLACE AND POTENTIALLY RECOVERABLE DEEP NATURAL GAS RESOURCE OF THE ONSHORE INTERIOR SALT BASINS, NORTH CENTRAL AND NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

The University of Alabama and Louisiana State University have undertaken a cooperative 3-year, advanced subsurface methodology resource assessment project, involving petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling, to facilitate exploration for a potential major source of natural gas that is deeply buried (below 15,000 feet) in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas. The project is designed to assist in the formulation of advanced exploration strategies for funding and maximizing the recovery from deep natural gas domestic resources at reduced costs and risks and with minimum impact. The results of the project should serve to enhance exploration efforts by domestic companies in their search for new petroleum resources, especially those deeply buried (below 15,000 feet) natural gas resources, and should support the domestic industry's endeavor to provide an increase in reliable and affordable supplies of fossil fuels. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and petroleum system identification. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on data compilation and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on petroleum system identification. The objectives of the study are: to perform resource assessment of the in-place deep (>15,000 ft) natural gas resource of the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling and to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the in-place deep gas resource that is potentially recoverable and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource. The project objectives will be achieved through a 3-year effort. First, emphasis is on petroleum system identification and characterization in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, the Manila Sub-basin and the Conecuh Sub-basin of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida panhandle. This task includes identification of the petroleum systems in these basins and the characterization of the overburden, source, reservoir and seal rocks of the petroleum systems and of the associated petroleum traps. Second, emphasis is on petroleum system modeling. This task includes the assessment of the timing of deep (>15,000 ft) gas generation, expulsion, migration, entrapment and alteration (thermal cracking of oil to gas). Third, emphasis is on resource assessment. This task includes the volumetric calculation of the total in-place hydrocarbon resource generated, the determination of the volume of the generated hydrocarbon resource that is classified as deep (>15,000 ft) gas, the estimation of the volume of deep gas that was expelled, migrated and entrapped, and the calculation of the potential volume of gas in deeply buried (>15,000 ft) reservoirs resulting from the process of thermal cracking of liquid hydrocarbons and their transformation to gas in the reservoir. Fourth, emphasis is on identifying those areas in the onshore interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource.

Ernest A. Mancini

2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

46

Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Gulf of Alaska (including Lower Cook Inlt) and their onshore impacts: a summary report, September 1980  

SciTech Connect

The search for oil and gas on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) in the Gulf of Alaska subregion of the Alaska leasing region began in 1967, when geophysical surveys of the area were initiated. Two lease sales have been held in the subregion. Lease Sale 39, for the Northern Gulf of Alaska, was held on April 13, 1976, and resulted in the leasing of 76 tracts. Lease Sale CI, for Lower Cook Inlet, was held on October 27, 1977, and resulted in the leasing of 87 tracts. Exploratory drilling on the tracts leased in Sale 39 began in September 1976, and exploratory drilling on tracts leased in Sale CI began in July 1978. Commercial amounts of hydrocarbons have not been found in any of the wells drilled in either sale area. Seventy-four of the leases issued in the Northern Gulf of Alaska have been relinquished. As of June 1980, exploratory drilling in both areas had ceased, and none was planned for the near future. The next lease sale in the Gulf of Alaska, Sale 55, is scheduled for October 1980. Lease Sale 60 (Lower Cook Inlet and Shelikof Strait) is scheduled for September 1981, and Lease Sale 61 (OCS off Kodiak Island) is scheduled for April 1983. Sale 60 will be coordinated with a State lease sale in adjacent State-owned waters. The most recent estimates (June 1980) by the US Geological Survey of risked, economically recoverable resources for the 2 tracts currently under lease in the Northern Gulf of Alaska are negligible. For the 87 tracts currently under lease in Lower Cook Inlet, the USGS has produced risked, economically recoverable resource estimates of 35 million barrels of oil and 26 billion cubic feet of gas. These resource estimates for the leased tracts in both areas are short of commercially producible amounts. Onshore impacts from OCS exploration have been minimal. Two communities - Yakutat and Seward - served as support bases for the Northern Gulf of Alaska.

Jackson, J.B.; Dorrier, R.T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

European Wind Atlas: Onshore | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

European Wind Atlas: Onshore European Wind Atlas: Onshore Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: European Wind Atlas: Onshore Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: www.windatlas.dk/Europe/landmap.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/european-wind-atlas-onshore,http://cl Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This is a European on-shore wind resources at 50 meters of altitude map, developed by Riso National Laboratory in 1989. The map shows the so-called generalised wind climate over Europe, also sometimes referred to as the regional wind climate or simply the wind atlas. In such a map, the influences of local topography have been removed and only the variations on

48

Providing for adjustments of royalty payments under certain Federal onshore and Indian oil and gas leases, and for other purposes. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session, October 15, 1987  

SciTech Connect

The House report on H.R. 3479 adjusting royalty payments on oil and gas leases recommends passage with certain amendments. The recommended title for the Act is The Notice to Lessees No. 5 (NTL-5) Gas Royalty Act of 1987. The Act addresses problems involving some onshore and Indian leases, and redefines the procedures for determining the value of the lease. The report summarizes the purpose and need for the legislation, analyzes it by section, and concludes with communications between the committee and the Interior Department. A minority view argues in favor of placing the highest possible value on leases in order to be fair to taxpayers.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Property:PotentialOnshoreWindGeneration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialOnshoreWindGeneration PotentialOnshoreWindGeneration Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialOnshoreWindGeneration Property Type Quantity Description The area of potential onshore wind in a place. Use this type to express a quantity of energy. The default unit for energy on OpenEI is the Kilowatt hour (kWh), which is 3,600,000 Joules. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_of_energy It's possible types are Watt hours - 1000 Wh, Watt hour, Watthour Kilowatt hours - 1 kWh, Kilowatt hour, Kilowatthour Megawatt hours - 0.001 MWh, Megawatt hour, Megawatthour Gigawatt hours - 0.000001 GWh, Gigawatt hour, Gigawatthour Joules - 3600000 J, Joules, joules Pages using the property "PotentialOnshoreWindGeneration" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25)

50

Federal Onshore Oil and Gas Leasing Program. Oversight hearing before the Subcommittee on Mining and Natural Resources of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, May 7, 1985  

SciTech Connect

A hearing on the management of the Department of Interior's (DOI) Onshore Oil and Gas Leasing Program examined the question of geology versus market forces in determining lease boundaries and lease offerings. At issue was the question of possible fraud and the loss of revenue to states when leases are sold over the counter or by lottery, as described by Senator Dale Bumpers of Arkansas and the Governor of Wyoming, and the potential environmental damage that could result from an accelerated federal leasing program. Representatives of DOI described leasing procedures and efforts to balance the need for orderly exploration while also meeting economic and environmental goals. The witnesses also included representatives of environmental groups, geologists, and the oil and gas industry. An appendix with additional correspondence, statements, and other material submitted for the record follows the testimony of the 13 witnesses.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

wind onshore | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

onshore onshore Dataset Summary Description This dataset highlights trends in financing terms for U.S. renewable energy projects that closed financing between Q3 2009 and Q3 2010. Information tracked includes debt interest rates, equity returns, financial structure applied, PPA duration, and other information. NREL's Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative (REFTI) tracks renewable energy project financing terms by technology and project size. The intelligence gathered is intended to reveal industry trends and to inform input assumptions for models. Source NREL Date Released March 27th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biomass financial geothermal project finance solar PV wind onshore Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon RE Project Finance Trends Q3 2009 - Q3 2010 (xlsx, 309.2 KiB)

52

Gas Sampling At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wister Area (DOE GTP) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Wister Area (DOE GTP)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling...

53

Soil Gas Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Cox,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Cox, 1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Soil Gas Sampling...

54

Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water-Gas Samples At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At...

55

Gas Flux Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Iovenitti...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the geothermal area. Ultimately for potential development of EGS. Notes A CO2 soil gas flux survey was conducted in areas recognized as geothermal upflow zones...

56

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique...

57

Isotopic Analysis- Gas At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Kennedy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Gas At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Kennedy & Soest, 2006) Exploration Activity Details...

58

Recoverable Resource Estimate of Identified Onshore Geopressured...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Recoverable Resource Estimate of Identified Onshore Geopressured Geothermal Energy in Texas and Louisiana AAPG 2012 Annual Convention and Exhibition Ariel Esposito and Chad...

59

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity...

60

Soil Gas Sampling At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker, 2008) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Gas Sampling At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Exploration...

62

Isotopic Analysis- Gas At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Gas At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Welhan, Et Al., 1988) Exploration Activity...

63

Gas Sampling At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Colado...

64

Gas Flux Sampling At Desert Peak Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Desert Peak Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) Exploration Activity...

65

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Grigsby...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration...

66

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity...

67

Gas Flux Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Thomas...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity...

68

U.S. Total Imports Natural Gas Plant Processing  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Processing Area: U.S. Alabama Alabama Onshore-Alabama Alabama Offshore-Alabama Alaska Arkansas Arkansas-Arkansas California California Onshore-California California...

69

Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana) Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana) Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Louisiana Department of Natural Resources In order to prevent waste and to avoid the drilling of unnecessary wells and to encourage the development of coal seam natural gas producing areas in Louisiana, the commissioner of conservation is authorized, as provided in this law, to establish a single unit to be served by one or more wells for a coal seam natural gas producing area. Without in any way modifying the authority granted to the commissioner to establish a drilling unit or

70

Gas Sampling At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gas Sampling At Maui Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling At Maui Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Maui Area Exploration Technique Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Sampling_At_Maui_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=689419" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages

71

Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Mexico Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Norman (2002) shows that the Cerro Prieto gas analyses collected by Cathy Janik and Alfred Truesdell from1977 to 1998 plot on a C02/N2 condensation

72

Evaluation of Global Onshore Wind Energy Potential and Generation Costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(2)Where Et is the wind technical potential (kWh/year), A is the area of each grid cell (km(2)), ?1 is the availability factor, ?2 is the array efficiency, ? is average installed power density (MW km2), and ((A?)/(1.5)) represents the number of turbines (1.5 MW GE turbine) in a given grid cell. ... If wind is to play a large role, lower quality wind resources would need to be used, and a bias against the highest speed winds can be less important. ... EEA. Europes Onshore and Offshore Wind Energy Potential. ...

Yuyu Zhou; Patrick Luckow; Steven J. Smith; Leon Clarke

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

73

Texas--RRC District 4 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas--RRC District 4 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

74

Gas Sampling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP, 2011) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Sampling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP, 2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye Patch Area Exploration Technique Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated...

75

Confinement Ventilation and Process Gas Treatment Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. . NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1168-2013 October 2013 DOE STANDARD CONFINEMENT VENTILATION AND PROCESS GAS TREATMENT FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1168-2013 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at http://energy.gov/hss/information-center/department-energy-technical-standards-program ii DOE-STD-1168-2013 INTENTIONALLY BLANK iv DOE-STD-1168-2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENT...................................................................................................................vii

76

Louisiana - South Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Louisiana - South Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0...

77

Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0...

78

California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0...

79

California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0...

80

California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Louisiana--South Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

company data. Release Date: 1242014 Next Release Date: 12312015 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 LA, South Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved...

82

Louisiana--South Onshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

company data. Release Date: 1242014 Next Release Date: 12312015 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production LA, South Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

83

Gas Flux Sampling At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Maui Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Maui Area...

84

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule1, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description...

85

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of...

86

OGEL (Oil, Gas & Energy Law Intelligence): Focussing on recent developments in the area of oil-gas-energy law,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

About OGEL OGEL (Oil, Gas & Energy Law Intelligence): Focussing on recent developments in the area of oil-gas-energy law, regulation, treaties, judicial and arbitral cases, voluntary guidelines, tax and contracting, including the oil-gas- energy geopolitics. For full Terms & Conditions and subscription rates

Dixon, Juan

87

WEDNESDAY: Chu, Salazar, Vilsack to Participate in Onshore Renewable Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu, Salazar, Vilsack to Participate in Onshore Chu, Salazar, Vilsack to Participate in Onshore Renewable Energy Workshop WEDNESDAY: Chu, Salazar, Vilsack to Participate in Onshore Renewable Energy Workshop February 8, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC --- On Wednesday, February 9th the Department of Interior will host an onshore renewable energy workshop. The two-day conference will bring together stakeholders from across the government, renewable energy industry, and conservation community to discuss the administration's efforts to rapidly and responsibly stand-up renewable energy projects on our nation's public lands. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar, and Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack will open the workshop with a roundtable discussion about the Administration's work to build a clean

88

Property:PotentialOnshoreWindCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialOnshoreWindCapacity PotentialOnshoreWindCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialOnshoreWindCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from Onshore Wind for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

89

Development of onshore wind energy utilisation in Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Onshore wind energy utilisation in Germany has developed very dynamically in the last decade. This has mainly been driven by the renewable energy laws that systematically support the expansion of renewable ene...

Ronald Meisel; Ren Pforte; Wolf Fichtner

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Texas--RRC District 2 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas--RRC District 2 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

91

Texas--RRC District 3 Onshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas--RRC District 3 Onshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

92

Texas--RRC District 3 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas--RRC District 3 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

93

Oil spill fluorosensing lidar for inclined onshore or shipboard operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An oil spill detection fluorosensing lidar for onshore or shipboard operation is described. Some difficulties for its operation arise from the inclined path of rays. This is due to...

Karpicz, Renata; Dementjev, Andrej; Kuprionis, Zenonas; Pakalnis, Saulius; Westphal, Rainer; Reuter, Rainer; Gulbinas, Vidmantas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Janik, 1992). Hot spring gas samples were collected by submerging a 20-cm-diameter plastic funnel into the pool over the bubble stream. Fumarole gas samples were collected by...

95

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Surface_Gas_Sampling_At_Valles_Caldera_-_Sulphur_Springs_Area_(Goff_%26_Janik,_2002)&oldid=689392

96

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from HDR well References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Surface_Gas_Sampling_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Goff_%26_Janik,_2002)&oldid=689255"

97

Gas Flux Sampling At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Gas Flux Sampling At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Haleakala Volcano Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The field survey program on the northwest rift zone consisted of soil mercury and radon emanometry surveys, groundwater temperature and chemistry studies, Schlumberger resistivity soundings and self-potential profiles. Geophysical and geochemical surveys along this rift (southwest) were limited by difficult field conditions and access limitations. The geophysical program consisted of one Schlumberger sounding, one

98

Gas Flux Sampling At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity...

99

Gas Sampling At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Area Exploration Technique Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Additional...

100

Gas Flux Sampling At Brady Hot Springs Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Brady Hot Springs Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) Exploration...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Gas Flux Sampling At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location...

102

Gas Sampling At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gabbs Valley Area Exploration Technique Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Additional...

103

Gas Flux Sampling At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location...

104

Gas Sampling At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gas Sampling At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Gabbs Valley Area Exploration Technique Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Sampling_At_Gabbs_Valley_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=689423" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

105

CA, Coastal Region Onshore Proved Nonproducing Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26 51 199 248 293 280 1996-2013 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998-2013 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 18 22 35 20 242 123 1996-2013 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 0 0...

106

California Onshore-California Natural Gas Plant Processing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

180,648 169,203 164,401 2011-2013 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 9,923 10,641 2012-2013 NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) 12,755 14,298...

107

CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

75 84 87 97 93 86 1977-2013 Adjustments 2 5 5 7 11 -9 1977-2013 Revision Increases 1 35 9 11 8 8 1977-2013 Revision Decreases 66 24 5 4 17 2 1977-2013 Sales 1 0 0 0 0 35 2000-2013...

108

CA, San Joaquin Basin Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,632 2,002 1,949 2,179 1,381 1,329 1979-2013 Adjustments -4 -2 2 907 -594 -19 1979-2013 Revision Increases 142 95 467 1,382 319 126 1979-2013 Revision Decreases 217 97 367 1,892...

109

CA, San Joaquin Basin Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2,128 2,469 2,321 2,590 1,550 1,460 1977-2013 Adjustments -8 2 4 902 -574 -55 1977-2013 Revision Increases 239 180 488 1,444 379 223 1977-2013 Revision Decreases 327 148 427 1,854...

110

CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2013 Adjustments 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2013 Revision Increases 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2013 Revision Decreases 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2013 Sales 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000-2013 Acquisitions 0...

111

CA, San Joaquin Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

617 607 498 506 269 245 1979-2013 Adjustments 3 1 -3 -12 58 -20 1979-2013 Revision Increases 111 96 47 116 84 115 1979-2013 Revision Decreases 128 59 84 31 120 73 1979-2013 Sales 1...

112

CA, Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

146 163 173 165 290 266 1977-2013 Adjustments 0 2 1 13 1 -11 1977-2013 Revision Increases 21 41 38 20 150 13 1977-2013 Revision Decreases 69 14 16 31 16 14 1977-2013 Sales 6 0 1 0...

113

CA, Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

50 168 178 172 303 282 1979-2013 Adjustments 1 2 2 15 2 -8 1979-2013 Revision Increases 21 42 38 21 157 14 1979-2013 Revision Decreases 72 14 17 31 17 15 1979-2013 Sales 6 0 1 0 0...

114

CA, Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 2 1 2 2 1979-2013 Adjustments 0 1 0 0 0 0 1979-2013 Revision Increases 0 0 1 0 1 0 1979-2013 Revision Decreases 0 1 0 1 0 0 1979-2013 Sales 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000-2013 Acquisitions 0...

115

CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

81 91 92 102 98 90 1979-2013 Adjustments 4 4 3 6 12 -9 1979-2013 Revision Increases 1 38 9 12 9 9 1979-2013 Revision Decreases 71 25 5 4 18 3 1979-2013 Sales 1 0 0 0 0 37 2000-2013...

116

,"TX, RRC District 4 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12292014 1:55:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: TX, RRC...

117

,"LA, South Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Excel File Name:","ngenrdrydcurlasoa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavngngenrdrydcurlasoa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"...

118

,"TX, RRC District 3 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Excel File Name:","ngenradngdcurtx03a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavngngenradngdcurtx03a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information...

119

Forecast of Geological Gas Hazards for Three-Soft Coal Seams in Gliding Structural Areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas outbursts from three-soft coal seams (soft roof, soft floor and soft coal) constitute a very serious problem in the Ludian gliding structure area in western Henan. By means of theories and methods of gas geology, structural geology, coal petrology and rock tests, we have discussed the effect of control of several physical properties of soft roof on gas preservation and proposed a new method of forecasting gas geological hazards under open structural conditions. The result shows that the areas with type III or IV soft roofs are the most dangerous areas where gas outburst most likely can take place. Therefore, countermeasures should be taken in these areas to prevent gas outbursts.

Zhi-rong WANG; Ling-xia CHEN; Cong-ren CHENG; Zhen-xiang LI

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from HDR well References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Jemez Springs Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles

122

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles

123

Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Bergfeld...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

thermal gradient in the center of the areas is around 320C m- 1. We estimate total heat loss from the two areas to be about 6.1 and 2.3 MW. Given current thinking on the...

124

Oil flow resumes in war torn onshore Neutral Zone  

SciTech Connect

Oil production has resumed in the war ravaged onshore fields of the Neutral Zone between Saudi Arabia and Kuwait 1 year after the end of Persian Gulf War. Initial production of about 40,000 b/d is expected to rise to 60,000 b/d by year end. This paper reports that prior to the January-February 1991 war to oust occupying Iraqi military forces from Kuwait, the Neutral Zone's Wafra, South Umm Gudair, and South Fuwaris onshore fields produced about 135,000 b/d.

Not Available

1992-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

125

Measuring the Environmental Externalities of Onshore Wind Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article provides a brief overview of the environmental externalities that are commonly associated with the development of onshore wind-power projects. The article discusses the physical characteristics of an onshore wind farm; the nature of the positive and negative externalities, such as low-carbon electricity generation, low water consumption, noise, visual amenity, wildlife impacts; and land disruption and change. A simple description of surrogate-based and nonmarket-based methods of measuring these externalities is given. Monetary values are also reported.

A. Bergmann

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Gas Sampling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gas Sampling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye Patch Area Exploration Technique Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Sampling_At_Rye_Patch_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=689417" Categories: Exploration Activities

127

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J. Abbott, C. E. Holley, L. A. Blatz (1983) Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Surface_Gas_Sampling_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Grigsby,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=689258

128

Gas Flux Sampling At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Gas Flux Sampling At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Soil mercury and radon emanometry sampling conducted in the Keaau prospect were similarly unable to define any anomalies that could reasonably be interpreted to be due to subsurface thermal effects. References Donald M. Thomas (1 January 1986) Geothermal Resources Assessment In Hawaii Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Flux_Sampling_At_Mauna_Loa_Northeast_Rift_Area_(Thomas,_1986)&oldid=389039"

129

Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Bergfeld, Et Al., 2006) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Bergfeld, Et Al., 2006) Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Bergfeld, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Bergfeld, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes At shallow depths in the caldera References Deborah Bergfeld, William C. Evans, James F. Howle, Christopher D. Farrar (2006) Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, Eastern California, Usa Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Flux_Sampling_At_Long_Valley_Caldera_Area_(Bergfeld,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=386973

130

Gas Flux Sampling At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) Gas Flux Sampling At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Lualualei Valley Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Soil mercury and radon emanation surveys were performed over much of the accessible surface of Lualualei Valley (Cox and Thomas, 1979). The results of these surveys (Figs 7 and 8) delineated several areas in which soil mercury concentrations or radon emanation rates were substantially above normal background values. Some of these areas were apparently coincident with the mapped fracture systems associated with the caldera boundaries.

131

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January 9, 2013 | Release Date: January 10, January 9, 2013 | Release Date: January 10, 2013 | Next Release: January 17, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 12/22/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: EIA forecasts continued growth in Lower 48 onshore natural gas production through 2014. EIA's January Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), released on January 7, now includes EIA's forecast of energy consumption, supply, and prices through 2014. STEO expects continued growth in natural gas production, driven largely by onshore production in shale areas. In particular, production in the Marcellus Shale areas of Pennsylvania and West Virginia is expected to continue rising, as recently drilled wells become operational. Despite relatively low natural gas prices, Pennsylvania drilling continues at a

132

California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

San Joaquin Basin Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 2010's...

133

Texas--RRC District 2 Onshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Onshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 - No Data...

134

Texas--RRC District 4 Onshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Onshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 - No Data...

135

California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Los Angeles Basin Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 2010's...

136

Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References David I. Norman, Joseph Moore (2004) Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For Geothermal Exploration Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Surface_Gas_Sampling_At_Lightning_Dock_Area_(Norman_%26_Moore,_2004)&oldid=689367"

137

Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. At shallow depths in the caldera

138

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells.

139

Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Lightning Dock, Animas Valley, New Mexico geothermal area was discovered when a rancher found boiling water while drilling a shallow stock tank welt (Elston, Deal, et. al, 1983). There are no surface manifestations of present or past geothermal activity in the Animas Valley. Norman and Bernhart (1982) analyzed the gases in the discovery well and 15 stock tank wells nearby (Figure 1).

140

Gas Flux Sampling At Lahaina-Kaanapali Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Lahaina-Kaanapali Area (Thomas, 1986) Gas Flux Sampling At Lahaina-Kaanapali Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Lahaina-Kaanapali Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Lahaina-Kaanapali Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The soil mercury concentration and radon emanometry patterns observed for the Lahaina prospect were similar to those found in Olowalu. Several localized zones of high mercury concentration or enhanced radon emanation were observed, but showed little relationship to each other or to the recognized geologic structure in the area. The data were interpreted to suggest that there might be a small thermal anomaly to the northeast of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Gas Flux Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Gas Flux Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Mokapu Penninsula Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The high degree of cultural activity (e.g. residential areas, streets, jet runways, etc.) on Mokapu both limited the extent of the soil geochemical surveys performed and rendered their interpretation much more difficult. Soil mercury concentrations and radon emanometry data on the peninsula showed a few localized high values (Figs 13, 14), but no consistent correlation between the anomalous zones and geologic features could be

142

Gas Flux Sampling At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) Gas Flux Sampling At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Soil mercury concentration and radon emanometry surveys were conducted along the stream beds in both Olowalu and Ukumehame Canyons and on the coastal alluvial fans (Cox and Cuff, 1981a). The results of these surveys indicated that a few minor -nomalies might be present. However, the extreme topographic relief in the area did not permit sufficient coverage of the

143

Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two

144

Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Jemez Springs Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long

145

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long

146

Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. At shallow depths in the caldera References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long

147

Gas Sampling At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gas Sampling At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Black Warrior Area Exploration Technique Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Sampling_At_Black_Warrior_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=689412" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities

148

Gas Flux Sampling At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Gas Flux Sampling At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Akutan Fumaroles Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Arsenic (As), mercury (Hg), and carbon dioxide (CO2) all appear in anomalously high concentrations near the hot springs and at the junction of the Fumarole Valley and the HSBV. This indicates either that Hg is being lost from a reservoir due to boiling and steam loss, probably northwest of the junction, or erosion has carried these elements in sediment from the higher elevation manifestations. The presence of such volatiles in

149

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J.

150

Gas Sampling At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gas Sampling At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Glass Buttes Area Exploration Technique Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Sampling_At_Glass_Buttes_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=689421" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities

151

Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid

152

A mathematical model for drainage and desorption area analysis during shale gas production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract For shale gas production, more attention is paid to production decline analysis, pressure transient analysis, and flow mechanism in nano-scale matrix. A few studies were carried out to analyze the depth of drainage and desorption in shale gas reservoir. When simulating shale gas production performance, especially in the case of multi-stage fractured horizontal wells (MFHW), the understanding of depth of drainage can analyze the critical time of interference and its intensity, and the desorption area is also a key factor to calculate production contributed from adsorbed gas. In these regards, this study presents a semi-analytical solution with dynamic gas compressibility to predict drainage and desorption area for long term. An analytical simplification solution is obtained to predict for early production, which is accurate enough. Using the method of continuous succession of steady states, the approximation solution is in good agreement with the results of Fast-Matching Method (FMM). The results show that the seepage area of each fracture expands much faster in stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) than that in unstimulated area with an elliptic shape. Desorption area also expands fast in SRV but is limited in SRV due to ultra-tight properties in unstimulated area. It is also proved that critical desorption pressure (CDP) delays desorption which plays a significant role in area expansion. This approach turns out to be simple and efficient when applied to practical projects.

Jin Zhang; Shijun Huang; Linsong Cheng; Shuang Ai; Bailu Teng; Yuting Guan; Yongchao Xue

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Gas Flux Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Based on all of the data, McLin concluded that there was little to no correlation between values for CO2 flux and known or postulated faults, and between the CO2 flux and the shallow thermal anomaly. Instead, the flux values appeared to depict a completely random pattern throughout the study area. Notably, absolute values for CO2 flux were elevated throughout the surveyed areas (McLin, 2004). A possible explanation not considered by

154

Gas Flux Sampling At Steamboat Springs Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steamboat Springs Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) Steamboat Springs Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Steamboat Springs Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Steamboat Springs Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gaseous geochemical signatures vary from system to system and utilization of a multi-gas analytical approach to exploration or characterization should enhance the survey's clarity. This paper describes differences in the gaseous geochemical signatures between the Steamboat Springs and Brady's Hot Springs geothermal systems and illustrates the usefulness of Hg vapor in soils at Desert Peak for mapping the trends of concealed geologic

155

Gas Flux Sampling At Kawaihae Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gas Flux Sampling At Kawaihae Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Kawaihae Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Kawaihae Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The soil geochemistry yielded quite complex patterns of mercury concentrations and radonemanation rates within the survey area (Cox and Cuff, 1981c). Mercury concentrations (Fig. 38) showed a general minimum along the Kawaihae-Waimea roads and a broad trend of increasing mercury

156

A metaheuristic approach for location of gas stations in a metropolitan area  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper presents a metaheuristic model, which is developed to determine the location of gas stations in the state of Kuwait. The variables of this study cover requirements to high demand areas such as commercial areas, businesses as well as safety and environmental factors translated into minimum distances to sensitive entities and receptors. The developed methodology combines GIS with analytic hierarchy process (AHP) to weigh and overlay layers of interest on the base map of urban and suburban areas in Kuwait. The output on this process is a suitability map that contains feasible locations for future gas stations sites. Feasible locations are then fed into an optimisation routine to obtain the optimal sites. The methodology includes international and national standards and regulation including minimum allowable distance to existing gas stations, natural gas distributors, fire stations, educational institutions, governmental agencies and ministries, airport, residential areas, commercial areas, industrial areas, road network and others. 199 feasible locations were obtained in the State of Kuwait that abide with all regulation while satisfying demand of businesses and residents. The optimum was obtained from these feasible solutions by using an optimisation routine.

Esra Aleisa; Mehmet Savsar; Mohammed M. Al-Mashaan; Abrar Al-Jadi; Sarah A. Al-Sabah

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Gas Flux Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gas Flux Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea East Rift Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Radon emanometry data for the same locality (Fig. 61) (Cox, 1980) similarly presented a complicated pattern of radon outgassing along the lower rift zone. Even though complexities are present within the rift zone, there

158

Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Lewicki, Et Al., 2008) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lewicki, Et Al., 2008) Lewicki, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Lewicki, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes At shallow depths in the caldera References J. L. Lewicki, M. L. Fischer, G. E. Hilley (2008) Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain, California- Performance Evaluation And Role Of Meteorological Forcing Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Flux_Sampling_At_Long_Valley_Caldera_Area_(Lewicki,_Et_Al.,_2008)&oldid=508150" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded

159

Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas  

SciTech Connect

A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger, and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area.

McCormick, S.H.; Pigott, W.R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Gas Flux Sampling At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Hualalai Northwest Rift Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Hualalai lower northwest rift and southern flank were sampled for soil mercury concentration and radon emanation rates (Cox and Cuff, 1981d). The data generated by these surveys yielded complex patterns of mercury concentrations and radon emanation rates that generally did not show coincident anomalies (Figs 42, 43). References Donald M. Thomas (1 January 1986) Geothermal Resources Assessment In

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Effects of Natural Recharge on Gas Composition in the Larderello - Castelnuovo Area  

SciTech Connect

A study of the temporal behaviour of gas compsition in the Larderello-Castelnuovo area shows that this behaviour varies, depending on whether the wells are affected or not by natural recharge. Where no natural recharge exists, gas composition seems to be governed by chemical equilibria. The recharge water, and the steam it produces, mix with the fluid already existing in the reservoir. At Larderello (far from absorption areas) the gas composition resulting from this mixing does not undergo further changes by chemical reaction. This is due either to a lack of reactivity where there is no liquid phase or to an ineffective fluid-rock interaction. At Castelnuovo (close to absorption areas) the H{sub 2}S and CH{sub 4} contents in the gas have gradually decreased with the increase in recharge effects. The decrease in H{sub 2}S can be attributed to dissolution in liquid water and oxidation. Various hypotheses have been forwarded for the methane. The correlation existing between CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2} concentrations, even when methane decreases in the areas affected by recharge, suggests that CH{sub 4} may be governed by more than just the Fisher-Tropsch reaction.

D'Amore, Franco; Celati, Romano; Calore, Claudio; Bertrami, Rino

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Water-Gas Samples At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2002) 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Water-Gas Samples Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Lightning Dock, Animas Valley, New Mexico geothermal area was discovered when a rancher found boiling water while drilling a shallow stock tank welt (Elston, Deal, et. al, 1983). There are no surface manifestations of present or past geothermal activity in the Animas Valley. Norman and Bernhart (1982) analyzed the gases in the discovery well and 15 stock tank wells nearby (Figure 1). References David Norman, Nigel Blarney, Lynne Kurilovitch (2002) New

163

Emission Testing of Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) Natural Gas and Diesel Transit Buses  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emission Testing of Washington Emission Testing of Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) Natural Gas and Diesel Transit Buses M. Melendez, J. Taylor, and J. Zuboy National Renewable Energy Laboratory W.S. Wayne West Virginia University D. Smith U.S. Department of Energy Technical Report NREL/TP-540-36355 December 2005 Emission Testing of Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) Natural Gas and Diesel Transit Buses M. Melendez, J. Taylor, and J. Zuboy National Renewable Energy Laboratory W.S. Wayne West Virginia University D. Smith U.S. Department of Energy Prepared under Task No. FC05-9000 Technical Report NREL/TP-540-36355 December 2005 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov

164

Minimum separation distances for natural gas pipeline and boilers in the 300 area, Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing actions to reduce energy expenditures and improve energy system reliability at the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. These actions include replacing the centralized heating system with heating units for individual buildings or groups of buildings, constructing a new natural gas distribution system to provide a fuel source for many of these units, and constructing a central control building to operate and maintain the system. The individual heating units will include steam boilers that are to be housed in individual annex buildings located at some distance away from nearby 300 Area nuclear facilities. This analysis develops the basis for siting the package boilers and natural gas distribution systems to be used to supply steam to 300 Area nuclear facilities. The effects of four potential fire and explosion scenarios involving the boiler and natural gas pipeline were quantified to determine minimum separation distances that would reduce the risks to nearby nuclear facilities. The resulting minimum separation distances are shown in Table ES.1.

Daling, P.M.; Graham, T.M.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Modelin the Transport and Chemical Evolution of Onshore and Offshore Emissions and Their Impact on Local and Regional Air Quality Using a Variable-Grid-Resolution Air Quality Model  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this research project was to develop an innovative modeling technique to adequately model the offshore/onshore transport of pollutants. The variable-grid modeling approach that was developed alleviates many of the shortcomings of the traditionally used nested regular-grid modeling approach, in particular related to biases near boundaries and the excessive computational requirements when using nested grids. The Gulf of Mexico region contiguous to the Houston-Galveston area and southern Louisiana was chosen as a test bed for the variable-grid modeling approach. In addition to the onshore high pollution emissions from various sources in those areas, emissions from on-shore and off-shore oil and gas exploration and production are additional sources of air pollution. We identified case studies for which to perform meteorological and air quality model simulations. Our approach included developing and evaluating the meteorological, emissions, and chemistry-transport modeling components for the variable-grid applications, with special focus on the geographic areas where the finest grid resolution was used. We evaluated the performance of two atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) schemes, and identified the best-performing scheme for simulating mesoscale circulations for different grid resolutions. Use of a newly developed surface data assimilation scheme resulted in improved meteorological model simulations. We also successfully ingested satellite-derived sea surface temperatures (SSTs) into the meteorological model simulations, leading to further improvements in simulated wind, temperature, and moisture fields. These improved meteorological fields were important for variable-grid simulations, especially related to capturing the land-sea breeze circulations that are critical for modeling offshore/onshore transport of pollutants in the Gulf region. We developed SMOKE-VGR, the variable-grid version of the SMOKE emissions processing model, and tested and evaluated this new system. We completed the development of our variable-grid-resolution air quality model (MAQSIP-VGR) and performed various diagnostic tests related to an enhanced cloud parameterization scheme. We also developed an important tool for variable-grid graphics using Google Earth. We ran the MAQSIP-VGR for the Houston-Galveston and southern Louisiana domains for an August 23 to September 2, 2002, episode. Results of the modeling simulations highlighted the usefulness of the variable-grid modeling approach when simulating complex terrain processes related to land and sea close to an urban area. Our results showed that realistic SST patterns based on remote sensing are critical to capturing the land-sea breeze, in particular the inland intrusion of the reversed mesoscale circulation that is critical for simulating air pollution over urban areas near coastal regions. Besides capturing the correct horizontal gradient between land and sea surface temperatures, it is important to use an adequate ABL scheme in order to quantify correctly the vertical profiles of various parameters. The ABL scheme should capture the dynamics of the marine boundary layer, which is not often considered in a typical simulation over land. Our results further showed the effect of using satellite-derived SSTs on the horizontal and vertical extent of the modeled pollution pattern, and the increase in hourly ozone concentrations associated with changes in ABL characteristics resulting from the enhanced mesoscale circulation in the lower troposphere.

Adel Hanna

2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

166

U.S. Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Area: U.S. Federal Offshore U.S. Federal Offshore, Pacific (California) Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, LA & AL Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, TX Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California CA, Coastal Region Onshore CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore CA, San Joaquin Basin Onshore CA, State Offshore Colorado Florida Kansas Kentucky Louisiana North Louisiana LA, South Onshore LA, State Offshore Michigan Mississippi Montana New Mexico NM, East NM, West New York North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Pennsylvania Texas TX, RRC District 1 TX, RRC District 2 Onshore TX, RRC District 3 Onshore TX, RRC District 4 Onshore TX, RRC District 5 TX, RRC District 6 TX, RRC District 7B TX, RRC District 7C TX, RRC District 8 TX, RRC District 8A TX, RRC District 9 TX, RRC District 10 TX, State Offshore Utah Virginia West Virginia Wyoming Miscellaneous Period:

167

U.S. Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Area: U.S. Federal Offshore U.S. Federal Offshore, Pacific (California) Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, LA & AL Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, TX Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California CA, Coastal Region Onshore CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore CA, San Joaquin Basin Onshore CA, State Offshore Colorado Florida Kansas Kentucky Louisiana North Louisiana LA, South Onshore LA, State Offshore Michigan Mississippi Montana Nebraska New Mexico NM, East NM, West New York North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Pennsylvania Texas TX, RRC District 1 TX, RRC District 2 Onshore TX, RRC District 3 Onshore TX, RRC District 4 Onshore TX, RRC District 5 TX, RRC District 6 TX, RRC District 7B TX, RRC District 7C TX, RRC District 8 TX, RRC District 8A TX, RRC District 9 TX, RRC District 10 TX, State Offshore Utah Virginia West Virginia Wyoming Miscellaneous Period:

168

U.S. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Area: U.S. Federal Offshore U.S. Federal Offshore, Pacific (California) Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, LA & AL Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, TX Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California CA, Coastal Region Onshore CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore CA, San Joaquin Basin Onshore CA, State Offshore Colorado Florida Kansas Kentucky Louisiana North Louisiana LA, South Onshore LA, State Offshore Michigan Mississippi Montana Nebraska New Mexico NM, East NM, West New York North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Pennsylvania Texas TX, RRC District 1 TX, RRC District 2 Onshore TX, RRC District 3 Onshore TX, RRC District 4 Onshore TX, RRC District 5 TX, RRC District 6 TX, RRC District 7B TX, RRC District 7C TX, RRC District 8 TX, RRC District 8A TX, RRC District 9 TX, RRC District 10 TX, State Offshore Utah Virginia West Virginia Wyoming Miscellaneous Period:

169

Temporal Analysis of Incompatible Land-Use and Land-Cover: The Proximity between Residential Areas and Gas Stations in Bucharest Suburban Area  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Incompatible land-use and land-cover indicate the trend in territorial planning and generate instability and conflicts leading to degradation in terms of environmental quality. Urban landscape structure of Bucharest suburban area has changed lately, especially due to expansion of residential areas, increasing the risks of a chaotic urban development. The consequences of this residential expansion have led to malfunctions, outlining a disadvantage area due to environmental problems. In this context, residential areas are frequently located in the proximity of gas stations in Bucharest suburban area. This paper presents the relation between residential areas and gas stations in order to evaluate causes that led to their proximity. Results have pointed out using a number of 60 gas stations (21 gas stations in residential areas and 39 in non-residential areas) the causes and the temporal dynamics of locational conflicts, suggesting that unplanned development and residential agglomeration are the main consequences of territorial conflicts. In this respect of incompatible land-use and land-cover expansion, it is required an evaluation and hierarchy in order to start new coherent plans of space development.

Cristian Ioan Ioj?; Constantina Alina Tudor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2DigesterLandfillGas | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DigesterLandfillGas DigesterLandfillGas Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Digester / landfill gas Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2DigesterLandfillGas" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 0.0 +

171

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2TownGas | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TownGas TownGas Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Town gas Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2TownGas" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0017 + 0.0 +

172

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2NaturalGas | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NaturalGas NaturalGas Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Natural gas Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2NaturalGas" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0017 + 0.0 +

173

U.S. Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Area: U.S. Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California CA, San Joaquin Basin Onshore Colorado Kentucky Louisiana North Louisiana LA, South Onshore Michigan Montana New Mexico NM, East NM, West North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Pennsylvania Texas TX, RRC District 1 TX, RRC District 2 Onshore TX, RRC District 3 Onshore TX, RRC District 4 Onshore TX, RRC District 5 TX, RRC District 6 TX, RRC District 7B TX, RRC District 7C TX, RRC District 8 TX, RRC District 9 TX, RRC District 10 TX, State Offshore West Virginia Wyoming Miscellaneous Period: Area: U.S. Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California CA, San Joaquin Basin Onshore Colorado Kentucky Louisiana North Louisiana LA, South Onshore Michigan Montana New Mexico NM, East NM, West North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Pennsylvania Texas TX, RRC District 1 TX, RRC District 2 Onshore TX, RRC District 3 Onshore TX, RRC District 4 Onshore TX, RRC District 5 TX, RRC District 6 TX, RRC District 7B TX, RRC District 7C TX, RRC District 8 TX, RRC District 9 TX, RRC District 10 TX, State Offshore West Virginia Wyoming Miscellaneous Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area

174

Beyond the Inventory: An Interagency Collaboration to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Greater Yellowstone Area  

SciTech Connect

As one of the largest, intact ecosystems in the continental United States, land managers within the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) have recognized the importance of compiling and understanding agency greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The 10 Federal units within the GYA have taken an active role in compiling GHG inventories on a unit- and ecosystem-wide level, setting goals for GHG mitigation, and identifying mitigation strategies for achieving those goals. This paper details the processes, methodologies, challenges, solutions, and lessons learned by the 10 Federal units within the GYA throughout this ongoing effort.

Kandt, A.; Hotchkiss, E.; Fiebig, M.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Biodegradation of Fuel Oil Hydrocarbons in Soil Contaminated by Oily Wastes Produced During Onshore Drilling Operations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The petroleum industry generates high amount of oily wastes during drilling, storage and refining operations. Onshore drilling operations produce oil based wastes, typically 100150m-3 well. The drilling cuttings...

Qaude-Henri Chaneau; Jean-Louis Morel; Jean Oudot

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

CA, San Joaquin Basin Onshore Proved Nonproducing Reserves  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

117 146 210 163 226 214 1996-2013 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998-2013 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 233 401 359 319 81 96 1996-2013 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft)...

177

CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore Proved Nonproducing Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

31 29 66 69 55 60 1996-2013 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998-2013 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 8 12 21 23 16 16 1996-2013 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 0 0 0 0 0 0...

178

NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS  

SciTech Connect

From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

179

Gas-Liquid Contact Area of Random and Structured Packing Ian David Wilson, B.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the gas or to avoid catalyst poisoning. It is becoming apparent that CO2 emissions may also play a mayor the flue gas and the liquid solvent. The gas exits from the top with a low concentration of CO2 while 1.1 CO2 removal by absorption/stripping Absorber Stripper Sweet Gas CO2 + H2O Sour Gas Rich Amine

Rochelle, Gary T.

180

2 Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 2, No. 1, 2009 Copyright 2009 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 2, No. 1, 2009 Copyright © 2009 Inderscience@yahoo.com Hafez Hafez ADCO-PDD, Abu Dhabi Company for Onshore Oil Operation (ADCO), P.O. Box 270, Abu Dhabi Dhabi Company for Onshore Oil Operation (ADCO), P.O. Box 270, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Email

Mohaghegh, Shahab

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Simplified life cycle approach: GHG variability assessment for onshore wind electricity based on Monte-Carlo simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simplified life cycle approach: GHG variability assessment for onshore wind electricity based in the literature. In the special case of greenhouses gases (GHG) from wind power electricity, the LCA results performances with a simplified life cycle approach. Variability of GHG performances of onshore wind turbines

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

182

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Decreasing Air Emission Impacts From Oil and Gas Development Decreasing Air Emission Impacts From Oil and Gas Development Decreasing Air Emission Impacts From Oil and Gas Development Authors: Charles B. McComas, PE; J. Daniel Arthur, PE; Gerry Baker; G. Lee Moody; and David B. Cornue, PG, CHMM Venue: American Chemical Society (53rd Pentasectional Meeting) – Halliburton Energy Services Technology Center, Duncan, OK, March 8, 2008 (http://www.acs.org [external site]) Abstract: Research funded by the United States Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory and conducted under the direction of the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission has examined concerns related to air emissions resulting from domestic onshore oil and gas exploration and production operations. Current air issues such as ambient air quality standards and non-attainment areas, regulatory compliance and regional inconsistencies, as well as global climate change and carbon sequestration are a few of the subjects perceived to represent potential barriers to energy development. The topic of air quality and how it relates to onshore oil and gas exploration and production activities is examined from the position of environmental sustainability. These concerns can be addressed through reasonable and prudent practices that industry may implement in order to avoid, minimize, or mitigate air emissions. Additionally, air emissions parameters that are not currently regulated (e.g.: CH4 and CO2) may become the subject of increased concern in the future and, therefore, add to the list of issues facing oil and gas exploration and production. Suggestions for further research opportunities with the potential to benefit responsible energy resource development are also presented.

183

Sequence stratigraphy of Niger Delta, Robertkiri field, onshore Nigeria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deposits of Robertkiri field, in the central offshore area of Niger Delta, comprise a 4 km thick succession of Pliocene to Miocene non-marine and shallow marine deposits. A sequence stratigraphic framework for Robertkiri field strata was constructed...

Magbagbeola, Olusola Akintayo

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

184

Intern experience with Getty Oil Company - Lafayette onshore area: an internship report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P a&F bC:uP The bit is the business end of the drill string. While drilling operations are in progress, attention should be focused on the optimum weight, rotary speed, and pump pressure necessary to optimize bit runs and minimize cost per foot... bit cost because it will ultimately determine how many days will be required to drill the well. The total cost for all bits used is usually less than 3% of the total well cost, but daily rig time and other rental costs usually represent over 40...

Shivers, Robert Magee, 1957-

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

185

Development of an electrical resistivity cone for the detection of gas hydrates in marine sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

onshore and offshore environments, as well as in permafrost and tropical regions. The presence of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments are of concern to geotechnical engineers for several reasons, including: (1) their effect on the load bearing...

McClelland, Martha Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

186

AREA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AREA AREA FAQ # Question Response 316 vs DCAA FAQ 1 An inquiry from CH about an SBIR recipient asking if a DCAA audit is sufficient to comply with the regulation or if they need to add this to their audit they have performed yearly by a public accounting firm. 316 audits are essentially A-133 audits for for-profit entities. They DO NOT replace DCAA or other audits requested by DOE to look at indirect rates or incurred costs or closeouts. DCAA would never agree to perform A-133 or our 316 audits. They don't do A-133 audits for DOD awardees. The purpose of the audits are different, look at different things and in the few instances of overlap, from different perspectives. 316

187

Evidence for natural gas hydrate occurrences in Colombia Basin  

SciTech Connect

Multichannel and selected single-channel seismic lines of the continental margin sediments of the Colombia basin display compelling evidence for large accumulations of natural gas hydrate. Seismic bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs), interpreted to mark the base of the hydrate stability zone, are pronounced and very widespread along the entire Panama-Colombia lower continental slope. BSRs have also been identified at two locations on the abyssal plain. Water depths for these suspected hydrate occurrences range from 900 to 4000 m. Although no gas hydrate samples have been recovered from this area, biogenic methane is abundant in Pliocene turbidites underlying the abyssal plain. More deeply buried rocks beneath the abyssal plain are thermally mature. Thermogenic gas from these rocks may migrate upward along structural pathways into the hydrate stability zone and form hydrate. Impermeable hydrate layers may form caps over large accumulations of free gas, accounting for the very well-defined BSRs in the area. The abyssal plain and the deformed continental margin hold the highest potential for major economic accumulations of gas hydrate in the basin. The extensive continuity of BSRs, relatively shallow water depths, and promixity to onshore production facilities render the marginal deformed belt sediments the most favorable target for future economic development of the gas hydrate resource within the Colombia basin. The widespread evidence of gas hydrates in the Colombia basin suggests a high potential for conventional hydrocarbon deposits offshore of Panama and Colombia.

Finley, P.D.; Krason, J.; Dominic, K.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Geological controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate from core, downhole log, and seismic data in the Shenhu area, South China Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Multi-channel seismic reflection data, well logs, and recovered sediment cores have been used in this study to characterize the geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in the Shenhu area of the South China Sea. The concept of the gas hydrate petroleum system has allowed for the systematic analysis of the impact of gas source, geologic controls on gas migration, and the role of the host sediment in the formation and stability of gas hydrates as encountered during the 2007 Guangzhou Marine Geological Survey Gas Hydrate Expedition (GMGS-1) in the Shenhu area. Analysis of seismic and bathymetric data identified seventeen sub-linear, near-parallel submarine canyons in this area. These canyons, formed in the Miocene, migrated in a northeasterly direction, and resulted in the burial and abandonment of canyons partially filled by coarse-grained sediments. Downhole wireline log (DWL) data were acquired from eight drill sites and sediment coring was conducted at five of these sites, which revealed the presence of suitable reservoirs for the occurrence of concentrated gas hydrate accumulations. Gas hydrate-bearing sediment layers were identified from well log and core data at three sites mainly within silt and silt clay sediments. Gas hydrate was also discovered in a sand reservoir at one site as inferred from the analysis of the DWL data. Seismic anomalies attributed to the presence of gas below the base of gas hydrate stability zone, provided direct evidence for the migration of gas into the overlying gas hydrate-bearing sedimentary sections. Geochemical analyses of gas samples collected from cores confirmed that the occurrence of gas hydrate in the Shenhu area is controlled by the presence thermogenic methane gas that has migrated into the gas hydrate stability zone from a more deeply buried source.

Xiujuan Wang; Timothy S. Collett; Myung W. Lee; Shengxiong Yang; Yiqun Guo; Shiguo Wu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Tular Lake Field, Kings County, California - a significant onshore development  

SciTech Connect

The Tulare Lake field is located in Kings County, California, on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley and 10 mi east of the Kettleman Hills (North Dome) field and 30 mi souuheast of the city of Coalinga. The field was discovered by Husky Oil Co. (Marathon) in October 1981 with the completion of the Boswell 22-16, Sec. 16, T22S, R20E from sands in the Burbank formation of Oligocene geologic age. Chevron USA offset the Husky discovery well with the completion of the Salyer 678X, Sec. 8, T22S, R20E, in May 1983. Both Chevron and Husky have continued an orderly development of the field, and to date Chevron has 9 producing wells and Husky 10 producing wells. Production is found in the Burbank formation at a vertical depth below 12,800 ft. The entrapment of hydrocarbons is caused by a low amplitude, seismically subtle, anticlinal fold trending northwest/southeast. Isochore maps of the Burbank formation show that stratigraphy is important in the distribution of the four producing sand intervals. Oil gravities form the sands vary 39/sup 0/ API to 51/sup 0/ API and the GOR ranges from 1050 to over 5500. As of January 1, 1984, the field has a cumulative production of 1.7 million bbl of oil and 3.5 billion ft/sup 3/ of gas.

Lindblom, R.G.; Waldron, J.M.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Onshore wind max capacity 50.4% - what wind farm, what year? | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Onshore wind max capacity 50.4% - what wind farm, what year? Onshore wind max capacity 50.4% - what wind farm, what year? Home How can I find more specific information about wind capacity? I can get the max/min/media stuff from the bar graphs. Is there any way to see individual wind farm capacity per year or get examples of performance? I'm helping run a tech site and some specific information would be helpful in dealing with skeptical individuals. Is there any more detailed information on capacity other than the graph summary statistics? (I do not know my way around this site, but I'm willing to learn.) Submitted by Bob Wallace on 15 June, 2013 - 00:23 1 answer Points: 0 Hi Bob- Thank you for posting your question. It seems that your question developed after viewing/using the Transparent Cost Database, however, I

191

U.S. Onshore Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1973 1,120 1,037 959 914 974 1,042 1,075 1,140 1,183 1,250 1,304 1,318 1974 1,283 1,264 1,272 1,280 1,319 1,342 1,387 1,426...

192

U.S. Onshore Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's NA 1950's NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1960's NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1970's NA NA NA...

193

Turbine exhaust diffuser with region of reduced flow area and outer boundary gas flow  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An exhaust diffuser system and method for a turbine engine. The outer boundary may include a region in which the outer boundary extends radially inwardly toward the hub structure and may direct at least a portion of an exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the hub structure. At least one gas jet is provided including a jet exit located on the outer boundary. The jet exit may discharge a flow of gas downstream substantially parallel to an inner surface of the outer boundary to direct a portion of the exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the outer boundary to effect a radially outward flow of at least a portion of the exhaust gas flow toward the outer boundary to balance an aerodynamic load between the outer and inner boundaries.

Orosa, John

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

194

Some methods of oil and gas reserve estimation in Azerbaijan  

SciTech Connect

This article deals with the scientific and practical problems related to estimating oil and gas reserves in terrigenous reservoirs of the Productive Series of middle Pliocene and in Upper Cretaceous volcanic and sedimentary rocks. The deposits in question are spread over onshore Azerbaijan and adjacent offshore areas in the Caspian Sea and are approximately 6.5 km deep. This article presents lithologic, stratigraphic, and petrophysical criteria used for selecting prospects for reserve estimation. Also presented are information on structure of rocks and estimation of their lithologic and physical properties. New methods for the interpretation and application of petrophysical and logging data, as well as statistical estimation of reserves, in complex volcaniclastic reservoir rocks, are also discussed.

Abasov, M.T.; Buryakovsky, L.A.; Kondrushkin, Y.M.; Dzhevanshir, R.D.; Bagarov, T.Y. [Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan); Chilingar, G.V. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Terr. Atmos. Ocean. Sci., Vol. 17, No. 4, 933-950, December 2006 Methane Venting in Gas Hydrate Potential Area Offshore of SW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Area Offshore of SW Taiwan: Evidence of Gas Analysis of Water Column Samples Tsanyao Frank Yang 1 areas offshore of SW Taiwan for analysis of dissolved gases. Some these samples show unusually high-shore and offshore of southwestern Taiwan (e.g., Chow et al. 2000; Yang et al. 2004; Chiu et al. 2006). The gases

Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

196

Table 19. Reported proved nonproducing reserves of crude oil, lease condensate, nonassociated gas, associated dissolved gas, and total gas (wet after lease separation), 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Reported proved nonproducing reserves of crude oil, lease condensate, : Reported proved nonproducing reserves of crude oil, lease condensate, nonassociated gas, associated dissolved gas, and total gas (wet after lease separation), 2011 a Lease Nonassociated Associated Total Crude Oil Condensate Gas Dissolved Gas Gas State and Subdivision (Million bbls) (Million bbls) (Bcf) (Bcf) (Bcf) Alaska 566 0 288 63 351 Lower 48 States 8,483 880 104,676 13,197 117,873 Alabama 1 0 101 1 102 Arkansas 0 0 5,919 0 5,919 California 542 2 267 128 395 Coastal Region Onshore 248 0 0 20 20 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 69 0 0 23 23 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 163 0 265 54 319 State Offshore 62 2 2 31 33 Colorado 208 30 5,316 1,478 6,794 Florida 4 0 4 0 4 Kansas 4 0 244 39 283 Kentucky 0 0 75 0 75 Louisiana 152 29 14,905 257 15,162 North 30 10 13,820 12 13,832 South Onshore 113 17 1,028 232 1,260 State Offshore 9 2 57 13 70 Michigan 0

197

Do Private Firms Invest Dierently than Public Firms? Taking Cues from the Natural Gas Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Do Private Firms Invest Dierently than Public Firms? Taking Cues from the Natural Gas Industry Erik and public rms using a unique dataset of onshore U.S. natural gas producers. In rm-level regressions we nd that investments by private rms are 68% less responsive to changes in natural gas prices, a measure that captures

Lin, Xiaodong

198

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze crude oil and natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 8). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule[1], and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2011), (Washington, DC, 2011). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum

199

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 119 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze crude oil and natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 8). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule[1], and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2011), (Washington, DC, 2011). The OGSM provides

200

Thailand gas project now operational  

SciTech Connect

Now operational, Phase 1 of Thailand's first major natural gas system comprises one of the world's longest (264 miles) offshore gas lines. Built for the Petroleum Authority of Thailand (PTT), this system delivers gas from the Erawan field in the Gulf of Thailand to two electrical power plants near Bangkok, operated by the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT). The project required laying about 360 miles of pipeline, 34-in., 0.625 in.-thick API-5LX-60 pipe offshore and 28-in., 0.406 in.-thick API-5LX-60 onshore. The offshore pipe received a coal-tar coating, a 3.5-5.0 in. concrete coating, and zinc sacrificial-anode bracelets. The onshore line was coated with the same coal-tar enamel and, where necessary, with concrete up to 4.5 in. thick. Because EGAT's two power plants are the system's only customers, no more pipeline will be constructed until deliveries, currently averaging about 100 million CF/day, reach the 250 million CF/day level. The project's second phase will include additional pipelines as well as an onshore distribution network to industrial customers.

Horner, C.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The onshore northeast Brazilian rift basins: An early Neocomian aborted rift system  

SciTech Connect

Early Cretaceous rift basins of northeastern Brazil illustrate key three-dimensional geometries of intracontinental rift systems, controlled mainly by the basement structures. These basins were formed and then abandoned during the early extension associated with the north-south-propagating separation of South America and Africa. During the early Neocomian, extensional deformation jumped from the easternmost basins (group 1: Sergipe Alagoas and Gabon basins; group 2: Reconcavo, Tucano, and Jatoba basins) to the west, forming a series of northeast-trending intracratonic basins (group 3: Araripe, Rio do Peixe, Iguatu, Malhada Vermelha, Lima Campos, and Potiguar basins). The intracratonic basins of groups 2 and 3 consist of asymmetric half-grabens separated by basement highs, transfer faults, and/or accommodation zones. These basins are typically a few tens of kilometers wide and trend northeast-southwest, roughly perpendicular to the main extension direction during the early Neocomian. Preexisting upper crustal weakness zones, like the dominantly northeast-southwest-trending shear zones of the Brazilian orogeny, controlled the development of intracrustal listric normal faults. Internal transverse structures such as transfer faults (Reconcavo basin and onshore Potiguar basin) and accommodation zones (onshore Potiguar basin and Araripe basin) were also controlled by the local basement structural framework. Transverse megafaults and lithostructural associations controlled the three main rift trends. The megashear zones of Pernanbuco (Brazil)-Ngaundere (Africa) apparently behaved like a huge accommodation zone, balancing extensional deformation along the Reconcavo-Jatoba/Sergipe Alagoas-Gabon trends with simultaneous extension along the Araripe-Potiguar trend. The Sergipe Alagoas-Gabon trend and the Potiguar basin represent the site of continued evolution into a marginal open basin following early Neocomian deformation.

Matos, R. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

NOXIOUS GAS EMISSIONS FROM THE CLOSED IRON MINES TO THE BUILT-UP AREAS ON THE SURFACE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mine workings, in which some inhabitants observed the dysfunctioning of gas cookers and boilers effects, the observed dysfunctioning of combustion appliances (boiler, gas cooker) due to CO2 polluted

Boyer, Edmond

203

Gas hydrate identified in sand-rich inferred sedimentary section using downhole logging and seismic data in Shenhu area, South China Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Downhole wireline log (DWL) data was acquired from eight drill sites during China's first gas hydrate drilling expedition (GMGS-1) in 2007. Initial analyses of the acquired well log data suggested that there were no significant gas hydrate occurrences at Site SH4. However, the re-examination of the DWL data from Site SH4 indicated that there are two intervals of high resistivity, which could be indicative of gas hydrate. One interval of high resistivity at depth of 171175m below seafloor (mbsf) is associated with a high compressional- wave (P-wave) velocities and low gamma ray log values, which suggests the presence of gas hydrate in a potentially sand-rich (low clay content) sedimentary section. The second high resistivity interval at depth of 175180mbsf is associated with low P-wave velocities and low gamma values, which suggests the presence of free gas in a potentially sand-rich (low clay content) sedimentary section. Because the occurrence of free gas is much shallower than the expected from the regional depth of the bottom simulating reflector (BSR), the free gas could be from the dissociation of gas hydrate during drilling or there may be a local anomaly in the depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. In order to determine whether the low P-wave velocity with high resistivity is caused by in-situ free gas or dissociated free gas from the gas hydrate, the surface seismic data were also used in this analysis. The log analysis incorporating the surface seismic data through the construction of synthetic seismograms using various models indicated the presence of free gas directly in contact with an overlying gas hydrate-bearing section. The occurrence of the anomalous base of gas hydrate stability at Site SH4 could be caused by a local heat flow conditions. This paper documents the first observation of gas hydrate in what is believed to be a sand-rich sediment in Shenhu area of the South China Sea.

Xiujuan Wang; Myung Lee; Timthy Collett; Shengxiong Yang; Yiqun Guo; Shiguo Wu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

lackouts, rising gas prices, changes to the Clean Air Act, proposals to open wilderness and protected offshore areas to gas drilling, and increasing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B lackouts, rising gas prices, changes to the Clean Air Act, proposals to open wilderness, author Julian Darley takes a hard-hitting look at natural gas as an energy source that rapidly went from nuisance to crutch. Darley outlines the implications of our increased dependence on this energy source

Keeling, Stephen L.

205

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

OIL AND GAS SUPPLY MODULE OIL AND GAS SUPPLY MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Lower 48 Onshore and Shallow Offshore Supply Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Deep Water Offshore Supply Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Alaska Oil and Gas Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Enhanced Oil Recovery Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Foreign Natural Gas Supply Submodule The oil and gas supply module (OGSM) consists of a series of process submodules that project the availability of: Domestic crude oil production and dry natural gas production from onshore, offshore, and Alaskan reservoirs Imported pipeline-quality gas from Mexico and Canada Imported liquefied natural gas. The OGSM regions are shown in Figure 12. The driving assumption of the OGSM is that domestic oil and gas exploration and development are undertaken if the discounted present value of the

206

Nitrogen gas emissions from stormwater retention basins during wet weather events in the Phoenix Metropolitan area: an additional ecosystem service?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen gas emissions from stormwater retention basins during wet weather events in the Phoenix Special thanks to all of our field and lab help: Rebecca Hale, Stevan Earl, Bony Ahmed, Lin Ye, Jolene. Samples were then taken throughout the day to assess water concentrations and gas losses (see photos

Hall, Sharon J.

207

Improving an Accuracy of ANN-Based Mesoscale-Microscale Coupling Model by Data Categorization: With Application to Wind Forecast for Offshore and Complex Terrain Onshore Wind Farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ANN-based mesoscale-microscale coupling model forecasts wind speed and wind direction with high accuracy for wind parks located in complex terrain onshore, yet some weather regimes remains unresolved and f...

Alla Sapronova; Catherine Meissner

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Southwest Region  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Southwest Region Southwest Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Southwest Region Overview | Export Transportation | Intrastate | Connection to Gulf of Mexico | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links Overview Most of the major onshore interstate natural gas pipeline companies (see Table below) operating in the Southwest Region (Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas) are primarily exporters of the region's natural gas production to other parts of the country and Mexico, while an extensive Gulf of Mexico and intrastate natural gas pipeline network is the main conduit for deliveries within the region. More than 56,000 miles of natural gas pipeline on more than 66 intrastate natural gas pipeline systems (including offshore-to-onshore and offshore Gulf of Mexico pipelines) deliver natural gas to the region's local natural gas distribution companies and municipalities and to the many large industrial and electric power facilities located in the region.

209

Cenozoic landscape evolution of the Convoy Range to Mackay Glacier area, Transantarctic Mountains: Onshore to offshore synthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of Mackay Glacier near Mount Wool-nough is backed by an arcuate...blocks there is evidence of areal scouring beneath thicker and/or faster-flowing...of Mackay Glacier near Mount Wool-nough is backed by an arcuate...blocks there is evidence of areal scouring beneath thicker and/or faster-flowing...

210

Resource Characterization and Quantification of Natural Gas-Hydrate and Associated Free-Gas Accumulations in the Prudhoe Bay - Kuparuk River Area on the North Slope of Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas hydrates have long been considered a nuisance by the petroleum industry. Hydrates have been hazards to drilling crews, with blowouts a common occurrence if not properly accounted for in drilling plans. In gas pipelines, hydrates have formed plugs if gas was not properly dehydrated. Removing these plugs has been an expensive and time-consuming process. Recently, however, due to the geologic evidence indicating that in situ hydrates could potentially be a vast energy resource of the future, research efforts have been undertaken to explore how natural gas from hydrates might be produced. This study investigates the relative permeability of methane and brine in hydrate-bearing Alaska North Slope core samples. In February 2007, core samples were taken from the Mt. Elbert site situated between the Prudhoe Bay and Kuparuk oil fields on the Alaska North Slope. Core plugs from those core samples have been used as a platform to form hydrates and perform unsteady-steady-state displacement relative permeability experiments. The absolute permeability of Mt. Elbert core samples determined by Omni Labs was also validated as part of this study. Data taken with experimental apparatuses at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, ConocoPhillips laboratories at the Bartlesville Technology Center, and at the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation's facilities in Anchorage, Alaska, provided the basis for this study. This study finds that many difficulties inhibit the ability to obtain relative permeability data in porous media-containing hydrates. Difficulties include handling unconsolidated cores during initial core preparation work, forming hydrates in the core in such a way that promotes flow of both brine and methane, and obtaining simultaneous two-phase flow of brine and methane necessary to quantify relative permeability using unsteady-steady-state displacement methods.

Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

Life cycle assessment of an onshore wind farm located at the northeastern coast of Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article assesses the life cycle emissions of a fictive onshore wind power station consisting of 141.5-MW wind turbines situated on the northeastern coast of Brazil. The objective is to identify the main sources of CO2(eq)-emissions during the life cycle of the wind farm. The novelty of this work lies in the focus on Brazil and its emerging national manufacturing industry. With an electricity matrix that is primarily based on renewable energy sources (87% in 2010), this country emits eight times less CO2 for the production of 1kWh of electricity than the global average. Although this fact jeopardizes the CO2 mitigation potential of wind power projects, it also reduces the carbon footprint of parts and components manufactured in Brazil. The analysis showed that reduced CO2-emissions in the material production stage and the low emissions of the component production stage led to a favorable CO2-intensity of 7.1g CO2/kWh. The bulk of the emissions, a share of over 90%, were unambiguously caused by the production stage, and the transportation stage was responsible for another 6% of the CO2-emissions. The small contributions from the construction and operation phases could be neglected. Within the manufacturing process, the steel tower was identified as the source responsible for more than half of the emissions. The environmental impacts of the wind farm are small in terms of CO2-emissions, which can be credited to a green electricity mix. This scenario presents an advantage for the country and for further production sites, particularly in the surroundings of the preferred wind farm sites in Brazil, which should be favored to reduce CO2 emissions to an even greater extent.

Kerstin B. Oebels; Sergio Pacca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Natural gas distributed throughout the Marcellus black shale in northern Appalachia could boost proven U.S. gas reserves by trillions of cubic feet (see http://live.psu.edu/story/28116).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas distributed throughout the Marcellus black shale in northern Appalachia could boost is the second largest producing on-shore domestic natural gas field in the United States after the San Juan and opportunities faced by landowners navigating the legal and practical issues of leasing their land for natural

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

213

EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prices Prices 2010 Peaks, Plans and (Persnickety) Prices This presentation provides information about EIA's estimates of working gas peak storage capacity, and the development of the natural gas storage industry. Natural gas shale and the need for high deliverability storage are identified as key drivers in natural gas storage capacity development. The presentation also provides estimates of planned storage facilities through 2012. Categories: Prices, Storage (Released, 10/28/2010, ppt format) Natural Gas Year-In-Review 2009 This is a special report that provides an overview of the natural gas industry and markets in 2009 with special focus on the first complete set of supply and disposition data for 2009 from the Energy Information Administration. Topics discussed include natural gas end-use consumption trends, offshore and onshore production, imports and exports of pipeline and liquefied natural gas, and above-average storage inventories. Categories: Prices, Production, Consumption, Imports/Exports & Pipelines, Storage (Released, 7/9/2010, Html format)

214

Maps of Selected State Subdivisions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves Summary Maps of Selected State Subdivisions Map 1: Alaska Map 2: California Map 3: Louisiana Map 4: New Mexico Map 5: Texas Map 6: Western Planning Area, Gulf of Mexico Map 7: Central Planning Area, Gulf of Mexico Map 8: Eastern Planning Area, Gulf of Mexico Map 1: Alaska AK 50 - North Onshore and Offshore AK 10 - South Onshore AK 05 - South State Offshore AK 00 - South Federal Offshore Map 2: California CA 50 - Coastal Region Onshore CA 90 - Los Angeles Basin Onshore CA 10 - San Joaquin Basin Onshore

215

Natural gas accumulations in low-permeability Tertiary, and Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) rock, Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

This report characterizes Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Maastrichtian, and lower Tertiary gas-bearing rocks in the Uinta Basin with special emphasis on those units that contain gas in reservoirs that have been described as being tight. The report was prepared for the USDOE whose Western Tight Gas Sandstone Program cofunded much of this research in conjunction with the US Geological Survey's Evolution of Sedimentary Basins, and Onshore Oil and Gas Programs. (VC)

Fouch, T.D.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.; Nuccio, V.F.; Schmoker, J.W.; Rice, D.D.; Johnson, R.C.; Dolton, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Natural gas accumulations in low-permeability Tertiary, and Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) rock, Uinta Basin, Utah. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report characterizes Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Maastrichtian, and lower Tertiary gas-bearing rocks in the Uinta Basin with special emphasis on those units that contain gas in reservoirs that have been described as being tight. The report was prepared for the USDOE whose Western Tight Gas Sandstone Program cofunded much of this research in conjunction with the US Geological Survey`s Evolution of Sedimentary Basins, and Onshore Oil and Gas Programs. (VC)

Fouch, T.D.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.; Nuccio, V.F.; Schmoker, J.W.; Rice, D.D.; Johnson, R.C.; Dolton, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Recoverable Resource Estimate of Identified Onshore Geopressured Geothermal Energy in Texas and Louisiana (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recoverable Resource Estimate of Identified Recoverable Resource Estimate of Identified Onshore Geopressured Geothermal Energy in Texas and Louisiana AAPG 2012 Annual Convention and Exhibition Ariel Esposito and Chad Augustine April 24, 2012 NREL/PR-6A20-54999 2 * Geopressured Geothermal o Reservoirs characterized by pore fluids under high confining pressures and high temperatures with correspondingly large quantities of dissolved methane o Soft geopressure: Hydrostatic to 15.83 kPa/m o Hard geopressure: 15.83- 22.61 kPa/m (lithostatic pressure gradient) * Common Geopressured Geothermal Reservoir Structure o Upper thick low permeability shale o Thin sandstone layer o Lower thick low permeability shale * Three Potential Sources of Energy o Thermal energy (Temperature > 100°C - geothermal electricity generation)

218

A preliminary sub-basin scale evaluation framework of site suitability for onshore aquifer-based CO{sub 2} storage in China  

SciTech Connect

Development of a reliable, broadly applicable framework for the identification and suitability evaluation of potential CO{sub 2} storage sites is essential before large-scale deployment of carbon dioxide capture and geological storage (CCS) can commence. In this study, a sub-basin scale evaluation framework was developed to assess the suitability of potential onshore deep saline aquifers for CO{sub 2} storage in China. The methodology, developed in consultation with experts from the academia and the petroleum industry in China, is based on a multi-criteria analysis (MCA) framework that considers four objectives: (1) storage optimization, in terms of storage capacity and injectivity; (2) risk minimization and storage security; (3) environmental restrictions regarding surface and subsurface use; and (4) economic considerations. The framework is designed to provide insights into both the suitability of potential aquifer storage sites as well as the priority for early deployment of CCS with existing CO{sub 2} sources. Preliminary application of the framework, conducted using GIS-based evaluation tools revealed that 18% of onshore aquifer sites with a combined CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 746 gigatons are considered to exhibit very high suitability, and 11% of onshore aquifer sites with a total capacity of 290 gigatons exhibit very high priority opportunities for implementation. These onshore aquifer sites may provide promising opportunities for early large-scale CCS deployment and contribute to CO{sub 2} mitigation in China for many decades.

Wei, Ning; Li, Xiaochun; Wang, Ying; Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.; Bromhal Grant S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Bridging 3D seismic onshore: Lodgepole play highlights promise and challenges  

SciTech Connect

Recent major discoveries by Conoco Inc. and Duncan Oil in the Lower Mississippian Lodgepole formation of the Williston basin show that finding major oil reserves is still possible in the US and that 3D seismic methods have the capability to locate them. The implications are profound for independent oil and gas producers, who traditionally concentrate their operations in the mature US. Like major companies, independents are profiting form use of 3D seismic methods. The Williston basin successes show how independents might use 3D seismic methods to identify opportunities in a region once considered to be drilled up. Both the increasing use of these technologies by independents as well as the experiences major companies have had with them are well-documented. The paper discusses the Lodgepole discoveries, rejuvenation of the US oil and gas industry, stratigraphic information available by 3D seismic means, economic impact, and implications of 30 seismic work in the US.

O`Connor, R.B. Jr. [Wavetech Geophysical Inc., Denver, CO (United States)

1995-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

220

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Table 50. Crude Oil Technically Recoverable Resources (Billion barrels) Printer Friendly Version Crude Oil Resource Category As of January 1, 2002 Undiscovered 56.02 Onshore 19.33 Northeast 1.47 Gulf Coast 4.76 Midcontinent 1.12 Southwest 3.25 Rocky Moutain 5.73 West Coast 3.00 Offshore 36.69 Deep (>200 meter W.D.) 35.01 Shallow (0-200 meter W.D.) 1.69 Inferred Reserves 49.14 Onshore 37.78 Northeast 0.79 Gulf Coast 0.80 Midcontinent 3.73 Southwest 14.61 Rocky Mountain 9.91 West Coast 7.94

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Imports/Exports & Pipelines  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Imports/Exports & Pipelines Imports/Exports & Pipelines 2010 U.S Natural Gas Imports and Exports: 2009 This report provides an overview of U.S. international natural gas trade in 2009. Natural gas import and export data, including liquefied natural gas (LNG) data, are provided through the year 2009 in Tables SR1-SR9. Categories: Imports & Exports/Pipelines (Released, 9/28/2010, Html format) Natural Gas Year-In-Review 2009 This is a special report that provides an overview of the natural gas industry and markets in 2009 with special focus on the first complete set of supply and disposition data for 2009 from the Energy Information Administration. Topics discussed include natural gas end-use consumption trends, offshore and onshore production, imports and exports of pipeline and liquefied natural gas, and above-average storage inventories. Categories: Prices, Production, Consumption, Imports/Exports & Pipelines, Storage (Released, 7/9/2010, Html format)

222

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Areas Areas Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

223

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 7). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply submodule, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2010), (Washington, DC, 2010). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural

224

Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

Yaghi, Omar M; Czaja, Alexander U; Wang, Bo; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L; Furukawa, Hiroyasu

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

225

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Print Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

226

Cement distribution in a carbonate reservoir: recognition of a palaeo oilwater contact and its relationship to reservoir quality in the Humbly Grove field, onshore, UK  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The distribution of mineral cements, total porosity, microporosity and permeability have been determined for the Humbly Grove oolitic carbonate reservoir (Middle Jurassic Great Oolite Formation, Weald Basin, onshore UK) using a combination of optical petrography, electron microscopy, fluid inclusion analysis, quantitative XRD, wireline data analysis and core analysis data. Grainstone reservoir facies have porosities ranging between 5 and 24%, but are mostly between 11 and 24%. Permeabilities vary from Jurassic reservoirs of the Weald Basin.

Emma C Heasley; Richard H Worden; James P Hendry

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Oil and Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Oil and Gas Supply Module The oil and gas supply module (OGSM) consists of a series of process submodules that project the availability of: Domestic crude oil production and dry natural gas production from onshore, offshore, and Alaskan reservoirs Imported pipeline–quality gas from Mexico and Canada Imported liquefied natural gas. Figure 12. Oil and Gas Supply Module Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-202-586-8800. Figure 13. Oil and Gas Suppply Module Structure. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Oil and Gas Supply Module Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

228

EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production Production 2010 Natural Gas Year-In-Review 2009 This is a special report that provides an overview of the natural gas industry and markets in 2009 with special focus on the first complete set of supply and disposition data for 2009 from the Energy Information Administration. Topics discussed include natural gas end-use consumption trends, offshore and onshore production, imports and exports of pipeline and liquefied natural gas, and above-average storage inventories. Categories: Prices, Production, Consumption, Imports/Exports & Pipelines, Storage (Released, 7/9/2010, Html format) Natural Gas Data Collection and Estimation This presentation to the Oklahoma Independent Petroleum Association gives an overview of the EIA natural gas data collection system, Oklahoma natural gas statistics, recent changes in monthly natural gas production statistics, and the May 2010 short-term natural gas forecast. The presentation focuses on the EIA-914, the "Monthly Natural Gas Production Report," and recent changes to this survey's estimation methodology. Categories: Production (Released, 6/9/2010, ppt format)

229

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 6) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 6) Natural gas spot prices declined this week as Hurricane Rita came ashore a weaker hurricane than expected, even while causing massive evacuations of rigs and platforms in the Gulf of Mexico and inflicting damage to both offshore and onshore energy-related infrastructure. While no price quotes are available at the Henry Hub, which was shut down owing to Hurricane Rita, trading at other market locations in Louisiana saw an average decrease of $1.35 per MMBtu on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, September 21-28). The average price among Louisiana trading locations yesterday (September 28) was $13.45 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for October delivery settled at $13.907 per MMBtu in its final day of trading yesterday, increasing about $1.31 per MMBtu or more than 10 percent since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,885 Bcf as of September 23, which is 2.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $0.60 per barrel, or less than 1 percent, on the week to $66.36 per barrel, or $11.44 per MMBtu.

230

Shale Gas Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Production Gas Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 View History U.S. 1,293 2,116 3,110 5,336 7,994 2007-2011 Alabama 0 0 0 0 2007-2010 Alaska 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2011 Arkansas 94 279 527 794 940 2007-2011 California 101 2011-2011 Colorado 0 0 1 1 3 2007-2011 Kentucky 2 2 5 4 4 2007-2011 Louisiana 1 23 293 1,232 2,084 2007-2011 North 1 23 293 1,232 2,084 2007-2011 South Onshore 0 2011-2011 Michigan 148 122 132 120 106 2007-2011 Montana 12 13 7 13 13 2007-2011 New Mexico 2 0 2 6 9 2007-2011 East 2 0 1 3 5 2007-2011 West 0 0 1 3 4 2007-2011 North Dakota 3 3 25 64 95 2007-2011

231

Design and preparation of high-surface-area Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts using a modified co-precipitation method for the water-gas shift reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Highly dispersed Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts were prepared by modifying a conventional co-precipitation method. By manipulating the preparation conditions, in this case solvent, precipitating temperature, and pH, a Cu surface area of 45.51.7m2/g was prepared, which was much greater than the surface area of 11.431.7m2/g obtained by the conventional co-precipitation method and seemed to be the largest Cu surface area ever reported in the literature. The preparation of catalysts with a high Cu surface area was attributed to the formation of aurichalcite, a complex containing Cu and Zn. The catalysts prepared by the modified co-precipitation method were used for a water-gas shift reaction, exhibiting higher catalytic activity compared to those prepared by the conventional co-precipitation method.

Adeline Budiman; Muhammad Ridwan; Sung Min Kim; Jae-Wook Choi; Chang Won Yoon; Jeong-Myeong Ha; Dong Jin Suh; Young-Woong Suh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Methodology for Assessing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Assessing Mitigation Options for On-Road Mobile Sources Project for the Houston-Galveston Area Council  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methodology for Assessing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Assessing Mitigation Options for On reductions in GHG, and b) use analytical tools/methods to assess the emissions reductions possible through and prioritized based on factors such as cost effectiveness, potential for emission reductions, and applicability

233

Geology, hydrocarbon potential of Rio Muni area, Equatorial Guinea  

SciTech Connect

The Republic of Equatorial Guinea, located in the oil producing province of West Africa, consists of three islands and an enclave in continental Africa with a total surface area of about 28,000 sq km. The islands are in the Gulf of Guinea. The largest, Bioko, lies off Nigeria and Cameroon. The continental enclave, Rio Muni, is bounded to the north by Cameroon and to the east and south by Gabon. The coastal basin of Rio Muni, which is the subject of this article, contributes the major portion of areas offered in the current exploration licensing round. Some 5,275 km of seismic data have been recorded the past 10 years covering most of the offshore and onshore areas of Rio Muni. The quality of seismic data is generally good. Data from all size wells drilled in the area and an aeromagnetic survey of the whole onshore and offshore are also available. The paper describes the West African setting, exploration history, basin development, presalt play, postsalt Aptian play, Albian play, clastic play, Senonian/Paleogene play, and the current licensing round.

Ross, D.; Hempstead, N. (EMS Ltd., Oxted (United Kingdom))

1993-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal Offshore Louisiana Federal Offshore Texas Louisiana Louisiana Onshore Louisiana Offshore Louisiana State Offshore New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Texas Onshore Texas Offshore Texas State Offshore Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Alabama Onshore Alabama Offshore Alabama State Offshore Arizona Arkansas California California Onshore California Offshore California State Offshore Federal Offshore California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual

235

Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal Offshore Louisiana Federal Offshore Texas Louisiana Louisiana Onshore Louisiana Offshore Louisiana State Offshore New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Texas Onshore Texas Offshore Texas State Offshore Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Alabama Onshore Alabama Offshore Alabama State Offshore Arizona Arkansas California California Onshore California Offshore California State Offshore Federal Offshore California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual

236

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal Offshore Louisiana Federal Offshore Texas Louisiana Louisiana Onshore Louisiana Offshore Louisiana State Offshore New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Texas Onshore Texas Offshore Texas State Offshore Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Alabama Onshore Alabama Offshore Alabama State Offshore Arizona Arkansas California California Onshore California Offshore California State Offshore Federal Offshore California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual

237

Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal Offshore Louisiana Federal Offshore Texas Louisiana Louisiana Onshore Louisiana Offshore Louisiana State Offshore New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Texas Onshore Texas Offshore Texas State Offshore Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Alabama Onshore Alabama Offshore Alabama State Offshore Arizona Arkansas California California Onshore California Offshore California State Offshore Federal Offshore California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual

238

Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal Offshore Louisiana Federal Offshore Texas Louisiana Louisiana Onshore Louisiana Offshore Louisiana State Offshore New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Texas Onshore Texas Offshore Texas State Offshore Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Alabama Onshore Alabama Offshore Alabama State Offshore Arizona Arkansas California California Onshore California Offshore California State Offshore Federal Offshore California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual

239

Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal Offshore Louisiana Federal Offshore Texas Louisiana Louisiana Onshore Louisiana Offshore Louisiana State Offshore New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Texas Onshore Texas Offshore Texas State Offshore Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Alabama Onshore Alabama Offshore Alabama State Offshore Arizona Arkansas California California Onshore California Offshore California State Offshore Federal Offshore California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual

240

California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal Offshore Louisiana Federal Offshore Texas Louisiana Louisiana Onshore Louisiana Offshore Louisiana State Offshore New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Texas Onshore Texas Offshore Texas State Offshore Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Alabama Onshore Alabama Offshore Alabama State Offshore Arizona Arkansas California California Onshore California Offshore California State Offshore Federal Offshore California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ultra-Deepwater and Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Program Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Program The Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research Program, launched by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), is a public/private partnership valued at $400 million over eight years that is designed to benefit consumers by developing technologies to increase America's domestic oil and gas production and reduce the Nation's dependency on foreign imports. Key aspects of the program include utilizing a non-profit consortium to manage the research, establishing two federal advisory committees, and funding of $50 million per year derived from royalties, rents, and bonuses from federal onshore

242

Category:Federal Oil and Gas Statutes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Statutes Statutes Jump to: navigation, search Add a new Federal Oil and Gas Statute You need to have JavaScript enabled to view the interactive timeline. Further results for this query.DECADEFederal Oil and Gas Royalty Simplification and Fairness Act of 19961996-01-010Year: 1996 Federal Onshore Oil and Gas Leasing Reform Act of 1987 (FOOGLRA)1987-01-010Year: 1987 Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Management Act of 19821982-01-010Year: 1982 Indian Mineral Development Act of 19821982-01-010Year: 1982 Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 19761976-01-010Year: 1976 Mining and Minerals Policy Act of 19701970-01-010Year: 1970 Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands of 19471947-01-010Year: 1947 Indian Mineral Leasing Act of 19381938-01-010Year: 1938 Mineral Leasing Act of 19201920-01-010Year: 1920

243

Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids (HGL): Recent Market Trends and Issues  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Over the past five years, rapid growth in U.S. onshore natural gas and oil production has led to increased volumes of natural gas plant liquids (NGPL) and liquefied refinery gases (LRG). The increasing economic importance of these volumes, as a result of their significant growth in production, has revealed the need for better data accuracy and transparency to improve the quality of historical data and projections for supply, demand, and prices of these liquids, co-products, and competing products. To reduce confusion in terminology and improve its presentation of data, EIA has worked with industry and federal and state governments to clarify gas liquid terminology and has developed the term Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids, or HGL.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

DOE-Funded Primer Underscores Technology Advances, Challenges of Shale Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-Funded Primer Underscores Technology Advances, Challenges of DOE-Funded Primer Underscores Technology Advances, Challenges of Shale Gas Development DOE-Funded Primer Underscores Technology Advances, Challenges of Shale Gas Development April 14, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces the release of "Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States: A Primer." The Primer provides regulators, policy makers, and the public with an objective source of information on the technology advances and challenges that accompany deep shale gas development. Natural gas production from hydrocarbon rich deep shale formations, known as "shale gas," is one of the most quickly expanding trends in onshore domestic oil and gas exploration. The lower 48 states have a wide

245

Table 10. Total natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Total natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011 : Total natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011 billion cubic feet Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries Estimated Proved Reserves Adjustments Increases Decreases Sales Acquisitions Extensions Discoveries in Old Fields Production Reserves State and subdivision 12/31/10 (+,-) (+) (-) (-) (+) (+) (+) (+) (-) 12/31/11 Alaska 8,917 -2 938 207 36 222 4 0 3 328 9,511 Lower 48 States 308,730 2,717 55,077 55,920 44,539 47,651 47,631 987 1,257 24,293 339,298 Alabama 2,724 -45 472 163 595 398 3 2 0 226 2,570 Arkansas 14,181 729 631 324 6,762 6,882 2,094 0 23 1,080 16,374 California 2,785 917 1,542 1,959 49 55 75 0 0 324 3,042 Coastal Region Onshore 180 15 21 32 0 0 1 0 0 12 173 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 92 6 12 4 0 3 0 0 0 7 102 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 2,447 895 1,498

246

Table 11. Dry natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Dry natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, 2011 : Dry natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, 2011 billion cubic feet Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries Estimated Proved Reserves Adjustments Increases Decreases Sales Acquisitions Extensions Discoveries in Old Fields Production Reserves State and Subdivision 12/31/10 (+,-) (+) (-) (-) (+) (+) (+) (+) (-) 12/31/11 Alaska 8,838 -1 928 206 36 221 4 0 3 327 9,424 Lower 48 States 295,787 1,732 52,673 53,267 43,150 46,020 45,905 947 1,224 23,228 324,643 Alabama 2,629 -49 455 157 573 383 3 2 0 218 2,475 Arkansas 14,178 728 631 324 6,760 6,880 2,093 0 23 1,079 16,370 California 2,647 923 1,486 1,889 47 52 73 0 0 311 2,934 Coastal Region Onshore 173 13 20 31 0 0 1 0 0 11 165 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 87 7 11 4 0 2 0 0 0 6 97 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 2,321 902 1,444 1,854 45 42 69 0 0 289 2,590 State Offshore

247

Table 12. Nonassociated natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Nonassociated natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011 : Nonassociated natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011 billion cubic feet Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries Estimated Proved Reserves Adjustments Increases Decreases SalesAcquisitions Extensions Discoveries in Old Fields Production Reserves State and Subdivision 12/31/10 (+,-) (+) (-) (-) (+) (+) (+) (+) (-) 12/31/11 Alaska 1,021 -1 95 128 34 171 1 0 3 152 976 Lower 48 States 280,880 2,326 47,832 50,046 43,203 45,818 41,677 376 1,097 21,747 305,010 Alabama 2,686 -48 470 163 586 378 3 0 0 218 2,522 Arkansas 14,152 705 581 311 6,724 6,882 2,094 0 23 1,074 16,328 California 503 -12 118 32 48 44 1 0 0 64 510 Coastal Region Onshore 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 498 -12 116 31 47 44 1 0 0 63 506 State Offshore

248

Brine and Gas Flow Patterns Between Excavated Areas and Disturbed Rock Zone in the 1996 Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for a Single Drilling Intrusion that Penetrates Repository and Castile Brine Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is located in southeastern New Mexico, is being developed for the geologic disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Waste disposal will take place in panels excavated in a bedded salt formation approximately 2000 ft (610 m) below the land surface. The BRAGFLO computer program which solves a system of nonlinear partial differential equations for two-phase flow, was used to investigate brine and gas flow patterns in the vicinity of the repository for the 1996 WIPP performance assessment (PA). The present study examines the implications of modeling assumptions used in conjunction with BRAGFLO in the 1996 WIPP PA that affect brine and gas flow patterns involving two waste regions in the repository (i.e., a single waste panel and the remaining nine waste panels), a disturbed rock zone (DRZ) that lies just above and below these two regions, and a borehole that penetrates the single waste panel and a brine pocket below this panel. The two waste regions are separated by a panel closure. The following insights were obtained from this study. First, the impediment to flow between the two waste regions provided by the panel closure model is reduced due to the permeable and areally extensive nature of the DRZ adopted in the 1996 WIPP PA, which results in the DRZ becoming an effective pathway for gas and brine movement around the panel closures and thus between the two waste regions. Brine and gas flow between the two waste regions via the DRZ causes pressures between the two to equilibrate rapidly, with the result that processes in the intruded waste panel are not isolated from the rest of the repository. Second, the connection between intruded and unintruded waste panels provided by the DRZ increases the time required for repository pressures to equilibrate with the overlying and/or underlying units subsequent to a drilling intrusion. Third, the large and areally extensive DRZ void volumes is a significant source of brine to the repository, which is consumed in the corrosion of iron and thus contributes to increased repository pressures. Fourth, the DRZ itself lowers repository pressures by providing storage for gas and access to additional gas storage in areas of the repository. Fifth, given the pathway that the DRZ provides for gas and brine to flow around the panel closures, isolation of the waste panels by the panel closures was not essential to compliance with the U.S. Environment Protection Agency's regulations in the 1996 WIPP PA.

ECONOMY,KATHLEEN M.; HELTON,JON CRAIG; VAUGHN,PALMER

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption 2010 Natural Gas Year-In-Review 2009 This is a special report that provides an overview of the natural gas industry and markets in 2009 with special focus on the first complete set of supply and disposition data for 2009 from the Energy Information Administration. Topics discussed include natural gas end-use consumption trends, offshore and onshore production, imports and exports of pipeline and liquefied natural gas, and above-average storage inventories. Categories: Prices, Production, Consumption, Imports/Exports & Pipelines, Storage (Released, 7/9/2010, Html format) Trends in U.S. Residential Natural Gas Consumption This report presents an analysis of residential natural gas consumption trends in the United States through 2009 and analyzes consumption trends for the United States as a whole (1990 through 2009) and for each Census Division (1998 through 2009). It examines a long-term downward per-customer consumption trend and analyzes whether this trend persists across Census Divisions. The report also examines some of the factors that have contributed to the decline in per-customer consumption. To provide a more meaningful measure of per-customer consumption, EIA adjusted consumption data presented in the report for weather. Categories: Consumption (Released, 6/23/2010, pdf format)

250

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

October 3, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 10) October 3, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 10) Spot and futures prices moved up strongly for the week (Wednesday, September 25 through Wednesday, October 2) as Tropical Storm Isidore and then Hurricane Lili caused significant production curtailments in the Gulf of Mexico and onshore Texas and Louisiana. The average spot price at the Henry Hub yesterday (Wednesday, October 2), at $4.24 per MMBtu, was 49 cents higher than a week ago. However, the amount of gas actually delivered at October 2 prices is likely to be small, as operations at the Henry Hub near Erath, LA, were essentially shut down for at least 48 hours because of Lili's impending arrival. On the NYMEX, the expiring near-month contract for October delivery ended trading on Thursday, September 26 with a sizeable gain of over 19 cents per MMBtu, closing at $3.686. Taking over as the near-month contract, the futures contract for November delivery promptly gained $0.152 per MMBtu to settle at $4.041 on Friday. Natural gas in storage reached 3,038 Bcf on September 27, which exceeds the average of the past 5 years by 10 percent. With continuing turmoil in the Middle East and uncertainty surrounding the conflict with Iraq over weapons inspections keeping oil prices high, the spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil hovered above $30 per barrel throughout the week. WTI ended trading Wednesday (October 2) at an average of $30.59 per barrel, or about $5.27 per MMBtu, down a dime per barrel from the previous Wednesday.

251

Natural Gas Regulation - Other Gas-Related Information Sources | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Regulation - Other Gas-Related Information Sources Natural Gas Regulation - Other Gas-Related Information Sources Natural Gas Regulation - Other Gas-Related Information Sources The single largest source of energy information available is the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA). The EIA publishes extensive reports on natural gas and other energy sources. Domestic natural gas markets are regulated in part by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The commission's chief area of concern is the interstate natural gas market. Natural gas moves for the most part by pipeline in the United States. The safety of those pipelines is the concern of the Department of Transportation's Office of Pipeline Safety. In Canada the regulation of interprovincial and international natural gas is the responsibility of the National Energy Board. Their areas of

252

Ertek, G., Tun, M.M., Kurtaraner, E., Kebude, D., 2012, 'Insights into the Efficiencies of On-Shore Wind Turbines: A Data-Centric Analysis', INISTA 2012 Conference. July 2-4, 2012, Trabzon,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Shore Wind Turbines: A Data-Centric Analysis', INISTA 2012 Conference. July 2-4, 2012, Trabzon, Turkey://research.sabanciuniv.edu. Insights into the Efficiencies of On-Shore Wind Turbines: A Data-Centric Analysis Gürdal Ertek, Murat University Istanbul, Turkey Abstract--Literature on renewable energy alternative of wind turbines does

Yanikoglu, Berrin

253

Africa: Unrest and restrictive terms limit abundant potential. [Oil and gas exploration and development in Africa  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the drilling and exploration activity of the oil and gas industries of Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, Nigeria, Cameroon, Gabon, the Congo, Angola, and South Africa. Information is provided on current and predicted trends in well drilling activities (both onshore and offshore), numbers of new wells, footage information, production statistics and what fields accounted for this production, and planned new exploration activities. The paper also describes the current status of government policies and political problems affecting the oil and gas industry.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. Projected production estimates of US crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian/Antrim shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects US domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted profitability to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Table 13. Associated-dissolved natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Associated-dissolved natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011 : Associated-dissolved natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011 billion cubic feet Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries Estimated Proved Reserves Adjustments Increases Decreases Sales Acquisitions Extensions Discoveries in Old Fields Production Reserves State and Subdivision 12/31/10 (+,-) (+) (-) (-) (+) (+) (+) (+) (-) 12/31/11 Alaska 7,896 -1 843 79 2 51 3 0 0 176 8,535 Lower 48 States 27,850 391 7,245 5,874 1,336 1,833 5,954 611 160 2,546 34,288 Alabama 38 3 2 0 9 20 0 2 0 8 48 Arkansas 29 24 50 13 38 0 0 0 0 6 46 California 2,282 929 1,424 1,927 1 11 74 0 0 260 2,532 Coastal Region Onshore 178 15 21 31 0 0 1 0 0 12 172 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 92 6 12 4 0 3 0 0 0 7 102 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 1,949 907 1,382 1,892 0 0 70 0 0 237 2,179 State Offshore 63 1 9 0 1 8 3 0 0 4 79

256

Gas shielding apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

Brandt, D.

1984-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

257

Gas Geothermometry | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Geothermometry Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group:...

258

Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

Dilley, Lorie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Table A14. Oil and gas supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

price: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Petroleum Marketing Monthly, DOEEIA- 0380(201308) (Washington, DC, August 2013). 2011 and 2012 lower 48 onshore, lower...

260

Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Plan Annual Plan Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program Report to Congress August 2011 U.S. Department of ENERGY United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 2011 Annual Plan | Page i Message from the Secretary As we take steps to create the clean energy economy of the future, prudent development of domestic oil and natural gas resources will continue to be part of our Nation's overall strategy for energy security for decades to come. These operations have to be conducted responsibly, ensuring that communities are safe and that the environment is protected. As industry tackles the challenge of developing an increasingly difficult reserve base - in ultra-deepwater offshore and unconventional plays onshore - we must ensure through scientific

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Gas Exchange, Partial Pressure Gradients,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Exchange, Partial Pressure Gradients, and the Oxygen Window Johnny E. Brian, Jr., M of circulatory and gas transport physiology, and the best place to start is with normobaric physiology. LIFE affect the precise gas exchange occurring in individual areas of the lungs and body tissues. To make

Riba Sagarra, Jaume

262

New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal Offshore Louisiana Federal Offshore Texas Louisiana Louisiana Onshore Louisiana Offshore Louisiana State Offshore New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Texas Onshore Texas Offshore Texas State Offshore Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Alabama Onshore Alabama Offshore Alabama State Offshore Arizona Arkansas California California Onshore California Offshore California State Offshore Federal Offshore California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual

263

U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal Offshore Louisiana Federal Offshore Texas Louisiana Louisiana Onshore Louisiana Offshore Louisiana State Offshore New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Texas Onshore Texas Offshore Texas State Offshore Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Alabama Onshore Alabama Offshore Alabama State Offshore Arizona Arkansas California California Onshore California Offshore California State Offshore Federal Offshore California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual

264

Chicago Area Alternative Fuels Deployment Project (CAAFDP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

risks - Unforeseen permitting issues - Construction delays - Availability of equipment * Gas Technology Institute (GTI) * Chicago Area Clean Cities Coalition * State of Illinois,...

265

AEO2011: Lower 48 Natural Gas Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natural Gas Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply Natural Gas Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply Region Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 133, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into Production, lower 48 onshore and lower 48 offshore. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Natural Gas Wellhead prices Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Lower 48 Natural Gas Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply Region- Reference Case (xls, 59.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License

266

Table 3. Changes to proved reserves of wet natural gas by source, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Changes to proved reserves of wet natural gas by source, 2011" Changes to proved reserves of wet natural gas by source, 2011" "trillion cubic feet" ,"Proved",,"Revisions &",,"Proved" ,"Reserves","Discoveries","Other Changes","Production","Reserves" "Source of Gas","Year-End 2010",2011,2011,2011,"Year-End 2011" "Coalbed Methane",17.5,0.7,0.4,-1.8,16.8 "Shale",97.4,33.7,8.5,-8,131.6 "Other (Conventional & Tight)" " Lower 48 Onshore",181.7,14.7,-3.5,-12.8,180.1 " Lower 48 Offshore",12.1,0.8,-0.4,-1.7,10.8 " Alaska",8.9,0,0.9,-0.3,9.5 "TOTAL",317.6,49.9,5.9,-24.6,348.8 "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-23, "Annual Survey of Domestic Oil and Gas Reserves."

267

Greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generated by offshore wind farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract For wind power generation offshore sites offer significantly better wind conditions compared to onshore. At the same time, the demand for raw materials and therefore the related environmental impacts increase due to technically more demanding wind energy converters and additional components (e.g. substructure) for the balance of plant. Additionally, due to environmental concerns offshore wind farms will be sited farshore (i.e. in deep water) in the future having a significant impact on the operation and maintenance efforts (O&M). Against this background the goal of this analysis is an assessment of the specific GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions as a function of the site conditions, the wind mill technology and the O&M necessities. Therefore, a representative offshore wind farm is defined and subjected to a detailed LCA (life cycle assessment). Based on parameter variations and modifications within the technical and logistical system, promising configurations regarding GHG emissions are determined for different site conditions. Results show, that all parameters related to the energy yield have a distinctive impact on the specific GHG emissions, whereas the distance to shore and the water depth affect the results marginally. By utilizing the given improvement potentials GHG emissions of electricity from offshore wind farms are comparable to those achieved onshore.

Britta Reimers; Burcu zdirik; Martin Kaltschmitt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Some Recent Advances in Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Production, Spill, Dispersion, and Safety  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Furthermore, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration,(3) new gas power plants required ?50% of the levelized capital cost of coal per MWh, less than 33% the cost of nuclear, and less than 20% the cost of onshore wind, let alone offshore wind (Table 1). ... coil-wound heat exchanger (CWHE) ... Rudan, S.; Ascic, B.; Visic, I. Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Collision and Grounding of Ship and Offshore Structures; Trondheim, Norway, June 1719, 2013; pp 331 337. ...

Walter Chukwunonso Ikealumba; Hongwei Wu

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

269

Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Sampling Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, and hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system.

270

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Georgia Oil and Gas Deep Drilling act of 1975 (Georgia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Georgia's Oil and Gas and Deep Drilling Act regulates oil and gas drilling activities to provide protection of underground freshwater supplies and certain "environmentally sensitive" areas. The...

272

Program Areas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Geothermal energya relatively untapped domestic energy resource from the heat of the earthrepresents a reliable and nearly inexhaustible energy source, with greatly reduced greenhouse gas...

273

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Major Natural Gas Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Transportation Corridors Natural Gas Transportation Corridors About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Major Natural Gas Transportation Corridors Corridors from the Southwest | From Canada | From Rocky Mountain Area | Details about Transportation Corridors The national natural gas delivery network is intricate and expansive, but most of the major transportation routes can be broadly categorized into 11 distinct corridors or flow patterns. 5 major routes extend from the producing areas of the Southwest 4 routes enter the United States from Canada 2 originate in the Rocky Mountain area. A summary of the major corridors and links to details about each corridor are provided below. Corridors from the Southwest Region

274

Barriers to the development of China's shale gas industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Shale gas has become a promising onshore energy prospect in China. As much as the country aspires for greater energy independence through the use of its shale gas reserves, this process is slowed down by the combined weight of relative inexperience, lack of technology, geographical complexity, a hostile economic environment, a disincentive pipeline regime, and a complex land ownership system. To foster a better understanding of the current circumstances of the country's shale gas sector, a panel of scholars and experts shared their perspectives and insider knowledge on China's shale gas industry. It was found that some of the country's man-made institutional barriers are factors that have been hindering shale gas development in China, in addition to natural conditions such as water concerns and the complex geography of shale fields. Resolving this situation necessitates breaking the monopoly that major state-owned oil companies have over high-quality shale gas resources, opening pipeline network access, providing geological data, developing the domestic oil service market, creating conditions for fair competition between service providers, and improving the water management system.

Zheng Wan; Tao Huang; Brian Craig

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2013 | Release Date: May 30, 9, 2013 | Release Date: May 30, 2013 | Next Release: June 6, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 12/22/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Island gas production returns in May, but remains below prior levels After planned outage for maintenance that began on April 23, natural gas production resumed on May 6 at northeastern Canada's Sable Island Offshore production field, which is located 125 miles off the coast of Nova Scotia. Spectra Energy's Maritimes and Northeast Pipeline subsidiary Maritimes Canada announced the completion of the planned outage and a return to production on May 5. Spectra's pipeline brings offshore, onshore, and liquid natural gas to Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and the northeastern United States.

277

Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. It is prepared in accordance with the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, Section 57(b)(2)). Projected production estimates of U.S. crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects U.S. domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted drilling expenditures and average drilling costs to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

NONE

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

278

Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Flux Sampling Details Activities (26) Areas (20) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling: Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can be an indication of hydrothermal activity.

279

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October , 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 10) Spot and futures prices moved up strongly for the week (Wednesday, September 25 through Wednesday, October 2) as Tropical Storm Isidore and then Hurricane Lili caused significant production curtailments in the Gulf of Mexico and onshore Texas and Louisiana. The average spot price at the Henry Hub yesterday (Wednesday, October 2), at $4.24 per MMBtu, was 49 cents higher than a week ago. However, the amount of gas actually delivered at October 2 prices is likely to be small, as operations at the Henry Hub near Erath, LA, were essentially shut down for at least 48 hours because of Lili's impending arrival. On the NYMEX, the expiring near-month contract for October delivery ended trading on Thursday, September 26 with a sizeable gain of over 19 cents per MMBtu, closing at

280

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 6) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 6) Natural gas spot prices declined this week as Hurricane Rita came ashore a weaker hurricane than expected, even while causing massive evacuations of rigs and platforms in the Gulf of Mexico and inflicting damage to both offshore and onshore energy-related infrastructure. While no price quotes are available at the Henry Hub, which was shut down owing to Hurricane Rita, trading at other market locations in Louisiana saw an average decrease of $1.35 per MMBtu on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, September 21-28). The average price among Louisiana trading locations yesterday (September 28) was $13.45 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for October delivery settled at $13.907 per

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

JOURNALDEPHYSIQUE ColloqueCl,suppl6ment aunO 1, Tome41,janvier 1980,page C1-115 SENSITIVE AREA OF A BACK-SCATTER-PIPE GAS FLCW DETECTOR FOR CONVERSION ELECTRON M&SBAUER SPECTRMTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF A BACK-SCATTER-PIPE GAS FLCW DETECTOR FOR CONVERSION ELECTRON M&SBAUER SPECTRMTRY M. Inaba, K. Nomura on a position sensitivity was obtained for the better sample setting i n a detector. 1. Introduction.- !he gas detail. It i s important t o clarify several factors t h a t influence the sensitivity of a detector

Boyer, Edmond

282

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil and gas supply module (OGSM) consists of a series of process submodules that project the availability of: oil and gas supply module (OGSM) consists of a series of process submodules that project the availability of: Domestic crude oil production and dry natural gas production from onshore, offshore, and Alaskan reservoirs Imported pipeline-quality gas from Mexico and Canada Imported liquefied natural gas. The OGSM regions are shown in Figure 12. Figure 12. Oil and Gas Supply Module Regions The driving assumption of OGSM is that domestic oil and gas exploration and development are undertaken if the discounted present value of the recovered resources at least covers the present value of taxes and the cost of capital, exploration, development, and production. In contrast, international gas trade is determined in part by scenario-dependent, noneconomic factors. Crude oil is transported to refineries, which are simulated in the petroleum market module, for conversion and blending into refined petroleum products. The individual submodules of the oil and gas supply module are solved independently, with feedbacks achieved through NEMS solution iterations (Figure 13).

283

coherence area  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1....In an electromagnetic wave, such as a lightwave or a radio wave, the area of a surface (a) every point on which the surface is perpendicular to the direction of propagation, (b) over which the e...

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Natural gas strategic plan and program crosscut plans  

SciTech Connect

The natural gas strategic plan recognizes the challenges and opportunities facing increased U.S. natural gas use. Focus areas of research include natural gas supply, delivery, and storage, power generation, industrial, residential and commercial, natural gas vehicles, and the environment. Historical aspects, mission, situation analysis, technology trends, strategic issues, performance indicators, technology program overviews, and forecasting in the above areas are described.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the gas turbine generator was introduced to the power generation ... fossil-fueled power plant. Twenty years later, gas turbines were established as an important means of ... on utility systems. By the early...

Jeffrey M. Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the time to separate out the essentials and the irrelevancies in a text-book. The gas ...gasturbine ...

H. CONSTANT

1950-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

287

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2009 1, 2009 Next Release: May 28, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 20, 2009) Natural gas prices at most trading locations fell on the week because of mild weather as well as continued weakness in the economy. Declines ranged between 37 cents at the Dracut trading area in the Northeast to 90 cents at the El Paso non-Bondad area in the Rocky Mountains. The Henry Hub spot price fell by 67 cents during the week to $3.75 per million Btu (MMBtu). Moving in the opposite direction of natural gas prices, the price of the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil contract rose on the week to $61.45 per barrel, or $10.59 per MMBtu. Oil prices are now at their highest level since November 10, 2008, having more than doubled since falling to a

288

Apparatus to measure permeation of a gas through a membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to an apparatus to measure permeation of a gas through a membrane. The membrane is mounted on a flange with two sealing areas. The region between the sealing areas defines an annular space. The annular space is swept with a gas in order to carry away any of the permeating gas which may leak through the sealing areas.

Nunes, Geoffrey

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

289

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 16, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 8, 2011) Natural gas prices rose on the week across the board, with somewhat moderate increases in most areas and steep increases in the Northeast United States. The Henry Hub spot price rose 20 cents on the week from $4.63 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, June 1, to $4.83 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (July 2011) contract rose about 5 percent, from $4.692 last Wednesday to $4.847 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,187 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 3, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

290

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2008 3, 2008 Next Release: October 30, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, October 22) Natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States this report week increased as a result of cold weather in some major gas consuming areas of the country, several ongoing pipeline maintenance projects, and the continuing production shut-ins in the Gulf of Mexico region. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month contract (November 2008) increased on the week to $6.777 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) as of yesterday (October 22). The net weekly increase occurred during a week in which the price increased in three trading sessions. As of Friday, October 17, working gas in underground storage totaled

291

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2008 , 2008 Next Release: October 9, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, September 24 to Wednesday, October 1) Natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week, as seasonably moderate temperatures minimized natural gas demand in many areas of the country. The return of some Gulf of Mexico supplies during the week provided further downward pressure on spot prices. As of yesterday, October 1, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) reported that 3.5 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day of natural gas production remains shut-in, 16 percent lower than the 4.2 Bcf per day reported 1 week earlier. The Henry Hub spot price fell in the first three trading sessions of

292

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 9, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 1, 2010) Since Wednesday, August 25, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations in the lower 48 States, although prices generally rose in the Northeast and Rocky Mountain areas. The Henry Hub spot price fell on the week from $3.99 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.73 per MMBtu, its lowest value since April 1, 2010. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the October 2010 natural gas futures contract fell about 3 percent from $3.896 per MMBtu to $3.762 per MMBtu. During the report week, the September 2010 natural gas futures contract expired at $3.651, having lost about $1.176 per MMBtu during its

293

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

294

California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

295

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

296

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

297

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

298

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

299

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

300

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

302

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

303

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

304

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

305

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

306

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

307

Surface Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling Surface Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Surface Gas Sampling Details Activities (12) Areas (10) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Surface Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction

308

New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal Offshore Louisiana Federal Offshore Texas Louisiana...

309

Radiological Areas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas On July 13, 2000, the Secretary of Energy imposed an agency-wide suspension on the unrestricted release of scrap metal originating from radiological areas at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for the purpose of recycling. The suspension was imposed in response to concerns from the general public and industry groups about the potential effects of radioactivity in or on material released in accordance with requirements established in DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The suspension was to remain in force until DOE developed and implemented improvements in, and better informed the public about, its release process. In addition, in 2001 the DOE announced its intention to prepare a

310

Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal...

311

Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal...

312

Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal...

313

Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal...

314

Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal...

315

Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal...

316

Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal...

317

Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal...

318

Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal...

319

Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal...

320

Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal...

322

Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal...

323

Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal...

324

Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal...

325

Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal...

326

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal...

327

Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal...

328

Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal...

329

Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal...

330

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gas Cleaning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cleaning Cleaning Chemicals from Coal Complex Chemicals from Coal Complex (Eastman Company) Novel gas cleaning and conditioning are crucial technologies for achieving near-zero emissions, while meeting gasification system performance and cost targets. DOE's Gasification Systems program supports technology development in the area of gas cleaning and conditioning, including advanced sorbents and solvents, particulate filters, and other novel gas-cleaning approaches that remove and convert gas contaminants into benign and marketable by-products. To avoid the cost and efficiency penalties associated with cooling the gas stream to temperatures at which conventional gas clean-up systems operate, novel processes are being developed that operate at mild to high temperatures and incorporate multi-contaminant control to

331

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

332

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

333

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview - May 21, 2001 Somewhat warmer temperatures early in the week, especially in the South, provided a lift to natural gas spot and futures prices. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) However, a report of another large stock build and a revised forecast for normal to below-normal temperatures over a larger area of the country turned the week's gains into losses. On a week-to-week basis, the spot price of natural gas at the Henry Hub dropped $0.10 to end Friday, May 18 at $4.15 per MMBtu, while the NYMEX price of natural gas for June delivery at the Henry Hub declined $0.013 to $4.291 per MMBtu. At 119 Bcf, net injections to storage for the week ended May 11, 2001, were the highest value for the 8-year period of weekly AGA data.

334

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. , 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 8, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 31, 2010) Natural gas spot prices fell almost across the board, as mild weather moved into most areas in the lower 48 States. The Henry Hub price fell by 9 cents, from $4.02 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, March 24, to $3.93 per MMBtu yesterday (March 31). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the April 2010 contract expired on Monday, March 29, at $3.842 per MMBtu. The May 2010 contract ended trading yesterday at $3.869 per MMBtu, a decline of about 29 cents from its closing price of $4.154 per MMBtu on March 24. Inventories of working natural gas in storage rose to 1,638 billion

335

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 22, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 14, 2009) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (October 7-14) as a cold-air mass moved over major consuming areas of the country, including the populous Northeast. The Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.12 to $3.82 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased significantly after increasing for 5 consecutive weeks. The futures contract for November delivery decreased by $0.47 per MMBtu on the week to $4.436. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday (October 9) is estimated to have been 3,716 billion cubic feet (Bcf), a record high

336

Shale Natural Gas Reserves Sales  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

563 1,685 22,694 2009-2011 563 1,685 22,694 2009-2011 Alaska 0 0 0 2009-2011 Lower 48 States 563 1,685 22,694 2009-2011 Alabama 0 0 2009-2010 Arkansas 3 336 6,087 2009-2011 California 0 2011-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 0 2011-2011 Colorado 0 0 0 2009-2011 Kentucky 0 0 45 2009-2011 Louisiana 3 11 3,782 2009-2011 North 3 11 3,782 2009-2011 Michigan 0 553 682 2009-2011 Montana 2 1 42 2009-2011 New Mexico 0 0 0 2009-2011 East 0 0 0 2009-2011 West 0 0 0 2009-2011 North Dakota 1 28 115 2009-2011 Ohio 0 0 2009-2010 Oklahoma 0 0 1,591 2009-2011 Pennsylvania 0 163 209 2009-2011 Texas 554 580 9,926 2009-2011 RRC District 1 0 409 1,132 2009-2011 RRC District 2 Onshore 0 61 2010-2011 RRC District 3 Onshore 0 0 0 2009-2011 RRC District 4 Onshore 0 0 75 2009-2011

337

Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Sampling Soil Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Soil Gas Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Identify concealed faults that act as conduits for hydrothermal fluids. Hydrological: Identify hydrothermal gases of magmatic origin. Thermal: Differentiate between amagmatic or magmatic sources heat. Dictionary.png Soil Gas Sampling: Soil gas sampling is sometimes used in exploration for blind geothermal resources to detect anomalously high concentrations of hydrothermal gases

338

Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces May 16, 2013 - 4:36pm Addthis A residential natural gas meter. A residential natural gas meter. What does this mean for me? Your gas boiler or furnace may be oversized, particularly if you've upgraded the energy efficiency of your home. Your gas boiler or furnace can be retrofitted to improve its energy efficiency. Gas boilers and furnaces can be fueled by either natural gas or propane with simple modifications accounting for the different characteristics of the fuels. Propane is usually more expensive as a fuel, but is available throughout the United States. Natural gas supplies depend on having a natural gas distribution system in your area, and areas at the end of the pipeline (such as the Northeast) tend to pay higher prices for natural gas.

339

Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces May 16, 2013 - 4:36pm Addthis A residential natural gas meter. A residential natural gas meter. What does this mean for me? Your gas boiler or furnace may be oversized, particularly if you've upgraded the energy efficiency of your home. Your gas boiler or furnace can be retrofitted to improve its energy efficiency. Gas boilers and furnaces can be fueled by either natural gas or propane with simple modifications accounting for the different characteristics of the fuels. Propane is usually more expensive as a fuel, but is available throughout the United States. Natural gas supplies depend on having a natural gas distribution system in your area, and areas at the end of the pipeline (such as the Northeast) tend to pay higher prices for natural gas.

340

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Development of a thermoacoustic natural gas liquefier.  

SciTech Connect

Praxair, in conjunction with the Los Alamos National Laboratory, is developing a new technology, thermoacoustic heat engines and refrigerators, for liquefaction of natural gas. This is the only technology capable of producing refrigeration power at cryogenic temperatures with no moving parts. A prototype, with a projected natural gas liquefaction capacity of 500 gallons/day, has been built and tested. The power source is a natural gas burner. Systems will be developed with liquefaction capacities up to 10,000 to 20,000 gallons per day. The technology, the development project, accomplishments and applications are discussed. In February 2001 Praxair, Inc. purchased the acoustic heat engine and refrigeration development program from Chart Industries. Chart (formerly Cryenco, which Chart purchased in 1997) and Los Alamos had been working on the technology development program since 1994. The purchase included assets and intellectual property rights for thermoacoustically driven orifice pulse tube refrigerators (TADOPTR), a new and revolutionary Thermoacoustic Stirling Heat Engine (TASHE) technology, aspects of Orifice Pulse Tube Refrigeration (OPTR) and linear motor compressors as OPTR drivers. Praxair, in cooperation with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the licensor of the TADOPTR and TASHE patents, is continuing the development of TASHE-OPTR natural gas powered, natural gas liquefiers. The liquefaction of natural gas, which occurs at -161 C (-259 F) at atmospheric pressure, has previously required rather sophisticated refrigeration machinery. The 1990 TADOPTR invention by Drs. Greg Swift (LANL) and Ray Radebaugh (NIST) demonstrated the first technology to produce cryogenic refrigeration with no moving parts. Thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators use acoustic phenomena to produce refrigeration from heat. The basic driver and refrigerator consist of nothing more than helium-filled heat exchangers and pipes, made of common materials, without exacting tolerances. The liquefier development program is divided into two components: Thermoacoustically driven refrigerators and linear motor driven refrigerators (LOPTRs). LOPTR technology will, for the foreseeable future, be limited to natural gas liquefaction capacities on the order of hundreds of gallons per day. TASHE-OPTR technology is expected to achieve liquefaction capacities of tens of thousands of gallons per day. This paper will focus on the TASHE-OPTR technology because its natural gas liquefaction capacity has greater market opportunity. LOPTR development will be mentioned briefly. The thermoacoustically driven refrigerator development program is now in the process of demonstrating the technology at a capacity of about 500 gallon/day (gpd) i.e., approximately 42,000 standard cubic feet/day, which requires about 7 kW of refrigeration power. This capacity is big enough to illuminate the issues of large-scale acoustic liquefaction at reasonable cost and to demonstrate the liquefaction of about 70% of an input gas stream, while burning about 30%. Subsequent to this demonstration a system with a capacity of approximately 10{sup 6} standard cubic feet/day (scfd) = 10,000 gpd with a projected liquefaction rate of about 85% of the input gas stream will be developed. When commercialized, the TASHE-OPTRs will be a totally new type of heat-driven cryogenic refrigerator, with projected low manufacturing cost, high reliability, long life, and low maintenance. A TASHE-OPTR will be able to liquefy a broad range of gases, one of the most important being natural gas (NG). Potential NG applications range from distributed liquefaction of pipeline gas as fuel for heavy-duty fleet and long haul vehicles to large-scale liquefaction at on-shore and offshore gas wellheads. An alternative to the thermoacoustic driver, but with many similar technical and market advantages, is the linear motor compressor. Linear motors convert electrical power directly into oscillating linear, or axial, motion. Attachment of a piston to the oscillator results in a direct drive compressor. Such a compressor

Wollan, J. J. (John J.); Swift, G. W. (Gregory W.); Backhaus, S. N. (Scott N.); Gardner, D. L. (David L.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Natural Gas Dry Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

19,266,026 20,158,602 20,623,854 21,315,507 22,901,879 24,057,609 19,266,026 20,158,602 20,623,854 21,315,507 22,901,879 24,057,609 1930-2012 Alaska 407,153 374,105 374,152 353,391 334,671 329,789 1982-2012 Alaska Onshore 294,212 2012-2012 Alaska State Offshore 35,577 2012-2012 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico 2,798,718 2,314,342 2,428,916 2,245,062 1,812,328 1,423,239 1999-2012 Louisiana 1,254,588 1,283,184 1,453,248 2,107,651 2,933,576 2,918,125 1982-2012 Louisiana Onshore 2,849,980 2012-2012 Louisiana State Offshore 68,145 2012-2012 New Mexico 1,421,672 1,353,625 1,288,164 1,200,222 1,147,012 1,131,211 1982-2012 Oklahoma 1,687,039 1,782,021 1,788,665 1,706,697 1,754,838 1,883,204 1982-2012 Texas 5,735,831 6,559,190 6,394,931 6,281,672 6,631,555 6,895,462 1982-2012 Texas Onshore 6,878,956 2012-2012

343

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

344

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

345

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

346

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

347

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

348

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

349

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

350

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

351

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

352

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

353

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

354

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

355

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

356

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

357

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

358

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the suspending water, of concentration...MPa and balances the atmospheric pressure. Note that...versely, liquid water could not form by condensation inside the gas vesicle...presumably surrounded by water on all sides. At...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

360

Natural Gas Annual Respondent Query System  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

loading new table loading new table Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Annual Respondent Query System Natural Gas Annual Respondent Query System (EIA-176 Data through 2012) Report: 176 Natural Gas Deliveries 176 Natural Gas Supply Items 176 Natural Gas Other Disposition Items 176 Type of Operations and Sector Items 176 Continuation Text Lines 176 Company List 191 Field Level Storage Data 757 Processing Capacity 176 Custom Report (User-defined) Years: 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 to 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Sort by: Area, Company, Item Company, Area, Item Item, Area, Company Company: Show only Company ID Show only Company Name Show both Company ID, Name 2012 Total

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Economics of natural gas upgrading  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas could be an important alternative energy source in meeting some of the market demand presently met by liquid products from crude oil. This study was initiated to analyze three energy markets to determine if greater use could be made of natural gas or natural gas derived products and if those products could be provided on an economically competitive basis. The three markets targeted for possible increases in gas use were motor fuels, power generation, and the chemical feedstocks market. The economics of processes to convert natural gas to transportation fuels, chemical products, and power were analyzed. The economic analysis was accomplished by drawing on a variety of detailed economic studies, updating them and bringing the results to a common basis. The processes analyzed included production of methanol, MTBE, higher alcohols, gasoline, CNG, and LNG for the transportation market. Production and use of methanol and ammonia in the chemical feedstock market and use of natural gas for power generation were also assessed. Use of both high and low quality gas as a process feed stream was evaluated. The analysis also explored the impact of various gas price growth rates and process facility locations, including remote gas areas. In assessing the transportation fuels market the analysis examined production and use of both conventional and new alternative motor fuels.

Hackworth, J.H.; Koch, R.W.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Southeast Idaho Area Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Area Attractions and Events Area Geography Area History Area Links Driving Directions Idaho Falls Attractions and Events INL History INL Today Research Park Sagebrush Steppe...

363

Issues and Trends: Natural Gas - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Issues and Trends: Natural Gas Issues and Trends: Natural Gas Updated: November 25, 2013 For prior report data see Natural Gas Year-in-Review archives EIA's Natural Gas Issues and Trends highlights timely information and analyses on natural gas markets. Natural gas prices reflect decreasing seasonality. Today in Energy, November 20, 2013 Increased Northeast natural gas production reduces net inflow of supply from other areas. Today in Energy, November 19, 2013 Gas pipeline expansions reduce Marcellus backup, New York gas prices. Natural Gas Weekly Update, November 13, 2013 EIA projects lower natural gas use this winter. Natural Gas Weekly Update, October 31, 2013 Northeast net imports from Canada plummet, driven by export growth at Niagara Falls. Natural Gas Weekly Update, October 10, 2013

364

Compressed natural gas measurement issues  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Vehicle Coalition`s Measurement and Metering Task Group (MMTG) was established on July 1st, 1992 to develop suggested revisions to National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST) Handbook 44-1992 (Specifications, Tolerances, and Other Technical Requirements for Weighing and Measuring Devices) and NIST Handbook 130-1991 (Uniform Laws & Regulations). Specifically, the suggested revisions will address the sale and measurement of compressed natural gas when sold as a motor vehicle fuel. This paper briefly discusses the activities of the MMTG and its interaction with NIST. The paper also discusses the Institute of Gas Technology`s (IGT) support of the MMTG in the area of natural gas composition, their impact on metering technology applicable to high pressure fueling stations as well as conversion factors for the establishment of ``gallon gasoline equivalent`` of natural gas. The final portion of this paper discusses IGT`s meter research activities and its meter test facility.

Blazek, C.F.; Kinast, J.A.; Freeman, P.M.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

High Temperature Optical Gas Sensing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Gas Sensing Optical Gas Sensing Opportunity Research is active on optical sensors integrated with advanced sensing materials for high temperature embedded gas sensing applications. Patent applications have been filed for two inventions in this area and several other methods are currently under development. These technologies are available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Organizations or individuals with capabilities in optical sensor packaging for harsh environment and high temperature applications are encouraged to contact NETL to explore potential collaborative opportunities. Overview Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov

366

Final Flue Gas Cleaning (FFGC)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Final Flue Gas Cleaning (FFGC) Pilot Plant. The pilot plant (FFGC-PP) will be used to test and evaluate removal of air pollution constituents from the flue gas of a 160 MW, Houston-area power plant operating on 100% petcoke. The two-week long test.... TABLE III FLUE GAS COMPOSITION PETCOKE FIRED POWER PLANT H 2 O 3.2 % O 2 4.9 % CO 2 17.7 % HCl 10 ppm SO 2 6800 ppm SO 3 300 ppm H2SO4 mist 690 ppm NOx 260 ppm...

Stinger, D. H.; Romero, M. H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

WORKSHOP THEMES The workshop will focus on the following areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, it is also a significant source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Global CO2 emissions from transportationWORKSHOP THEMES The workshop will focus on the following areas: a) Greenhouse Gas Emissions from related Greenhouse Gas Emissions c) Technological Solutions to Greenhouse Emissions from

368

Ground Gas Handbook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pathways of least resistance to gas transport, and applications are discussed, such as migrating landfill gas emissions, also from leaking landfill gas collection systems, as well as natural gas and oil-field gas leakage from abandoned production...

Allen W Hatheway

369

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

370

Natural gas pipeline technology overview.  

SciTech Connect

The United States relies on natural gas for one-quarter of its energy needs. In 2001 alone, the nation consumed 21.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. A large portion of natural gas pipeline capacity within the United States is directed from major production areas in Texas and Louisiana, Wyoming, and other states to markets in the western, eastern, and midwestern regions of the country. In the past 10 years, increasing levels of gas from Canada have also been brought into these markets (EIA 2007). The United States has several major natural gas production basins and an extensive natural gas pipeline network, with almost 95% of U.S. natural gas imports coming from Canada. At present, the gas pipeline infrastructure is more developed between Canada and the United States than between Mexico and the United States. Gas flows from Canada to the United States through several major pipelines feeding U.S. markets in the Midwest, Northeast, Pacific Northwest, and California. Some key examples are the Alliance Pipeline, the Northern Border Pipeline, the Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline, the TransCanada Pipeline System, and Westcoast Energy pipelines. Major connections join Texas and northeastern Mexico, with additional connections to Arizona and between California and Baja California, Mexico (INGAA 2007). Of the natural gas consumed in the United States, 85% is produced domestically. Figure 1.1-1 shows the complex North American natural gas network. The pipeline transmission system--the 'interstate highway' for natural gas--consists of 180,000 miles of high-strength steel pipe varying in diameter, normally between 30 and 36 inches in diameter. The primary function of the transmission pipeline company is to move huge amounts of natural gas thousands of miles from producing regions to local natural gas utility delivery points. These delivery points, called 'city gate stations', are usually owned by distribution companies, although some are owned by transmission companies. Compressor stations at required distances boost the pressure that is lost through friction as the gas moves through the steel pipes (EPA 2000). The natural gas system is generally described in terms of production, processing and purification, transmission and storage, and distribution (NaturalGas.org 2004b). Figure 1.1-2 shows a schematic of the system through transmission. This report focuses on the transmission pipeline, compressor stations, and city gates.

Folga, S. M.; Decision and Information Sciences

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Natural Gas Marketed Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 20,196,346 21,112,053 21,647,936 22,381,873 24,036,352 25,307,949 1900-2012 Alaska 433,485 398,442 397,077 374,226 356,225 351,259 1967-2012 Alaska Onshore 368,344 337,359 349,457 316,546 294,728 315,682 1992-2012 Alaska State Offshore 65,141 61,084 47,620 57,680 61,496 35,577 1992-2012 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico 2,798,718 2,314,342 2,428,916 2,245,062 1,812,328 1,507,564 1997-2012 Federal Offshore Alabama 1992-1998 Federal Offshore Louisiana 1992-1998 Federal Offshore Texas 1992-1998 Louisiana 1,365,333 1,377,969 1,548,607 2,210,099 3,029,206 2,955,437 1967-2012 Louisiana Onshore 1,293,590 1,292,366 1,472,722 2,140,525 2,958,249 2,882,193 1992-2012 Louisiana State Offshore

372

EPA's Liquefied Natural Gas Regulatory Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Regulatory Roadmap July 2006 EPA230-B-06-001 About this Roadmap Natural gas continues to play an important role in meeting our nation's growing energy needs. In 2005, natural gas accounted for 23% of our nation's total energy consumption. 1 The Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects that domestic consumption of natural gas will continue to increase and that imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) will meet much of the increased demand. 2 LNG, created when natural gas is converted into a liquid state by cooling it to a temperature close to negative 260°F, presents an efficient way to transport natural gas via ship from foreign production areas to the United States. The cooling process reduces the

373

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Western Region  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Region Western Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Western Region Overview | Transportation South | Transportation North | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links Overview Ten interstate and nine intrastate natural gas pipeline companies provide transportation services to and within the Western Region (Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington), the fewest number serving any region (see Table below). Slightly more than half the capacity entering the region is on natural gas pipeline systems that carry natural gas from the Rocky Mountain area and the Permian and San Juan basins. These latter systems enter the region at the New Mexico-Arizona and Nevada-Utah State lines. The rest of the capacity arrives on natural gas pipelines that access Canadian natural gas at the Idaho and Washington State border crossings with British Columbia, Canada.

374

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

375

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

376

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

377

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

378

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

379

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

380

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

382

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

383

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

384

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

385

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

386

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

387

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

388

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

389

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the gas vesicles simply reduce their sinking rates and...remaining suspended in the water column. A microorganism...phenomena as stratification, water- bloom formation, and...the many proteins that make up the phycobilisome (73...flagellate bacteria in natural waters. The natural selection...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...these costs can be compared is in units of energy expenditure per time (joules per second...requires 7.24 x 10-18 kg of Gvp. The energy cost of making this protein, Eg, is...Eg = 2.84 x 101- o J. The rate of energy expenditure in gas vesicle synthesis then...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Gas sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

392

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2008 6, 2008 Next Release: July 3, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot price movements were mixed this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, June 18-25), with price decreases generally occurring in producing areas in the Gulf of Mexico region and price increases at trading locations in the Rockies, the Midcontinent, and the Northeast. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.17 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $12.76. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), a trend of rising prices for futures contracts was at least temporarily interrupted. After trading at $13.20 per MMBtu on Monday, the futures contract for July delivery decreased by 45 cents in value over the next 2 days and ended the

393

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 5, 2009 Next Release: February 12, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 4, 2009) Natural gas spot prices decreased in half of the trading regions in the Lower 48 States this report week. Generally, areas east of the Rockies and particularly those that experienced frigid temperatures posted weekly price increases. However, there were some exceptions, including the Midcontinent and East Texas. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures trading for the near-month contract was fairly volatile, with daily price changes ranging between a 16-cent loss and a 16-cent increase. The March 2009 contract ended trading yesterday 18 cents higher than on the previous Wednesday.

394

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 16, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 8, 2010) Price changes during the week were mixed, but in most areas, these changes were moderate. The Henry Hub price rose slightly from $3.73 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, September 1, to $3.81 per MMBtu yesterday. The report week was shortened due to the Labor Day holiday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the October 2010 futures contract rose about 5 cents, from $3.762 per MMBtu on September 1 to $3.814 per MMBtu on September 8. Working natural gas in storage as of Friday, September 3, was 3,164 Bcf, following an implied net injection of 58 Bcf, according to EIA’s

395

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2008 1, 2008 Next Release: September 18, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, September 3, to Wednesday, September 10) Natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, September 3-10), as the fifth hurricane of the season moving through the Gulf of Mexico has prompted mandatory evacuation orders in some areas as well as evacuation of personnel from offshore platforms. Mandatory evacuation orders in Louisiana have led to the shutdown of at least two processing plants, with a total of 700 million cubic feet (MMcf) per day of processing capacity. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.39 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $7.65.

396

Liquid Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Natural Gas ... IN A new technique for storing natural gas at the East Ohio Gas Co. plant, Cleveland, Ohio, the gas is liquefied before passing to the gas holders. ... Natural gas contains moisture and carbon dioxide, both of which liquefy before the natural gas and are somewhat of a nuisance because upon solidification they clog the pipes. ...

W. F. SCHAPHORST

1941-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

397

Resources on Greenhouse Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Areas » Greenhouse Gases » Resources on Greenhouse Gas Program Areas » Greenhouse Gases » Resources on Greenhouse Gas Resources on Greenhouse Gas October 7, 2013 - 2:30pm Addthis Many helpful resources about greenhouse gases (GHG) are available. Also see Contacts. GHG Reporting and Accounting Tools Annual GHG and Sustainability Data Report: Lists resources for reporting annual greenhouse gas activities. FedCenter Greenhouse Gas Inventory Reporting Website: Features additional information, training, and tools to assist agencies with completing comprehensive GHG inventory reporting requirements under Executive Order (E.O.) 13514. General Services Administration (GSA) Carbon Footprint and Green Procurement Tool: Voluntary tool developed by GSA to assist agencies in managing GHGs as required by E.O. 13514. Also see Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning Data and Tools.

398

The oil and gas potential of the South Caspian Sea  

SciTech Connect

For 150 years, the oil fountains of Baku have fueled the imaginations of oilmen around the world. The phrase {open_quotes}another Baku{close_quotes} often has been used to describe major new discoveries. The production of oil and gas from onshore Azerbaijan and from the shallower waters of the Caspian Sea offers tantalizing evidence for the hydrocarbon yet to be discovered. Today, the Azeri, Guneshli, and Chirag oil fields, with over four billion barrels of recoverable reserves, have refocused the attention of the petroleum industry on Baku. The rapid subsidence of the South Caspian Basin and accumulation of over 20 kilometers of Late Mesozoic and Cenozoic sediments have resulted in that rare combination of conditions ideal for the generation and entrapment of numerous giant oil and gas accumulations. Working with existing geological, geophysical, and geochemical data, SOCAR geologists, geophysicists, and geochemists have identified numerous structural and stratigraphic prospects which have yet to be tested by drilling. In the South Caspian Basin, undrilled prospects remain in relatively shallow water, 200-300 meters. As these shallow-water prospects are exhausted, exploration will shift farther offshore into deeper water, 300-1000 meters. The deepwater region of the South Caspian is unquestionably prospective. Exploration and development of oil and gas fields in water depths in excess of 300 meters will require the joint efforts of international companies and the Azerbaijan petroleum enterprises. In the near future, water depth and drilling depth will not be limiting factors in the exploration of the Caspian Sea. Much work remains to be done; and much oil and gas remain to be found.

Jusufzade, K.B.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Cost analysis of oil, gas, and geothermal well drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper evaluates current and historical drilling and completion costs of oil and gas wells and compares them with geothermal wells costs. As a starting point, we developed a new cost index for US onshore oil and gas wells based primarily on the API Joint Association Survey 19762009 data. This index describes year-to-year variations in drilling costs and allows one to express historical drilling expenditures in current year dollars. To distinguish from other cost indices we have labeled it the Cornell Energy Institute (CEI) Index. This index has nine sub-indices for different well depth intervals and has been corrected for yearly changes in drilling activity. The CEI index shows 70% higher increase in well cost between 2003 and 2008 compared to the commonly used Producer Price Index (PPI) for drilling oil and gas wells. Cost trends for various depths were found to be significantly different and explained in terms of variations of oil and gas prices, costs, and availability of major well components and services at particular locations. Multiple methods were evaluated to infer the cost-depth correlation for geothermal wells in current year dollars. In addition to analyzing reported costs of the most recently completed geothermal wells, we investigated the results of the predictive geothermal well cost model WellCost Lite. Moreover, a cost database of 146 historical geothermal wells has been assembled. The CEI index was initially used to normalize costs of these wells to current year dollars. A comparison of normalized costs of historical wells with recently drilled ones and WellCost Lite predictions shows that cost escalation rates of geothermal wells were considerably lower compared to hydrocarbon wells and that a cost index based on hydrocarbon wells is not applicable to geothermal well drilling. Besides evaluating the average well costs, this work examined economic improvements resulting from increased drilling experience. Learning curve effects related to drilling multiple similar wells within the same field were correlated.

Maciej Z. Lukawski; Brian J. Anderson; Chad Augustine; Louis E. Capuano Jr.; Koenraad F. Beckers; Bill Livesay; Jefferson W. Tester

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Change Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas, Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Publications, Technical report Website: www.pewclimate.org...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Focus Area Renewable Energy, Agriculture, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Land Use Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Policiesdeployment programs...

402

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

403

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to...

404

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas production output. Rigs Natural Gas Transportation Update Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company yesterday (August 4) said it is mobilizing equipment and manpower for...

405

2013 Unconventional Oil and Gas Project Selections  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Fossil Energys National Energy Technology Laboratoryhas an unconventional oil and gas program devoted to research in this important area of energy development. The laboratory...

406

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 9, 2007) 2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 9, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 25-August 1) as tropical storm activity increased and weather-related demand returned along with normal summertime heat in large market areas in the East. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price increased 62 cents per MMBtu, or 11.1 percent, to $6.19. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery expired last Friday (July 27) at $6.11 per MMBtu. Although the price of the expiring contract in the last couple days of trading rose slightly, the expiration price was still the second lowest of the year (the January 2007 contract expired at $5.838). Taking over as the near-month contract, the September 2007 contract increased in price by $0.29 per MMBtu on the week to $6.352. EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report today reported natural gas storage supplies of 2,840 Bcf as of Friday, July 27. This level of working gas in underground storage exceeds the maximum level of the previous 5 years. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $0.75 per barrel on the week to $76.49 per barrel. On a Btu basis, the crude oil price is now more than double the price of natural gas at $13.19 per MMBtu.

407

Site Monitoring Area Maps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring Area sampler Control measures (best management practices) installed at the Site Monitoring Area Structures such as...

408

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

409

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Researchers from the University of Missouri and ICx Nomadics have reported on the use of a optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR) sensor for on-column detection ?. ... Although substantial differences were noted between fresh and aged (or oxidized) oils, many of the compounds in the oxidized oil went unidentified due to lack of library mass spectral data. ... A high resolution MEMS based gas chromatography column for the analysis of benzene and toluene gaseous mixtures ...

Frank L. Dorman; Joshua J. Whiting; Jack W. Cochran; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

410

Flammable Gas Detection for the D-Zero Gas System  

SciTech Connect

The use of flammable gas and high voltage in detector systems is common in many experiments at Fermilab. To mitigate the hazards associated with these systems, Fermilab Engineering Standard SD-45B (Ref. 1) was adopted. Since this note is meant to be a guide and not a mandatory standard, each experiment is reviewed for compliance with SD-45B by the flammable gas safety subcommittee. Currently, there are only two types of flammable gas in use, ethane (Appendix A) and methane (Appendix B). The worst flammable-gas case is C2H6 (ethane), which has an estimated flow rate that is 73% of the CH4 (methane) flow but a heat of combustion (in kcal/g-mole) that is 173% of that of methane. In the worst case, if ethane were to spew through its restricting orifice into its gas line at 0 psig and then through a catastrophic leak into Room 215 (TRD) or Room 511 (CDC/FDCNTX), the time that would be required to build up a greater than Class 1 inventory (0.4kg H2 equivalent) would be 5.2 hours (Ref. 2). Therefore a worst-case flammable gas leak would have to go undetected for over 5 hours in order to transform a either mixing room to an environment with a Risk Class greater than Class 1. The mixing systems, gas lines, and detectors themselves will be thoroughly leak checked prior to active service. All vessels that are part of the mixing systems will be protected from overpressure by safety valves vented outside the building. Both the input and output of all detector volumes are protected from overpressure in the same way. The volume immediately outside the central tracking detectors is continuously purged by nitrogen from boiloff from the main nitrogen dewar at the site. However, if flammable gas were to build up in the mixing rooms or particular detector areas, no matter how unlikely, flammable gas detectors that are part of the interlock chain of each gas mixing system will shut down the appropriate system. This includes shutting off the output of flammable gas manifolds within the gas shed. Similarly, if a fire were to break out anywhere in the D-ZERO Hall, fire sensors would stop the output of all flammable gas manifolds within the gas shed, by unpowering electrically controlled solenoid valves that are normally closed in the event of a power failure. Fire sensor contacts have not yet been installed.

Spires, L.D.; Foglesong, J.; /Fermilab

1991-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

411

Backscatter absorption gas imaging system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A video imaging system for detecting hazardous gas leaks. Visual displays of invisible gas clouds are produced by radiation augmentation of the field of view of an imaging device by radiation corresponding to an absorption line of the gas to be detected. The field of view of an imager is irradiated by a laser. The imager receives both backscattered laser light and background radiation. When a detectable gas is present, the backscattered laser light is highly attenuated, producing a region of contrast or shadow on the image. A flying spot imaging system is utilized to synchronously irradiate and scan the area to lower laser power requirements. The imager signal is processed to produce a video display.

McRae, Jr., Thomas G. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,850 14,740 7,603 4,109 10,153 43,186 2000-2011 2,850 14,740 7,603 4,109 10,153 43,186 2000-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 2,718 897 700 158 880 318 2000-2011 Pacific (California) 0 1 0 0 0 0 2000-2011 Louisiana & Alabama 1,532 803 616 124 741 295 2000-2011 Texas 1,186 93 84 34 139 23 2000-2011 Alaska 0 10 0 5 131 36 2000-2011 Lower 48 States 22,850 14,730 7,603 4,104 10,022 43,150 2000-2011 Alabama 188 302 10 2 263 573 2000-2011 Arkansas 4 298 19 54 393 6,760 2000-2011 California 274 164 8 4 3 47 2000-2011 Coastal Region Onshore 70 4 6 0 1 0 2000-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 35 0 1 0 0 0 2000-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 169 158 1 4 2 45 2000-2011 State Offshore 0 2 0 0 0 2 2000-2011 Colorado 1,539 750 747 374 242 1,244 2000-2011

413

Natural Gas Liquids Reserves Sales  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

03 442 440 931 670 282 2000-2008 03 442 440 931 670 282 2000-2008 Federal Offshore U.S. 84 59 35 104 41 27 2000-2008 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000-2008 Louisiana & Alabama 77 57 34 84 40 27 2000-2008 Texas 7 2 1 20 1 0 2000-2008 Alaska 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000-2008 Lower 48 States 403 442 440 931 670 282 2000-2008 Alabama 4 5 14 17 4 0 2000-2008 Arkansas 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000-2008 California 2 5 8 17 7 0 2000-2008 Coastal Region Onshore 0 0 0 7 0 0 2000-2008 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 1 0 0 2 0 0 2000-2008 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 1 5 8 8 7 0 2000-2008 State Offshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000-2008 Colorado 10 71 33 70 22 21 2000-2008 Florida 0 0 0 0 1 0 2000-2008 Kansas 12 8 2 1 3 1 2000-2008 Kentucky 0 0 0 21 0 0 2000-2008

414

Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

743 1,147 207 5,098 509 1,731 1977-2011 743 1,147 207 5,098 509 1,731 1977-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. -39 -62 14 22 -123 -28 1990-2011 Pacific (California) 2 -7 -1 0 0 -1 1977-2011 Louisiana & Alabama -37 -16 10 2 -106 -28 1981-2011 Texas -4 -39 5 20 -17 1 1981-2011 Alaska -46 1 -3 3 1 -1 1977-2011 Lower 48 States 789 1,146 210 5,095 508 1,732 1977-2011 Alabama -11 12 -71 46 32 -49 1977-2011 Arkansas -26 -27 -64 5 -34 728 1977-2011 California -74 33 -6 11 10 923 1977-2011 Coastal Region Onshore -62 3 0 2 1 13 1977-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 0 0 2 5 5 7 1977-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore -12 31 -8 2 4 902 1977-2011 State Offshore 0 -1 0 2 0 1 1977-2011 Colorado 52 136 -250 306 449 801 1977-2011 Florida 2 4 79 6 64 -54 1977-2011

415

Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

743 1,147 207 5,098 509 1,731 1977-2011 743 1,147 207 5,098 509 1,731 1977-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. -39 -62 14 22 -123 -28 1990-2011 Pacific (California) 2 -7 -1 0 0 -1 1977-2011 Louisiana & Alabama -37 -16 10 2 -106 -28 1981-2011 Texas -4 -39 5 20 -17 1 1981-2011 Alaska -46 1 -3 3 1 -1 1977-2011 Lower 48 States 789 1,146 210 5,095 508 1,732 1977-2011 Alabama -11 12 -71 46 32 -49 1977-2011 Arkansas -26 -27 -64 5 -34 728 1977-2011 California -74 33 -6 11 10 923 1977-2011 Coastal Region Onshore -62 3 0 2 1 13 1977-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 0 0 2 5 5 7 1977-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore -12 31 -8 2 4 902 1977-2011 State Offshore 0 -1 0 2 0 1 1977-2011 Colorado 52 136 -250 306 449 801 1977-2011 Florida 2 4 79 6 64 -54 1977-2011

416

Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production Production (Million Barrels) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 View History U.S. 629 650 667 714 745 784 1979-2011 Alabama 3 2 7 5 6 6 1979-2011 Alaska 14 13 13 13 11 11 1979-2011 Arkansas 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 California 11 11 11 11 10 10 1979-2011 Coastal Region Onshore 1 1 1 1 1 1 1979-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 10 10 10 10 9 9 1979-2011 State Offshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Colorado 26 27 38 48 58 63 1979-2011 Florida 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Kansas 18 18 18 16 16 16 1979-2011 Kentucky 3 3 3 4 5 4 1979-2011 Louisiana

417

Natural Gas Liquids Estimated Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

802 827 788 811 831 840 1979-2008 802 827 788 811 831 840 1979-2008 Federal Offshore U.S. 148 155 123 125 127 94 1981-2008 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Louisiana & Alabama 120 127 98 102 108 80 1981-2008 Texas 28 28 25 23 19 14 1981-2008 Alaska 18 18 17 14 13 13 1979-2008 Lower 48 States 784 809 771 797 818 827 1979-2008 Alabama 5 4 5 5 4 9 1979-2008 Arkansas 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 California 10 10 11 11 11 11 1979-2008 Coastal Region Onshore 1 1 1 1 1 1 1979-2008 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 9 9 10 10 10 10 1979-2008 State Offshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Colorado 29 32 31 32 33 45 1979-2008 Florida 1 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Kansas 23 22 20 19 19 19 1979-2008

418

Dry Natural Gas Reserves Extensions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

21,778 27,107 26,687 42,139 44,783 45,909 1977-2011 21,778 27,107 26,687 42,139 44,783 45,909 1977-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 733 657 903 289 326 94 1990-2011 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1977-2011 Louisiana & Alabama 530 525 610 270 186 81 1981-2011 Texas 203 132 293 19 140 13 1981-2011 Alaska 49 28 18 2 14 4 1977-2011 Lower 48 States 21,729 27,079 26,669 42,137 44,769 45,905 1977-2011 Alabama 146 123 59 20 28 3 1977-2011 Arkansas 491 1,148 1,754 4,627 3,082 2,093 1977-2011 California 176 16 101 450 12 73 1977-2011 Coastal Region Onshore 5 0 0 0 0 1 1977-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 4 0 0 0 0 0 1977-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 166 13 96 446 8 69 1977-2011 State Offshore 1 3 5 4 4 3 1977-2011 Colorado 1,980 2,812 2,294 3,346 2,838 2,015 1977-2011

419

Dry Natural Gas Reserves Acquisitions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5,846 15,148 8,498 3,968 12,748 46,241 2000-2011 5,846 15,148 8,498 3,968 12,748 46,241 2000-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 2,575 1,185 615 181 1,003 455 2000-2011 Pacific (California) 0 3 0 0 0 0 2000-2011 Louisiana & Alabama 1,341 991 532 159 785 385 2000-2011 Texas 1,234 191 83 22 218 70 2000-2011 Alaska 0 6 0 0 0 221 2000-2011 Lower 48 States 25,846 15,142 8,498 3,968 12,748 46,020 2000-2011 Alabama 253 379 21 0 148 383 2000-2011 Arkansas 5 280 5 36 807 6,880 2000-2011 California 252 231 30 78 0 52 2000-2011 Coastal Region Onshore 58 6 6 0 0 0 2000-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 38 0 1 0 0 2 2000-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 156 225 23 78 0 42 2000-2011 State Offshore 0 0 0 0 0 8 2000-2011 Colorado 1,540 450 1,346 437 229 1,218 2000-2011

420

Natural Gas Liquids Reserves Extensions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

629 734 863 924 1,030 956 1979-2008 629 734 863 924 1,030 956 1979-2008 Federal Offshore U.S. 33 44 29 31 36 29 1981-2008 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Louisiana & Alabama 30 43 27 26 25 24 1981-2008 Texas 3 1 2 5 11 5 1981-2008 Alaska 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Lower 48 States 629 734 863 924 1,030 956 1979-2008 Alabama 5 2 1 3 2 2 1979-2008 Arkansas 0 0 0 0 1 0 1979-2008 California 2 5 5 8 1 4 1979-2008 Coastal Region Onshore 0 1 0 1 0 0 1979-2008 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 0 2 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 2 2 5 7 1 4 1979-2008 State Offshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Colorado 33 29 51 54 67 70 1979-2008 Florida 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Kansas 4 3 5 6 7 4 1979-2008 Kentucky 2 4 3 1 13 7 1979-2008

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Dry Natural Gas Reserves Acquisitions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5,846 15,148 8,498 3,968 12,748 46,241 2000-2011 5,846 15,148 8,498 3,968 12,748 46,241 2000-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 2,575 1,185 615 181 1,003 455 2000-2011 Pacific (California) 0 3 0 0 0 0 2000-2011 Louisiana & Alabama 1,341 991 532 159 785 385 2000-2011 Texas 1,234 191 83 22 218 70 2000-2011 Alaska 0 6 0 0 0 221 2000-2011 Lower 48 States 25,846 15,142 8,498 3,968 12,748 46,020 2000-2011 Alabama 253 379 21 0 148 383 2000-2011 Arkansas 5 280 5 36 807 6,880 2000-2011 California 252 231 30 78 0 52 2000-2011 Coastal Region Onshore 58 6 6 0 0 0 2000-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 38 0 1 0 0 2 2000-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 156 225 23 78 0 42 2000-2011 State Offshore 0 0 0 0 0 8 2000-2011 Colorado 1,540 450 1,346 437 229 1,218 2000-2011

422

Natural Gas Liquids Reserves Extensions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

629 734 863 924 1,030 956 1979-2008 629 734 863 924 1,030 956 1979-2008 Federal Offshore U.S. 33 44 29 31 36 29 1981-2008 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Louisiana & Alabama 30 43 27 26 25 24 1981-2008 Texas 3 1 2 5 11 5 1981-2008 Alaska 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Lower 48 States 629 734 863 924 1,030 956 1979-2008 Alabama 5 2 1 3 2 2 1979-2008 Arkansas 0 0 0 0 1 0 1979-2008 California 2 5 5 8 1 4 1979-2008 Coastal Region Onshore 0 1 0 1 0 0 1979-2008 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 0 2 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 2 2 5 7 1 4 1979-2008 State Offshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Colorado 33 29 51 54 67 70 1979-2008 Florida 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Kansas 4 3 5 6 7 4 1979-2008 Kentucky 2 4 3 1 13 7 1979-2008

423

Natural Gas Liquids Reserves Adjustments  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-338 273 -89 173 -139 76 1979-2008 -338 273 -89 173 -139 76 1979-2008 Federal Offshore U.S. -101 119 26 47 -7 -29 1981-2008 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 1 0 1 1979-2008 Louisiana & Alabama -93 118 29 44 -3 -32 1981-2008 Texas -8 1 -3 2 -4 2 1981-2008 Alaska 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Lower 48 States -338 273 -89 173 -139 76 1979-2008 Alabama -2 -5 0 9 -13 76 1979-2008 Arkansas -1 0 0 2 -2 -1 1979-2008 California 11 9 -6 8 0 5 1979-2008 Coastal Region Onshore 1 1 -3 5 -7 1 1979-2008 Los Angeles Basin Onshore -1 0 0 0 1 2 1979-2008 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 11 8 -3 3 6 2 1979-2008 State Offshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Colorado -38 55 -19 -14 -23 120 1979-2008 Florida 4 -5 -5 -2 -2 -1 1979-2008 Kansas 3 32 -25 8 -9 5 1979-2008

424

Natural Gas Liquids Reserves Acquisitions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

33 554 596 1,048 771 332 2000-2008 33 554 596 1,048 771 332 2000-2008 Federal Offshore U.S. 61 68 41 97 45 26 2000-2008 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000-2008 Louisiana & Alabama 58 66 37 72 44 25 2000-2008 Texas 3 2 4 25 1 1 2000-2008 Alaska 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000-2008 Lower 48 States 433 554 596 1,048 771 332 2000-2008 Alabama 4 0 28 5 16 1 2000-2008 Arkansas 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000-2008 California 2 7 10 18 10 1 2000-2008 Coastal Region Onshore 0 1 0 6 0 0 2000-2008 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 1 0 1 5 0 0 2000-2008 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 1 6 9 7 10 1 2000-2008 State Offshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000-2008 Colorado 13 69 49 62 10 40 2000-2008 Florida 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000-2008 Kansas 12 11 3 1 3 1 2000-2008 Kentucky 0 0 0 26 0 0 2000-2008

425

Natural Gas Liquids Estimated Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

802 827 788 811 831 840 1979-2008 802 827 788 811 831 840 1979-2008 Federal Offshore U.S. 148 155 123 125 127 94 1981-2008 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Louisiana & Alabama 120 127 98 102 108 80 1981-2008 Texas 28 28 25 23 19 14 1981-2008 Alaska 18 18 17 14 13 13 1979-2008 Lower 48 States 784 809 771 797 818 827 1979-2008 Alabama 5 4 5 5 4 9 1979-2008 Arkansas 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 California 10 10 11 11 11 11 1979-2008 Coastal Region Onshore 1 1 1 1 1 1 1979-2008 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 9 9 10 10 10 10 1979-2008 State Offshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Colorado 29 32 31 32 33 45 1979-2008 Florida 1 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Kansas 23 22 20 19 19 19 1979-2008

426

Natural Gas Liquids Reserves Sales  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

03 442 440 931 670 282 2000-2008 03 442 440 931 670 282 2000-2008 Federal Offshore U.S. 84 59 35 104 41 27 2000-2008 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000-2008 Louisiana & Alabama 77 57 34 84 40 27 2000-2008 Texas 7 2 1 20 1 0 2000-2008 Alaska 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000-2008 Lower 48 States 403 442 440 931 670 282 2000-2008 Alabama 4 5 14 17 4 0 2000-2008 Arkansas 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000-2008 California 2 5 8 17 7 0 2000-2008 Coastal Region Onshore 0 0 0 7 0 0 2000-2008 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 1 0 0 2 0 0 2000-2008 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 1 5 8 8 7 0 2000-2008 State Offshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000-2008 Colorado 10 71 33 70 22 21 2000-2008 Florida 0 0 0 0 1 0 2000-2008 Kansas 12 8 2 1 3 1 2000-2008 Kentucky 0 0 0 21 0 0 2000-2008

427

Dry Natural Gas Reserves Extensions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,778 27,107 26,687 42,139 44,783 45,909 1977-2011 21,778 27,107 26,687 42,139 44,783 45,909 1977-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 733 657 903 289 326 94 1990-2011 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1977-2011 Louisiana & Alabama 530 525 610 270 186 81 1981-2011 Texas 203 132 293 19 140 13 1981-2011 Alaska 49 28 18 2 14 4 1977-2011 Lower 48 States 21,729 27,079 26,669 42,137 44,769 45,905 1977-2011 Alabama 146 123 59 20 28 3 1977-2011 Arkansas 491 1,148 1,754 4,627 3,082 2,093 1977-2011 California 176 16 101 450 12 73 1977-2011 Coastal Region Onshore 5 0 0 0 0 1 1977-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 4 0 0 0 0 0 1977-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 166 13 96 446 8 69 1977-2011 State Offshore 1 3 5 4 4 3 1977-2011 Colorado 1,980 2,812 2,294 3,346 2,838 2,015 1977-2011

428

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 19) 2, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 19) Moderate temperatures across the country except in the Southwest contributed to natural gas spot prices easing 25 to 50 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, June 4. On the week (Wednesday, June 4-Wednesday, June 11), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 35 cents per MMBtu to $6.06. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub fell about 16 cents per MMBtu to $6.213. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, June 6, increased to 1,324 Bcf, which is 25.2 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $2.36 per barrel on the week to yesterday's (June 11) closing price of $32.17 per barrel, or $5.55 per MMBtu. Prices: Natural gas spot prices at many market locations in the Lower 48 States have declined for three consecutive trading days from Friday peaks as key market areas in the Midwest and the Eastern seaboard have experienced unseasonably cool weather. Although prices remain elevated, the slackened demand for natural gas for electric generation has contributed to prices generally softening across the board. For the week, the spot price at the Henry Hub dropped about 6 percent to $6.06 per MMBtu, while other pricing points on the Gulf Coast showed slightly greater declines and fell below the $6-mark. The overall easing of prices may reflect also the slightly improving storage picture as injections in 7 of the past 8 weeks have exceeded the 5-year average with a record net addition reported last Thursday. Although the storage refill season started slowly, injections have increased considerably, with at least one major interstate pipeline serving the Northeast, Tennessee Gas Pipeline, announcing restrictions to shippers due to injection nominations exceeding capacity. The spot price at Tennessee Gas Pipeline's Zone 6, which serves major citygates in New York and other Northeastern states, this week fell 47 cents per MMBtu to $6.30. In contrast to the East, prices in the West moved higher early in the week, as maintenance on El Paso Natural Gas in the San Juan Basin restricted deliveries from the region and a heat wave sparked buying at pricing locations in California and New Mexico. The spot price at the Southern California border surged 61 cents per MMBtu on Monday to $5.78, but has since dropped to $5.51, which is a net decline of 51 cents since Wednesday, June 4.

429

Prices for Natural Gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prices for Natural Gas Prices for Natural Gas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Prices for Natural Gas Agency/Company /Organization: Google Sector: Energy Focus Area: Economic Development Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.google.com/publicdata/explore?ds=m49d2j928087j_ Country: United States Web Application Link: www.google.com/publicdata/explore?ds=m49d2j928087j_ Cost: Free Northern America Prices for Natural Gas Screenshot References: Public Data Explorer[1] EIA[2] Logo: Prices for Natural Gas Prices for Natural Gas Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet and Percent in U.S. Total Represented by the Price. Overview A graphing tool that displays prices for natural gas dollars per thousand cubic feet and percent in U.S. Total represented by the price, using data

430

Gas Sampling Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas sampling is carried out to measure the quality of a gas. Gas samples are sometimes acquired by in situ observation within the main gas body by using remote or visual observation for specific properties. A mor...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety.......................................................................................................... 5 6. DANGEROUS GAS USAGE REQUIREMENTS................................................. 7 6.1. RESTRICTED PURCHASE/ACQUISITION RULES: ................................................ 7 7. FLAMMABLE GAS

Sherrill, David

432

Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Agency/Company /Organization: Future Perfect Sector: Climate Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development, Greenhouse Gas Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Training materials Website: www.gpstrategiesltd.com/divisions/future-perfect/ Country: South Korea Eastern Asia Language: English References: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling[1] Logo: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Jointly sponsored by Greenhouse Gas Inventory & Research (GIR) Center of

433

Market Digest: Natural Gas  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration's Natural Gas Market Digest provides information and analyses on all aspects of natural gas markets.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

25, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 1, 2007) 25, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 1, 2007) Natural gas spot prices across the country surged this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, January 17-24) as a blast of Arctic cold covered the Lower 48 States, reaching as far south as Texas. Prices in some gas-consuming markets in the Northeast were the highest in the country at more than $10 per MMBtu by the end of the week. But price effects from the increased heating demand registered in production areas as well. On the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub increased by $0.89 per MMBtu to an average of $7.46 yesterday (Wednesday, January 24). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for February delivery ended trading on Wednesday at $7.421 per MMBtu, which was $1.187 higher than last Wednesday's price. As of January 19, natural gas in storage was 2,757 Bcf, or 20.7 percent above the 5-year average for this week. Crude oil prices climbed $1.94 per barrel since last Wednesday to an average of $54.24, or $9.35 per MMBtu.

435

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

He received his B.S. degree in 1970 from Rhodes College in Memphis, TN, his M.S. degree in 1973 from the University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, and his Ph.D. degree in 1975 from Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... A review (with 145 references) on the role of carrier gases on the separation process (A4) demonstrates that carrier gas interactions are integral to the chromatographic process. ... In another report, activity coefficients for refrigerants were evaluated with a polyol ester oil stationary phase (C22). ...

Gary A. Eiceman; Herbert H. Hill, Jr.; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

436

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monday, January 28, 2002 Monday, January 28, 2002 Natural gas prices generally declined last week as mild temperatures continued in most of the country and working gas storage stocks remain at very high levels. Spot prices at most major markets that serve the eastern two-thirds of the country ended the week down from the previous Friday with weather forecasts for the past weekend calling for daytime temperatures to be in the mid 50s to the low 60s in an area stretching from Chicago to Boston. At the Henry Hub prices moved down 9 cents on Friday to end at $2.04 per MMBtu--$0.25 below the previous Friday. The National Weather Service's (NWS) latest 6- to 10-day forecast is calling for above normal temperatures to continue through this week in most areas east of the Mississippi River. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) At the NYMEX futures market, the February contract continued to trend down as it ended the week trading at $2.037 per MMBtu-off almost $0.20 from previous Friday. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained almost $1.80 per barrel reaching $19.80 on Friday or about $3.40 per MMBtu.

437

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

12, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 19) 12, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 19) Natural gas spot prices have moved up by 10 to 25 cents at most trading locations since Wednesday, September 4. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the average Henry Hub price climbed $0.20 per MMBtu to $3.32 as Tropical Storm Fay temporarily threatened Gulf area production activity and late-season high temperatures triggered cooling demand in key market areas. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub increased a more moderate $0.057 per MMBtu since last Wednesday to settle at $3.250 yesterday. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,855 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by nearly 12.3 percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $1.49 per barrel to $29.77, or $5.13 per MMBtu.

438

Framework and systematic functional criteria for integrated work processes in complex assets: a case study on integrated planning in offshore oil and gas production industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Improving the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of the oil and gas (O&G) production process is considered as a critical timely need. The core work processes in particular are targeted for considerable improvements. In this context, development related to integrated planning (IP) is seen as one of the major bases for developing collaborative work processes connecting offshore production and onshore support system. With feasible benefits, for instance, relating to reduction of non-working time, less work repetition, reduction of reduction in production losses, better resource utilisation, etc., a systematic and a complete IP system is today seen as an attractive solution for integrating complex operations and to work smarter. This paper, based on a case study from North Sea oil and gas production environment, describes the systematic functional criteria required as the basis for developing a fully functional IP system.

Yu Bai; Jayantha P. Liyanage

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Holiday Notice: Holiday Notice: Due to the federal holiday in observance of Martin Luther King Day on Monday, January 21, 2002, the next issue of the Natural Gas Weekly Update will be published on Tuesday, January 22, 2002. Overview: Monday, January 14, 2002 Natural gas prices were generally lower last week as the fundamentals of ample working gas in storage and very little temperature-driven swing demand dominated the market. With little in the way of market-changing developments, trading in both the spot and futures markets tended to occur in relatively small price ranges throughout the week. The warming trend begun late in the previous week continued nearly unabated through last week, with the heavy gas-consuming areas of the Midwest and Northeast recording many of the greatest deviations above daily normal temperatures. Philadelphia, New York City, and Buffalo, NY had at least 3 days of temperatures that were 10 or more degrees above normal; Chicago's temperature reached an unusually warm 26 degrees above normal on Wednesday. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) Spot prices at the Henry Hub moved down moderately from the previous week, ending trading on Friday at $2.31, down 5 cents from the previous Friday. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub declined by $0.071 from the previous Friday, settling on Friday, January 11 at $2.204 per MMBtu. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil also fell, dipping below $20 per barrel for the first time in the New Year, ending trading last Friday at $19.67 per barrel, or $3.39 per MMBtu, down $1.80 per barrel, or $0.31 per MMBtu, from Friday, January 4.

440

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Fluid Inclusion Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman & Moore, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman & Moore, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Mexico Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Our examination of Cerro Prieto gas analyses indicates that the geothermal system structure is changing with time. Gas data routinely measured in most geothermal fields; hence fluid-flow plots as presented here can be accomplished with little cost. Gas analytical data, therefore, are useful

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Review of technologies for oil and gas produced water treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Produced water is the largest waste stream generated in oil and gas industries. It is a mixture of different organic and inorganic compounds. Due to the increasing volume of waste all over the world in the current decade, the outcome and effect of discharging produced water on the environment has lately become a significant issue of environmental concern. Produced water is conventionally treated through different physical, chemical, and biological methods. In offshore platforms because of space constraints, compact physical and chemical systems are used. However, current technologies cannot remove small-suspended oil particles and dissolved elements. Besides, many chemical treatments, whose initial and/or running cost are high and produce hazardous sludge. In onshore facilities, biological pretreatment of oily wastewater can be a cost-effective and environmental friendly method. As high salt concentration and variations of influent characteristics have direct influence on the turbidity of the effluent, it is appropriate to incorporate a physical treatment, e.g., membrane to refine the final effluent. For these reasons, major research efforts in the future could focus on the optimization of current technologies and use of combined physico-chemical and/or biological treatment of produced water in order to comply with reuse and discharge limits.

Ahmadun Fakhrul-Razi; Alireza Pendashteh; Luqman Chuah Abdullah; Dayang Radiah Awang Biak; Sayed Siavash Madaeni; Zurina Zainal Abidin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Neutron microdosimetric response of a gas electron multiplier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......avalanching structure called the gas electron multiplier...MSGC including its high cost per unit area, the inability...metallic strips, a counting gas region and a cathode...below 10 keV microm1. The production of alpha particles, through...heavy recoil ions in the gas produced the high LET......

J. Dubeau; A. J. Waker

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal...

444

South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal...

445

New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal...

446

West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal Offshore U.S. Alaska Alaska Onshore Alaska Offshore Alaska State Offshore Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Alabama Federal...

447

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 15, 2007) 8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 15, 2007) Natural gas spot price movements varied this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, October 31-November 7). Prices in Lower 48 market areas in the West and the Midcontinent decreased significantly on the week. Other regions, however, most notably the high-demand areas of the Northeast and the Midwest, as well as Gulf Coast production areas, recorded price increases. The spot price at the Henry Hub gained 16 cents per MMBtu, or about 2 percent, to $7.42 per MMBtu. In contrast to the spot market, prices of futures contracts at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) for the next 12 months uniformly decreased, with the futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub decreasing about 71 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday (November 7) at $7.624 per MMBtu. Working gas stocks as of Friday, November 2, again hit a record high with 3,545 Bcf in storage, which is 8.9 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.30 per barrel, or 2.4 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $96.46 per barrel or $16.63 per MMBtu. Yesterday's crude oil price was $37.52 per barrel higher than the year-ago level, when crude oil traded at $58.94 per barrel on November 7, 2006.

448

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Gas holdup in a gas-liquid-fiber semi-batch bubble column.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A 4-m high, 15.24-cm diameter semi-batch bubble column connected to one of three perforated plate gas distributors with open area ratios A = 0.57%, 0.99%, (more)

Su, Xuefeng

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

RHIC | New Areas of Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Area of Physics A New Area of Physics RHIC has created a new state of hot, dense matter out of the quarks and gluons that are the basic particles of atomic nuclei, but it is a state quite different and even more remarkable than had been predicted. Instead of behaving like a gas of free quarks and gluons, as was expected, the matter created in RHIC's heavy ion collisions is more like a liquid. Quarks Gluons and quarks Ions Ions about to collide Impact Just after collision Perfect Liquid The "perfect" liquid hot matter Hot Nuclear Matter A review article in the journal Science describes groundbreaking discoveries that have emerged from RHIC, synergies with the heavy-ion program at the Large Hadron Collider, and the compelling questions that will drive this research forward on both sides of the Atlantic.

451

Natural gas annual 1993 supplement: Company profiles  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. This report, the Natural Gas Annual 1993 Supplement: Company Profiles, presents a detailed profile of 45 selected companies in the natural gas industry. The purpose of this report is to show the movement of natural gas through the various States served by the companies profiled. The companies in this report are interstate pipeline companies or local distribution companies (LDC`s). Interstate pipeline companies acquire gas supplies from company owned production, purchases from producers, and receipts for transportation for account of others. Pipeline systems, service area maps, company supply and disposition data are presented.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wednesday, January 02, 2002 Wednesday, January 02, 2002 Spot prices in the Midwest and the East moved up most days during the holiday period as cold weather blanketed much of the area. .(See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) (Temperature map) (Temperature Deviation Map). Prices in Chicago moved close to $3.00 per MMBtu last week, while prices in the New York City area approached $5.00 on the last day of the year. Daytime temperatures early this week in the Northeast remained in the 20s and 30s from Washington, DC to Boston. The National Weather Service is calling for the wintry temperatures to continue through the end of the week in most areas in the eastern two thirds of the country. On the NYMEX, the daily settlement price for the futures contract for February delivery has declined in recent trading as the higher-than-average storage levels continue to be the main contributor to the current strong natural gas supply situation. An estimated 2,992 Bcf remains in storage as of December 21, 2001. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved down in last week's trading and ended the year at $19.96 per barrel or $3.44 per MMBtu on Monday.

453

HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING  

SciTech Connect

This second quarter report of 2002 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. Previous reports described development of a catalyst with the required selectivity and efficiency for producing sulfur dioxide from H{sub 2}S. In the laboratory, the catalyst was shown to be robust and stable in the presence of several intentionally added contaminants, including condensate from the pilot plant site. This report describes testing using the laboratory apparatus but operated at the pilot plant using the actual pilot plant gas, which contains far more contaminants than can be simulated in the laboratory. The results are very encouraging, with stable and efficient operation being obtained for a prolonged period of time.

Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Natural Gas | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Gas Dataset Summary Description This is a non-proprietary subset of DOE's Buildings Performance Database. Buildings from the cities of Dayton, OH and Gainesville, FL areas are provided as an example of the data in full database. Sample data here is formatted as CSV Source Department of Energy's Buildings Performance Database Date Released July 09th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Buildings Performance Database Dayton Electricity Gainesville Natural Gas open data Residential Data application/zip icon BPD Dayton and Gainesville Residential csv files in a zip file (zip, 2.8 MiB) text/csv icon BPD Dayton and Gainesville Residential Building Characteristics data (csv, 1.4 MiB) text/csv icon BPD Dayton and Gainesville Residential data headers (csv, 5.8 KiB)

455

Shale Natural Gas New Field Discoveries  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

868 557 232 2009-2011 868 557 232 2009-2011 Alaska 0 0 0 2009-2011 Lower 48 States 868 557 232 2009-2011 Alabama 0 0 2009-2010 Arkansas 0 0 0 2009-2011 California 0 2011-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 0 2011-2011 Colorado 4 0 0 2009-2011 Kentucky 0 0 0 2009-2011 Louisiana 244 48 0 2009-2011 North 244 48 0 2009-2011 Michigan 0 2 0 2009-2011 Montana 0 0 0 2009-2011 New Mexico 0 0 0 2009-2011 East 0 0 0 2009-2011 West 0 0 0 2009-2011 North Dakota 6 8 2 2009-2011 Ohio 0 0 2009-2010 Oklahoma 0 54 37 2009-2011 Pennsylvania 120 49 162 2009-2011 Texas 353 396 31 2009-2011 RRC District 1 353 114 20 2009-2011 RRC District 2 Onshore 282 0 2010-2011 RRC District 3 Onshore 0 0 0 2009-2011 RRC District 4 Onshore 0 0 0 2009-2011 RRC District 5 0 0 0 2009-2011

456

Shale Natural Gas New Field Discoveries  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

868 557 232 2009-2011 868 557 232 2009-2011 Alaska 0 0 0 2009-2011 Lower 48 States 868 557 232 2009-2011 Alabama 0 0 2009-2010 Arkansas 0 0 0 2009-2011 California 0 2011-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 0 2011-2011 Colorado 4 0 0 2009-2011 Kentucky 0 0 0 2009-2011 Louisiana 244 48 0 2009-2011 North 244 48 0 2009-2011 Michigan 0 2 0 2009-2011 Montana 0 0 0 2009-2011 New Mexico 0 0 0 2009-2011 East 0 0 0 2009-2011 West 0 0 0 2009-2011 North Dakota 6 8 2 2009-2011 Ohio 0 0 2009-2010 Oklahoma 0 54 37 2009-2011 Pennsylvania 120 49 162 2009-2011 Texas 353 396 31 2009-2011 RRC District 1 353 114 20 2009-2011 RRC District 2 Onshore 282 0 2010-2011 RRC District 3 Onshore 0 0 0 2009-2011 RRC District 4 Onshore 0 0 0 2009-2011 RRC District 5 0 0 0 2009-2011

457

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Drilling Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jul-14 Aug-14 Sep-14 Oct-14 Nov-14 Dec-14 View History Rotary Rigs in Operation 1,876 1,904 1,930 1,924 1,925 1,882 1973-2014 By Site Onshore 1,819 1,842 1,866 1,867 1,872 1,824...

458

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Drilling Activity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jun-14 Jul-14 Aug-14 Sep-14 Oct-14 Nov-14 View History Rotary Rigs in Operation 1,861 1,876 1,904 1,930 1,924 1,925 1973-2014 By Site Onshore 1,804 1,819 1,842 1,866 1,867 1,872...

459

Observer Design for Gas Lifted Oil Wells Ole Morten Aamo, Gisle Otto Eikrem, Hardy Siahaan, and Bjarne Foss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observer Design for Gas Lifted Oil Wells Ole Morten Aamo, Gisle Otto Eikrem, Hardy Siahaan flow systems is an area of increasing interest for the oil and gas industry. Oil wells with highly related to oil and gas wells exist, and in this study, unstable gas lifted wells will be the area

Foss, Bjarne A.

460

Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture (MAGHG) Name Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture (MAGHG) Agency/Company /Organization Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture, Greenhouse Gas Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Dataset, Technical report Website http://www.fao.org/climatechan References MICCA Website[1] The overall objective of the MAGHG project is to support developing countries assess and report their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Neutron Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We assume that the neutron-neutron potential is well-behaved and velocity-dependent. We can then apply perturbation theory to find the energy per particle of a neutron gas, in the range of Fermi wave numbers 0.5

J. S. Levinger and L. M. Simmons

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Clay mineralogy of onshore UK Carboniferous mudrocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...structures, geochemistry and mineralogy (Wright et al., 1991) is that there was a climatic change from a predominantly dry-type monsoonal system to a strongly seasonal wet monsoonal-type climate. Under these conditions primary smectite was transformed...

D. A. SPEARS

463

Natural Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Hydrates ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ...

Willard I. Wilcox; D. B. Carson; D. L. Katz

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Gas Kick Mechanistic Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas kicks occur during drilling when the formation pressure is greater than the wellbore pressure causing influx of gas into the wellbore. Uncontrolled gas kicks could result in blowout of the rig causing major financial loss and possible injury...

Zubairy, Raheel

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

465

Gas turbine topping combustor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combustor for burning a mixture of fuel and air in a rich combustion zone, in which the fuel bound nitrogen in converted to molecular nitrogen. The fuel rich combustion is followed by lean combustion. The products of combustion from the lean combustion are rapidly quenched so as to convert the fuel bound nitrogen to molecular nitrogen without forming NOx. The combustor has an air radial swirler that directs the air radially inward while swirling it in the circumferential direction and a radial fuel swirler that directs the fuel radially outward while swirling it in the same circumferential direction, thereby promoting vigorous mixing of the fuel and air. The air inlet has a variable flow area that is responsive to variations in the heating value of the fuel, which may be a coal-derived fuel gas. A diverging passage in the combustor in front of a bluff body causes the fuel/air mixture to recirculate with the rich combustion zone.

Beer, Janos (Winchester, MA); Dowdy, Thomas E. (Orlando, FL); Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Delmont, PA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Isotopic Analysis- Gas At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker, Et Al...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laboratory sampling and analysis of He isotopes from Chena Hot Springs. Notes Helium isotope measurements indicate there is no magmatic or mantle input at the Chena Geothermal...

467

Isotopic Analysis- Gas At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kennedy at the University of California at Berkeley, CA. Isotopic ratios of helium and CO2 determined for gases sampled at LVEW were 3.66 Ra (3He4He ratio) and -6.4 %o (delta...

468

Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lewicki...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flux Sampling Activity Date - 2008 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "CO2 and heat fluxes were measured over a six-week period (09082006 to 10242006) by the eddy...

469

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 16, 2006) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 16, 2006) Natural gas spot price movements were mixed this week (Wednesday to Wednesday, March 1-8) as temperatures varied across the Lower 48 States. Spot prices at some market locations climbed 2 to 49 cents per MMBtu since last Wednesday, primarily in areas that experienced colder-than-normal temperatures during the week, while price declines in the East, Midwest, and Louisiana averaged 34 cents per MMBtu. The Henry Hub spot price decreased 14 cents per MMBtu, or 2 percent, to $6.48. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub fell by 9 cents per MMBtu, settling at $6.648 on Wednesday, March 8. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, March 3, decreased to 1,887 Bcf, which is 54 percent above the 5-year (2001-2005) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil traded at $60.06 per barrel, decreasing $1.95, or $0.34 per MMBtu on the week.

470

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 17) 10, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 17) Unlikely wintry weather in key market areas this week boosted aggregate demand, lifting natural gas spot prices $0.20 per MMBtu or more at most trading location in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday, April 2-Wednesday, April 9), the Henry Hub spot price increased 22 cents per MMBtu, while spot price gains in the still-frigid Northeast were generally between $0.70 and $1.00. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub rose $0.13 per MMBtu, or 2.6 percent, to settle at $5.195 yesterday (April 9). Natural gas in storage decreased to 671 Bcf as of Friday, April 4, which is about 44 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased 38 cents per barrel or 1.3 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $28.93 per barrel or $4.99 per MMBtu.

471

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 15) 8, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 15) Spot and futures prices seesawed throughout the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, April 30-May 7) with no clear underlying trend, however prices ended trading yesterday at uniformly higher levels than one week ago. The weather's influence on gas demand was muted, as temperatures in most areas of the country were generally comfortably spring-like, except for some parts of the Southeast and Southwest, where summer-like temperatures prompted some early air conditioning load. The Henry Hub average spot price increased 23 cents from the previous Wednesday (April 30) to $5.48 per MMBtu. The daily settlement price of the NYMEX futures contract for June delivery rose $0.275 on the week, ending at $5.660 per MMBtu in yesterday's trading. The EIA reported that 821 Bcf of gas was held in storage as of Friday, May 2, which is 39.9 percent less than the 5-year average. The average spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil traded in a narrow range of less than $1 per barrel during the week, and ended trading yesterday with a small increase of 15 cents on the week, at $26.24 per barrel, or $4.52 per MMBtu.

472

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

November 6 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 13) November 6 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 13) Since Wednesday, October 29, natural gas spot prices have increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States except in the Gulf of Mexico producing region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 5 cents or about 1 percent to $4.45 per MMBtu. Prices climbed in most areas despite moderate temperatures in the Lower 48 States in apparent anticipation of a return to cold temperatures. Yesterday (Wednesday, November 5), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub was nearly 4 cents more than last Wednesday's price. Natural gas in storage increased to 3,155 Bcf as of October 31, which is about 3 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $1.34 per barrel or about 5 percent since last Wednesday to $30.29 per barrel or $5.222 per MMBtu.

473

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 6, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 13) June 6, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 13) Natural gas spot prices weakened in the opening days of June as concerns lingered over high storage inventories levels and mild weather limited gas demand in the key market areas of the Midwest and Northeast. Net storage injections for the week ending May 31 were 105 Bcf, bringing the total inventory level in the country to 1,893 Bcf, according to EIA estimates. Since Wednesday, May 29, prices at most trading locations have dropped by 16 cents or less. At the NYMEX, prices for futures contracts have declined more sharply. In the first week of trading as the near-month contract, the price for a futures contract for July delivery fell to $3.260 per MMBtu by yesterday's close, a drop of $0.245 per MMBtu since the previous Wednesday. Crude oil prices provided little impetus for price advances. The spot price of West Texas Intermediate crude oil fell $0.62 per barrel for the week, trading on Wednesday, June 5 at $25.02 per barrel, or $4.31 per MMBtu.

474

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 6) 7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 6) Natural gas spot prices across the country surged to record highs this week as yet another Arctic blast of cold arrived, this time reaching as far south as Texas. Prices in the Northeast were the highest in the country at more than $20 per MMBtu for much of the week, but prices also tripled since last Wednesday to $18 and more at production-area trading locations along the Gulf Coast and in Texas. On the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub had a net change of $4.26 per MMBtu to an average of $10.36 yesterday (Wednesday, February 26). The NYMEX contract for March delivery ended its run as the near-month futures contract on Wednesday, settling at just over $9.13 per MMBtu, or $3 higher on the week. As of February 21, natural gas in storage was 1,014 Bcf, or 33.4 percent below the 5-year average for this week. Crude oil prices climbed $1.90 per barrel yesterday to an average of $37.96, or $6.54 per MMBtu, which is near a 12-year high.

475

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 21) 14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 21) Natural gas spot prices and the near-month futures price showed a week-to-week decline as the pace of storage injections indicate adequate supplies, despite continued shut-in production in the Gulf of Mexico owing to Hurricane Ivan's impact. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, October 6-13), the price at the Henry Hub decreased 61 cents or about 10 percent to $5.39 per MMBtu. Prices in production areas along the Gulf Coast and Texas generally fell between 40 and 75 cents per MMBtu, while Midcontinent price declines were less than 36 cents per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for November delivery ended the week at $6.851, a decline of roughly 19 cents per MMBtu or slightly more than 2.8 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage increased to 3,159 Bcf as of Friday, October 8, which is about 7.2 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.88 per barrel, or 3.6 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday (October 13) at $53.86 per barrel or $9.29 per MMBtu.

476

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

25 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 1) 25 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 1) Since Wednesday, August 17, changes to natural gas spot prices were mixed, decreasing in major consuming areas in the Northeast and Midwest, while increasing at most markets in the Rocky Mountains, California, and West Texas regions. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 2 cents to $10 per MMBtu. Yesterday (August 24), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery settled at $9.984 per MMBtu, increasing about 59 cents or more than 6 percent since Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,575 Bcf as of August 19, which is 5.6 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $3.81 per barrel, or about 6 percent, on the week to a record high price of $67.10 per barrel, or $11.57 per MMBtu.

477

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 12) 5 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 12) Cold weather over the Thanksgiving weekend and early this week lifted natural gas spot prices in many regions of the country. While prices at several Northeast trading locations climbed more than $1 per MMBtu since Wednesday, November 27, prices along the Gulf Coast and other producing areas increased by a more modest 4 to 25 cents per MMBtu. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the Henry Hub spot price rose $0.04 per MMBtu to $4.24. At the NYMEX, the price of the futures contract for January delivery climbed just under a dime to $4.298 per MMBtu. Cold weather throughout the final full week in November also resulted in the season's largest withdrawal from storage. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 29, decreased by 91 Bcf to 2,956 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by 0.9 percent. The spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped $0.54 per barrel in trading yesterday (Wednesday, December 4), settling at $26.80, or $4.62 per MMBtu.,

478

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Thursday, December 18 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on Monday, December 29) Thursday, December 18 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on Monday, December 29) Since Wednesday, December 10, natural gas spot prices have decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 9 cents or about 1 percent to $6.56 per MMBtu. Prices declined in most areas as temperatures moderated following the first significant winter storms of the 2003-2004 heating season. Yesterday (Wednesday, December 17), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.993 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 28 cents or 4 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage decreased to 2,850 Bcf as of December 12, which is 1.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $1.44 per barrel or about 5 percent since last Wednesday, climbing to $33.36 per barrel or $6.993 per MMBtu.

479

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

24, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 31) 24, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 31) A second early season cold front caused heating demand that increased prices at key market centers in the Northeast and West Coast up to 42 cents per MMBtu since October 16. The higher aggregate demand lifted natural gas spot prices 10 to 25 cents at most production-area trading locations. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the average Henry Hub price climbed $0.14 per MMBtu to $4.24. At the NYMEX, the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub increased a more moderate $0.033 per MMBtu to a $4.260 settlement yesterday (October 23). Natural gas in storage increased to 3,161 Bcf for the week ending October 18, which exceeds the 5-year average by 7.4 percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped $1.09 per barrel to $28.19, or $4.86 per MMBtu.

480

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

February 6, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 13) February 6, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 13) Natural gas spot prices climbed between $0.55 and $0.95 per MMBtu at most production-area trading locations since Wednesday, January 29. Strong space-heating demand in the Midcontinent and parts of New England supported prices well over $6 throughout much of the country, but price gains were particularly large at Rockies trading locations. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the Henry Hub spot price jumped $0.62 to an average of $6.24 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for March delivery gained just under 2 cents per MMBtu on the week to settle at $5.644 on Wednesday, February 5. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, January 31, decreased to 1,521 Bcf, which is 15.9 percent below the 5-year (1998-2002) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $0.37 per barrel on the week to yesterday's closing price of $33.91 per barrel, or $5.29 per MMBtu.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "onshore area gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 30) 23, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 30) Natural gas spot and futures prices trended down for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, May 15-22). The cold front that moved into major gas-consuming areas of the Midwest and Northeast for the weekend and lingered into the first part of this week had minimal impact on prices. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price fell 24 cents for the week to $3.38 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the settlement price of the near-month contract (June delivery) declined for 5 straight trading sessions before recording a small increase of $0.064 per MMBtu in May 22 trading, to settle at $3.459. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil, which had held at or above $28 per barrel since last Thursday, fell nearly $1 on Tuesday, May 21, following the American Petroleum Institute's announcement of an unexpected build in crude oil stocks of 5.5 million barrels for the week ended Friday, May 17. For the week (May 15-22), the WTI price was down $0.99, at $27.01 per barrel, or $4.66 per MMBtu.

482

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 2) 26 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 2) Natural gas prices in both the spot and futures markets continued their downward slide, as unusually cool August temperatures persisted for another week in most areas of the country. At the Henry Hub, the spot price edged down 3 cents on the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, August 18-25) as spot gas traded yesterday (August 25) for $5.32 per MMBtu. On the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for September delivery declined over 8 cents, or just under 2 percent, settling yesterday at $5.298 per MMBtu. EIA reported that inventories were 2,614 Bcf as of Friday, August 20, which is 6.7 percent greater than the prior 5-year average. After climbing to consecutive record highs on Wednesday and Thursday of last week (August 18-19), the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell sharply in the ensuing 4 trading days. The WTI spot price declined $3.53 per barrel ($0.61 per MMBtu) on the week to $43.83 ($7.56), a drop of over 7 percent.

483

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 8) 1, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 8) Since Wednesday, July 24, natural gas spot prices have registered gains between 5 and 20 cents at most trading locations in the Lower 48 States. A heat wave rolling through most of the East supported production area prices during the week and prompted a surge in Northeast prices to highs for the season. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the Henry Hub spot price gained $0.13 per MMBtu to an average price of $3.04 yesterday (July 31). The price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $2.954 per MMBtu yesterday, 8.6 cents less than last Wednesday's price. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,546 Bcf as of July 26, which exceeds the 5-year average by 16.9 percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $0.24 cents per barrel since last Wednesday, trading at $27.02 per barrel or $4.66 per MMBtu.

484

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 12) 5 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 12) Since Wednesday, April 27, natural gas spot prices have decreased at all market locations in the Lower 48 States, as springtime temperatures prevailed in most areas. Spot prices at the Henry Hub decreased 62 cents or about 9 percent to $6.49 per MMBtu, while spot price declines were generally greater in West Texas at between 72 and 80 cents per MMBtu. Yesterday (May 4), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub, which became the near-month contract on April 28, settled at $6.630 per MMBtu, declining 17 cents or about 3 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,455 Bcf as of April 29, which is 25.2 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $1.15 per barrel or about 2 percent on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) to $50.22 per barrel or $8.66 per MMBtu.

485

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May 1, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 8) May 1, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 8) Spot natural gas prices at most trading locations in the Lower 48 States dropped $0.25-$0.50 per MMBtu this week (Wednesday, April 23-Wednesday, April 30) as springtime temperatures prevailed in most areas. The Henry Hub spot price decreased 33 cents per MMBtu to $5.25, while spot price declines in the Northeast were generally greater at between $0.36 and $0.50. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for June delivery, which became the near-month contract on Tuesday, April 29, has declined 29 cents since last Wednesday. The June contract settled at $5.385 yesterday (April 30). Natural gas in storage increased to 741 Bcf as of Friday, April 25, which is about 43.2 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.95 per barrel or about 7 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $26.09 per barrel or $4.50 per MMBtu.

486

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

487

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

488

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

489

Future of Natural Gas  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

technology is improving - Producers are drilling in liquids rich gas and crude oil shale plays due to lower returns on dry gas production - Improved well completion time...

490

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

491

E-Print Network 3.0 - area position-sensitive ionization Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

coefficient of positional... photoelectron focusing and high electron transmission efficiency from the gas ionization area to the detector... their spectral resolution and...

492

Natural Gas Vented and Flared  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

143,457 166,909 165,360 165,928 209,439 212,848 1936-2012 143,457 166,909 165,360 165,928 209,439 212,848 1936-2012 Alaska 6,458 10,023 6,481 10,173 10,966 11,769 1967-2012 Alaska Onshore 5,125 7,812 5,271 8,034 9,276 9,244 1992-2012 Alaska State Offshore 1,334 2,212 1,210 2,139 1,690 2,525 1992-2012 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico 12,509 14,507 14,754 13,971 15,502 16,296 1997-2012 Louisiana 6,496 4,021 4,336 4,578 6,302 NA 1967-2012 Louisiana Onshore 6,078 3,777 4,121 4,432 6,153 NA 1992-2012 Louisiana State Offshore 418 243 215 146 149 NA 1999-2012 New Mexico 929 803 481 1,586 4,360 12,259 1967-2012 Oklahoma 0 0 0 0 1967-2010 Texas 36,682 42,541 41,234 39,569 35,248 47,530 1967-2012 Texas Onshore 36,682 42,541 41,234 39,569 35,248 47,530 1992-2012

493

Targeted technology applications for infield reserve growth: A synopsis of the Secondary Natural Gas Recovery project, Gulf Coast Basin. Topical report, September 1988--April 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Secondary Natural Gas Recovery (SGR): Targeted Technology Applications for Infield Reserve Growth is a joint venture research project sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), the US Department of Energy (DOE), the State of Texas through the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, with the cofunding and cooperation of the natural gas industry. The SGR project is a field-based program using an integrated multidisciplinary approach that integrates geology, geophysics, engineering, and petrophysics. A major objective of this research project is to develop, test, and verify those technologies and methodologies that have near- to mid-term potential for maximizing recovery of gas from conventional reservoirs in known fields. Natural gas reservoirs in the Gulf Coast Basin are targeted as data-rich, field-based models for evaluating infield development. The SGR research program focuses on sandstone-dominated reservoirs in fluvial-deltaic plays within the onshore Gulf Coast Basin of Texas. The primary project research objectives are: To establish how depositional and diagenetic heterogeneities cause, even in reservoirs of conventional permeability, reservoir compartmentalization and hence incomplete recovery of natural gas. To document examples of reserve growth occurrence and potential from fluvial and deltaic sandstones of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin as a natural laboratory for developing concepts and testing applications. To demonstrate how the integration of geology, reservoir engineering, geophysics, and well log analysis/petrophysics leads to strategic recompletion and well placement opportunities for reserve growth in mature fields.

Levey, R.A.; Finley, R.J.; Hardage, B.A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Shale Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Adjustments Revision Increases Revision Decreases Sales Acquisitions Extensions New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Period: Data Series: Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Adjustments Revision Increases Revision Decreases Sales Acquisitions Extensions New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 View History U.S. 23,304 34,428 60,644 97,449 131,616 2007-2011 Alaska 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2011 Lower 48 States 23,304 34,428 60,644 97,449 131,616 2007-2011 Alabama 1 2 0 0 2007-2010 Arkansas 1,460 3,833 9,070 12,526 14,808 2007-2011 California 855 2011-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 855 2011-2011 Colorado 0 0 4 4 10 2007-2011 Kentucky

495

Greenhouse Gas Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Areas » Greenhouse Gases » Greenhouse Gas Basics Program Areas » Greenhouse Gases » Greenhouse Gas Basics Greenhouse Gas Basics October 7, 2013 - 10:01am Addthis Federal agencies must understand key terms and management basics to successfully manage greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Greenhouse gases are trace gases in the lower atmosphere that trap heat through a natural process called the "greenhouse effect." This process keeps the planet habitable. International research has linked human activities to a rapid increase in GHG concentrations in the atmosphere, contributing to major shifts in the global climate. Graphic of the top half of earth depicting current arctic sea ice. A red outline depicts arctic sea ice boundaries in 1979. Current arctic sea ice is shown roughly 50% smaller than the 1979 depiction.

496

Options and costs for offsite disposal of oil and gas exploration and production wastes.  

SciTech Connect

In the United States, most of the exploration and production (E&P) wastes generated at onshore oil and gas wells are disposed of or otherwise managed at the well site. Certain types of wastes are not suitable for onsite management, and some well locations in sensitive environments cannot be used for onsite management. In these situations, operators must transport the wastes offsite for disposal. In 1997, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) prepared a report that identified offsite commercial disposal facilities in the United States. This information has since become outdated. Over the past year, Argonne has updated the study through contacts with state oil and gas agencies and commercial disposal companies. The new report, including an extensive database for more than 200 disposal facilities, provides an excellent reference for information about commercial disposal operations. This paper describes Argonne's report. The national study provides summaries of the types of offsite commercial disposal facilities found in each state. Data are presented by waste type and by disposal method. The categories of E&P wastes in the database include: contaminated soils, naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), oil-based muds and cuttings, produced water, tank bottoms, and water-based muds and cuttings. The different waste management or disposal methods in the database involve: bioremediation, burial, salt cavern, discharge, evaporation, injection, land application, recycling, thermal treatment, and treatment. The database includes disposal costs for each facility. In the United States, most of the 18 billion barrels (bbl) of produced water, 149 million bbl of drilling wastes, and 21 million bbl of associated wastes generated at onshore oil and gas wells are disposed of or otherwise managed at the well site. However, under certain conditions, operators will seek offsite management options for these E&P wastes. Commercial disposal facilities are offsite businesses that accept and manage E&P wastes for a fee. Their services include waste management and disposal, transportation, cleaning of vehicles and tanks, disposal of wash water, and, in some cases, laboratory analysis. Commercial disposal facilities offer a suite of waste management methods and technologies.

Puder, M. G.; Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 26, 2007) 9, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 26, 2007) Since Wednesday, July 11, natural gas spot prices decreased at virtually all markets in the Lower 48 States. Prices at the Henry Hub declined 41 cents per MMBtu, or 6 percent, since Wednesday, July 11, to $6.24 per MMBtu. At the NYMEX, the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (July 18) at $6.528 per MMBtu, falling 7 cents per MMBtu, or 1 percent since last Wednesday, July 11. Natural gas in storage was 2,692 Bcf as of July 13, which is 15.7 percent above the 5-year average (2002-2006). The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $2.45 per barrel on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) to $75.03 per barrel or $12.94 per MMBtu. Prices: Natural gas prices fell at virtually all market locations since last Wednesday, July 11, with declines of 25 to 50 cents per MMBtu or about 4 to 12 percent. Moderating temperatures in most areas of the Lower 48 States likely accounted for the widespread declines, as cooler temperatures mitigated cooling demand for natural gas. On a regional basis, price declines averaged between 18 and 58 cents per MMBtu, or 3 and 13 percent, since last Wednesday, July 11. The largest price decreases since last Wednesday, July 11, occurred principally in the Rocky Mountain region, where prices fell by more than 57 cents per MMBtu, or 13 percent on average. By far, the smallest decreases occurred in the Arizona/Nevada and Florida regions, where prices fell by 18 and 24 cents per MMBtu on average, respectively, with the Florida citygate posting the highest price in the Lower 48 States at $8.00 per MMBtu. Elsewhere, average price decreases by region ranged between 30 and 43 cents per MMBtu. Despite these declines and lower electric generation demand relative to last year, prices generally exceeded levels reported last year at this time, with prices at the Henry Hub $0.22 per MMBtu or 4 percent above last year's level. The principal exception to the year-over-year price increases occurred in the Rocky Mountain region, where prices at selected markets were between $1.87 and $2.28 per MMBtu or about 35 and 43 percent below last year's level.

498

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

24 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 31, 2006) 24 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 31, 2006) Since Wednesday, August 16, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations with the exception of a few locations in the Northeast. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 17 cents to $7.19 per MMBtu. Yesterday (August 23), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery settled at $6.875 per MMBtu, increasing about 11 cents or about 2 percent since Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,857 Bcf as of August 18, which is 13.5 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased 19 cents per barrel, or about 0.3 percent, on the week to $71.45 per barrel, or $12.32 per MMBtu. Prices: Despite the lower cooling load across much of the Lower 48 States and a diminished threat from Tropical Storm Debby, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations on the week. The increases, however, were moderate, as they were mostly limited to less than 15 cents per MMBtu. With the exception of the southern United States, power loads have been steadily diminishing in the past couple of weeks. Gas demand for electric power generation was much lower compared with the week ending August 5, when the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) reported record-high weekly electricity demand, leading to the 12 Bcf net withdrawal for the storage week ended August 4, 2006. On a regional basis, market locations in East Texas recorded the largest increases since Wednesday, August 16, averaging 18 cents per MMBtu, followed by Louisiana (16 cents per MMBtu). Most locations along the Gulf Coast recorded increases between 3 and 18 cents, while major consuming areas in the Midwest recorded an average increase of 14 cents per MMBtu. Despite the general increases this week, a few market locations in the Northeast recorded decreases since last Wednesday, the largest one of which was the 10-cent decrease at the Dracut, MA, trading point. Even with the overall increases in recent weeks, as of August 23, 2006, spot prices at market locations in the Lower 48 States are 17 to 30 percent lower than last year's levels.

499

WHAT IS A NETWORK? (Gas and Electricity) A complex, interconnected group or  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WHAT IS A NETWORK? (Gas and Electricity) A complex, interconnected group or system Electricity and Gas: A system used to distribute electricity and gas around the world/certain area, by compromising to minimise costs and generate the most electricity and gas as possible, which maximises profits

Wright, Francis

500

To Fill or not to Fill: The Gas Station Problem. SAMIR KHULLER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To Fill or not to Fill: The Gas Station Problem. SAMIR KHULLER Dept. of Computer Science and the vehicle can travel 17 miles per gallon, then the cost per mile is 20 cents. At each gas station we may, there is significant variance in the price of gas between gas stations in different areas. For example

Khuller, Samir