Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oncologist helen vodopick" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Oral Histories: Oncologist Helen Vodopick, M.D.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 HUMAN RADIATION STUDIES: REMEMBERING THE EARLY YEARS Oral History of Oncologist Helen Vodopick, M.D. Conducted December 28, 1994 United States Department of Energy Office of Human Radiation Experiments August 1995 CONTENTS Foreword Short Biography Academic Fellowship at Oak Ridge Institute for Nuclear Studies (ORINS), 1960 Appointment to the Staff at ORINS Medical Division The Medium-Exposure-Rate Total Body Irradiator (METBI) ORINS Radioisotope Tracer Studies Participation by Regional Universities at Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) Treatment of Cancer Patients with the METBI Introduction of Immunotherapy Radiation Treatment for Leukemia Patients Bone Marrow Treatment of Leukemia Low-Exposure-Rate Total Body Irradiator (LETBI) Treatment of Radiation Accident Victims at ORAU

2

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Oncologist Helen Vodopick, M.D., December 28, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report is a transcript of an interview with Dr. Helen Vodopick by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Dr. Vodopick was chosen for this interview because of her involvement with the Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies (ORINS) and Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) experimental cancer-therapy program involving total-body irradiation. After a short biographical sketch Dr. Vodopick relates her remembrances of the Medium-Exposure-Rate Total Body Irradiator (METBI), ORINS radioisotope tracer studies, treatment of cancer patients with the METBI, radiation treatment for leukemia patients, bone marrow treatment of leukemia, the Low-Exposure-Rate Total Body Irradiation (LETBI), treatment of radiation accident victims at ORAU, research with radioactive phosphorus and sulfur, and public opinion issues.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Yun (Helen) He  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Road Mail Stop 943R0256 Berkeley, CA 94720 US Biographical Sketch Helen is a High Performance Computing consultant of the User Services Group at NERSC. She has been the main USG...

4

The Alumni and Development Team Helen Black  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Alumni and Development Team Helen Black Development Coordinator (Fundraising) Ph 8302 0974 Fax 8302 0970 helen.black@unisa.edu.au Chris Crabbe Development Officer (Corporate & Named Scholarships) Ph

South Australia, University of

5

Review: Nuclear Power Is Not the Answer by Helen Caldicott  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sciences, Pakistan. Helen Caldicott. Nuclear Power Is NotNuclear Information and Resource Service (http://www.nirs.org) Umar Karim Mirza , PakistanNuclear Power Is Not the Answer By Helen Caldicott Reviewed by Umar Karim Mirza Pakistan

Mirza, Umar Karim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Mt St Helens Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Mt St Helens Geothermal Area (Redirected from Mt St Helens Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Washington Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

7

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fumarole discharges (95-560°C) collected from the dacite dome inside Mount St. Helens crater show temporal changes in their isotopic and chemical compositions. A ΔD vs. Δ18O plot shows that condensed waters from the gases are mixtures of meteoric and magmatic components, but that the apparent magmatic end-member in 1994 was depleted by about 7‰ in ΔD relative to the apparent end-member in 1980. Based on ΔD modeling, approximately 63% of shallow, post-1980 magma has yet to degas.

8

Mt. St. Helens' Aerosols: Some Tropospheric and Stratospheric Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol optical depth measurements based on the attenuation of direct solar radiation before and after the six major explosive eruptions of Mt. St. Helens during 1980 are presented. These automated measurements are from a site 200 km mostly cut ...

J. J. Michalsky; G. M. Stokes

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

"Ecological Lessons Learned 30 Years After Mount Saint Helens...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MBG AUDITORIUM "Ecological Lessons Learned 30 Years After Mount Saint Helens", Dr. Virginia Dale, Oak Ridge National Laboratory http:mediacentral.princeton.eduid0bi7ab6iz...

10

Mt St Helens Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Washington Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

11

Boise Inc. St. Helens Paper Mill Achieves Significant Fuel Savings  

SciTech Connect

This case study describes how the Boise Inc. paper mill in St. Helens, Oregon, achieved annual savings of approximately 154,000 MMBtu and more than $1 million after receiving a DOE Save Energy Now energy assessment and implementing recommendations to improve the efficiency of its steam system.

Not Available

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Water Sampling At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt St Helens Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Lisa Shevenell, Fraser Goff (1995) Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Water_Sampling_At_Mt_St_Helens_Area_(Shevenell_%26_Goff,_1995)&oldid=389549" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

13

Dr Helen Kerch | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Helen Kerch Helen Kerch Materials Sciences and Engineering (MSE) Division MSE Home About Staff Listings/Contact Information What's New Research Areas Scientific Highlights Reports and Activities Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Staff Listings/Contact Information Dr. Helen Kerch Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Kerch Team Lead Scattering and Instrumentation Sciences Materials Sciences and Engineering Division Office of Basic Energy Sciences SC-22.2/Germantown Building, Rm F-411 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585-1290 E-Mail:Helen.Kerch@science.doe.gov Phone: (301) 903-2346 Fax: (301) 903-9513 Dr. Helen Kerch is team lead for Scattering and Instrumentation Sciences in the Office of Science in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). She joined

14

Aeromagnetic Survey At Mt St Helens Area (Towle, 1983) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Towle, 1983) Towle, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aeromagnetic Survey At Mt St Helens Area (Towle, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt St Helens Area Exploration Technique Aeromagnetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The VLF method has proved useful in mapping the crater and central dome of Mount St. Helens. More detailed and extensive VLF investigations as well as other electrical and electromagnetic studies will be useful in determining the electrical structure of Mount St. Helens in more detail. Electrical and electromagnetic methods would be especially useful in determining the actual electrical conductivity of partial melt beneath the dome. The ability of these methods to determine the correlation of surface features

15

Effects of the Mount St. Helens Volcanic Cloud on Turbidity at Ann Arbor, Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of turbidity were made at the University of Michigan irradiance and meteorological measurement facility just prior to, during and after the passage of the volcanic cloud from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. They were ...

Edward Ryznar; Michael R. Weber; Thomas S. Hallaron

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

LWA-0006 - In the Matter of Helen Gaidine Oglesbee | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 - In the Matter of Helen Gaidine Oglesbee 6 - In the Matter of Helen Gaidine Oglesbee LWA-0006 - In the Matter of Helen Gaidine Oglesbee This Decision involves a whistleblower complaint filed by Helen Gaidine Oglesbee (Oglesbee) under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Oglesbee has been and is currently an employee of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), the management and operating contractor at the DOE's Hanford Nuclear Site. She alleges that she made health and safety complaints to her immediate supervisor from December 1990 to August 1991, and that beginning in October or November 1991, she elevated these concerns to higher management officials at WHC. Oglesbee maintains that WHC took the following reprisals against her: failing to respond to her health-related issues and denying her access to

17

Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hydrothermal water samples at Mount St. Helens collected between 1985 and 1989 and in 1994 are used to identify water types and describe their evolution through time. Two types of low temperature hydrothermal systems are associated with the 1980 eruptions and were initiated soon after emplacement of shallow magma and pyroclastic flows. The Loowit hot spring system is located in the breach zone and is associated with the magma conduit and nearby avalanche deposits, whereas the Pumice Plain (PP)

18

Hydrothermal Circulation At Mount St Helens Determined By Self-Potential  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Hydrothermal Circulation At Mount St Helens Determined By Self-Potential Measurements Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hydrothermal Circulation At Mount St Helens Determined By Self-Potential Measurements Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The distribution of hydrothermal circulation within active volcanoes is of importance in identifying regions of hydrothermal alteration which may in turn control explosivity, slope stability and sector collapse. Self-potential measurements, indicative of fluid circulation, were made within the crater of Mount St. Helens in 2000 and

19

Introducing mobility into CSP B Steve Schneider, Helen Treharne, and Beeta Vajar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AVoCS 2007 Introducing mobility into CSP B Steve Schneider, Helen Treharne, and Beeta Vajar Department of Computing University of Surrey Guildford, Surrey, UK Abstract CSP B is a combination of CSP, the semantic foundation for pi |B is cumbersome for reasoning about systems, and a CSP based approach may

Schneider, Steve

20

Quantitative Analysis of Mt. St. Helens Ash by X-Ray Diffraction and X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A quantitative study by x-ray diffraction, optical polarizing microscopy, and x-ray fluorescence spectrometry of fallout and ambient ash from three Mt. St. Helens eruptions has revealed a consistent picture of the mineralogical and elemental ...

Briant L. Davis; L. Ronald Johnson; Dana T. Griffen; William Revell Phillips; Robert K. Stevens; David Maughan

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oncologist helen vodopick" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

James M. Craw, Nicholas P. Cardo, Yun (Helen) He Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mortem of the NERSC Franklin XT Mortem of the NERSC Franklin XT Upgrade to CLE 2.1 James M. Craw, Nicholas P. Cardo, Yun (Helen) He Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA craw@nersc.gov, cardo@nersc.gov, yhe@lbl.gov And Janet M. Lebens Cray, Inc. jml@cray.com May 4, 2009 Atlanta CUG This presentation will discuss the lessons learned of the events leading up to the production deployment of CLE 2.1 and the post install issues experienced in upgrading NERSC's XT4(tm) system called Franklin CUG 2008 page 2 Introduction NERSC * NERSC is a Production Computing Facility for DOE Office of Science * NERSC serves a large scientific population * Approximately 3,000 users, * 400 projects, * 500 code instances * Focus is high end computing services CUG 2008 page 3 NERSC-5 Systems

22

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff - 2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Low Dose Radiation Program Workshop IV DOE Low Dose Radiation Program Workshop IV Abstract Title: TGF-β Protects Human Mammary Epithelial Cells from Radiation-Induced Centrosome Amplification Authors: Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff, Bahram Parvin, Anna C. Erickson and Rishi Gupta Institutions: Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Life Sciences Division, Ernest Orlando Lawrence, Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California In recent studies we have shown that ionizing radiation (IR), a known carcinogen of human and murine mammary gland, compromises human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) polarity and multicellular organization in a manner characteristic of neoplastic progression through a heritable, non-mutational mechanism (1). Thus, when all cells are irradiated with a significant dose (2 Gy), the daughters of irradiated cells lose their

23

Franklin Job Completion Analysis Yun (Helen) He, Hwa-Chun Wendy Lin, and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Job Completion Analysis Job Completion Analysis Yun (Helen) He, Hwa-Chun Wendy Lin, and Woo-Sun Yang National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center CUG 2010, May 24-27, Edinburgh 2 Our Goal * Identify and track system issues that cause user jobs to fail. Work with Cray to get them fixed. * Job completion report, i.e. how many jobs ran successfully and how many jobs failed for what reasons. 3 Our Data Job Completion rate = Success + User related failures 4 User Related Job Failures * Application Errors: APEXIT, APNOENT, APRESOURCE, APWRAP * Runtime Errors: CCERUNTIME, PATHRUNTIME * MPI Errors: MPIABORT, MPIENV, MPIFATAL, MPIIO * IO Errors: PGFIO * PTL Errors: PTLUSER * Signal: SIGSEGV, SIGTERM, * Misc: XBIGOUT, DISKQUOTA, OOM, NIDTERM 5 System Related Job Failures

24

Thermal surveillance of active volcanoes using the Landsat-1 Data Collection System. Part III. Heat discharge from Mount St. Helens, Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two thermal anomalies, A at 2740 m altitude on the north slope, and B between 2650 and 2750 m altitude on the southwest slope at the contact of the dacite summit dome of Mount St. Helens, Washington, were confirmed by aerial infrared-scanner surveys between 1971 and 1973. Landsat-1 Data Collection Platform 6166, emplaced at site B anomaly, transmitted 482 sets of temperature values in 1973 and 1974, suitable for estimating the differential radiant exitance as 84 W m/sup -2/, approximately equivalent to the Fourier conductive flux of 89 W m/sup -2/ in the upper 15 cm below the surface. The differential geothermal flux, including heat loss via evaporation and convection, was estimated at 376 W m/sup -2/. Total energy yield of Mount St. Helens probably ranges between 0.1 and 0.4 x 10/sup 6/ W.

Friedman, J.D.; Frank, D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Helen He! NERSC User Services Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using the Cray Using the Cray perftools-lite Performance Measurement Tool --- 1 --- October 1 0, 2 013 * A s implified a nd e asy t o u se v ersion o f t he C rayPat performance m easurement a nd a nalysis t ool. * Provides b asic p erformance a nalysis i nfo a utoma@cally w ith simple steps. * Users can decide whether to use full perCools v ersion aCerwards. What is Perftools-lite 2 Outputs from Perftools-lite * In s tdout, basic informa@on from the default "sample_profile" o p@on: - execu)on ) me - memory h igh w ater m ark - aggregate F LOPS r ate ( only o n H opper) - top ) me---consuming u ser f unc)ons - MPI i nforma)on, e tc. * A * .rpt t ext fi le w ith t he s ame i nfo a s a bove * A * .ap2 fi le t hat c an b e u sed w ith: - "pat_report" f or m ore d etailed i nforma)on - "app2"

26

LWA-0006 - Deputy Secretary Decision - In the Matter of Helen...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

trier of fact to judge the credibility of witnesses. Compare, Pullman Standard v. Swint, 456 U.S. 273 (1982), with Amadeo v. Zant, 486 U.S. 214, 223 (1988), quoting Federal Rule of...

27

Mike Stewart and Helen He NERSC User Services Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Introduction * Available Compilers on Hopper * Recommended Compiler Options * Benchmarks Used in the study * Performance Results from Each Compiler * Summary and...

28

Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USA 92:1332-1336. 10. Barcellos-Hoff, M.H., and Ravani, S.A. 2000. Irradiated mammary gland stroma promotes the expression of tumorigenic potential by unirradiated epithelial...

29

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B.B. and Barcellos-Hoff, M.H. (2001) Epigenetics and breast cancer. Journal of Mammary Gland Biology Neoplasia 6(2):151-152. Barcellos-Hoff, M.H. and Brooks, A.L. (2001)....

30

Distributed Learning in Hierarchical Networks Hel`ene Le Cadre  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

curves for energy services requirements in a building microgrid (µgrid), fuel costs and other economic Energy Commission, Public Interest Energy Research Program, under Work for Others Contract No. 500. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by its trade name, trademark

31

Review: Nuclear Power Is Not the Answer by Helen Caldicott  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

viable option for a sustainable energy future. You do nottowards having a sustainable energy future. A detailed notes

Mirza, Umar Karim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Review: Nuclear Power Is Not the Answer by Helen Caldicott  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the possibility of nuclear weapons proliferation make itto a discussion of nuclear weapons proliferation. In the

Mirza, Umar Karim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Hydrothermal Circulation At Mount St Helens Determined By Self...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

toward the dome summit. The anomaly pattern is believed to result from a combination of thermoelectric, electrokinetic, and fluid disruption effects within and surrounding the...

34

Targeting geothermal exploration sites in the Mount St. Helens area using soil mercury surveys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The background mercury level was determined for the areas studied, providing preliminary information for future work. Identification of areas which might merit more intensive sampling was also accomplished. The clusters of samples with high Hg concentrations in both areas may indicate high heat flow and should be investigated further. Problems involving the use of this method in the Cascades were also identified. Both areas north and south of the mountain had approximately the same standard deviation (expressed as a percentage of the mean), even though the sampling horizons seemed much more consistent and less disturbed in the Marble Mountain area than in the Green River Soda Springs area. This may indicate that for these areas, secondary controls are more important, or that Hg anomalies are much smaller than indicated in studies of other areas.

Holmes, J.; Waugh, K.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Helen T. Edwards, 1986 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Physics: For her leadership in the construction and commissioning of the Tevatron at Fermilab. This is the first successful super-conducting proton...

36

Application of lasers to ultracold atoms and molecules Hel`ene Perrin1,6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and their applications. After a brief historical review of laser cooling and Bose-Einstein condensation, we present vector k. Light is coupled to atoms by the interaction between the electric light field and the atomic the photon scattering rate and is maximum on resonance. On the other hand, a redistribution of photons

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

37

Dr. Helen Caldicott Widely regarded as one of the great public speakers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

." Large amounts of fossil fuels are required to mine and refine the uranium needed, to construct of uranium ore in the world. Despite industry and government claims, nuclear power is not "clean and green from the extraction of uranium emit radioactive elements to the air and water. Adequate remediation

Argerami, Martin

38

The evolution and role of the Saharan Air Layer during Hurricane Helene (2006)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Saharan air layer (SAL) has received considerable attention in recent years as a potential negative influence on the formation and development of Atlantic tropical cyclones. Observations of substantial Saharan dust in the near environment of ...

Scott A. Braun; Jason A. Sippel; Chung-Lin Shie; Ryan A. Boller

39

Surgical Management of Early-Stage Non-small Cell Lung Carcinoma and the Present and Future Roles of Adjuvant Therapy: A Review for the Radiation Oncologist  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We review the evidence for optimal surgical management and adjuvant therapy for patients with stages I and II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) along with factors associated with increased risks of recurrence. Based on the current evidence, we recommend optimal use of mediastinal lymph node dissection, adjuvant chemotherapy, and post-operative radiation therapy, and make suggestions for areas to explore in future prospective randomized clinical trials.

Medford-Davis, Laura [Department of Emergency Medicine, Ben Taub General Hospital, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Emergency Medicine, Ben Taub General Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); DeCamp, Malcom [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Recht, Abram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Flickinger, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Belani, Chandra P. [Department of Medical Oncology, Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States); Varlotto, John, E-mail: jvarlotto@hmc.psu.edu [Division of Radiation Oncology, Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Division of Radiation Oncology, Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Pigments, Patterns, and Fish Behavior Anna C. Price, Cameron J. Weadick, Janet Shim, and F. Helen Rodd  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND BOOK CHAPTERS 90. Bedini R., Bertuccelli M., Canali M.G., Bedini A., Distribution and mor- phology

Rodd, Helen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oncologist helen vodopick" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Predictability of a Mediterranean Tropical-Like Storm Downstream of the Extratropical Transition of Hurricane Helene (2006)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extratropical transition (ET) of a tropical cyclone is known as a source of forecast uncertainty that can propagate far downstream. The present study focuses on the predictability of a Mediterranean tropical-like storm (Medicane) on 26 ...

Florian P. Pantillon; Jean-Pierre Chaboureau; Patrick J. Mascart; Christine Lac

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

For more information, contact Mary Helen Meza at (mmeza@uh.edu) or Rebecca Szwarc at (rszwarc@central.uh.edu)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Lamps (lights come on by touch only) Light Bulbs (60 watts), bulbs for outside (yellow bulbs) Linens NEW ITEMS NEEDED All Purpose Wipes Bathing Towels Batteries & Flash lights Books in large print Chucks

Azevedo, Ricardo

43

Waveguide confined Raman spectroscopy for microfluidic interrogation Praveen C. Ashok,* Gajendra P. Singh, Helen A. Rendall, Thomas F. Krauss and Kishan Dholakia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not been reported before. Bulk optic based Raman detection systems have two inherent limitations be found in some recent publications.6,10 The other limitation of a bulk optic based system is its lack the system still requires optical alignment expertise to collect the Raman signal. A true portable MRS system

Dholakia, Kishan

44

A Volcano Rekindled: The Renewed Eruption of Mount St. Helens, 20042006 Edited by David R. Sherrod, William E. Scott, and Peter H. Stauffer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, William E. Scott, and Peter H. Stauffer U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1750, 2008 Chapter 12 1 U.S. Geological Survey, 1300 SE Cardinal Court, Vancouver, WA 98683 2 U.S. Geological Survey, PO Box by other researchers to correlate with repetitive, nearly periodic shallow earthquakes. Introduction Aerial

45

WIPP Opportunities -CBFO Procurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contact information: Contracting Officer Diane Snow (575) 234-7452 Diane.Snow@wipp.ws Contracting Officer Helen Thomas (575) 234-7420 Helen.Thomas@wipp.ws Purchasing...

46

Idahoans Saving Green by Going Green | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Helen Humphreys never thought she would be able to afford the upfront costs of making her home more energy-efficient. Helen lives in southeastern Idaho and relies on Social...

47

Comparing the Performance of Urban Transit Bus Routes after Adjusting for the Environment,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Centers (CUTC). Sonali Tandon, MUPP student, won the 2006 Helene M. Overly Memorial Scholarship on January 21, 2006. Sonali Tandon, MUPP, won the 2006 Helene M. Overly Memorial Scholarship awarded

Illinois at Chicago, University of

48

Energy Liberalisation in Historical Context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Centers (CUTC). Sonali Tandon, MUPP student, won the 2006 Helene M. Overly Memorial Scholarship on January 21, 2006. Sonali Tandon, MUPP, won the 2006 Helene M. Overly Memorial Scholarship awarded

Kraft, Markus

49

Tour Registration Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 25, 2000 ... Accompanying Persons and Plant Tours. REGISTRATION FORM. PLEASE COMPLETE FORM AND MAIL WITH CHECK TO: Helen L.

50

Jacalyn F. '78 and Andrew Aaron '09P Deborah J. Goodman and David E. Abbey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Ms. Elma Roane Ms. Virginia Rust Mr. Carl Sanders Jr. Dr. Helen Sawyer Mrs. Katherine B. Sevedge+ Dr

Napier, Terrence

51

WIPP Opportunities -CBFO Procurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Current Solicitations WIPP Transportation Services WIPP M&O Procurement contact information: Contracting Officer Diane Snow (575) 234-7452 Diane.Snow@ Contracting Officer Helen...

52

A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1982). Evidence based on measurements of S and Cl in erupted rocks, glass inclusions, gas samples, and atmospheric samples collected for both Mount St. Helens and Fuego...

53

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Temporal...

54

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Multidimensional Analysis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multidimensional Analysis of Human Epithelial Cell Response to Low Dose Radiation Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA. (Jointly funded by...

55

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Researchers Freely Share...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Researchers Freely Share LCLS Experiment Data on Public Database By Helen Shen November 22, 2011 In 2009, when biophysicist Ilme Schlichting and her colleagues applied to use the...

56

Department of Computing Stepwise Refinement in Event-B||CSP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Event-B||CSP Part 1: Safety Steve Schneider, Helen Treharne and Heike Wehrheim March 12th 2011 #12;Stepwise Refinement in Event-B CSP Part 1: Safety Steve Schneider1 Helen Treharne1 Heike Wehrheim2 1, 2011 Contents 1 Introduction 3 2 CSP 3 2.1 Notation

Doran, Simon J.

57

Studies of digital seismic data obtained in geothermal and volcanic regions. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in the following research areas: (1) study of tremor waveforms recorded at Mount St. Helens during 1980; (2) study of seismicity recorded during 1981 at Mount St. Helens; and (3) the monitoring of seismicity accompanying hydrofracturing experiments carried out in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico. (ACR)

Fehler, M.

1982-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

58

Greenhouse gas budgets of crop production current  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas budgets of crop production ­ current and likely future trends Helen C. Flynn and Pete Smith #12;Greenhouse gas budgets of crop production ­ current and likely future trends Helen C or boundaries. #12;3Greenhouse gas budgets of crop production ­ current and likely future trends About

Levi, Ran

59

Effective Methods in Reducing Communication Overheads in Solving  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0/2002 Yun (Helen) He, GHC2002 1 0/2002 Yun (Helen) He, GHC2002 1 Effective Methods in Reducing Communication Overheads in Solving PDE Problems on Distributed-Memory Computer Architectures Chris Ding and Yun (Helen) He Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 10/10/2002 Yun (Helen) He, GHC2002 2 Outline n Introduction n Traditional Method n Ghost Cell Expansion (GCE) Method n GCE Algorithm n Diagonal Communication Elimination (DCE) Technique n Analysis of GCE Method n Message Volume n Communication Time n Memory Usage and Computational Cost n Performance n Test Problem n Test Results n Conclusions 10/10/2002 Yun (Helen) He, GHC2002 3 Background n On a distributed system, each processor holds a problem

60

A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego And Mount St Helens Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego And Mount St Helens Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The large amount of scientific data collected on the Mount St. Helens eruption has resulted in significant changes in thinking about the atmospheric hazards caused by explosive volcanic activity. The hazard posed by fine silicate ash with long residence time in the atmosphere is probably much less serious than previously thought. The Mount St. Helens eruption released much fine ash in the upper atmosphere. These silicates were removed very rapidly due to a process of particle aggregation (Sorem, 1982;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oncologist helen vodopick" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Tracking Algorithm for Multi- Dimensional Array Transposition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

He, SC2002 1 MPI and OpenMP Paradigms on Cluster of SMP Architectures: the Vacancy Tracking Algorithm for Multi- Dimensional Array Transposition Yun (Helen) He and Chris Ding...

62

p o s t m a r k s For parents and Friends oF the University oF illinois at Urbana-Champaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GILCREASE, CHRIS 1 year MEMBER HANDLER, BETH 3 years MEMBER HURST, HELEN 2 years MEMBER LIN, HUNG-CHU 2 years MEMBER/UNDERGRAD BEGNAUD, CHELSEA 3 years MEMBER/LIBERAL ARTS GRAMLING, ROBERT 3 years MEMBER

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

63

FOR ALUMNI, PARENTS, AND FRIENDS OF THE EASTMAN SCHOOL OF MUSICWINTER 2011 FROM THE DEAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GILCREASE, CHRIS 1 year MEMBER HANDLER, BETH 3 years MEMBER HURST, HELEN 2 years MEMBER LIN, HUNG-CHU 2 years MEMBER/UNDERGRAD BEGNAUD, CHELSEA 3 years MEMBER/LIBERAL ARTS GRAMLING, ROBERT 3 years MEMBER

Goldman, Steven A.

64

Assessing interactions between the associations of common genetic susceptibility variants, reproductive history and body mass index with breast cancer risk in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium: a combined case-control study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Helene Holland 3 , kConFab 40 , AOCS 3,41 , Graham G Gilesstudies (ABCFS, GENICA, kConFab/AOCS, MARIE and SASBAC) usedGENICA* GESBC* KBCP kConFab/ AOCS LMBC MARIE* MCBCS MCCS*

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Please use "gres" settings in your batch scripts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Please use "gres" settings in your batch scripts Please use "gres" settings in your batch scripts September 4, 2012 by Helen He (0 Comments) We would like to encourage you to use...

66

Case Study of a Developing African Easterly Wave during NAMMA: An Energetic Point of View  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The West African perturbation that subsequently evolved into Hurricane Helene (2006) during NASAs African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (NAMMA), 15 August14 September 2006, and AMMAs third special observing period (SOP-3), 1529 September ...

Jol Arnault; Frank Roux

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Larry Jacobs: Jacobs Farm/Del Cabo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

he moved to Vermont to apprentice with Helen and Scottfarming and writing. 3 He had apprentices coming, so therewas a group of apprentices who were working, helping him run

Reti, Irene H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

T h e A l t e r n a t i v e E n e r g y T r u s t Business Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.........................................................................................................19 Appendix 4: Net Present Value Calculation Per Residential Unit OF GEOTHERMAL HEATING ON UBC RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENTS With special thanks to Helen Goodland of GVRD, who helped.....................................................................................................16 Appendix 2: Geothermal, Natural Gas & Electricity Comparison

69

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - SLAC Software Developer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SLAC Software Developer Discusses Physics Simulation Tool to Make Cancer Therapy Safer By Helen Shen October 20, 2011 Tiny particles are making a big difference in the world of...

70

1.1 NYT20000222.0111 -1 xxxxxxxxxxxxx 1.1 NYT19980623. ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Murasaki 29.2 NYT19990527.0336 -1 Jane Austen 29.2 ... saucer hiding behind the Hale-Bopp comet ... NYT19990105.0125 -1 Sister Mary Helen 54.3 ...

2005-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

71

Larry Jacobs: Jacobs Farm/Del Cabo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

graduation, he moved to Vermont to apprentice with Helen andthe United States. In Vermont, Jacobs met his future wife,farmhouse on 65 acres in Vermont. For over 20 years, they

Reti, Irene H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The dissolution rates of natural glasses as a function of their composition at pH 4 and 10.6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1995) Chemical weathering rates of pyroxenes and amphibols.In Chemical weathering rates of silicate minerals (eds. A.H. (1999) Field weathering rates of Mt. St. Helens tephra.

Wolff-Boenisch, Domenik

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Design and Test of a Nb3Sn Subscale Dipole Magnet for Training Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subscale Dipole Magnet for Training Studies Helene Felice,lateral and axial preload on training. On the other hand, ithas been developed to study training in Nb 3 Sn coils under

Caspi, Shlomo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Globalization and the Future of the National Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many observers are concerned that the growth of globalization will undermine and destroy national economies. For the past six years, Professor Suzanne Berger, the Raphael Dorman and Helen Starbuck Professor of Political ...

Boyd, James Patrick

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

75

Seismological investigation of crack formation in hydraulic rock-fracturing experiments and in natural geothermal environments. Progress report, September 1, 1982-August 31, 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the following: interpretation of seismic data from the recent activities in Long Valley, California; theoretical study on a source model for the long-period events and volcanic tremor observed at Mount St. Helens; calculation of synthetic seismograms for the tremor source model; analysis of the Easter Island tremor records; testing and application of the Gaussian beam synthetic method to observations at Mount St. Helens; and field testing and development of a high-temperature borehole seismograph.

Aki, K.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 3260 of 28,905 results. 51 - 3260 of 28,905 results. Download Request for Records Dispostion Authority http://energy.gov/cio/downloads/request-records-dispostion-authority Download ATTACHMENT A- CHECKLIST FOR SELF ASSESSMENT http://energy.gov/cio/downloads/attachment-checklist-self-assessment Download EIS-0448: Final Environmental Impact Statement Desert Sunlight Solar Farm Project, California http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0448-final-environmental-impact-statement Download LWA-0006- In the Matter of Helen Gaidine Oglesbee This Decision involves a whistleblower complaint filed by Helen Gaidine Oglesbee (Oglesbee) under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Oglesbee has... http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/lwa-0006-matter-helen-gaidine-oglesbee

77

Open Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Open Issues Open Issues Open Issues "error while loading shared libraries: libalpslli.so.0" with serial codes on login nodes December 13, 2013 by Helen He | 0 Comments Symptom: Dynamic executables built with compiler wrappers running directly on the external login nodes are getting the following error message: 0 comments | Read the full post Resolved: Running jobs error: "inet_arp_address_lookup" September 22, 2013 by Helen He | 0 Comments Symptom: After the Hopper August 14 maintenance, users reporting get the error message similar as follows occassionaly: 0 comments | Read the full post Resolved: qstat -a does not show correct hours in elpsed time for running jobs July 12, 2013 by Helen He | 0 Comments Sympton: After the Torque/Moab upgrade on 6/19, the elapsed run time display from

78

Open Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resolved -- "cannot find -lhdf5_hl_cpp" compiler error with C++ code using Resolved -- "cannot find -lhdf5_hl_cpp" compiler error with C++ code using hdf5 January 24, 2012 by Helen He | 0 Comments Symptom: After the 1/18 system maintenance, C++ code compilation gets an error if the default hdf5/1.8.5.0 module is loaded: "/usr/bin/ld: cannot find -lhdf5_hl_cpp". 0 comments | Read the full post "module: command not found" in batch jobs January 6, 2012 by Helen He | 0 Comments Sympotom: Users with csh/tcsh as default login shells will get this error when trying to use bash syntax in the batch scripts. The following batch script will get the "module: command not found" error at run time. 0 comments | Read the full post Resolved -- Job cannot be executed January 3, 2012 by Helen He | 0 Comments

79

Vlf Electromagnetic Investigations Of The Crater And Central Dome Of Mount  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vlf Electromagnetic Investigations Of The Crater And Central Dome Of Mount Vlf Electromagnetic Investigations Of The Crater And Central Dome Of Mount St Helens, Washington Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Vlf Electromagnetic Investigations Of The Crater And Central Dome Of Mount St Helens, Washington Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic induction survey in the crater of Mount St. Helens has identified several electrically conductive structures that appear to be associated with thermal anomalies and ground water within the crater. The most interesting of these conductive structures lies beneath the central dome. It is probably a partial melt of dacite similar to that comprising the June 1981 lobe of the central dome. Author(s): James N. Towle

80

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL Office of Acquisition and Project Management Office of Property Management Personal Property Policy Division In conjunction with: National Nuclear Security Administration - OPMO National Nuclear Security Administration - Nonproliferation & International Security Environmental Management - OPMO Savannah River Department of Energy 1 Property Management & Control Your Panel Presenters: Helene Abbott MA-653 Policy helene.abbott@hq.doe.gov Tyrone Ware MA-653 Training tyrone.ware@hq.doe.gov Tim Armstrong OPMO - EM-SRO timothy.armstrong@srs.gov Jim Bullian OPMO - NNSA james.bullian@nnsa.doe.gov Anatoli Welihozkiy NA-24 Export Control anatoli.welihozkiy@nnsa.doe.gov

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oncologist helen vodopick" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Heart Knowledge A short time after being diagnosed with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heart Knowledge A short time after being diagnosed with cancer in December of 2005 I was having healing." "Listen with your heart," he said. He insisted I put my full faith in my oncologist, my surgeon that I needed to attend to my "inner healing and heart knowledge." What did Cliff mean by "heart

O'Laughlin, Jay

82

Variation in Adherence to External Beam Radiotherapy Quality Measures Among Elderly Men With Localized Prostate Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To characterize the variation in adherence to quality measures of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for localized prostate cancer and its relation to patient and provider characteristics in a population-based, representative sample of U.S. men. Methods and Materials: We evaluated EBRT quality measures proposed by a RAND expert panel of physicians among men aged {>=}65 years diagnosed between 2000 and 2002 with localized prostate cancer and treated with primary EBRT using data from the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare program. We assessed the adherence to five EBRT quality measures that were amenable to analysis using SEER-Medicare data: (1) use of conformal RT planning; (2) use of high-energy (>10-MV) photons; (3) use of custom immobilization; (4) completion of two follow-up visits with a radiation oncologist in the year after therapy; and (5) radiation oncologist board certification. Results: Of the 11,674 patients, 85% had received conformal RT planning, 75% had received high-energy photons, and 97% had received custom immobilization. One-third of patients had completed two follow-up visits with a radiation oncologist, although 91% had at least one visit with a urologist or radiation oncologist. Most patients (85%) had been treated by a board-certified radiation oncologist. Conclusions: The overall high adherence to EBRT quality measures masked substantial variation in geography, socioeconomic status in the area of residence, and teaching affiliation of the RT facility. Future research should examine the reasons for the variations in these measures and whether the variation is associated with important clinical outcomes.

Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: bekelmaj@mskcc.org; Zelefsky, Michael J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Jang, Thomas L. [Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, Sidney Kimmel Center for Prostate and Urologic Cancers, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Basch, Ethan M.; Schrag, Deborah [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics (Health Outcomes Research Group), Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Automatic generation of CSP || B skeletons from xUML models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automatic generation of CSP || B skeletons from xUML models Edward Turner, Helen Treharne, Steve. CSP B is a formal approach to specification that combines CSP and B. In this paper we present our tool that automatically trans- lates a subset of executable UML (xUML) models into CSP B, for the purpose of verification

Doran, Simon J.

84

A CSP Approach to Control in Event-B Steve Schneider1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A CSP Approach to Control in Event-B Steve Schneider1 , Helen Treharne1 , and Heike Wehrheim2 1 CSP to provide ex- plicit control flow for an Event-B model and alternatively to provide a way as the basis of a running example to illustrate the framework. Keywords: Event-B, CSP, control flow

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

85

Department of Computing CSP||B modelling for railway verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Surrey Department of Computing Computing Sciences Report CS-12-03 CSP||B modelling Schneider Helen Treharne March 30th 2012 #12;CSP||B modelling for railway verification: the double junction work in verifying railway systems through CSP k B modelling and analysis. In particular we consider

Doran, Simon J.

86

CSP Theorems for Communicating B Machines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CSP Theorems for Communicating B Machines Steve Schneider and Helen Treharne Technical Report CSD #12;#12;Introduction 1 Abstract. Recent work on combining CSP and B has provided ways of describing sys- tems comprised of components described in both B (to express requirements on state) and CSP (to

Doran, Simon J.

87

Chalk it up to clever advertising The chalked sign in front of Mr. Bartley's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Many stu- dents came to Radcliffe afterward because of Helen Keller." From the Harvard Historical residences, and other locations around the University. U.S. delivery (periodical mail) of 32 issues per year- munications Director Perry Hewitt, on an updated platform that will enable us to present more multimedia

Manapat, Michael

88

Human Rights and Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Migration, Human Rights and Security in Europe MRU Student Conference Proceedings 2012 Edited by Siril Berglund, Helen McCarthy and Agata Patyna #12;2 "Migration, Human Rights and Security...............................................................................................58 #12;3 "Migration, Human Rights and Security in Europe", MRU Student Conference Proceedings

Saunders, Mark

89

Asynchronous IC Interconnect Network Design and Implementation Using a Standard ASIC Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maryland Leah Jamieson,Purdue Univerriry James Varah, University of British Columbia Helen Wood, National be edited for space and clarity. Expanding the Pipeline S gender gap still a problem . BY Clark Thomborson believe Nancy Griffeth of Bellcore was the first to study this data for its rel- evance to the CS pipeline

Wilton, Steve

90

Proceedings of the COLING/ACL 2006 Main Conference Poster Sessions, pages 6572, Sydney, July 2006. c 2006 Association for Computational Linguistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maryland Leah Jamieson,Purdue Univerriry James Varah, University of British Columbia Helen Wood, National be edited for space and clarity. Expanding the Pipeline S gender gap still a problem . BY Clark Thomborson believe Nancy Griffeth of Bellcore was the first to study this data for its rel- evance to the CS pipeline

91

CSDP: the seismology of continental thermal regimes. Final technical report, January 1, 1975-December 31, 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research progress is reported in the development of new seismological tools to define and characterize the geometry, mechanical construction and mass transport process of a geothermal system, and their application to various geothermal systems including the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock System, New Mexico, Kilauea and Kilauea Iki, Hawaii, Mt. St. Helens, Washington, and Long Valley, California. (ACR)

Aki, K.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

European Communications in Mathematical and Theoretical Biology June 2011, No. 13  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spirit of simultaneous review and outlook is a letter by the current President, Carlos Braumann (see page and possible future special issues of the journal are reviewed. It is agreed that special issues may originate; WA, AD and Helen Byrne will act as editors for the special issue. WA reports on the status

93

Highly-Sensitive and Efficient Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greg Ward Paul Bell Sophy Palmer Jody Palmer Helen Hayward Dave Evans Sean Paling Ria Johnson Ian Taylor David Chow Ling Yan Hung James Keates Pawel Majewski Joel Weller Terrance Figy Gudrun Heinrich Cook Philip Rodrigues Laurence Carson Julian Sonner Raymond Davis Iain D Kendall Dave Pickup David

Lindsay, C. Michael

94

The Werner Syndrome Helicase Is a Cofactor for HIV-1 Long Terminal Repeat Transactivation and Retroviral Replication*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Carolyn K. Harrod , Elizabeth F. Matlock , Saiqa Khan , Louisa Xu , Stephanie Chan , Helen Yang , Charu K. Thammavaram , Randall A. Rasor , Dennis K. Burns§ , Daniel J. Skiest¶ , Carine Van Lint 2 , Anne-Marie Girard protein and RecQ DNA helicases in transcription. Balajee et al. (1) have demonstrated that WRN contributes

Monnat, Ray

95

Revised May 24, 2013 21st Conference on Postal and Delivery Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Method Thomas Bozzo, Kristen Capogrossi, Kelly Eakin, John Pickett, &Mithuna Srinivasan: Are Postal Price Elkela, Heikki Nikali, and Chris J. Paterson: Comparative Study ­ Digitalization of Consumer Invoices Chris Rowsell: The UK's New Regulatory Framework for Postal Services ­ One Year On Paul Hodgson, Helen

Lin, Xiaodong

96

Y campusmap Mead Visitor Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& applied science law school graduate school Mason Lab Helen Hadley Hall Leet Oliver Watson Hall Malone left. The Visitor Center is on the left in the middle of the first block, across from the New Haven 203.432.2798 www.library.yale.edu Yale Bowl 81 Central Ave From downtown New Haven, go west on Chapel

97

Page 436 Faculty Sonoma State University 2008-2010 Catalog Emiliano C. Ayala (2000)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. and Clark K. Riley '57 ++ Helene M. and Anton Roeger III '57 Jill E. and C. Keith Rust '57 '82P '88P. and Toms B. Royal '61 '88P '92P '93P ++ Lynn and G. William Ruhl '61 ++ Shirley and S. Murray Rust III '61

Ravikumar, B.

98

Parents and Families LEHIGH UNIVERSITY 1 Anonymous ++  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. Decker `33* 1934 President Associates Elinor and S. Murray* Rust, Jr. `34 `61P `67P `72P ++ Jane F. and Clark K. Riley `57 ++ Helene M. and Anton Roeger III `57 Jill E. and C. Keith Rust `57 `82P

Gilchrist, James F.

99

U N I V E R s I t y O F V E R m O N t CO L L E G E O F m E d I C I N E V e r m o n t s u m m e r 2 0 1 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. Decker `33* 1934 President Associates Elinor and S. Murray* Rust, Jr. `34 `61P `67P `72P ++ Jane F. and Clark K. Riley `57 ++ Helene M. and Anton Roeger III `57 Jill E. and C. Keith Rust `57 `82P

Bermingham, Laura Hill

100

Anthropolog Summer 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the six tribes of the state (Crow, Blackfeet, Cree,Assiniboine, Sioux, GrosVen- tre). The goal them in subsequent years. The five students were Wilena Old Person (Blackfeet), Helen Cryer (Cree), Glen Still Smoking (Blackfeet), Eli Suzukovich III (Chippewa-Cree) and Miranda McCarvel. The faculty

Mathis, Wayne N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oncologist helen vodopick" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A Comparison of Lidar and Balloon-Borne Particle Counter Measurements of the Stratospheric Aerosol 19741980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We compare a series of 85 dustsonde measurements and 84 lidar measurements made in midlatitude North America during 197480. This period includes two major volcanic increases (Fuego in 1974 and St. Helens in 1980), as well as an unusually clean, ...

T. J. Swissler; P. Hamill; M. Osborn; P. B. Russell; M. P. McCormick

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Using CamGRID to Calculate Protein Structures from NMR Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Biochemistry University of Cambridge Using CamGRID to Calculate Protein Structures from NMR Data Helen Mott Structural Studies of Signalling Proteins Nuclei with spin (e.g. 1H) align (mostly) with the applied magnetic field... restraints NMR t preparation evolution detection 2D NMR t1 t2...

Mott, Helen

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

103

Secure source coding with a helper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider a secure lossless source coding problem with a rate-limited helper. In particular, Alice observes an i.i.d. source Xn and wishes to transmit this source losslessly to Bob at a rate Rx. A helper, say Helen, ...

Ravi Tandon; Sennur Ulukus; Kannan Ramchandran

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Ohio State ADA Coordinator to Provide Assistance in Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ohio State ADA Coordinator to Provide Assistance in Indonesia L. Scott Lissner, The Ohio State in Indonesia on disability policy and practice. The trip, from September 15 ­ October 2, 2013, is sponsored, and university professors and students, the U.S. Embassy, along with Helen Keller International Indonesia [a U

Howat, Ian M.

105

ALDEN HULL .. ... .. .. Editor JANE PIER . . . Business Manager  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Directed by Richard Sullivan Lee Nancy T. Hansen Theatre iphigenia and other Daughters by Ellen mcLaughlin Schmidli James Keller Andrew Martin Kate Keller Colette Pfeiffer Helen Keller Anastasia Spalding Aunt Ev for making this place a home. She would especially like to thank Anastasia for taking this amazing trip

O'Laughlin, Jay

106

Bianca Aaron Joshua Abernathy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Killion Carrie McKinley Lavender McKittrick Ryan McLaughlin Mikayla McLean William McMahon McGuire McManus Brandt Anastasia Anderson William Anderson Helen Anderson Tyler Anderson-Sieg Michael Andrade Luke Andrea Greyson

Taylor, Jerry

107

Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: A Survey in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the current patterns of practice in Japan and to investigate factors that may make clinicians reluctant to use single-fraction radiotherapy (SF-RT). Methods and Materials: Members of the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) completed an Internet-based survey and described the radiotherapy dose fractionation they would recommend for four hypothetical cases describing patients with painful bone metastasis (BM). Case 1 described a patient with an uncomplicated painful BM in a non-weight-bearing site from non-small-cell lung cancer. Case 2 investigated whether management for a case of uncomplicated spinal BM would be different from that in Case 1. Case 3 was identical with Case 2 except for the presence of neuropathic pain. Case 4 investigated the prescription for an uncomplicated painful BM secondary to oligometastatic breast cancer. Radiation oncologists who recommended multifraction radiotherapy (MF-RT) for Case 2 were asked to explain why they considered MF-RT superior to SF-RT. Results: A total of 52 radiation oncologists from 50 institutions (36% of JROSG institutions) responded. In all four cases, the most commonly prescribed regimen was 30 Gy in 10 fractions. SF-RT was recommended by 13% of respondents for Case 1, 6% for Case 2, 0% for Case 3, and 2% for Case 4. For Case 4, 29% of respondents prescribed a high-dose MF-RT regimen (e.g., 50 Gy in 25 fractions). The following factors were most often cited as reasons for preferring MF-RT: 'time until first increase in pain' (85%), 'incidence of spinal cord compression' (50%), and 'incidence of pathologic fractures' (29%). Conclusions: Japanese radiation oncologists prefer a schedule of 30 Gy in 10 fractions and are less likely to recommend SF-RT. Most Japanese radiation oncologists regard MF-RT as superior to SF-RT, based primarily on the time until first increase in pain.

Nakamura, Naoki, E-mail: naokinak@luke.or.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Shikama, Naoto [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Hidaka (Japan); Wada, Hitoshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Miyagi Cancer Center, Natori (Japan); Harada, Hideyuki [Division of Radiation Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center, Mishima (Japan); Nozaki, Miwako [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo Medical University Koshigaya Hospital, Koshigaya (Japan); Nagakura, Hisayasu [Department of Radiology, KKR Sapporo Medical Center, Sapporo (Japan); Tago, Masao [Department of Radiology, Teikyo University Mizonokuchi Hospital, Kawasaki (Japan); Oguchi, Masahiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Uchida, Nobue [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shimane University Hospital, Izumo (Japan)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Patient-Physician Communication About Complementary and Alternative Medicine in a Radiation Oncology Setting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Despite the extensive use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among cancer patients, patient-physician communication regarding CAM therapies remains limited. This study quantified the extent of patient-physician communication about CAM and identified factors associated with its discussion in radiation therapy (RT) settings. Methods and Materials: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 305 RT patients at an urban academic cancer center. Patients with different cancer types were recruited in their last week of RT. Participants self-reported their demographic characteristics, health status, CAM use, patient-physician communication regarding CAM, and rationale for/against discussing CAM therapies with physicians. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify relationships between demographic/clinical variables and patients' discussion of CAM with radiation oncologists. Results: Among the 305 participants, 133 (43.6%) reported using CAM, and only 37 (12.1%) reported discussing CAM therapies with their radiation oncologists. In multivariate analyses, female patients (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21-0.98) and patients with full-time employment (AOR 0.32, 95% CI 0.12-0.81) were less likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists. CAM users (AOR 4.28, 95% CI 1.93-9.53) were more likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists than were non-CAM users. Conclusions: Despite the common use of CAM among oncology patients, discussions regarding these treatments occur rarely in the RT setting, particularly among female and full-time employed patients. Clinicians and patients should incorporate discussions of CAM to guide its appropriate use and to maximize possible benefit while minimizing potential harm.

Ge Jin [Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Fishman, Jessica [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States) [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Annenberg School for Communication at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Vapiwala, Neha [Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States) [Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Li, Susan Q.; Desai, Krupali [Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Xie, Sharon X. [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mao, Jun J., E-mail: maoj@uphs.upenn.edu [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

2009 Canadian Radiation Oncology Resident Survey  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Statistics from the Canadian post-MD education registry show that numbers of Canadian radiation oncology (RO) trainees have risen from 62 in 1999 to approximately 150 per year between 2003 and 2009, contributing to the current perceived downturn in employment opportunities for radiation oncologists in Canada. When last surveyed in 2003, Canadian RO residents identified job availability as their main concern. Our objective was to survey current Canadian RO residents on their training and career plans. Methods and Materials: Trainees from the 13 Canadian residency programs using the national matching service were sought. Potential respondents were identified through individual program directors or chief resident and were e-mailed a secure link to an online survey. Descriptive statistics were used to report responses. Results: The eligible response rate was 53% (83/156). Similar to the 2003 survey, respondents generally expressed high satisfaction with their programs and specialty. The most frequently expressed perceived weakness in their training differed from 2003, with 46.5% of current respondents feeling unprepared to enter the job market. 72% plan on pursuing a postresidency fellowship. Most respondents intend to practice in Canada. Fewer than 20% of respondents believe that there is a strong demand for radiation oncologists in Canada. Conclusions: Respondents to the current survey expressed significant satisfaction with their career choice and training program. However, differences exist compared with the 2003 survey, including the current perceived lack of demand for radiation oncologists in Canada.

Debenham, Brock, E-mail: debenham@ualberta.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Banerjee, Robyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Fairchild, Alysa; Dundas, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Trotter, Theresa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Yee, Don [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Microsoft Word - L0295-StJohnsTap-CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Joyce Vaughn Project Engineering - TELP-TPP-3 Proposed Action: L0295 - St. Johns-St. Helens #1 Interconnection Project Budget Information: Work Order #004866, Task 04 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6: "Additions or modifications to electric power transmission facilities that would not affect the environment beyond the previously developed facility area..." Location: Columbia County, Oregon (T4N, R1W, Section 7) Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Columbia River PUD (CRPUD) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to install a new tap and associated disconnect structures on BPA's St. Johns-St. Helens #1 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line to

111

Idahoans Saving Green by Going Green | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idahoans Saving Green by Going Green Idahoans Saving Green by Going Green Idahoans Saving Green by Going Green January 7, 2010 - 4:18pm Addthis Joshua DeLung Helen Humphreys never thought she would be able to afford the upfront costs of making her home more energy-efficient. Helen lives in southeastern Idaho and relies on Social Security for her income. Her energy bills sometimes left her pinching pennies. "My heating bills were quite high for a house this size, so I was a little alarmed," she says about her circa 1951 home, which doesn't even take up 1,000 square feet. This year, though, the Southeastern Idaho Community Action Agency had more funding than usual for its weatherization program because of $1.7 million in stimulus funding it will spend through March 2011. The agency ran a

112

The short and long term role of the ocean in Greenhouse Gas mitigation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JY01ax.doc 19 May 2001 JY01ax.doc 19 May 2001 The short and long term role of the ocean in Greenhouse Gas mitigation Ian S F Jones, Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, New York i.jones@ldeo.columbia.edu Helen E Young Earth Ocean and Space, Australian Technology Park, Sydney, HelenYoung@ozemail.com.au Introduction The carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere is rising rapidly, mostly as a result of fossil fuel burning. This is leading to more trapping of solar radiation in the atmosphere with the expectation that the world's climate will change. Rapid climate change has a downside risk of endangering the food security of the poor and raising the spectra of large scale transmigration. The UNFCCC was an agreement amongst most of the sovereign nations of the world

113

PROPERTYMANAGEMENTNEWSLETTERVol1issue3.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MAY 2006 VOLUME 1, NUMBER 3 MAY 2006 VOLUME 1, NUMBER 3 Jerry Hanley, Director 202-287-1563 jerry.hanley@hq.doe.gov Helene Mattiello 202-287-1593 helene.mattiello@hq.doe.g ov Beth Neely 202-287-1369 beth.neely@hq.doe.gov Kevin Rorer 202-287-1574 kevin.rorer@hq.doe.gov Fran Sutton 202-287-1562 fronzetta.sutton@hq.doe.g ov Daniel Young 202-287-1596 daniel.young2@hq.doe.gov ********************* MA-632 Mission Policy Data Management Assessments ********************* WELCOME to the latest edition of the property management newsletter. We have made this a special edition because it covers some of the highlights of our property management conference. The feedback on our recent conference - both from people who attended as well as people who presented - was

114

NAME  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liaison Officers (RLO) Liaison Officers (RLO) Distribution List NAME PROGRAM PROGRAM OFFICE PHONE EMAIL Auch, Joan NA-122.21 National Nuclear Security Administration 202-586-1852 Joan.auch@nnsa.doe.gov Barnes, Claude GC Office of the General Counsel 202-586-2957 claude.barnes@hq.doe.gov Black, Helen EE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 202-586-8563 helen.black@hq.doe.gov Briggs, Felecia (alternate POC) HS Office of Health, Safety and Security 301-903-8803 felecia.briggs@hq.doe.gov Cambrel, Shirley MA-70 Office of the Executive Secretariat 202-586-3173 shirley.cambrel@hq.doe.gov Campbell, Kevin SC Office of Science 301-903-1215 kevin.campbell@science.doe.gov Carter, Lionel NA-40 National Nuclear Security Administration 202-586-3904 lionel.carter@nnsa.doe.gov

115

http://10.31.201.4/Cases/whistle/lwa0006.htm  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 September 2, 1994 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Helen Gaidine Oglesbee Date of Filing: February 28, 1994 Case Number: LWA-0006 This Decision involves a whistleblower complaint filed by Helen Gaidine Oglesbee (Oglesbee) under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Oglesbee has been and is currently an employee of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), the management and operating contractor at the DOE's Hanford Nuclear Site. She alleges that she made health and safety complaints to her immediate supervisor from December 1990 to August 1991, and that beginning in October or November 1991, she elevated these concerns to higher management officials at WHC. Oglesbee

116

LWJ-0004 - In the Matter of Westinghouse Hanford Company | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LWJ-0004 - In the Matter of Westinghouse Hanford Company LWJ-0004 - In the Matter of Westinghouse Hanford Company LWJ-0004 - In the Matter of Westinghouse Hanford Company On February 28, 1994, Helen "Gai" Oglesbee filed a request for hearing under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. This request has been assigned Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Case No. LWA-0006. On May 31, 1994, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) filed a request that the OHA issue a Protective Order concerning certain documents which the company has agreed to provide to the Government Accountability Project (GAP) and Thad M. Guyer, counsel for Ms. Oglesbee. lwj0004.pdf More Documents & Publications LWZ-0031 - In the Matter of Westinghouse Hanford Company LWA-0006 - In the Matter of Helen Gaidine Oglesbee

117

Open Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Unable to open kgni version file /sys/class/gemini/kgni0/version" error "Unable to open kgni version file /sys/class/gemini/kgni0/version" error April 13, 2011 by Helen He | 0 Comments Symptom: Dynamic executables built with compiler wrappers running directly on the external login nodes are getting the following error message: 0 comments | Read the full post Resolved -- Default version not shown in "module avail module_name" command April 13, 2011 by Helen He | 0 Comments Symptom: The default software version is not shown when "module avail module_name" is issued. For example: 0 comments | Read the full post Job dependencies do not work as expected. Require additional string in job name April 8, 2011 by Katie Antypas | 0 Comments Symptom: submitting jobs which depend on other jobs does not work. 0 comments | Read the full post

118

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Biotechnology --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z D'Andrea, Fabio (Fabio D'Andrea) - Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, Ecole Normale Supérieure D'Odorico, Paolo (Paolo D'Odorico) - Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia Dacre, Helen (Helen Dacre) - Department of Meteorology, University of Reading Daczko, Nathan (Nathan Daczko) - Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Macquarie University Dai, Aiguo (Aiguo Dai) - Climate and Global Dynamics Division, National Center for Atmospheric Research Daly, Christopher (Christopher Daly) - Department of Geosciences, Oregon State University Damm, Bodo (Bodo Damm) - Institut für Geographie, Universität Regensburg Damoah, Richard (Richard Damoah) - School of GeoSciences, University

119

Low Dose Radiation Program: Workshop VI Abstracts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop VI Principal Investigator and Abstracts Workshop VI Principal Investigator and Abstracts Anderson, Carl Whole Genome Analysis of Functional Protein Binding Sites and DNA Methylation: Application to p53 and Low Dose Ionizing Radiation. Averbeck, Dietrich Cellular Responses at Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation. Azzam, Edouard Adaptive Responses to Low Dose/Low Dose-Rate ?-Rays in Normal Human Fibroblasts: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism. Bailey, Susan The Role of Telomere Dysfunction in Driving Genomic Instability. Balajee, Adayabalam Low Dose Radiation Induced DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Responses in Human 3-Dimensional Skin Model System. Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen Imaging Bioinformatics for Mapping Multidimensional Responses. Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen Biological Response to Radiation Mediated through the Microenvironment and

120

Microsoft Word - Fall 2006 NEWSLETTER.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT NEWSLETTER PROPERTY MANAGEMENT NEWSLETTER SEPTEMBER 2006 VOLUME 1, NUMBER 4 Jerry Hanley, Director 202-287-1563 jerry.hanley@hq.doe.gov Helene Mattiello 202-287-1593 helene.mattiello@hq.doe.g ov Beth Neely 202-287-1369 beth.neely@hq.doe.gov Fran Sutton 202-287-1562 fronzetta.sutton@hq.doe.g ov Daniel Young 202-287-1596 daniel.young@hq.doe.gov ********************* MA-632 Mission Policy Data Management Assessments ********************* Celebrating Our Profession! It is my pleasure to present you with the 4 th edition of the Property Management Newsletter. In this edition of the newsletter, we will be focusing on our profession and some of the important initiatives recently accomplished or currently underway in the Department. One of the purposes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oncologist helen vodopick" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

CX-004263: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Categorical Exclusion Determination 3: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004263: Categorical Exclusion Determination L0295 - Saint Johns-Saint Helens Number 1 Interconnection Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 10/15/2010 Location(s): Columbia County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to install a new tap and associated disconnect structures on BPA?s Saint Johns-Saint Helens Number 1 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line to provide a point of interconnection for Columbia River Public Utility District's (CRPUD's) new Columbia River Substation. CRPUD is constructing the new 115-kV substation in Columbia County, Oregon to serve residential load growth in the area. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-004263.pdf More Documents & Publications

122

Human Resource Directors (HRD) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resource Resource Directors (HRD) Human Resource Directors (HRD) Name Organization Phone Number E-Mail Brian Carter Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) (503) 230-4527 becarter@bpa.gov Linda Brunner (Acting) Consolidated Business Center (EM) (513) 246-0518 linda.brunner@emcbc.doe.gov Connie Nottingham (Acting) Richland Operations Office (EM) (509) 373-6288 connie.nottingham@rl.doe.gov Helene Taylor Savannah River Operations (EM) (803) 952-8123 helene.taylor@srs.gov Bruce Wynn National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL/FE) (412) 386-5259 bruce.wynn@netl.doe.gov Shandon Davis Strategic Petroleum Reserve Proj. Office (SPRO/FE) (504) 734-4382 shandon.davis@spr.doe.gov Edith Ramos Office of Inspector General (OIG) (202) 586-2470 edith.ramos@hq.doe.gov

123

Microsoft Word - propertyfallnewsletter.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SEPTEMBER 2007 VOLUME 1, NUMBER 5 SEPTEMBER 2007 VOLUME 1, NUMBER 5 Jerry Hanley, Director 202-287-1563 jerry.hanley@hq.doe.gov Helene Mattiello 202-287-1593 helene.mattiello@hq.doe.gov Beth Leykamm 202-287-1369 beth.leykamm@hq.doe.gov Gaynel Abadie 202-287-1574 Gaynel.abadie@hq.doe.gov ********************* MA-632 Mission Policy Data Management Assessments ********************* Celebrating Our Profession! Welcome to the 5th edition of the Property Management Newsletter. It's been a busy few months since our last issue. In this edition, you will read about several property management accomplishments especially in the area of electronic recycling. Everyone in the DOE property management community contributed to these FY 2007 successes and you should be proud of the

124

Seismological investigation of crack formation in hydraulic rock fracturing experiments and in natural geothermal environments. Progress report, September 1, 1981-August 31, 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accomplishments during the present reporting period are: high-quality digital data obtained in the crater and the flank of Mt. St. Helens by the deployment of 9 event-recorders; discovery of striking differences in arrival times and amplitudes of seismic events between the crater station and flank stations; successful interpretation of the above observations by a powerful new method of seismogram synthesis called Gaussian Beam Method; evidence obtained at Mt. St. Helens for a close connection between the volcanic tremor and so-called long-period events; further development of our volcanic tremor model by including acoustic vibration in magma; and development of a high-temperature small-diameter borehole seismograph for use in search of a magma reservoir by listening to seismic events due to thermal stress.

Aki, K.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Fission and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

O P Q R S O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Nelson, Michael P. (Michael P. Nelson) - Institute for Conservation Ethics, Michigan State University Nickel, Bernhard (Bernhard Nickel) - Department of Philosophy, Harvard University Nissenbaum, Helen (Helen Nissenbaum) - Department of Culture and Communications & Computer Science Department, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University Norton, John D.(John D.Norton).- Department of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh Nualart, Eulalia (Eulalia Nualart) - Département de Mathématiques, Institut Galilée, Université Paris 13 Nord Go back to Individual Researchers Collections: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Biochemical

126

Morale: definitions, dimensions and measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

am very grateful to my supervisor, Philip Stiles, for his unstinting support throughout both this research and the MBA and MPhil which preceded it. He was in turn supported by Annick Stiles who kindly reviewed the statistics for me. I am indebted... of different research sites. I am grateful to Penny Bugden, Denise Clements, Richard Dellabarca, Stephen England-Hall, Nerys Evans, Sue Gibson, Kate Hartigan, Caroline Hulks, Helen Ives, Sian Jeffrey, Carole Manship, Tom Ogilvie, Adrian Roberts, Garret...

Hardy, Ben

2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

127

ANCIL in action: progress updates on A New Curriculum for Information Literacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

represents this development in four progressive bands which radiate outwards from the learner at the centre, starting with the development of practical skills and expanding through increasingly complex processes. These include establishing an evolving... for use with pilot institutions, Helen Webster designed a template for using ANCIL principles to inform lesson planning. This document was used as the basis of a session-level audit of classes in the Research Skills Programme at Cambridge University...

Coonan, Emma; Secker, Jane; Wrathall, Katy; Webster, Helen

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

128

Fifth international fungus spore conference. [Abstracts]: Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This folio contains the proceedings of the Fifth International Fungal Spore Conference held August 17-21, 1991 at the Unicoi State Park at Helen, Georgia. The volume contains abstracts of each oral presentation as well as a collection of abstracts describing the poster sessions. Presentations were organized around the themes (1) Induction of Sporulation, (2) Nuclear Division, (3) Spore Formation, (4) Spore Release and Dispersal, and (4) Spore Germination.

Timberlake, W.E.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Fifth international fungus spore conference  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This folio contains the proceedings of the Fifth International Fungal Spore Conference held August 17-21, 1991 at the Unicoi State Park at Helen, Georgia. The volume contains abstracts of each oral presentation as well as a collection of abstracts describing the poster sessions. Presentations were organized around the themes (1) Induction of Sporulation, (2) Nuclear Division, (3) Spore Formation, (4) Spore Release and Dispersal, and (4) Spore Germination.

Timberlake, W.E.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Recognizing Achievement and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. and Clark K. Riley '57 ++ Helene M. and Anton Roeger III '57 Jill E. and C. Keith Rust '57 '82P '88P. and Toms B. Royal '61 '88P '92P '93P ++ Lynn and G. William Ruhl '61 ++ Shirley and S. Murray Rust III '61 III '67 '94P ++ Jane and James O. Rust '67 Peng and Robert K. Schaumann '67 Tracy and William K

Simmons, Craig A.

131

Predictors of IMRT and Conformal Radiotherapy Use in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A SEER-Medicare Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The extent to which new techniques for the delivery of radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have diffused into clinical practice is unclear, including the use of 3-dimensional conformal RT (3D-RT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database, we identified 2,495 Medicare patients with Stage I-IVB HNSCC diagnosed at age 65 years or older between 2000 and 2005 and treated with either definitive (80%) or adjuvant (20%) radiotherapy. Our primary aim was to analyze the trends and predictors of IMRT use over this time, and the secondary aim was a similar description of the trends and predictors of conformal radiotherapy (CRT) use, defined as treatment with either 3D-RT or IMRT. Results: Three hundred sixty-four (15%) patients were treated with IMRT, and 1,190 patients (48%) were treated with 3D-RT. Claims for IMRT and CRT rose from 0% to 33% and 39% to 86%, respectively, between 2000 and 2005. On multivariable analysis, IMRT use was associated with SEER region (West 18%; Northeast 11%; South 12%; Midwest 13%), advanced stage (advanced, 21%; early, 9%), non-larynx site (non-larynx, 23%; larynx, 7%), higher median census tract income (highest vs. lowest quartile, 18% vs. 10%), treatment year (2003-2005, 31%; 2000-2002, 6%), use of chemotherapy (26% with; 9% without), and higher radiation oncologist treatment volume (highest vs. lowest tertile, 23% vs. 8%). With CRT as the outcome, only SEER region, treatment year, use of chemotherapy, and increasing radiation oncologist HNSCC volume were significant on multivariable analysis. Conclusions: The use of IMRT and CRT by Medicare beneficiaries with HNSCC rose significantly between 2000 and 2005 and was associated with both clinical and non-clinical factors, with treatment era and radiation oncologist HNSCC treatment volume serving as the strongest predictors of IMRT use.

Sher, David J., E-mail: dsher@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Neville, Bridget A. [Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Aileen B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Schrag, Deborah [Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

Consideration of Dose Limits for Organs at Risk of Thoracic Radiotherapy: Atlas for Lung, Proximal Bronchial Tree, Esophagus, Spinal Cord, Ribs, and Brachial Plexus  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To review the dose limits and standardize the three-dimenional (3D) radiographic definition for the organs at risk (OARs) for thoracic radiotherapy (RT), including the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: The present study was performed by representatives from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, and Soutwestern Oncology Group lung cancer committees. The dosimetric constraints of major multicenter trials of 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT were reviewed and the challenges of 3D delineation of these OARs described. Using knowledge of the human anatomy and 3D radiographic correlation, draft atlases were generated by a radiation oncologist, medical physicist, dosimetrist, and radiologist from the United States and reviewed by a radiation oncologist and medical physicist from Europe. The atlases were then critically reviewed, discussed, and edited by another 10 radiation oncologists. Results: Three-dimensional descriptions of the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus are presented. Two computed tomography atlases were developed: one for the middle and lower thoracic OARs (except for the heart) and one focusing on the brachial plexus for a patient positioned supine with their arms up for thoracic RT. The dosimetric limits of the key OARs are discussed. Conclusions: We believe these atlases will allow us to define OARs with less variation and generate dosimetric data in a more consistent manner. This could help us study the effect of radiation on these OARs and guide high-quality clinical trials and individualized practice in 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT.

Kong, Feng-Ming, E-mail: fengkong@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan and Ann Arbor Veteran Affairs Medical System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ritter, Timothy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan and Ann Arbor Veteran Affairs Medical System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Quint, Douglas J. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hurkmans, Coen W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Timmerman, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States); Bezjak, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States); Marsh, Lon [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan and Ann Arbor Veteran Affairs Medical System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Okunieff, Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Choy, Hak [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University Cancer Center, and Winship Cancer institute, Atlanta, GA (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

NA Standards | Valence Geometries | Nitrog. Bases Table 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table 1: References for Nitrogenous Base Structures Table 1: References for Nitrogenous Base Structures used in Lester Clowney, Shri C. Jain, A. R. Srinivasan, John Westbrook, Wilma K. Olson, and Helen M. Berman. "Geometric Parameters in Nucleic Acids: Nitrogenous Bases. (1996) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 118, 519-529. Cytosine -------------------------------------------------------------------------- CSD ID Compound Reference -------------------------------------------------------------------------- acytid alpha-cytidine Post, M.L., et al. Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 1977, 479, 133 bivvil 2',3'-O-(tetraisopropyl-1,3-disiloxanediyl)-cytidine Hoogendorp J.D and Romers, C Acta Cryst., 1982, B38, 2738 bofwoi 2'-deoxy-2'-fluorocytidine dihydrate Marck, C., et al. J. Mol. Struct., 1982, 82, 77

134

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steering Group Steering Group Eugene Beier University of Pennsylvania Joel Butler Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Sally Dawson Brookhaven National Laboratory Helen Edwards Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Thomas Himel Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stephen Holmes Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Young-Kee Kim, Chair Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory/ University of Chicago Andrew Lankford University of California, Irvine David McGinnis Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Sergei Nagaitsev Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Tor Raubenheimer Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Vladimir Shiltsev Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Maury Tigner Cornell University Hendrik Weerts Argonne National Laboratory Contributors Neutrino Physics Group Eugene Beier University of Pennsylvania

135

NA Standards | Valence Geometries | Table 1 Ref.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1: References for Mononucleoside and Mononucleotide Structures 1: References for Mononucleoside and Mononucleotide Structures used in Anke Gelbin, Bohdan Schneider, Lester Clowney, Shu-Hsin Hsieh, Wilma K. Olson, and Helen M. Berman. "Geometric Parameters in Nucleic Acids: Sugar and Phosphate Constituents. (1996) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 118, 519-529. -------------------------------------------------------------------------- CSD ID Compound Reference -------------------------------------------------------------------------- fikhai 3',5'-Di-O-acetyl-2'-deoxyadenosine Koole, L. H., et al. Can. J. Chem., 1987, 65, 326 fikhai01 3',5'-Di-O-acetyl-2'-deoxyadenosine Low, J. N., et al. Acta Cryst., 1988, C44, 2202 foylua 3'-O-acetyl-2'-deoxyadenosine Low, J. N., et al.

136

Models on Distributed Memory Architectures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5/2004 Y.He 1 5/2004 Y.He 1 MPH: a Library for Coupling Multi-Component Models on Distributed Memory Architectures and its Applications Yun (Helen) He and Chris Ding CRD Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 10/15/2004 Y.He 2 10/15/2004 Y.He 3 Motivation n Application problems grow in scale & complexity n Effective organization of simulation software system that is maintainable, reusable, sharable, and efficient è a major issue n Community Climate System Model (CCSM) development n Software lasts much longer than a computer! 10/15/2004 Y.He 4

137

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 DATE: October 27, 2010 TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Director, Policy Division Office of Procurement and Assistance Policy Office of Procurement and Assistance Management SUBJECT: Revised DOE Acquisition Guide Chapter 42.1 Indirect Rate Administration (October 2010) SUMMARY: The Office of Procurement and Assistant Management (OPAM) has issued the above Acquisition Guide Chapter. DOE Acquisition Guide Chapter 42.1 Indirect Rate Administration has been revised to provide the current references and requirements. This Flash will be available online at the following website: http://www.management.energy.gov/policy_guidance/policy_flashes.htm. Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Helen Oxberger at

138

Seismological investigation of crack formation in hydraulic rock fracturing experiments and in natural geothermal environments. Progress report, September 1, 1980-August 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the following: interpretation of seismic data from hydraulic fracturing experiments at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Site, interpretation of 3-D velocity anomalies in the western US with special attention to geothermal areas, theoretical and observational studies of scattering and attenuation of high-frequency seismic waves, theoretical and observational studies of volcanic tremors in relation to magma transport mechanisms, and deployment and maintenance of 9 event-recorders around Mt. St. Helens. Abstracts of papers submitted for publication are included. (MHR)

Aki, K.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Seismological investigation of crack formation in hydraulic rock fracturing experiments and in natural geothermal environments. Progress report, September 1, 1979-August 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in the following research areas: a synthesis of seismic experiments at the Fenton Hill Hot-Dry-Rock System; attenuation of high-frequency shear waves in the lithosphere; a new kinematic source model for deep volcanic tremors; ground motion in the near-field of a fluid-driven crack and its interpretation in the study of shallow volcanic tremor; low-velocity bodies under geothermal areas; and operation of event recorders in Mt. St. Helens and Newberry Peak with preliminary results from them. (MHR)

Aki, K.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Impact of informed-choice invitations on diabetes screening knowledge, attitude and intentions: an analogue study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conducted the screening clinics led by Marian Bosman; MRC Field Epidemiology team; Nicola Popplewell, Helen Morris, Kate Williams and Rachel Crockett for their contribution to the development of the study and the materials Author details 1Psychology... 2007, 5(2):112-119. 20. World Medical Association: Declaration of Helsinki. 2008 [http://www.wma. net/en/30publications/10policies/b3/17c.pdf]. 21. Muir J, Mant D, Jones L, Yudkin P, on behalf of the Imperial Cancer Research Fund OXCHECK study group...

Mann, Eleanor; Kellar, Ian; Sutton, Stephen; Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Hankins, Matthew; Griffin, Simon J; Marteau, Theresa M

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oncologist helen vodopick" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Microsoft Word - LBNL-62500.v3.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

500 500 Understanding and Mitigating Multicore Performance Issues on the AMD Opteron Architecture John Levesque, Jeff Larkin, Martyn Foster, Joe Glenski, Garry Geissler, Stephen Whalen Cray Inc. Brian Waldecker AMD Inc. Jonathan Carter, David Skinner, Helen He, Harvey Wasserman, John Shalf NERSC Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Hongzhang Shan, Erich Strohmaier Computational Research Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory March 7, 2007 This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. 2 Understanding and Mitigating Multicore Performance Issues on the AMD Opteron Architecture

142

SciPy IPython IPython:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SciPy SciPy IPython IPython: modern tools for interactive & web-enabled scientific computing Fernando Pérez http://fperez.org, @fperez_org Fernando.Perez@berkeley.edu Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, UC Berkeley NERSC User Day, LBL, Berkeley, Feb 13, 2013 SciPy IPython Outline 1 Scientific Python 2 IPython: Interactive Python FP (UC Berkeley) IPython 2/13/13 2 / 21 Beyond (Floating Point) Number Crunching Hardware floating point Arbitrary precision integers Rationals Interval arithmetic Symbolic manipulation FORTRAN Extended precision floating point Text processing Databases Graphical user interfaces Web interfaces

143

The 1983 Temperature Gradient and Heat Flow Drilling Project for the State of Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the Summer of 1983, the Washington Division of Geology and Earth Resources carried out a three-hole drilling program to collect temperature gradient and heat flow information near potential geothermal resource target areas. The project was part of the state-coupled US Department of Energy Geothermal Program. Richardson Well Drilling of Tacoma, Washington was subcontracted through the State to perform the work. The general locations of the project areas are shown in figure 1. The first hole, DNR 83-1, was located within the Green River valley northwest of Mount St. Helens. This site is near the Green River Soda Springs and along the projection of the Mount St. Helens--Elk Lake seismic zone. The other two holes were drilled near Mount Baker. Hole DNR 83-3 was sited about 1/4 km west of the Baker Hot Springs, 10.5 km east of Mount Baker, while hole DNR 83-5 was located along Rocky Creek in the Sulphur Creek Valley. The Rocky Creek hole is about 10 km south-southwest of the peak. Two other holes, DNR 83-2 and DNR 83-4, were located on the north side of the Sulphur Creek Valley. Both holes were abandoned at early stages of drilling because of deep overburden and severe caving problems. The sites were apparently located atop old landslide deposits.

Korosec, Michael A.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

1983 temperature gradient and heat flow drilling project for the State of Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the Summer of 1983, a three-hole drilling program was carried out to collect temperature gradient and heat flow information near potential geothermal resource target areas. The general locations of the project areas are shown. The first hole, DNR 83-1, was located within the Green River valley northwest of Mount St. Helens. This site is near the Green River Soda Springs and along the projection of the Mount St. Helens - Elk Lake seismic zone. The other two holes were drilled near Mount Baker. Hole DNR 83-3 was sited about 1/4 km west of the Baker Hot Springs, 10.5 km east of Mount Baker, while hole DNR 83-5 was located along Rocky Creek in the Sulphur Creek Valley. The Rocky Creek hole is about 10 km south-southwest of the peak. Two other holes, DNR 83-2 and DNR 83-4, were located on the north side of the Sulphur Creek Valley. Both holes were abandoned at early stages of drilling because of deep overburden and severe caving problems. The sites were apparently located atop old landslide deposits.

Korosec, M.A.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Chemical and Physical Signatures for Microbial Forensics  

SciTech Connect

Chemical and physical signatures for microbial forensics John Cliff and Helen Kreuzer-Martin, eds. Humana Press Chapter 1. Introduction: Review of history and statement of need. Randy Murch, Virginia Tech Chapter 2. The Microbe: Structure, morphology, and physiology of the microbe as they relate to potential signatures of growth conditions. Joany Jackman, Johns Hopkins University Chapter 3. Science for Forensics: Special considerations for the forensic arena - quality control, sample integrity, etc. Mark Wilson (retired FBI): Western Carolina University Chapter 4. Physical signatures: Light and electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, gravimetry etc. Joseph Michael, Sandia National Laboratory Chapter 5. Lipids: FAME, PLFA, steroids, LPS, etc. James Robertson, Federal Bureau of Investigation Chapter 6. Carbohydrates: Cell wall components, cytoplasm components, methods Alvin Fox, University of South Carolina School of Medicine David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 7. Peptides: Peptides, proteins, lipoproteins David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 8. Elemental content: CNOHPS (treated in passing), metals, prospective cell types John Cliff, International Atomic Energy Agency Chapter 9. Isotopic signatures: Stable isotopes C,N,H,O,S, 14C dating, potential for heavy elements. Helen Kreuzer-Martin, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Michaele Kashgarian, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chapter 10. Extracellular signatures: Cellular debris, heme, agar, headspace, spent media, etc Karen Wahl, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 11. Data Reduction and Integrated Microbial Forensics: Statistical concepts, parametric and multivariate statistics, integrating signatures Kristin Jarman, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Cliff, John B.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Wunschel, David S.

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

146

Secure Source Coding with a Helper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a secure lossless source coding problem with a rate-limited helper. In particular, Alice observes an i.i.d. source $X^{n}$ and wishes to transmit this source losslessly to Bob at a rate $R_{x}$. A helper, say Helen, observes a correlated source $Y^{n}$ and transmits at a rate $R_{y}$ to Bob. A passive eavesdropper can observe the coded output of Alice. The equivocation $\\Delta$ is measured by the conditional entropy $H(X^{n}|J_{x})/n$, where $J_{x}$ is the coded output of Alice. We first completely characterize the rate-equivocation region for this secure source coding model, where we show that Slepian-Wolf type coding is optimal. We next study two generalizations of this model and provide single-letter characterizations for the respective rate-equivocation regions. In particular, we first consider the case of a two-sided helper where Alice also has access to the coded output of Helen. We show that for this case, Slepian-Wolf type coding is suboptimal and one can further decrease the information l...

Tandon, Ravi; Ramchandran, Kannan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

A review of prostate motion with considerations for the treatment of prostate cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The motion of the prostate gland can influence the efficacy of radiation therapy. This article examines the literature concerning prostate gland motion with considerations for the treatment of cancer. The objectives of this review include providing radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and dosimetrists with data to assist in determining the best treatment adaptation for individual patients. The prostate gland is not a static structure, but rather a dynamic structure and this should be a consideration in the treatment protocol. The treatment planning personnel must add a margin to the clinical treatment volume (CTV) radiation field to account for prostate motion and patient setup errors resulting in a planning treatment volume (PTV). The movement of the prostate in a radiation field with a small margin to protect the anterior rectum may allow the posterior aspect of the gland to escape the prescribed dose. Thus, an understanding of potential prostate movements in radiation therapy is critical to achieve tumor control and minimize radiation complications in patients.

Byrne, Thomas E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thompson Cancer Survival Center, Knoxville, TN (United States)]. E-mail: tbyrne@covhlth.com

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Training and organizational analysis. Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of human factors evaluations were undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multidisciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. A team of human factors specialists, assisted by a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation therapists, conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. A function and task analysis was initially performed to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of system-user interfaces, procedures, training and qualifications, and organizational policies and practices. The present work focuses solely on training and qualifications of personnel (e.g., training received before and during employment), and the potential impact of organizational factors on the performance of teletherapy. Organizational factors include such topics as adequacy of staffing, performance evaluations, commonly occurring errors, implementation of quality assurance programs, and organizational climate.

Henriksen, K.; Kaye, R.D.; Jones, R. [Hughes Training, Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States); Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.I. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Barriers to the Implementation of Surveillance for Stage I Testicular Seminoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Postorchiectomy adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for Stage I seminoma can be associated with long-term toxicity, and management strategies with a lower treatment burden achieve the same excellent cure rate. Because studies suggest that radiation oncologists in the United States continue to recommend RT for these patients, we sought to identify factors associated with management recommendations. Methods and Materials: We conducted a one-time internet-based survey among 491 randomly selected American radiation oncologists self-described as specializing in genitourinary oncology. Results: Response rate was 53% (n = 261). Forty-nine percent of respondents worked in university-affiliated practices. Sixty-two percent of respondents always/usually recommended adjuvant RT for patients with Stage I seminoma, whereas 21% always/usually recommended surveillance and 3% always/usually recommended chemotherapy. One third (33%) expressed concerns that patients who experienced relapse during surveillance could not be salvaged. Although 88% of physicians were aware of an increased risk of second malignant neoplasms (SMN) after adjuvant RT, 85% underestimated its magnitude. Compared with physicians not typically recommending RT, physicians who always/usually recommended RT were more likely to believe that patients might not be salvaged at relapse during surveillance (p = 0.008) and were less aware of the association between RT and SMN (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Respondents who always/usually recommend postorchiectomy RT for patients with Stage I seminoma are more likely to underestimate late RT morbidity and to believe that surveillance is associated with increased mortality. Given the equivalent efficacy and reduced morbidity of surveillance compared with RT, our findings underscore the need for ongoing physician education to increase appropriate clinical implementation of surveillance strategies.

Arvold, Nils D. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Catalano, Paul J. [Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, and Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, and Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sweeney, Christopher J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Nguyen, Paul L.; Balboni, Tracy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Fossa, Sophie D. [Department of Clinical Research, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University, Oslo (Norway)] [Department of Clinical Research, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University, Oslo (Norway); Travis, Lois B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Beard, Clair J., E-mail: cbeard@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Estimation of Citation-Based Scholarly Activity Among Radiation Oncology Faculty at Domestic Residency-Training Institutions: 1996-2007  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Advancement in academic radiation oncology is largely contingent on research productivity and the perceived external influence of an individual's scholarly work. The purpose of this study was to use the Hirsch index (h-index) to estimate the research productivity of current radiation oncology faculty at U.S. academic institutions between 1996 and 2007. Methods and Materials: We performed bibliometric citation database searches for available radiation oncology faculty at domestic residency-training institutions (n = 826). The outcomes analyzed included the total number of manuscripts, total number of citations, and the h-index between 1996 and 2007. Analysis of overall h-index rankings with stratification by academic ranking, junior vs. senior faculty status, and gender was performed. Results: Of the 826 radiation oncologists, the mean h-index was 8.5. Of the individuals in the top 10% by the h-index, 34% were chairpersons, 88% were senior faculty, and 13% were women. A greater h-index was associated with a higher academic ranking and senior faculty status. Recursive partitioning analysis revealed an h-index threshold of 15 (p <0.0001) as an identified breakpoint between the senior and junior faculty. Overall, women had lower h-indexes compared with men (mean, 6.4 vs. 9.4); however, when stratified by academic ranking, the gender differential all but disappeared. Conclusion: Using the h-index as a partial surrogate for research productivity, it appears that radiation oncologists in academia today comprise a prolific group, however, with a highly skewed distribution. According to the present analysis, the h-index correlated with academic ranking. Thus, it potentially has utility in the process of promotion decisions. Overall, women in radiation oncology were less academically productive than men; the possible reasons for the gender differential are discussed.

Choi, Mehee [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Fuller, Clifton D. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Radiological Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Department of Radiology, Division of Radiological Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States)], E-mail: thomasch@ohsu.edu

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Geographic Analysis of the Radiation Oncology Workforce  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate trends in the geographic distribution of the radiation oncology (RO) workforce. Methods and Materials: We used the 1995 and 2007 versions of the Area Resource File to map the ratio of RO to the population aged 65 years or older (ROR) within different health service areas (HSA) within the United States. We used regression analysis to find associations between population variables and 2007 ROR. We calculated Gini coefficients for ROR to assess the evenness of RO distribution and compared that with primary care physicians and total physicians. Results: There was a 24% increase in the RO workforce from 1995 to 2007. The overall growth in the RO workforce was less than that of primary care or the overall physician workforce. The mean ROR among HSAs increased by more than one radiation oncologist per 100,000 people aged 65 years or older, from 5.08 per 100,000 to 6.16 per 100,000. However, there remained consistent geographic variability concerning RO distribution, specifically affecting the non-metropolitan HSAs. Regression analysis found higher ROR in HSAs that possessed higher education (p = 0.001), higher income (p rates (p < 0.001), and higher minority population (p = 0.022). Gini coefficients showed RO distribution less even than for both primary care physicians and total physicians (0.326 compared with 0.196 and 0.292, respectively). Conclusions: Despite a modest growth in the RO workforce, there exists persistent geographic maldistribution of radiation oncologists allocated along socioeconomic and racial lines. To solve problems surrounding the RO workforce, issues concerning both gross numbers and geographic distribution must be addressed.

Aneja, Sanjay [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, CT (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gross, Cary P. [Cancer Outcomes, Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, CT (United States); Department of General Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Roberts, Kenneth [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Yu, James B., E-mail: james.b.yu@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, CT (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Evaluation of Dosimetric Consequences of Seroma Contour Variability in Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using a Constructed Representative Seroma Contour  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Contouring variability of the seroma can have important implications in the planning and delivery of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). This study aimed to quantify the dosimetric impact of these interobserver and intraobserver contouring variations by construction of a representative seroma contour (RSC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with a seroma suitable for APBI underwent four computed tomography (CT) scans: one planning CT and three additional CTs on the first, third, and fifth days of treatment. Three radiation oncologists contoured the seroma on each CT scan. For 3 patients, oncologists repeated contouring twice to assess intraobserver variations. Seroma contour variability was quantified by construction of an RSC. In addition, the percent volume overlap (PVO) was calculated. Root-mean-square (RMS) differences in seroma volume, size, and center of mass position compared to those of the RSC were calculated. Treatment fields from the original plan were applied to the repeated CTs by using the same isocenter shifts as the original plan. The dosimetric impact of the contour variations was assessed using V{sub 95} (volume receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD). Results: Interobserver RMS volume differences were, on average, 5.6 times larger than intraobserver differences. The median interobserver RMS seroma volume difference was 1.48 cm{sup 3}. The median PVO was 51.6%. V{sub 95} and EUD of the seroma contours were similar for all patients. The median RMS differences of the seroma V{sub 95} and EUD were 0.01% (range, 0%-3.99%) and 0.05 Gy (range, 0-0.98 Gy). Conclusions: Construction of the RSC showed that interobserver variations were most responsible for contour variations of the seroma. Current planning margins provided adequate dose coverage of the seroma despite these contour variations.

Kosztyla, Robert, E-mail: rkosztyla@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Olson, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Centre for the North, Prince George, British Columbia (Canada); Division of Radiation Oncology and Developmental Radiotherapeutics, Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Carolan, Hannah [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Division of Radiation Oncology and Developmental Radiotherapeutics, Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Balkwill, Susan [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Division of Radiation Oncology and Developmental Radiotherapeutics, Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Kwan, Winkle [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Division of Radiation Oncology and Developmental Radiotherapeutics, Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Hopper Featured Announcements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Announcements Announcements Hopper Featured Announcements Hopper OS upgrade and new SW set to default next Wed, Feb 27 February 21, 2013 by Helen He | 0 Comments 1) There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance for Hopper next Wednesday, February 27, from 7 am to 7 pm Pacific time. This is a major OS upgrade. Most applications are highly recommended to recompile (or at least relink) after the maintenance. C++ and PGAS applications are recommended to recompile and relink. Please plan your work accordingly and check the NERSC Message of the Day (MOTD) for status update: http://www.nersc.gov/live-status/motd/. 2) After the maintenance, the following software versions will be set to default on Hopper: -- pgi/12.9.0 -- gcc/4.7.2 -- cce/8.1.3 -- intel/13.0.1.117

154

Feb01_tribenotes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TEC Tribal Issues Topic Group Meeting TEC Tribal Issues Topic Group Meeting February 6, 2001 Portland, Oregon Participants: Richard Arnold (Las Vegas Indian Center), Helen Belencan (DOE/EM- 22), Kevin Blackwell (DOT/FRA), Wynona Boyer (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes), Mike Calhoun (DOT/FRA), Michael Chavarria/Joseph Mark Chavarria (Santa Clara Pueblo), Kevin Clarke (DOE/RL), Sandra Covi (UPR), Martha Crosland (DOE/EM- 11), Jim Daust (CVSA), Ed Gonzales (ELG Engineering), Ken Gray (CTUIR), Veronica Herkshan (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes), Robert Holden (NCAI), Judith Holm (DOE/NTPA), Henry Jacobs (DOT/FRA), Daniel King (Oneida Nation), Edward Liebow (EH&SP), Linda Minton (ENA), Stanley Paytiamo (Pueblo of Acoma EPA), Wilda Portner (SAIC), Max Powell (DOE/YMSCO), Mike Rowswell (Assoc. of State Rail Safety Managers), Greg Sahd (DOE/CAO/WIPP), Patrick Sobotta (Nez Perce

155

Procurement Directors FROM: Office of Procurement and Assistance Policy, MA-61  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 25,2008 July 25,2008 Procurement Directors FROM: Office of Procurement and Assistance Policy, MA-61 Office of Procurement and Assistance Management SUBJECT: Acquisition Letter 2008-02, Audit Management SUMMARY: Attached is Acquisition Letter (AL) 2008-02, Audit Management. It provides guidance to contracting officers on effective management of contract audits for non-M&O prime ;ontracts as well as subcontracts under management and operating (M&O) contracts. This Acquisition Letter replaces AL 2006-12, Corporate Audit Management Program (CAMP), which is cancelled. This Flash and its attachment will be online within a day, at the following website: http:l/mananernent.ener~.~ov/polic~ guidance/volicv flashes-htm. Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Helen Oxberger at (202) 287-1332

156

vita_dmm.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VITA VITA Dimitri Mihalas Laboratory Fellow (retired) Applied Physics Division Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545 Personal Born March 20, 1939; Los Angeles, California. Degrees B.A. 1959 University of California, Los Angeles M.S. 1960 California Institute of Technology Ph.D. 1963 California Institute of Technology Professional Associations U. S. National Academy of Sciences International Astronomical Union Commission 12 (Radiation and Structure of the Solar Atmosphere) Commission 36 (Stellar Atmospheres) American Astronomical Society Los Alamos National Laboratory Fellow Honors and Awards 1985 NCAR Outstanding Publication Award 1984 Alexander von Humboldt Stiftung Senior U.S. Scientist Award 1981 Elected to U.S. National Academy of Sciences 1979 NCAR Outstanding Publication Award 1975 Philips Lecturer, Haverford College 1974 Helen B. Warner Prize

157

Open Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resolved -- Error Message: "ModuleCmd_Switch.c(172):ERROR:152: Module Resolved -- Error Message: "ModuleCmd_Switch.c(172):ERROR:152: Module 'PrgEnv---cray' is currently not loaded" June 28, 2012 by Helen He | 2 Comments Symptom: User batch jobs with "#PBS -V" in the script are seeing an error message: "ModuleCmd_Switch.c(172):ERROR:152: Module 'PrgEnv---cray' is currently not loaded". This is caused by overwriting the default Cray Programming Environment from Cray to PGI. This message can also be seen with "script" on the login nodes, and "nodestat" on the MOM nodes. User jobs without "#PBS -V" do not trigger this error message. Solution: ignore as harmless. 2 comments | Read the full post Resolved: pgi/12.4.0 has link error with OpenMP when perftools/5.3.x is

158

1980's | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

's 's The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-9395 E: lawrence.award@science.doe.gov Award Laureates 1980's Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page 1988 Mary K. Gaillard Richard T. Lahey, Jr. Chain Tsuan Liu Gene H. McCall Alexander Pines Joseph S. Wall 1987 James W. Gordon Miklos Gyulassy Sung-Hou Kim James L. Kinsey J. Robert Merriman David E. Moncton 1986 James J. Duderstadt Helen T. Edwards Joe W. Gray C. Bradley Moore Gustavus J. Simmons James L. Smith

159

high "thruput" queue now available on Hopper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

high thruput queue now available on Hopper high thruput queue now available on Hopper high thruput queue now available on Hopper August 30, 2012 by Helen He (0 Comments) A new batch queue named "thruput" has been implemented on Hopper to support the increased high throughput computing needs from the user community. The queue limits for this queue are as follows: -- max wall time is 168 hrs -- max node count is 2 (max core count is 48) -- max queue-able jobs per user is 500 -- max running jobs from all users in this queue is 500 -- has same priority as of the "reg_small" queue -- charging factor is 1 Post your comment You cannot post comments until you have logged in. Login Here. Comments No one has commented on this page yet. RSS feed for comments on this page | RSS feed for all comments

160

NERSC Users Group Meeting October 2-3, 2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NUG 2008 Dates October 2-3, 2008 Location NERSC's Oakland Scientific Facility 415 20th St. [MAP] Oakland CA, 94612 NERSC's Web Site Presentations Agenda Training Day - Thursday, October 2, 2008 Oakland Scientific Facility, Conference Room 238 Time (Pacific) Topic Presenter 8:30 Registration and Welcome 9:00 Franklin Quad Core Update/Differences Helen He 9:30 File Transfer Best Practices David Turner 10:00 Enabling Grid File Transfers: The NERSC CA Shreyas Cholia 10:30 Break 10:45 Franklin IO: Systems Overview Richard Gerber 11:15 Franklin IO: Best Practices for Application Performance ... Read More » Attendee List Attendees at NERSC: Onsite and Remote participation OSF, Onsite 61 registered (46 for Oct. 2, 54 for Oct. 3) Name Affiliation Location Days

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oncologist helen vodopick" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Connections Between the TCR Proteins XPG and CSB, Repair of Oxidative DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Connections Between the TCR Proteins XPG and CSB, Repair of Oxidative DNA Connections Between the TCR Proteins XPG and CSB, Repair of Oxidative DNA Base Damage, and the Radio-Adaptive Response Helen Budworth, Brett Haltiwanger, Altaf Sarker, Torsten Grösser, Björn Rydberg, and Priscilla K. Cooper* Life Sciences Division, MailStop 74-157, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720; *Corresponding author A key question that is central to accurately assessing human health risks from environmentally relevant low level (low dose, low dose rate) exposures to ionizing radiation is whether cellular responses measured at the higher doses for which there are strong epidemiological health data and the high doses commonly used in laboratory experiments extrapolate in a linear fashion to low doses. Recent data suggest that they may not. For example, low-dose hypersensitivity for

162

A History Of Geothermal Exploration In Washington | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History Of Geothermal Exploration In Washington History Of Geothermal Exploration In Washington Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: A History Of Geothermal Exploration In Washington Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: The presence of Mt. St. Helens and other Quaternary andesitic volcanoes and other indicators, e.g., both thermal and both mineral springs, in the Washington Cascades suggests that this area has good potential for geothermal resources. Exploration for geothermal resources has been conducted in the region since the early 1970s, with surge of interest and exploration activity in 1974 when the Federal Government developed a leasing program for its land. This surge was followed by a gradual decline in activity through the early 1980s. During the mid 1980s,

163

Press Pass - Press Release Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Holiday Special: Fermilab's Lederman Science Center open Dec. 28 - Ask-a-Scientist program continues during holidays 12/20/02 Fermilab Hosts Virtual Ask-a-Scientist on December 12, 2002 11/7/02 Fermilab's Helen Edwards Receives Prestigious 2003 Robert R. Wilson Prize from the American Physical Society 10/22/02 Visitors again welcome at Fermilab's Ask-a-Scientist program 10/10/02 Fermilab Astrophysicist to Speak at American Academy of Arts and Sciences Induction Ceremony 10/3/02 Fermilab Hosts Virtual Ask-a-Scientist on October 9, 2002 10/3/02 Fermilab Arts Series opens this weekend with special access procedures 9/20/02 Live Web-cast of Fermilab colloquium, Sept. 25: Native American culture in the Fox River Valley 9/20/02 Fermilab Hosts Virtual Ask-a-Scientist on October 9, 2002 9/19/02

164

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance Effect of Multi-core Performance Effect of Multi-core on Scientific Applications Jonathan Carter, Yun (Helen) He, John Shalf, Erich Strohmaier, Hongzhang Shan, and Harvey Wasserman NERSC Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory CUG 2007, May 7-10, Seattle, WA CUG 2007, May 7-10, Seattle, WA Outline * Introduction and Micro-benchmarks * Application Studies - MILC - BeamBeam3D * Performance Prediction for Multi-core Applications - Model Introduction - Model Verification with Various Applications - Quad Core Performance Prediction * Conclusion CUG 2007, May 7-10, Seattle, WA Current Trend * New Constraints - 15 years of exponential clock rate growth has ended * But Moore's Law continues! - Number of transistors keep increase exponentially. - How do keep performance increasing at historical

165

Microsoft Word - cug2010_JobComp.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 Proceedings 1 of 12 10 Proceedings 1 of 12 Franklin Job Completion Analysis Hwa-Chun Wendy Lin, Yun (Helen) He, Woo-Sun Yang National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) ABSTRACT: The NERSC Cray XT4 machine Franklin has been in production for 3000+ users since October 2007, where about 1800 jobs run each day. There has been an on-going effort to better understand how well these jobs run, whether failed jobs are due to application errors or system issues, and to further reduce system related job failures. In this paper, we talk about the progress we made in tracking job completion status, in identifying job failure root cause, and in expediting resolution of job failures, such as hung jobs, that are caused by system issues. In addition, we present some Cray software

166

Please use "gres" settings in your batch scripts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Please use "gres" settings in your batch scripts Please use "gres" settings in your batch scripts Please use "gres" settings in your batch scripts September 4, 2012 by Helen He (0 Comments) We would like to encourage you to use the generic resources ("gres") setting for various file systems that your batch jobs use. This feature is currently available on Hopper and Carver. The advantage of this setting is that your jobs won't start (thus won't fail) during a scheduled file system maintenance. The syntax for the "gres" setting is: #PBS -l gres=filesystem1[%filesystem2%filesystem3...] (new recommendation) or #PBS -l gres=filesystem1:1[%filesystem2:1%filesystem3:1...] (as announced before) Note that the "%" character means "and". Therefore, if multiple file

167

http://10.31.201.4/cases/whistle/lwz0031.htm  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 31 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Petitioners: Westinghouse Hanford Company Date of Filing: April 5, 1994 Case Number: LWZ-0031 This determination will consider a Motion to Dismiss filed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) on April 5, 1994. In its Motion, WHC seeks the dismissal of the underlying complaint and hearing request filed by Helen "Gai" Oglesbee under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Oglesbee's request for a hearing under 708.9 was filed on February 28, 1994, and it has been assigned Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Case No. LWA-0006. I. Background The Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program was established to safeguard "public and employee health

168

EIS-0285-SA-33: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0285-SA-33: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-33: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-33: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management along the St Helens-Allston Transmission Line ROW. The line is a 115 kV Single Circuit Transmission Line having an easement width of 100 feet. BPA proposes to clear danger trees from varying widths of the indicated transmission line right-of-way that are approaching electrical clearance zones in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA Standards. See Section 1.1 of the attached checklist for pertinent information on each section of referenced transmission line. BPA is clearing the danger trees to prevent them from falling or growing into the lines, thereby causing outages. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management

169

kfl055 223..241  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2005 2005 World Health Organization Reevaluation of Human and Mammalian Toxic Equivalency Factors for Dioxins and Dioxin-Like Compounds Martin Van den Berg, a,1 Linda S. Birnbaum, b Michael Denison, c Mike De Vito, b William Farland, d Mark Feeley, e Heidelore Fiedler, f Helen Hakansson, g Annika Hanberg, g Laurie Haws, h Martin Rose, i Stephen Safe, j Dieter Schrenk, k Chiharu Tohyama, l Angelika Tritscher, m Jouko Tuomisto, n Mats Tysklind, o Nigel Walker, p and Richard E. Peterson q a World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Research on Environmental Health Risk Assessment and Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Faculties of Veterinary Medicine, Science and University Medical Center, Universiteit Utrecht, PO Box 80177, 3508 TD Utrecht, The Netherlands; b National Health & Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, United States Environmental Protection

170

RHIC II Science Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Groups and Convenors Working Groups and Convenors The purpose of these Working Groups is to provide an organized way for the community to refine the science agenda for the RHIC II upgrades, and make a compelling case for these upgrades to the broad nuclear physics community. A document summarizing the Working Group results, with a sharp focus on the science case for RHIC II, will be produced early in 2006. Electromagnetic Probes Convenors: Ralf Rapp, Zhangbu Xu, Gabor David Email list info Website Heavy Flavor Convenors: Ramona Vogt, Thomas Ullrich, Tony Frawley Email list info Website High pT Convenors: Denes Molnar, Saskia Mioduszewski, Kirill Filimonov Internal working group web page Email list info Equation of State Convenors: Steffen Bass, Julia Velkovska, Helen Caines Email list info

171

Nucleic Acid Standards - Sugar and Phosphate Constituents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sugar and Phosphate Constituents Sugar and Phosphate Constituents The following tables contain the complete references for the structures used in a statistical survey of well-refined mononucleoside, mononucleotide, dinucleoside monophosphate, and trinucleoside diphosphate crystal structures found in the Cambridge Structural Database and the Nucleic Acid Database that appeared in The Journal of the American Chemical Society (Anke Gelbin, Bohdan Schneider, Lester Clowney, Shu-Hsin Hsieh, Wilma K. Olson, and Helen M. Berman. "Geometric Parameters in Nucleic Acids: Sugar Phosphate Constituents" (1996) 118, 519-529.) Table 1: References for Mononucleoside and Mononucleotide Structures Table 2: References for Dinucleoside Monophosphate and Trinucleoside Diphosphate Structures The following tables are summaries of the bond lengths, angles, and torsion

172

Microsoft Word - FlightsEnd_CX.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2013 0, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Dorie Welch Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Flight's End property funding Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2011-003-00, Contract # BPA-007071 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Real Property transfers for cultural protection, habitat preservation and wildlife management. Location: Saint Helens quadrangle, in Columbia County, Oregon (near Scapoose, Oregon) Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to fund the Greenbelt Trust's purchase of the Flight's End property (Property), a 100-acre peninsula located at the north end of Sauvie Island in

173

FTCP FAQ Standards Qualifying Officials List - Savannah River Operations Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SR TQP Functional Area Qualifying Officials SR TQP Functional Area Qualifying Officials Functional Area Name Phone Organization Chemical Processing Pat Suggs 803-208-2908 AMWDP I Ci vi] Structural Engineering Mike Dholakia 803-208-1228 AMWDP Brent Gutierrez 803-208-2969 AMWDP I Construction Management Robert Baker 803-644-3711 AMWDP William Huxford 803-952-4281 NNSA Criticality Safety Glenn Christenbury 803-208-3737 NNSA Norm Shepard 803-208-3618 AMNMSP Deactivation and Decommissioning Angelia Adams 803-952-8593 AMCP Helen Belencan 803-952-8696 AMCP Electrical Systems Fred Brown 803-208-2529 AMWDP Michael Mikolanis 803-208-1223 AMWDP Marc Woodworth 803-208-3966 AMNMSP Emergency Management Cindy Brizes 803-952-4290 NNSA Howard Burgess 803-952-5538 OS SES Environmental Compliance ·A very Hammett 803-952-7805 AMCP

174

Origins and consequences of radiation…induced centrosome aberrations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Origins and consequences of radiation-induced centrosome aberrations Origins and consequences of radiation-induced centrosome aberrations Sangeetha Vijayakumar, Nisarg Shah, Ignacio Fernandez-Garcia, Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NY, NY. Centrosome aberrations are frequently observed in pre-neoplastic breast lesions and are known to drive chromosomal instability (Lingle et al., 2002). Previous studies from our lab have shown that human mammary epithelial cells exposed to low doses of radiation exhibit centrosome aberrations (CAs) in a dose dependent manner from 10-200 cGy (Maxwell et al., 2008). These data demonstrated that radiation-induced CAs actually precede and generate genomic instability and that TGFβ is a key mediator

175

CX-002003: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

003: Categorical Exclusion Determination 003: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002003: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ohio State American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Act 3 (Competitive Grants) Antioch College - Geothermal CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/14/2010 Location(s): Antioch, Ohio Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The Glen Helen Ecology Institute at Antioch College is proposing a project to install a ground source heat pump system with a heating and cooling capacity of 26.8 tons. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-002003.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-002680: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002007: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001884: Categorical Exclusion Determination

176

E-Newsletter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peruse the Newsletter Archives. Peruse the Newsletter Archives. Email to subscribe or unsubscribe, or to submit news. Life Sciences Division Newsletter DNA November 2013 In this issue: Scientific News » Un-Junking Junk DNA » New Imaging Technique Identified to Monitor Progression of Heart Failure » The Inner Workings of a Bacterial Black Box Caught on Time-Lapse Video » Mina Bissell Comments on The Risks of the Replication Drive » Recent Publications » Divisional News » Lab Director Alivisatos Calls Out Work by Costes and Tang at All-Hands Meeting » Biosciences Expert Advisory Committee Meets on November 7 » Employee News » Honoring Those Who Served: Lab Vets, Including Tony Smith, Share Their Stories » Helen Budworth Mentors Emerging Leader from Nigeria in TechWomen Program »

177

NERSC Users Group Meeting October 2-3, 2008 Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentations Presentations Presentations Sort by: Default | Name | Date (low-high) | Date (high-low) | Source | Category Franklin Quad Core Update/Differences October 2, 2008 | Author(s): Yun (Helen) He | Download File: HeQuadCoreNUG2008.pdf | pdf | 238 KB File Transfer Best Practices October 2, 2008 | Author(s): David Turner | Download File: turner.pdf | pdf | 197 KB Enabling Grid File Transfers: The NERSC CA October 2, 2008 | Author(s): Sheryas Cholia | Download File: cholia-train.pdf | pdf | 157 KB Franklin IO: Systems Overview October 2, 2008 | Author(s): Richard A. Gerber | Download File: gerber.pdf | pdf | 427 KB Accelerating X Windows with NX* October 2, 2008 | Author(s): Janet Jacbsen | Download File: NXDemo.pdf | pdf | 52 KB Franklin Profiling and Performance Tools

178

AARD Membership Update | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Advanced Accelerator R&D Subpanel Advanced Accelerator R&D Subpanel High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) HEPAP Home Meetings Members .pdf file (20KB) Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (44KB) HEP Committees of Visitors HEP Home Charges/Reports Advanced Accelerator R&D Subpanel Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Jay Marx, Chair ( Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) Ilan Ben-Zvi, (Brookhaven National Laboratory) Jean-Pierre Delahaye, (CERN) Alex Dragt, ( University of Maryland ) Helen Edwards, (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory) Don Hartill, ( Cornell University ) Andrew Hutton, (Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility) Young-Kee Kim, ( University of Chicago ) Katsunobu Oide (KEK, Japan ) Nan Phinney, (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center ) Jamie Rosenzweig, ( University of California at Los Angeles )

179

COMPETITIVE SOURCING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EXECUTIVE STEERING GROUP Meeting Proceedings October 30, 2002 Room 6E-069, 10:30 - 12:00 Agenda Opening Remarks Bruce Carnes Competitive Sourcing Update Denny O'Brien Team Briefings Team Leads ESG Discussion/Wrap up Bruce Carnes Attendees Bruce Carnes, Acting Chair MaryAnn Shebek Robert Card Prentis Cook Ambassador Brooks Tony Lane Kyle McSlarrow Karen Evans Suzanne Brennan, NTEU Claudia Cross Brian Costlow Helen Sherman Frank Bessera Laurie Morman Denny O'Brien Travis McCrory Bill Pearce Jeff Dowl Mark Hively Steven Apicella Robin Mudd Bruce Carnes chaired the meeting and began with welcoming NTEU to the meeting. In regard to the OMB's Balanced Scorecard, the Department has achieved a Green on progress and we are close to achieving a yellow on status.

180

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-103): Supplemental Analysis for Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (August 12, 2002)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/Z992 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-103-Keeler-Pennwalt). Jim Jellison - TFO/Olympia Ed Tompkins - TFO/Ross Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Keeler-Pennwalt transmission line and parts of the St. John-Keeler, Rivergate-Keeler, Keeler-Oregon City, & St. John-St. Helens lines. Location: Washington and Multnomah Counties, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to clear targeted vegetation within the Right-of-Ways along access roads and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. See Section 1.4 of the attached checklist for a complete description of the proposed action. Analysis: See the attached checklist for the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oncologist helen vodopick" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285-SA-33)(11/27/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 27, 2001 November 27, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/Z992 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS- 0285/SA-33) Bill Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Jim Jellison - TFO/Olympia Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the St Helens-Allston Transmission Line ROW. The line is a 115 kV Single Circuit Transmission Line having an easement width of 100 feet. Location: The ROW is located in Columbia County, OR, being in the Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear danger trees from varying widths of the indicated transmission line right-of-way that are approaching electrical clearance zones in accordance

182

Hopper Featured Announcements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper May 31, 2012 by Helen He | 0 Comments We have increased the max walltime for the low queue on Hopper from 12 to 24 hrs. 0 comments | Read the full post Hopper compilers and DDT short outage next Wed, May 16 May 10, 2012 | 0 Comments Due to a scheduled maintenance for the License Servers, most of the compilers (except GNU) and the DDT debugger on Hopper will not be available from 10:30 am to 12:30 pm on Wednesday, May 16. If there are any questions or concerns, please contact "consult at nersc dot gov". 0 comments | Read the full post Hopper scheduled maintenance next Tues (May 8) and new software available May 1, 2012 | 0 Comments 1) In conjunction with the NERSC Center Wide Outage for global file systems

183

COMPETITIVE SOURCING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMPETITIVE SOURCING COMPETITIVE SOURCING EXECUTIVE STEERING GROUP MEETING PROCEEDINGS June 17, 2002 8:30 am - 11:00 am Room 5E-069 ATTENDEES John Gordon Robert Card Bruce Carnes Kathy Peery Brendan Danaher, AFGE Tony Lane Karen Evans Bill Sylvester Claudia Cross Brian Costlow Laurie Smith Helen Sherman Frank Bessera Rosalie Jordan Dennis O'Brien Mark Hively Robin Mudd Steven Apicella AGENDA 8:30 a.m. - 8:35 a.m. Opening Remarks 8:35a.m. - 8:55 a.m. Executive Steering Group roles and responsibilities, A-76 status, and talking points Team Briefings 8:55 a.m. - 9:20 a.m. Information Technology Study 9:20 a.m. - 9:45 a.m. Financial Services Study

184

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Mechanisms of Tissue Response to Low  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tissue Response to Low Dose Radiation Tissue Response to Low Dose Radiation Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Why This Project? In the past, the effects of ionizing radiation on humans has been attributed in great part to its ability to damage DNA, which transmits information from cell to cell, and generation to generation. Damaged DNA can lead to cell death or perpetuate the damage to daughter cells and to future generations. In addition to the information contained with the genome (i.e., DNA sequence), information directing cell behavior and tissue function is also stored outside the DNA. The success in cloning sheep from the DNA contained in the nucleus of an adult cell shows how important signals from the outside are in defining how the genome is expressed. This

185

Using Three Dimensional Cell Culture and Tissue Architecture to Monitor an  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Three Dimensional Cell Culture and Tissue Architecture to Monitor an Three Dimensional Cell Culture and Tissue Architecture to Monitor an Adaptive Response in Mammary Epithelial Cells Mina Bissell Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Exposure of tissues to ionizing radiation results in targeted effect on cells as well as non-targeted effects on tissues. Although, targeted effects such as the DNA damage response have been studied extensively, non-targeted effects leading to modification in tissue architecture and tumor progression have been less studied and are not well understood. The mammary gland is a tissue that has been shown to be susceptible to tumor formation and cancer progression following exposure to ionizing radiation. In conjunction with the laboratories of Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff and Catherine Park we showed previously that in the presence of TGF-β,

186

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Performance Impacts from and Performance Impacts from Franklin Upgrades Yun (Helen) He National Energy Research Supercomputing Center Cray User Group Meeting May 4-7, 2009 1 Outline * Franklin Introduction * Benchmarks * Quad Core Upgrade * CLE 2.1 Upgrade * IO Upgrade * Summary 2 Franklin's Role at NERSC * NERSC is the US DOE's keystone high performance computing center. * Franklin is the "flagship" system at NERSC serving ~3,100 scientific users in different application disciplines. * Serves the needs for most NERSC users from modest to extreme concurrencies. * Expects significant percentage of time to be used for capability jobs on Franklin. 3 Kernel Benchmarks * Processor: NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) - Serial: NPB 2.3 Class B * best understood code base - Parallel: NPB 2.4 Class D at 64 and 256 ways

187

Microsoft Word - BGE SEP Summer 2008 Report _05_05_09_-tg.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BGE's SMART ENERGY PRICING PILOT BGE's SMART ENERGY PRICING PILOT SUMMER 2008 IMPACT EVALUATION April 28, 2009 Ahmad Faruqui, Ph.D. Sanem Sergici, Ph.D. Prepared for Baltimore Gas & Electric Company Copyright © 2008 The Brattle Group, Inc. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors would like to acknowledge the research assistance of Lamine Akaba. We would also like to thank the members of the BGE SEP team for their helpful suggestions and comments on earlier drafts of this report. Our special thanks go to Cheryl Hindes, Neel Gulhar, Ed Berman, and Mary Straub. We also would like to thank Helen Connolly of the Luxembourg Income Study for helpful suggestions on some econometric aspects of this study. Ahmad Faruqui Sanem Sergici Suggested Citation:

188

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC Cray XT4 NERSC Cray XT4 Helen He NERSC User Services yhe@lbl.gov NERSC User Group Meeting September 17-20, 2007 1 Training Topics * Overview * XT4 Architecture * PGI Compiler * Single Node and MPI Optimizations * Performance and Profiling Tools * Running Jobs * Third-party Softwares * ACTS Tools * DDT Debugger * I/O * Grid Services * Benchmark Performance 2 Benjamin Franklin, one of America's first scientists, performed ground breaking work in energy efficiency, electricity, materials, climate, ocean currents, transportation, health, medicine, acoustics and heat transfer. Franklin Franklin 3 About Franklin * Largest Cray XT-4 * 9,740 nodes with 19,480 CPU (cores) * dual-core AMD Opteron 2.6 GHz, 5.2 GFlops/sec peak * 102 node cabinets * 16 KWs per cabinet (~1.7 MWs total) * 39.5 TBs aggregate memory * 16.1+ Tflop/s

189

Hopper Featured Announcements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rebooting some Hopper login nodes this afternoon Rebooting some Hopper login nodes this afternoon February 25, 2011 by Katie Antypas | 0 Comments We will be rebooting some of the login nodes this afternoon, one at a time. You may see a broadcast message asking you to log off. You should log out and log back in to hopper.nersc.gov. 0 comments | Read the full post Users should access Hopper2 via hopper.nersc.gov now February 24, 2011 by Helen He | 1 Comments You should now use "hopper.nersc.gov" to access the Hopper phase 2 system. "hopp2.nersc.gov" will remain an alias for Hopper for the next few weeks. Please contact consult@nersc.gov if you have problems accessing Hopper. 1 comments | Read the full post NERSC training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications

190

Microsoft Word - Minutes.060503.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMPETITIVE SOURCING COMPETITIVE SOURCING EXECUTIVE STEERING GROUP MEETING PROCEEDINGS June 5, 2003 2:00 pm-3:00 pm Room 7B-252 ATTENDEES Kyle McSlarrow Robert Card Linton Brooks James Campbell Brandon Daneher, AFGE Cary Kurtz, NTEU Karen Evans Brian Costlow William Pearce Helen Sherman Frank Bessera Eric Fygi Prentis Cook Mary Ann Shebek Kathy Peery Robert Tuttle Jeffery Dowell Kevin Kolevar Al Knight Dennis O'Brien Steven Apicella AGENDA Opening Remarks (Kyle McSlarrow) Approvals/Notification Overview (Dennis O'Brien/Team Chiefs) Team Study Change Decisions (Brian Costlow, William Pearce, Karen Evans) New OMB Circular A-76 (Dennis O'Brien) Team Status Synopsis (Time permitting) Open discussion

191

http://10.31.201.4/cases/whistle/lwj0004.htm  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LWJ-0004 LWJ-0004 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Protective Order Name of Petitioner: Westinghouse Hanford Company Date of Filing: May 31, 1994 Case Number: LWJ-0004 On February 28, 1994, Helen "Gai" Oglesbee filed a request for hearing under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. This request has been assigned Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Case No. LWA- 0006. On May 31, 1994, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) filed a request that the OHA issue a Protective Order concerning certain documents which the company has agreed to provide to the Government Accountability Project (GAP) and Thad M. Guyer, counsel for Ms. Oglesbee. In conjunction with the request, WHC has submitted a Stipulated Protective Order, attached to this Decision, to which WHC,

192

NERSC Users Group Meeting October 2-3, 2008 Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agenda Agenda Agenda Training Day - Thursday, October 2, 2008 Oakland Scientific Facility, Conference Room 238 Time (Pacific) Topic Presenter 8:30 Registration and Welcome 9:00 Franklin Quad Core Update/Differences Helen He 9:30 File Transfer Best Practices David Turner 10:00 Enabling Grid File Transfers: The NERSC CA Shreyas Cholia 10:30 Break 10:45 Franklin IO: Systems Overview Richard Gerber 11:15 Franklin IO: Best Practices for Application Performance Katie Antypas 12:00 Lunch and optional individual portrait shots of attendees next to Franklin 1:15 Accelerating X Windows with NX* Janet Jacobsen 1:45 Franklin Profiling and Performance Tools Jonathan Carter 2:30 Break 2:45 Debugging with DDT David Lecomber, Allinea Software 3:30 DDT and Tools Hands-On; Continues all day Friday 5:00

193

Goals:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CUG 2009 Proceedings 1 of 8 CUG 2009 Proceedings 1 of 8 User and Performance Impacts from Franklin Upgrades Yun (Helen) He National Energy Research Supercomputing Center Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 ABSTRACT: The NERSC flagship computer Cray XT4 system "Franklin" has gone through three major upgrades: quad core upgrade, CLE 2.1 upgrade, and IO upgrade, during the past year. In this paper, we will discuss the various aspects of the user impacts such as user access, user environment, and user issues etc from these upgrades. The performance impacts on the kernel benchmarks and selected application benchmarks will also be presented. KEYWORDS: Cray XT4, Franklin, NERSC, Quad Core, CLE 2.1, Application Performance, IO Performance, User Impacts.

194

Hopper Featured Announcements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and /project outage scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and /project outage September 18, 2012 by Helen He | 0 Comments There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance for Hopper next Wednesday, Sept 19, from 6:30 am to midnight Pacific time. Please plan your work accordingly and check the NERSC Message of the Day (MOTD) for status update: http://www.nersc.gov/live-status/motd/. The /project file system (also known as /global/project) will be unavailable from 8am Wednesday, Sept 19 until 5pm Friday, Sept 21, during and after the scheduled Hopper maintenance. If your job depends on /project, please add the following "gres" setting in your batch script (so that your job won't start and fail during the /project outage): #PBS -l gres=project If your job is already queued (but not yet running), the following

195

Compliance Monitoring of Underwater Blasting for Rock Removal at Warrior Point, Columbia River Channel Improvement Project, 2009/2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) conducted the 20-year Columbia River Channel Improvement Project (CRCIP) to deepen the navigation channel between Portland, Oregon, and the Pacific Ocean to allow transit of fully loaded Panamax ships (100 ft wide, 600 to 700 ft long, and draft 45 to 50 ft). In the vicinity of Warrior Point, between river miles (RM) 87 and 88 near St. Helens, Oregon, the USACE conducted underwater blasting and dredging to remove 300,000 yd3 of a basalt rock formation to reach a depth of 44 ft in the Columbia River navigation channel. The purpose of this report is to document methods and results of the compliance monitoring study for the blasting project at Warrior Point in the Columbia River.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Skalski, J. R.; Seaburg, Adam

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

196

CSDP: The seismology of continental thermal regimes: Final report for period April 1, 1986-April 1, 1987  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes progress in the study of both wave propagation in complex structures and source mechanism of geothermal seismic events. The following work was accomplished in the past one-year period: (1) interpretation of long-period events observed at Mt. St. Helens and at the Fenton Hill hot-dry-rock experimental site in terms of seismic radiation from a fluid-filled crack; (2) interpretation of teleseismic data collected in and near the Valles caldera in terms of a model with irregular topography, caldera fill, and magma chamber; (3) interpretation of VSP (Vertical Seismic Profiling) data from the Oroville fault zone by ray tracing and polarization calculation for P, SV, and SH waves in heterogeneous and anisotropic media containing aligned fluid-filled and/or dry cracks; and (4) development of a new powerful method for calculating seismic motions in media with irregular topography and interfaces by the superposition of Gaussian Beams.

Aki, K.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Assessing interactions between the associations of common genetic susceptibility variants, reproductive history and body mass index with breast cancer risk in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium: a combined case-control study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chenevix-Trench3, Helene Holland3, kConFab40, AOCS3,41, Graham G Giles14,42,43, Laura Baglietto14,42, Gianluca Severi14,42, Stig E Bojensen44, Brge G Nordestgaard44, Henrik Flyger44, Esther M John45,46, Dee W West45,46, Alice S Whittemore46, Celine Vachon... (s). Genotyping methods have been previously described [1,6,7,12,14]. Briefly, five studies (ABCFS, GENICA, kConFab/AOCS, MARIE and SASBAC) used Seque- noms MassARRAY system and iPLEX technology (Sequenom, San Diego, CA, USA) for most SNPs. All Milne et al...

Milne, Roger L; Gaudet, Mia M; Spurdle, Amanda B; Fasching, Peter A; Couch, Fergus J; Benitez, Javier; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Zamora, Maria Pilar; Malats, Nuria; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Gibson, Lorna J; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Figueroa, Jonine; Brinton, Louise; Sherman, Mark E; Lissowska, Jolanta; Hopper, John L; Dite, Gillian S; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Sigurdson, Alice J; Linet, Martha S; Schonfeld, Sara J; Freedman, D Michal; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Auvinen, Paivi; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Knight, Julia A; Weerasooriya, Nayana; Cox, Angela; Reed, Malcolm W R; Cross, Simon S; Dunning, Alison M; Ahmed, Shahana; Shah, Mitul; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Bruning, Thomas; GENICA Network; Lambrechts, Diether; Reumers, Joke; Smeets, Ann; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Irwanto, Astrid K; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Holland, Helene; (kConFab), Kathleen Cuningham Foundation Consortium for Research; AOCS Investigators; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Borge G; Flyger, Henrik; John, Esther M; West, Dee W; Whittemore, Alice S; Vachon, Celine M; Olson, Janet E; Fredericksen, Zachary S; Kosel, Matthew; Hein, Rebecca; Vrieling, Alina; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Beckmann, Matthias; Heusinger, Katharina; Ekici, Arif B; Haeberle, Lothar; Easton, Douglas F; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Morrison, Jonathan; Pharoah, Paul D P; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Goode, Ellen L; Chang-Claude, Jenny

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

The Macromolecular CIF Dictionary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ant to the macromolecular crystallographic experiment. This working group was chaired by Paula Fitzgerald (Merck) and included Enrique Abola (Protein Data Bank), Helen Berman (Rutgers), Phil Bourne (then at Columbia) Eleanor Dodson (York), Art Olson (Scripps), Wolfgang Steigemann (Martinsreid), Lynn Ten Eyck (SDSC), and Keith Watenpaugh (then Upjohn). The original short term goal of the working group was to fulfill the mandate set by the IUCr: to define CIF data names that needed to be included in the CIF dictionary in order to adequately describe the macromolecular crystallographic experiment and its results. Long term goals were also established: to provide sufficient data names so that the experimental section of a structure paper could be written automatically and to facilitate the development of tools so that computer programs could easily interface with mmCIF. During the course of the development of the mmCIF dictionary, however, these goals were greatly expanded, and the resulti

Paula Fitzgerald; Phil Bourne; Brian Mcmahon; Keith Watenpaugh; John

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Geothermal energy in Washington: site data base and development status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is an attempt to identify the factors which have affected and will continue to affect geothermal assessment and development in the state. The eight potential sites chosen for detailed analysis include: Indian Heaven KGRA, Mount St. Helens KGRA, Kennedy Hot Springs KGRA, Mount Adams PGRA (Potential Geothermal Resource Area), Mount Rainier PGRA, Mount Baker PGRA, Olympic-Sol Duc Hot Springs, and Yakima. The following information is included for each site: site data, site location and physical description, geological/geophysical description, reservoir characteristics, land ownership and leasing, geothermal development status, institutional characteristics, environmental factors, transportation and utilities, and population. A number of serious impediments to geothermal development were identified which can be solved only by legislative action at the state or federal level and/or changes in attitudes by regulatory agencies. (MHR)

Bloomquist, R.G.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Final Reminder:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Reminder: Final Reminder: Final Reminder: Please save your $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2 imporant files by 4/30/12 April 27, 2012 by Helen He (0 Comments) Franklin batch system is drained, and all batch queues are stopped as of 4/26 23:59pm. This is the final reminder that please make sure to save important files on your Franklin $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2. ALL FILES THERE WILL BE DELETED, and there will be no mechanisms to recover any of the files after May 1. Mon Apr 30: Last day to retrieve files from Franklin scratch file systems Mon Apr 30, 23:59: User logins are disabled If you need help or have any concerns, please contact "consult at nersc dot gov". Post your comment You cannot post comments until you have logged in. Login Here. Comments No one has commented on this page yet.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oncologist helen vodopick" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

February 2013 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Standards Actions Technical Standards Program Newsletter U . S . D E PA R T M E N T O F O ffi ce O f nuclear SaFety ENERGY inSide thiS iSSue * Featured DOE Technical Standards Activities * DOE Technical Standards Cost- Savings and Access Improvement Initiative * Domestic and International Nuclear Energy Voluntary Consensus Standards Needs * Nuclear Safety- Related Standards Activity Featured dOe technical StandardS activitieS DOE Technical Standards Cost-Savings and Access Improvement Initiative By Helen Todosow, Brookhaven National Laboratory The Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standards Managers (TSM) are actively exploring ways to save the government and tax payers' money while at the same time significantly improving efficiencies in access and use of voluntary consensus

202

Trillion Particles,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trillion Trillion Particles, 120,000 cores, and 350 TBs: Lessons Learned from a Hero I/O Run on Hopper Surendra Byna ∗ , Andrew Uselton ∗ , Prabhat ∗ , David Knaak † , and Yun (Helen) He ∗ ∗ Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA. Email: {sbyna, acuselton, prabhat, yhe}@lbl.gov † Cray Inc., USA. Email: knaak@cray.com Abstract-Modern petascale applications can present a variety of configuration, runtime, and data management challenges when run at scale. In this paper, we describe our experiences in running VPIC, a large-scale plasma physics simulation, on the NERSC production Cray XE6 system Hopper. The simulation ran on 120,000 cores using ∼80% of computing resources, 90% of the available memory on each node and 50% of the Lustre scratch file system. Over two trillion particles were simulated for 23,000 timesteps, and 10 one-trillion particle dumps, each ranging between

203

CUG2011_Hopper2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cray User Group 2011 Proceedings 1 of 13 Cray User Group 2011 Proceedings 1 of 13 Transitioning Users from the Franklin XT4 System to the Hopper XE6 System Katie Antypas and Yun (Helen) He, National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center ABSTRACT: The Hopper XE6 system, NERSC's first peta-flop system with over 153,000 cores has increased the computing hours available to the Department of Energy's Office of Science users by more than a factor of 4. As NERSC users transition from the Franklin XT4 system with 4 cores per node to the Hopper XE6 system with 24 cores per node, they have had to adapt to a lower amount of memory per core and on- node I/O performance which does not scale up linearly with the number of cores per node. This paper will discuss Hopper's usage during the "early user period" and

204

Woo-Sun Yang  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Woo-Sun Yang Woo-Sun Yang Woo-Sun Yang Woo-Sun-Yang.jpg Woo-Sun Yang , Ph.D. HPC Consultant , WYang@lbl.gov Phone: (510) 486-5735 , Fax: (510) 486-4316 1 Cyclotron Road Mail Stop 943-256 Berkeley, CA 94720 Conference Papers Wendy Hwa-Chun Lin, Yun (Helen) He, and Woo-Sun Yang, "Franklin Job Completion Analysis", Cray User Group 2010 Proceedings, Edinburgh, UK, May 2010, Download File: cug2010JobComp.pdf (pdf: 429 KB) The NERSC Cray XT4 machine Franklin has been in production for 3000+ users since October 2007, where about 1800 jobs run each day. There has been an on-going effort to better understand how well these jobs run, whether failed jobs are due to application errors or system issues, and to further reduce system related job failures. In this paper, we talk about the

205

Unable to allocate hugepages in running jobs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unable to allocate hugepages in running jobs Unable to allocate hugepages in running jobs Unable to allocate hugepages in running jobs January 14, 2013 by Helen He (0 Comments) Symptom User job sometimes get an error message similar to the following, usually at the start of a batch job, causing the job to abort: MPICH2 ERROR [Rank 7436] [job id 14638087] [Sat Jan 12 04:56:54 2013] [c11-2c1s3n1] [nid04487] - MPIU_nem_gni_get_hugepages(): Unable to mmap 4194304 bytes for file /var/lib/hugetlbfs/global/pagesize-2097152/hugepagefile.MPICH.0.5841.kvs_14638087, err Cannot allocate memory This is caused by available huge page memory being not sufficient on one or more of the allocated compute nodes. The above error happens more often with jobs using the "-ss" option for the aprun command. It is confirmed

206

Nucleic Acid Standards - Refinement Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Refinement Parameters Refinement Parameters The DNA/RNA topology and parameter files for X-PLOR are shown below. These were tested with DNA structures and with protein-DNA complexes. X-PLOR topology file X-PLOR parameter files: X-PLOR parameter file For the refinement of high resolution structures (< 1.7 Angstroms) the parameter file with distinct bond distances and bond angles for both C2'-endo and C3'-endo conformations should be considered: X-PLOR parameter file for high resolution structures "New Parameters for the Refinement of Nucleic Acid Containing Structures." Gary Parkinson, Jaroslav Vojtechovsky, Lester Clowney, Axel Brunger*, and Helen M. Berman. (1996) Acta Cryst. D 52, 57-64 Rutgers University, Department of Chemistry, Piscataway, NJ 08855-0939; *The Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Departments of Molecular and

207

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuels Education in Alabama  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Fuels Biodiesel Fuels Education in Alabama to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuels Education in Alabama on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuels Education in Alabama on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuels Education in Alabama on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuels Education in Alabama on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuels Education in Alabama on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuels Education in Alabama on AddThis.com... May 1, 2012 Biodiesel Fuels Education in Alabama " As Alabama native Helen Keller once said, 'No one has the right to consume happiness without producing it.' The same can be said of

208

Clinical evaluation of a commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction tool for CT simulations in radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Severe artifacts in kilovoltage-CT simulation images caused by large metallic implants can significantly degrade the conspicuity and apparent CT Hounsfield number of targets and anatomic structures, jeopardize the confidence of anatomical segmentation, and introduce inaccuracies into the radiation therapy treatment planning process. This study evaluated the performance of the first commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction function (O-MAR) for radiation therapy, and investigated its clinical applications in treatment planning. Methods: Both phantom and clinical data were used for the evaluation. The CIRS electron density phantom with known physical (and electron) density plugs and removable titanium implants was scanned on a Philips Brilliance Big Bore 16-slice CT simulator. The CT Hounsfield numbers of density plugs on both uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images were compared. Treatment planning accuracy was evaluated by comparing simulated dose distributions computed using the true density images, uncorrected images, and O-MAR corrected images. Ten CT image sets of patients with large hip implants were processed with the O-MAR function and evaluated by two radiation oncologists using a five-point score for overall image quality, anatomical conspicuity, and CT Hounsfield number accuracy. By utilizing the same structure contours delineated from the O-MAR corrected images, clinical IMRT treatment plans for five patients were computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images, respectively, and compared. Results: Results of the phantom study indicated that CT Hounsfield number accuracy and noise were improved on the O-MAR corrected images, especially for images with bilateral metal implants. The {gamma} pass rates of the simulated dose distributions computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images referenced to those of the true densities were higher than 99.9% (even when using 1% and 3 mm distance-to-agreement criterion), suggesting that dose distributions were clinically identical. In all patient cases, radiation oncologists rated O-MAR corrected images as higher quality. Formerly obscured critical structures were able to be visualized. The overall image quality and the conspicuity in critical organs were significantly improved compared with the uncorrected images: overall quality score (1.35 vs 3.25, P= 0.0022); bladder (2.15 vs 3.7, P= 0.0023); prostate and seminal vesicles/vagina (1.3 vs 3.275, P= 0.0020); rectum (2.8 vs 3.9, P= 0.0021). The noise levels of the selected ROIs were reduced from 93.7 to 38.2 HU. On most cases (8/10), the average CT Hounsfield numbers of the prostate/vagina on the O-MAR corrected images were closer to the referenced value (41.2 HU, an average measured from patients without metal implants) than those on the uncorrected images. High {gamma} pass rates of the five IMRT dose distribution pairs indicated that the dose distributions were not significantly affected by the CT image improvements. Conclusions: Overall, this study indicated that the O-MAR function can remarkably reduce metal artifacts and improve both CT Hounsfield number accuracy and target and critical structure visualization. Although there was no significant impact of the O-MAR algorithm on the calculated dose distributions, we suggest that O-MAR corrected images are more suitable for the entire treatment planning process by offering better anatomical structure visualization, improving radiation oncologists' confidence in target delineation, and by avoiding subjective density overrides of artifact regions on uncorrected images.

Li Hua; Noel, Camille; Chen, Haijian; Harold Li, H.; Low, Daniel; Moore, Kevin; Klahr, Paul; Michalski, Jeff; Gay, Hiram A.; Thorstad, Wade; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Philips Healthcare System, Cleveland, Ohio 44143 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Automated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Treatment Planning for Stage III Lung Cancer: How Does It Compare With Intensity-Modulated Radio Therapy?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To compare the quality of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans generated by an automated inverse planning system with that of dosimetrist-generated IMRT treatment plans for patients with stage III lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Two groups of 8 patients with stage III lung cancer were randomly selected. For group 1, the dosimetrists spent their best effort in designing IMRT plans to compete with the automated inverse planning system (mdaccAutoPlan); for group 2, the dosimetrists were not in competition and spent their regular effort. Five experienced radiation oncologists independently blind-reviewed and ranked the three plans for each patient: a rank of 1 was the best and 3 was the worst. Dosimetric measures were also performed to quantitatively evaluate the three types of plans. Results: Blind rankings from different oncologists were generally consistent. For group 1, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.6, 2.13, and 2.18, respectively. The auto-VMAT plans in group 1 had 10% higher planning tumor volume (PTV) conformality and 24% lower esophagus V70 (the volume receiving 70 Gy or more) than the manual IMRT plans; they also resulted in more than 20% higher complication-free tumor control probability (P+) than either type of IMRT plans. The auto- and manual IMRT plans in this group yielded generally comparable dosimetric measures. For group 2, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.55, 1.75, and 2.75, respectively. Compared to the manual IMRT plans in this group, the auto-VMAT plans and auto-IMRT plans showed, respectively, 17% and 14% higher PTV dose conformality, 8% and 17% lower mean lung dose, 17% and 26% lower mean heart dose, and 36% and 23% higher P+. Conclusions: mdaccAutoPlan is capable of generating high-quality VMAT and IMRT treatment plans for stage III lung cancer. Manual IMRT plans could achieve quality similar to auto-IMRT plans if best effort was spent.

Quan, Enzhuo M. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Xia Tingyi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beijing 301 Hospital, Beijing (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beijing 301 Hospital, Beijing (China); Yuan Zhiyong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Tianjin (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Tianjin (China); Liu Hui [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan University Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Li, Xiaoqiang; Wages, Cody A.; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Synopsis of History of American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology 1958-2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To provide a synopsis of the history of the association of radiation oncologists in the United States, currently known as the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO), with the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the organization. Methods and Materials: The history of ASTRO, from its beginning as the American Club of Therapeutic Radiologists, is the subject of a book that is to be released with the occasion of the 50th Annual Meeting of the Society in 2008. This book was prepared by members of ASTRO's History Committee and History Working Subcommittee. The source material for the book was the archives of the Society and recorded interviews, conducted by members of the subcommittee, of members of the Society and of the past and present Society staff. The book was also based on previously published material. This article used the source material used for the Society anniversary book. Results: This synopsis of the history of the Society will provide a source of reference for anyone interested in the history of the Society from its foundation in 1958 to the present, 2008.

Montana, Gustavo S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)], E-mail: gustavo.montana@duke.edu

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Bile Acid Malabsorption After Pelvic and Prostate Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: An Uncommon but Treatable Condition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a significant therapeutic advance in prostate cancer, allowing increased tumor dose delivery and increased sparing of normal tissues. IMRT planning uses strict dose constraints to nearby organs to limit toxicity. Bile acid malabsorption (BAM) is a treatable disorder of the terminal ileum (TI) that presents with symptoms similar to radiation therapy toxicity. It has not been described in patients receiving RT for prostate cancer in the contemporary era. We describe new-onset BAM in men after IMRT for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Diagnosis of new-onset BAM was established after typical symptoms developed, selenium-75 homocholic acid taurine (SeHCAT) scanning showed 7-day retention of =}45 Gy developed moderate to severe BAM, whereas those whose TI received <45 Gy had only mild to moderate BAM. Conclusions: Radiation delivered to the TI during IMRT may cause BAM. Identification of the TI from unenhanced RT planning computed tomography scans is difficult and may impede accurate dosimetric evaluation. Thorough toxicity assessment and close liaison between oncologist and gastroenterologist allow timely diagnosis and treatment.

Harris, Victoria [Academic Urology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom)] [Academic Urology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Benton, Barbara [Gastroenterology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom)] [Gastroenterology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Sohaib, Aslam [Department of Radiology, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom)] [Department of Radiology, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Dearnaley, David [Academic Urology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom)] [Academic Urology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Andreyev, H. Jervoise N., E-mail: j@andreyev.demon.co.uk [Gastroenterology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom)] [Gastroenterology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Results of the 2003 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) surveys of residents and chief residents in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To document demographic characteristics of current residents, career motivations and aspirations, and training program policies and resources. Methods: In 2003, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) conducted two nationwide surveys: one of all U.S. radiation oncology residents and one of chief residents. Results: The Chief Residents' Survey was completed by representatives from all 77 programs (response rate, 100%). The Residents' Survey was returned by 229 respondents (response rate, 44%). In each, 32% of respondents were female. The most popular career after residency was private practice (46%), followed by permanent academic practice (28%). Changes that would entice those choosing private practice to consider an academic career included more research experience as a resident (76%), higher likelihood of tenure (69%), lesser time commitment (66%), and higher salary (54%). Although the majority of respondents were satisfied with educational experience overall, a number of programs were reported to provide fewer resources than required. Conclusions: Median program resources and numbers of outliers are documented to allow residents and program directors to assess the relative adequacy of experience in their own programs. Policy-making bodies and individual programs should consider these results when developing interventions to improve educational experiences of residents and to increase retention of radiation oncologists in academic practice.

Jagsi, Reshma [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Buck, David A. [Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, VA (United States); Singh, Anurag K. [Washington University, Seattle, WA (United States); Engleman, Mark [Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Thakkar, Vipul [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Frank, Steven J. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Flynn, Daniel [Holy Family Hospital, Methuen, MA (United States)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Literature review. Volume 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of human factors evaluations were undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multidisciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. A team of human factors specialists, assisted by a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation therapists, conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. A function and task analysis was performed initially to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of workplace environment, system-user interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices. To further acquire an in-depth and up-to-date understanding of the practice of teletherapy in support of these evaluations, a systematic literature review was conducted. Factors that have a potential impact on the accuracy of treatment delivery were of primary concern. The present volume is the literature review. The volume starts with an overview of the multiphased nature of teletherapy, and then examines the requirement for precision, the increasing role of quality assurance, current conceptualizations of human error, and the role of system factors such as the workplace environment, user-system interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices.

Henriksen, K.; Kaye, R.D.; Jones, R. [Hughes Training, Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States); Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Dentalmaps: Automatic Dental Delineation for Radiotherapy Planning in Head-and-Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To propose an automatic atlas-based segmentation framework of the dental structures, called Dentalmaps, and to assess its accuracy and relevance to guide dental care in the context of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A multi-atlas-based segmentation, less sensitive to artifacts than previously published head-and-neck segmentation methods, was used. The manual segmentations of a 21-patient database were first deformed onto the query using nonlinear registrations with the training images and then fused to estimate the consensus segmentation of the query. Results: The framework was evaluated with a leave-one-out protocol. The maximum doses estimated using manual contours were considered as ground truth and compared with the maximum doses estimated using automatic contours. The dose estimation error was within 2-Gy accuracy in 75% of cases (with a median of 0.9 Gy), whereas it was within 2-Gy accuracy in 30% of cases only with the visual estimation method without any contour, which is the routine practice procedure. Conclusions: Dose estimates using this framework were more accurate than visual estimates without dental contour. Dentalmaps represents a useful documentation and communication tool between radiation oncologists and dentists in routine practice. Prospective multicenter assessment is underway on patients extrinsic to the database.

Thariat, Juliette, E-mail: jthariat@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology/Institut de biologie et developpement du cancer (IBDC) centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) unite mixte de recherche UMR 6543, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); Ramus, Liliane [DOSIsoft, Cachan (France); INRIA (Institut National de Recherche en Automatique et en Automatique)-Asclepios Research Project, Sophia-Antipolis (France); Maingon, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Dijon Cedex (France); Odin, Guillaume [Department of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire-Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, Nice Cedex (France); Gregoire, Vincent [Department of Radiation Oncology, St.-Luc University Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Darcourt, Vincent [Department of Radiation Oncology-Dentistry, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); Guevara, Nicolas [Department of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire-Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, Nice Cedex (France); Orlanducci, Marie-Helene [Department of Odontology, CHU, Nice (France); Marcie, Serge [Department of Radiation Oncology/Institut de biologie et developpement du cancer (IBDC) centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) unite mixte de recherche UMR 6543, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); Poissonnet, Gilles [Department of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne-Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, Nice Cedex (France); Marcy, Pierre-Yves [Department of Radiology, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); and others

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Effectiveness of a clinical intervention in improving pain control in outpatients with cancer treated by radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of a multicomponent clinical intervention to reduce pain in outpatients with cancer. Methods and Materials: Sixty-four patients were randomly assigned to receive either a clinical intervention including an information session, the use of a pain diary, and the possibility to contact a physician to adjust the pain medication, or the usual treatment of pain by the staff radiation oncologist. All patients reported their average and worst pain levels at baseline and 2 and 3 weeks after the start of the intervention. Results: The study groups were similar with respect to their baseline characteristics and pain levels at randomization. After 3 weeks, the average and worst pain experienced by patients randomized to the clinical intervention group was significantly inferior to the average pain experienced by patients in the control group (2.9/10 vs. 4.4/10 and 4.2/10 vs. 5.5/10, respectively). Results showed that the experimental group patients decreased their pain levels more than the control group patients did over time. Conclusion: An intervention including patient education, a pain diary, and defining a procedure for therapeutic adjustments can be effective to improve pain relief in outpatients with cancer.

Vallieres, Isabelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec-Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec City (Canada)]. E-mail: isabelle.vallieres@mail.chuq.qc.ca; Aubin, Michele [Department of Family Medicine, Laval Hospital, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada); Blondeau, Lucie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec-Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec City (Canada); Simard, Serge [Research Centre of Laval Hospital, Laval University, Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada); Giguere, Anik [Palliative Care Research Team, Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada)

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Effects of insertion speed and trocar stiffness on the accuracy of needle position for brachytherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: In prostate brachytherapy, accurate positioning of the needle tip to place radioactive seeds at its target site is critical for successful radiation treatment. During the procedure, needle deflection leads to seed misplacement and suboptimal radiation dose to cancerous cells. In practice, radiation oncologists commonly use high-speed hand needle insertion to minimize displacement of the prostate as well as the needle deflection. Effects of speed during needle insertion and stiffness of trocar (a solid rod inside the hollow cannula) on needle deflection are studied. Methods: Needle insertion experiments into phantom were performed using a 2{sup 2} factorial design (2 parameters at 2 levels), with each condition having replicates. Analysis of the deflection data included calculating the average, standard deviation, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) to find significant single and two-way interaction factors. Results: The stiffer tungsten carbide trocar is effective in reducing the average and standard deviation of needle deflection. The fast insertion speed together with the stiffer trocar generated the smallest average and standard deviation for needle deflection for almost all cases. Conclusions: The combination of stiff tungsten carbide trocar and fast needle insertion speed are important to decreasing needle deflection. The knowledge gained from this study can be used to improve the accuracy of needle insertion during brachytherapy procedures.

McGill, Carl S.; Schwartz, Jonathon A.; Moore, Jason Z.; McLaughlin, Patrick W.; Shih, Albert J. [Biomedical Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, State College, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Biomedical Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 and Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Inter- and Intra-Observer Variability in Prostate Definition With Tissue Harmonic and Brightness Mode Imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare the relative utility of tissue harmonic (H) and brightness (B) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images of the prostate by studying interobserver and intraobserver variation in prostate delineation. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with early-stage disease were randomly selected. TRUS images of prostates were acquired using B and H modes. The prostates on all images were contoured by an experienced radiation oncologist (RO) and five equally trained observers. The observers were blinded to information regarding patient and imaging mode. The volumes of prostate glands and areas of midgland slices were calculated. Volumes contoured were compared among the observers and between observer group and RO. Contours on one patient were repeated five times by four observers to evaluate the intraobserver variability. Results: A one-sample Student t-test showed the volumes outlined by five observers are in agreement (p > 0.05) with the RO. Paired Student t-test showed prostate volumes (p = 0.008) and midgland areas (p = 0.006) with H mode were significantly smaller than that with B mode. Two-factor analysis of variances showed significant interobserver variability (p =}35 cc), B mode provided more consistent estimates. Conclusions: H mode provided superior inter- and intraobserver agreement in prostate volume definition for small to medium prostates. In large glands, H mode does not exhibit any additional advantage. Although harmonic imaging has not proven advantageous for all cases, its utilization seems to be judicious for small prostates.

Sandhu, Gurpreet Kaur, E-mail: Gurpreet.Sandhu2@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Dunscombe, Peter [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Meyer, Tyler [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Pavamani, Simon [Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Christian Medical College, Vellore (India); Khan, Rao [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Development of the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Gynecologic Applicators for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer: Historical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To provide historical background on the development and initial studies of the gynecological (gyn) applicators developed by Dr. Gilbert H. Fletcher, a radiation oncologist and chairperson from 1948 to 1981 of the department at the M.D. Anderson Hospital (MDAH) for Cancer Research in Houston, TX, and to acknowledge the previously unrecognized contribution that Dr. Leonard G. Grimmett, a radiation physicist and chairperson from 1949 to 1951 of the physics department at MDAH, made to the development of the gynecological applicators. Methods and Materials: We reviewed archival materials from the Historical Resource Center and from the Department of Radiation Physics at University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, as well as contemporary published papers, to trace the history of the applicators. Conclusions: Dr. Fletcher's work was influenced by the work on gynecologic applicators in the 1940s in Europe, especially work done at the Royal Cancer Hospital in London. Those efforts influenced not only Dr. Fletcher's approach to the design of the applicators but also the methods used to perform in vivo measurements and determine the dose distribution. Much of the initial development of the dosimetry techniques and measurements at MDAH were carried out by Dr. Grimmett.

Yordy, John S., E-mail: john.yordy@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Almond, Peter R. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Delclos, Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

H  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H H ybrid M PI/OpenMP, UPC, a nd C AF a t N ERSC Yun ( Helen) H e a nd W oo---Sun Y ang NERSC U ser G roup M eeFng February 2 , 2 012 2 Outline * Architecture T rend * Benefits o f H ybrid M PI/OpenMP * Hybrid M PI/OpenMP P rogramming M odel * Hybrid M PI/OpenMP I ssues * Compile a nd R un h ybrid M PI/OpenMP * Using U PC a nd C AF o n H opper 3 Common A rchitectures * Shared M emory A rchitecture - MulFple C PUs s hare g lobal m emory, c ould h ave l ocal c ache - Uniform M emory A ccess ( UMA) - Typical S hared M emory P rogramming M odel: O penMP, P threads, ... * Distributed M emory A rchitecture - Each C PU h as o wn m emory - Non---Uniform M emory A ccess ( NUMA) - Typical M essage P assing P rogramming M odel: MPI, ... * Hybrid A rchitecture - UMA w ithin o ne S MP n ode - NUMA a cross n odes - Typical H ybrid P

220

October 2001 NDB Newsletter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THE NUCLEIC ACID DATABASE NEWSLETTER THE NUCLEIC ACID DATABASE NEWSLETTER October 2001, Volume 5, Number 1 1. A Standard Reference Frame for the Description of Nucleic Acid Base-Pair Geometry Published 2. NDB Chapter in International Tables Published 1. Standard Reference Frame Published The paper "A Standard Reference Frame for the Description of Nucleic Acid Base-Pair Geometry" has been published in the Journal of Molecular Biology (2001; 313, pp. 229 - 237). This document is available from the NDB at http://ndbserver.rutgers.edu/NDB_news/ and from the Journal of Molecular Biology. The standardization of these parameters was the subject of the Tsukuba Workshop on Nucleic Acid Structure and Interactions that was organized by the NDB and the Structural Biology Centre and held at the Structural Biology Centre in Tsukuba, Japan on January 12-14, 1999. The meeting was funded by the COE program of the Science and Technology Agency, Japan and the CREST program of the Japan Science and Technology Corporation. The meeting was organized by Masashi Suzuki of the National Institute of Bioscience and Human-Technology and Helen M. Berman and Wilma K. Olson of the Nucleic Acid Database Project (supported by National Science Foundation (USA).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oncologist helen vodopick" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Microsoft Word - ITSI award doc 06-D0008 conformed to P00001.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CODE CODE (Hour) PAGE(S) until 04:00 PM local time 12 Oct 2005 X A X B X C D E X X G F X H david.villarreal@langley.af.mil RATING PAGE OF PAGES 7. ISSUED BY (Date) 29-Sep-2006 IMPORTANT - Award will be made on this Form, or on Standard Form 26, or by other authorized official written notice. Previous Edition is Unusable 33-134 STANDARD FORM 33 (REV. 9-97) Prescribed by GSA FAR (48 CFR) 53.214(c) HELEN VAUGHN 1 87 (If other than Item 7) 15A. NAME 16. NAME AND TITLE OF PERSON AUTHORIZED TO AND ADDRESS SIGN OFFER (Type or print) OF OFFEROR AMENDMENT NO. DATE 15B. TELEPHONE NO (Include area code) 17. SIGNATURE 303-858-0965 15C. CHECK IF REMITTANCE ADDRESS IS DIFFERENT FROM ABOVE - ENTER SUCH ADDRESS IN SCHEDULE. 18. OFFER DATE INNOVATIVE TECHNICAL SOLUTIONS, INC. JOHN ENGLAND DBA: ITSI 2730 SHADELANDS DR #100

222

The Quest for Clouds and Volcanoes  

SciTech Connect

Elementary students are using the internet to experience virtual field trips to learn about areas that they are not able to experience in person. This poster presentation describes a virtual field trip taken by Mendoza Elementary School, Las Vegas, Nevada classes during the summer of 2003. The authors, who are DataStreme Learning Implementation Team members, drove from Las Vegas to Seattle for the annual DataStreme Summer Workshop. During the trip and in Seattle, the authors communicated through the internet with classrooms in Las Vegas. Weather information, pictures, and pertinent information about Seattle or the enroute area were sent to the classes each day. The students then compared the weather in Las Vegas with the weather and clouds from the communication. Fourth grade students were studying about volcanoes and were excited to hear about, and see pictures of, Mt. Shasta, Mt. Lassen, Mt. St. Helen and Mt. Rainier during the virtual field trip. Classes were able to track the route taken on a map during the virtual field trip.

Blink, F D; Blink, J A

2004-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

223

Exploration of volcanic geothermal energy resources based on rheological techniques. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tidal strain and tilt field observations were carried out during the period February 1978 to December 1979 at the Klamath Graben and Newberry Caldera in Oregon and at Krafla in Northern Iceland. Moreover, tilt observations were made at Mt. St. Helens, Washington, during the summer of 1980. Two strainmeters of the same type as now in use by the US Geological Survey were applied in the strain work. Tilts were measured by two Kinemetrics model TM-1B biaxial tilt meters. The instruments were placed at depths of approximately one to two meters below the ground surface. Both strain and tilt fields turn out to be heavily contaminated by noise that is mostly of thermoelastic origin. In spite of considerable efforts, it has not been possible to process the strain field data to obtain sufficiently clear tidal signals. The tilt data are less contaminated and rather clear tidal signals were observed at Newberry in Oregon and Krafla in Iceland. A local magnification by a factor of about 3 of the EW component of the theoretical solid earth and ocean load tilt was observed at one station at Krafla. Moreover, the tidal tilt component across the ring fault at Newberry appears to be magnified by a factor of 1.4 to 1.9. The phenomena at the Krafla may possibly be due to a local magma chamber. These results are a clear indication of a tilt field modification by local structure and indicate the possibility of using tilt data to locate subsurface magma bodies.

Bodvarsson, G.; Axelsson, G.; Johnson, A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Evaluation of the sensitivity and fading characteristics of an image plate system for x-ray diagnostics  

SciTech Connect

Image plates (IPs) are a reusable recording media capable of detecting ionizing radiation, used to diagnose x-ray emission from laser-plasma experiments. Due to their superior performance characteristics in x-ray applications [C. C. Bradford, W. W. Peppler, and J. T. Dobbins III, Med. Phys. 26, 27 (1999) and J. Digit. Imaging. 12, 54 (1999)], the Fuji Biological Analysis System (BAS) IPs are fielded on x-ray diagnostics for the HELEN laser by the Plasma Physics Department at AWE. The sensitivities of the Fuji BAS IPs have been absolutely calibrated for absolute measurements of x-ray intensity in the energy range of 0-100 keV. In addition, the Fuji BAS IP fading as a function of time was investigated. We report on the characterization of three Fuji BAS IP responses to x-rays using a radioactive source, and discrete x-ray line energies generated by the Excalibur soft x-ray facility and the Defense Radiological Standards Centre filter-fluorescer hard x-ray system at AWE.

Meadowcroft, A. L.; Bentley, C. D.; Stott, E. N. [Plasma Physics Department, AWE Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Image plates as x-ray detectors in plasma physics experiments  

SciTech Connect

The performance of image plates based on the photostimulable phosphor BaF(Br,l):Eu{sup 2+} has been investigated and compared with x-ray film. Evaluation of detective quantum efficiency (DQE), sensitivity, dynamic range, and linearity was carried out for several types of commercially available image plate, using the Excalibur soft x-ray calibration facility at AWE. Image plate response was found to be linear over a dynamic range of 5 orders of magnitude. One type of image plate was found to have a number of advantages for soft x-ray detection, with a measured sensitivity 1 order of magnitude greater than that of Kodak Industrex CX and DEF-5 x-ray film. The DQE of this plate was found to be superior to that of film at low [less than 10{sup 3} photons/(50 {mu}m){sup 2}] and high fluxes [greater than 10{sup 4} photons/(50 {mu}m){sup 2}]. The spatial resolution of image plates, scanned with several models of commercial image plate readers, has been evaluated using a USAF resolution test target. The highest spatial resolution measured is 35 {mu}m. Though this is significantly lower than the resolution possible with film, it is sufficient for many applications. Image plates were fielded in a refractive x-ray lens imaging diagnostic on the 1 TW Helen laser and these results are discussed.

Gales, S.G.; Bentley, C.D. [AWE Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Hopper Featured Announcements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

batch walltime increase and new xfer queue batch walltime increase and new xfer queue June 29, 2011 by Helen He | 0 Comments There are two batch queue configuration changes on Hopper: 1) User jobs using fewer than 4,096 nodes can now run for up to 36 hrs. In particular, the max wall time limits for reg_small (1-683 nodes), reg_med (684-2,048 nodes), and reg_big (2,049-4,096 nodes) jobs have been increased from 24 to 36 hrs. 2) A new "xfer" queue has been introduced. Users can use the xfer job to pre-stage input files for a large simulation and archive output files afterwards without the penalty of being charged for the large amount of compute nodes during the file transfers. The xfer queue on Hopper is being implemented on a local batch server (hopper06), which is separate from the main batch server on the main Hopper

227

The Bulletin - BNL's Weekly Newspaper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Robert J. Walton Robert J. Walton A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z In Memoriam Home | Bulletin Home Posted: October 2, 2008 Robert J. Walton, 82, of East Patchogue passed into eternal peace at home on July 26, 2008 while surrounded by his beloved wife of 61 years Evelyn and his 4 children. Bob was born April 1926 in Mt. Vernon, NY to May and Francis Walton. He is survived by his wife Evelyn; brother Francis Walton and wife Helen; children Gordon Walton and wife Maria, Russell Walton and wife Judy, Debora Greene, and Pamela Esposito and companion Lee; 12 grandchildren, Jennifer and husband Matt Masur, Jeremy Walton and wife Kerry, Michael Walton and wife Sabina, Laura Walton and companion Andrew, Jason Walton and companion Ashley, Chris Walton and companion Amanda, Craig Walton, Eva Esposito, Michael Esposito, Tami Greene and companion Billy, Janelle Greene and Derek Greene and 7 great-grandchildren Abby Walton, Andrew Robert Walton, Ben Walton Masur, Bernard Walton Masur, Jordan Walton, Alexander Rhodes and Michael Rhodes.

228

Has the Pattern of Practice in the Prescription of Radiotherapy for the Palliation of Thoracic Symptoms Changed Between 1999 and 2006 at the Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Eleven randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing various radiotherapy (RT) schedules for locally advanced lung cancer published since 1991 found no difference in palliation of intrathoracic symptoms. The most commonly prescribed schedule by Canadian Radiation Oncologists (RO) (20 Gy in five fractions [20 Gy/5]), when first evaluated versus 10 Gy/1 in a 2002 RCT, showed a significant survival benefit. A subsequent RCT assessing 20 Gy/5 found worse survival versus 16 Gy/2. This study examines whether the RT prescription for lung cancer palliation in the Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program (RRRP) has changed over time. Methods and Materials: Chart review was conducted for patients treated with palliative thoracic RT across three periods (1999-2006). Patient demographics, tumor, treatment, and organizational factors were analyzed descriptively. Chi-square test was used to detect differences in proportions between unordered categorical variables. Continuous variables were tested using analysis of variance. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of RT schedule prescribed. Results: A total of 117 patients received 121 courses of palliative thoracic RT. The most common dose (20 Gy/5) comprised 65% of courses in 1999, 68% in 2003, and 60% in 2005-2006 (p = 0.76). The next most common dose was 30 Gy/10 (13%). Overall, the median survival was 14.9 months, independent of RT schedule (p = 0.68). Multivariate analysis indicated palliative chemotherapy and certification year of RO were significant predictors of prescription of 20 Gy/5. Conclusion: RT schedule for palliation of intrathoracic symptoms did not mirror the results of sequential, conflicting RCTs, suggesting that factors other than the literature influenced practice patterns in palliative thoracic RT.

Fairchild, Alysa [Rapid Access Palliative Radiotherapy Program, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Goh, Philiz; Sinclair, Emily; Barnes, Elizabeth A. [Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ghosh, Sunita [Department of Experimental Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Danjoux, Cyril; Barbera, Lisa; Tsao, May [Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chow, Edward [Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: Edward.Chow@sunnybrook.ca

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Monte Carlo based dosimetry and treatment planning for neutron capture therapy of brain tumors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monte Carlo based dosimetry and computer-aided treatment planning for neutron capture therapy have been developed to provide the necessary link between physical dosimetric measurements performed on the MITR-II epithermal-neutron beams and the need of the radiation oncologist to synthesize large amounts of dosimetric data into a clinically meaningful treatment plan for each individual patient. Monte Carlo simulation has been employed to characterize the spatial dose distributions within a skull/brain model irradiated by an epithermal-neutron beam designed for neutron capture therapy applications. The geometry and elemental composition employed for the mathematical skull/brain model and the neutron and photon fluence-to-dose conversion formalism are presented. A treatment planning program, NCTPLAN, developed specifically for neutron capture therapy, is described. Examples are presented illustrating both one and two-dimensional dose distributions obtainable within the brain with an experimental epithermal-neutron beam, together with beam quality and treatment plan efficacy criteria which have been formulated for neutron capture therapy. The incorporation of three-dimensional computed tomographic image data into the treatment planning procedure is illustrated. The experimental epithermal-neutron beam has a maximum usable circular diameter of 20 cm, and with 30 ppm of B-10 in tumor and 3 ppm of B-10 in blood, it produces a beam-axis advantage depth of 7.4 cm, a beam-axis advantage ratio of 1.83, a global advantage ratio of 1.70, and an advantage depth RBE-dose rate to tumor of 20.6 RBE-cGy/min (cJ/kg-min). These characteristics make this beam well suited for clinical applications, enabling an RBE-dose of 2,000 RBE-cGy/min (cJ/kg-min) to be delivered to tumor at brain midline in six fractions with a treatment time of approximately 16 minutes per fraction.

Zamenhof, R.G.; Clement, S.D.; Harling, O.K.; Brenner, J.F.; Wazer, D.E.; Madoc-Jones, H.; Yanch, J.C. (Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston, MA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Scripting in Radiation Therapy: An Automatic 3D Beam-Naming System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scripts can be executed within the radiation treatment planning software framework to reduce human error, increase treatment planning efficiency, reduce confusion, and promote consistency within an institution or even among institutions. Scripting is versatile, and one application is an automatic 3D beam-naming system that describes the position of the beam relative to the patient in 3D space. The naming system meets the need for nomenclature that is conducive for clear and accurate communication of beam entry relative to patient anatomy. In radiation oncology in particular, where miscommunication can cause significant harm to patients, a system that minimizes error is essential. Frequent sharing of radiation treatment information occurs not only among members within a department but also between different treatment centers. Descriptions of treatment beams are perhaps the most commonly shared information about a patient's course of treatment in radiation oncology. Automating the naming system by the use of a script reduces the potential for human error, improves efficiency, enforces consistency, and would allow an institution to convert to a new naming system with greater ease. This script has been implemented in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Washington Medical Center since December 2009. It is currently part of the dosimetry protocol and is accessible by medical dosimetrists, radiation oncologists, and medical physicists. This paper highlights the advantages of using an automatic 3D beam-naming script to flawlessly and quickly identify treatment beams with unique names. Scripting in radiation treatment planning software has many uses and great potential for improving clinical care.

Holdsworth, Clay, E-mail: clayhholdsworth@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Cancer Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Hummel-Kramer, Sharon M.; Phillips, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Cancer Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Is Primary Prostate Cancer Treatment Influenced by Likelihood of Extraprostatic Disease? A Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Patterns of Care Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To examine the patterns of primary treatment in a recent population-based cohort of prostate cancer patients, stratified by the likelihood of extraprostatic cancer as predicted by disease characteristics available at diagnosis. Methods and Materials: A total of 157,371 patients diagnosed from 2004 to 2008 with clinically localized and potentially curable (node-negative, nonmetastatic) prostate cancer, who have complete information on prostate-specific antigen, Gleason score, and clinical stage, were included. Patients with clinical T1/T2 disease were grouped into categories of 50% likelihood of having extraprostatic disease using the Partin nomogram. Clinical T3/T4 patients were examined separately as the highest-risk group. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between patient group and receipt of each primary treatment, adjusting for age, race, year of diagnosis, marital status, Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database region, and county-level education. Separate models were constructed for primary surgery, external-beam radiotherapy (RT), and conservative management. Results: On multivariable analysis, increasing likelihood of extraprostatic disease was significantly associated with increasing use of RT and decreased conservative management. Use of surgery also increased. Patients with >50% likelihood of extraprostatic cancer had almost twice the odds of receiving prostatectomy as those with 50% likelihood of extraprostatic cancer (34%) and clinical T3-T4 disease (24%). The proportion of patients who received prostatectomy or conservative management was approximately 50% or slightly higher in all groups. Conclusions: There may be underutilization of RT in older prostate cancer patients and those with likely extraprostatic disease. Because more than half of prostate cancer patients do not consult with a radiation oncologist, a multidisciplinary consultation may affect the treatment decision-making process.

Holmes, Jordan A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Wang, Andrew Z. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); University of North Carolina-Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hendrix, Laura H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Rosenman, Julian G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); University of North Carolina-Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Carpenter, William R. [University of North Carolina-Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States) [University of North Carolina-Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Department of Health Policy and Management, University of North Carolina School of Public Health, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Godley, Paul A. [University of North Carolina-Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States) [University of North Carolina-Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Division of Hematology-Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Chen, Ronald C., E-mail: ronald_chen@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); University of North Carolina-Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Radiation Oncology in Undergraduate Medical Education: A Literature Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To review the published literature pertaining to radiation oncology in undergraduate medical education. Methods and Materials: Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE Daily Update and EMBASE databases were searched for the 11-year period of January 1, 1998, through the last week of March 2009. A medical librarian used an extensive list of indexed subject headings and text words. Results: The search returned 640 article references, but only seven contained significant information pertaining to teaching radiation oncology to medical undergraduates. One article described a comprehensive oncology curriculum including recommended radiation oncology teaching objectives and sample student evaluations, two described integrating radiation oncology teaching into a radiology rotation, two described multidisciplinary anatomy-based courses intended to reinforce principles of tumor biology and radiotherapy planning, one described an exercise designed to test clinical reasoning skills within radiation oncology cases, and one described a Web-based curriculum involving oncologic physics. Conclusions: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first review of the literature pertaining to teaching radiation oncology to medical undergraduates, and it demonstrates the paucity of published work in this area of medical education. Teaching radiation oncology should begin early in the undergraduate process, should be mandatory for all students, and should impart knowledge relevant to future general practitioners rather than detailed information relevant only to oncologists. Educators should make use of available model curricula and should integrate radiation oncology teaching into existing curricula or construct stand-alone oncology rotations where the principles of radiation oncology can be conveyed. Assessments of student knowledge and curriculum effectiveness are critical.

Dennis, Kristopher E.B., E-mail: kdennis@bccancer.bc.c [Radiation Oncology Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Duncan, Graeme [Radiation Oncology Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

International Spine Radiosurgery Consortium Consensus Guidelines for Target Volume Definition in Spinal Stereotactic Radiosurgery  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Spinal stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is increasingly used to manage spinal metastases. However, target volume definition varies considerably and no consensus target volume guidelines exist. This study proposes consensus target volume definitions using common scenarios in metastatic spine radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Seven radiation oncologists and 3 neurological surgeons with spinal radiosurgery expertise independently contoured target and critical normal structures for 10 cases representing common scenarios in metastatic spine radiosurgery. Each set of volumes was imported into the Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research. Quantitative analysis was performed using an expectation maximization algorithm for Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE) with kappa statistics calculating agreement between physicians. Optimized confidence level consensus contours were identified using histogram agreement analysis and characterized to create target volume definition guidelines. Results: Mean STAPLE agreement sensitivity and specificity was 0.76 (range, 0.67-0.84) and 0.97 (range, 0.94-0.99), respectively, for gross tumor volume (GTV) and 0.79 (range, 0.66-0.91) and 0.96 (range, 0.92-0.98), respectively, for clinical target volume (CTV). Mean kappa agreement was 0.65 (range, 0.54-0.79) for GTV and 0.64 (range, 0.54-0.82) for CTV (P<.01 for GTV and CTV in all cases). STAPLE histogram agreement analysis identified optimal consensus contours (80% confidence limit). Consensus recommendations include that the CTV should include abnormal marrow signal suspicious for microscopic invasion and an adjacent normal bony expansion to account for subclinical tumor spread in the marrow space. No epidural CTV expansion is recommended without epidural disease, and circumferential CTVs encircling the cord should be used only when the vertebral body, bilateral pedicles/lamina, and spinous process are all involved or there is extensive metastatic disease along the circumference of the epidural space. Conclusions: This report provides consensus guidelines for target volume definition for spinal metastases receiving upfront SRS in common clinical situations.

Cox, Brett W., E-mail: coxb@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Spratt, Daniel E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Lovelock, Michael [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bilsky, Mark H. [Department of Surgery, Division of Neurosurgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Division of Neurosurgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Lis, Eric [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ryu, Samuel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Sheehan, Jason [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Gerszten, Peter C. [Department of Neurological Surgery and Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, UPMC Presbyterian, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Neurological Surgery and Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, UPMC Presbyterian, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Chang, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Health Sciences Campus, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Health Sciences Campus, Los Angeles, California (United States); Gibbs, Iris; Soltys, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Sahgal, Arjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital and the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital and the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Deasy, Joe [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Flickinger, John; Quader, Mubina [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, UPMC Presbyterian, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, UPMC Presbyterian, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Mindea, Stefan [Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); and others

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Development and Validation of a Heart Atlas to Study Cardiac Exposure to Radiation Following Treatment for Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Cardiac toxicity is an important sequela of breast radiotherapy. However, the relationship between dose to cardiac structures and subsequent toxicity has not been well defined, partially due to variations in substructure delineation, which can lead to inconsistent dose reporting and the failure to detect potential correlations. Here we have developed a heart atlas and evaluated its effect on contour accuracy and concordance. Methods and Materials: A detailed cardiac computed tomography scan atlas was developed jointly by cardiology, cardiac radiology, and radiation oncology. Seven radiation oncologists were recruited to delineate the whole heart, left main and left anterior descending interventricular branches, and right coronary arteries on four cases before and after studying the atlas. Contour accuracy was assessed by percent overlap with gold standard atlas volumes. The concordance index was also calculated. Standard radiation fields were applied. Doses to observer-contoured cardiac structures were calculated and compared with gold standard contour doses. Pre- and post-atlas values were analyzed using a paired t test. Results: The cardiac atlas significantly improved contour accuracy and concordance. Percent overlap and concordance index of observer-contoured cardiac and gold standard volumes were 2.3-fold improved for all structures (p < 0.002). After application of the atlas, reported mean doses to the whole heart, left main artery, left anterior descending interventricular branch, and right coronary artery were within 0.1, 0.9, 2.6, and 0.6 Gy, respectively, of gold standard doses. Conclusions: This validated University of Michigan cardiac atlas may serve as a useful tool in future studies assessing cardiac toxicity and in clinical trials which include dose volume constraints to the heart.

Feng, Mary, E-mail: maryfeng@umich.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Moran, Jean M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Koelling, Todd [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Chughtai, Aamer [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Chan, June L.; Freedman, Laura; Hayman, James A.; Jagsi, Reshma; Jolly, Shruti; Larouere, Janice; Soriano, Julie; Marsh, Robin; Pierce, Lori J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Automatic Segmentation of Whole Breast Using Atlas Approach and Deformable Image Registration  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To compare interobserver variations in delineating the whole breast for treatment planning using two contouring methods. Methods and Materials: Autosegmented contours were generated by a deformable image registration-based breast segmentation method (DEF-SEG) by mapping the whole breast clinical target volume (CTVwb) from a template case to a new patient case. Eight breast radiation oncologists modified the autosegmented contours as necessary to achieve a clinically appropriate CTVwb and then recontoured the same case from scratch for comparison. The times to complete each approach, as well as the interobserver variations, were analyzed. The template case was also mapped to 10 breast cancer patients with a body mass index of 19.1-35.9 kg/m{sup 2}. The three-dimensional surface-to-surface distances and volume overlapping analyses were computed to quantify contour variations. Results: The median time to edit the DEF-SEG-generated CTVwb was 12.9 min (range, 3.4-35.9) compared with 18.6 min (range, 8.9-45.2) to contour the CTVwb from scratch (30% faster, p = 0.028). The mean surface-to-surface distance was noticeably reduced from 1.6 mm among the contours generated from scratch to 1.0 mm using the DEF-SEG method (p = 0.047). The deformed contours in 10 patients achieved 94% volume overlap before correction and required editing of 5% (range, 1-10%) of the contoured volume. Conclusion: Significant interobserver variations suggested a lack of consensus regarding the CTVwb, even among breast cancer specialists. Using the DEF-SEG method produced more consistent results and required less time. The DEF-SEG method can be successfully applied to patients with different body mass indexes.

Reed, Valerie K.; Woodward, Wendy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhang Lifei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Tereffe, Welela; Oh, Julia L.; Yu, T. Kuan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bedrosian, Isabelle [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Whitman, Gary J. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: ldong@mdanderson.org

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Effect of distance to radiation treatment facility on use of radiation therapy after mastectomy in elderly women  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: We sought to study the effect of distance to the nearest radiation treatment facility on the use of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) in elderly women. Methods and Materials: Using data from the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare (SEER-Medicare) database, we analyzed 19,787 women with Stage I or II breast cancer who received mastectomy as definitive surgery during 1991 to 1999. Multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate the association of distance with receipt of PMRT after adjusting for clinical and sociodemographic factors. Results: Overall 2,075 patients (10.5%) treated with mastectomy received PMRT. In addition to cancer and patient characteristics, in our primary analysis, increasing distance to the nearest radiation treatment facility was independently associated with a decreased likelihood of receiving PMRT (OR 0.996 per additional mile, p = 0.01). Secondary analyses revealed that the decline in PMRT use appeared at distances of more than 25 miles and was statistically significant for those patients living more than 75 miles from the nearest radiation facility (odds of receiving PMRT of 0.58 [95% CI 0.34-0.99] vs. living within 25 miles of such a facility). The effect of distance on PMRT appeared to be more pronounced with increasing patient age (>75 years). Variation in the effect of distance on radiation use between regions of the country and nodal status was also identified. Conclusions: Oncologists must be cognizant of the potential barrier to quality care that is posed by travel distance, especially for elderly patients; and policy makers should consider this fact in resource allocation decisions about radiation treatment centers.

Punglia, Rinaa S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: rpunglia@lroc.harvard.edu; Weeks, Jane C. [Division of Medical Oncology, Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Neville, Bridget A. [Division of Medical Oncology, Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Earle, Craig C. [Division of Medical Oncology, Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Quantifying Interobserver Variation in Target Definition in Palliative Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To describe the degree of interobserver and intraobserver variability in target and field definition when using three-dimensional (3D) volume- vs. two-dimensional (2D) field-based planning. Methods and Materials: Standardized case scenario and diagnostic imaging for 9 palliative cases (3 bone metastases, 3 palliative lung cancer, and 3 abdominal pelvis soft-tissue disease) were presented to 5 study radiation oncologists. After a decision on what the intended anatomic target should be, observers created two sets of treatment fields, first using a 2D field-based and then a 3D volume-based planning approach. Percent overlap, under-coverage, and over-coverage were used to describe interobserver and intraobserver variations in target definition. Results: The degree of interobserver variation for 2D and 3D planning was similar with a degree of overlap of 76% (range, 56%-85%) and 74% (range, 55%-88%), respectively. When comparing the treatment fields defined by the same observer using the two different planning methods, the mean degree of overlap was 78%; over-coverage, 22%; and under-coverage, 41%. There was statistically significantly more under-coverage when field-based planning was used for bone metastases (33%) vs. other anatomic sites (16%) (p = 0.02). In other words, 2D planning is more likely to result in geographic misses in bone metastases compared with other areas. Conclusions: In palliative radiotherapy clinically significant interobserver and intraobserver variation existed when using both field- and volume-based planning approaches. Strategies that would reduce this variability deserve further investigation.

Grabarz, Daniel [Centro Oncologia Mendel and Associados, Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Panzarella, Tony [Biostatistics Department, Princess Margaret Hospital, and Dalla Lana Scholl of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bezjak, Andrea; Mclean, Michael [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Elder, Christine [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Oncology Department, Auckland City Hospital (New Zealand); Wong, Rebecca K.S., E-mail: Rebecca.wong@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Validating the RTOG-Endorsed Brachial Plexus Contouring Atlas: An Evaluation of Reproducibility Among Patients Treated by Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate interobserver variability for contouring the brachial plexus as an organ-at-risk (OAR) and to analyze its potential dosimetric consequences in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-endorsed brachial plexus contouring atlas, three radiation oncologists independently delineated the OAR on treatment planning computed-tomography (CT) axial scans from 5 representative patients undergoing IMRT to a prescribed dose of 70 Gy for head-and-neck cancer. Dose-volume histograms for the brachial plexus were calculated, and interobserver differences were quantified by comparing various dosimetric statistics. Qualitative analysis was performed by visually assessing the overlapping contours on a single beam's eye view. Results: Brachial plexus volumes for the 5 patients across observers were 26 cc (18-35 cc), 25 cc (21-30 cc), 29 cc (28-32 cc), 29 cc (23-38 cc), and 29 cc (23-34 cc). On qualitative analysis, minimal variability existed except at the inferolateral portion of the OAR, where slight discrepancies were noted among the physicians. Maximum doses to the brachial plexus ranged from 71.6 to 72.6 Gy, 75.2 to 75.8 Gy, 69.1 to 71.0 Gy, 76.4 to 76.9 Gy, and 70.6 to 71.4 Gy. Respective volumes receiving doses greater than 60 Gy (V60) were 8.6 to 10.9 cc, 6.2 to 8.1 cc, 8.2 to 11.6 cc, 8.3 to 10.5 cc, and 5.6 to 9.8 cc. Conclusion: The RTOG-endorsed brachial plexus atlas provides a consistent set of guidelines for contouring this OAR with essentially no learning curve. Adoption of these contouring guidelines in the clinical setting is encouraged.

Yi, Sun K.; Hall, William H.; Mathai, Mathew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Dublin, Arthur B. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Gupta, Vishal; Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allen.chen@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

External audit of clinical practice and medical decision making in a new Asian oncology center: Results and implications for both developing and developed nations  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The external audit of oncologist clinical practice is increasingly important because of the incorporation of audits into national maintenance of certification (MOC) programs. However, there are few reports of external audits of oncology practice or decision making. Our institution (The Cancer Institute, Singapore) was asked to externally audit an oncology department in a developing Asian nation, providing a unique opportunity to explore the feasibility of such a process. Methods and Materials: We audited 100 randomly selected patients simulated for radiotherapy in 2003, using a previously reported audit instrument assessing clinical documentation/quality assurance and medical decision making. Results: Clinical documentation/quality assurance, decision making, and overall performance criteria were adequate 74.4%, 88.3%, and 80.2% of the time, respectively. Overall 52.0% of cases received suboptimal management. Multivariate analysis revealed palliative intent was associated with improved documentation/clinical quality assurance (p = 0.07), decision making (p 0.007), overall performance (p = 0.003), and optimal treatment rates (p 0.07); non-small-cell lung cancer or central nervous system primary sites were associated with better decision making (p = 0.001), overall performance (p = 0.03), and optimal treatment rates (p = 0.002). Conclusions: Despite the poor results, the external audit had several benefits. It identified learning needs for future targeting, and the auditor provided facilitating feedback to address systematic errors identified. Our experience was also helpful in refining our national revalidation audit instrument. The feasibility of the external audit supports the consideration of including audit in national MOC programs.

Shakespeare, Thomas P. [North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour, Sydney, NSW (Australia) and Cancer Institute (Singapore)]. E-mail: ThomasShakespeare@gmail.com; Back, Michael F. [Cancer Institute (Singapore); Lu, Jiade J. [Cancer Institute (Singapore); Lee, Khai Mun [Cancer Institute (Singapore); Mukherjee, Rahul K. [Cancer Institute (Singapore)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Barthold, H. Joseph [Commonwealth Hematology and Oncology, Weymouth, MA (United States); Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); O'Meara, Elizabeth [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Al-Lozi, Rawan [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Myerson, Robert [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); and others

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oncologist helen vodopick" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Physician Beliefs and Practices for Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Despite results of randomized trials that support adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer with adverse pathologic features (APF), many clinicians favor selective use of salvage RT. This survey was conducted to evaluate the beliefs and practices of radiation oncologists (RO) and urologists (U) regarding RT after RP. Methods and Materials: We designed a Web-based survey of post-RP RT beliefs and policies. Survey invitations were e-mailed to a list of 926 RO and 591 U. APF were defined as extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, or positive surgical margin. Differences between U and RO in adjuvant RT recommendations were evaluated by comparative statistics. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate factors predictive of adjuvant RT recommendation. Results: Analyzable surveys were completed by 218 RO and 92 U (overallresponse rate, 20%). Adjuvant RT was recommended based on APF by 68% of respondents (78% RO, 44% U, p <0.001). U were less likely than RO to agree that adjuvant RT improves survival and/or biochemical control (p < 0.0001). PSA thresholds for salvage RT were higher among U than RO (p < 0.001). Predicted rates of erectile dysfunction due to RT were higher among U than RO (p <0.001). On multivariate analysis, respondent specialty was the only predictor of adjuvant RT recommendations. Conclusions: U are less likely than RO to recommend adjuvant RT. Future research efforts should focus on defining the toxicities of post-RP RT and on identifying the subgroups of patients who will benefit from adjuvant vs. selective salvage RT.

Showalter, Timothy N., E-mail: timothy.showalter@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ohri, Nitin; Teti, Kristopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Foley, Kathleen A. [Strategic Consulting, Thomson Reuters Healthcare, Cambridge, MA (United States); Keith, Scott W. [Division of Biostatistics, Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Trabulsi, Edouard J.; Lallas, Costas D. [Department of Urology, Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hoffman-Censits, Jean [Department of Medical Oncology, Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pizzi, Laura T. [School of Pharmacy, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Gomella, Leonard G. [Department of Urology, Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Is It Time to Tailor the Prediction of Radio-Induced Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients? Building the First Set of Nomograms for Late Rectal Syndrome  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Development of user-friendly tools for the prediction of single-patient probability of late rectal toxicity after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This multicenter protocol was characterized by the prospective evaluation of rectal toxicity through self-assessed questionnaires (minimum follow-up, 36 months) by 718 adult men in the AIROPROS 0102 trial. Doses were between 70 and 80 Gy. Nomograms were created based on multivariable logistic regression analysis. Three endpoints were considered: G2 to G3 late rectal bleeding (52/718 events), G3 late rectal bleeding (24/718 events), and G2 to G3 late fecal incontinence (LINC, 19/718 events). Results: Inputs for the nomogram for G2 to G3 late rectal bleeding estimation were as follows: presence of abdominal surgery before RT, percentage volume of rectum receiving >75 Gy (V75Gy), and nomogram-based estimation of the probability of G2 to G3 acute gastrointestinal toxicity (continuous variable, which was estimated using a previously published nomogram). G3 late rectal bleeding estimation was based on abdominal surgery before RT, V75Gy, and NOMACU. Prediction of G2 to G3 late fecal incontinence was based on abdominal surgery before RT, presence of hemorrhoids, use of antihypertensive medications (protective factor), and percentage volume of rectum receiving >40 Gy. Conclusions: We developed and internally validated the first set of nomograms available in the literature for the prediction of radio-induced toxicity in prostate cancer patients. Calculations included dosimetric as well as clinical variables to help radiation oncologists predict late rectal morbidity, thus introducing the possibility of RT plan corrections to better tailor treatment to the patient's characteristics, to avoid unnecessary worsening of quality of life, and to provide support to the patient in selecting the best therapeutic approach.

Valdagni, Riccardo [Prostate Program, Scientific Directorate, Fondazione IRCCS-Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Radiotherapy, Fondazione IRCCS - Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Kattan, Michael W. [Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Rancati, Tiziana, E-mail: tiziana.rancati@istitutotumori.mi.it [Prostate Program, Scientific Directorate, Fondazione IRCCS-Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Yu Changhong [Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Vavassori, Vittorio [Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale di Circolo, Varese (Italy); Department of Radiotherapy, Humanitas - Gavazzeni, Bergamo (Italy); Fellin, Giovanni [Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale Santa Chiara, Trento (Italy); Cagna, Elena [Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale Sant'Anna, Como (Italy); Gabriele, Pietro [Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo (Italy); Mauro, Flora Anna; Baccolini, Micaela [Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale Villa Maria Cecilia, Lugo (Italy); Bianchi, Carla [Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale di Circolo, Varese (Italy); Menegotti, Loris [Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale Santa Chiara, Trento (Italy); Monti, Angelo F. [Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale Sant'Anna, Como (Italy); Stasi, Michele [Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo (Italy); Giganti, Maria Olga [Prostate Program, Scientific Directorate, Fondazione IRCCS-Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Dept. of Oncology, Ospedale Niguarda, Milan (Italy); and others

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Internet-Based Survey Evaluating Use of Pain Medications and Attitudes of Radiation Oncology Patients Toward Pain Intervention  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Pain is a common symptom among cancer patients, yet many patients do not receive adequate pain management. Few data exist quantifying analgesic use by radiation oncology patients. This study evaluated the causes of pain in cancer patients and investigated the reasons patients fail to receive optimal analgesic therapy. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved, Internet-based questionnaire assessing analgesic use and pain control was posted on the OncoLink (available at (www.oncolink.org)) Website. Between November 2005 and April 2006, 243 patients responded. They were predominantly women (73%), white (71%), and educated beyond high school (67%) and had breast (38%), lung (6%), or ovarian (6%) cancer. This analysis evaluated the 106 patients (44%) who underwent radiotherapy. Results: Of the 106 patients, 58% reported pain from their cancer treatment, and 46% reported pain directly from their cancer. The pain was chronic in 51% and intermittent in 33%. Most (80%) did not use medication to manage their pain. Analgesic use was significantly less in patients with greater education levels (11% vs. 36%, p = 0.002), with a trend toward lower use by whites (16% vs. 32%, p 0.082) and women (17% vs. 29%, p = 0.178). The reasons for not taking analgesics included healthcare provider not recommending medication (87%), fear of addiction or dependence (79%), and inability to pay (79%). Participants experiencing pain, but not taking analgesics, pursued alternative therapies for relief. Conclusions: Many radiation oncology patients experience pain from their disease and cancer treatment. Most study participants did not use analgesics because of concerns of addiction, cost, or failure of the radiation oncologist to recommend medication. Healthcare providers should have open discussions with their patients regarding pain symptoms and treatment.

Simone, Charles B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)], E-mail: simonec@mail.nih.gov; Vapiwala, Neha; Hampshire, Margaret K.; Metz, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A Prospective, Multicenter Study of Complementary/Alternative Medicine (CAM) Utilization During Definitive Radiation for Breast Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Although complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) utilization in breast cancer patients is reported to be high, there are few data on CAM practices in breast patients specifically during radiation. This prospective, multi-institutional study was conducted to define CAM utilization in breast cancer during definitive radiation. Materials/Methods: A validated CAM instrument with a self-skin assessment was administered to 360 Stage 0-III breast cancer patients from 5 centers during the last week of radiation. All data were analyzed to detect significant differences between users/nonusers. Results: CAM usage was reported in 54% of the study cohort (n=194/360). Of CAM users, 71% reported activity-based CAM (eg, Reiki, meditation), 26% topical CAM, and 45% oral CAM. Only 16% received advice/counseling from naturopathic/homeopathic/medical professionals before initiating CAM. CAM use significantly correlated with higher education level (P<.001), inversely correlated with concomitant hormone/radiation therapy use (P=.010), with a trend toward greater use in younger patients (P=.066). On multivariate analysis, level of education (OR: 6.821, 95% CI: 2.307-20.168, P<.001) and hormones/radiation therapy (OR: 0.573, 95% CI: 0.347-0.949, P=.031) independently predicted for CAM use. Significantly lower skin toxicity scores were reported in CAM users vs nonusers, respectively (mild: 34% vs 25%, severe: 17% vs 29%, P=.017). Conclusion: This is the first prospective study to assess CAM practices in breast patients during radiation, with definition of these practices as the first step for future investigation of CAM/radiation interactions. These results should alert radiation oncologists that a large percentage of breast cancer patients use CAM during radiation without disclosure or consideration for potential interactions, and should encourage increased awareness, communication, and documentation of CAM practices in patients undergoing radiation treatment for breast cancer.

Moran, Meena S., E-mail: meena.moran@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, William W. Backus Hospital, Norwich, Connecticut (United States); Ma Shuangge [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Jagsi, Reshma [University of Michigan, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [University of Michigan, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Yang, Tzu-I Jonathan [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Higgins, Susan A. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States) [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, Shoreline Medical Center, Guilford, Connecticut (United States); Weidhaas, Joanne B. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States) [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, Lawrence and Memorial Hospital, New London, Connecticut (United States); Lloyd, Shane [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Peschel, Richard [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States) [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, Lawrence and Memorial Hospital, New London, Connecticut (United States); Gaudreau, Bryant [Department of Radiation Therapy, William W. Backus Hospital, Norwich, Connecticut (United States)] [Department of Radiation Therapy, William W. Backus Hospital, Norwich, Connecticut (United States); Rockwell, Sara [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

ESG Brief 103002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

M M a n a g e m e n t o f H u m a n C a p i t a l E x p a n d e d E l e c t r o n i c G o v e r n m e n t I m p r o v e d F i n a n c i a l p e r f o r m a n c e B u d g e t a n d P e r f o r m a n c e I n t e g r a t i o n C o m p e t i t i v e S o u r c C o m p e t i t i v e S o u r c P M A i n g i n g Competitive Sourcing Executive Steering Group Meeting October 30, 2002 2 Competitive Sourcing/A-76 FY 02/03 Study Status Office of Competitive Sourcing/A-76 3 Functional Area Studies 1/0 13 (all HQ) Brian Costlow, ME Graphics 1/0 8 (all HQ) Frank Beserra, ED Civil Rights Reviews ( Direct Conversion) 2/8 21 (9/12) Paralegals (removed by ESG) 0/3 27 (0/27) Rosalie Jordan, SO Personnel Security Clearances (deferred by ESG) 3/12 200+ (101/99) Brian Costlow, ME Logistics 1/13 151 (60/91) Helen Sherman, ME Financial Services 24/19 165+ (82/83) Claudia Cross, ME Human Resources 14/19 420 (224/196) Karen Evans, CIO Information Technology

246

The 1980-1982 Geothermal Resource Assessment Program in Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since 1978, the Division of Geology and Earth Resources of the Washington Department of Natural Resources has participated in the U.S. Department of Energy's (USDOE) State-Coupled Geothermal Resource Program. Federal and state funds have been used to investigate and evaluate the potential for geothermal resources, on both a reconnaissance and area-specific level. Preliminary results and progress reports for the period up through mid-1980 have already been released as a Division Open File Report (Korosec, Schuster, and others, 1981). Preliminary results and progress summaries of work carried out from mid-1980 through the end of 1982 are presented in this report. Only one other summary report dealing with geothermal resource investigations in the state has been published. An Information Circular released by the Division (Schuster and others, 1978) compiled the geology, geochemistry, and heat flow drilling results from a project in the Indian Heaven area in the south Cascades. The previous progress report for the geothermal program (Korosec, Schuster, and others, 1981) included information on temperature gradients measured throughout the state, heat flow drilling in the southern Cascades, gravity surveys for the southern Cascades, thermal and mineral spring investigations, geologic mapping for the White Pass-Tumac Mountain area, and area specific studies for the Camas area of Clark County and Mount St. Helens. This work, along with some additional studies, led to the compilation of the Geothermal Resources of Washington map (Korosec, Kaler, and others, 1981). The map is principally a nontechnical presentation based on all available geothermal information, presented as data points, tables, and text on a map with a scale of 1:500,000.

Korosec, Michael A.; Phillips, William M.; Schuster, J.Eric

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Decline in urinary retention incidence in 805 patients after prostate brachytherapy: The effect of learning curve?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and factors predictive of acute urinary retention (AUR) in 805 consecutive patients treated with prostate brachytherapy monotherapy and to examine the possible effect of a learning curve. Methods and Materials: Between July 1998 and November 2002, 805 patients were treated with prostate brachytherapy. Low-risk patients (Gleason Score (GS) {<=}6; prostate specific antigen (PSA) {<=}10, and {<=} T2b [UICC 1997]) received implant alone. Patients with prostate volume of 50 cc or more, GS = 7, or PSA = 10 to 15 received 6 months of androgen suppression (AS) with brachytherapy. Patient, treatment, and dosimetric factors examined include baseline prostate symptom score (IPSS), diabetes, vascular disease, PSA, Gleason score, clinical stage, AS, ultrasound planning target volume (PUTV), postimplant prostate volume (obtained with 'Day 30' postimplant CT), CT:PUTV ratio (surrogate for postimplant edema), number of seeds, number of needles, number of seeds per needle, dosimetric parameters (V100, V150, and D90), date of implant (learning curve), and implanting oncologists. Univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out. Results: Acute urinary retention in the first 200 patients was 17% vs. 6.3% in the most recently treated 200 patients (p = 0.002). Overall AUR was 12.7%, and prolonged urinary obstruction incidence (>20 days) was 5%. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of any AUR include baseline IPSS (p = < 0.004), CT:PUTV ratio (p = < 0.001), PUTV (p = < 0.001), and implant order (learning curve) (p = 0.001). Factors predictive for 'prolonged' catheterization (>20 days) on multivariate analysis include IPSS (p < 0.01), number of needles (p < 0.001), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.048), and CT:PUTV ratio (p < 0.001) Conclusion: Over the years, our AUR rate has fallen significantly (from 17% to 6.3%). On multivariate analysis, highly significant factors include IPSS, PUTV, CT:PUTV ratio (i.e., degree of prostate edema), and order of implant (learning curve). Over the course of the program, we have deliberately reduced the number of needles and OR time per patient, which have potentially minimized intraoperative trauma and may have contributed to less toxicity. A learning curve in prostate brachytherapy programs affect not only the outcome but also the toxicity from the treatment.

Keyes, Mira [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada)]. E-mail: mkeyes@bccancer.bc.ca; Schellenberg, Devin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Moravan, Veronika M.Sc. [Population and Preventive Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); McKenzie, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Agranovich, Alexander [Fraser Valley Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Pickles, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Wu, Jonn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Liu, Mitchell [Fraser Valley Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Bucci, Joseph M.B.B.S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. George Hospital, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Morris, W. James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Report on the TESLA Engineering Study/Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In March, 2001, the TESLA Collaboration published its Technical Design Report (TDR, see references and links in Appendix), the first sentence of which stated ''...TESLA (TeV-Energy Superconducting Linear Collider) (will be) a superconducting electron-positron collider of initially 500 GeV total energy, extendable to 800 GeV, and an integrated X-ray laser laboratory.'' The TDR included cost and manpower estimates for a 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider (250 on 250 GeV) based on superconducting RF cavity technology. This was submitted as a proposal to the German government. The government asked the German Science Council to evaluate this proposal. The recommendation from this body is anticipated to be available by November 2002. The government has indicated that it will react on this recommendation by mid-2003. In June 2001, Steve Holmes, Fermilab's Associate Director for Accelerators, commissioned Helen Edwards and Peter Garbincius to organize a study of the TESLA Technical Design Report and the associated cost and manpower estimates. Since the elements and methodology used in producing the TESLA cost estimate were somewhat different from those used in preparing similar estimates for projects within the U.S., it is important to understand the similarities, differences, and equivalences between the TESLA estimate and U.S. cost estimates. In particular, the project cost estimate includes only purchased equipment, materials, and services, but not manpower from DESY or other TESLA collaborating institutions, which is listed separately. It does not include the R&D on the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) nor the costs of preparing the TDR nor the costs of performing the conceptual studies so far. The manpower for the pre-operations commissioning program (up to beam) is included in the estimate, but not the electrical power or liquid Nitrogen (for initial cooldown of the cryogenics plant). There is no inclusion of any contingency or management reserve. If the U.S. were to become involved with the TESLA project, either as a collaborator for an LC in Germany, or as host country for TESLA in the U.S., it is important to begin to understand the scope and technical details of the project, what R&D still needs to be done, and how the U.S. can contribute. The charge for this study is included in the Appendix to this report.

Cornuelle, John C.

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

249

Proc. of the workshop on pushing the limits of RF superconductivity.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For three days in late September last year, some sixty experts in RF superconductivity from around the world came together at Argonne to discuss how to push the limits of RF superconductivity for particle accelerators. It was an intense workshop with in-depth presentations and ample discussions. There was added excitement due to the fact that, a few days before the workshop, the International Technology Recommendation Panel had decided in favor of superconducting technology for the International Linear Collider (ILC), the next major high-energy physics accelerator project. Superconducting RF technology is also important for other large accelerator projects that are either imminent or under active discussion at this time, such as the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) for nuclear physics, energy recovery linacs (ERLs), and x-ray free-electron lasers. For these accelerators, the capability in maximum accelerating gradient and/or the Q value is essential to limit the length and/or operating cost of the accelerators. The technological progress of superconducting accelerators during the past two decades has been truly remarkable, both in low-frequency structures for acceleration of protons and ions as well as in high-frequency structures for electrons. The requirements of future accelerators demand an even higher level of performance. The topics of this workshop are therefore highly relevant and timely. The presentations given at the workshop contained authoritative reviews of the current state of the art as well as some original materials that previously had not been widely circulated. We therefore felt strongly that these materials should be put together in the form of a workshop proceeding. The outcome is this report, which consists of two parts: first, a collection of the scholarly papers prepared by some of the participants and second, copies of the viewgraphs of all presentations. The presentation viewgraphs, in full color, are also available from the Workshop Presentations link on the workshop's web page at http://www.aps.anl.gov/conferences/RFSCLimits/. I would like to thank all of the participants for their lively contributions to the workshop and to these proceedings, and Helen Edwards and Hasan Padamsee for their help in developing the workshop program. I also thank Cathy Eyberger, Kelly Jaje, and Renee Lanham for working very hard to take care of the administrative details, in particular Cathy for editing this report.

Kim, K-J., Eyberger, C., editors

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z