Sample records for oncologist helen vodopick

  1. Review: Nuclear Power Is Not the Answer by Helen Caldicott

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirza, Umar Karim

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Nuclear Power Is Not the Answer By Helen CaldicottPakistan. Helen Caldicott. Nuclear Power Is Not the Answer.about the true costs of nuclear power, the health effects of

  2. TITLE: Cornell's Urban Sustainability Initiatives HOST: Marianne Krasny, Helene Dillard and Marvin Pritts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    TITLE: Cornell's Urban Sustainability Initiatives HOST: Marianne Krasny, Helene Dillard and Marvin by Marianne Krasny (Natural Resources), Helene Dillard (CCE), and Marvin Pritts (Horticulture). #12;

  3. Boise Inc. St. Helens Paper Mill Achieves Significant Fuel Savings...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE energy assessment and implementing recommendations to improve the efficiency of its steam system. Boise Inc. St. Helens Paper Mill Achieves Significant Fuel Savings (May 2008)...

  4. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Goff (2000) Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  5. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fraser Goff (1995) Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCompounda...

  6. Guidance on peat soils 1 | Peat | Helen Cariss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance on peat soils 1 | Peat | Helen Cariss Forestry and deep peat Purpose This policy guidance on forestry and deep peat acts as the country level guidance for FCW. It applies to regulatory functions: conserving and enhancing biodiversity climate change mitigation maintaining the peat and soil resource

  7. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2012 Workforce Study: The Radiation Oncologists' and Residents' Perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pohar, Surjeet, E-mail: spohar@iuhealth.org [Indiana University Health East, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Fung, Claire Y. [Commonwealth Newburyport Cancer Center, Newburyport, Massachusetts (United States); Hopkins, Shane [William R. Bliss Cancer Center, Ames, Iowa (United States); Miller, Robert [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Azawi, Samar [VA Veteran Hospital/University of California Irvine, Newport Beach, California (United States); Arnone, Anna; Patton, Caroline [ASTRO, Fairfax, Virginia (United States); Olsen, Christine [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) conducted the 2012 Radiation Oncology Workforce Survey to obtain an up-to-date picture of the workforce, assess its needs and concerns, and identify quality and safety improvement opportunities. The results pertaining to radiation oncologists (ROs) and residents (RORs) are presented here. Methods: The ASTRO Workforce Subcommittee, in collaboration with allied radiation oncology professional societies, conducted a survey study in early 2012. An online survey questionnaire was sent to all segments of the radiation oncology workforce. Respondents who were actively working were included in the analysis. This manuscript describes the data for ROs and RORs. Results: A total of 3618 ROs and 568 RORs were surveyed. The response rate for both groups was 29%, with 1047 RO and 165 ROR responses. Among ROs, the 2 most common racial groups were white (80%) and Asian (15%), and the male-to-female ratio was 2.85 (74% male). The median age of ROs was 51. ROs averaged 253.4 new patient consults in a year and 22.9 on-treatment patients. More than 86% of ROs reported being satisfied or very satisfied overall with their career. Close to half of ROs reported having burnout feelings. There was a trend toward more frequent burnout feelings with increasing numbers of new patient consults. ROs' top concerns were related to documentation, reimbursement, and patients' health insurance coverage. Ninety-five percent of ROs felt confident when implementing new technology. Fifty-one percent of ROs thought that the supply of ROs was balanced with demand, and 33% perceived an oversupply. Conclusions: This study provides a current snapshot of the 2012 radiation oncology physician workforce. There was a predominance of whites and men. Job satisfaction level was high. However a substantial fraction of ROs reported burnout feelings. Perceptions about supply and demand balance were mixed. ROs top concerns reflect areas of attention for the healthcare sector as a whole.

  8. Termination of rewriting strategies: a generic approach Isabelle Gnaedig, Hel`ene Kirchner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Termination of rewriting strategies: a generic approach Isabelle Gnaedig, H´el`ene Kirchner LORIA@loria.fr,Helene.Kirchner@loria.fr Abstract. We propose a generic termination proof method for rewriting under strategies, based on an explicit induction on the termination property. Rewriting trees on ground terms are modelized by proof

  9. Richard Gerber, Helen He, Zhengji Zhao, David Turner NUG Monthly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-RayReview/Verify3UserNext Steps --- 1Helen

  10. The Total War of Paris Mathematicians David Aubin, Hel`ene Gispert, and Catherine Goldstein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The Total War of Paris Mathematicians David Aubin, H´el`ene Gispert, and Catherine Goldstein Abstract. From 1914 to 1918, Paris mathematicians were highly mobilized for war. From their standpoint, the war was indeed total, touching most as- pects of their life. In this chapter, we discuss three areas

  11. The Total War of Paris Mathematicians David Aubin, Hel`ene Gispert, and Catherine Goldstein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Total War of Paris Mathematicians David Aubin, H´el`ene Gispert, and Catherine Goldstein Abstract. From 1914 to 1918, Paris mathematicians were highly mobilized for war. In this paper, we argue the effects of war on postwar images of mathematics focusing on three specific aspects: institutional

  12. Introducing mobility into CSP B Steve Schneider, Helen Treharne, and Beeta Vajar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Steve

    AVoCS 2007 Introducing mobility into CSP B Steve Schneider, Helen Treharne, and Beeta Vajar Department of Computing University of Surrey Guildford, Surrey, UK Abstract CSP B is a combination of CSP, the semantic foundation for pi |B is cumbersome for reasoning about systems, and a CSP based approach may

  13. Fluorocarbon impurities in KrF lasers Helen H. Hwang, Kristopher James, Roger Hui, and Mark J. KushneP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    Fluorocarbon impurities in KrF lasers Helen H. Hwang, Kristopher James, Roger Hui, and Mark J, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (Received 24 January 1991; accepted for publication 7 March 1991) Fluorocarbon amounts of impurities, and flu- orocarbons in particular.' Fluorocarbons such as CF4 are common

  14. Predictability of a Mediterranean Tropical-Like Storm Downstream of the Extratropical Transition of Hurricane Helene (2006)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predictability of a Mediterranean Tropical-Like Storm Downstream of the Extratropical Transition downstream. The present study focuses on the predictability of a Mediterranean tropical-like storm (Medicane) on 26 September 2006 downstream of the ET of Hurricane Helene from 22 to 25 September. While

  15. Four-year prospective study of the respiratory effects of volcanic ash from Mt. St. Helens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buist, A.S.; Vollmer, W.M.; Johnson, L.R.; Bernstein, R.S.; McCamant, L.E.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the 4-yr follow-up of 712 loggers exposed over an extended period to varying levels of fresh volcanic ash from the 1980 eruptions of Mt. St. Helens. Concerns related to the irritant effect the ash might have on the airways and also to its fibrogenic potential if exposures were intense and continued over many years. Our subjects were divided into 3 groups: high, low, and no exposure. Baseline testing was begun in June 1980, 1 month after the major eruption, and follow-up testing continued on an annual basis through 1984; 88% of the loggers have been tested at least 3 times. Analysis of lung function data showed that a significant, exposure-related decline in FEV1 occurred during the first year after the eruption. The decline was short-lived, however, and by 1984 the differences between exposure groups were no longer significant. Self-reported symptoms of cough, phlegm, and wheeze showed a similar pattern. No ash-related changes were seen in chest roentgenograms taken in 1980 and in 1984. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the inhaled ash caused mucus hypersecretion and/or airway inflammation that reversed when the exposure levels decreased. The ash levels to which the loggers were exposed were low compared with permissible occupational levels for nuisance dusts, but generally higher than the total suspended particulate levels permissible in ambient air.

  16. Ambient Airborne Solids Concentrations Including Volcanic Ash at Hanford, Washington Sampling Sites Subsequent to the Mount St. Helens Eruption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1982-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A major eruption of Mount St. Helens occurred on May 18, 1980. Subsequently, airborne solid concentrations were measured as a function of time at two sites within the southern edge of the fallout plume about 211 km east of Mount St. Helens. This ash was a source for investigating area-wide resuspension. Rain had a variable effect on decreasing airborne concentrations from resuspension. From 0.5 to 1.5 cm of rain were required to significantly reduce airborne solid concentrations through July. For a more aged resuspension source in September, a rain of 2.0 cm had a negligible effect. A monthly average threshold-wind speed for resuspension was defined as 3.6 m/s. For monthly-average wind speeds less than the threshold wind speed, monthly-average airborne concentrations tended to decrease with time. A decrease was recorded between September and October. For this 4-month time period, the half-life was on the order of 50 days, corresponding to a weathering rate of 5.1 year/sup -1/.

  17. Yun (Helen) He

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires mayYuan T. Lee's Crossed Molecular Beam Experiment

  18. Yun (Helen) He, NERSC!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhatY-12 recognizedThesis PrizeYucca MountainHe,

  19. australian gynaecologic oncologists: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES QUALITY AGENCY Report of an Audit of Swinburne; AUQA Audit Report Number 61 ISBN 978 1 877090 90 5 Australian...

  20. Helen He! NERSC User Services Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartment ofHeat TransferStartup AmericaHeikoAdding

  1. Helen He! NERSC User Services Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartment ofHeat TransferStartup

  2. Helen He! NERSC User Services Group!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartment ofHeat TransferStartupHe! NERSC User

  3. Helen He! NERSC User Services Group!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartment ofHeat TransferStartupHe! NERSC UserGroup!

  4. Helene Moglen and the Vicissitudes of a Feminist Administrator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moglen, Helene; Reti, Irene; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    identity, as it is for many people. Reti: It’s not part ofcoming. Moglen: I don’t think many people were aware of it.mayor yet but like so many people downtown, she was a UCSC

  5. Marie-Helene Radenac Yves Dandonneau Bruno Blanke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the equa- torial divergence, the phytoplankton biomass is low relative to available nitrate concentrations of such an ecosystem are that nitrate up- take is kept at a very low rate (Price et al. 1994) and that a large amount gyre are nitrate-depleted with low phytoplankton biomass (Wyrtki and Kilonsky 1984; Hardy et al. 1996

  6. Distributed Learning in Hierarchical Networks Hel`ene Le Cadre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , an illustration of which is the smart grid. Smart grid management requires the control of non-renewable energy production and the integration of renewable energies which might be highly unpredictable. Indeed optimal control strategies on the non- renewable energy productions and compare competitive learning

  7. Hydrothermal Circulation At Mount St Helens Determined By Self...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the dome summit. The anomaly pattern is believed to result from a combination of thermoelectric, electrokinetic, and fluid disruption effects within and surrounding the dome....

  8. Catherine Graham CV (March 2014) Page 1 Catherine Helen Graham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Ana

    , phylogenetic and trait betadiversity in South American hummingbirds. American Naturalist. (78) Holt, B.graham@stonybrook.edu http://catherinegraham.weebly.com/ BIOGEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION Nationality: American Date of birth of montane biodiversity: integrating evolutionary and ecological processes. Ecography. (79) Weinstein, B

  9. Nazim Bharmal Anthony Slingo Jeff Settle Gary Robinson Helen White

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at 2:00 P.M.InnovationRADAGAST:

  10. Mike Stewart and Helen He NERSC User Services Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625Data ShowC -9MicrowaveFuelMike Carr

  11. Richard Gerber Helen He, Zhengji Zhao, Chris Daley NUG Monthly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-RayReview/Verify3 TheRichard B.RichardGerber

  12. Helen He, David Turner, Richard Gerber NUG Monthly Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartment ofHeat TransferStartupHe! NERSC

  13. Hopper* Suren Byna, Prabhat, Andrew Uselton, David Knaak, Helen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football Highdefault Sign InData inmax walltimeTrillion

  14. Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:HoldingsTechintIsNumeric JumpTerrace,

  15. Mt St Helens Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,MontereyHill,Spurr GeothermalInformationMt RainierRanierMt

  16. Mt St Helens Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,MontereyHill,Spurr GeothermalInformationMt

  17. Boise Inc. St. Helens Paper Mill Achieves Significant Fuel Savings |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform isEnergyMeeting |Resources » EnergyJulyBoise Buses Running

  18. Impairment of the Bacterial Biofilm Stability by Triclosan Helen V. Lubarsky1,2.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    concerns about the impact of this harmful chemical on the biofilms that are the dominant life style composition ­ isolated from sediments of the Eden Estuary (Scotland, UK) ­ on non-cohesive glass beads (,63 mm determined. While the triclosan exposure did not prevent bacterial settlement, biofilm development

  19. A Review of "The English Poems of George Herbert" edited by Helen Wilcox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Jeffrey P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the 1633 print edition and the Bodleian manuscript. Most critics believe the elegant Bodleian manuscript was produced by a member of Nicholas Ferrar?s Little Gidding community for the licensing of The Temple in 1633, but that it was NOT the ?little..., ed. Nicholas Oldisworth?s Manuscript (Bodleian MS. Don.c.24). Tempe, AZ: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2009. xlv + 256 pp. $54.00. Review by a.h. de quehen, university of toronto. Nicholas Oldisworth was a Gloucestershire man...

  20. Composing Speci cations using Communication Helen Treharne, Steve Schneider, and Marchia Bramble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    CSPto enable controlled interaction between B machines. This illustrates how B machines are essential abstract speci cation described in CSP. This allows safety and liveness properties to be established for combinations of communicating B machines. Keywords: B-Method, CSP, Composing Speci cations, Combining

  1. 56 | THE HELEN HAMLYN CENTRE FOR DESIGN YEARBOOK 2012 CHALLENGE WORKSHOPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Sriram

    a feature of the employment scene in many countries. In Western Europe, many have been transformed fresh business life into sheltered workshops for disabled people in the Balkans how inclusive design

  2. HelenPilcher,London An avian flu virus is mutating and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    an unspecified period of time through the auction of radio spectrum that is currently used for television broad that, if elected, he would lift Pre

  3. Spatial factors affecting primary succession on the Muddy River Lahar, Mount St. Helens, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Moral, Roger

    in different CTs mingled spatially and in multivariate space. Species patterns were weakly related analysis (RDA), and Mantel tests to compare the vegetation relationships with explanatory factors. Plots cannot be predicted well from the data available, suggesting that there were no prominent deterministic

  4. Low Altitude Wind Simulation Over Mount Saint Helens Using NASA SRTM Digital Terrain Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberta, University of

    . Using a new radar sweep- ing technique most of the Earth's surfaces was digitized in 3D in approximately Medellin, Colombia Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6J 2E8 Abstract On February 11, 2000, the Shuttle Radar Topography Mis- sion (SRTM) was launched into space as part of one of the payload of the Shuttle Endeavor

  5. Ethicsof Field Research:Do fournals Set the Standard? HeleneMarshand CaroleM. Eros

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, Helene

    Instirutes of ileolth. L.tSA H. (i. Gassen. T H Durmstatlt. Ger nruny L. N. (iefler. lrirlr & Ri.rritttcr o/'llcolth. LtSA J. R. Ravetz.RcreorchMcthodsCrnsulktnt t, IJK .4.N. Rowan. lifrs Sthool rl Vct

  6. GP commissioning: implications for the third Helen Dickinson1 and Robin Miller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    (Secretary of State for Health, 2010) heralded reforms described as the `biggest upheaval of the NHS outcome focus, extended choice etc),recent reform processes have shown that during implementation be for the third sector. NHS reform and policy drivers To some extent, the recently proposed reforms

  7. Towards Dynamic Updates In AUTOSAR Hel`ene Martorell1,2,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , validated and then uploaded in ECUs in a monolithic fashion, before a vehicle is put in operation. Yet that will enable to fit in as many dif- ferent functions as possible. These carefully chosen adaptation areas

  8. The Poetics and Politics of Children's Play: Helen Levitt's Early Work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gand, Elizabeth Margaret

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    considering that Johann Huizinga’s magisterial Homo Ludens:theorist of play, Johann Huizinga, insists upon in Homoof an act apart. Johann Huizinga 1938 to 1940 count as

  9. Helen Hosmer: A Radical Critic of California Agribusiness in the 1930s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regional History Project, UCSC Library; Hosmer, Helen; Jarrell, Randall

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be Stewart Meigs of Carpinteria." He was named chairman ofhere, right down in the Carpinteria area. Jarrell: Why isn't

  10. Self Potential At Mt St Helens Area (Bedrosian, Et Al., 2007) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd JumpInformationScotts Corners,Energy Information

  11. Water Sampling At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, searchOpen EnergyKauaiMt Ranier Area

  12. James M. Craw, Nicholas P. Cardo, Yun (Helen) He Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation PeerNOON... No matterJamaicanJamesJamesMortem

  13. Aeromagnetic Survey At Mt St Helens Area (Towle, 1983) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEE JumpAeroWind Inc. Place: Potsdam,OpenAl., 1984) |

  14. Isotopic Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInterias Solar Energy JumpIremNot Available)Information2002)

  15. Isotopic Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 2000) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInterias Solar Energy JumpIremNot Available)Information2002)Energy

  16. Hydrothermal Circulation At Mount St Helens Determined By Self-Potential

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas: EnergyHy9Moat of Long Valley Caldera | Open

  17. Geothermometry At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005)EnergyAmatitlanGmbH und Co2010) |Information

  18. Richard Gerber, Lisa Gerhardt, Harvey Wasserman, Helen He, Scott French, Zhengji

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-RayReview/Verify3UserNext Steps ---

  19. Helen T. Edwards, 1986 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartment ofHeat TransferStartupHe! NERSCHelen T.

  20. Dr Helen Kerch | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven National Laboratory LaboratoryMaterialsDocumentChristopherGregory

  1. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia,2005) | Open(Thompson, 1985) |Open Energy1995)

  2. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia,2005) | Open(Thompson, 1985) |Open

  3. Franklin Job Completion Analysis Yun (Helen) He, Hwa-Chun Wendy Lin, and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof Energy Forrestal GarageD.Charge rateFranklinFranklinJob

  4. Franklin XT4 to Hopper XE6 Katie Antypas and Helen He NERSC User Services Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof Energy Forrestal GarageD.Charge

  5. Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 NoEurope BV Jump to: navigation, searchClean Energy Place:Energy

  6. Numerical study of HeleShaw flow with suction Hector D. Ceniceros, Thomas Y. Hou, and Helen Si

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Thomas Yizhao

    with suction are relevant to the process of oil recovery. In these flows, a blob of viscous fluid, surrounded the more viscous fluid is sucked out. In the oil analogy, this fingering process could reduce the amount; accepted 27 May 1999# We investigate numerically the effects of surface tension on the evolution

  7. To: Frank Disalvo and Helene Schember, Cornell Center for a Sustainable Future From: Cornell Global Labor Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    -level labor and environmental leaders for the NYS Climate Action Plan, as well as federal and international-level climate policy. Building on GLI's research and educational activities, the discussion began with a brief, agriculture, urban planning and building design reveals numerous challenges and opportunities for working

  8. "Call me a Californio": Translating Hemispheric Legacies in Helen Hunt Jackson, Don Antonio Coronel, and José Martí

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearson, Chelsea Leah

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Spanish revivalism unaccounted for in many histories oftranslation, however, unaccounted for in the novel’s making;from the novel. These unaccounted-for mediations, common in

  9. Privacy Challenges in Patient-Centric Health Information Systems Anupam Datta , Nipun Dave , John Mitchell , Helen Nissenbaum , Divya Sharma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    'un tel classement, malgré ses imperfections, rendrait de nombreux services. C'est dans ce but que nous

  10. A review of "Court Culture in Dresden: From Renaissance to Baroque." by Helen Watanabe-O’Kelly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marian Matrician

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Francesco I,? 53-77). Mario Infelise presents the evolution of the avvisi since their beginning until the end of seventeenth century, using many examples of this inform- ing activity which introduced a new factor into political life: public opinion...

  11. Boise Inc. St. Helens Paper Mill Achieves Significant Fuel Savings; Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) Save Energy Now (SEN) Case Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyandapproximately 10|BlueFireBoiler MACTDepartmentBoise

  12. A Volcano Rekindled: The Renewed Eruption of Mount St. Helens, 20042006 Edited by David R. Sherrod, William E. Scott, and Peter H. Stauffer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    not deployed specifically for photogrammetric purposes. Quantitative analysis of oblique terrestrial imagery photographs sufficient to make quantitative (photogrammetric) measurements of static features or dynamic scientists to unnecessary risk and to pro- vide ancillary information on conditions in the crater (such

  13. http://www.sedimentaryores.net/Cascades/MtStHelens/Cascade%20Range%20Lahars.pdf Cascade Range Lahars (Volcanic Debris Flows) JB Maynard 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maynard, J. Barry

    Geomorphologie, Supplement v. 9, p.168­186. Landim, P.M.B., and Frakes, L.A., 1968, Distinction between tills

  14. Department of Materials MS Part II Course Handbook 201011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    silicon imaging devices AIK / GM Helen DUGDALE MAN Understanding crack growth in nuclear reactors SL ............................................................................................................. 22 Lab Books

  15. Institute Jor ADVANCED STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for advanced study HELENE L. KAPLAN Of Counsel Skiiddcn Arps Slate Meagher & Flam PETER R. KANN Chairman

  16. MNOA FACULTY SENATE MEETING MINUTES February 16, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty Senate clerk Helen Yano is retiring at the end of February, 2011. The Chair thanked her for her

  17. New nanotech invention improves effectiveness of the 'penicillin...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory have added a new weapon to oncologists' arsenal of anti-cancer therapies. By combining magnetic nanoparticles with one of the most common and...

  18. Atomic layer deposition of Al-incorporated Zn(O,S) thin films with tunable electrical Helen Hejin Park, Ashwin Jayaraman, Rachel Heasley, Chuanxi Yang, Lauren Hartle, Ravin Mankad, Richard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the conventional toxic CdS buffer material for CIGS and CZTS solar cells, Zn(O,S) is composed of earth (CBO) at the buffer/absorber interface to optimize the solar cell device performance,13 as illustrated absorber materials, such as Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 (CIGS),1,2 Cu2ZnSn(Se,S)4 (CZTS),3­5 and SnS.6­9 Compared

  19. Ground-based and Airborne Telescopes IV, edited by Larry Stepp, Roberto Gilmozzi, Helen J. Hall, Proc. of SPIE Vol. 8444, 8444OY 2012 SPIE CCC code: 0277-786/12/$18 doi: 10.1117/12.926780

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and diffracted light from the material obstruction of the pupil associated with the secondary mirror. The faint, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA (3) Big Bear Solar Observatory, NJIT, Big Bear City, California for higher dynamic range, for example, those devoted to faint companion detection and solar studies. Smaller

  20. Dirhodium(II,II) Complexes: Molecular Characteristics that Affect in Vitro Activity Alfredo M. Angeles-Boza, Helen T. Chifotides, J. Dafhne Aguirre, Abdellatif Chouai, Patty K.-L. Fu,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turro, Claudia

    of Chemistry, Texas A & M UniVersity, College Station, Texas 77843, and U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 5100.29-31 These compounds exhibit increased toxicity upon irradiation with low-energy light and thus the ability to cleave DNA upon irradiation with visible light, both in t

  1. Hopper scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and /project...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and project outage Hopper scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and project outage September 18, 2012 by Helen He (0 Comments) There...

  2. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and project outage September 18, 2012 by Helen He | 0 Comments There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance for Hopper next...

  3. alcohol randomized controlled: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anne; Sweeting, Michael; Touquet, Robin; Tyrer, Peter; Ward, Helen; Crawford, Mike J 2012-08-25 2 ALCOHOL CiteSeer Summary: Excess drinking is associated with lost...

  4. The Critical World of Harry Berger, Jr.: An Oral History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderscoff, Cameron; Reti, Irene; Berger, Harry Jr.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    simultaneously. In doing so, he renders his writing rigorousto draw upon in order to render Helen of Troy. 17 Do you

  5. Institute for ADVANCED STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones and Company, Inc. New York, New York HELENE L. KAPLAN Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom New York, New York T

  6. INTRODUCTION THE DETRIMENTAL EFFECTS OF SHIFTWORK, IN PARTICU-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , PhD; Nicole Lamond, PhD; Alexandra L. Holmes, PhD; Helen J. Burgess, PhD; Gregory D. Roach, PhD; Adam

  7. Journal of Theatre and Performing Arts Vol.7, No.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    Reinelt (University of Warwick); Joseph Roach (Yale University); Dan Rebellato (RHUL); Helen Nicholson (RHUL); Brian Singleton (Trinity College Dublin); Patrick Lonergan (National University of Ireland

  8. Issue 4 Michaelmas 2005 www.bluesci.org Artificial Intelligence Obesity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Issue 4 Michaelmas 2005 www.bluesci.org · Artificial Intelligence · Obesity · · Women In Science.............................................................................. Fat Of The Land Helen Stimpson weighs up the evidence for the `obesity epidemic

  9. Case No. VBH-0060

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of an unsuccessful appeal, the decision and order shall be implemented by each affected NNSA element, official or employee and by each affected contractor. Helen E. Mancke Hearing...

  10. altered lumbar connective: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AND H'ELENE ESNAULT anything to do with ffl-factors Bloch, Spencer 125 SmartConnect: Data connectivity for peripheral health facilities Computer Technologies and Information...

  11. Running jobs error: "inet_arp_address_lookup"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    jobs error: "inetarpaddresslookup" Resolved: Running jobs error: "inetarpaddresslookup" September 22, 2013 by Helen He (0 Comments) Symptom: After the Hopper August 14...

  12. Vlf Electromagnetic Investigations Of The Crater And Central...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Helens, Washington Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Vlf Electromagnetic Investigations Of The Crater And Central Dome Of Mount...

  13. Cellular/Molecular Classification of NPY-Expressing Neocortical Interneurons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battaglia, Demian

    Karagiannis,1,2* Thierry Gallopin,1* Csaba Da´vid,3* Demian Battaglia,4,5* He´le`ne Geoffroy,1 Jean Rossier,1

  14. Unpleasant Things: Teaching Advocacy in Archival Education Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Richard J

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Princeton University Press. Buss, H. M. , & Kadar, M. (nature of the archive. Helen Buss, in an introduction to aattention to theorization” (Buss & Kadar, 2001, p. 4). When

  15. Dean of Libraries Associate Dean for Public Services,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Christa Poparad Interlibrary Loan Coordinator Brandon Lewter Alana Lewis, LTA Chris Nelson, LTA Jared Seay Fund Deborah Larsen, Office Manager Special Collections Harlan Greene Marine Resources Library Helen

  16. Boston University Photonics Center Shared Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finzi, Adrien

    (s) Project/Organization Role Helen Fawcett Manager, Operations and Technical Programs Robert Schaejbe .........................................................................................................5 3.3 Personal Property................................................................................................8 4.4 Personal Productivity and Protection................

  17. u.s. Wea.ther Bureau. Hurricane Helena. Sept. 2S-29. 1958.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QC 945.2 .H45 H8 1958 u.s. Wea.ther Bureau. Hurricane Helena. Sept. 2S-29. 1958. #12;National;PRELIMINARY REPORT, HURRICANE HELENE SEPTEMBER 23-29, 1958 Hurricane Helene, one of the most dangerous to hurricane strength by the next day. It continued to intensify and advanced on a slow and somewhat erratic

  18. Use of Gold in Head and Neck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Peter

    Use of Gold in Head and Neck Cancer Treatments Q & A with Dr. Frank McCormick UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center Cancer Center Connection Frank McCormick, PhD, FRS, is the director of the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center (HDFCCC) and is Associate Dean of the UCSF School

  19. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Streamlined LCA of Paper Towel End of Life Options for UBC SEEDS Recycling vs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Towel End of Life Options for UBC SEEDS Recycling vs. Composting Helen Brennek, Landon Gardner, Sizhe LCA of Paper Towel End of Life Options for UBC SEEDS Recycling vs. Composting by Helen Brennek, Landon a comparison between end-of-life options for paper towel used in SUB bathrooms, in particular for recycling

  20. THE TEPHRA STRATIGRAPHY OF TWO LAKES IN SOUTH-CENTRAL BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE MID-LATE HOLOCENE VOLCANIC ACTIVITY AT GLACIER PEAK AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavin, Daniel G.

    FOR THE MID-LATE HOLOCENE VOLCANIC ACTIVITY AT GLACIER PEAK AND MOUNT ST. HELENS, WASHINGTON, USA Objective · New evidence of the ages and plume trajectories for four tephras. First evidence of Glacier Peak A, D, and Dusty Creek, and Mt. St. Helens P, as airfall tephra in south-central British Columbia. · The Glacier

  1. Inside this issue: DEC Award 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidd, William S. F.

    that over 25% of the electricity in New York State is derived from nuclear power? Indian Point, the largest that we have crafted the "You've Got the Power to Conserve" energy conservation programs. This knits. Helen Caldicott UAlbany was please to host world renowned author and anti-nuclear activist, Dr. Helen

  2. Department of Computing Stepwise Refinement in Event-B||CSP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    in Event-B||CSP Part 1: Safety Steve Schneider, Helen Treharne and Heike Wehrheim March 12th 2011 #12;Stepwise Refinement in Event-B CSP Part 1: Safety Steve Schneider1 Helen Treharne1 Heike Wehrheim2 1, 2011 Contents 1 Introduction 3 2 CSP 3 2.1 Notation

  3. Radiation tests of the EMU spacesuit for the International Space Station using energetic protons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeitlin, C.; Heilbronn, L.; Miller, J.; Shavers, M.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in The Modern Technology of Radiation Oncology: A CompendiumMedical Physicists and Radiation Oncologists, ed. J. vanDyk,Radiation Tests of the EMU Spacesuit for the International

  4. Page 2 Innovative Clinical Trials and Research Expand Targeted Medical Therapies and Personalized Approaches to Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaole Shirley

    and changing the standard of care for many patients with thoracic cancers; · Offers a wide range of cutting-edge factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in non-small cell lung cancer, medical oncologists and researchers

  5. A self-adaptive case-based reasoning system for dose planning in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Nishikant; Petrovic, Sanja; Sundar, Santhanam [Automated Scheduling, Optimisation and Planning Research Group, School of Computer Science, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG8 1BB (United Kingdom); Department of Oncology, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham NG5 1PB (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in the male population. Radiotherapy is often used in the treatment for prostate cancer. In radiotherapy treatment, the oncologist makes a trade-off between the risk and benefit of the radiation, i.e., the task is to deliver a high dose to the prostate cancer cells and minimize side effects of the treatment. The aim of our research is to develop a software system that will assist the oncologist in planning new treatments. Methods: A nonlinear case-based reasoning system is developed to capture the expertise and experience of oncologists in treating previous patients. Importance (weights) of different clinical parameters in the dose planning is determined by the oncologist based on their past experience, and is highly subjective. The weights are usually fixed in the system. In this research, the weights are updated automatically each time after generating a treatment plan for a new patient using a group based simulated annealing approach. Results: The developed approach is analyzed on the real data set collected from the Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, City Hospital Campus, UK. Extensive experiments show that the dose plan suggested by the proposed method is coherent with the dose plan prescribed by an experienced oncologist or even better. Conclusions: The developed case-based reasoning system enables the use of knowledge and experience gained by the oncologist in treating new patients. This system may play a vital role to assist the oncologist in making a better decision in less computational time; it utilizes the success rate of the previously treated patients and it can also be used in teaching and training processes.

  6. MAGAZINE OF THE GERALD J. AND DOROTHY R. FRIEDMAN SCHOOL OF NUTRITION SCIENCE AND POLICY VOL. 10 NO. 1 FALL 2008 Why we just can't get enough

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennett, Daniel

    FOOD CRISIS NUTRITION #12;ASK TUFTS NUTRITION PHOTO: VITO ALUIA For this installment of "Ask Tufts another identity. By Helene Ragovin 18 From the Heart Why are African Americans more prone to heart

  7. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hopper scheduled maintenance and SW new default versions on Wednesday, Jan 18 January 11, 2012 by Helen He | 0 Comments 1) There will be a scheduled hardware and software...

  8. Franklin Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scheduled maintenance next Wed (June 15) and new software available June 8, 2011 by Helen He | 0 Comments 1) There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance for...

  9. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scheduled maintenance on Wed, June 1 May 26, 2011 by Helen He | 0 Comments There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance followed by a dedicated system testing for...

  10. actinide separations final: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference; Rw Sector A; John Kelly; Helen Finch 2002-01-01 72 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) We are applying our unique capabilities in actinide and repository Materials...

  11. Volume 5, Numbers 2 and 3 ESR THEME SECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewison, Rebecca

    Email: ir@int-res.com, Internet: www.int-res.com THEME SECTIONS of Endangered Species Research (ESR Hodgson David Agnew Daniel Oro Clement Tisdell Helene Marsh Rory Wilson Brendan Godley Steven Cooke Andrew

  12. Dwek School on Nanoplasmonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dwek School on Nanoplasmonics 9-13 December 2012 Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel Research School of Chemical Science Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for Nanoscale Science Maurice & Gabriela

  13. altitude wind tunnel: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Helens Using NASA SRTM Digital Terrain Model M Alberta, University of 2 Utilization of Wind Energy at High Altitude Physics (arXiv) Summary: Ground based, wind energy extraction...

  14. http://10.31.201.4/Cases/whistle/lwa0006.htm

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    6 September 2, 1994 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Helen Gaidine Oglesbee Date of Filing: February 28, 1994 Case Number:...

  15. Globalization and the Future of the National Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, James Patrick

    2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Many observers are concerned that the growth of globalization will undermine and destroy national economies. For the past six years, Professor Suzanne Berger, the Raphael Dorman and Helen Starbuck Professor of Political ...

  16. Satellite measurements of the clear-sky greenhouse effect from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    LETTERS Satellite measurements of the clear-sky greenhouse effect from tropospheric ozone HELEN M of 0.48±0.14 W m-2 between 45 S and 45 N. This estimate of the clear-sky greenhouse effect from

  17. The Motif of Fate in Homeric Epics and Oedipus Tyrannus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Chun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in comparison with the house of Priam; C and Helen are alsowhen Achilles speaks to Priam about how gods distributeshow us Andromache’s tears, Priam’s pains and Penelope’s

  18. Show Business: Deixis in Fifth-Century Athenian Drama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, David Julius

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    there is no Hector here, no Priam, no gold. This is a Greekin Book 3 of the Iliad where Priam and Helen stand atop thethe battlefield. When Priam asks about a particular warrior

  19. Department: Theatre and Film 2013/14 Season Prod. # Feb 24, 2014 Ver. 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeff

    Game by Eugene Ionesco, trans Helen Gary Bishop Event Date & Time: Tue, Nov 26 - Fri, Nov 29 - 8pm, Sat Churchill Event Date & Time: Sat Mar 29 Director: Blake Taylor Location: ACTF Theatre 1T15, Possession: Fri

  20. magazine of the gerald j. and dorothy r. friedman school of nutrition science and policy SUMMER 2011 VOL. 12 NO. 2 PLUS: GENES AND DIET n INNOVATIONS IN AFRICA n FEEDING YOUR PET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennett, Daniel

    Contributing Writers Gail Bambrick, Herb Brody, Taylor McNeil, Jacqueline Mitchell, Danielle Nierenberg, Helene the leadership of Doug Balentine and Anita Owen; and our Board of Overseers under the leadership of Ed Budd, A55

  1. Jonathan White, Dale Thompson University of ArkansasMotivation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Dale R.

    DANIEL 13. JACKSON KAREN PAUL 14. WHITE BETTY MARK 15. HARRIS HELEN DONALD 16. MARTIN SANDRA GEORGE 17 line. Offset Name Ranges 1 AAAAAAAAA ALI 2 ALICEA ANDERSON 3 ANDERTON AVERETT Results The method

  2. REGION, IDENTITY AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT FOR AN ECONOMIC REGIONAL OBSERVATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ________________________________________________________________ Marie-Hélène DE SEDE-MARCEAU, Alexandre MOINE Professors of geography alexandre.moine@univ-fcomte.fr, marie-helene.de-sede-marceau@univ-fcomte.fr Professional address CERSOT-ThéMA, UMR-6049 (CNRS

  3. SAGEO'2009, pages 00 00 Du producteur l'utilisateur: identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    'appropriation des données géographiques. Matthieu NOUCHER *, Marie-Hélène de SEDE-MARCEAU **, François GOLAY, 32 rue Mégevand, 25030 Besançon Cedex marie-helene.de-sede-marceau@univ-fcomte.fr RÉSUMÉ. Décliner

  4. Ceramic Mugs & Dishes Incandescent Light Bulbs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Keith

    , MU East Rock Hall/19-B CELL PHONES - EYEGLASSES 654 Minnesota Street Room 208, copy room CVRI Helen. Zion Cancer Research Building N423 Parnassus Campus: eyeglasses "I" level, Optometry Store, MU West

  5. Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Temporal...

  6. ;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. McClain Terry G. Fitch Levy M. James Anne B. McClearn Myron J. Adams, Jr. August 1984 U Goodman, Helen Hankins, Clark Heath, ~ ~ artin Hirsch, Vernon Houk, James Hudson, Martha Hunter, Bobbie

  7. LWJ-0004- In the Matter of Westinghouse Hanford Company

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On February 28, 1994, Helen "Gai" Oglesbee filed a request for hearing under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. This request has been assigned...

  8. Revue de presse ANGLAIS Semaine du 04 au 10 octobre 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rennes, Université de

    Scientist ­ October 09, 2010 Technology The green city that has a brain (by Helen Knight) : An eco-city the secret of elongating life. US News & World Report ­ October 2010 Special How to retire smart Retire smart

  9. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Fred erick B. Dent, Secretary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and Tanner Crabs; Chionoecetes bairdi, Robert M. Meyer 17 A Survey of Giant Clams, Tridacnidae, on Helen Reef on Molting Tanner Crabs, Chionoecetes bairdi, John F. Karinen and Stanley D. Rice Departments 38 NOAA

  10. In this program students receive highly specialized training in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    and street smart, using New York City as their laboratory. DAVID AND HELEN GURLEY BROWN INSTITUTE FOR MEDIA INNOVATION Thanks to the largest gift in its history, Columbia Journalism School will soon be home to the market

  11. Arts & Science Dean's Honor Roll Fall Semester 2013 Jackson Aaberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jerry

    Jessica Anania Megan Anderson Amber Anderson Teagan Anderson Katelyn Anderson Mark Anderson William Anderson Helen Anderson Marleigh Anderson Tristian Anderson Shelby Anderson Tyler Anderson-Sieg Jayne Kelly Bielfeldt Jordan Biermann Mary Bifulco Aalieyah Billings Sarah Billingsly Mitchell Bird Thomas

  12. Effects of changes of food type for different aged postlarval blue shrimp cultured in a raceway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morales, Helen Marie

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF CHANGES OF FOOD TYPE FOR DIFFERENT AGED POSTLARVAL BLUE SHRIMP CULTURED IN A RACEWAY A Thesis by HELEN MARIE MORALES Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major subject: wildlife and Fisheries sciences EFFECTS OF CHANGES OF FOOD TYPE FOR DIFFERENT AGED POSTLARVAL BLUE SHRIMP CULTURED IN A RACEWAY A Thesis by HELEN MARIE MORALES Approved as to style...

  13. Comparison of cecal colonization of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in white leghorn chicks and Salmonella-resistant mice 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivula, Christine Patricia

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    by: Co-Chairs of Committee, Helene Andrews-Polymenis L. Garry Adams Committee Member, Melanie Ihrig Head of Department, Gerald R. Bratton August 2008 Major Subject: Laboratory Animal Medicine iii ABSTRACT Comparison of Cecal... ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to express my gratitude to my committee co-chairs, Helene Andrews-Polymenis and Garry Adams, and committee member Melanie Ihrig. Thank you all for your encouragement and support throughout this process. Lydia Bogomolnaya, Megan...

  14. Heart Knowledge A short time after being diagnosed with

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    O'Laughlin, Jay

    Heart Knowledge A short time after being diagnosed with cancer in December of 2005 I was having healing." "Listen with your heart," he said. He insisted I put my full faith in my oncologist, my surgeon that I needed to attend to my "inner healing and heart knowledge." What did Cliff mean by "heart

  15. STAG UK Newsletter Issue 25

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be some modifications to costumes and set. R.d. Goo(lwin and Harold Livingston and producers on the series which is slated to start filming around the 15th of November, for airing (in the States) about j.pril. It is hoped to sell the series around... * * * CONVENTION REPORT by Karen Daly Philip Rae No award (only one entry) Lesley Coles Sheila Clark Sheila Clark Stewart Andrews Robin Hill Helen IfloCarthy Helen McCarthy I h2.d been prepared for about nnything when I arrived except a womnn in full...

  16. (H1N1): Early Findings

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    2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 20, 2010 ... Helen E. Jenkins,1 Emily J. Lyons,1 Thibaut Jombart,1 Wes R. Hinsley,1 Nicholas C. Grassly,1. Francois Balloux,1 ... (Spearman correlation coefficient: 0.56, P= 0.004). (Fig. .... (B) The number of cases exported to country j as.

  17. Acting Director Pat Burchat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    . Peter Graham v. Phil Marshall vi. Eric Charles vii. Seth Digel viii. Igor Moskalenko ix. Christopher. Kirk Gilmore (Instrumentation Seminar) d. Outreach and Education i. Phil Marshall (co-chair) ii. Ziba Mahdavi (co-chair) iii. Andrea Albert iv. Debbie Bard v. Helen Craig vi. Becky Canning vii. Kiruthika

  18. Quantifying the Digital Traces of Hurricane Sandy on Flickr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    Quantifying the Digital Traces of Hurricane Sandy on Flickr Tobias Preis1 *, Helen Susannah Moat1 social science. To investigate user attention to the Hurricane Sandy disaster in 2012, we analyze data to Hurricane Sandy bears a striking correlation to the atmospheric pressure in the US state New Jersey during

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    quality and reliability. ACM is, however, committed to solving the software quality problem by promoting R&D, by developing a core body of knowledge for software engineering, and by identifying standards of practice and lawyer; Bev Littlewood, Center for Software Reliability, City University, London; and Helen Nissenbaum

  20. Geochemistry and arsenic behaviour in groundwater resources of the Pannonian Basin (Hungary and Romania)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    and Romania) Helen A.L. Rowland a,d, , Enoma O. Omoregie b , Romain Millot c , Cristina Jimenez d,e , Jasmin Faculty of Environmental Sciences, University of Babes-Bolyai, Cluj Napoca, Romania e Institute handling by R. Fuge a b s t r a c t Groundwater resources in the Pannonian Basin (Hungary, Romania, Croatia

  1. Ohio State ADA Coordinator to Provide Assistance in Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Ohio State ADA Coordinator to Provide Assistance in Indonesia L. Scott Lissner, The Ohio State in Indonesia on disability policy and practice. The trip, from September 15 ­ October 2, 2013, is sponsored, and university professors and students, the U.S. Embassy, along with Helen Keller International Indonesia [a U

  2. Using Web-Based Technology in Laboratory

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    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Using Web-Based Technology in Laboratory Instruction to Reduce Costs RITA M. POWELL,1 HELEN curriculum while reducing their costs through the application of web-based teaching tools. The project.interscience. wiley.com.); DOI 10.1002/cae.10029 Keywords: engineering education; laboratory materials; World Wide Web

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    Goldman, Steven A.

    Rush Rhees Library Morey Lattimore Dewey Meliora Harkness Gavett Taylor NYS Ctr. for Advanced Tech Institute School of Medicine & Dentistry Arthur Kornberg Medical Research Building STRONG MEMORIAL HOSPITAL Emergency Helen Wood Hall Clinical Translational Science Building Ernest J. Del Monte Neuromedicine

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    Liu, Yufeng

    selection; RKHS; Semiparametric regression; Shrinkage; Smoothing splines. 1. INTRODUCTION Linear to be linear and others to be non- linear. Partially linear models have wide applications in practice due://pubs.amstat.org. Linear or Nonlinear? Automatic Structure Discovery for Partially Linear Models Hao Helen ZHANG, Guang

  5. Wind Farm Portfolio Optimization under Network Capacity Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Wind Farm Portfolio Optimization under Network Capacity Constraints H´el`ene Le Cadre, Anthony of wind farms in a Market Coupling organization, for two Market Designs (exogenous prices and endogenous of efficient wind farm portfolios, is derived theoretically as a function of the number of wind farms

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    Arleo, Angelo

    ANAIS ABRO WANIS ABS BLANDINE ABUZARLI MURAD ACHACHE AMANI ACHARD LOUIS ACHILLEOS N DETE MARIE HELENE HANANE ALLART PIERRE-ANTOINE ALLART GUILLAUME, NORBERT, LOUIS ALLIGNET TOM ALLOUCHE NATHAN ALMOSAWY MEHDI ALEXANDRE ARLANDON JEROME ARMET CYNTHIA ARNAUD AYMERIC ARNAUT PIERRE ARNOULD PRISCILLA ARNOUX CLAIRE

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    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    avoir su faire co¨incider ses vies de th´esarde et de maman. Un grand merci `a Helene Davaux et Pierre, St´ephane Gaussent, Pierre, S´ebastien, Philippe Monnier, de m'avoir support´e pendant ces ann´ees et pour son aide orthographique ; merci `a Jeanie Achard et Marion Lebris pour ce club des cinq si

  8. PERSPECTIVES Accounting for uncertainty in marine reserve design Benjamin S. Halpern,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    modelling can allow for (1) an evaluation of the risk associated with any decision based on the assumed * Helen M. Regan,2 Hugh P. Possingham3 and Michael A. McCarthy4 1 National Center for Ecological Analysis tool for communicating to stakeholders the challenges in managing highly uncertain systems. We also

  9. Open Archive TOULOUSE Archive Ouverte (OATAO) OATAO is an open access repository that collects the work of Toulouse researchers and makes it freely available over the web where possible.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    and Arguel, Philippe Graphene in silicon photovoltaic cells. (2012) In: 38th International conference;Graphene in silicon photovoltaic cells H.Tap-Béteillea,c , B.Caussata,b , H.Vergnesa,b , P-mail: helene.tap@enseeiht.fr Keywords: graphene, silicon technology, transparent electrode, photovoltaic

  10. Behavioral Neuroscience 1987, Vol. 101. No. 6. 7S2-789

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    . Mizumori, Veena Channon, Mark R. Rqsenzweig, and Edward L. Bennett University of California, Berkeley the National Institute of Mental Health to M. R. Rosenzweig and E. L. Bennett. The authors greatly appreciate the assistance of Helene Blaustein, Shawnya Kaleta, Mike Faff, and Matthew Pease with behavioral testing and data

  11. Proceedings of the Automated Reasoning Workshop 2009

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    Atkinson, Katie

    Hustadt Technical Report ULCS-09-007 Department of Computer Science University of Liverpool #12;c 2009) this copyright notice is included, (ii) proper attribution to the editor(s) or author(s) is made, (iii organisation, namely, Helen Bradley, Kenneth Chan, Patrick Colleran, Clare Dixon, Louise Dennis, Judith Lewa

  12. 11 A WYSIWYG Interface for User-Friendly Access to Geospatial Data Collections

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    Jenny, Bernhard

    11 A WYSIWYG Interface for User-Friendly Access to Geospatial Data Collections Helen Jenny1 offer online access to their geospatial data repositories. Users can visually browse and some- times greatly from novice to GIS expert. Two types of user interfaces for geospatial data collections

  13. Acrolein-Mediated Mechanisms of Neuronal Death

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    Shi, Riyi

    Acrolein-Mediated Mechanisms of Neuronal Death Peishan Liu-Snyder,1 Helen McNally,1 Riyi Shi,1 stress lead to breakdown of membrane lipids (lipid peroxidation) during secondary injury. Acrolein certain fea- tures of cell death induced by acrolein on PC12 cells as well as cells from dorsal root

  14. Report of the Puget Sound Expedition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Report of the Puget Sound Expedition September 8-16, 1998 A Rapid Assessment Survey of Non-indigenous Species in the Shallow Waters of Puget Sound Prepared by Andrew Cohen, Claudia Mills, Helen Berry Olympia, WA 98504-7027 (360) 902-1100 #12;Report of the Puget Sound Expedition Sept. 8-16, 1998 Contents

  15. Graduate Alumni LEHIGH UNIVERSITY 1 John H. Weitz ++

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    Gilchrist, James F.

    . Douglas Nelson ++ 1945 Anne P. McGeady 1947 Richard C. Wilson 1948 Charles W. Dodson ++ 1949 Hart K ++ 1961 Francis H. Brobst ++ Louis A. Gonsalves Daniel W. Haines David K. Hogberg Anthony P. Jordan Ray K. Bilheimer Henry P. Brubaker ++ John W. Fisher Helen M. Irvine Stanley S. Le Roy Edward Mc Cafferty ++ Diane

  16. The Chemical Engineer...news and jobs for the process industries brought to you by the Institution of Chemical Engineers Advertiser information

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    Lovley, Derek

    31/7/2009 More efficient electricity-making Geobacter Power output increased by eight times by Helen for the production of a biofilm which allows the Geobacter to transport electrons. The bacteria produces electricity news: More efficient electricity-making Geobacter http

  17. 94 University of Virginia School of Law law school foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    roger h. Kimmel, Law '71 George Washington University '68 chair alfonso l. carney, Jr., Law '74 Trinity allen c. goolsby iii, Law '68 Yale University '61 Michael J. horvitz, Law '75 University of Pennsylvania helen Mead snyder, Law '87 University of Virginia '83 chief operating officer David h. ibbeken, Law '71

  18. Controlling Nonspecific Protein Adsorption in a Plug-Based Microfluidic System by Controlling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    Interfacial Chemistry Using Fluorous-Phase Surfactants L. Spencer Roach, Helen Song, and Rustem F. Ismagilov. 2003, 125, 14613-14619. (3) Zheng, B.; Roach, L. S.; Ismagilov, R. F. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, 125.; Tice, J. D.; Ismagilov, R. F. Anal. Chem. 2004, 76, 4977-4982. (6) Zheng, B.; Tice, J. D.; Roach, L. S

  19. Assessing interactions between the associations of common genetic susceptibility variants, reproductive history and body mass index with breast cancer risk in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium: a combined case-control study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milne, Roger L; Gaudet, Mia M; Spurdle, Amanda B; Fasching, Peter A; Couch, Fergus J; Benitez, Javier; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Zamora, Maria Pilar; Malats, Nuria; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Gibson, Lorna J; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Figueroa, Jonine; Brinton, Louise; Sherman, Mark E; Lissowska, Jolanta; Hopper, John L; Dite, Gillian S; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Sigurdson, Alice J; Linet, Martha S; Schonfeld, Sara J; Freedman, D Michal; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Auvinen, Paivi; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Knight, Julia A; Weerasooriya, Nayana; Cox, Angela; Reed, Malcolm W R; Cross, Simon S; Dunning, Alison M; Ahmed, Shahana; Shah, Mitul; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Bruning, Thomas; GENICA Network; Lambrechts, Diether; Reumers, Joke; Smeets, Ann; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Irwanto, Astrid K; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Holland, Helene; (kConFab), Kathleen Cuningham Foundation Consortium for Research; AOCS Investigators; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Borge G; Flyger, Henrik; John, Esther M; West, Dee W; Whittemore, Alice S; Vachon, Celine M; Olson, Janet E; Fredericksen, Zachary S; Kosel, Matthew; Hein, Rebecca; Vrieling, Alina; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Beckmann, Matthias; Heusinger, Katharina; Ekici, Arif B; Haeberle, Lothar; Easton, Douglas F; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Morrison, Jonathan; Pharoah, Paul D P; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Goode, Ellen L; Chang-Claude, Jenny

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    Chenevix-Trench3, Helene Holland3, kConFab40, AOCS3,41, Graham G Giles14,42,43, Laura Baglietto14,42, Gianluca Severi14,42, Stig E Bojensen44, Børge G Nordestgaard44, Henrik Flyger44, Esther M John45,46, Dee W West45,46, Alice S Whittemore46, Celine Vachon...

  20. Using Historical Data to Estimate Changes in Floating Kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana and Macrocystis integrifolia) in Puget Sound, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Using Historical Data to Estimate Changes in Floating Kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana and Macrocystis 98504-7027; 360-902-1052; helen.berry@wadnr.gov Keywords: floating kelp, vegetated habitats, nearshore, temporal trends, Macrocystis integrifolia, Nereocystis leutkana Abstract Floating kelp beds (Nereocystis

  1. Berry and others: Temporal Trends of Canopy-forming Kelp Beds Temporal Trends in the Areal Extent of Canopy-forming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Berry and others: Temporal Trends of Canopy-forming Kelp Beds Temporal Trends in the Areal Extent of Canopy-forming Kelp Beds Along the Strait of Juan de Fuca and Washington's Outer Coast Helen Berry Ecoscan Resource Data Extended Abstract Kelp beds are important nearshore habitats that support commercial

  2. RACIAL DIVERSITY IN THE STAFF LEADERSHIP

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    Saldin, Dilano

    RACIAL DIVERSITY IN THE STAFF LEADERSHIP OF MILWAUKEE'S NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Helen Bader Diversity in the Staff Leadership of Milwaukee's Nonprofits I Fall 2011 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This project serving in second-tier leadership roles, provided their perspective and offered suggestions for increasing

  3. Eligibility: Cancer Survivor ages 35-75

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    Walter, Peter

    Eligibility: · Cancer Survivor ages 35-75 · Patient has completed treatment within last two years for non-metastic solid tumor · Patient's cancer is currently considered stable or in remission · At least. Please contact Missy Buchanan 415-353-7019 for more information. Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer

  4. Up-Regulated Dicer Expression in Patients with Cutaneous Melanoma

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    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Up-Regulated Dicer Expression in Patients with Cutaneous Melanoma Zhihai Ma1 , Helen Swede2 , David clinically annotated controls and skin tumors consisting of melanocytic nevi (n = 71), a variety of melanomas Dicer in 81% of cutaneous, 80% of acrolentiginous and 96% of metastatic melanoma specimens compared

  5. Open Archive TOULOUSE Archive Ouverte (OATAO) OATAO is an open access repository that collects the work of Toulouse researchers and

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    Boyer, Edmond

    -based approach for reliability assessment. (2014) In: International Conference on Accelerated Life Testing-based approach for reliability assessment Hocine Dehmous1 , Moussa Karama2 and H´el`ene Welemane2 1 Universit of composite materials and structures. Based on the coupling of reliability methods and homogenization

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    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    University, Bloomington Mary Case AMLS, University of Michigan, MA, Syracuse University , John M. Cullars MLS, University of Michigan, MA, PhD, University of Notre Dame Helen Georgas MLS, University of Toronto LaVerne Gray MLIS, Dominican University Emily Guss MLS, University of Michigan Tammy Hampton MLIS, University

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    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    , University of Michigan MA, Syracuse University John M. Cullars MLS, PhD, Indiana University Robert A, Rosary College Joan B. Fiscella AMLS, University of Michigan MA, PhD, University of Notre Dame Helen Georgas MLS, University of Toronto Emily Guss MLS, University of Michigan Valerie Harris MLIS, University

  8. This is an author-deposited version published in: http://oatao.univ-toulouse.fr/ Eprints ID: 10125

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    , Hélène and Cantarel, Arthur and Karama, Moussa Application of non destructive testing to the detection-Laetitia Pastor2 , Hélène Welemane1 , Arthur Cantarel2 andMoussa Karama1 1 PRES Université de Toulouse, INP, ENIT.perrin@iut-tarbes.fr, marie-laetitia.pastor@iut-tarbes.fr, helene.welemane@enit.fr, arthur.cantarel@iut-tarbes.fr, moussa

  9. To link to this article : http://www.revtn.ro/no4-2013.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and Perrin, Marianne and Pastor, Marie-Laetitia and Welemane, Hélène and Cantarel, Arthur and Karama, Moussa 2 , Pastor Marie-Laetitia 2 , Welemane Hélène 1 , Cantarel Arthur 2 and Karama Moussa 1 1 PRES.munozcuartas@enit.fr, marianne.perrin@iut-tarbes.fr, marie-laetitia.pastor@iut-tarbes.fr, helene.welemane@enit.fr, arthur.cantarel

  10. To link to this article : http://www.revtn.ro/no4-2013.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    and Perrin, Marianne and Pastor, Marie-Laetitia and Welemane, Hélène and Cantarel, Arthur and Karama, Moussa-Laetitia 2 , Welemane Hélène 1 , Cantarel Arthur 2 and Karama Moussa 1 1 PRES Université de Toulouse, INP.perrin@iut-tarbes.fr, marie-laetitia.pastor@iut-tarbes.fr, helene.welemane@enit.fr, arthur.cantarel@iut-tarbes.fr, moussa

  11. Toward a socio-cognitive approach of spatial data co-production Matthieu Noucher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -Unis 71000 Mâcon matthieu.noucher@ieti.fr Marie-Hélène de Sède-Marceau Professeur Universités de Franche marie-helene.de-sede-marceau@univ-fcomte.fr Summary: The abilities of territorial communitiesP) in order to organize thematic data co-production (Noucher, de Sède-Marceau, Golay et Pornon, 2006

  12. PAPERS ON TERRITORIAL INTELLIGENCE AND GOVERNANCE PARTICIPATORY ACTION-RESEARCH AND TERRITORIAL DEVELOPMENT

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    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -Hélène DE SEDE-MARCEAU Yaël KOUZMINE, Hélène AVOCAT, Marie-Hélène DE SEDE-MARCEAU Laboratoire ThéMA UMR 6049.kouzmine@univ-fcomte.fr avocathelene@yahoo.fr marie-helene.de-sede-marceau@univ-fcomte.fr Abstract: The authors deal with the best way

  13. Division of Student Affairs Office of Student Government

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    List Staff Members Student Government Associate Dean of Students, Boca Raton Campus ­ Terry Mena Solomon Graduate Assistant, Programming ­ Helen Pferdehirt SG Advisors Interim Associate Dean of Students, Broward Campuses, SG Advisor ­ David Bynes Interim Associate Dean of Students, Northern Campuses, SG

  14. Combating Child Labor through DESTINO - Reducing Child Labor in Panama: An Impact Evaluation of a Department of Labor-Funded Initiative

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    Andisha, Nasir; Chiquito-Saban, Oscar; Emmerich, Eduardo; Figueroa, Aurelia; Jiang, Yuewen; Hui-Lee, Jun; Manning, Darren; Ortega-Sanchez, Alejandra

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reducing Child Labor in Panama: An Impact Evaluation of a Department of Labor-Funded Initiative ___________________________________________________ Nasir Andisha Oscar Chiquito-Saban Eduardo Emmerich Aurelia Figueroa... Gawande Helen and Roy Ryu Chair in International Economics and Development Executive Summary This impact evaluation reviews a United States Department of Labor-funded child labor reduction program in Panama, administrated...

  15. Utah Commission on Aging June 16, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    is focusing on fall prevention, end of life care, and elder abuse issues, all of which fall under the auspices Cherie Brunker Health Care Shauna O'Neil Area Agencies on Aging Robert Archuleta Ethnic Minorities Helen-Michele Church Department of Human Services Kent Alderman Legal Profession Gary Kelso Long-Term Care Jo

  16. Addressing Invitations When hand-addressing

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    Almor, Amit

    the second line for the city and the third for the state and zip code. Do not use abbreviations for Street sending to an elected official (i.e. Legislators, Judges, Board of Trustees, etc.): The Honorable William;If both are elected officials: The Honorable Helen C. Harvey and The Honorable W. Brantley Harvey

  17. 7TH INT SYMP ON FLUID CONTROL, MEASUREMENT AND VISUALIZATION THE ROLE OF INFRARED THERMOGRAPHY IN THE

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    Zuccher, Simone

    IN THE STUDY OF CROSSFLOW INSTABILITY AT M=2.4 Simone Zuccher, William S. Saric, Helen L. Reed and Lloyd B. Mc INTRODUCTION 1.1 Crossflow Instability Enabling laminar flow over most of the wing of a modern airplane would result in a remarkable engineering benefit. For this reason, transition to turbulence in crossflow

  18. AIAA 2003-0771 CROSSFLOW INSTABILITIES THEORY & TECHNOLOGY

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    #12;AIAA 2003-0771 CROSSFLOW INSTABILITIES ­ THEORY & TECHNOLOGY William S. Saric* and Helen L the years, the crossflow instability has been the primary challenge for Laminar Flow Control (LFC). Favorable pressure gradients used to stabilize streamwise instabilities destabilize crossflow. For years

  19. Adrienne Roeder Address: Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology

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    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    -2008 Helen Hay Whitney Postdoctoral Fellowship 1999-2004 Howard Hughes Medical Institute Predoctoral University 1999 Stanford University Excellence in Teaching Award 1998 Howard Hughes Medical Institute-273. Jun, J., Fiume, E., Roeder, A.H.K. , Meng, L., Sharma, V.K., Osmont, K.S., Baker, C., Ha, C

  20. Anisotropic Motion and Molecular Dynamics of Cholesterol, Lanosterol, and Ergosterol in Lecithin Bilayers Studied by Quasi-elastic Neutron Scattering

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    Brown, Michael F.

    Bilayers Studied by Quasi-elastic Neutron Scattering Emil Endress, Helmut Heller,§ He´le`ne CasaltaVised Manuscript ReceiVed June 27, 2002 ABSTRACT: Quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) was employed to study of motion within the bilayer on the molecular dynamics time scale. In a recent quasi-elastic neutron

  1. 1956 . , , 119334, . e-mail: artemeva@psi.edu,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belousov, Alexander

    ., - - . , - - - - . - - (CRDF), RG2 ­2540-PZ-03. 1. Belousov A. Pyroclastic deposits of March 30, 1956 directed blast. ( ) ( ) - ( ) ( ) . , - . #12;61 2. Kieffer S.W. Fluid dynamics of the May 18 blast at Mount St. Helens. In: Lipman P: Application to the thermal layer effect // Shock Waves. 1999. V.9. P. 381-390. 4. Thompson S.L. and Lauson H

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    Post-Disaster Reconstruction Models in the Asia Pacific: the cases of China, Iran and Myanmar Helen ­ Sichuan Earthquake 2008 Iran ­ Bam Earthquake 2003; Tabriz Earthquake 2012 Myanmar ­ Cyclone Nargis 2008 element in psycho-social recovery and reconstruction phase. #12;Iran Model Iran: Bam Earthquake 2003

  3. A CSP Approach to Control in Event-B Steve Schneider1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A CSP Approach to Control in Event-B Steve Schneider1 , Helen Treharne1 , and Heike Wehrheim2 1 CSP to provide ex- plicit control flow for an Event-B model and alternatively to provide a way as the basis of a running example to illustrate the framework. Keywords: Event-B, CSP, control flow

  4. CSP Theorems for Communicating B Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    CSP Theorems for Communicating B Machines Steve Schneider and Helen Treharne Technical Report CSD #12;#12;Introduction 1 Abstract. Recent work on combining CSP and B has provided ways of describing sys- tems comprised of components described in both B (to express requirements on state) and CSP (to

  5. Automatic generation of CSP || B skeletons from xUML models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    Automatic generation of CSP || B skeletons from xUML models Edward Turner, Helen Treharne, Steve. CSP B is a formal approach to specification that combines CSP and B. In this paper we present our tool that automatically trans- lates a subset of executable UML (xUML) models into CSP B, for the purpose of verification

  6. Department of Computing CSP||B modelling for railway verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    University of Surrey Department of Computing Computing Sciences Report CS-12-03 CSP||B modelling Schneider Helen Treharne March 30th 2012 #12;CSP||B modelling for railway verification: the double junction work in verifying railway systems through CSP k B modelling and analysis. In particular we consider

  7. THE NEXUS BETWEEN ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN OECD COUNTRIES: A DECOMPOSITION ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 THE NEXUS BETWEEN ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN OECD COUNTRIES: A DECOMPOSITION ANALYSIS Sahar Shafiei, Ruhul A. Salim and Helen Cabalu School of Economics & Finance, Curtin Business the impacts of renewable and non-renewable energy consumption on economic activities to find out whether

  8. IT Policy, Procedures and Guidance University College, Oxford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    IT Policy, Procedures and Guidance University College, Oxford Patrick Baird IT and Web Fellow Andy Hamilton IT Manager Helene Augar College Registrar #12;Summary This policy and guidance document. Transgressions (Junior Members) 14 14. Flexible Hours and Working at Home (Staff) 15 15. Revisions to this Policy

  9. Geoecology PhD Seminar WS 2013/14 Institute of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Potsdam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potsdam, Universität

    drought in the Limpopo basin 20.11.13 Philip Mueller (GFZ) Anett Schibalski (UP) Impact of the summer Water Uptake in Heterogeneous Soils via Neutron Radiography Effects of a restored stream channel of meso-scale catchments under intensive agricultural production 05.02.14 Stefan Lüdtke (GFZ) Helene

  10. Our SuppOrterS We are pleased to recognize the following donors who have enhanced the excellence of the School of Arts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    , parent Leonard Goldberg, W'55, parent Wendy Goldberg, parent Jeffrey Goldenberg Susan Udolf Goldenberg, C, parent Jonathon S. Jacobson, W'83, parent Elliot S. Jaffe, W'49, parent Roslyn Jaffe, parent David Jaffe, C'81, W'81, parent Helen H. Jaffe, parent Linda R. Jesselson, parent Michael G. Jesselson, parent

  11. PRIMARY CYSTIC LUNG LIGHT CHAIN DEPOSITION DISEASE: a clinicopathologic entity derived from unmutated B cells with a stereotyped IGHV4-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PRIMARY CYSTIC LUNG LIGHT CHAIN DEPOSITION DISEASE: a clinicopathologic entity derived from-helene.delfau@hmn.aphp.fr Running title: Primary cystic lung LCDD: a new entity Word count for abstract: 196 Word count for text deposition disease (LCDD) presenting as a severe cystic lung disorder requiring lung transplantation

  12. Performance Evaluation of a Resource Monitoring and Discovery Service for the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarvis, Stephen

    Performance Evaluation of a Resource Monitoring and Discovery Service for the Grid H´el`ene N. Lim, 2003 Abstract The Grid Information Service (GIS) is one of the Grid Common Services which make up the basic functions belonging to Grids. This service offers a resource discovery mechanism, of which

  13. Submitted to Acta Applicandae Mathematicae. December 13, 2013, revised May 26, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    analysis of the geodesic flow is given in this article to describe the optimal transfers of the time Energy in the Averaged Optimal Coplanar Kepler Transfer towards Circular Orbits Bernard Bonnard · Helen C. Henninger · Jana Nmcová · Jean-Baptiste Pomet Abstract This article makes a study of the averaged optimal

  14. & Education CenterOregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caughman, John

    Fourth Ave Building Art Building Science & Education CenterOregon Sustainability Center (planned Hall Lincoln Hall School of Business 5th Ave Cinema East Hall University Technology Services Honors Stratford Building Parkway Science Building 1 Helen Gordon Child Center Science Research & Teaching Center

  15. & Education Structure 2 Parking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caughman, John

    Cinema East Hall University Technology Services Honors Stratford Building Parkway Science Building 1N Kononia House Fourth Ave Building Art Building Science & Education Center Parking Structure 2 Helen Gordon Child Center Science Research & Teaching Center Parking Structure 3 Ho man Hall West

  16. LincolnStreet WhitneyAvenue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Marcia K.

    55 1 142 Mason Lab 17 Helen Hadley Hall Leet Oliver 24 Watson Hall Malone Engineering Center 77 28 Research Building Sage Hall Sterling Chemistry Lab Wright Lab Wright Lab West Pierson-Sage Garage Bass Bookstore Beinecke Library Commons Woolsey Hall Woodbridge Hall Sprague Hall Sterling Memorial Library SFAS

  17. yale university campus north Continued on next page

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observatory & Planetarium Mason Lab 17 Helen Hadley Hall Leet Oliver 24 Watson Hall Malone Engineering Center Chemistry Research Building Sage Hall Sterling Chemistry Lab Wright Lab Wright Lab West Pierson-Sage Garage Sterling Divinity Quadrangle Marquand Chapel Greeley Memorial Lab Marsh Hall Bellamy Marsh Botanical Garden

  18. Oil and Gas CDT Bots in Rocks: Intelligent Rock Deformation for Fault Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Heriot-Watt University, Institute of Petroleum Engineering Supervisory Team · Dr Helen Lewis, Heriot://www.pet.hw.ac.uk/staff-directory/jimsomerville.htm Key Words Nano/Micro sensors; faults; fault zones; geomechanics; rock mechanics; rock deformation-deformed equivalent, a different lab-deformed example and a geomechanical simulation of a fault zone showing permanent

  19. Dean's List Winter 2013 Jackson Aaberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jerry

    Anderson Sydney Anderson Jonathan Anderson Mark Anderson Amber Anderson Haley Anderson Carson Anderson Anastasia Anderson William Anderson Helen Anderson Tyler Anderson-Sieg Michael Andrade Luke Andrea Greyson Biek Kasandra Bienhoff Elizabeth Bier Mary Bifulco Nicole Billen Sarah Billingsly Sidney Billstein Ryan

  20. WHEELS: A CONVERSATIONAL SYSTEM IN THE AUTOMOBILE CLASSIFIEDS DOMAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WHEELS: A CONVERSATIONAL SYSTEM IN THE AUTOMOBILE CLASSIFIEDS DOMAIN Helen Meng, Senis WHEELS is a conversational system which provides access to a database of eletronic automobile classified users to search through a database of 5,000 automobile classifieds. The current end-to-end system can re

  1. Philip E. Bourne is a Professor of Pharmacology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourne, Philip E.

    interests include bioinformatics, computational biology and ontology management. Helen M. Berman is a Board interests include structural biology and bioinformatics, with a special focus on protein­nucleic acid at SDSC, and a Co-Director of the PDB. His research interests focus on structural bioinformatics and high

  2. Patient-Physician Communication About Complementary and Alternative Medicine in a Radiation Oncology Setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ge Jin [Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Fishman, Jessica [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States) [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Annenberg School for Communication at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Vapiwala, Neha [Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States) [Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Li, Susan Q.; Desai, Krupali [Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Xie, Sharon X. [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mao, Jun J., E-mail: maoj@uphs.upenn.edu [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Despite the extensive use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among cancer patients, patient-physician communication regarding CAM therapies remains limited. This study quantified the extent of patient-physician communication about CAM and identified factors associated with its discussion in radiation therapy (RT) settings. Methods and Materials: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 305 RT patients at an urban academic cancer center. Patients with different cancer types were recruited in their last week of RT. Participants self-reported their demographic characteristics, health status, CAM use, patient-physician communication regarding CAM, and rationale for/against discussing CAM therapies with physicians. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify relationships between demographic/clinical variables and patients' discussion of CAM with radiation oncologists. Results: Among the 305 participants, 133 (43.6%) reported using CAM, and only 37 (12.1%) reported discussing CAM therapies with their radiation oncologists. In multivariate analyses, female patients (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21-0.98) and patients with full-time employment (AOR 0.32, 95% CI 0.12-0.81) were less likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists. CAM users (AOR 4.28, 95% CI 1.93-9.53) were more likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists than were non-CAM users. Conclusions: Despite the common use of CAM among oncology patients, discussions regarding these treatments occur rarely in the RT setting, particularly among female and full-time employed patients. Clinicians and patients should incorporate discussions of CAM to guide its appropriate use and to maximize possible benefit while minimizing potential harm.

  3. Re-organisation of oesophago-gastric cancer care in England: progress and remaining challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palser, Tom R; Cromwell, David A; Hardwick, Richard H; Riley, Stuart A; Greenaway, Kimberley; Allum, William; van der Meulen, Jan HP

    2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    for Cancer Services London: Her Maj- esty's Stationary Office; 2004. 11. The Royal College of Radiologists: Good Practice Guide for Clinical Oncologists 2nd edition. London: The Royal College of Radiologists; 2003. 12. National Cancer Action Team: National... Research 2009, 9:204 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6963/9/204 their surgical inpatients and 41 (33%) did not perform any formal nutritional assessment before starting treat- ment. Discussion Since the publication of the Improving Outcomes Guid- ance [5...

  4. 2009 Canadian Radiation Oncology Resident Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debenham, Brock, E-mail: debenham@ualberta.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Banerjee, Robyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Fairchild, Alysa; Dundas, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Trotter, Theresa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Yee, Don [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Statistics from the Canadian post-MD education registry show that numbers of Canadian radiation oncology (RO) trainees have risen from 62 in 1999 to approximately 150 per year between 2003 and 2009, contributing to the current perceived downturn in employment opportunities for radiation oncologists in Canada. When last surveyed in 2003, Canadian RO residents identified job availability as their main concern. Our objective was to survey current Canadian RO residents on their training and career plans. Methods and Materials: Trainees from the 13 Canadian residency programs using the national matching service were sought. Potential respondents were identified through individual program directors or chief resident and were e-mailed a secure link to an online survey. Descriptive statistics were used to report responses. Results: The eligible response rate was 53% (83/156). Similar to the 2003 survey, respondents generally expressed high satisfaction with their programs and specialty. The most frequently expressed perceived weakness in their training differed from 2003, with 46.5% of current respondents feeling unprepared to enter the job market. 72% plan on pursuing a postresidency fellowship. Most respondents intend to practice in Canada. Fewer than 20% of respondents believe that there is a strong demand for radiation oncologists in Canada. Conclusions: Respondents to the current survey expressed significant satisfaction with their career choice and training program. However, differences exist compared with the 2003 survey, including the current perceived lack of demand for radiation oncologists in Canada.

  5. Germany and the euro-zone crisis: the European reformation of the German banking crisis and the future of the euro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Helen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Germany and the euro-zone crisis: the European reformation of the German banking crisis and the future of the euro Helen Thompson By different paths of reasoning most analysis of the euro-zone crisis has concluded that the European Union... combination of structural reform in the periphery to improve external competitiveness (Arghyrou and Tsoukalas 2011) and a more demand-oriented macro- economic approach in Germany (Feldstein 2012; Moravcsik 2012; Pettis 2013; Schwartz 2012; Hall 2014...

  6. Identification of Novel Virulence Genes of Salmonella enterica Using an Array Based Analysis of Cistrons Under Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Mollie Megan

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    . (May 2010) Mollie Megan Reynolds, B.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Helene Andrews-Polymenis Pools of mutants of minimal complexity but maximal coverage of genes of interest facilitate screening for genes under selection... in a particular environment. Prior to this work, mutants were generated by random transposon insertions, which yielded highly complex pools for in vivo studies. Recent advances in polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based mutagenesis in bacteria using...

  7. RAWLS COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Faculty/Staff Roster -Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westfall, Peter H.

    -1531 031B Debbie Laverie 834-3953 241 Mary Frances Weatherly 834-8428 281C Derek Abrams 834-5805 139R Peter-1514 E333 Carol Robertson 834-3768 229 Geleah Sharp 834-3943 145F Stephanie Bohn 834-1497 W320 Mike Ryan317 Jerry Stevens 834-3195 E347 Helen Miller 742-2198 107 CAREER MANAGEMENT CENTER Jack Cooney 834

  8. Actes JFPC 2012 Compilation de CSP en Set-labeled Diagram

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Actes JFPC 2012 Compilation de CSP en Set-labeled Diagram Alexandre Niveau H´el`ene Fargier C parfois ^etre ex´ecut´ees en ligne et en temps limit´e. Dans ce cas, la r´esolution du CSP n'est pas assez´e- sente l'assignation d'une variable ; l'ensemble des solu- tions d'un CSP correspond `a l'ensemble des

  9. Acadian Settlement in Louisiana: Colonial Populations and Imperial Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolb, Frances Bailey

    2007-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    for survival. The Native American tribes of the Lower Mississippi Valley most relevant to the areas later settled by Acadian exiles included the Houmas, the Tunica, the Tensas, the Chetimacha, and the Attakapas. The latter tribe was located primarily west... translated several of the Spanish documents cited in the text. My family and friends have also been very supportive of me during this project. I would especially like to recognize my parents Frederick and Helen Kolb and my sisters Caroline and Eleanor...

  10. An Innovative Approach for Data Collection and Handling to Enable Advancements in Micro Air Vehicle Persistent Surveillance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodnight, Ryan David

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Vehicle Persistent Surveillance. (August 2009) Ryan David Goodnight, B.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Helen Reed The success of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) in the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts has led to increased... .............................. 24 10 Paparazzi Tiny V2.1 Autopilot System ...................................................... 25 11 Aerovironment Black Widow MAV Subsystem Anatomy ........................ 28 12 Texas A&M University Integrated MAV (IMAV) Inventor...

  11. Frequency and Clinical Significance of Previously Undetected Incidental Findings Detected on Computed Tomography Simulation Scans for Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Naoki, E-mail: naokinak@luke.or.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Tsunoda, Hiroko [Department of Radiology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Takahashi, Osamu [Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)] [Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kikuchi, Mari; Honda, Satoshi [Department of Radiology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Shikama, Naoto [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Hidaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Hidaka (Japan); Akahane, Keiko; Sekiguchi, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the frequency and clinical significance of previously undetected incidental findings found on computed tomography (CT) simulation images for breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: All CT simulation images were first interpreted prospectively by radiation oncologists and then double-checked by diagnostic radiologists. The official reports of CT simulation images for 881 consecutive postoperative breast cancer patients from 2009 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Potentially important incidental findings (PIIFs) were defined as any previously undetected benign or malignancy-related findings requiring further medical follow-up or investigation. For all patients in whom a PIIF was detected, we reviewed the clinical records to determine the clinical significance of the PIIF. If the findings from the additional studies prompted by a PIIF required a change in management, the PIIF was also recorded as a clinically important incidental finding (CIIF). Results: There were a total of 57 (6%) PIIFs. The 57 patients in whom a PIIF was detected were followed for a median of 17 months (range, 3-26). Six cases of CIIFs (0.7% of total) were detected. Of the six CIIFs, three (50%) cases had not been noted by the radiation oncologist until the diagnostic radiologist detected the finding. On multivariate analysis, previous CT examination was an independent predictor for PIIF (p = 0.04). Patients who had not previously received chest CT examinations within 1 year had a statistically significantly higher risk of PIIF than those who had received CT examinations within 6 months (odds ratio, 3.54; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-9.50; p = 0.01). Conclusions: The rate of incidental findings prompting a change in management was low. However, radiation oncologists appear to have some difficulty in detecting incidental findings that require a change in management. Considering cost, it may be reasonable that routine interpretations are given to those who have not received previous chest CT examinations within 1 year.

  12. Predictors of IMRT and Conformal Radiotherapy Use in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A SEER-Medicare Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sher, David J., E-mail: dsher@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Neville, Bridget A. [Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Aileen B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Schrag, Deborah [Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The extent to which new techniques for the delivery of radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have diffused into clinical practice is unclear, including the use of 3-dimensional conformal RT (3D-RT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database, we identified 2,495 Medicare patients with Stage I-IVB HNSCC diagnosed at age 65 years or older between 2000 and 2005 and treated with either definitive (80%) or adjuvant (20%) radiotherapy. Our primary aim was to analyze the trends and predictors of IMRT use over this time, and the secondary aim was a similar description of the trends and predictors of conformal radiotherapy (CRT) use, defined as treatment with either 3D-RT or IMRT. Results: Three hundred sixty-four (15%) patients were treated with IMRT, and 1,190 patients (48%) were treated with 3D-RT. Claims for IMRT and CRT rose from 0% to 33% and 39% to 86%, respectively, between 2000 and 2005. On multivariable analysis, IMRT use was associated with SEER region (West 18%; Northeast 11%; South 12%; Midwest 13%), advanced stage (advanced, 21%; early, 9%), non-larynx site (non-larynx, 23%; larynx, 7%), higher median census tract income (highest vs. lowest quartile, 18% vs. 10%), treatment year (2003-2005, 31%; 2000-2002, 6%), use of chemotherapy (26% with; 9% without), and higher radiation oncologist treatment volume (highest vs. lowest tertile, 23% vs. 8%). With CRT as the outcome, only SEER region, treatment year, use of chemotherapy, and increasing radiation oncologist HNSCC volume were significant on multivariable analysis. Conclusions: The use of IMRT and CRT by Medicare beneficiaries with HNSCC rose significantly between 2000 and 2005 and was associated with both clinical and non-clinical factors, with treatment era and radiation oncologist HNSCC treatment volume serving as the strongest predictors of IMRT use.

  13. Standing on the Shoulders of Giants: Results From the Radiation Oncology Academic Development and Mentorship Assessment Project (ROADMAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holliday, Emma B. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jagsi, Reshma [The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Oregon Health Science Center Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon (United States); Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Fuller, Clifton D., E-mail: cdfuller@mdanderson.org [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Oregon Health Science Center Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon (United States)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To analyze survey information regarding mentorship practices and cross-correlate the results with objective metrics of academic productivity among academic radiation oncologists at US Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited residency training programs. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved survey for the Radiation Oncology Academic Development and Mentorship Assessment Project (ROADMAP) was sent to 1031 radiation oncologists employed at an ACGME-accredited residency training program and administered using an international secure web application designed exclusively to support data capture for research studies. Data collected included demographics, presence of mentorship, and the nature of specific mentoring activities. Productivity metrics, including number of publications, number of citations, h-index, and date of first publication, were collected for each survey respondent from a commercially available online database, and m-index was calculated. Results: A total of 158 academic radiation oncologists completed the survey, 96 of whom reported having an academic/scientific mentor. Faculty with a mentor had higher numbers of publications, citations, and h- and m-indices. Differences in gender and race/ethnicity were not associated with significant differences in mentorship rates, but those with a mentor were more likely to have a PhD degree and were more likely to have more time protected for research. Bivariate fit regression modeling showed a positive correlation between a mentor's h-index and their mentee's h-index (R{sup 2} = 0.16; P<.001). Linear regression also showed significant correlates of higher h-index, in addition to having a mentor (P=.001), included a longer career duration (P<.001) and fewer patients in treatment (P=.02). Conclusions: Mentorship is widely believed to be important to career development and academic productivity. These results emphasize the importance of identifying and striving to overcome potential barriers to effective mentorship.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Target Volume Delineation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Brain Tumors Using Localized Region-Based Active Contour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aslian, Hossein [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, Mahdi [Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabie [Department of Medical Physics, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Babapour Mofrad, Farshid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Astarakee, Mahdi, E-mail: M-Astarakee@Engineer.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khaledi, Navid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fadavi, Pedram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical application of a robust semiautomatic image segmentation method to determine the brain target volumes in radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: A local robust region-based algorithm was used on MRI brain images to study the clinical target volume (CTV) of several patients. First, 3 oncologists delineated CTVs of 10 patients manually, and the process time for each patient was calculated. The averages of the oncologists’ contours were evaluated and considered as reference contours. Then, to determine the CTV through the semiautomatic method, a fourth oncologist who was blind to all manual contours selected 4-8 points around the edema and defined the initial contour. The time to obtain the final contour was calculated again for each patient. Manual and semiautomatic segmentation were compared using 3 different metric criteria: Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance. A comparison also was performed between volumes obtained from semiautomatic and manual methods. Results: Manual delineation processing time of tumors for each patient was dependent on its size and complexity and had a mean (±SD) of 12.33 ± 2.47 minutes, whereas it was 3.254 ± 1.7507 minutes for the semiautomatic method. Means of Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance between manual contours were 0.84 ± 0.02, 2.05 ± 0.66 cm, and 0.78 ± 0.15 cm, and they were 0.82 ± 0.03, 1.91 ± 0.65 cm, and 0.7 ± 0.22 cm between manual and semiautomatic contours, respectively. Moreover, the mean volume ratio (=semiautomatic/manual) calculated for all samples was 0.87. Conclusions: Given the deformability of this method, the results showed reasonable accuracy and similarity to the results of manual contouring by the oncologists. This study shows that the localized region-based algorithms can have great ability in determining the CTV and can be appropriate alternatives for manual approaches in brain cancer.

  15. The Value of the Internship for Radiation Oncology Training: Results of a Survey of Current and Recent Trainees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Stephen R. [University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ (United States)], E-mail: bakersr@umdnj.edu; Romero, Michelle J. M.A.; Geannette, Christian M.D.; Patel, Amish [University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ (United States)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Although a 12-month clinical internship is the traditional precursor to a radiation oncology residency, the continuance of this mandated training sequence has been questioned. This study was performed to evaluate the perceptions of current radiation oncology residents with respect to the value of their internship experience. Methods and Materials: A survey was sent to all US radiation oncology residents. Each was queried about whether they considered the internship to be a necessary prerequisite for a career as a radiation oncologist and as a physician. Preferences were listed on a Likert scale (1 = not at all necessary to 5 = absolutely necessary). Results: Seventy-one percent considered the internship year mostly (Likert Scale 4) or absolutely necessary (Likert Scale 5) for their development as a radiation oncologist, whereas 19.1% answered hardly or not at all (Likert Scale 2 and 1, respectively). With respect to their collective considerations about the impact of the internship year on their development as a physician, 89% had a positive response, 5.8% had a negative response, and 4.7% had no opinion. Although both deemed the preliminary year favorably, affirmative answers were more frequent among erstwhile internal medicine interns than former transitional program interns. Conclusions: A majority of radiation oncology residents positively acknowledged their internship for their development as a specialist and an even greater majority valued it for their development as a physician. This affirmative opinion was registered more frequently by those completing an internal medicine internship compared with a transitional internship.

  16. Major shifts in calcareous phytoplankton assemblages through the Eocene-Oligocene transition of Tanzania and their implications for low-latitude primary production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Tom Dunkley; Bown, Paul R.; Pearson, Paul N.; Wade, Bridget S.; Coxall, Helen K.; Lear, Caroline H.

    Major shifts in calcareous phytoplankton assemblages through the Eocene-Oligocene transition of Tanzania and their implications for low-latitude primary production Tom Dunkley Jones, 1 Paul R. Bown, 2 Paul N. Pearson, 3 Bridget S. Wade, 4 Helen K... carbonate primary production at the onset of global cooling, and (3) a significant increase in nutrient availability in the low-latitude surface ocean through the EOT. Citation: Dunkley Jones, T., P. R. Bown, P. N. Pearson, B. S. Wade, H. K. Coxall, and C. H...

  17. The normal levels of immunoglobulins of the mare's uterus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergeron, Helene

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    [IgG, IgA, IgG(T)) were prepared. The plates were kept at 4 C in a moist chamber for at least 24 hours before being used. 32 Table 3 ? Approximate final concentration of antisera against horse IgG, IgA and IgG(T) after dilution Antrserum (against...) Charle L. d (Head of Department) August 1984 The Normal Levels of Immunoglobulins of the Mare's Uterus (August, 1984) Helene Bergeron, D. M. V. , Universite de Montreal, Quebec, Canada Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. John M. Bowen The levels...

  18. Effective Methods in Reducing Communication Overheads in Solving

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11ComputationalEdNERSC:Effect of0/2002 Yun (Helen)

  19. VectorIntro3.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1 - USAF Wind Power ProgramDeslippe, Helen He,

  20. Vectorization: What is it and what is it good for?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1 - USAF Wind Power ProgramDeslippe, Helen He,

  1. Vegetation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1 - USAF Wind Power ProgramDeslippe, Helen He,o

  2. Vegetation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1 - USAF Wind Power ProgramDeslippe, Helen

  3. Vegetation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1 - USAF Wind Power ProgramDeslippe, Helen/::vI

  4. SU-E-J-07: A Functional MR Protocol for the Pancreatic Tumor Delineation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreychenko, A; Heerkens, H; Meijer, G; Vulpen, M van; Lagendijk, J; Berg, C van den [UMC Utrecht, Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Pancreatic cancer is one of the cancers with the poorest survival prognosis. At the time of diagnosis most of pancreatic cancers are unresectable and those patients can be treated by radiotherapy. Radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer is limited due to uncertainties in CT-based delineations. MRI provides an excellent soft tissue contrast. Here, an MR protocol is developed to improve delineations for radiotherapy treatment of pancreatic cancer. In a later stage this protocol can also be used for on-line visualization of the pancreas during MRI guided treatments. Methods: Nine pancreatic cancer patients were included. The MR protocol included T2 weighted(T2w), T1 weighted(T1w), diffusion weighted(DWI) and dynamic contrast enhanced(DCE) techniques. The tumor was delineated on T2w and T1w MRI by an experienced radiation oncologist. Healthy pancreas or pancreatitis (assigned by the oncologist based on T2w) areas were also delineated. Apparent diffusion coefficient(ADC), and area under the curve(AUC)/time to peak(TTP) maps were obtained from DWI and DCE scans, respectively. Results: A clear demarcation of tumor area was visible on b800 DWI images in 5 patients. ADC maps of those patients characterized tumor as an area with restricted water diffusion. Tumor delineations based on solely DCE were possible in 7 patients. In 6 of those patients AUC maps demonstrated tumor heterogeneity: a hypointense area with a hyperintense ring. TTP values clearly discriminated the tumor and the healthy pancreas but could not distinguish tumor and the pancreatitis accurately. Conclusion: MR imaging results in a more pronounced tumor contrast than contrast enhanced CT. The addition of quantitative, functional MRI provides valuable, additional information to the radiation oncologist on the spatial tumor extent by discriminating tumor from the healthy pancreas(TTP, DWI) and characterizing the tumor(ADC). Our findings indicate that tumor delineation in pancreatic cancer can greatly benefit from the addition of MRI and especially functional MR techniques.

  5. The 1983 Temperature Gradient and Heat Flow Drilling Project for the State of Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korosec, Michael A.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the Summer of 1983, the Washington Division of Geology and Earth Resources carried out a three-hole drilling program to collect temperature gradient and heat flow information near potential geothermal resource target areas. The project was part of the state-coupled US Department of Energy Geothermal Program. Richardson Well Drilling of Tacoma, Washington was subcontracted through the State to perform the work. The general locations of the project areas are shown in figure 1. The first hole, DNR 83-1, was located within the Green River valley northwest of Mount St. Helens. This site is near the Green River Soda Springs and along the projection of the Mount St. Helens--Elk Lake seismic zone. The other two holes were drilled near Mount Baker. Hole DNR 83-3 was sited about 1/4 km west of the Baker Hot Springs, 10.5 km east of Mount Baker, while hole DNR 83-5 was located along Rocky Creek in the Sulphur Creek Valley. The Rocky Creek hole is about 10 km south-southwest of the peak. Two other holes, DNR 83-2 and DNR 83-4, were located on the north side of the Sulphur Creek Valley. Both holes were abandoned at early stages of drilling because of deep overburden and severe caving problems. The sites were apparently located atop old landslide deposits.

  6. Chemical and Physical Signatures for Microbial Forensics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cliff, John B.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Wunschel, David S.

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical and physical signatures for microbial forensics John Cliff and Helen Kreuzer-Martin, eds. Humana Press Chapter 1. Introduction: Review of history and statement of need. Randy Murch, Virginia Tech Chapter 2. The Microbe: Structure, morphology, and physiology of the microbe as they relate to potential signatures of growth conditions. Joany Jackman, Johns Hopkins University Chapter 3. Science for Forensics: Special considerations for the forensic arena - quality control, sample integrity, etc. Mark Wilson (retired FBI): Western Carolina University Chapter 4. Physical signatures: Light and electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, gravimetry etc. Joseph Michael, Sandia National Laboratory Chapter 5. Lipids: FAME, PLFA, steroids, LPS, etc. James Robertson, Federal Bureau of Investigation Chapter 6. Carbohydrates: Cell wall components, cytoplasm components, methods Alvin Fox, University of South Carolina School of Medicine David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 7. Peptides: Peptides, proteins, lipoproteins David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 8. Elemental content: CNOHPS (treated in passing), metals, prospective cell types John Cliff, International Atomic Energy Agency Chapter 9. Isotopic signatures: Stable isotopes C,N,H,O,S, 14C dating, potential for heavy elements. Helen Kreuzer-Martin, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Michaele Kashgarian, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chapter 10. Extracellular signatures: Cellular debris, heme, agar, headspace, spent media, etc Karen Wahl, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 11. Data Reduction and Integrated Microbial Forensics: Statistical concepts, parametric and multivariate statistics, integrating signatures Kristin Jarman, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

  7. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Performance of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, Beth A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Demanes, D. Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology , University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Radiological Physics Center, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hayes, John K. [Gamma West Brachytherapy, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hsu, I-Chow J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Morris, David E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Rabinovitch, Rachel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Tward, Jonathan D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-Dose-Rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with a variety of different malignancies. Careful adherence to established standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for HDR brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrists. Review of the leading indications for HDR brachytherapy in the management of gynecologic, thoracic, gastrointestinal, breast, urologic, head and neck, and soft tissue tumors is presented. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedures and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful HDR brachytherapy program.

  8. Late Toxicity and Patient Self-Assessment of Breast Appearance/Satisfaction on RTOG 0319: A Phase 2 Trial of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy-Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Following Lumpectomy for Stages I and II Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chafe, Susan, E-mail: susan.chafe@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute-University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Moughan, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); McCormick, Beryl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wong, John [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Pass, Helen [Womens' Breast Center, Stamford Hospital, Stamford, Connecticut (United States); Rabinovitch, Rachel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Arthur, Douglas W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Petersen, Ivy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); White, Julia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Vicini, Frank A. [Michigan Healthcare Professionals/21st Century Oncology, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Late toxicities and cosmetic analyses of patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) on RTOG 0319 are presented. Methods and Materials: Patients with stages I to II breast cancer ?3 cm, negative margins, and ?3 positive nodes were eligible. Patients received three-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT; 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions twice daily over 5 days). Toxicity and cosmesis were assessed by the patient (P), the radiation oncologist (RO), and the surgical oncologist (SO) at 3, 6, and 12 months from the completion of treatment and then annually. National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, was used to grade toxicity. Results: Fifty-two patients were evaluable. Median follow-up was 5.3 years (range, 1.7-6.4 years). Eighty-two percent of patients rated their cosmesis as good/excellent at 1 year, with rates of 64% at 3 years. At 3 years, 31 patients were satisfied with the treatment, 5 were not satisfied but would choose 3D-CRT again, and none would choose standard radiation therapy. The worst adverse event (AE) per patient reported as definitely, probably, or possibly related to radiation therapy was 36.5% grade 1, 50% grade 2, and 5.8% grade 3 events. Grade 3 AEs were all skin or musculoskeletal-related. Treatment-related factors were evaluated to potentially establish an association with observed toxicity. Surgical bed volume, target volume, the number of beams used, and the use of bolus were not associated with late cosmesis. Conclusions: Most patients enrolled in RTOG 0319 were satisfied with their treatment, and all would choose to have the 3D-CRT APBI again.

  9. The Adoption of New Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Modalities Among Medicare Beneficiaries With Breast Cancer: Clinical Correlates and Cost Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Kenneth B. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States) [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Soulos, Pamela R. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States) [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Herrin, Jeph [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States) [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Health Research and Educational Trust, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Yu, James B. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States) [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Long, Jessica B. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States) [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Dostaler, Edward [Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); and others

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: New radiation therapy modalities have broadened treatment options for older women with breast cancer, but it is unclear how clinical factors, geographic region, and physician preference affect the choice of radiation therapy modality. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database to identify women diagnosed with stage I-III breast cancer from 1998 to 2007 who underwent breast-conserving surgery. We assessed the temporal trends in, and costs of, the adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and brachytherapy. Using hierarchical logistic regression, we evaluated the relationship between the use of these new modalities and patient and regional characteristics. Results: Of 35,060 patients, 69.9% received conventional external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Although overall radiation therapy use remained constant, the use of IMRT increased from 0.0% to 12.6% from 1998 to 2007, and brachytherapy increased from 0.7% to 9.0%. The statistical variation in brachytherapy use attributable to the radiation oncologist and geographic region was 41.4% and 9.5%, respectively (for IMRT: 23.8% and 22.1%, respectively). Women undergoing treatment at a free-standing radiation facility were significantly more likely to receive IMRT than were women treated at a hospital-based facility (odds ratio for IMRT vs EBRT: 3.89 [95% confidence interval, 2.78-5.45]). No such association was seen for brachytherapy. The median radiation therapy cost per treated patient increased from $5389 in 2001 to $8539 in 2007. Conclusions: IMRT and brachytherapy use increased substantially from 1998 to 2007; overall, radiation therapy costs increased by more than 50%. Radiation oncologists played an important role in treatment choice for both types of radiation therapy, whereas geographic region played a bigger role in the use of IMRT than brachytherapy.

  10. STAG UK Newsletter Issue 25 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    're lying: If anyone tells you I don't like STiJ\\ 'rREK - you tell them I said thoy're lying:") - "t tho moment it seoms that there will be 3 new characters (George said that ParamOu."lt insisted on three new younger characters) - a full blooded Vulcan...:- Write to Leonard Nimoy - c/o The Helen Hayes 'rheatre, New York City, New York, U.S.A. 1'011 him ',10 syrJpathise vii th the problems he's beon having, but stress the fact that we need him, STiJ\\ TREK need.s him, and most important Kirk and MoCoy need...

  11. Compliance Monitoring of Underwater Blasting for Rock Removal at Warrior Point, Columbia River Channel Improvement Project, 2009/2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Skalski, J. R.; Seaburg, Adam

    2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) conducted the 20-year Columbia River Channel Improvement Project (CRCIP) to deepen the navigation channel between Portland, Oregon, and the Pacific Ocean to allow transit of fully loaded Panamax ships (100 ft wide, 600 to 700 ft long, and draft 45 to 50 ft). In the vicinity of Warrior Point, between river miles (RM) 87 and 88 near St. Helens, Oregon, the USACE conducted underwater blasting and dredging to remove 300,000 yd3 of a basalt rock formation to reach a depth of 44 ft in the Columbia River navigation channel. The purpose of this report is to document methods and results of the compliance monitoring study for the blasting project at Warrior Point in the Columbia River.

  12. Genes and the Microenvironment: Two Faces of Breast Cancer (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe; Love, Susan M.; Bissell, Min; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In this April 21, 2008 Berkeley Lab event, a dynamic panel of Berkeley Lab scientists highlight breast cancer research advances related to susceptibility, early detection, prevention, and therapy - a biological systems approach to tackling the disease from the molecular and cellular levels, to tissues and organs, and ultimately the whole individual. Joe Gray, Berkeley Lab Life Sciences Division Director, explores how chromosomal abnormalities contribute to cancer and respond to gene-targeted therapies. Mina Bissell, former Life Sciences Division Director, approaches the challenge of breast cancer from the breast's three dimensional tissue microenvironment and how the intracellular ''conversation'' triggers malignancies. Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff, Deputy Director, Life Sciences Division, identifies what exposure to ionizing radiation can tell us about how normal tissues suppress carcinogenesis. The panel is moderated by Susan M. Love, breast cancer research pioneer, author, President and Medical Director of the Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation.

  13. Modeling added compressibility of porosity and the thermomechanical response of wet porous rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, M.B.; Elata, D.; Attia, A.V.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper concerned with modeling the response of a porous brittle solid whose pores may be dry or partially filled with fluid. A form for the Helmholtz free energy is proposed which incorporated known Mie-Grueneisen constitutive equations for the nonporous solid and for the fluid, and which uses an Eilnstein formulation with variable specific heat. In addition, a functional form for porosity is postulated which porous rock. Restrictions on constitutive assumptions for the composite of porous solid ad fluid are obtained which ensure thermodynamic consistency. Examples show that although the added compressibility of porosity is determined by fitting data for dry Mt. Helen Tuff, the predicted responses of saturated and partially saturated tuff agree well with experimental data.

  14. An evaluation of the variability of tumor-shape definition derived by experienced observers from CT images of supraglottic carcinomas (ACRIN protocol 6658)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Jay S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States)]. E-mail: jcooper@maimonidesmed.org; Mukherji, Suresh K. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Otolaryngology Head Neck Surgery, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Toledano, Alicia Y. [Center for Statistical Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Beldon, Clifford [Department of Radiology, State University of New York, Albany Medical School, Albany, NY (United States); Schmalfuss, Ilona M. [Department of Radiology, University of Florida School of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Amdur, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida School of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sailer, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Loevner, Laurie A. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kousouboris, Phil [Department of Radiology, Bryn Mawr Hospital, Bryn Mawr, PA (United States); Ang, K. Kian [Department of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cormack, Jean [Center for Statistical Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Sicks, JoRean M.S. [Center for Statistical Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States)

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Accurate target definition is considered essential for sophisticated, image-guided radiation therapy; however, relatively little information has been reported that measures our ability to identify the precise shape of targets accurately. We decided to assess the manner in which eight 'experts' interpreted the size and shape of tumors based on 'real-life' contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scans. Methods and Materials: Four neuroradiologists and four radiation oncologists (the authors) with considerable experience and presumed expertise in treating head-and-neck tumors independently contoured, slice-by-slice, his/her interpretation of the precise gross tumor volume (GTV) on each of 20 sets of CT scans taken from 20 patients who previously were enrolled in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 91-11. Results: The average proportion of overlap (i.e., the degree of agreement) was 0.532 (95% confidence interval 0.457 to 0.606). There was a slight tendency for the proportion of overlap to increase with increasing average GTV. Conclusions: Our work suggests that estimation of tumor shape currently is imprecise, even for experienced physicians. In consequence, there appears to be a practical limit to the current trend of smaller fields and tighter margins.

  15. Interactive Decision-Support Tool for Risk-Based Radiation Therapy Plan Comparison for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodin, N. Patrik [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, New York, New York (United States); Maraldo, Maja V., E-mail: dra.maraldo@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Aznar, Marianne C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Vogelius, Ivan R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Petersen, Peter M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Oncology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Hematology, Rigshospitalet, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Bentzen, Søren M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Specht, Lena [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Oncology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Hematology, Rigshospitalet, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To present a novel tool that allows quantitative estimation and visualization of the risk of various relevant normal tissue endpoints to aid in treatment plan comparison and clinical decision making in radiation therapy (RT) planning for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Methods and Materials: A decision-support tool for risk-based, individualized treatment plan comparison is presented. The tool displays dose–response relationships, derived from published clinical data, for a number of relevant side effects and thereby provides direct visualization of the trade-off between these endpoints. The Quantitative Analyses of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic reports were applied, complemented with newer data where available. A “relevance score” was assigned to each data source, reflecting how relevant the input data are to current RT for HL. Results: The tool is applied to visualize the local steepness of dose–response curves to drive the reoptimization of a volumetric modulated arc therapy treatment plan for an HL patient with head-and-neck involvement. We also use this decision-support tool to visualize and quantitatively evaluate the trade-off between a 3-dimensional conformal RT plan and a volumetric modulated arc therapy plan for a patient with mediastinal HL. Conclusion: This multiple-endpoint decision-support tool provides quantitative risk estimates to supplement the clinical judgment of the radiation oncologist when comparing different RT options.

  16. Semi-automatic delineation using weighted CT-MRI registered images for radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitton, I. [European Georges Pompidou Hospital, Department of Radiology, 20 rue Leblanc, 75015, Paris (France); Cornelissen, S. A. P. [Image Sciences Institute, UMC, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Duppen, J. C.; Rasch, C. R. N.; Herk, M. van [The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Radiotherapy, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Steenbakkers, R. J. H. M. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ Groningen (Netherlands); Peeters, S. T. H. [UZ Gasthuisberg, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgique (Belgium); Hoebers, F. J. P. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW School for Oncology and Development Biology Maastricht, 6229 ET Maastricht (Netherlands); Kaanders, J. H. A. M. [UMC St-Radboud, Department of Radiotherapy, Geert Grooteplein 32, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nowak, P. J. C. M. [ERASMUS University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology,Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a delineation tool that refines physician-drawn contours of the gross tumor volume (GTV) in nasopharynx cancer, using combined pixel value information from x-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during delineation. Methods: Operator-guided delineation assisted by a so-called ''snake'' algorithm was applied on weighted CT-MRI registered images. The physician delineates a rough tumor contour that is continuously adjusted by the snake algorithm using the underlying image characteristics. The algorithm was evaluated on five nasopharyngeal cancer patients. Different linear weightings CT and MRI were tested as input for the snake algorithm and compared according to contrast and tumor to noise ratio (TNR). The semi-automatic delineation was compared with manual contouring by seven experienced radiation oncologists. Results: A good compromise for TNR and contrast was obtained by weighing CT twice as strong as MRI. The new algorithm did not notably reduce interobserver variability, it did however, reduce the average delineation time by 6 min per case. Conclusions: The authors developed a user-driven tool for delineation and correction based a snake algorithm and registered weighted CT image and MRI. The algorithm adds morphological information from CT during the delineation on MRI and accelerates the delineation task.

  17. Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Literature review. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henriksen, K.; Kaye, R.D.; Jones, R. [Hughes Training, Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States); Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of human factors evaluations were undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multidisciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. A team of human factors specialists, assisted by a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation therapists, conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. A function and task analysis was performed initially to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of workplace environment, system-user interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices. To further acquire an in-depth and up-to-date understanding of the practice of teletherapy in support of these evaluations, a systematic literature review was conducted. Factors that have a potential impact on the accuracy of treatment delivery were of primary concern. The present volume is the literature review. The volume starts with an overview of the multiphased nature of teletherapy, and then examines the requirement for precision, the increasing role of quality assurance, current conceptualizations of human error, and the role of system factors such as the workplace environment, user-system interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices.

  18. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Guidelines for the Delineation of the Clinical Target Volume in the Postoperative Treatment of Pancreatic Head Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Regine, William F. [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ben-Josef, Edgar [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Haustermans, Karin [University Hospital Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Bosch, Walter R. [Image-Guided Therapy QA Center, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Turian, Julius; Abrams, Ross A. [Rush University Medical College, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop contouring guidelines to be used in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0848, a Phase III randomized trial evaluating the benefit of adjuvant chemoradiation in patients with resected head of pancreas cancer. Methods and Materials: A consensus committee of six radiation oncologists with expertise in gastrointestinal radiotherapy developed stepwise contouring guidelines and an atlas for the delineation of the clinical target volume (CTV) in the postoperative treatment of pancreas cancer, based on identifiable regions of interest and margin expansions. Areas at risk for subclinical disease to be included in the CTV were defined, including nodal regions, anastomoses, and the preoperative primary tumor location. Regions of interest that could be reproducibly contoured on postoperative imaging after a pancreaticoduodenectomy were identified. Standardized expansion margins to encompass areas at risk were developed after multiple iterations to determine the optimal margin expansions. Results: New contouring recommendations based on CT anatomy were established. Written guidelines for the delineation of the postoperative CTV and normal tissues, as well as a Web-based atlas, were developed. Conclusions: The postoperative abdomen has been a difficult area for effective radiotherapy. These new guidelines will help physicians create fields that better encompass areas at risk and minimize dose to normal tissues.

  19. Dentalmaps: Automatic Dental Delineation for Radiotherapy Planning in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thariat, Juliette, E-mail: jthariat@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology/Institut de biologie et developpement du cancer (IBDC) centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) unite mixte de recherche UMR 6543, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); Ramus, Liliane [DOSIsoft, Cachan (France); INRIA (Institut National de Recherche en Automatique et en Automatique)-Asclepios Research Project, Sophia-Antipolis (France); Maingon, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Dijon Cedex (France); Odin, Guillaume [Department of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire-Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, Nice Cedex (France); Gregoire, Vincent [Department of Radiation Oncology, St.-Luc University Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Darcourt, Vincent [Department of Radiation Oncology-Dentistry, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); Guevara, Nicolas [Department of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire-Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, Nice Cedex (France); Orlanducci, Marie-Helene [Department of Odontology, CHU, Nice (France); Marcie, Serge [Department of Radiation Oncology/Institut de biologie et developpement du cancer (IBDC) centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) unite mixte de recherche UMR 6543, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); Poissonnet, Gilles [Department of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne-Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, Nice Cedex (France); Marcy, Pierre-Yves [Department of Radiology, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); and others

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To propose an automatic atlas-based segmentation framework of the dental structures, called Dentalmaps, and to assess its accuracy and relevance to guide dental care in the context of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A multi-atlas-based segmentation, less sensitive to artifacts than previously published head-and-neck segmentation methods, was used. The manual segmentations of a 21-patient database were first deformed onto the query using nonlinear registrations with the training images and then fused to estimate the consensus segmentation of the query. Results: The framework was evaluated with a leave-one-out protocol. The maximum doses estimated using manual contours were considered as ground truth and compared with the maximum doses estimated using automatic contours. The dose estimation error was within 2-Gy accuracy in 75% of cases (with a median of 0.9 Gy), whereas it was within 2-Gy accuracy in 30% of cases only with the visual estimation method without any contour, which is the routine practice procedure. Conclusions: Dose estimates using this framework were more accurate than visual estimates without dental contour. Dentalmaps represents a useful documentation and communication tool between radiation oncologists and dentists in routine practice. Prospective multicenter assessment is underway on patients extrinsic to the database.

  20. Image plates as x-ray detectors in plasma physics experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gales, S.G.; Bentley, C.D. [AWE Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of image plates based on the photostimulable phosphor BaF(Br,l):Eu{sup 2+} has been investigated and compared with x-ray film. Evaluation of detective quantum efficiency (DQE), sensitivity, dynamic range, and linearity was carried out for several types of commercially available image plate, using the Excalibur soft x-ray calibration facility at AWE. Image plate response was found to be linear over a dynamic range of 5 orders of magnitude. One type of image plate was found to have a number of advantages for soft x-ray detection, with a measured sensitivity 1 order of magnitude greater than that of Kodak Industrex CX and DEF-5 x-ray film. The DQE of this plate was found to be superior to that of film at low [less than 10{sup 3} photons/(50 {mu}m){sup 2}] and high fluxes [greater than 10{sup 4} photons/(50 {mu}m){sup 2}]. The spatial resolution of image plates, scanned with several models of commercial image plate readers, has been evaluated using a USAF resolution test target. The highest spatial resolution measured is 35 {mu}m. Though this is significantly lower than the resolution possible with film, it is sufficient for many applications. Image plates were fielded in a refractive x-ray lens imaging diagnostic on the 1 TW Helen laser and these results are discussed.

  1. Geothermal energy resource investigations at Mt. Spurr, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D.L.; Wescott, E.M. (eds.)

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spurr volcano is a composite Quaternary cone of largely andesitic composition located on the west side of Cook Inlet about 80 miles west of Anchorage and about 40 miles from the Beluga electrical transmission line. Geologic mapping (Plate 1-1) shows that the present summit depression was produced by a Mt. St. Helens-type sector collapse, rather than by a caldera collapse. Geochronologic and previous tephrachronologic studies show that there has been an active magmatic system at Spurr volcano during the late Pleistocene-to-Holocene time interval that is of critical interest for geothermal energy resource assessment. Major effort was devoted to geochemical and geophysical surveys of the accessible area south of Mt. Spurr, in addition to geologic mapping and geochronologic studies. Many coincident mercury and helium anomalies were found, suggesting the presence of geothermal systems at depth. Extremely large electrical self-potential anomalies were also found, together with extensive zones of low resistivity discovered by our controlled-source audiomagnetotelluric survey. The juxtaposition of all of these different types of anomalies at certain areas on the south slope of Crater Peak indicates the presence of a geothermal system which should be accessible by drilling to about 2000 ft depth. It is also evident that there is a strong volcanic hazard to be evaluated in considering any development on the south side of Mt. Spurr. This hazardous situation may require angle drilling of production wells from safer areas and placement of power generation facilities at a considerable distance from hazardous areas.

  2. Development and Impact Evaluation of an E-Learning Radiation Oncology Module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfieri, Joanne, E-mail: Joanne.alfieri@mail.mcgill.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Portelance, Lorraine; Souhami, Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Steinert, Yvonne; McLeod, Peter [Centre for Medical Education, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Gallant, Fleure [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Artho, Giovanni [Department of Radiology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Radiation oncologists are faced with the challenge of irradiating tumors to a curative dose while limiting toxicity to healthy surrounding tissues. This can be achieved only with superior knowledge of radiologic anatomy and treatment planning. Educational resources designed to meet these specific needs are lacking. A web-based interactive module designed to improve residents' knowledge and application of key anatomy concepts pertinent to radiotherapy treatment planning was developed, and its effectiveness was assessed. Methods and Materials: The module, based on gynecologic malignancies, was developed in collaboration with a multidisciplinary team of subject matter experts. Subsequently, a multi-centre randomized controlled study was conducted to test the module's effectiveness. Thirty-six radiation oncology residents participated in the study; 1920 were granted access to the module (intervention group), and 17 in the control group relied on traditional methods to acquire their knowledge. Pretests and posttests were administered to all participants. Statistical analysis was carried out using paired t test, analysis of variance, and post hoc tests. Results: The randomized control study revealed that the intervention group's pretest and posttest mean scores were 35% and 52%, respectively, and those of the control group were 37% and 42%, respectively. The mean improvement in test scores was 17% (p < 0.05) for the intervention group and 5% (p = not significant) for the control group. Retrospective pretest and posttest surveys showed a statistically significant change on all measured module objectives. Conclusions: The use of an interactive e-learning teaching module for radiation oncology is an effective method to improve the radiologic anatomy knowledge and treatment planning skills of radiation oncology residents.

  3. The incidence of burnout or compassion fatigue in medical dosimetrists as a function of various stress and psychologic factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, Michelle, E-mail: Mhoward24601@yahoo.com [University of Wisconsin—La Crosse, WI 54601 (United States)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT: Burnout and compassion fatigue (CF) adversely affect medical professionals, including those employed in radiation oncology. Previously conducted research acknowledged the presence of burnout in populations of radiation therapists, radiation oncologists, and oncology nursing staff. The aim of the following research was to measure the incidence of burnout or CF in the specific population of medical dosimetrists surveyed. As professional members of the radiation oncology team, this group had not been included in published research data to date. The hypothesis of the subsequent study stated that a comparable incidence of burnout would be observed among medical dosimetrists as had been reported by earlier researchers for a population of radiation therapists. A survey tool based on the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and distributed to full members of the American Association of Medical Dosimetrists (AAMD) was utilized as the research measurement method. Results obtained indicated an incidence rates of burnout or CF for medical dosimetrists were less than the rates previously measured for radiation therapists (53% vs 11% for emotional exhaustion [EE] and 45% vs 27% for depersonalization [DP]). The incidence of burnout was based on the Burnout Inventory (BI) developed for the research project. Each of the subscales, EE, DP, and decreased personal accomplishment (PA), was considered and analyzed independently. Although not as prevalent among medical dosimetrists as a variety of additional radiation oncology professionals, a significant portion of the population demonstrated signs of burnout or CF. Future concerns abound for the population of medical dosimetrists as a large number of members scored positive for intermediate risk of burnout and CF. Additionally, a large portion of the population was found to be rapidly approaching retirement.

  4. Reliability of Quantitative Ultrasonic Assessment of Normal-Tissue Toxicity in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, Emi J.; Chen Hao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Torres, Mylin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Andic, Fundagul [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Liu Haoyang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Chen Zhengjia [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Statistics, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Sun, Xiaoyan [Department of Statistics, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Liu Tian, E-mail: tliu34@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We have recently reported that ultrasound imaging, together with ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC), can provide quantitative assessment of radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicity. This study's purpose is to evaluate the reliability of our quantitative ultrasound technology in assessing acute and late normal-tissue toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy. Method and Materials: Our ultrasound technique analyzes radiofrequency echo signals and provides quantitative measures of dermal, hypodermal, and glandular tissue toxicities. To facilitate easy clinical implementation, we further refined this technique by developing a semiautomatic ultrasound-based toxicity assessment tool (UBTAT). Seventy-two ultrasound studies of 26 patients (720 images) were analyzed. Images of 8 patients were evaluated for acute toxicity (<6 months postradiotherapy) and those of 18 patients were evaluated for late toxicity ({>=}6 months postradiotherapy). All patients were treated according to a standard radiotherapy protocol. To assess intraobserver reliability, one observer analyzed 720 images in UBTAT and then repeated the analysis 3 months later. To assess interobserver reliability, three observers (two radiation oncologists and one ultrasound expert) each analyzed 720 images in UBTAT. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate intra- and interobserver reliability. Ultrasound assessment and clinical evaluation were also compared. Results: Intraobserver ICC was 0.89 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.96 for glandular tissue toxicity. Interobserver ICC was 0.78 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.94 for glandular tissue toxicity. Statistical analysis found significant changes in dermal (p < 0.0001), hypodermal (p = 0.0027), and glandular tissue (p < 0.0001) assessments in the acute toxicity group. Ultrasound measurements correlated with clinical Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity scores of patients in the late toxicity group. Patients with RTOG Grade 1 or 2 had greater ultrasound-assessed toxicity percentage changes than patients with RTOG Grade 0. Conclusion: Early and late radiation-induced effects on normal tissue can be reliably assessed using quantitative ultrasound.

  5. A Prospective, Multicenter Study of Complementary/Alternative Medicine (CAM) Utilization During Definitive Radiation for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, Meena S., E-mail: meena.moran@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, William W. Backus Hospital, Norwich, Connecticut (United States); Ma Shuangge [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Jagsi, Reshma [University of Michigan, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [University of Michigan, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Yang, Tzu-I Jonathan [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Higgins, Susan A. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States) [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, Shoreline Medical Center, Guilford, Connecticut (United States); Weidhaas, Joanne B. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States) [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, Lawrence and Memorial Hospital, New London, Connecticut (United States); Lloyd, Shane [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Peschel, Richard [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States) [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, Lawrence and Memorial Hospital, New London, Connecticut (United States); Gaudreau, Bryant [Department of Radiation Therapy, William W. Backus Hospital, Norwich, Connecticut (United States)] [Department of Radiation Therapy, William W. Backus Hospital, Norwich, Connecticut (United States); Rockwell, Sara [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Although complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) utilization in breast cancer patients is reported to be high, there are few data on CAM practices in breast patients specifically during radiation. This prospective, multi-institutional study was conducted to define CAM utilization in breast cancer during definitive radiation. Materials/Methods: A validated CAM instrument with a self-skin assessment was administered to 360 Stage 0-III breast cancer patients from 5 centers during the last week of radiation. All data were analyzed to detect significant differences between users/nonusers. Results: CAM usage was reported in 54% of the study cohort (n=194/360). Of CAM users, 71% reported activity-based CAM (eg, Reiki, meditation), 26% topical CAM, and 45% oral CAM. Only 16% received advice/counseling from naturopathic/homeopathic/medical professionals before initiating CAM. CAM use significantly correlated with higher education level (P<.001), inversely correlated with concomitant hormone/radiation therapy use (P=.010), with a trend toward greater use in younger patients (P=.066). On multivariate analysis, level of education (OR: 6.821, 95% CI: 2.307-20.168, P<.001) and hormones/radiation therapy (OR: 0.573, 95% CI: 0.347-0.949, P=.031) independently predicted for CAM use. Significantly lower skin toxicity scores were reported in CAM users vs nonusers, respectively (mild: 34% vs 25%, severe: 17% vs 29%, P=.017). Conclusion: This is the first prospective study to assess CAM practices in breast patients during radiation, with definition of these practices as the first step for future investigation of CAM/radiation interactions. These results should alert radiation oncologists that a large percentage of breast cancer patients use CAM during radiation without disclosure or consideration for potential interactions, and should encourage increased awareness, communication, and documentation of CAM practices in patients undergoing radiation treatment for breast cancer.

  6. Beyond the Standard Curriculum: A Review of Available Opportunities for Medical Students to Prepare for a Career in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Ankit; DeNunzio, Nicholas J.; Ahuja, Divya; Hirsch, Ariel E., E-mail: Ariel.hirsch@bmc.org

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To review currently available opportunities for medical students to supplement their standard medical education to prepare for a career in radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: Google and PubMed were used to identify existing clinical, health policy, and research programs for medical students in radiation oncology. In addition, results publicly available by the National Resident Matching Program were used to explore opportunities that successful radiation oncology applicants pursued during their medical education, including obtaining additional graduate degrees. Results: Medical students can pursue a wide variety of opportunities before entering radiation oncology. Several national specialty societies, such as the American Society for Radiation Oncology and the Radiological Society of North America, offer summer internships for medical students interested in radiation oncology. In 2011, 30% of allopathic senior medical students in the United States who matched into radiation oncology had an additional graduate degree, including PhD, MPH, MBA, and MA degrees. Some medical schools are beginning to further integrate dedicated education in radiation oncology into the standard 4-year medical curriculum. Conclusions: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first comprehensive review of available opportunities for medical students interested in radiation oncology. Early exposure to radiation oncology and additional educational training beyond the standard medical curriculum have the potential to create more successful radiation oncology applicants and practicing radiation oncologists while also promoting the growth of the field. We hope this review can serve as guide to radiation oncology applicants and mentors as well as encourage discussion regarding initiatives in radiation oncology opportunities for medical students.

  7. Can Images Obtained With High Field Strength Magnetic Resonance Imaging Reduce Contouring Variability of the Prostate?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usmani, Nawaid, E-mail: Nawaid.Usmani@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Sloboda, Ron [Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Kamal, Wafa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Ghosh, Sunita [Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Department of Experimental Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Pervez, Nadeem; Pedersen, John; Yee, Don; Danielson, Brita; Murtha, Albert; Amanie, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Monajemi, Tara [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to determine whether there is less contouring variability of the prostate using higher-strength magnetic resonance images (MRI) compared with standard MRI and computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Forty patients treated with prostate brachytherapy were accrued to a prospective study that included the acquisition of 1.5-T MR and CT images at specified time points. A subset of 10 patients had additional 3.0-T MR images acquired at the same time as their 1.5-T MR scans. Images from each of these patients were contoured by 5 radiation oncologists, with a random subset of patients repeated to quantify intraobserver contouring variability. To minimize bias in contouring the prostate, the image sets were placed in folders in a random order with all identifiers removed from the images. Results: Although there was less interobserver contouring variability in the overall prostate volumes in 1.5-T MRI compared with 3.0-T MRI (p < 0.01), there was no significant differences in contouring variability in the different regions of the prostate between 1.5-T MRI and 3.0-T MRI. MRI demonstrated significantly less interobserver contouring variability in both 1.5-T and 3.0-T compared with CT in overall prostate volumes (p < 0.01, p = 0.01), with the greatest benefits being appreciated in the base of the prostate. Overall, there was less intraobserver contouring variability than interobserver contouring variability for all of the measurements analyzed. Conclusions: Use of 3.0-T MRI does not demonstrate a significant improvement in contouring variability compared with 1.5-T MRI, although both magnetic strengths demonstrated less contouring variability compared with CT.

  8. Supplement to the 2004 update of the AAPM Task Group No. 43 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivard, Mark J.; Butler, Wayne M.; DeWerd, Larry A.; Huq, M. Saiful; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Melhus, Christopher S.; Mitch, Michael G.; Nath, Ravinder; Williamson, Jeffrey F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, West Virginia 26003 (United States); Accredited Dosimetry and Calibration Laboratory, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States); Radiological Physics Center, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Ionizing Radiation Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06510 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Since publication of the 2004 update to the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group No. 43 Report (TG-43U1), several new low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources have become available. Many of these sources have satisfied the AAPM prerequisites for routine clinical use as of January 10, 2005, and are posted on the Joint AAPM/RPC Brachytherapy Seed Registry. Consequently, the AAPM has prepared this supplement to the 2004 AAPM TG-43 update. This paper presents the AAPM-approved consensus datasets for these sources, and includes the following {sup 125}I sources: Amersham model 6733, Draximage model LS-1, Implant Sciences model 3500, IBt model 1251L, IsoAid model IAI-125A, Mentor model SL-125/SH-125, and SourceTech Medical model STM1251. The Best Medical model 2335 {sup 103}Pd source is also included. While the methodology used to determine these data sets is identical to that published in the AAPM TG-43U1 report, additional information and discussion are presented here on some questions that arose since the publication of the TG-43U1 report. Specifically, details of interpolation and extrapolation methods are described further, new methodologies are recommended, and example calculations are provided. Despite these changes, additions, and clarifications, the overall methodology, the procedures for developing consensus data sets, and the dose calculation formalism largely remain the same as in the TG-43U1 report. Thus, the AAPM recommends that the consensus data sets and resultant source-specific dose-rate distributions included in this supplement be adopted by all end users for clinical treatment planning of low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources. Adoption of these recommendations may result in changes to patient dose calculations, and these changes should be carefully evaluated and reviewed with the radiation oncologist prior to implementation of the current protocol.

  9. Comparison of 2D Radiographic Images and 3D Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Positioning Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Heng [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: xrzhu@mdanderson.org; Zhang Lifei; Dong Lei; Tung, Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ahamad, Anesa M.D.; Chao, K. S. Clifford; Morrison, William H.; Rosenthal, David I.; Schwartz, David L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the positioning accuracy using two-dimensional kilovoltage (2DkV) imaging and three-dimensional cone beam CT (CBCT) in patients with head and neck (H and N) cancer receiving radiation therapy. To assess the benefit of patient-specific headrest. Materials and Methods: All 21 patients studied were immobilized using thermoplastic masks with either a patient-specific vacuum bag (11 of 21, IMA) or standard clear plastic (10 of 21, IMB) headrests. Each patient was imaged with a pair of orthogonal 2DkV images in treatment position using onboard imaging before the CBCT procedure. The 2DkV and CBCT images were acquired weekly during the same session. The 2DkV images were reviewed by oncologists and also analyzed by a software tool based on mutual information (MI). Results: Ninety-eight pairs of assessable 2DkV-CBCT alignment sets were obtained. Systematic and random errors were <1.6 mm for both 2DkV and CBCT alignments. When we compared shifts determined by CBCT and 2DkV for the same patient setup, statistically significant correlations were observed in all three major directions. Among all CBCT couch shifts, 4.1% {>=} 0.5 cm and 18.7% {>=} 0.3 cm, whereas among all 2DkV (MI) shifts, 1.7% {>=} 0.5 cm and 11.2% {>=} 0.3 cm. Statistically significant difference was found on anteroposterior direction between IMA and IMB with the CBCT alignment only. Conclusions: The differences between 2D and 3D alignments were mainly caused by the relative flexibility of certain H and N structures and possibly by rotation. Better immobilization of the flexible neck is required to further reduce the setup errors for H and N patients receiving radiotherapy.

  10. Beam Profile Disturbances from Implantable Pacemakers or Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gossman, Michael S., E-mail: mgossman@tsrcc.com [Tri-State Regional Cancer Center, Medical Physics Section, Ashland, KY (United States); Comprehensive Heart and Vascular Associates, Heart and Vascular Center, Ashland, KY (United States); Medtronic, Inc., External Research Program, Mounds View, MN (United States); Nagra, Bipinpreet; Graves-Calhoun, Alison; Wilkinson, Jeffrey [Tri-State Regional Cancer Center, Medical Physics Section, Ashland, KY (United States); Comprehensive Heart and Vascular Associates, Heart and Vascular Center, Ashland, KY (United States); Medtronic, Inc., External Research Program, Mounds View, MN (United States)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The medical community is advocating for progressive improvement in the design of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and implantable pacemakers to accommodate elevations in dose limitation criteria. With advancement already made for magnetic resonance imaging compatibility in some, a greater need is present to inform the radiation oncologist and medical physicist regarding treatment planning beam profile changes when such devices are in the field of a therapeutic radiation beam. Treatment plan modeling was conducted to simulate effects induced by Medtronic, Inc.-manufactured devices on therapeutic radiation beams. As a continuation of grant-supported research, we show that radial and transverse open beam profiles of a medical accelerator were altered when compared with profiles resulting when implantable pacemakers and cardioverter-defibrillators are placed directly in the beam. Results are markedly different between the 2 devices in the axial plane and the sagittal planes. Vast differences are also presented for the therapeutic beams at 6-MV and 18-MV x-ray energies. Maximum changes in percentage depth dose are observed for the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator as 9.3% at 6 MV and 10.1% at 18 MV, with worst distance to agreement of isodose lines at 2.3 cm and 1.3 cm, respectively. For the implantable pacemaker, the maximum changes in percentage depth dose were observed as 10.7% at 6 MV and 6.9% at 18 MV, with worst distance to agreement of isodose lines at 2.5 cm and 1.9 cm, respectively. No differences were discernible for the defibrillation leads and the pacing lead.

  11. Case study thoracic radiotherapy in an elderly patient with pacemaker: The issue of pacing leads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirova, Youlia M., E-mail: youlia.kirova@curie.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Menard, Jean; Chargari, Cyrus; Mazal, Alejandro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Kirov, Krassen [Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Institut Curie, Paris (France)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To assess clinical outcome of patients with pacemaker treated with thoracic radiation therapy for T8-T9 paravertebral chloroma. A 92-year-old male patient with chloroma presenting as paravertebral painful and compressive (T8-T9) mass was referred for radiotherapy in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie. The patient presented with cardiac dysfunction and a permanent pacemaker that had been implanted prior. The decision of Multidisciplinary Meeting was to deliver 30 Gy in 10 fractions for reducing the symptoms and controlling the tumor growth. The patient received a total dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions using 4-field conformal radiotherapy with 20-MV photons. The dose to pacemaker was 0.1 Gy but a part of the pacing leads was in the irradiation fields. The patient was treated the first time in the presence of his radiation oncologist and an intensive care unit doctor. Moreover, the function of his pacemaker was monitored during the entire radiotherapy course. No change in pacemaker function was observed during any of the radiotherapy fractions. The radiotherapy was very well tolerated without any side effects. The function of the pacemaker was checked before and after the radiotherapy treatment by the cardiologist and no pacemaker dysfunction was observed. Although updated guidelines are needed with acceptable dose criteria for implantable cardiac devices, it is possible to treat patients with these devices and parts encroaching on the radiation field. This case report shows we were able to safely treat our patient through a multidisciplinary approach, monitoring the patient during each step of the treatment.

  12. Results of a Quality Assurance Review of External Beam Radiation Therapy in the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (Europe) Neuroblastoma Group's High-risk Neuroblastoma Trial: A SIOPEN Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaze, Mark N., E-mail: mark.gaze@uclh.nhs.uk [Department of Oncology, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Boterberg, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Dieckmann, Karin; Hoermann, Marcus [General Hospital Vienna, Medical University Vienna (Austria)] [General Hospital Vienna, Medical University Vienna (Austria); Gains, Jennifer E.; Sullivan, Kevin P. [Department of Oncology, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)] [Department of Oncology, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ladenstein, Ruth [Children's Cancer Research Institute, St. Anna Children's Hospital, Vienna (Austria)] [Children's Cancer Research Institute, St. Anna Children's Hospital, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is important for local control in neuroblastoma. This study reviewed the compliance of plans with the radiation therapy guidelines of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (Europe) Neuroblastoma Group (SIOPEN) High-Risk Trial protocol. Methods and Materials: The SIOPEN trial central electronic database has sections to record diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy planning data. Individual centers may upload data remotely, but not all centers involved in the trial chose to use this system. A quality scoring system was devised based on how well the radiation therapy plan matched the protocol guidelines, to what extent deviations were justified, and whether adverse effects may result. Central review of radiation therapy planning was undertaken retrospectively in 100 patients for whom complete diagnostic and treatment sets were available. Data were reviewed and compared against protocol guidelines by an international team of radiation oncologists and radiologists. For each patient in the sample, the central review team assigned a quality assurance score. Results: It was found that in 48% of patients there was full compliance with protocol requirements. In 29%, there were deviations for justifiable reasons with no likely long-term adverse effects resulting. In 5%, deviations had occurred for justifiable reasons, but that might result in adverse effects. In 1%, there was a deviation with no discernible justification, which would not lead to long-term adverse events. In 17%, unjustified deviations were noted, with a risk of an adverse outcome resulting. Conclusions: Owing to concern over the proportion of patients in whom unjustified deviations were observed, a protocol amendment has been issued. This offers the opportunity for central review of radiation therapy plans before the start of treatment and the treating clinician a chance to modify plans.

  13. Long-Term Outcomes of Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Pituitary Adenomas at the BC Cancer Agency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Julian O.; Ma, Roy [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Division of Radiation Oncology and Developmental Radiotherapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Akagami, Ryojo [Division of Neurosurgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); McKenzie, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Division of Radiation Oncology and Developmental Radiotherapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Johnson, Michelle [Division of Endocrinology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Gete, Ermias [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Nichol, Alan, E-mail: anichol@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Division of Radiation Oncology and Developmental Radiotherapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the long-term disease control and toxicity outcomes of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) in patients with pituitary adenomas treated at the BC Cancer Agency. Methods and Materials: To ensure a minimum of 5 years of clinical follow-up, this study identified a cohort of 76 patients treated consecutively with FSRT between 1998 and 2007 for pituitary adenomas: 71% (54/76) had nonfunctioning and 29% (22/76) had functioning adenomas (15 adrenocorticotrophic hormone-secreting, 5 growth hormone-secreting, and 2 prolactin-secreting). Surgery was used before FSRT in 96% (73/76) of patients. A median isocenter dose of 50.4 Gy was delivered in 28 fractions, with 100% of the planning target volume covered by the 90% isodose. Patients were followed up clinically by endocrinologists, ophthalmologists, and radiation oncologists. Serial magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess tumor response. Results: With a median follow-up time of 6.8 years (range, 0.6 - 13.1 years), the 7-year progression-free survival was 97.1% and disease-specific survival was 100%. Of the 2 patients with tumor progression, both had disease control after salvage surgery. Of the 22 patients with functioning adenomas, 50% (11/22) had complete and 9% (2/22) had partial responses after FSRT. Of the patients with normal pituitary function at baseline, 48% (14/29) experienced 1 or more hormone deficiencies after FSRT. Although 79% (60/76) of optic chiasms were at least partially within the planning target volumes, no patient experienced radiation-induced optic neuropathy. No patient experienced radionecrosis. No secondary malignancy occurred during follow-up. Conclusion: In this study of long-term follow-up of patients treated for pituitary adenomas, FSRT was safe and effective.

  14. Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Barthold, H. Joseph [Commonwealth Hematology and Oncology, Weymouth, MA (United States); Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); O'Meara, Elizabeth [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Al-Lozi, Rawan [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Myerson, Robert [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); and others

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

  15. Multi-institutional Quantitative Evaluation and Clinical Validation of Smart Probabilistic Image Contouring Engine (SPICE) Autosegmentation of Target Structures and Normal Tissues on Computer Tomography Images in the Head and Neck, Thorax, Liver, and Male Pelvis Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Mingyao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Bzdusek, Karl [Philips Healthcare, Fitchburg, Wisconsin (United States); Brink, Carsten [Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Laboratory of Radiation Physics, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Eriksen, Jesper Grau [Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Hansen, Olfred [Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Jensen, Helle Anita [Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Gay, Hiram A.; Thorstad, Wade [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Widder, Joachim; Brouwer, Charlotte L.; Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M.; Vanhauten, Hubertus A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Cao, Jeffrey Q.; McBrayne, Gail [London Regional Cancer Centre, Ontario (Canada); Patel, Salil H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Cannon, Donald M. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin—Madison (United States); Hardcastle, Nicholas [Department of Physical Science, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Tomé, Wolfgang A. [Montefiore Medical Center and Institute of Onco-Physics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Guckenberg, Matthias [University of Würzburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Würzburg (Germany); Parikh, Parag J., E-mail: pparikh@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Clinical validation and quantitative evaluation of computed tomography (CT) image autosegmentation using Smart Probabilistic Image Contouring Engine (SPICE). Methods and Materials: CT images of 125 treated patients (32 head and neck [HN], 40 thorax, 23 liver, and 30 prostate) in 7 independent institutions were autosegmented using SPICE and computational times were recorded. The number of structures autocontoured were 25 for the HN, 7 for the thorax, 3 for the liver, and 6 for the male pelvis regions. Using the clinical contours as reference, autocontours of 22 selected structures were quantitatively evaluated using Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) and Mean Slice-wise Hausdorff Distance (MSHD). All 40 autocontours were evaluated by a radiation oncologist from the institution that treated the patients. Results: The mean computational times to autosegment all the structures using SPICE were 3.1 to 11.1 minutes per patient. For the HN region, the mean DSC was >0.70 for all evaluated structures, and the MSHD ranged from 3.2 to 10.0 mm. For the thorax region, the mean DSC was 0.95 for the lungs and 0.90 for the heart, and the MSHD ranged from 2.8 to 12.8 mm. For the liver region, the mean DSC was >0.92 for all structures, and the MSHD ranged from 5.2 to 15.9 mm. For the male pelvis region, the mean DSC was >0.76 for all structures, and the MSHD ranged from 4.8 to 10.5 mm. Out of the 40 autocontoured structures reviews by experts, 25 were scored useful as autocontoured or with minor edits for at least 90% of the patients and 33 were scored useful autocontoured or with minor edits for at least 80% of the patients. Conclusions: Compared with manual contouring, autosegmentation using SPICE for the HN, thorax, liver, and male pelvis regions is efficient and shows significant promise for clinical utility.

  16. Missoula flood dynamics and magnitudes inferred from sedimentology of slack-water deposits on the Columbia Plateau, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.A. (Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sedimentological study of late Wisconsin, Missoula-flood slack-water sediments deposited along the Columbia and Tucannon Rivers in southern Washington reveals important aspects of flood dynamics. Most flood facies were deposited by energetic flood surges (velocities>6 m/sec) entering protected areas along the flood tract, or flowing up and then directly out of tributary valleys. True still-water facies are less voluminous and restricted to elevations below 230 m. High flood stages attended the initial arrival of the flood wave and were not associated with subsequent hydraulic ponding upslope from channel constrictions. Among 186 flood beds studied in 12 sections, 57% have bioturbated tops, and about half of these bioturbated beds are separated from overlying flood beds by nonflood sediments. A single graded flood bed was deposited at most sites during most floods. Sequences in which 2-9 graded beds were deposited during a single flood are restricted to low elevations. These sequences imply complex, multi-peaked hydrographs in which the first flood surge was generally the largest, and subsequent surges were attenuated by water already present in slack-water areas. Slack-water - sediment stratigraphy suggests a wide range of flood discharges and volumes. Of >40 documented late Wisconsin floods that inundated the Pasco Basin, only about 20 crossed the Palouse-Snake divide. Floods younger than the set-S tephras from Mount St.Helens were generally smaller than earlier floods of late Wisconsin age, although most still crossed the Palouse-Snake divide. These late floods primarily traversed the Cheney-Palouse scabland because stratigraphy of slack-water sediment along the Columbia River implies that the largest flood volumes did not enter the Pasco Basin by way of the Columbia River. 47 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. The 1980-1982 Geothermal Resource Assessment Program in Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korosec, Michael A.; Phillips, William M.; Schuster, J.Eric

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1978, the Division of Geology and Earth Resources of the Washington Department of Natural Resources has participated in the U.S. Department of Energy's (USDOE) State-Coupled Geothermal Resource Program. Federal and state funds have been used to investigate and evaluate the potential for geothermal resources, on both a reconnaissance and area-specific level. Preliminary results and progress reports for the period up through mid-1980 have already been released as a Division Open File Report (Korosec, Schuster, and others, 1981). Preliminary results and progress summaries of work carried out from mid-1980 through the end of 1982 are presented in this report. Only one other summary report dealing with geothermal resource investigations in the state has been published. An Information Circular released by the Division (Schuster and others, 1978) compiled the geology, geochemistry, and heat flow drilling results from a project in the Indian Heaven area in the south Cascades. The previous progress report for the geothermal program (Korosec, Schuster, and others, 1981) included information on temperature gradients measured throughout the state, heat flow drilling in the southern Cascades, gravity surveys for the southern Cascades, thermal and mineral spring investigations, geologic mapping for the White Pass-Tumac Mountain area, and area specific studies for the Camas area of Clark County and Mount St. Helens. This work, along with some additional studies, led to the compilation of the Geothermal Resources of Washington map (Korosec, Kaler, and others, 1981). The map is principally a nontechnical presentation based on all available geothermal information, presented as data points, tables, and text on a map with a scale of 1:500,000.

  18. SU-E-J-153: MRI Based, Daily Adaptive Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer: Contour Adaptation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleijnen, J; Burbach, M; Verbraeken, T; Weggers, R; Zoetelief, A; Reerink, O; Lagendijk, J; Raaymakers, B; Asselen, B [University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A major hurdle in adaptive radiotherapy is the adaptation of the planning MRI's delineations to the daily anatomy. We therefore investigate the accuracy and time needed for online clinical target volume (CTV) adaptation by radiation therapists (RTT), to be used in MRI-guided adaptive treatments on a MRI-Linac (MRL). Methods: Sixteen patients, diagnosed with early stage rectal cancer, underwent a T2-weighted MRI prior to each fraction of short-course radiotherapy, resulting in 4–5 scans per patient. On these scans, the CTV was delineated according to guidelines by an experienced radiation oncologist (RO) and considered to be the gold standard. For each patient, the first MRI was considered as the planning MRI and matched on bony anatomy to the 3–4 daily MRIs. The planning MRI's CTV delineation was rigidly propagated to the daily MRI scans as a proposal for adaptation. Three RTTs in training started the adaptation of the CTV conform guidelines, after a two hour training lecture and a two patient (n=7) training set. To assess the inter-therapist variation, all three RTTs altered delineations of 3 patients (n=12). One RTT altered the CTV delineations (n=53) of the remaining 11 patients. Time needed for adaptation of the CTV to guidelines was registered.As a measure of agreement, the conformity index (CI) was determined between the RTTs' delineations as a group. Dice similarity coefficients were determined between delineations of the RTT and the RO. Results: We found good agreement between RTTs' and RO's delineations (average Dice=0.91, SD=0.03). Furthermore, the inter-observer agreement between the RTTs was high (average CI=0.94, SD=0.02). Adaptation time reduced from 10:33 min (SD= 3:46) to 2:56 min (SD=1:06) between the first and last ten delineations, respectively. Conclusion: Daily CTV adaptation by RTTs, seems a feasible and safe way to introduce daily, online MRI-based plan adaptation for a MRL.

  19. Report on the TESLA Engineering Study/Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornuelle, John C.

    2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In March, 2001, the TESLA Collaboration published its Technical Design Report (TDR, see references and links in Appendix), the first sentence of which stated ''...TESLA (TeV-Energy Superconducting Linear Collider) (will be) a superconducting electron-positron collider of initially 500 GeV total energy, extendable to 800 GeV, and an integrated X-ray laser laboratory.'' The TDR included cost and manpower estimates for a 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider (250 on 250 GeV) based on superconducting RF cavity technology. This was submitted as a proposal to the German government. The government asked the German Science Council to evaluate this proposal. The recommendation from this body is anticipated to be available by November 2002. The government has indicated that it will react on this recommendation by mid-2003. In June 2001, Steve Holmes, Fermilab's Associate Director for Accelerators, commissioned Helen Edwards and Peter Garbincius to organize a study of the TESLA Technical Design Report and the associated cost and manpower estimates. Since the elements and methodology used in producing the TESLA cost estimate were somewhat different from those used in preparing similar estimates for projects within the U.S., it is important to understand the similarities, differences, and equivalences between the TESLA estimate and U.S. cost estimates. In particular, the project cost estimate includes only purchased equipment, materials, and services, but not manpower from DESY or other TESLA collaborating institutions, which is listed separately. It does not include the R&D on the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) nor the costs of preparing the TDR nor the costs of performing the conceptual studies so far. The manpower for the pre-operations commissioning program (up to beam) is included in the estimate, but not the electrical power or liquid Nitrogen (for initial cooldown of the cryogenics plant). There is no inclusion of any contingency or management reserve. If the U.S. were to become involved with the TESLA project, either as a collaborator for an LC in Germany, or as host country for TESLA in the U.S., it is important to begin to understand the scope and technical details of the project, what R&D still needs to be done, and how the U.S. can contribute. The charge for this study is included in the Appendix to this report.

  20. Proc. of the workshop on pushing the limits of RF superconductivity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K-J., Eyberger, C., editors

    2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    For three days in late September last year, some sixty experts in RF superconductivity from around the world came together at Argonne to discuss how to push the limits of RF superconductivity for particle accelerators. It was an intense workshop with in-depth presentations and ample discussions. There was added excitement due to the fact that, a few days before the workshop, the International Technology Recommendation Panel had decided in favor of superconducting technology for the International Linear Collider (ILC), the next major high-energy physics accelerator project. Superconducting RF technology is also important for other large accelerator projects that are either imminent or under active discussion at this time, such as the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) for nuclear physics, energy recovery linacs (ERLs), and x-ray free-electron lasers. For these accelerators, the capability in maximum accelerating gradient and/or the Q value is essential to limit the length and/or operating cost of the accelerators. The technological progress of superconducting accelerators during the past two decades has been truly remarkable, both in low-frequency structures for acceleration of protons and ions as well as in high-frequency structures for electrons. The requirements of future accelerators demand an even higher level of performance. The topics of this workshop are therefore highly relevant and timely. The presentations given at the workshop contained authoritative reviews of the current state of the art as well as some original materials that previously had not been widely circulated. We therefore felt strongly that these materials should be put together in the form of a workshop proceeding. The outcome is this report, which consists of two parts: first, a collection of the scholarly papers prepared by some of the participants and second, copies of the viewgraphs of all presentations. The presentation viewgraphs, in full color, are also available from the Workshop Presentations link on the workshop's web page at http://www.aps.anl.gov/conferences/RFSCLimits/. I would like to thank all of the participants for their lively contributions to the workshop and to these proceedings, and Helen Edwards and Hasan Padamsee for their help in developing the workshop program. I also thank Cathy Eyberger, Kelly Jaje, and Renee Lanham for working very hard to take care of the administrative details, in particular Cathy for editing this report.