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  1. Yun (Helen) He

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as strategies to improve IO performance. Wendy Hwa-Chun Lin, Yun (Helen) He, and Woo-Sun Yang, "Franklin Job Completion Analysis", Cray User Group 2010 Proceedings, Edinburgh,...

  2. Electroplating Helen H. Lou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yinlun

    Electroplating Helen H. Lou Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, Texas, Detroit, Michigan, U.S.A. INTRODUCTION Electroplating is an electrodeposition process for producing a dense, uniform, and adherent coating, usually of metal or alloys, upon a surface by the act of electric

  3. Helen Bacon Beacon, an obituary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Younger, John G.

    2008-07-01

    Helen Bacon Beacon died 9 November 2007, past president of the American Philological Association, member of the Managing Committee of the American School of Classical Studies, Athens, and champion of gay rights....

  4. How Radiation Oncologists Would Disclose Errors: Results of a Survey of Radiation Oncologists and Trainees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Suzanne B.; Yu, James B.; Chagpar, Anees

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To analyze error disclosure attitudes of radiation oncologists and to correlate error disclosure beliefs with survey-assessed disclosure behavior. Methods and Materials: With institutional review board exemption, an anonymous online survey was devised. An email invitation was sent to radiation oncologists (American Society for Radiation Oncology [ASTRO] gold medal winners, program directors and chair persons of academic institutions, and former ASTRO lecturers) and residents. A disclosure score was calculated based on the number or full, partial, or no disclosure responses chosen to the vignette-based questions, and correlation was attempted with attitudes toward error disclosure. Results: The survey received 176 responses: 94.8% of respondents considered themselves more likely to disclose in the setting of a serious medical error; 72.7% of respondents did not feel it mattered who was responsible for the error in deciding to disclose, and 3.9% felt more likely to disclose if someone else was responsible; 38.0% of respondents felt that disclosure increased the likelihood of a lawsuit, and 32.4% felt disclosure decreased the likelihood of lawsuit; 71.6% of respondents felt near misses should not be disclosed; 51.7% thought that minor errors should not be disclosed; 64.7% viewed disclosure as an opportunity for forgiveness from the patient; and 44.6% considered the patient's level of confidence in them to be a factor in disclosure. For a scenario that could be considerable, a non-harmful error, 78.9% of respondents would not contact the family. Respondents with high disclosure scores were more likely to feel that disclosure was an opportunity for forgiveness (P=.003) and to have never seen major medical errors (P=.004). Conclusions: The surveyed radiation oncologists chose to respond with full disclosure at a high rate, although ideal disclosure practices were not uniformly adhered to beyond the initial decision to disclose the occurrence of the error.

  5. Review: Nuclear Power Is Not the Answer by Helen Caldicott

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirza, Umar Karim

    2007-01-01

    Review: Nuclear Power Is Not the Answer By Helen CaldicottPakistan. Helen Caldicott. Nuclear Power Is Not the Answer.about the true costs of nuclear power, the health effects of

  6. Coordination of Breast Cancer Care Between Radiation Oncologists and Surgeons: A Survey Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Abrahamse, Paul; Morrow, Monica; Hamilton, Ann S.; Katz, Steven J.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To assess whether radiation oncologists and surgeons differ in their attitudes regarding the local management of breast cancer, and to examine coordination of care between these specialists. Methods and Materials: We surveyed attending surgeons and radiation oncologists who treated a population-based sample of patients diagnosed with breast cancer in metropolitan Detroit and Los Angeles. We identified 419 surgeons, of whom 318 (76%) responded, and 160 radiation oncologists, of whom 117 (73%) responded. We assessed demographic, professional, and practice characteristics; challenges to coordinated care; and attitudes toward management in three scenarios. Results: 92.1% of surgeons and 94.8% of radiation oncologists indicated access to a multidisciplinary tumor board. Nevertheless, the most commonly identified challenge to radiation oncologists, cited by 27.9%, was failure of other providers to include them in the treatment decision process early enough. Nearly half the surgeons (49.7%) stated that few or almost none of the breast cancer patients they saw in the past 12 months had consulted with a radiation oncologist before undergoing definitive surgery. Surgeons and radiation oncologists differed in their recommendations in management scenarios. Radiation oncologists were more likely to favor radiation than were surgeons for a patient with 3/20 lymph nodes undergoing mastectomy (p = 0.03); surgeons were more likely to favor more widely clear margins after breast conservation than were radiation oncologists (p = 0.001). Conclusions: Despite the widespread availability of tumor boards, a substantial minority of radiation oncologists indicated other providers failed to include them in the breast cancer treatment decision-making process early enough. Earlier inclusion of radiation oncologists may influence patient decisions, and interventions to facilitate this should be considered.

  7. Review: Nuclear Power Is Not the Answer by Helen Caldicott

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirza, Umar Karim

    2007-01-01

    by Umar Karim Mirza Pakistan Institute of Engineeringand Applied Sciences, Pakistan. Helen Caldicott. Nuclear, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and

  8. VI. Universal Arm Exponents Helen K. Lei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei, Guo-Ying "Helen"

    (VI) VI. Universal Arm Exponents Helen K. Lei Caltech, W'02 From the "fences and corridors cases (in particular 5­arm crossings in a full annulus and 3­arm crossings in a half annulus the characteristic length. 5­Arm Exponent in Full Space. Here we will establish that Lemma. Suppose p = pc. Let

  9. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References L. Shevenell, F. Goff (2000) Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa,...

  10. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Lisa Shevenell, Fraser Goff (1995) Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa Additional References...

  11. Boise Inc. St. Helens Paper Mill Achieves Significant Fuel Savings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boise Inc. St. Helens mill produces nearly 1,000 tons of pulp and specialty paper per day, including a wide variety of light-to-heavy paper and napkin grade tissues. Boise Inc. St....

  12. Guidance on peat soils 1 | Peat | Helen Cariss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : conserving and enhancing biodiversity climate change mitigation maintaining the peat and soil resource on these sites over the next 15 years. 1 Forest Research, A Strategic Assessment of Afforested Peat ResourceGuidance on peat soils 1 | Peat | Helen Cariss Forestry and deep peat Purpose This policy guidance

  13. The University of Reading Helen Dacre Evaluating pollution transport in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dacre, Helen

    and PM10 concentrations for 16 urban areas and 16 UK regions Forecast for East (last updated at 10 Outline Air pollution forecasting Offline forecasting Online forecasting Aim Overview of ETEX 2 case Conclusions and future work #12;The University of Reading Helen Dacre Offline Air Pollution Forecasting

  14. Where computer security meets national security1 Helen Nissenbaum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nissenbaum, Helen

    of International Relations. Key words: cyber-security, computer security, securitization Introduction OverWhere computer security meets national security1 Helen Nissenbaum Department of Culture conceptions of security in contemporary concerns over the vulnerability of computers and networks to hostile

  15. Sign Language Recognition Using Boosted Volumetric Features Helen Cooper Richard Bowden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowden, Richard

    Sign Language Recognition Using Boosted Volumetric Features Helen Cooper Richard Bowden CVSSP, SEPS using an integral volume. These volumetric fea- tures are assembled into spatio-temporal classifiers

  16. Helene L. and Mark N. Kaplan Professor of Natural and Physical Sciences CURRICULUM VITAE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Rae

    1 RAE SILVER Helene L. and Mark N. Kaplan Professor of Natural and Physical Sciences CURRICULUM Telephone: (212) 854-5531 Fax: (212) 854-3609 email: QR@columbia.edu Titles Helene L. and Mark N. Kaplan Advisor, National Science Foundation 1990: Kaplan Professor of Natural and Physical Sciences 1982

  17. 1 Bernhard Jenny, Helen Jenny, Stefan Rber Map design for the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenny, Bernhard

    1 Bernhard Jenny, Helen Jenny, Stefan Rber Map design for the Internet 1 Bernhard Jenny, Helen of Internet user behavior or compiled from selected sources. 1 The relevance of digital map design Map authors can choose today among a range of GIS or graphics software products to create maps for the Internet

  18. Some Effects of Mt. St. Helens Volcanic Ash on Juvenile Salmon Smolts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Some Effects of Mt. St. Helens Volcanic Ash on Juvenile Salmon Smolts TIMOTHY W. NEWCOMB and THOMAS. Helens, which was completely decimated with vol- canic ash and mud slides. Heavy sediment loads smolts were exposed to various concentrations ofairborne volcanic ash from the 18 May 1980 eruption

  19. Reirradiation After Radical Radiation Therapy: A Survey of Patterns of Practice Among Canadian Radiation Oncologists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, Kurian Jones [Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)], E-mail: kurianjo@cancerboard.ab.ca; Al-Mandhari, Zahid; Pervez, Nadeem; Parliament, Matthew [Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Wu, Jackson [Tom Baker Cancer Center and University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Ghosh, Sunita [Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Tai, Patricia [Allan Blair Cancer Centre and University of Saskatchewan, Saskatchewan (Canada); Lian Jidong [Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Levin, Wilfred [University of Toronto and Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada)

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to survey the use of reirradiation (Re-RT) for in-field failures after previous radical radiation treatment (RT) among Canadian radiation oncologists (ROs). Methods and Materials: An electronic survey was sent to 271 ROs in Canada. The completed surveys were received electronically via e-mail and the data were analyzed using SAS 9.1.3 software. Results: A total of 183 ROs (67.5%) completed and returned the survey. The majority of the respondents were involved in the practice of either breast (48%) or genitourinary (43%) tumor sites. A total of 49% of the participants were interested in using Re-RT for the management of in-field recurrences. The goals of the therapy would be improvement of quality of life (99%), locoregional control (80%), or cure (32%). Most of the physicians believed that patients should have a minimum Karnofsky performance status of 50 or Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 3, a minimum life expectancy of 3 months, and a minimum interval from initial treatment of 3 months if Re-RT were to be given with curative intent. Conclusions: This survey showed that a wide variation existed among ROs in their approach to Re-RT. Newer technologies in RT planning and delivery would be employed to facilitate normal tissue avoidance. The results of this study suggested that a consensus meeting was needed to establish guidelines for the practice and prospective evaluation of Re-RT.

  20. Mt St Helens Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformationOliver, Pennsylvania:(CTI PFAN) | OpenMt St Helens

  1. Mt St Helens Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformationOliver, Pennsylvania:(CTI PFAN) | OpenMt St HelensMt St

  2. Richard Gerber, Helen He, Zhengji Zhao, David Turner NUG Monthly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100Nationalquestionnaires 0serialIndustrialSenior8 , 2 013 ConnectionHelen

  3. IS PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY ADAPTIVE? Kimberly A. Hughes, Mary H. Burleson, and F. Helen Rodd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Kim

    23 Chapter 2 IS PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY ADAPTIVE? Kimberly A. Hughes, Mary H. Burleson, and F. Helen Rodd Keywords: adaptation, adaptationist paradigm, canalization, cost of plasticity, evolutionary, multivariate selection analysis, natural selection, optimality models, phenotypic plasticity, quantitative

  4. TITLE: Cornell's Urban Sustainability Initiatives HOST: Marianne Krasny, Helene Dillard and Marvin Pritts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    TITLE: Cornell's Urban Sustainability Initiatives HOST: Marianne Krasny, Helene Dillard and Marvin take to define an urban sustainability initiative in collaboration with ACSF. In particular, we broadly address urban sustainability issues. Our initiative dovetails with concerns Cornell University

  5. Resolved dynamics of single electron tunneling using the RF-SET Julie Helen Love

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devoret, Michel H.

    .4 Tunneling Rates in the single Electron Trap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 5 CotunnellingAbstract Resolved dynamics of single electron tunneling using the RF-SET Julie Helen Love 2007 This thesis presents measurements of time resolved single electron tunneling events in a metallic thin film

  6. The ethical and social implications of personalization technologies for Helen Ashman a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Michael

    The ethical and social implications of personalization technologies for e-learning Helen Ashman a and communications technology, however, has brought education online, implemented in e-learning systems. An e T Personalization in information systems can be considered beneficial but also ethically and socially harmful. Like

  7. A review of "Milton and the Politics of Public Speech" by Helen Lynch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    , or simply, an English epic or a Protestant epic. Nardos achievement is her ability to universalize Miltons masterpiece for readers of Spanish. Helen Lynch. Milton and the Politics of Public Speech. Farnham, Surrey and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2015. xvii...

  8. Scattering matrices of volcanic ash particles of Mount St. Helens, Redoubt, and Mount Spurr Volcanoes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    Scattering matrices of volcanic ash particles of Mount St. Helens, Redoubt, and Mount Spurr particles taken from seven samples of volcanic ashes corresponding to four different volcanic eruptions. The samples studied contain large mass fractions of fine particles and were chosen to represent ash that could

  9. Introducing mobility into CSP B Steve Schneider, Helen Treharne, and Beeta Vajar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Steve

    AVoCS 2007 Introducing mobility into CSP B Steve Schneider, Helen Treharne, and Beeta Vajar Department of Computing University of Surrey Guildford, Surrey, UK Abstract CSP B is a combination of CSP, the semantic foundation for pi |B is cumbersome for reasoning about systems, and a CSP based approach may

  10. Carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide from the eruptions of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, R.A.; Khalil, M.A.K.; Dalluge, R.W.; Penkett, S.A.; Jones, B.

    1982-01-01

    Ash from the massive 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens readily gave off large amounts of carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide gases at room temperature. These findings suggest that the sulfur that enhances the Junge sulfate layer in the stratosphere after volcanic eruptions could be carried directly to the upper atmosphere as carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide adsorbed on ash particles from major volcanic eruptions.

  11. On the Effect of Winglets on the Performance of Micro-Aerial-Vehicles Dr. Helen L. Reed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    vehicles. The smallest airplanes in use at that time were the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) that had#12;On the Effect of Winglets on the Performance of Micro-Aerial-Vehicles Dr. Helen L. Reed in developing Micro-Aerial-Vehicles (MAVs) has been expressed by various military and civilian entities

  12. GeoComputation in context by Helen Couclelis, Professor of Geography, Department of Geography and National Center for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Keith

    GeoComputation in context by Helen Couclelis, Professor of Geography, Department of Geography three groups of questions: (a) the place of GeoComputation within geography, in particular in connection'. This paraphrases Dobson's (1983) early attempt to define `Automated Geography', a concept we would now readily

  13. Review: Privacy in the 21st Century: Issues for Public, School, and Academic Libraries by Helen R. Adams, Robert F. Bocher, Carol A. Gordon, and Elizabeth Barry-Kessler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuers, Laura

    2006-01-01

    for the Nevada County Public Libraries in rural northernis a consultant for public libraries, Gordon works in anIssues for Public, School, and Academic Libraries by Helen

  14. Kennedy, Rosemary and Caswell, Helen (2005) The Centre For Subtropical Design A Collaboration Between A Local Government Authority And A University. In Proceedings Action for Sustainabilty, The World Sustainable Building Conference in sb05 Tokyo, Tokyo.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Colin

    2005-01-01

    Kennedy, Rosemary and Caswell, Helen (2005) The Centre For Subtropical Design A Collaboration BETWEEN A LOCAL GOVERNMENT AUTHORITY AND A UNIVERSITY Rosemary KENNEDY1 Helen CASWELL2 1 Centre for Subtropical Design, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, Qld. 4001. r.kennedy

  15. Four-year prospective study of the respiratory effects of volcanic ash from Mt. St. Helens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buist, A.S.; Vollmer, W.M.; Johnson, L.R.; Bernstein, R.S.; McCamant, L.E.

    1986-04-01

    This report describes the 4-yr follow-up of 712 loggers exposed over an extended period to varying levels of fresh volcanic ash from the 1980 eruptions of Mt. St. Helens. Concerns related to the irritant effect the ash might have on the airways and also to its fibrogenic potential if exposures were intense and continued over many years. Our subjects were divided into 3 groups: high, low, and no exposure. Baseline testing was begun in June 1980, 1 month after the major eruption, and follow-up testing continued on an annual basis through 1984; 88% of the loggers have been tested at least 3 times. Analysis of lung function data showed that a significant, exposure-related decline in FEV1 occurred during the first year after the eruption. The decline was short-lived, however, and by 1984 the differences between exposure groups were no longer significant. Self-reported symptoms of cough, phlegm, and wheeze showed a similar pattern. No ash-related changes were seen in chest roentgenograms taken in 1980 and in 1984. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the inhaled ash caused mucus hypersecretion and/or airway inflammation that reversed when the exposure levels decreased. The ash levels to which the loggers were exposed were low compared with permissible occupational levels for nuisance dusts, but generally higher than the total suspended particulate levels permissible in ambient air.

  16. Ambient Airborne Solids Concentrations Including Volcanic Ash at Hanford, Washington Sampling Sites Subsequent to the Mount St. Helens Eruption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1982-12-20

    A major eruption of Mount St. Helens occurred on May 18, 1980. Subsequently, airborne solid concentrations were measured as a function of time at two sites within the southern edge of the fallout plume about 211 km east of Mount St. Helens. This ash was a source for investigating area-wide resuspension. Rain had a variable effect on decreasing airborne concentrations from resuspension. From 0.5 to 1.5 cm of rain were required to significantly reduce airborne solid concentrations through July. For a more aged resuspension source in September, a rain of 2.0 cm had a negligible effect. A monthly average threshold-wind speed for resuspension was defined as 3.6 m/s. For monthly-average wind speeds less than the threshold wind speed, monthly-average airborne concentrations tended to decrease with time. A decrease was recorded between September and October. For this 4-month time period, the half-life was on the order of 50 days, corresponding to a weathering rate of 5.1 year/sup -1/.

  17. Yun (Helen) He

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAboutXu Named| Princeton Plasma Physics LabYourYu LokYun

  18. Yun (Helen) He, NERSC!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single|YejunOpportunityYue Lu Yue Lu YueHe,

  19. Helen He! NERSC User Services Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-DoseOptions forHeavy-Duty Waste HaulerHeiko Lokstein

  20. Helen He! NERSC User Services Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-DoseOptions forHeavy-Duty Waste HaulerHeiko LoksteinUsing

  1. Helen He! NERSC User Services Group!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-DoseOptions forHeavy-Duty Waste HaulerHeiko LoksteinUsingHe!

  2. Helen He! NERSC User Services Group!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-DoseOptions forHeavy-Duty Waste HaulerHeiko

  3. A TUTUREFORTHE DUGONG? HeleneMarsh, Helen Penroseand CaroleEros

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, Helene

    on dugong status and management within lts range East Africa Kenya Tanzania Mozambique Madagascar Comoros

  4. Cognitive Measurements of Graph Aesthetics Colin Ware, Helen Purchase#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ware, Colin

    Mapping University of New Hampshire 24 Colovos Road, Durham, NH 03824, USA phone: 603 862 1138 fax: 603 of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering The University of Queensland St Lucia, 4072, Brisbane and suggesting new ones. In particular, we find the importance of good continuity (i.e. keeping multi-edge paths

  5. Review: Nuclear Power Is Not the Answer by Helen Caldicott

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirza, Umar Karim

    2007-01-01

    and the possibility of nuclear weapons proliferation make itto a discussion of nuclear weapons proliferation. In the

  6. Review: Nuclear Power Is Not the Answer by Helen Caldicott

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirza, Umar Karim

    2007-01-01

    the possibility of nuclear weapons proliferation make it ato a discussion of nuclear weapons proliferation. In the

  7. Boise Inc. St. Helens Paper Mill Achieves Significant Fuel Savings...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for the Pulp and Paper, Chemical Manufacturing, and Petroleum Refining Industries ITP Forest Products: Report for AIChE Pulp and Paper Industry Energy Bandwidth Study Report...

  8. Marie-Helene Radenac Yves Dandonneau Bruno Blanke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The second concerns the persis- tent upwelling in the eastern basin. Water parcels have complex trajectories CNRS-IRD-UPMC, case 100, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France B. Blanke Laboratoire de

  9. Hydrothermal Circulation At Mount St Helens Determined By Self...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the dome summit. The anomaly pattern is believed to result from a combination of thermoelectric, electrokinetic, and fluid disruption effects within and surrounding the dome....

  10. Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) | Opensource History View NewsourceUsa, 1980-1994 | Open Energy

  11. Mike Stewart and Helen He NERSC User Services Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OFDetectionBenchmark Performance of Different Compilers on

  12. Nazim Bharmal Anthony Slingo Jeff Settle Gary Robinson Helen White

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolar Photovoltaic(MillionNature and Origin of the| NationalNavigating

  13. Richard Gerber Helen He, Zhengji Zhao, Chris Daley NUG Monthly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100Nationalquestionnaires 0serialIndustrial

  14. Boise Inc. St. Helens Paper Mill Achieves Significant Fuel Savings |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De pEnergy Industrial LocalAprilstaff are makingDepartment of

  15. Helen He, David Turner, Richard Gerber NUG Monthly Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-DoseOptions forHeavy-Duty Waste HaulerHeikoHe, David Turner,

  16. Hopper* Suren Byna, Prabhat, Andrew Uselton, David Knaak, Helen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHigh energyHighland ViewdefaultJulySeptember 2012OSscheduled

  17. 2007 IEEE Workshop on Applications of Signal Processing to Audio and Acoustics October 21-24, 2007, New Paltz, NY PROBABILISTIC MODEL BASED SIMILARITY MEASURES FOR AUDIO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virtanen, Tuomas

    and Marko Helen Tampere University of Technology tuomas.virtanen@tut.fi, marko.helen@tut.fi ABSTRACT

  18. MODELLING INTONATIONAL STRUCTURE USING HIDDEN MARKOV MODELS Helen Wright and Paul Taylor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    units. For example, O'Connor and Arnold's [6] high drop consists of a low pre-head, high head and low, all with names such as low bounce and high drop. This paper examines the converse ap- proach of top tailpre-head nuclearpre-nuclear phrase phrase tone tone head(d) (c) (b) (a) Figure 1. Intonational

  19. MODELLING INTONATIONAL STRUCTURE USING HIDDEN MARKOV MODELS Helen Wright and Paul Taylor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    units. For example, O'Connor and Arnold's [6] high drop consists of a low prehead, high head and low, all with names such as low bounce and high drop. This paper examines the converse ap proach of top prehead nuclear prenuclear phrase phrase tone tone head (d) (c) (b) (a) Figure 1. Intonational

  20. Surjectivity of cycle maps Hel`ene Esnault and Marc Levine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Marc

    for which the rational topological cycle maps CHp (X) Q H2p B (X, Q) #12;Surjectivity of cycle maps i cycle, and d = dim(X). One consequence of this decomposition is that the total cycle map d p=0 CHp) the Hodge numbers hp,q (X) all vanish for |p - q| > 1. (4) the maps CHp (X) C Hp (X, Kp+1) are all

  1. VISIONING WESTON NURSERIES Team 1: Valerie Gingrich, Helen Lee, Taylor Mammen, Adam Marcus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishii, Hiroshi

    to have a conference center below the natural gas facility. Our proposal primarily focuses on three will feature higher density housing for young families and 55+ seniors. Continuing north to Weston Woodlands and below Route 135, the Marathon Flats residential development takes the form of clustered housing

  2. NONLINEAR ANALYSIS OF JUXTACRINE PATTERNS HELEN J. WEARING AND JONATHAN A. SHERRATT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherratt, Jonathan A.

    . pattern formation, juxtacrine signaling, positive feedback, bifurcation analysis AMS subject. In particular, there is no quantitative agreement between the unstable modes derived from linear analysis a single cell adopts a different fate from that of its neighbors. This microscopic pattern formation

  3. Taking part in the process Authors: Dr Helen Clayton, Dr Faith Culshaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    of case studies 27 Glossary 28 Contents #12;2 Never have environmental issues been higher on the political With Environmental Change; Daniela Schmidt, University of Bristol; Bill Sutherland, University of Cambridge; Kathryn

  4. Hard or Soft Classification? Large-margin Unified Yufeng Liu, Hao Helen Zhang, and Yichao Wu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hao "Helen"

    , the LUM provides a unified algorithm to fit various classifiers and hence a convenient platform to compare, Car- olina Center for Genome Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (E

  5. The Poetics and Politics of Children's Play: Helen Levitt's Early Work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gand, Elizabeth Margaret

    2011-01-01

    toy pistol and a half-eaten Popsicle. Here we have Levittslost, namely the boy with popsicle and gun, the strolling

  6. The Poetics and Politics of Children's Play: Helen Levitt's Early Work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gand, Elizabeth Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Film on the Left: American Documentary Film from 1931-1942.on the Left: American Documentary Film from 1931 to 1942.on the Left: American Documentary Film from 1931 to 1942, (

  7. Spring grasshopper safari Prepared by Dan Johnson, for the Helen Schuler Coulee Centre,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Dan L.

    and May of 2004. A container and small net such as an aquarium net or butterfly net will help. Bring a hat a trident. The back is marked with two dark longitudinal stripes highlighted by thinner, light stripes

  8. Vegetation development on pumice at Mount St. Helens, USA Roger del Moral* and Chad Jones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Moral, Roger

    lepidus, Anaphalis margaritacea and Salix commutata has developed. The accumulation phase of pri- mary succession is nearly complete. The next phase, in which vertical structure develops as Salix and conifers

  9. Final Independent External Peer Review Report Mount St. Helens Sediment Management Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ) has been operating as run-of-river since 1998 and as a result is now less efficient at trapping reduction levels once the SRS became a run-of-river project, but also provided the option for assessing Congressionally authorized levels of flood risk reduction on the Cowlitz River in a cost

  10. Hydrothermal Circulation At Mount St Helens Determined By Self-Potential

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas: EnergyHunterdonHutto,FuelEnergyGabbs

  11. Geothermometry At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:Bore TechnologiesAssessmentOpenFishOpen Energy1976)

  12. Self Potential At Mt St Helens Area (Bedrosian, Et Al., 2007) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk,SageScheucoSedco Hills,Information HualalaiInformation St

  13. Isotopic Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8, 13RenewableIremInformation Goff, Et Al.,2002) |

  14. Isotopic Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 2000) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8, 13RenewableIremInformation Goff, Et Al.,2002)

  15. Richard Gerber, Lisa Gerhardt, Harvey Wasserman, Helen He, Scott French, Zhengji

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100Nationalquestionnaires 0serialIndustrialSenior8 , 2 013

  16. Water Sampling At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw, Poland: EnergyPageEnergyDellechaie, 1976) |

  17. Aeromagnetic Survey At Mt St Helens Area (Towle, 1983) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolar EnergyAerodyn Energiesysteme GmbHOpenAl., 1984) |

  18. Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdisto Electric Coop,Erosion FlumeEvent Planning Page Updated!Energy

  19. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures JumpCommercial Jump(Thompson, 1985) | Open1995) | Open Energy

  20. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures JumpCommercial Jump(Thompson, 1985) | Open1995) | Open

  1. Dr Helen Kerch | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H. Zinn,Christopher Fecko Chemical

  2. James M. Craw, Nicholas P. Cardo, Yun (Helen) He Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATIONIntroducing theActivation byIsJag

  3. Helen T. Edwards, 1986 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-DoseOptions forHeavy-Duty Waste HaulerHeikoHe, David

  4. Franklin Job Completion Analysis Yun (Helen) He, Hwa-Chun Wendy Lin, and

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)Forthcoming Upgrades to theGame Changers?FRANKLIN COUNTYJob

  5. Franklin XT4 to Hopper XE6 Katie Antypas and Helen He NERSC User Services Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)Forthcoming Upgrades to theGame

  6. To: Frank Disalvo and Helene Schember, Cornell Center for a Sustainable Future From: Cornell Global Labor Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    CCSF around integrating research and action agendas on the socio-economic and political issues related-level labor and environmental leaders for the NYS Climate Action Plan, as well as federal and international development (based on trade-driven growth) and meeting important social and environmental needs, like quality

  7. Predictability of a Mediterranean Tropical-Like Storm Downstream of the Extratropical Transition of Hurricane Helene (2006)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    northeastward by an upstream trough during ET and contributed to the building of a downstream ridge. A troughPredictability of a Mediterranean Tropical-Like Storm Downstream of the Extratropical Transition downstream. The present study focuses on the predictability of a Mediterranean tropical-like storm (Medicane

  8. A review of "Court Culture in Dresden: From Renaissance to Baroque." by Helen Watanabe-OKelly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marian Matrician

    2003-01-01

    . xv + 310 pp. + 56 illus. $39.95. Review by MARIAN MATRICIAN, UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS, LITTLE ROCK. REVIEWS 279 Reformation era warfare resulted in loss of the electoral dig- nity by one branch of the house of Wettin in Saxony and grant...

  9. Surface Level Fluctuation in Cedar Creek Bog, Minnesota Author(s): Murray F. Buell and Helen Foot Buell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    (L.) R. & S. Typha latifoliaL. occursscatteredhereandthere. Salix petiolarisSm., S. bebbiaizaOeder.,Rhaninusalnifolia L'Her., AndromedaglaucophyllaLink, Rhus vernix L. and several species of Salix. A dense growthof

  10. Proc. of the 6th Int. Conference on Digital Audio Effects (DAFX-03), London, UK, September 8-11, 2003 PERCEPTUALLY MOTIVATED PARAMETRIC REPRESENTATION FOR HARMONIC

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    Virtanen, Tuomas

    PURPOSES Marko Helen, Tuomas Virtanen Institute of Signal Processing, Tampere University of Technology P

  11. Enabling Security in Cloud Storage SLAs with CloudProof Raluca Ada Popa Jacob R. Lorch David Molnar Helen J. Wang Li Zhuang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enabling Security in Cloud Storage SLAs with CloudProof Raluca Ada Popa Jacob R. Lorch David Molnar,dmolnar,helenw,lizhuang}@microsoft.com ABSTRACT Several cloud storage systems exist today, but none of them provide security guaranteesProof, a secure storage system specifically de- signed for the cloud. In CloudProof, customers can not only detect

  12. Based on staff policy from KAP (with assistance from Helen Hymers (POD), February 2010. Approved IB SEVERE/ADVERSE WEATHER GUIDANCE FOR STUDENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    SEVERE/ADVERSE WEATHER GUIDANCE FOR STUDENTS Introduction There will be occasions where severe or adverse weather creates difficulties in attending the University on time or at all. There are so many potential situations resulting from severe weather, all of which will have a different impact, that detailed

  13. Vegetation Patterns 25 Years after the Eruption In September 2004, Mount St. Helens commenced a renewed phase of dome-building activity that has

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Moral, Roger

    , steam and ash have been released in several events, and a second dome is forming between the existing prone to repeated flooding compared to vegetation described in 1992 (del Moral, et al. 1995). We sampled

  14. Vol. 33, No.2, pp. 127-131. 1994 SALMON, KIT S. LAM. STEPHEN FELDER. HELEN YEOMAN, JOSEPH SCHLESSINGER. AXEL ULLRICH,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lam, Kit S.

    of the compound of interest is obtained by automated peptide g from the bead of origin. We have applied screening with able libraries is being used for growth inhibition of human tumor cell lines. Initial on two major : rational drug design and random screening of synthetic products. Both approaches have e

  15. Review Worksheet for exam 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Charlotte M

    2014-09-17

    31) Jean can wax her car in 2 hours time. When Helen helps her, they can wax the car in hour. How long would it take Helen alone to wax Jean's car?

  16. ITS-Davis Biennial Report 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan

    2009-01-01

    s Transportation Seminar (WTS), SacramentoHelene M. Overly2008 Julia Silvis, center WTS, SacramentoSharon D. Banks

  17. 2 Department of Geology and Geophysics University of Wisconsin-Madison Giftsto the department in 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Clark M.

    Hanners David J. Hart Helen L. Hart Kristen Hart Orville D. Hart James A. Hartman Patricia M. Hartshorne

  18. This is a chapter on the book "The SAGE Handbook of GIS and Society", edited by Timothy Nyerges, Helen Couclelis, and Robert McMaster. Thousand Oaks, CA, 2009.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    This is a chapter on the book "The SAGE Handbook of GIS and Society", edited by Timothy Nyerges in the Earth's environment and climate. The implications of these changes for sustainability call in an interdisciplinary way is what is called today Sustainability Science. This new undertaking has recently gained space

  19. Atomic layer deposition of Al-incorporated Zn(O,S) thin films with tunable electrical Helen Hejin Park, Ashwin Jayaraman, Rachel Heasley, Chuanxi Yang, Lauren Hartle, Ravin Mankad, Richard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    absorber materials, such as Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 (CIGS),1,2 Cu2ZnSn(Se,S)4 (CZTS),35 and SnS.69 Compared for SnS/Zn(O,S) heterojunc- tions in Fig. S1 (see Ref. 14). If the conduction band energy of the buffer deposition of Al-doped ZnO thin films J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 31, 01A109 (2013); 10.1116/1.4757764 Low

  20. T h e A l t e r n a t i v e E n e r g y T r u s t Business Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....................................................................................................................................................6 Geothermal Energy OF GEOTHERMAL HEATING ON UBC RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENTS With special thanks to Helen Goodland of GVRD, who helped .........................................................................................................................................3 Role of the Energy Trust

  1. Vlf Electromagnetic Investigations Of The Crater And Central...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the crater of Mount St. Helens has identified several electrically conductive structures that appear to be associated with thermal anomalies and ground water within the...

  2. Hopper scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and /project...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and project outage Hopper scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and project outage September 18, 2012 by Helen He (0 Comments) There...

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    scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and project outage September 18, 2012 by Helen He | 0 Comments There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance for Hopper next...

  4. The University of Chicago Department of Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The University of Chicago Department of Statistics Seminar Series HELENE MASSAM Department of Mathematics and Statistics York University, Toronto, Canada "Two New Families of Conjugate Priors

  5. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synthesis and Evaluation Zhou, Hui ; Connery, Kathryn E. ; Bartsch, Richard A. ; Moyer, Bruce A ; Haverlock, Tamara ; Delmau, Laetitia Helene January 2013 Prev Select...

  6. Mutual inspiration in the development of new technology for older people

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisma, R.; Dickinson, A.; Goodman, J.

    Eisma,R. Dickinson,A. Goodman,J. Mival,O. Syme,A. Tiwari,L. Include 2003 Helen Hamlyn Research Centre

  7. Characterization of the structurefunction relationship at the ligament-to-bone interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Helen H.

    , Clark T. Hung , and Helen H. Lu* *Biomaterials and Interface Tissue Engineering Laboratory, Department, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027; and College of Dental

  8. Long-term effects of Lupinus lepidus on vegetation dynamics at Mount R. del Moral1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Moral, Roger

    (Jumpponen et al. 1998; Jones and del Moral 2005), slack dunes (Berendse et al. 1998), coastal dunes (Olff et-1 Long-term effects of Lupinus lepidus on vegetation dynamics at Mount St. Helens R. del Moral1 surfaces at Mount St. Helen. We compared vegetation structure in 30 Lupinus colonies in three age classes

  9. Department of Computing Stepwise Refinement in Event-B||CSP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    in Event-B||CSP Part 1: Safety Steve Schneider, Helen Treharne and Heike Wehrheim March 12th 2011 #12;Stepwise Refinement in Event-B CSP Part 1: Safety Steve Schneider1 Helen Treharne1 Heike Wehrheim2 1, 2011 Contents 1 Introduction 3 2 CSP 3 2.1 Notation

  10. u.s. Wea.ther Bureau. Hurricane Helena. Sept. 2S-29. 1958.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QC 945.2 .H45 H8 1958 u.s. Wea.ther Bureau. Hurricane Helena. Sept. 2S-29. 1958. #12;National;PRELIMINARY REPORT, HURRICANE HELENE SEPTEMBER 23-29, 1958 Hurricane Helene, one of the most dangerous to hurricane strength by the next day. It continued to intensify and advanced on a slow and somewhat erratic

  11. RADIATION ONCOLOGY TARGET YOUR FUTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    be used to treat almost all cancers anywhere in the body and over half of new cancer patients require. These professions include: Radiation oncologist - a medical doctor who completes training to specialise

  12. Faculty of Arts and Sciences 2002-2003 Student Prize Recipients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    Haas Finley, a prize of $1,000 Joseph L. Barrett Award - to Tabatha L. George - to Caitlin A. Harrington - to Emily R. Van Dyke Helen Choate Bell Prize - to Zoe Trodd, a prize of $2,500 James Gordon

  13. LIFE SCIENCES DIVISION E-NEWSLETTER May 31, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    9 #12; 2 DOE scientific focus area notes Low Dose Radiation Research accomplishments that provide fundamental research in the low dose region. Mary Helen BarcellosHoff, 5 Focus Area Notes o Low Dose Program Represented 2 o GTLGenomics Novel

  14. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wed, June 1 May 26, 2011 by Helen He | 0 Comments There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance followed by a dedicated system testing for Hopper next Wednesday,...

  15. max walltime for "low" queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper May 31, 2012 by Helen He (0 Comments) We have increased the...

  16. Topical Lunch Minutes 1. Dave Dieterich: the mission of CCSF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    : Smart grid makes everything possible 15. Helene Schember and Mark Lawrence: Keep the group engaged mites 2. More theories 13. Tom Whitlow: a. Urban LTER i. Transactional cost of getting something

  17. Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  18. Belonging Matters: Identity, Health and Sustainable Development June 2nd, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belonging Matters: Identity, Health and Sustainable Development June 2nd, 2014 To coincide in sustainable development. CIFAR Senior Fellow Alexander Haslam (Queensland University) and CIFAR Advisor John plural and developing societies. Following their presentations, Helen Branswell, medical reporter

  19. Twain's Rhetoric of Irony in 'the War-Prayer'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lock, Helen

    2009-01-01

    1917. Twain, Mark. The War-Prayer. Europe and Elsewhere.the Philippine-American War. Fili- pinas Magazine (Sept.s Rhetoric of Irony in The War-Prayer Helen LOCK The point

  20. ()$./$''"#0&-1+&,$%"!)(#"$& 2/$(-&0(".&-1()301&("24&

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh American Council on Renewable Energy (ACORE) Tom Weirich Jan Siler National Electrical (Caltech, Pasadena) Peter Meiesen, Global Energy Network Institute Helen Tocco, Think Energy, Inc. Michael Energy Greg Mungas, Firestar Technologies, LLC Kirk Neuner, Greenwich Blackhawk Trung Soai, Solar

  1. : Divine Rape on the Tragic Stage Rachel Herzog, Barnard College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salzman, Daniel

    : Divine Rape on the Tragic Stage Rachel Herzog, Barnard College Advisor: Professor Helene Foley that its telling may have on an individual and communal level. Creusa's rape by the god Apollo is an event

  2. Proceedings of the NAACL HLT 2010 Second Louhi Workshop on Text and Data Mining of Health Documents, pages 5360, Los Angeles, California, June 2010. c 2010 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    perspectives. Our data includes textual nursing documentation of adult patients with a protracted inpatient Characteristics and Analysis of Finnish and Swedish Clinical Intensive Care Nursing Narratives Helen Allvinf , Maria Skeppstedtf , Hanna Suominene , Sumithra Velupillaif a Department of Nursing Science, University

  3. BRIEF REPORT Posterror slowing predicts rule-based

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    Maddox, W. Todd

    learning Helen Tam & W. Todd Maddox & Cynthia L. Huang-Pollock Published online: 27 April 2013/dangerous," "same/different," and "friend/foe"--has been perpetuated throughout evolutionary history (Smith, Chapman

  4. Poly 3D fault modeling scripts/data for permeability potential of Washington State geothermal prospects

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Michael Swyer

    2015-02-05

    Matlab scripts/functions and data used to build Poly3D models and create permeability potential GIS layers for 1) Mount St Helen's, 2) Wind River Valley, and 3) Mount Baker geothermal prospect areas located in Washington state.

  5. BRAUN-BLANQUETIA, vol. 46, 2010 217 LESSONS FOR RESTORATION OF PROTECTED LANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Moral, Roger

    (GRISHIN et al., 1996) and is rarely visi- ted. Mount St. Helens, in a cool tempe- rate coniferous zone is the most studied volcano on the planet (DEL MORAL etal., 2005). The biota of many volcanoes is protected

  6. Folk narratives, archaeology, and descendant communities: a case study of the Albert J. Phillips Memorial Cemetery (41gv125), Galveston County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Leah Carson

    1998-01-01

    and colleagues at Texas ASSAM University. Many thanks to Helen Danzeiser Dockall, Barry Baker, John Dockall, Julia Sanchez, Brian Shaffer, Joan Baker, Gavin Morgan, and Charlie McCormick for the insightful comments, heated debates, and fun shared during my...

  7. Soil suitability index identifies potential areas for groundwater banking on agricultural lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Saal, Helen Dahlke, David Doll, Rachel Elkins, Allan Fulton,basins for groundwater recharge. David Doll http://Josh Viers, UC Merced David Doll estimate assumes 1 foot per

  8. Katie Antypas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A paper presented in the Cray User Group meeting, Apri 29-May-3, 2012, Stuttgart, Germany., May 1, 2012, Yun (Helen) He and Katie Antypas, "Running Large Jobs on a Cray XE6...

  9. Larry Jacobs: Jacobs Farm/Del Cabo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reti, Irene H.

    2010-01-01

    graduation, he moved to Vermont to apprentice with Helen andthe United States. In Vermont, Jacobs met his future wife,farmhouse on 65 acres in Vermont. For over 20 years, they

  10. Impact of parental multiple sclerosis on early childhood development: A retrospective cohort study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    journalsPermissions.nav Neda Razaz, Helen Tremlett, W.Canada. rmarrie@hsc.mb.ca Neda Razaz School of Populationinferred. Conflict of interest Neda Razaz is funded by the

  11. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OS upgrade and new SW set to default next Wed, Feb 27 February 21, 2013 by Helen He | 0 Comments 1) There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance for Hopper next...

  12. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hopper scheduled maintenance and SW new default versions on Wednesday, Jan 18 January 11, 2012 by Helen He | 0 Comments 1) There will be a scheduled hardware and software...

  13. Hopper OS upgrade and new SW set to default next Wed, Feb 27

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OS upgrade and new SW set to default next Wed, Feb 27 Hopper OS upgrade and new SW set to default next Wed, Feb 27 February 21, 2013 by Helen He (0 Comments) 1) There will be a...

  14. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Announcements Hopper Featured Announcements Hopper OS upgrade and new SW set to default next Wed, Feb 27 February 21, 2013 by Helen He | 0 Comments 1) There will be a scheduled...

  15. Field Stations Compliance CommitteesAdministrative Units Research Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    California Institute for Energy and the Environment California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences Center of Paleontology UC Botanical Garden University & Jepson Herbaria Energy Biosciences Institute (EBI) Helen Wills Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies Institute of Transportation Studies Institute

  16. CENTRIFUGAL FORCES: READING RUSSIA'S REGIONAL IDENTITIES AND INITIATIVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    CENTRIFUGAL FORCES: READING RUSSIA'S REGIONAL IDENTITIES AND INITIATIVES Thursday, March 26 and Natural Heritage, Moscow, Russia), " : , " ("The Centrifugality of the Centripetal: Space, Identity and Industry as Centrifugal Forces in Tsarist Transcaucasia" Helen Hundley (History, Wichita State U

  17. Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 days of the week to 5.131. Contributing to the early week rise were reports that Hurricane Gordon and Tropical Storm Helene posed possible threats to production areas in the...

  18. Current and Future Trends in Imaging Informatics for Oncology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Daniel L.

    Current and Future Trends in Imaging Informatics for Oncology Mia A. Levy, MD, PhD* and Daniel L, and future trends in imaging informatics for oncology care including clinical and clini- cal research systems con- straints of the film library. Oncologists are now able to view the imaging studies

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REPORT TO THE U.S. CONGRESS AND THE SECRETARY OF ENERGY U.S. NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD January to December 1996 #12;#12;#12;Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Dr. John E. Cantlon, Chairman Helen W. Einersen Executive Assistant Debra K. Hairston Management Assistant Linda L. Hiatt Management

  20. Satellite measurements of the clear-sky greenhouse effect from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LETTERS Satellite measurements of the clear-sky greenhouse effect from tropospheric ozone HELEN M of longer-lived greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide. Here, we analyse spectrally resolved measurements of 0.480.14 W m-2 between 45 S and 45 N. This estimate of the clear-sky greenhouse effect from

  1. Executive Dysfunction and Its Relation to Language Ability in Verbal School-Age Children With Autism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlini, David

    With Autism Robert M. Joseph, Lauren M. McGrath, and Helen Tager-Flusberg Department of Anatomy and its relation to language ability in verbal school- age children with autism. Participants were 37 children with autism and 31 nonautistic comparison participants who were matched on age and on verbal

  2. PROTOTYPICAL CATEGORY LEARNING IN AUTISM 1 Prototypical Category Learning in High-Functioning Autism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossberg, Stephen

    PROTOTYPICAL CATEGORY LEARNING IN AUTISM 1 Prototypical Category Learning in High-Functioning Autism Tony Vladusich1,5,6* , Femi Lafe2,6 , Dae-Shik Kim4 , Helen Tager-Flusberg2,3,6 and Stephen 781 736 4870, Fax: +1 781 736 2398, email: thevlad@brandeis.edu Autism Research, in press

  3. PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY THE FRIENDS OF THE BANCROFT LIBRARY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94720

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    the generosity ofMrs. Gerald Kennedy, the granddaughter of Charles Weber, who presented the family pa- pers gratis to the Friends of The Bancroft Library. Now Mrs. Kennedy's four daughters, Helen Kennedy Cahill, Geraldine Kennedy Cole, Katherine Kennedy Cookson, and Moira Kennedy Holden, have presented in their mother

  4. Faculty of Arts and Sciences 2012-2013 Student Prize Recipients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    - to Caitlin Andrews, class of 2016 - to Wanjiku Mungai, class of 2014 The Matthew Abramson Prize for Best of 2016, a prize of $500 for her project entitled "Ce que la peur enseigne" Lillian Bell Prize in History: Soviet Influence in the Creation of the Nuremberg Trial and the German Response" Helen Choate Bell Prize

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLE -H2AX foci are increased in lymphocytes in vivo in young

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    very low ionizing radiation exposure doses from CT exams can induce -H2AX formation in vivo in young children. Objective To test whether very low ionizing radiation doses from CT exams can induce lymphocytic low-dose X-irradiation: a pilot study Brunhild M. Halm & Adrian A. Franke & Jennifer F. Lai & Helen C

  6. 10.1101/gr.7.10.974Access the most recent version at doi: 1997 7: 974-985Genome Res.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baillie, David

    W. Franz, Nigel J. O'Neil, Greg P. Vatcher, Helen I. Caenorhabditis elegansLibrary of Interpreting a Cosmid Transgenic Library of Caenorhabditis elegans Diana L. Janke,1,3 Jacqueline E. Schein,1 The^ Ha,1 Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, V6T 1Z3 We have generated a library of transgenic

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arleo, Angelo

    ANAIS ABRO WANIS ABS BLANDINE ABUZARLI MURAD ACHACHE AMANI ACHARD LOUIS ACHILLEOS N DETE MARIE HELENE HANANE ALLART PIERRE-ANTOINE ALLART GUILLAUME, NORBERT, LOUIS ALLIGNET TOM ALLOUCHE NATHAN ALMOSAWY MEHDI ALEXANDRE ARLANDON JEROME ARMET CYNTHIA ARNAUD AYMERIC ARNAUT PIERRE ARNOULD PRISCILLA ARNOUX CLAIRE

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    avoir su faire coincider ses vies de thesarde et de maman. Un grand merci `a Helene Davaux et Pierre, Stephane Gaussent, Pierre, Sebastien, Philippe Monnier, de m'avoir supporte pendant ces annees et pour son aide orthographique ; merci `a Jeanie Achard et Marion Lebris pour ce club des cinq si

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hydrothermal vent fluids on the geochemistry of Yellowstone, in Morgan, L.A., ed., Integrated geoscience studies in the greater Yellowstone area--Volcanic, tectonic, and hydrothermal processes in the Yellowstone St. Helens determined by self-potential measurements: Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research

  10. Smart-Phone Attacks and Defenses Chuanxiong Guo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Bing

    Smart-Phone Attacks and Defenses Chuanxiong Guo xguo@ieee.org Microsoft Research Helen J. Wang smart-phones), and our environment (e.g., through the use of sensors, actuators, and RFIDs). While is becoming a reality: Smart-phones, interoperable between the telecom networks and the Inter- net

  11. Two Perspectives on Data Quality Geographic Knowledge Production Through GIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Two Perspectives on Data Quality Geographic Knowledge Production Through GIS: Towards a Model Report 92-12 December 1992 #12;Geographic Knowledge Production Through GIS: Towards a Model for Quality through GIS: Towards a model for quality monitoring. HELEN COUCLELIS Department of Geography University

  12. 1 Designing Constraint Logic Programming Languages using Computational Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vittek, Marian

    1 Designing Constraint Logic Programming Languages using Computational Systems Claude Kirchner, H'el`ene Kirchner and Marian Vittek 1.1 Abstract This work presents computational systems, a framework as computational systems. We thus get a framework in which rewriting techniques can be used to reason about

  13. Some Aspects of Optimality in Natural Language Interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blutner, Reinhard

    optimality theory (OT) to semantics. These authors argue that there is a fundamental difference between Berlin Abstract In a series of papers, Petra Hendriks, Helen de Hoop and Henritte de Swart have applied`s (1981) idea of balancing between informativeness and efficiency in natural language processing

  14. Arthur D. Harrison, the doyen of African limnol-ogy and studies of the Afrotropical Chironomidae,

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    Cranston, Peter S.

    Arthur D. Harrison, the doyen of African limnol- ogy and studies of the Afrotropical Chironomidae, post-drought, including documenting Fish Hoek. Photo P. Cranston Arthur D. Harrison. Photo Helen James, died in Canada over 3 years ago with little or no posthumous scientific recognition. This piece

  15. REVIEW Open Access Assessing environmental impacts of offshore wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aberdeen, University of

    REVIEW Open Access Assessing environmental impacts of offshore wind farms: lessons learned and recommendations for the future Helen Bailey1* , Kate L Brookes2 and Paul M Thompson3 Abstract Offshore wind power literature and our experience with assessing impacts of offshore wind developments on marine mammals

  16. Oil and Gas CDT Bots in Rocks: Intelligent Rock Deformation for Fault Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Heriot-Watt University, Institute of Petroleum Engineering Supervisory Team Dr Helen Lewis, Heriot://www.pet.hw.ac.uk/staff-directory/jimsomerville.htm Key Words Nano/Micro sensors; faults; fault zones; geomechanics; rock mechanics; rock deformation-deformed equivalent, a different lab-deformed example and a geomechanical simulation of a fault zone showing permanent

  17. Communications Aqueous droplets of 250 pL formed in a microfluidic channel in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    Angewandte Chemie Communications Aqueous droplets of 250 pL formed in a microfluidic channel-7851/03/4207-0767 $ 20.00+.50/0 #12;High-Throughput Measurements A Microfluidic System for Controlling Reaction Networks in Time** Helen Song, Joshua D. Tice, and Rustem F. Ismagilov* We present here a microfluidic system

  18. Final Report Page 1 of 24 http://www.ncgia.ucsb.edu/conf/BALTIMORE/report.html 6/27/98

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Final Report Page 1 of 24 http://www.ncgia.ucsb.edu/conf/BALTIMORE/report.html 6/27/98 National September 9-11, 1996 Lord Baltimore Hotel, Baltimore, Maryland Research Conference Report Compiled by Helen, Portland State University Susan Hanson, Clark University Kingsley Haynes, George Mason University http://www.ncgia.ucsb.edu/conf/BALTIMORE

  19. CURRICULUM VITAE Lawrence Michael Hanks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanks, Lawrence M.

    . California, Davis MS (1982) Dept. of Biology, Univ. Nevada, Reno. RW Rust, advisor. Thesis title: Foraging Richard Atkinson's Report to the Board of Regents, Univ. California (1996) Elected to full membership, Benefits from the USDA-Land Grand Partnership Report (IV 2001) Awarded designation as Helen Corley Petit

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FIRST REPORT TO THE U.S. CONGRESS AND THE U.S. SECRETARY OF ENERGY FROM THE NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL Joanne E. Donnelly Helen W. Einersen Debra K. Hairston Report Production Services Nancy E. Derr William D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Report Format

  1. Extending the Scope of the Student Model Dept. of Artificial Intelligence

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    Bull, Susan

    Extending the Scope of the Student Model Susan Bull Dept. of Artificial Intelligence University University Lancaster LA1 4YR Helen Pain Dept. of Artificial Intelligence University of Edinburgh 80 South material. As an example of this approach we describe the student model of an intelligent computer assisted

  2. Approved Module Information for CS2410, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Internet Applications and Techniques Module Code: CS2410

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neirotti, Juan Pablo

    Approved Module Information for CS2410, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Internet Applications and Techniques Module Code: CS2410 School: Engineering and Applied Science Module Type: Standard Module New Module? No Module Credits: 10 Module Management Information Module Leader Name Hongxia (Helen) Wang Email

  3. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Streamlined LCA of Paper Towel End of Life Options for UBC SEEDS Recycling vs.

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    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Streamlined LCA of Paper LCA of Paper Towel End of Life Options for UBC SEEDS Recycling vs. Composting by Helen Brennek, Landon the environmental footprint of paper towels used in the Student Union Building (SUB). This streamlined LCA provides

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    Observatory & Planetarium Mason Lab 17 Helen Hadley Hall Leet Oliver 24 Watson Hall Malone Engineering Center Chemistry Research Building Sage Hall Sterling Chemistry Lab Wright Lab Wright Lab West Pierson-Sage Garage Sterling Divinity Quadrangle Marquand Chapel Greeley Memorial Lab Marsh Hall Bellamy Marsh Botanical Garden

  5. Connections WINTER 2014/15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    Mending a Broken Heart Team Operates on Baby Boy's CHD Using 3D Printing Technology Author Helen Keller diagnosis--at NewYork-Presbyterian FROM LEFT: DRS. BACHA, FRAINT, AND CHELLIAH USED A 3D PRINTED HEART of technology on care. Our cover story is about how heart surgeons are using 3D printing to help them plan

  6. Testate amoebae as indicators of hydroseral change: An 8500 year record from Mer Bleue Bog, eastern Ontario, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Timothy

    Ontario, Canada Suzanne M. Elliotta,*, Helen M. Roea , R. Timothy Pattersonb a School of Geography-Carleton Geoscience Centre and Department of Earth Sciences, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6, Canada a r, Ontario, Canada, a large ombrotrophic peatland, which evolved from a brackish-water embayment in the early

  7. Using Web-Based Technology in Laboratory

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    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Using Web-Based Technology in Laboratory Instruction to Reduce Costs RITA M. POWELL,1 HELEN curriculum while reducing their costs through the application of web-based teaching tools. The project.interscience. wiley.com.); DOI 10.1002/cae.10029 Keywords: engineering education; laboratory materials; World Wide Web

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    Wayner Souza, Brazil/FIOCRUZ Dr. Jose Escamilla, OPSOMS Mr. John Haynes, United States (NASA) Dr. Samir (Speakers assemble at 8:30 AM) Welcome from Brazil).......................Ms. Helen Wood, United States, USGEO Co-Chair GEOSS in the Americas Regional Cooperation in Space (10

  9. 07/06/2006 08:45 PMHow to Train a Woman -New York Times Page 1 of 3http://select.nytimes.com/2006/07/05/opinion/05dowd.html?th&emc=th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menzel, Suzanne

    ? Helen Fisher, a Rutgers anthropologist and the author of "Why We Love: The Nature and Chemistry TRAVEL JOBS REAL ESTATE AUTOS EDITORIALS COLUMNISTS CONTRIBUTORS LETTERS N.Y./REGION OPINIONS READERS and Chemistry of Romantic Love," speculated that it might be easier for men to train women because "women

  10. Computational Statistics & Data Analysis 51 (2007) 63806394 www.elsevier.com/locate/csda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yufeng

    2007-01-01

    ; accepted 3 February 2007 Available online 20 February 2007 Abstract The standard support vector machine vector machines with adaptive Lq penalty Yufeng Liua, , Hao Helen Zhangb , Cheolwoo Parkc , Jeongyoun Ahnc aDepartment of Statistics and Operations Research, Carolina Center for Genome Sciences, University

  11. Self-report of cognitive impairment and Mini-Mental State Exam performance in PRKN, LRRK2, and GBA carriers with early onset

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    carriers with early onset Parkinson's disease Roy N. Alcalay1, Helen Mejia-Santana1, Ming X. Tang1,2, Brian/Movement Disorder Section, Chicago, IL, USA 6Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center, Pennsylvania 17Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center of NeuroHealth, Warwick, RI, USA 18Department

  12. An Authorization Framework for a Grid Based Component Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Security Infrastructure (GSI) [1] is widely accepted as the standard for authentication on the Grid for security. Desired characteristics of Grid security include: The ability to verify the identityAn Authorization Framework for a Grid Based Component Architecture Lavanya Ramakrishnan1 , Helen

  13. Digital Disaster, Cyber Security, and the Copenhagen School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nissenbaum, Helen

    Digital Disaster, Cyber Security, and the Copenhagen School Lene Hansen University of Copenhagen and Helen Nissenbaum New York University This article is devoted to an analysis of cyber security, a concept is devoted to an analysis of ``cyber security,'' a concept that arrived on the post-Cold War agenda

  14. Privacy and Contextual Integrity: Framework and Applications Adam Barth Anupam Datta John C. Mitchell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, John C.

    Privacy and Contextual Integrity: Framework and Applications Adam Barth Anupam Datta John C helen.nissenbaum@nyu.edu Abstract Contextual integrity is a conceptual framework for un- derstanding for expressing and reasoning about norms of transmission of personal information. In comparison with access

  15. Luciana Puntillo Diamante Advisor: Dr. Behrooz Shirazi RA: Nina Peterson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Parthasarathy for her help. REFERENCES 1. United States Geological Survey web page http of EECS, Washington State University, Pullman This work was supported by the National Science Foundation of deaths (more than 29,000)[2]. An example of that is Mt. Saint Helens, WA; and its eruption on May1980

  16. Massive dissociation of gas hydrate during a Jurassic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hesselbo, Stephen P.

    the upper oceanic, biospheric and atmospheric carbon reservoirs, and that this occurred despite the enhanced hydrate during a Jurassic oceanic anoxic event Stephen P. Hesselbo*, Darren R. Gro¨cke*, Hugh C. Jenkyns*, Christian J. Bjerrum, Paul Farrimond, Helen S. Morgans Bell* & Owen R. Green* * Department of Earth Sciences

  17. IT Policy, Procedures and Guidance University College, Oxford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    IT Policy, Procedures and Guidance University College, Oxford Patrick Baird IT and Web Fellow Andy Hamilton IT Manager Helene Augar College Registrar #12;Summary This policy and guidance document. Transgressions (Junior Members) 14 14. Flexible Hours and Working at Home (Staff) 15 15. Revisions to this Policy

  18. AIAA 2003-0771 CROSSFLOW INSTABILITIES THEORY & TECHNOLOGY

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    #12;AIAA 2003-0771 CROSSFLOW INSTABILITIES THEORY & TECHNOLOGY William S. Saric* and Helen L the years, the crossflow instability has been the primary challenge for Laminar Flow Control (LFC). Favorable pressure gradients used to stabilize streamwise instabilities destabilize crossflow. For years

  19. Addressing Invitations When hand-addressing

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    Almor, Amit

    the second line for the city and the third for the state and zip code. Do not use abbreviations for Street sending to an elected official (i.e. Legislators, Judges, Board of Trustees, etc.): The Honorable William;If both are elected officials: The Honorable Helen C. Harvey and The Honorable W. Brantley Harvey

  20. Faculty of Engineering List of Potential Hosting Institutions for Professor Charles K. Kao Summer Research Exchange Scholarship Scheme 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    Tissue Engineering Laboratory, Columbia University 1. Orthopaedic and Dental Biomaterials 2. Interface University, U. S. A. Professor Helen H. Lu Professor of Biomedical Engineering Biomaterials and Interface tissue engineering and mechanisms of soft tissue to bone integration 3. Mechanism of cell-biomaterial

  1. Technical NoteYoung Investigator's Award, 8th World Biomaterials Congress, Amsterdam RAI, The Netherlands,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Helen H.

    Technical NoteYoung Investigator's Award, 8th World Biomaterials Congress, Amsterdam RAI Stephen B. Doty,3 X. Edward Guo,4 Scott A. Rodeo,2 Helen H. Lu1,5 1 Biomaterials and Interface Tissue of Dental Medicine, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032 Received 18 January 2008; accepted 12

  2. Anisotropic Motion and Molecular Dynamics of Cholesterol, Lanosterol, and Ergosterol in Lecithin Bilayers Studied by Quasi-elastic Neutron Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael F.

    Bilayers Studied by Quasi-elastic Neutron Scattering Emil Endress, Helmut Heller, Hele`ne CasaltaVised Manuscript ReceiVed June 27, 2002 ABSTRACT: Quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) was employed to study of motion within the bilayer on the molecular dynamics time scale. In a recent quasi-elastic neutron

  3. This is an author-deposited version published in: http://oatao.univ-toulouse.fr/ Eprints ID: 10125

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    , Hlne and Cantarel, Arthur and Karama, Moussa Application of non destructive testing to the detection-Laetitia Pastor2 , Hlne Welemane1 , Arthur Cantarel2 andMoussa Karama1 1 PRES Universit de Toulouse, INP, ENIT.perrin@iut-tarbes.fr, marie-laetitia.pastor@iut-tarbes.fr, helene.welemane@enit.fr, arthur.cantarel@iut-tarbes.fr, moussa

  4. To link to this article : http://www.revtn.ro/no4-2013.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    and Perrin, Marianne and Pastor, Marie-Laetitia and Welemane, Hlne and Cantarel, Arthur and Karama, Moussa 2 , Pastor Marie-Laetitia 2 , Welemane Hlne 1 , Cantarel Arthur 2 and Karama Moussa 1 1 PRES.munozcuartas@enit.fr, marianne.perrin@iut-tarbes.fr, marie-laetitia.pastor@iut-tarbes.fr, helene.welemane@enit.fr, arthur.cantarel

  5. To link to this article : http://www.revtn.ro/no4-2013.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    and Perrin, Marianne and Pastor, Marie-Laetitia and Welemane, Hlne and Cantarel, Arthur and Karama, Moussa-Laetitia 2 , Welemane Hlne 1 , Cantarel Arthur 2 and Karama Moussa 1 1 PRES Universit de Toulouse, INP.perrin@iut-tarbes.fr, marie-laetitia.pastor@iut-tarbes.fr, helene.welemane@enit.fr, arthur.cantarel@iut-tarbes.fr, moussa

  6. UCSF Foundation Annual Report on Private Support 2007-2008 Working together.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Gail

    Matthes Susan McLaughlin Steven L. Merrill Harold M. Messmer Jr. Catherine H. Podell Carmen Policy T. Gary at every turn. The Helen Diller Family Cancer Research Building is nearly finished, ground has been broken for Regenerative Medicine. This unique facility will spur collaboration and support the long-term goal

  7. MINUTES OF MEETING 2004-2005 #2 -SEPTEMBER 10TH, 2004 Members in attendance: Mr. S. Elkas (Chair), Mr. A. Ansell, Dr. D. Bardati, Mr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MINUTES OF MEETING 2004-2005 #2 - SEPTEMBER 10TH, 2004 Members in attendance: Mr. S. Elkas (Chair), Mr. A. Ansell, Dr. D. Bardati, Mr. M. McLaughlin, Mr. C. Quinn, Mr. T. Rochester, Mr. K. Skelton. Guests: Ms Helene Lapierre, Ms Jenny Kang, Ms Molly MacDonald, Dr. Don Hilton, Mr. Pierre Marcoux, Mr

  8. Inside this issue: DEC Award 1

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    Alexandrova, Ivana

    Recovery Agency's Municipal Food Waste Composting Project (Onondaga County) for an innovative compostingInside this issue: DEC Award 1 Dr. Helen Caldicott Visits UAlbany 3 Focus on Local Foods: Healthy Energy Award (con't from page 1) While many choose to submit programs related to recycling and waste

  9. A CSP Approach to Control in Event-B Steve Schneider1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    A CSP Approach to Control in Event-B Steve Schneider1 , Helen Treharne1 , and Heike Wehrheim2 1 CSP to provide ex- plicit control flow for an Event-B model and alternatively to provide a way as the basis of a running example to illustrate the framework. Keywords: Event-B, CSP, control flow

  10. CSP Theorems for Communicating B Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    CSP Theorems for Communicating B Machines Steve Schneider and Helen Treharne Technical Report CSD #12;#12;Introduction 1 Abstract. Recent work on combining CSP and B has provided ways of describing sys- tems comprised of components described in both B (to express requirements on state) and CSP (to

  11. Automatic generation of CSP || B skeletons from xUML models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    Automatic generation of CSP || B skeletons from xUML models Edward Turner, Helen Treharne, Steve. CSP B is a formal approach to specification that combines CSP and B. In this paper we present our tool that automatically trans- lates a subset of executable UML (xUML) models into CSP B, for the purpose of verification

  12. Department of Computing CSP||B modelling for railway verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    University of Surrey Department of Computing Computing Sciences Report CS-12-03 CSP||B modelling Schneider Helen Treharne March 30th 2012 #12;CSP||B modelling for railway verification: the double junction work in verifying railway systems through CSP k B modelling and analysis. In particular we consider

  13. Assessing underwater noise levels during pile-driving at an offshore windfarm and its potential effects on marine mammals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aberdeen, University of

    impacts Renewable energy a b s t r a c t Marine renewable developments have raised concerns over impacts; Gordon et al., 2003). Over the last decade there has been a growing interest in marine renewable energy effects on marine mammals Helen Bailey a,*, Bridget Senior a , Dave Simmons b , Jan Rusin b , Gordon

  14. Simulating Customer Experience and Word-Of-Mouth in Retail -A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    @cs.nott.ac.uk Helen Celia Chris W. Clegg University of Leeds, Centre for Organisational Strategy, Learning & Change (LUBS) Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK Agents offer a new and exciting way of understanding the world of work and this is something of a `black box'...' [3]. A recent literature review of management practices and organizational

  15. 82 NATURE PHYSICS | VOL 10 | FEBRUARY 2014 | www.nature.com/naturephysics Timekeepers of the future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    of the future Helen Margolis The latest generation of optical atomic clocks has reached such a degree for a future redefinition of the second, is the accuracy of the clock, or the uncertainty with which below 1 part in 1017 (refs 6,7). This anomalous situation raises the prospect of a future redefinition

  16. MODULATEDCITIES NETWORKEDSPACES,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nissenbaum, Helen

    ;Situated Technologies Pamphlets 9: Modulated Cities: Networked Spaces, Reconstituted Subjects Helen.archleague.org info@archleague.org Pamphlets Coordinator: Gregory Wessner Special Projects Director, The Architectural Technologies Pamphlet Series extends a discourse initiated in the summer of 2006 by a three

  17. Quantifying the Digital Traces of Hurricane Sandy on Flickr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    Quantifying the Digital Traces of Hurricane Sandy on Flickr Tobias Preis1 *, Helen Susannah Moat1 social science. To investigate user attention to the Hurricane Sandy disaster in 2012, we analyze data to Hurricane Sandy bears a striking correlation to the atmospheric pressure in the US state New Jersey during

  18. Re-organisation of oesophago-gastric cancer care in England: progress and remaining challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palser, Tom R; Cromwell, David A; Hardwick, Richard H; Riley, Stuart A; Greenaway, Kimberley; Allum, William; van der Meulen, Jan HP

    2009-11-12

    for Cancer Services London: Her Maj- esty's Stationary Office; 2004. 11. The Royal College of Radiologists: Good Practice Guide for Clinical Oncologists 2nd edition. London: The Royal College of Radiologists; 2003. 12. National Cancer Action Team: National... Research 2009, 9:204 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6963/9/204 their surgical inpatients and 41 (33%) did not perform any formal nutritional assessment before starting treat- ment. Discussion Since the publication of the Improving Outcomes Guid- ance [5...

  19. Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: A Survey in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Naoki; Shikama, Naoto; Wada, Hitoshi; Harada, Hideyuki; Nozaki, Miwako; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Tago, Masao; Oguchi, Masahiko; Uchida, Nobue

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the current patterns of practice in Japan and to investigate factors that may make clinicians reluctant to use single-fraction radiotherapy (SF-RT). Methods and Materials: Members of the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) completed an Internet-based survey and described the radiotherapy dose fractionation they would recommend for four hypothetical cases describing patients with painful bone metastasis (BM). Case 1 described a patient with an uncomplicated painful BM in a non-weight-bearing site from non-small-cell lung cancer. Case 2 investigated whether management for a case of uncomplicated spinal BM would be different from that in Case 1. Case 3 was identical with Case 2 except for the presence of neuropathic pain. Case 4 investigated the prescription for an uncomplicated painful BM secondary to oligometastatic breast cancer. Radiation oncologists who recommended multifraction radiotherapy (MF-RT) for Case 2 were asked to explain why they considered MF-RT superior to SF-RT. Results: A total of 52 radiation oncologists from 50 institutions (36% of JROSG institutions) responded. In all four cases, the most commonly prescribed regimen was 30 Gy in 10 fractions. SF-RT was recommended by 13% of respondents for Case 1, 6% for Case 2, 0% for Case 3, and 2% for Case 4. For Case 4, 29% of respondents prescribed a high-dose MF-RT regimen (e.g., 50 Gy in 25 fractions). The following factors were most often cited as reasons for preferring MF-RT: 'time until first increase in pain' (85%), 'incidence of spinal cord compression' (50%), and 'incidence of pathologic fractures' (29%). Conclusions: Japanese radiation oncologists prefer a schedule of 30 Gy in 10 fractions and are less likely to recommend SF-RT. Most Japanese radiation oncologists regard MF-RT as superior to SF-RT, based primarily on the time until first increase in pain.

  20. Patient-Physician Communication About Complementary and Alternative Medicine in a Radiation Oncology Setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ge Jin; Fishman, Jessica; Annenberg School for Communication at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ; Vapiwala, Neha; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ; Li, Susan Q.; Desai, Krupali; Xie, Sharon X.; Mao, Jun J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the extensive use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among cancer patients, patient-physician communication regarding CAM therapies remains limited. This study quantified the extent of patient-physician communication about CAM and identified factors associated with its discussion in radiation therapy (RT) settings. Methods and Materials: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 305 RT patients at an urban academic cancer center. Patients with different cancer types were recruited in their last week of RT. Participants self-reported their demographic characteristics, health status, CAM use, patient-physician communication regarding CAM, and rationale for/against discussing CAM therapies with physicians. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify relationships between demographic/clinical variables and patients' discussion of CAM with radiation oncologists. Results: Among the 305 participants, 133 (43.6%) reported using CAM, and only 37 (12.1%) reported discussing CAM therapies with their radiation oncologists. In multivariate analyses, female patients (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21-0.98) and patients with full-time employment (AOR 0.32, 95% CI 0.12-0.81) were less likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists. CAM users (AOR 4.28, 95% CI 1.93-9.53) were more likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists than were non-CAM users. Conclusions: Despite the common use of CAM among oncology patients, discussions regarding these treatments occur rarely in the RT setting, particularly among female and full-time employed patients. Clinicians and patients should incorporate discussions of CAM to guide its appropriate use and to maximize possible benefit while minimizing potential harm.

  1. 2009 Canadian Radiation Oncology Resident Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debenham, Brock, E-mail: debenham@ualberta.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Banerjee, Robyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Fairchild, Alysa; Dundas, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Trotter, Theresa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Yee, Don [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Statistics from the Canadian post-MD education registry show that numbers of Canadian radiation oncology (RO) trainees have risen from 62 in 1999 to approximately 150 per year between 2003 and 2009, contributing to the current perceived downturn in employment opportunities for radiation oncologists in Canada. When last surveyed in 2003, Canadian RO residents identified job availability as their main concern. Our objective was to survey current Canadian RO residents on their training and career plans. Methods and Materials: Trainees from the 13 Canadian residency programs using the national matching service were sought. Potential respondents were identified through individual program directors or chief resident and were e-mailed a secure link to an online survey. Descriptive statistics were used to report responses. Results: The eligible response rate was 53% (83/156). Similar to the 2003 survey, respondents generally expressed high satisfaction with their programs and specialty. The most frequently expressed perceived weakness in their training differed from 2003, with 46.5% of current respondents feeling unprepared to enter the job market. 72% plan on pursuing a postresidency fellowship. Most respondents intend to practice in Canada. Fewer than 20% of respondents believe that there is a strong demand for radiation oncologists in Canada. Conclusions: Respondents to the current survey expressed significant satisfaction with their career choice and training program. However, differences exist compared with the 2003 survey, including the current perceived lack of demand for radiation oncologists in Canada.

  2. Major shifts in calcareous phytoplankton assemblages through the Eocene-Oligocene transition of Tanzania and their implications for low-latitude primary production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Tom Dunkley; Bown, Paul R.; Pearson, Paul N.; Wade, Bridget S.; Coxall, Helen K.; Lear, Caroline H.

    2008-01-01

    phytoplankton assemblages through the Eocene-Oligocene transition of Tanzania and their implications for low-latitude primary production Tom Dunkley Jones, 1 Paul R. Bown, 2 Paul N. Pearson, 3 Bridget S. Wade, 4 Helen K. Coxall, 3 and Caroline H. Lear 3 Received... 28 April 2008; revised 30 June 2008; accepted 18 July 2008; published 22 October 2008. [1] A high-resolution record of exceptionally well preserved calcareous nannofossil assemblages from Tanzania is marked by two key transitions closely related...

  3. Solar Cooking in the Sahel1 Beth Newton1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsham, John

    , E-mail: J.Marsham@leeds.ac.uk11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Capsule: The potential for use of low-cost solar and remotely sensed SEVIRI data.19 #12;ABSTRACT20 Solar cookers have the potential to help many of the worldSolar Cooking in the Sahel1 Beth Newton1 , Sophie Cowie1 , Derk Rijks2 Jamie Banks3 , Helen

  4. Direct linearization of continuous and hybrid dynamical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parish, Julie Marie Jones

    2009-05-15

    of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, John E. Hurtado Committee Members, John L. Junkins Guy Battle Head of Department, Helen L. Reed December 2007 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering iii ABSTRACT Direct... I was getting myself into! To my graduate committee members, Dr. John L. Junkins and Dr. Guy Battle, I am thankful for past research contributions, recent insights to my work, and lively entertainment. To my co-workers at Sandia and the Department...

  5. Calcium Concentration Effects on the Mechanical and Biochemical Properties of Chondrocyte-Alginate Constructs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Helen H.

    -Alginate Constructs LEO Q. WAN,1 JIE JIANG,2 DIANA E. ARNOLD,1 X. EDWARD GUO,3 HELEN H. LU,2 and VAN C. MOW 1 1 in medium with a calcium concentration ([Ca2+ ]) of 1.8 mM, while the calcium level in the synovial fluid environment, the two studies in this paper were designed to investigate how the alginate scaffold alone

  6. Anglo-Scottish tracts, 1701-1714 : a descriptive checklist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLeod, William Reynolds; McLeod, V. B.

    1979-01-01

    Leod UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS LIBRARIES 1979 PRINTED IN LAWRENCE, KANSAS, U.S.A, BY THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PRINTING SERVICE To Helen and Don CONTENTS PREFACE LIBRARY SYMBOLS XV ABBREVIATIONS THE CHECKLIST 1 BIOGRAPHIES 154 CHRONOLOGICAL INDEX 210 VII... Succession, 1958. Davis & Ehrenpreis Herbert Davis and Irvin Ehrenpreis, eds., Jonathan Swift. Political Tracts, 1713-1719, 1964. Defoe, History Daniel Defoe, The history of the union of Great Britain, 1709. DNB Dictionary of National Biography. EHR...

  7. Molecular Evolution of Four Salivary Proteins within Species of the Anopheles gambiae Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Maryam I

    2013-02-05

    .3.1. http://tree.bio.ed.ac.uk/software/figtree/. Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh. Rozen, Steve, Skaletsky, Helen. (2000). Primer3 on the WWW for general users and for biologist programmers. In: Krawetz S, Misener S (eds... running low and graduate students Luciano Cosme and Kevin Deitz came to the rescue when we needed help running different data analysis software. We thank the entire lab group for pitching in their comments and suggestions when it came to editing...

  8. Volume 40 - 2009: Navigating the Geoscience Information Landscape: Pathways to Success - Proceedings of the 44th Meeting of the Geoscience Information Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GeoScience Information Society

    2009-01-01

    . Scientists had produced huge numbers of reports about the various events. (As of February 2010, the Washington bibliography included more than 3,000 items about Mount St. Helens.) (About that time, the DGER offices were moved from the converted apartment... REAL-TIME HYDROLOGIC DATA FOR SCIENCE Rich Marvin129 GEOSCIML DEVELOPMENT STATUS REPORT Stephen M. Richard and CGI Interoperability Working Group, IUGS.130 CATALOG SERVICE FOR THE WEB...

  9. Karan A. Adhikari '12 in honor of Joseph N. Gothie '94

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napier, Terrence

    . Davis 'F/S Krittapas Chanchaiworawit '13 in honor of George E. McCluskey, Jr. 'F/S Irene A. Chou '98G in honor of Helen M. Chan 'F/S Irene A. Chou '98G in honor of Martin P. Harmer '07P '11P 'F/S Sylvia Cooper in honor of John L. Hankins '39 '79P '12GP* Donna L. Hardiman in honor of Paul F. Hartzell, Jr. '75

  10. Commencement Program, May 19, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-05-19

    Manette Gerhart Barley Carrie M. Hohl Molly Ann McVey Corinne E. Myers Sarah J. Pyszczynski Andrea Romero Peter Curtis Schillig McNair Scholars Sarah Jo Bregman Jessica Renee Brooks Ashley Alyssabeth Cotton Raymond Isaac Dean Bryan Jeremy Gordon Ithar... Jonathan D. Perez, BFA James David Reynolds, BFA Noel Angelique Rivard, BFA Andres Antonio Rivas, BFA Andrea Danielle Rose, BFA Mark Philip Rush, BFA* Jaime Del Ryan, BFA Skyler Jon Schlageck, BFA Stephanie Helene Schulz, BFA Danielle Shae Self, BFA Ryan...

  11. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Nancy

    .041/6.431: Probabilistic Systems Analysis (Fall 2010) Recitation 18 November 9, 2010 1. There are n fish in a lake, some of which are green and the rest blue. Each day, Helen catches 1 fish. She is equally likely to catch any one of the n fish in the lake. She throws back all the fish, but paints each green fish blue before

  12. RAWLS COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Faculty/Staff Roster -Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westfall, Peter H.

    -1531 031B Debbie Laverie 834-3953 241 Mary Frances Weatherly 834-8428 281C Derek Abrams 834-5805 139R Peter-1514 E333 Carol Robertson 834-3768 229 Geleah Sharp 834-3943 145F Stephanie Bohn 834-1497 W320 Mike Ryan317 Jerry Stevens 834-3195 E347 Helen Miller 742-2198 107 CAREER MANAGEMENT CENTER Jack Cooney 834

  13. Actes JFPC 2012 Compilation de CSP en Set-labeled Diagram

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Actes JFPC 2012 Compilation de CSP en Set-labeled Diagram Alexandre Niveau Hel`ene Fargier C parfois ^etre executees en ligne et en temps limite. Dans ce cas, la resolution du CSP n'est pas asseze- sente l'assignation d'une variable ; l'ensemble des solu- tions d'un CSP correspond `a l'ensemble des

  14. Consideration of Dose Limits for Organs at Risk of Thoracic Radiotherapy: Atlas for Lung, Proximal Bronchial Tree, Esophagus, Spinal Cord, Ribs, and Brachial Plexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, Feng-Ming; Ritter, Timothy; Quint, Douglas J.; Senan, Suresh; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Komaki, Ritsuko U.; Hurkmans, Coen W.; Timmerman, Robert; Bezjak, Andrea; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Movsas, Benjamin; Marsh, Lon; Okunieff, Paul; Choy, Hak; Curran, Walter J.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To review the dose limits and standardize the three-dimenional (3D) radiographic definition for the organs at risk (OARs) for thoracic radiotherapy (RT), including the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: The present study was performed by representatives from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, and Soutwestern Oncology Group lung cancer committees. The dosimetric constraints of major multicenter trials of 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT were reviewed and the challenges of 3D delineation of these OARs described. Using knowledge of the human anatomy and 3D radiographic correlation, draft atlases were generated by a radiation oncologist, medical physicist, dosimetrist, and radiologist from the United States and reviewed by a radiation oncologist and medical physicist from Europe. The atlases were then critically reviewed, discussed, and edited by another 10 radiation oncologists. Results: Three-dimensional descriptions of the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus are presented. Two computed tomography atlases were developed: one for the middle and lower thoracic OARs (except for the heart) and one focusing on the brachial plexus for a patient positioned supine with their arms up for thoracic RT. The dosimetric limits of the key OARs are discussed. Conclusions: We believe these atlases will allow us to define OARs with less variation and generate dosimetric data in a more consistent manner. This could help us study the effect of radiation on these OARs and guide high-quality clinical trials and individualized practice in 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT.

  15. Standing on the Shoulders of Giants: Results From the Radiation Oncology Academic Development and Mentorship Assessment Project (ROADMAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holliday, Emma B. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jagsi, Reshma [The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Oregon Health Science Center Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon (United States); Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Fuller, Clifton D., E-mail: cdfuller@mdanderson.org [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Oregon Health Science Center Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze survey information regarding mentorship practices and cross-correlate the results with objective metrics of academic productivity among academic radiation oncologists at US Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited residency training programs. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved survey for the Radiation Oncology Academic Development and Mentorship Assessment Project (ROADMAP) was sent to 1031 radiation oncologists employed at an ACGME-accredited residency training program and administered using an international secure web application designed exclusively to support data capture for research studies. Data collected included demographics, presence of mentorship, and the nature of specific mentoring activities. Productivity metrics, including number of publications, number of citations, h-index, and date of first publication, were collected for each survey respondent from a commercially available online database, and m-index was calculated. Results: A total of 158 academic radiation oncologists completed the survey, 96 of whom reported having an academic/scientific mentor. Faculty with a mentor had higher numbers of publications, citations, and h- and m-indices. Differences in gender and race/ethnicity were not associated with significant differences in mentorship rates, but those with a mentor were more likely to have a PhD degree and were more likely to have more time protected for research. Bivariate fit regression modeling showed a positive correlation between a mentor's h-index and their mentee's h-index (R{sup 2} = 0.16; P<.001). Linear regression also showed significant correlates of higher h-index, in addition to having a mentor (P=.001), included a longer career duration (P<.001) and fewer patients in treatment (P=.02). Conclusions: Mentorship is widely believed to be important to career development and academic productivity. These results emphasize the importance of identifying and striving to overcome potential barriers to effective mentorship.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Target Volume Delineation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Brain Tumors Using Localized Region-Based Active Contour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aslian, Hossein; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Mahdavi, Seied Rabie; Babapour Mofrad, Farshid; Astarakee, Mahdi; Khaledi, Navid; Fadavi, Pedram

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical application of a robust semiautomatic image segmentation method to determine the brain target volumes in radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: A local robust region-based algorithm was used on MRI brain images to study the clinical target volume (CTV) of several patients. First, 3 oncologists delineated CTVs of 10 patients manually, and the process time for each patient was calculated. The averages of the oncologists contours were evaluated and considered as reference contours. Then, to determine the CTV through the semiautomatic method, a fourth oncologist who was blind to all manual contours selected 4-8 points around the edema and defined the initial contour. The time to obtain the final contour was calculated again for each patient. Manual and semiautomatic segmentation were compared using 3 different metric criteria: Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance. A comparison also was performed between volumes obtained from semiautomatic and manual methods. Results: Manual delineation processing time of tumors for each patient was dependent on its size and complexity and had a mean (SD) of 12.33 2.47 minutes, whereas it was 3.254 1.7507 minutes for the semiautomatic method. Means of Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance between manual contours were 0.84 0.02, 2.05 0.66 cm, and 0.78 0.15 cm, and they were 0.82 0.03, 1.91 0.65 cm, and 0.7 0.22 cm between manual and semiautomatic contours, respectively. Moreover, the mean volume ratio (=semiautomatic/manual) calculated for all samples was 0.87. Conclusions: Given the deformability of this method, the results showed reasonable accuracy and similarity to the results of manual contouring by the oncologists. This study shows that the localized region-based algorithms can have great ability in determining the CTV and can be appropriate alternatives for manual approaches in brain cancer.

  17. The development of external sanitary facilities aboard ships of the fifteenth to nineteenth centuries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Joe J

    1985-01-01

    Centuries. (December 1985) Joe John S1mmons, III, B. A. , Southern Methodist University Chai rman of Advisory Comm1ttee: Dr. George F. Bass This thesis examines the appearance and development of seats-of-ease, roundhouses, pissdales, quarter galleries.... Stern turrets on two vessels drawn by the Master WA; late 15th century. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Figure 13. Battlemented stern turrets on ship from Gozzoli 's The Ra e of Helen; late 15th century. 41 Figure 14. Stern of a 15th-century carrack...

  18. Seismological investigation of crack formation in hydraulic rock fracturing experiments and in natural geothermal environments. Progress report, September 1, 1979-August 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aki, K.

    1980-09-01

    Progress is reported in the following research areas: a synthesis of seismic experiments at the Fenton Hill Hot-Dry-Rock System; attenuation of high-frequency shear waves in the lithosphere; a new kinematic source model for deep volcanic tremors; ground motion in the near-field of a fluid-driven crack and its interpretation in the study of shallow volcanic tremor; low-velocity bodies under geothermal areas; and operation of event recorders in Mt. St. Helens and Newberry Peak with preliminary results from them. (MHR)

  19. Determinants of sugar-sweetened beverage consumption in young children: a systematic review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paes, Veena Mazarello; Hesketh, Kathryn; OMalley, Claire; Moore, Helen; Summerbell, Carolyn; Griffin, Simon; van Sluijs, Esther M. F.; Ong, Ken K.; Lakshman, Rajalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    TITLE PAGE Title of article: Determinants of sugar-sweetened beverage consumption in young children: a systematic review Authors: Veena Mazarello Paes1,2, Kathryn Hesketh2,3, Claire OMalley4, Helen Moore4, Carolyn Summerbell4, Simon Griffin1... . Public Health Nutr. 2012;15(08):1338-46. 37. Koh GA, Scott JA, Oddy WH, Graham KI, Binns CW. Exposure to non-core foods and beverages in the first year of life: Results from a cohort study. Nutrition & Dietetics. 2010;67(3):137-42. 38. Lim S, Zoellner...

  20. Mt. Baker Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformationOliver, Pennsylvania:(CTI PFAN) | OpenMt St HelensMt StMt.

  1. Mud Hen Lake, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformationOliver, Pennsylvania:(CTI PFAN) | OpenMt St HelensMt

  2. Chemical and Physical Signatures for Microbial Forensics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cliff, John B.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Wunschel, David S.

    2012-01-03

    Chemical and physical signatures for microbial forensics John Cliff and Helen Kreuzer-Martin, eds. Humana Press Chapter 1. Introduction: Review of history and statement of need. Randy Murch, Virginia Tech Chapter 2. The Microbe: Structure, morphology, and physiology of the microbe as they relate to potential signatures of growth conditions. Joany Jackman, Johns Hopkins University Chapter 3. Science for Forensics: Special considerations for the forensic arena - quality control, sample integrity, etc. Mark Wilson (retired FBI): Western Carolina University Chapter 4. Physical signatures: Light and electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, gravimetry etc. Joseph Michael, Sandia National Laboratory Chapter 5. Lipids: FAME, PLFA, steroids, LPS, etc. James Robertson, Federal Bureau of Investigation Chapter 6. Carbohydrates: Cell wall components, cytoplasm components, methods Alvin Fox, University of South Carolina School of Medicine David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 7. Peptides: Peptides, proteins, lipoproteins David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 8. Elemental content: CNOHPS (treated in passing), metals, prospective cell types John Cliff, International Atomic Energy Agency Chapter 9. Isotopic signatures: Stable isotopes C,N,H,O,S, 14C dating, potential for heavy elements. Helen Kreuzer-Martin, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Michaele Kashgarian, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chapter 10. Extracellular signatures: Cellular debris, heme, agar, headspace, spent media, etc Karen Wahl, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 11. Data Reduction and Integrated Microbial Forensics: Statistical concepts, parametric and multivariate statistics, integrating signatures Kristin Jarman, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

  3. The Esthetic Element in the Origin of Mythology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Helen Maude

    1907-01-01

    s c i e n t i f i c " . ( 3 ) "The a r t i s t ' s 1. P r o f . B l a c k i e . On Beauty, p.2. 2. P r o f e s s o r Templin. 3. Hirm, The O r i g i n of A r t . Ch. I I , p. 20. 19 development depends on the same q u a l i t i e s l a r g e l y..., Helen M. 1907 H2he esthetic element i n the o r i g i n of raythology," The E s t h e t i c Element i n the O r i g i n of. M y t h o i e g p Helen M. C l a r k e . Contents. I. D e f i n i t i o n s . 1. O r i g i n . 2. Mythology. 3. E s t h e...

  4. SU-E-J-07: A Functional MR Protocol for the Pancreatic Tumor Delineation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreychenko, A; Heerkens, H; Meijer, G; Vulpen, M van; Lagendijk, J; Berg, C van den

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Pancreatic cancer is one of the cancers with the poorest survival prognosis. At the time of diagnosis most of pancreatic cancers are unresectable and those patients can be treated by radiotherapy. Radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer is limited due to uncertainties in CT-based delineations. MRI provides an excellent soft tissue contrast. Here, an MR protocol is developed to improve delineations for radiotherapy treatment of pancreatic cancer. In a later stage this protocol can also be used for on-line visualization of the pancreas during MRI guided treatments. Methods: Nine pancreatic cancer patients were included. The MR protocol included T2 weighted(T2w), T1 weighted(T1w), diffusion weighted(DWI) and dynamic contrast enhanced(DCE) techniques. The tumor was delineated on T2w and T1w MRI by an experienced radiation oncologist. Healthy pancreas or pancreatitis (assigned by the oncologist based on T2w) areas were also delineated. Apparent diffusion coefficient(ADC), and area under the curve(AUC)/time to peak(TTP) maps were obtained from DWI and DCE scans, respectively. Results: A clear demarcation of tumor area was visible on b800 DWI images in 5 patients. ADC maps of those patients characterized tumor as an area with restricted water diffusion. Tumor delineations based on solely DCE were possible in 7 patients. In 6 of those patients AUC maps demonstrated tumor heterogeneity: a hypointense area with a hyperintense ring. TTP values clearly discriminated the tumor and the healthy pancreas but could not distinguish tumor and the pancreatitis accurately. Conclusion: MR imaging results in a more pronounced tumor contrast than contrast enhanced CT. The addition of quantitative, functional MRI provides valuable, additional information to the radiation oncologist on the spatial tumor extent by discriminating tumor from the healthy pancreas(TTP, DWI) and characterizing the tumor(ADC). Our findings indicate that tumor delineation in pancreatic cancer can greatly benefit from the addition of MRI and especially functional MR techniques.

  5. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Performance of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, Beth A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Demanes, D. Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology , University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Radiological Physics Center, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hayes, John K. [Gamma West Brachytherapy, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hsu, I-Chow J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Morris, David E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Rabinovitch, Rachel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Tward, Jonathan D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2011-03-01

    High-Dose-Rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with a variety of different malignancies. Careful adherence to established standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for HDR brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrists. Review of the leading indications for HDR brachytherapy in the management of gynecologic, thoracic, gastrointestinal, breast, urologic, head and neck, and soft tissue tumors is presented. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedures and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful HDR brachytherapy program.

  6. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Transperineal Permanent Brachytherapy of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, Seth A., E-mail: rosenthals@radiological.co [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Bittner, Nathan H.J. [Tacoma/Valley Radiation Oncology Centers, Tacoma, WA (United States); Beyer, David C. [Arizona Oncology Services, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Demanes, D. Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Goldsmith, Brian J. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Radiological Physics Center, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Nag, Subir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaiser Permanante, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Suh, W. Warren [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center of Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Potters, Louis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Transperineal permanent prostate brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with organ-confined prostate cancer. Careful adherence to established brachytherapy standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for permanent prostate brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrist. Factors with respect to patient selection and appropriate use of supplemental treatment modalities such as external beam radiation and androgen suppression therapy are discussed. Logistics with respect to the brachtherapy implant procedure, the importance of dosimetric parameters, and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful prostate brachytherapy program.

  7. SU-E-J-201: Position Verification in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Using Tantalum Clips in the Lumpectomy Cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santvoort, J van; Van der Drift, M; Kuipers, J; Mast, M; Van Egmond, J; Struikmans, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To find out whether tantalum surgical clips can be used for online position verification in treatment of the lumpectomy cavity (LC) in breast cancer patients. Tantalum is a high density metal that could be visible on Electronic Portal Images (EPIs) and be an affordable alternative to gold markers. Clips are considered more representative for the LC position than nearby bony structures. Methods: In twelve patients the surgeon had placed 2 to 5 tantalum clips in the LC. The AP and lateral fields used for portal imaging, were adapted. In doing so, both bony structures and tantalum clips were visible on EPIs. The following analyses were performed:1. Image degradation, with respect to delineating the CTV, of the axial CT slices by artefacts because of the tantalum clips was evaluated by a radiation oncologist;2. The visibility of the tantalum clips on the EPIs was evaluated by four radiation therapists (RTTs);3. Bony anatomy and tantalum clip matches were performed on the same images independently by two observers. Results: 1. Delineation of the CTV by the radiation oncologist was not hampered by CT image artefacts because of the clips.2. The mean score for visibility of the clips on the EPIs, analysed by the four RTTs, was 5.6 on a scale of 10 (range 3.9 8.0).3. In total 12 patients with 16 fractions each were analysed. The differences between clip match and bone match are significant with a mean vector length of 5.2 mm (SD 1.9 mm) for the difference. Conclusion: Results of matches on tantalum clips as compared to matches on bony structures differ substantially. Therefore clip matches can result in smaller CTV to PTV margins than bone matches. Visibility of the clips on EPIs is sufficient, so they can be an alternative to gold markers.

  8. SU-E-J-148: Evaluating Tumor Response with a Commercially Available Deformable Registration System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowling, J; Ramsey, C [Thompson Cancer Survival Center, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to present a method for evaluating the response to treatment using a commercially available deformable image registration software package (Velocity Medical Systems) and repeat PET/CT imaging. This technique can be used to identify volumes that are risk for tumor recurrence. Methods: Response to treatment was evaluated using PET/CT images acquired prior-to and post-treatment for radiation therapy patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy. Velocity (Version 3.0.1) was used to deform the initial PET/CT to the post treatment PET/CT. The post-treatment PET images were then subtracted from the pre-treatment PET images. The resulting re-sampled image is a three-dimensional SUV difference map that shows pixels with increasing SUV values. SUV values increases greater than 2.5 in the post treatment images were identified for additional follow-up. Results: A total of 5 Lung patients were analyzed as part of this study. One lung patient in the cohort had an SUV increase of +3.28 that was identified using the SUV difference map. This volume of increased uptake was located outside the treatment field and adjacent to the 35 Gy isodose line. The remaining four patients all had SUV decreases inside the planning target volume, and no unexpected areas of increase outside the irradiated volumes. All five patients were analyzed using standard tools inside the Velocity application. Conclusion: The response to treatment can easily be measured using serial PET/CT images and a commercially available deformable image registration. This provides both the radiation oncologists and medical oncologists with a quantitative assessment of their treatment to use in patient follow-up.

  9. The Adoption of New Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Modalities Among Medicare Beneficiaries With Breast Cancer: Clinical Correlates and Cost Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Kenneth B.; Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut ; Soulos, Pamela R.; Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut ; Herrin, Jeph; Health Research and Educational Trust, Chicago, Illinois ; Yu, James B.; Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut ; Long, Jessica B.; Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut ; Dostaler, Edward; and others

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: New radiation therapy modalities have broadened treatment options for older women with breast cancer, but it is unclear how clinical factors, geographic region, and physician preference affect the choice of radiation therapy modality. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database to identify women diagnosed with stage I-III breast cancer from 1998 to 2007 who underwent breast-conserving surgery. We assessed the temporal trends in, and costs of, the adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and brachytherapy. Using hierarchical logistic regression, we evaluated the relationship between the use of these new modalities and patient and regional characteristics. Results: Of 35,060 patients, 69.9% received conventional external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Although overall radiation therapy use remained constant, the use of IMRT increased from 0.0% to 12.6% from 1998 to 2007, and brachytherapy increased from 0.7% to 9.0%. The statistical variation in brachytherapy use attributable to the radiation oncologist and geographic region was 41.4% and 9.5%, respectively (for IMRT: 23.8% and 22.1%, respectively). Women undergoing treatment at a free-standing radiation facility were significantly more likely to receive IMRT than were women treated at a hospital-based facility (odds ratio for IMRT vs EBRT: 3.89 [95% confidence interval, 2.78-5.45]). No such association was seen for brachytherapy. The median radiation therapy cost per treated patient increased from $5389 in 2001 to $8539 in 2007. Conclusions: IMRT and brachytherapy use increased substantially from 1998 to 2007; overall, radiation therapy costs increased by more than 50%. Radiation oncologists played an important role in treatment choice for both types of radiation therapy, whereas geographic region played a bigger role in the use of IMRT than brachytherapy.

  10. Late Toxicity and Patient Self-Assessment of Breast Appearance/Satisfaction on RTOG 0319: A Phase 2 Trial of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy-Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Following Lumpectomy for Stages I and II Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chafe, Susan; Moughan, Jennifer; McCormick, Beryl; Wong, John; Pass, Helen; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Arthur, Douglas W.; Petersen, Ivy; White, Julia; Vicini, Frank A.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Late toxicities and cosmetic analyses of patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) on RTOG 0319 are presented. Methods and Materials: Patients with stages I to II breast cancer ?3 cm, negative margins, and ?3 positive nodes were eligible. Patients received three-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT; 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions twice daily over 5 days). Toxicity and cosmesis were assessed by the patient (P), the radiation oncologist (RO), and the surgical oncologist (SO) at 3, 6, and 12 months from the completion of treatment and then annually. National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, was used to grade toxicity. Results: Fifty-two patients were evaluable. Median follow-up was 5.3 years (range, 1.7-6.4 years). Eighty-two percent of patients rated their cosmesis as good/excellent at 1 year, with rates of 64% at 3 years. At 3 years, 31 patients were satisfied with the treatment, 5 were not satisfied but would choose 3D-CRT again, and none would choose standard radiation therapy. The worst adverse event (AE) per patient reported as definitely, probably, or possibly related to radiation therapy was 36.5% grade 1, 50% grade 2, and 5.8% grade 3 events. Grade 3 AEs were all skin or musculoskeletal-related. Treatment-related factors were evaluated to potentially establish an association with observed toxicity. Surgical bed volume, target volume, the number of beams used, and the use of bolus were not associated with late cosmesis. Conclusions: Most patients enrolled in RTOG 0319 were satisfied with their treatment, and all would choose to have the 3D-CRT APBI again.

  11. Genes and the Microenvironment: Two Faces of Breast Cancer (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe; Love, Susan M.; Bissell, Min; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2011-10-04

    In this April 21, 2008 Berkeley Lab event, a dynamic panel of Berkeley Lab scientists highlight breast cancer research advances related to susceptibility, early detection, prevention, and therapy - a biological systems approach to tackling the disease from the molecular and cellular levels, to tissues and organs, and ultimately the whole individual. Joe Gray, Berkeley Lab Life Sciences Division Director, explores how chromosomal abnormalities contribute to cancer and respond to gene-targeted therapies. Mina Bissell, former Life Sciences Division Director, approaches the challenge of breast cancer from the breast's three dimensional tissue microenvironment and how the intracellular ''conversation'' triggers malignancies. Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff, Deputy Director, Life Sciences Division, identifies what exposure to ionizing radiation can tell us about how normal tissues suppress carcinogenesis. The panel is moderated by Susan M. Love, breast cancer research pioneer, author, President and Medical Director of the Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation.

  12. Compliance Monitoring of Underwater Blasting for Rock Removal at Warrior Point, Columbia River Channel Improvement Project, 2009/2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Skalski, J. R.; Seaburg, Adam

    2011-05-10

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) conducted the 20-year Columbia River Channel Improvement Project (CRCIP) to deepen the navigation channel between Portland, Oregon, and the Pacific Ocean to allow transit of fully loaded Panamax ships (100 ft wide, 600 to 700 ft long, and draft 45 to 50 ft). In the vicinity of Warrior Point, between river miles (RM) 87 and 88 near St. Helens, Oregon, the USACE conducted underwater blasting and dredging to remove 300,000 yd3 of a basalt rock formation to reach a depth of 44 ft in the Columbia River navigation channel. The purpose of this report is to document methods and results of the compliance monitoring study for the blasting project at Warrior Point in the Columbia River.

  13. habitat 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert W. Corbett

    2011-08-02

    /plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 President: S ecret8 ry: Editor: NEWSLETTER No. 20 J2net Qu~?lrton1 15 Letter D[-lilJ., Ceirnb8pn, Lochg'ilphe2d, ~rgyll, Scotlel1d. Heth Hel1em, F1f1t 3, 36 Cl"phelll Rei., J3edofrd, EngL'ncl. Sheil[-l Clerk, 6 Crcd..., everyone! It's nov, e yepI' since Jenet, !3eth 2nd I, ~11ong witih Helen?lVIcCf.H.'thy, took over the running of SfJ?l\\G. It doesn't seem th2t long.' It's been 8 yeer th8t 1188 scen 8 number of chengas, .?nd given us hope for 8 reviv8l of ST,\\H THEK 8t...

  14. Biologically based multistage modeling of radiation effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Hazelton; Suresh Moolgavkar; E. Georg Luebeck

    2005-08-30

    This past year we have made substantial progress in modeling the contribution of homeostatic regulation to low-dose radiation effects and carcinogenesis. We have worked to refine and apply our multistage carcinogenesis models to explicitly incorporate cell cycle states, simple and complex damage, checkpoint delay, slow and fast repair, differentiation, and apoptosis to study the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation in mouse intestinal crypts, as well as in other tissues. We have one paper accepted for publication in ''Advances in Space Research'', and another manuscript in preparation describing this work. I also wrote a chapter describing our combined cell-cycle and multistage carcinogenesis model that will be published in a book on stochastic carcinogenesis models edited by Wei-Yuan Tan. In addition, we organized and held a workshop on ''Biologically Based Modeling of Human Health Effects of Low dose Ionizing Radiation'', July 28-29, 2005 at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. We had over 20 participants, including Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff as keynote speaker, talks by most of the low-dose modelers in the DOE low-dose program, experimentalists including Les Redpath (and Mary Helen), Noelle Metting from DOE, and Tony Brooks. It appears that homeostatic regulation may be central to understanding low-dose radiation phenomena. The primary effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are cell killing, delayed cell cycling, and induction of mutations. However, homeostatic regulation causes cells that are killed or damaged by IR to eventually be replaced. Cells with an initiating mutation may have a replacement advantage, leading to clonal expansion of these initiated cells. Thus we have focused particularly on modeling effects that disturb homeostatic regulation as early steps in the carcinogenic process. There are two primary considerations that support our focus on homeostatic regulation. First, a number of epidemiologic studies using multistage carcinogenesis models that incorporate the ''initiation, promotion, and malignant conversion'' paradigm of carcinogenesis are indicating that promotion of initiated cells is the most important cellular mechanism driving the shape of the age specific hazard for many types of cancer. Second, we have realized that many of the genes that are modified in early stages of the carcinogenic process contribute to one or more of four general cellular pathways that confer a promotional advantage to cells when these pathways are disrupted.

  15. Semi-automatic delineation using weighted CT-MRI registered images for radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitton, I. [European Georges Pompidou Hospital, Department of Radiology, 20 rue Leblanc, 75015, Paris (France); Cornelissen, S. A. P. [Image Sciences Institute, UMC, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Duppen, J. C.; Rasch, C. R. N.; Herk, M. van [The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Radiotherapy, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Steenbakkers, R. J. H. M. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ Groningen (Netherlands); Peeters, S. T. H. [UZ Gasthuisberg, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgique (Belgium); Hoebers, F. J. P. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW School for Oncology and Development Biology Maastricht, 6229 ET Maastricht (Netherlands); Kaanders, J. H. A. M. [UMC St-Radboud, Department of Radiotherapy, Geert Grooteplein 32, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nowak, P. J. C. M. [ERASMUS University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology,Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: To develop a delineation tool that refines physician-drawn contours of the gross tumor volume (GTV) in nasopharynx cancer, using combined pixel value information from x-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during delineation. Methods: Operator-guided delineation assisted by a so-called ''snake'' algorithm was applied on weighted CT-MRI registered images. The physician delineates a rough tumor contour that is continuously adjusted by the snake algorithm using the underlying image characteristics. The algorithm was evaluated on five nasopharyngeal cancer patients. Different linear weightings CT and MRI were tested as input for the snake algorithm and compared according to contrast and tumor to noise ratio (TNR). The semi-automatic delineation was compared with manual contouring by seven experienced radiation oncologists. Results: A good compromise for TNR and contrast was obtained by weighing CT twice as strong as MRI. The new algorithm did not notably reduce interobserver variability, it did however, reduce the average delineation time by 6 min per case. Conclusions: The authors developed a user-driven tool for delineation and correction based a snake algorithm and registered weighted CT image and MRI. The algorithm adds morphological information from CT during the delineation on MRI and accelerates the delineation task.

  16. Prototype demonstration of radiation therapy planning code system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, R.C.; Adams, K.J.; Estes, G.P.; Hughes, L.S. III; Waters, L.S.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Radiation therapy planning is the process by which a radiation oncologist plans a treatment protocol for a patient preparing to undergo radiation therapy. The objective is to develop a protocol that delivers sufficient radiation dose to the entire tumor volume, while minimizing dose to healthy tissue. Radiation therapy planning, as currently practiced in the field, suffers from inaccuracies made in modeling patient anatomy and radiation transport. This project investigated the ability to automatically model patient-specific, three-dimensional (3-D) geometries in advanced Los Alamos radiation transport codes (such as MCNP), and to efficiently generate accurate radiation dose profiles in these geometries via sophisticated physics modeling. Modem scientific visualization techniques were utilized. The long-term goal is that such a system could be used by a non-expert in a distributed computing environment to help plan the treatment protocol for any candidate radiation source. The improved accuracy offered by such a system promises increased efficacy and reduced costs for this important aspect of health care.

  17. SciFri PM: Topics 03: The Global Task Force on Radiotherapy for Cancer Control: Core Investments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Dyk, J.; Jaffray, D. A.; MacPherson, M. S.

    2014-08-15

    The Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) is a membership-based, non-governmental organization with a mandate to to unite the cancer community to reduce the global cancer burden, to promote greater equity, and to integrate cancer control into the world health and development agenda. COMP is an associate member of the UICC. It is well recognized by the UICC that there are major gaps between high, and low and middle income countries, in terms of access to cancer services including access to radiation therapy. In this context, the UICC has developed a Global Task Force on Radiotherapy for Cancer Control with a charge to answer a single question: What does it cost to close the gap between what exists today and reasonable access to radiotherapy globally? The Task Force consists of leaders internationally recognized for their radiation treatment related expertise (radiation oncologists, medical physicists, radiation therapists) as well as those with global health and economics specialization. The Task Force has developed three working groups: (1) to look at the global burden of cancer; (2) to look at the infrastructure requirements (facilities, equipment, personnel); and (3) to consider outcomes in terms of numbers of lives saved and palliated patients. A report is due at the World Cancer Congress in December 2014. This presentation reviews the infrastructure considerations under analysis by the second work group. The infrastructure parameters being addressed include capital costs of buildings and equipment and operating costs, which include human resources, equipment servicing and quality control, and general overhead.

  18. Impact of Radiotherapy on Fertility, Pregnancy, and Neonatal Outcomes in Female Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wo, Jennifer Y.; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation has many potential long-term effects on cancer survivors. Female cancer patients may experience decreased fertility depending on the site irradiated. Oncologists should be aware of these consequences and discuss options for fertility preservation before initiating therapy. Methods and Materials: A comprehensive review of the existing literature was conducted. Studies reporting the outcomes for female patients treated with cranio-spinal, abdominal, or pelvic radiation reporting fertility, pregnancy, or neonatal-related outcomes were reviewed. Results: Cranio-spinal irradiation elicited significant hormonal changes in women that affected their ability to become pregnant later in life. Women treated with abdomino-pelvic radiation have an increased rate of uterine dysfunction leading to miscarriage, preterm labor, low birth weight, and placental abnormalities. Early menopause results from low-dose ovarian radiation. Ovarian transposition may decrease the rates of ovarian dysfunction. Conclusions: There is a dose-dependent relationship between ovarian radiation therapy (RT) and premature menopause. Patients treated with RT must be aware of the impact of treatment on fertility and explore appropriate options.

  19. Poster Thur Eve 16: 4DCT simulation with synchronized contrast injection of liver SBRT patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karotki, A.; Korol, R.; Milot, L.; Chu, W.; Chung, H. T.; Erler, D.

    2014-08-15

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has recently emerged as a valid option for treating liver metastases. SBRT delivers highly conformai dose over a small number of fractions. As such it is particularly sensitive to the accuracy of target volume delineation by the radiation oncologist. However, contouring liver metastases remains challenging for the following reasons. First, the liver usually undergoes significant motion due to respiration. Second, liver metastases are often nearly indistinguishable from the surrounding tissue when using computed tomography (CT) for imaging making it difficult to identify and delineate them. Both problems can be overcome by using four dimensional CT (4DCT) synchronized with intravenous contrast injection. We describe a novel CT simulation process which involves two 4DCT scans. The first scan captures the tumor and immediately surrounding tissue which in turn reduces the 4DCT scan time so that it can be optimally timed with intravenous contrast injection. The second 4DCT scan covers a larger volume and is used as the primary CT dataset for dose calculation, as well as patient setup verification on the treatment unit. The combination of two 4DCT scans, short and long, allows visualization of the liver metastases over all phases of breathing cycle while simultaneously acquiring long enough 4DCT dataset suitable for planning and patient setup verification.

  20. Geothermal energy resource investigations at Mt. Spurr, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D.L.; Wescott, E.M. (eds.)

    1986-12-01

    Spurr volcano is a composite Quaternary cone of largely andesitic composition located on the west side of Cook Inlet about 80 miles west of Anchorage and about 40 miles from the Beluga electrical transmission line. Geologic mapping (Plate 1-1) shows that the present summit depression was produced by a Mt. St. Helens-type sector collapse, rather than by a caldera collapse. Geochronologic and previous tephrachronologic studies show that there has been an active magmatic system at Spurr volcano during the late Pleistocene-to-Holocene time interval that is of critical interest for geothermal energy resource assessment. Major effort was devoted to geochemical and geophysical surveys of the accessible area south of Mt. Spurr, in addition to geologic mapping and geochronologic studies. Many coincident mercury and helium anomalies were found, suggesting the presence of geothermal systems at depth. Extremely large electrical self-potential anomalies were also found, together with extensive zones of low resistivity discovered by our controlled-source audiomagnetotelluric survey. The juxtaposition of all of these different types of anomalies at certain areas on the south slope of Crater Peak indicates the presence of a geothermal system which should be accessible by drilling to about 2000 ft depth. It is also evident that there is a strong volcanic hazard to be evaluated in considering any development on the south side of Mt. Spurr. This hazardous situation may require angle drilling of production wells from safer areas and placement of power generation facilities at a considerable distance from hazardous areas.

  1. Image plates as x-ray detectors in plasma physics experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gales, S.G.; Bentley, C.D. [AWE Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2004-10-01

    The performance of image plates based on the photostimulable phosphor BaF(Br,l):Eu{sup 2+} has been investigated and compared with x-ray film. Evaluation of detective quantum efficiency (DQE), sensitivity, dynamic range, and linearity was carried out for several types of commercially available image plate, using the Excalibur soft x-ray calibration facility at AWE. Image plate response was found to be linear over a dynamic range of 5 orders of magnitude. One type of image plate was found to have a number of advantages for soft x-ray detection, with a measured sensitivity 1 order of magnitude greater than that of Kodak Industrex CX and DEF-5 x-ray film. The DQE of this plate was found to be superior to that of film at low [less than 10{sup 3} photons/(50 {mu}m){sup 2}] and high fluxes [greater than 10{sup 4} photons/(50 {mu}m){sup 2}]. The spatial resolution of image plates, scanned with several models of commercial image plate readers, has been evaluated using a USAF resolution test target. The highest spatial resolution measured is 35 {mu}m. Though this is significantly lower than the resolution possible with film, it is sufficient for many applications. Image plates were fielded in a refractive x-ray lens imaging diagnostic on the 1 TW Helen laser and these results are discussed.

  2. Interobserver Variability in Target Definition for Hepatocellular Carcinoma With and Without Portal Vein Thrombus: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Theodore S.; Bosch, Walter R.; Krishnan, Sunil; Kim, Tae K.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Seong, Jinsil; Haddock, Michael G.; Cheng, Jason C.; Feng, Mary U.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Roberge, David; and others

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Defining hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) gross tumor volume (GTV) requires multimodal imaging, acquired in different perfusion phases. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the variability in contouring and to establish guidelines and educational recommendations for reproducible HCC contouring for treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Anonymous, multiphasic planning computed tomography scans obtained from 3 patients with HCC were identified and distributed to a panel of 11 gastrointestinal radiation oncologists. Panelists were asked the number of HCC cases they treated in the past year. Case 1 had no vascular involvement, case 2 had extensive portal vein involvement, and case 3 had minor branched portal vein involvement. Theagreement between the contoured total GTVs (primary+vascular GTV) was assessed using the generalized kappa statistic. Agreement interpretation was evaluated using Landis and Koch's interpretation of strength of agreement. The S95 contour, defined using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm consensus at the 95% confidence level, was created for each case. Results: Of the 11 panelists, 3 had treated >25 cases in the past year, 2 had treated 10to 25 cases, 2 had treated 5 to 10 cases, 2 had treated 1 to 5 cases, 1 had treated 0 cases, and 1 did not respond. Near perfect agreement was seen for case 1, and substantial agreement was seen for cases 2 and 3. For case 2, there was significant heterogeneity in the volume identified as tumor thrombus (range 0.58-40.45cc). For case 3, 2 panelists did not include the branched portal vein thrombus, and 7 panelists contoured thrombus separately from the primary tumor, also showing significant heterogeneity in volume of tumor thrombus (range 4.52-34.27cc). Conclusions: In a group of experts, excellent agreement was seen in contouring total GTV. Heterogeneity exists in the definition of portal vein thrombus that may impact treatment planning, especially if differential dosing is contemplated. Guidelines for HCC GTV contouring are recommended.

  3. Reliability of Quantitative Ultrasonic Assessment of Normal-Tissue Toxicity in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, Emi J.; Chen Hao; Torres, Mylin; Andic, Fundagul; Liu Haoyang; Chen Zhengjia; Sun, Xiaoyan; Curran, Walter J.; Liu Tian

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: We have recently reported that ultrasound imaging, together with ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC), can provide quantitative assessment of radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicity. This study's purpose is to evaluate the reliability of our quantitative ultrasound technology in assessing acute and late normal-tissue toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy. Method and Materials: Our ultrasound technique analyzes radiofrequency echo signals and provides quantitative measures of dermal, hypodermal, and glandular tissue toxicities. To facilitate easy clinical implementation, we further refined this technique by developing a semiautomatic ultrasound-based toxicity assessment tool (UBTAT). Seventy-two ultrasound studies of 26 patients (720 images) were analyzed. Images of 8 patients were evaluated for acute toxicity (<6 months postradiotherapy) and those of 18 patients were evaluated for late toxicity ({>=}6 months postradiotherapy). All patients were treated according to a standard radiotherapy protocol. To assess intraobserver reliability, one observer analyzed 720 images in UBTAT and then repeated the analysis 3 months later. To assess interobserver reliability, three observers (two radiation oncologists and one ultrasound expert) each analyzed 720 images in UBTAT. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate intra- and interobserver reliability. Ultrasound assessment and clinical evaluation were also compared. Results: Intraobserver ICC was 0.89 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.96 for glandular tissue toxicity. Interobserver ICC was 0.78 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.94 for glandular tissue toxicity. Statistical analysis found significant changes in dermal (p < 0.0001), hypodermal (p = 0.0027), and glandular tissue (p < 0.0001) assessments in the acute toxicity group. Ultrasound measurements correlated with clinical Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity scores of patients in the late toxicity group. Patients with RTOG Grade 1 or 2 had greater ultrasound-assessed toxicity percentage changes than patients with RTOG Grade 0. Conclusion: Early and late radiation-induced effects on normal tissue can be reliably assessed using quantitative ultrasound.

  4. Validating the RTOG-Endorsed Brachial Plexus Contouring Atlas: An Evaluation of Reproducibility Among Patients Treated by Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi, Sun K.; Hall, William H.; Mathai, Mathew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Dublin, Arthur B. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Gupta, Vishal; Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allen.chen@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate interobserver variability for contouring the brachial plexus as an organ-at-risk (OAR) and to analyze its potential dosimetric consequences in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-endorsed brachial plexus contouring atlas, three radiation oncologists independently delineated the OAR on treatment planning computed-tomography (CT) axial scans from 5 representative patients undergoing IMRT to a prescribed dose of 70 Gy for head-and-neck cancer. Dose-volume histograms for the brachial plexus were calculated, and interobserver differences were quantified by comparing various dosimetric statistics. Qualitative analysis was performed by visually assessing the overlapping contours on a single beam's eye view. Results: Brachial plexus volumes for the 5 patients across observers were 26 cc (18-35 cc), 25 cc (21-30 cc), 29 cc (28-32 cc), 29 cc (23-38 cc), and 29 cc (23-34 cc). On qualitative analysis, minimal variability existed except at the inferolateral portion of the OAR, where slight discrepancies were noted among the physicians. Maximum doses to the brachial plexus ranged from 71.6 to 72.6 Gy, 75.2 to 75.8 Gy, 69.1 to 71.0 Gy, 76.4 to 76.9 Gy, and 70.6 to 71.4 Gy. Respective volumes receiving doses greater than 60 Gy (V60) were 8.6 to 10.9 cc, 6.2 to 8.1 cc, 8.2 to 11.6 cc, 8.3 to 10.5 cc, and 5.6 to 9.8 cc. Conclusion: The RTOG-endorsed brachial plexus atlas provides a consistent set of guidelines for contouring this OAR with essentially no learning curve. Adoption of these contouring guidelines in the clinical setting is encouraged.

  5. Development of a Standardized Method for Contouring the Lumbosacral Plexus: A Preliminary Dosimetric Analysis of this Organ at Risk Among 15 Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lower Gastrointestinal Cancers and the Incidence of Radiation-Induced Lumbosacral Plexopathy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi, Sun K., E-mail: sun.yi@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Mak, Walter [Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Yang, Claus C.; Liu Tianxiao [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Cui Jing; Chen, Allen M.; Purdy, James A.; Monjazeb, Arta M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Do, Ly [Cancer Care Institute, San Jose, CA (United States)] [Cancer Care Institute, San Jose, CA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To generate a reproducible step-wise guideline for the delineation of the lumbosacral plexus (LSP) on axial computed tomography (CT) planning images and to provide a preliminary dosimetric analysis on 15 representative patients with rectal or anal cancers treated with an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique. Methods and Materials: A standardized method for contouring the LSP on axial CT images was devised. The LSP was referenced to identifiable anatomic structures from the L4-5 interspace to the level of the sciatic nerve. It was then contoured retrospectively on 15 patients treated with IMRT for rectal or anal cancer. No dose limitations were placed on this organ at risk during initial treatment planning. Dosimetric parameters were evaluated. The incidence of radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy (RILSP) was calculated. Results: Total prescribed dose to 95% of the planned target volume ranged from 50.4 to 59.4 Gy (median 54 Gy). The mean ({+-}standard deviation [SD]) LSP volume for the 15 patients was 100 {+-} 22 cm{sup 3} (range, 71-138 cm{sup 3}). The mean maximal dose to the LSP was 52.6 {+-} 3.9 Gy (range, 44.5-58.6 Gy). The mean irradiated volumes of the LSP were V40Gy = 58% {+-} 19%, V50Gy = 22% {+-} 23%, and V55Gy = 0.5% {+-} 0.9%. One patient (7%) was found to have developed RILSP at 13 months after treatment. Conclusions: The true incidence of RILSP in the literature is likely underreported and is not a toxicity commonly assessed by radiation oncologists. In our analysis the LSP commonly received doses approaching the prescribed target dose, and 1 patient developed RILSP. Identification of the LSP during IMRT planning may reduce RILSP. We have provided a reproducible method for delineation of the LSP on CT images and a preliminary dosimetric analysis for potential future dose constraints.

  6. Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Barthold, H. Joseph [Commonwealth Hematology and Oncology, Weymouth, MA (United States); Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); O'Meara, Elizabeth [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Al-Lozi, Rawan [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Myerson, Robert [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); and others

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

  7. SU-E-T-568: Improving Normal Brain Sparing with Increasing Number of Arc Beams for Volume Modulated Arc Beam Radiosurgery of Multiple Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossain, S; Hildebrand, K; Ahmad, S; Larson, D; Ma, L; Sahgal, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated arc beams have been newly reported for treating multiple brain metastases. The purpose of this study was to determine the variations in the normal brain doses with increasing number of arc beams for multiple brain metastases treatments via the TrueBeam Rapidarc system (Varian Oncology, Palo Alto, CA). Methods: A patient case with 12 metastatic brain lesions previously treated on the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (GK) was used for the study. All lesions and organs at risk were contoured by a senior radiation oncologist and treatment plans for a subset of 3, 6, 9 and all 12 targets were developed for the TrueBeam Rapidarc system via 3 to 7 intensity modulated arc-beams with each target covered by at least 99% of the prescribed dose of 20 Gy. The peripheral normal brain isodose volumes as well as the total beam-on time were analyzed with increasing number of arc beams for these targets. Results: All intensisty modulated arc-beam plans produced efficient treatment delivery with the beam-on time averaging 0.61.5 min per lesion at an output of 1200 MU/min. With increasing number of arc beams, the peripheral normal brain isodose volumes such as the 12-Gy isodose line enclosed normal brain tissue volumes were on average decreased by 6%, 11%, 18%, and 28% for the 3-, 6-, 9-, 12-target treatment plans respectively. The lowest normal brain isodose volumes were consistently found for the 7-arc treatment plans for all the cases. Conclusion: With nearly identical beam-on times, the peripheral normal brain dose was notably decreased when the total number of intensity modulated arc beams was increased when treating multiple brain metastases. Dr Sahgal and Dr Ma are currently serving on the board of international society of stereotactic radiosurgery.

  8. Gene induction and adaptive responses in irradiated cells: Mechanisms and clinical implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehnert, S. [McGill Univ., Quebec (Canada)

    1995-01-01

    A characteristic of living things, conserved throughout evolution, is their capacity to react to environmental insult. From bacteria to yeast to human cells, environmental inputs induce changes in the program of genes expressed. A subset of this response, of particular interest to the radiobiologists and radiation oncologists who gathered for this meeting, is the case of radiation-mediated gene induction. A large number of genes have been reported to be up/down-regulated by ionizing radiation; some of these have been identified, while others have so far preserved their anonymity as bands and blots on gels and membranes. It is safe to say that many more such genes will be discovered in the future as the scientific and clinical significance of these processes is better understood. Substantial evidence, extending back many years, suggests the existence of an adaptive response, apparent as cellular radioprotective mechanisms which can be up-regulated after a small dose of radiation. At the molecular level, the timing of the changes in expression of induced genes and of the changes in levels of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins which they encode is such as to support involvement of these elements in induced radioresistance. The adaptive response is one component of the battery of intrinsic factors which influence the response of tumors to radiation. Radiation-induced gene products encompass a spectrum of activities including cell cycle control, DNA repair, signal transduction, apoptosis and oncogenesis, all of which can influence tumor radioresponse and contribute to the multifactorial radioresistant phenotype. Growth factors and cytokines are encoded by several early and late-responding genes whose expression is up-regulated by radiation. These must be assumed to affect the toxicity of radiation toward early- and late-responding normal tissues profoundly by promoting repair or conversely by acting synergistically to enhance radiation damage.

  9. Inter- and Intra-Observer Variability in Prostate Definition With Tissue Harmonic and Brightness Mode Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandhu, Gurpreet Kaur, E-mail: Gurpreet.Sandhu2@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Dunscombe, Peter [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Meyer, Tyler [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Pavamani, Simon [Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Christian Medical College, Vellore (India); Khan, Rao [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare the relative utility of tissue harmonic (H) and brightness (B) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images of the prostate by studying interobserver and intraobserver variation in prostate delineation. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with early-stage disease were randomly selected. TRUS images of prostates were acquired using B and H modes. The prostates on all images were contoured by an experienced radiation oncologist (RO) and five equally trained observers. The observers were blinded to information regarding patient and imaging mode. The volumes of prostate glands and areas of midgland slices were calculated. Volumes contoured were compared among the observers and between observer group and RO. Contours on one patient were repeated five times by four observers to evaluate the intraobserver variability. Results: A one-sample Student t-test showed the volumes outlined by five observers are in agreement (p > 0.05) with the RO. Paired Student t-test showed prostate volumes (p = 0.008) and midgland areas (p = 0.006) with H mode were significantly smaller than that with B mode. Two-factor analysis of variances showed significant interobserver variability (p < 0.001) in prostate volumes and areas. Inter- and intraobserver consistency was quantified as the standard deviation of mean volumes and areas, and concordance indices. It was found that for small glands ({<=}35 cc) H mode provided greater interobserver consistency; however, for large glands ({>=}35 cc), B mode provided more consistent estimates. Conclusions: H mode provided superior inter- and intraobserver agreement in prostate volume definition for small to medium prostates. In large glands, H mode does not exhibit any additional advantage. Although harmonic imaging has not proven advantageous for all cases, its utilization seems to be judicious for small prostates.

  10. Can Images Obtained With High Field Strength Magnetic Resonance Imaging Reduce Contouring Variability of the Prostate?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usmani, Nawaid, E-mail: Nawaid.Usmani@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Sloboda, Ron [Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Kamal, Wafa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Ghosh, Sunita [Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Department of Experimental Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Pervez, Nadeem; Pedersen, John; Yee, Don; Danielson, Brita; Murtha, Albert; Amanie, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Monajemi, Tara [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to determine whether there is less contouring variability of the prostate using higher-strength magnetic resonance images (MRI) compared with standard MRI and computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Forty patients treated with prostate brachytherapy were accrued to a prospective study that included the acquisition of 1.5-T MR and CT images at specified time points. A subset of 10 patients had additional 3.0-T MR images acquired at the same time as their 1.5-T MR scans. Images from each of these patients were contoured by 5 radiation oncologists, with a random subset of patients repeated to quantify intraobserver contouring variability. To minimize bias in contouring the prostate, the image sets were placed in folders in a random order with all identifiers removed from the images. Results: Although there was less interobserver contouring variability in the overall prostate volumes in 1.5-T MRI compared with 3.0-T MRI (p < 0.01), there was no significant differences in contouring variability in the different regions of the prostate between 1.5-T MRI and 3.0-T MRI. MRI demonstrated significantly less interobserver contouring variability in both 1.5-T and 3.0-T compared with CT in overall prostate volumes (p < 0.01, p = 0.01), with the greatest benefits being appreciated in the base of the prostate. Overall, there was less intraobserver contouring variability than interobserver contouring variability for all of the measurements analyzed. Conclusions: Use of 3.0-T MRI does not demonstrate a significant improvement in contouring variability compared with 1.5-T MRI, although both magnetic strengths demonstrated less contouring variability compared with CT.

  11. Physician Beliefs and Practices for Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Showalter, Timothy N.; Ohri, Nitin; Teti, Kristopher G.; Foley, Kathleen A.; Keith, Scott W.; Trabulsi, Edouard J.; Lallas, Costas D.; Dicker, Adam P.; Hoffman-Censits, Jean; Pizzi, Laura T.; Gomella, Leonard G.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Despite results of randomized trials that support adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer with adverse pathologic features (APF), many clinicians favor selective use of salvage RT. This survey was conducted to evaluate the beliefs and practices of radiation oncologists (RO) and urologists (U) regarding RT after RP. Methods and Materials: We designed a Web-based survey of post-RP RT beliefs and policies. Survey invitations were e-mailed to a list of 926 RO and 591 U. APF were defined as extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, or positive surgical margin. Differences between U and RO in adjuvant RT recommendations were evaluated by comparative statistics. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate factors predictive of adjuvant RT recommendation. Results: Analyzable surveys were completed by 218 RO and 92 U (overallresponse rate, 20%). Adjuvant RT was recommended based on APF by 68% of respondents (78% RO, 44% U, p <0.001). U were less likely than RO to agree that adjuvant RT improves survival and/or biochemical control (p < 0.0001). PSA thresholds for salvage RT were higher among U than RO (p < 0.001). Predicted rates of erectile dysfunction due to RT were higher among U than RO (p <0.001). On multivariate analysis, respondent specialty was the only predictor of adjuvant RT recommendations. Conclusions: U are less likely than RO to recommend adjuvant RT. Future research efforts should focus on defining the toxicities of post-RP RT and on identifying the subgroups of patients who will benefit from adjuvant vs. selective salvage RT.

  12. SU-E-T-460: Comparison of Proton and IMRT Planning for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fontenla, S; Zhou, Y; Kowalski, A; Mah, D; Leven, T; Cahlon, O; Lee, N; Hunt, M; Mechalakos, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A retrospective study comparing proton and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer Methods: This study consists of six H and N cancer patients that underwent proton as well as IMRT planning. Patients analyzed had unilateral target volumes, one had prior RT. 3D-conformal proton therapy (3D-CPT) plans with multiple field uniform scanning were generated for delivery on the inclined beam line. IMRT was planned using fixed field sliding window. Final plan evaluations were performed by a radiation oncologist and a physicist. Metrics for comparison included tumor coverage, organ sparing with respect to spinal cord, brainstem, parotids, submandibulars, oral cavity, larynx, brachial plexus, cochleas, normal brain tissue, and skin using relevant indices for these structures. Dose volume histograms were generated as well as a qualitative comparison of isodose distributions between the two modalities. Planning and treatment delivery times were compared. Results: Results showed that IMRT plans offered better conformality in the high dose region as demonstrated by the conformality index for each plan. Ipsilateral cochlea, submandibular gland, and skin doses were lower with IMRT than proton therapy. There was significant sparing of larynx, oral cavity, and brainstem with proton therapy compared to IMRT. This translated into direct patient benefit with no evidence of hoarseness, mucositis, or nausea. Contralateral parotid and submandibular glands were equally spared. IMRT had shorter planning/parts fabrication and treatment times which needs to be taken into account when deciding modality. Conclusion: Sparing of clinically significant normal tissue structures such as oral cavity and larynx for unilateral H and N cancers was seen with 3D-CPT versus IMRT. However, this is at the expense of less conformality at the high dose region and higher skin dose. Future studies are needed with full gantry systems and pencil beam scanning as these deliveries would be expected to further improve conformality and normal tissue sparing.

  13. Internet-Based Survey Evaluating Use of Pain Medications and Attitudes of Radiation Oncology Patients Toward Pain Intervention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simone, Charles B. Vapiwala, Neha; Hampshire, Margaret K.; Metz, James M.

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: Pain is a common symptom among cancer patients, yet many patients do not receive adequate pain management. Few data exist quantifying analgesic use by radiation oncology patients. This study evaluated the causes of pain in cancer patients and investigated the reasons patients fail to receive optimal analgesic therapy. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved, Internet-based questionnaire assessing analgesic use and pain control was posted on the OncoLink (available at (www.oncolink.org)) Website. Between November 2005 and April 2006, 243 patients responded. They were predominantly women (73%), white (71%), and educated beyond high school (67%) and had breast (38%), lung (6%), or ovarian (6%) cancer. This analysis evaluated the 106 patients (44%) who underwent radiotherapy. Results: Of the 106 patients, 58% reported pain from their cancer treatment, and 46% reported pain directly from their cancer. The pain was chronic in 51% and intermittent in 33%. Most (80%) did not use medication to manage their pain. Analgesic use was significantly less in patients with greater education levels (11% vs. 36%, p = 0.002), with a trend toward lower use by whites (16% vs. 32%, p 0.082) and women (17% vs. 29%, p = 0.178). The reasons for not taking analgesics included healthcare provider not recommending medication (87%), fear of addiction or dependence (79%), and inability to pay (79%). Participants experiencing pain, but not taking analgesics, pursued alternative therapies for relief. Conclusions: Many radiation oncology patients experience pain from their disease and cancer treatment. Most study participants did not use analgesics because of concerns of addiction, cost, or failure of the radiation oncologist to recommend medication. Healthcare providers should have open discussions with their patients regarding pain symptoms and treatment.

  14. Final LDRD report : development of sample preparation methods for ChIPMA-based imaging mass spectrometry of tissue samples.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maharrey, Sean P.; Highley, Aaron M.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.; Wiese-Smith, Deneille

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this short-term LDRD project was to acquire the tools needed to use our chemical imaging precision mass analyzer (ChIPMA) instrument to analyze tissue samples. This effort was an outgrowth of discussions with oncologists on the need to find the cellular origin of signals in mass spectra of serum samples, which provide biomarkers for ovarian cancer. The ultimate goal would be to collect chemical images of biopsy samples allowing the chemical images of diseased and nondiseased sections of a sample to be compared. The equipment needed to prepare tissue samples have been acquired and built. This equipment includes an cyro-ultramicrotome for preparing thin sections of samples and a coating unit. The coating unit uses an electrospray system to deposit small droplets of a UV-photo absorbing compound on the surface of the tissue samples. Both units are operational. The tissue sample must be coated with the organic compound to enable matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and matrix enhanced secondary ion mass spectrometry (ME-SIMS) measurements with the ChIPMA instrument Initial plans to test the sample preparation using human tissue samples required development of administrative procedures beyond the scope of this LDRD. Hence, it was decided to make two types of measurements: (1) Testing the spatial resolution of ME-SIMS by preparing a substrate coated with a mixture of an organic matrix and a bio standard and etching a defined pattern in the coating using a liquid metal ion beam, and (2) preparing and imaging C. elegans worms. Difficulties arose in sectioning the C. elegans for analysis and funds and time to overcome these difficulties were not available in this project. The facilities are now available for preparing biological samples for analysis with the ChIPMA instrument. Some further investment of time and resources in sample preparation should make this a useful tool for chemical imaging applications.

  15. Results of a Quality Assurance Review of External Beam Radiation Therapy in the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (Europe) Neuroblastoma Group's High-risk Neuroblastoma Trial: A SIOPEN Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaze, Mark N., E-mail: mark.gaze@uclh.nhs.uk [Department of Oncology, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Boterberg, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Dieckmann, Karin; Hoermann, Marcus [General Hospital Vienna, Medical University Vienna (Austria)] [General Hospital Vienna, Medical University Vienna (Austria); Gains, Jennifer E.; Sullivan, Kevin P. [Department of Oncology, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)] [Department of Oncology, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ladenstein, Ruth [Children's Cancer Research Institute, St. Anna Children's Hospital, Vienna (Austria)] [Children's Cancer Research Institute, St. Anna Children's Hospital, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is important for local control in neuroblastoma. This study reviewed the compliance of plans with the radiation therapy guidelines of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (Europe) Neuroblastoma Group (SIOPEN) High-Risk Trial protocol. Methods and Materials: The SIOPEN trial central electronic database has sections to record diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy planning data. Individual centers may upload data remotely, but not all centers involved in the trial chose to use this system. A quality scoring system was devised based on how well the radiation therapy plan matched the protocol guidelines, to what extent deviations were justified, and whether adverse effects may result. Central review of radiation therapy planning was undertaken retrospectively in 100 patients for whom complete diagnostic and treatment sets were available. Data were reviewed and compared against protocol guidelines by an international team of radiation oncologists and radiologists. For each patient in the sample, the central review team assigned a quality assurance score. Results: It was found that in 48% of patients there was full compliance with protocol requirements. In 29%, there were deviations for justifiable reasons with no likely long-term adverse effects resulting. In 5%, deviations had occurred for justifiable reasons, but that might result in adverse effects. In 1%, there was a deviation with no discernible justification, which would not lead to long-term adverse events. In 17%, unjustified deviations were noted, with a risk of an adverse outcome resulting. Conclusions: Owing to concern over the proportion of patients in whom unjustified deviations were observed, a protocol amendment has been issued. This offers the opportunity for central review of radiation therapy plans before the start of treatment and the treating clinician a chance to modify plans.

  16. A Prospective, Multicenter Study of Complementary/Alternative Medicine (CAM) Utilization During Definitive Radiation for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, Meena S.; Ma Shuangge; Jagsi, Reshma; Yang, Tzu-I Jonathan; Higgins, Susan A.; Department of Radiation Therapy, Shoreline Medical Center, Guilford, Connecticut ; Weidhaas, Joanne B.; Wilson, Lynn D.; Department of Radiation Therapy, Lawrence and Memorial Hospital, New London, Connecticut ; Lloyd, Shane; Peschel, Richard; Department of Radiation Therapy, Lawrence and Memorial Hospital, New London, Connecticut ; Gaudreau, Bryant; Rockwell, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Although complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) utilization in breast cancer patients is reported to be high, there are few data on CAM practices in breast patients specifically during radiation. This prospective, multi-institutional study was conducted to define CAM utilization in breast cancer during definitive radiation. Materials/Methods: A validated CAM instrument with a self-skin assessment was administered to 360 Stage 0-III breast cancer patients from 5 centers during the last week of radiation. All data were analyzed to detect significant differences between users/nonusers. Results: CAM usage was reported in 54% of the study cohort (n=194/360). Of CAM users, 71% reported activity-based CAM (eg, Reiki, meditation), 26% topical CAM, and 45% oral CAM. Only 16% received advice/counseling from naturopathic/homeopathic/medical professionals before initiating CAM. CAM use significantly correlated with higher education level (P<.001), inversely correlated with concomitant hormone/radiation therapy use (P=.010), with a trend toward greater use in younger patients (P=.066). On multivariate analysis, level of education (OR: 6.821, 95% CI: 2.307-20.168, P<.001) and hormones/radiation therapy (OR: 0.573, 95% CI: 0.347-0.949, P=.031) independently predicted for CAM use. Significantly lower skin toxicity scores were reported in CAM users vs nonusers, respectively (mild: 34% vs 25%, severe: 17% vs 29%, P=.017). Conclusion: This is the first prospective study to assess CAM practices in breast patients during radiation, with definition of these practices as the first step for future investigation of CAM/radiation interactions. These results should alert radiation oncologists that a large percentage of breast cancer patients use CAM during radiation without disclosure or consideration for potential interactions, and should encourage increased awareness, communication, and documentation of CAM practices in patients undergoing radiation treatment for breast cancer.

  17. The 1980-1982 Geothermal Resource Assessment Program in Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korosec, Michael A.; Phillips, William M.; Schuster, J.Eric

    1983-08-01

    Since 1978, the Division of Geology and Earth Resources of the Washington Department of Natural Resources has participated in the U.S. Department of Energy's (USDOE) State-Coupled Geothermal Resource Program. Federal and state funds have been used to investigate and evaluate the potential for geothermal resources, on both a reconnaissance and area-specific level. Preliminary results and progress reports for the period up through mid-1980 have already been released as a Division Open File Report (Korosec, Schuster, and others, 1981). Preliminary results and progress summaries of work carried out from mid-1980 through the end of 1982 are presented in this report. Only one other summary report dealing with geothermal resource investigations in the state has been published. An Information Circular released by the Division (Schuster and others, 1978) compiled the geology, geochemistry, and heat flow drilling results from a project in the Indian Heaven area in the south Cascades. The previous progress report for the geothermal program (Korosec, Schuster, and others, 1981) included information on temperature gradients measured throughout the state, heat flow drilling in the southern Cascades, gravity surveys for the southern Cascades, thermal and mineral spring investigations, geologic mapping for the White Pass-Tumac Mountain area, and area specific studies for the Camas area of Clark County and Mount St. Helens. This work, along with some additional studies, led to the compilation of the Geothermal Resources of Washington map (Korosec, Kaler, and others, 1981). The map is principally a nontechnical presentation based on all available geothermal information, presented as data points, tables, and text on a map with a scale of 1:500,000.

  18. The management of imaging dose during image-guided radiotherapy: Report of the AAPM Task Group 75

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Martin J.; Balter, James; Balter, Stephen; BenComo, Jose A. Jr.; Das, Indra J.; Jiang, Steve B.; Ma, C.-M.; Olivera, Gustavo H.; Rodebaugh, Raymond F.; Ruchala, Kenneth J.; Shirato, Hiroki; Yin, Fang-Fang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Departments of Medicine and Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 10021 (United States) and Department of Radiation Physics, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); St. Joseph's Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona 85013 (United States); TomoTherapy, Inc., Madison, Wisconsin 53717 (United States); Department of Radiology, Hokkaido University Hospital, Hokkaido (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2007-10-15

    Radiographic image guidance has emerged as the new paradigm for patient positioning, target localization, and external beam alignment in radiotherapy. Although widely varied in modality and method, all radiographic guidance techniques have one thing in common--they can give a significant radiation dose to the patient. As with all medical uses of ionizing radiation, the general view is that this exposure should be carefully managed. The philosophy for dose management adopted by the diagnostic imaging community is summarized by the acronym ALARA, i.e., as low as reasonably achievable. But unlike the general situation with diagnostic imaging and image-guided surgery, image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) adds the imaging dose to an already high level of therapeutic radiation. There is furthermore an interplay between increased imaging and improved therapeutic dose conformity that suggests the possibility of optimizing rather than simply minimizing the imaging dose. For this reason, the management of imaging dose during radiotherapy is a different problem than its management during routine diagnostic or image-guided surgical procedures. The imaging dose received as part of a radiotherapy treatment has long been regarded as negligible and thus has been quantified in a fairly loose manner. On the other hand, radiation oncologists examine the therapy dose distribution in minute detail. The introduction of more intensive imaging procedures for IGRT now obligates the clinician to evaluate therapeutic and imaging doses in a more balanced manner. This task group is charged with addressing the issue of radiation dose delivered via image guidance techniques during radiotherapy. The group has developed this charge into three objectives: (1) Compile an overview of image-guidance techniques and their associated radiation dose levels, to provide the clinician using a particular set of image guidance techniques with enough data to estimate the total diagnostic dose for a specific treatment scenario (2) identify ways to reduce the total imaging dose without sacrificing essential imaging information, and (3) recommend optimization strategies to trade off imaging dose with improvements in therapeutic dose delivery. The end goal is to enable the design of image guidance regimens that are as effective and efficient as possible.

  19. A One-Step Cone-Beam CT-Enabled Planning-to-Treatment Model for Palliative Radiotherapy-From Development to Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Rebecca K.S.; Letourneau, Daniel; Varma, Anita; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario ; Bissonnette, Jean Pierre; Fitzpatrick, David; Grabarz, Daniel; Elder, Christine; Martin, Melanie; Bezjak, Andrea; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario ; Panzarella, Tony; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario ; Jaffray, David A.; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To develop a cone-beam computed tomography (CT)-enabled one-step simulation-to-treatment process for the treatment of bone metastases. Methods and Materials: A three-phase prospective study was conducted. Patients requiring palliative radiotherapy to the spine, mediastinum, or abdomen/pelvis suitable for treatment with simple beam geometry ({<=}2 beams) were accrued. Phase A established the accuracy of cone-beam CT images for the purpose of gross tumor target volume (GTV) definition. Phase B evaluated the feasibility of implementing the cone-beam CT-enabled planning process at the treatment unit. Phase C evaluated the online cone-beam CT-enabled process for the planning and treatment of patients requiring radiotherapy for bone metastases. Results: Eighty-four patients participated in this study. Phase A (n = 9) established the adequacy of cone-beam CT images for target definition. Phase B (n = 45) established the quality of treatment plans to be adequate for clinical implementation for bone metastases. When the process was applied clinically in bone metastases (Phase C), the degree of overlap between planning computed tomography (PCT) and cone-beam CT for GTV and between PCT and cone-beam CT for treatment field was 82% {+-} 11% and 97% {+-} 4%, respectively. The oncologist's decision to accept the plan under a time-pressured environment remained of high quality, with the cone-beam CT-generated treatment plan delivering at least 90% of the prescribed dose to 100% {+-} 0% of the cone-beam CT planning target volume (PTV). With the assumption that the PCT PTV is the gold-standard target, the cone-beam CT-generated treatment plan delivered at least 90% and at least 95% of dose to 98% {+-} 2% and 97% {+-} 5% of the PCT PTV, respectively. The mean time for the online planning and treatment process was 32.7 {+-} 4.0 minutes. Patient satisfaction was high, with a trend for superior satisfaction with the cone-beam CT-enabled process. Conclusions: The cone-beam CT-enabled palliative treatment process is feasible and is ready for clinical implementation for the treatment of bone metastases using simple beam geometry, providing a streamlined one-step process toward palliative radiotherapy.

  20. SU-E-J-214: Comparative Assessment On IGRT On Partial Bladder Cancer Treatment Between CT-On-Rails (CTOR) and KV Cone Beam CT (CBCT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, T; Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Image-Guided radiation therapy(IGRT) depends on reliable online patient-specific anatomy information to address random and progressive anatomy changes. Large margins have been suggested to bladder cancer treatment due to large daily bladder anatomy variation. KV Cone beam CT(CBCT) has been used in IGRT localization prevalently; however, its lack of soft tissue contrast makes clinicians hesitate to perform daily soft tissue alignment with CBCT for partial bladder cancer treatment. This study compares the localization uncertainties of bladder cancer IGRT using CTon- Rails(CTOR) and CBCT. Methods: Three T2N0M0 bladder cancer patients (total of 66 Gy to partial bladder alone) were localized daily with either CTOR or CBCT for their entire treatment course. A total of 71 sets of CTOR and 22 sets of CBCT images were acquired and registered with original planning CT scans by radiation therapists and approved by radiation oncologists for the daily treatment. CTOR scanning entailed 2mm slice thickness, 0.98mm axial voxel size, 120kVp and 240mAs. CBCT used a half fan pelvis protocol from Varian OBI system with 2mm slice thickness, 0.98axial voxel size, 125kVp, and 680mAs. Daily localization distribution was compared. Accuracy of CTOR and CBCT on partial bladder alignment was also evaluated by comparing bladder PTV coverage. Results: 1cm all around PTV margins were used in every patient except target superior limit margin to 0mm due to bowel constraint. Daily shifts on CTOR averaged to 0.48, 0.24, 0.19 mms(SI,Lat,AP directions); CBCT averaged to 0.43, 0.09, 0.19 mms(SI,Lat,AP directions). The CTOR daily localization showed superior results of V100% of PTV(102% CTOR vs. 89% CBCT) and bowel(Dmax 69.5Gy vs. 78Gy CBCT). CTOR images showed much higher contrast on bladder PTV alignment. Conclusion: CTOR daily localization for IGRT is more dosimetrically beneficial for partial bladder cancer treatment than kV CBCT localization and provided better soft tissue PTV identification.

  1. SU-E-J-153: MRI Based, Daily Adaptive Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer: Contour Adaptation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleijnen, J; Burbach, M; Verbraeken, T; Weggers, R; Zoetelief, A; Reerink, O; Lagendijk, J; Raaymakers, B; Asselen, B [University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A major hurdle in adaptive radiotherapy is the adaptation of the planning MRI's delineations to the daily anatomy. We therefore investigate the accuracy and time needed for online clinical target volume (CTV) adaptation by radiation therapists (RTT), to be used in MRI-guided adaptive treatments on a MRI-Linac (MRL). Methods: Sixteen patients, diagnosed with early stage rectal cancer, underwent a T2-weighted MRI prior to each fraction of short-course radiotherapy, resulting in 45 scans per patient. On these scans, the CTV was delineated according to guidelines by an experienced radiation oncologist (RO) and considered to be the gold standard. For each patient, the first MRI was considered as the planning MRI and matched on bony anatomy to the 34 daily MRIs. The planning MRI's CTV delineation was rigidly propagated to the daily MRI scans as a proposal for adaptation. Three RTTs in training started the adaptation of the CTV conform guidelines, after a two hour training lecture and a two patient (n=7) training set. To assess the inter-therapist variation, all three RTTs altered delineations of 3 patients (n=12). One RTT altered the CTV delineations (n=53) of the remaining 11 patients. Time needed for adaptation of the CTV to guidelines was registered.As a measure of agreement, the conformity index (CI) was determined between the RTTs' delineations as a group. Dice similarity coefficients were determined between delineations of the RTT and the RO. Results: We found good agreement between RTTs' and RO's delineations (average Dice=0.91, SD=0.03). Furthermore, the inter-observer agreement between the RTTs was high (average CI=0.94, SD=0.02). Adaptation time reduced from 10:33 min (SD= 3:46) to 2:56 min (SD=1:06) between the first and last ten delineations, respectively. Conclusion: Daily CTV adaptation by RTTs, seems a feasible and safe way to introduce daily, online MRI-based plan adaptation for a MRL.

  2. SU-E-T-272: Radiation Damage Comparison Between Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and Field-In-Field Technique in Breast Cancer Treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ai, H; Zhang, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare normal tissue complications between IMRT and FIF treatment in breast cancer. Methods: 16 patients treated with IMRT plan and 20 patients treated with FIF plan were evaluated in this study. Both kinds of plans were generated using Eclipse treatment planning system by dosimetrist following clinical radiotherapy treatment guidelines. The plans were reviewed and approved by radiation oncologist. The average survival fraction (SF) for three different normal tissue cells of each concerned structure can be calculated from differential dose volume histogram (DVH) using linear quadratic model. The three types of normal tissues include radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant that represents 70%, 50% and 30% survival fractions, respectively, for a 2-Gy open field. Equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for corresponding normal tissues of each structure were calculated. Results: The EUDs of the lungs, heart, healthy breast and spinal cord with both IMRT and FIF treatments were calculated. Considering the average value of all IMRT plans, the lung of treated side absorbed 16.0% of dosage prescribed to the tumor if the radiosensitivity of the lung is similar to the radiosensitive cell line. For moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, the average EUDs can be 18.9% and 22.4% of prescription. In contrast, patients treated with FIF plans were delivered 6.0%, 7.5% and 10.3% of prescribed dose for radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, respectively. Comparing heart EUDs between IMRT and FIF plans, average absorbed doses in IMRT treatment were 7.7%, 8.7% and 9.7% of prescription for three types of heart normal tissue cell lines while FIF treatments delivered only 1.3%, 1.5% and 1.6% of prescription dose. For the other organs, the results were similar. Conclusion: The results indicated that breast cancer treatment using IMRT technique had more normal tissue damage than FIF treatment. FIF demonstrated more effective normal tissue dose reduction in breast cancer treatment.

  3. SU-C-17A-05: Quantification of Intra-Fraction Motion of Breast Tumors Using Cine-MRI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heijst, T van; Philippens, M; Bongard, D van den; Asselen, B van; Lagendijk, J; Kleijnen, J; Hartogh, M den

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables direct characterization of intra-fraction motion ofbreast tumors, due to high softtissue contrast and geometric accuracy. The purpose is to analyzethis motion in early-stage breast-cancer patients using pre-operative supine cine-MRI. Methods: MRI was performed in 12 female early-stage breast-cancer patients on a 1.5-T Ingenia (Philips)wide-bore scanner in supine radiotherapy (RT) position, prior to breast-conserving surgery. Twotwodimensional (2D) T2-weighted balanced fast-field echo (cine-MRI) sequences were added tothe RT protocol, oriented through the tumor. They were alternately acquired in the transverse andsagittal planes, every 0.3 s during 1 min. A radiation oncologist delineated gross target volumes(GTVs) on 3D contrast-enhanced MRI. Clinical target volumes (CTV = GTV + 15 mm isotropic)were generated and transferred onto the fifth time-slice of the time-series, to which subsequents lices were registered using a non-rigid Bspline algorithm; delineations were transformed accordingly. To evaluate intra-fraction CTV motion, deformation fields between the transformed delineations were derived to acquire the distance ensuring 95% surface coverage during scanning(P95%), for all in-plane directions: anteriorposterior (AP), left-right (LR), and caudal-cranial(CC). Information on LR was derived from transverse scans, CC from sagittal scans, AP fromboth sets. Results: Time-series with registration errors - induced by motion artifacts - were excluded by visual inspection. For our analysis, 11 transverse, and 8 sagittal time-series were taken into account. Themedian P95% calculated in AP (19 series), CC (8), and LR (11) was 1.8 mm (range: 0.94.8), 1.7mm (0.83.6), and 1.0 mm (0.63.5), respectively. Conclusion: Intra-fraction motion analysis of breast tumors was achieved using cine-MRI. These first results show that in supine RT position, motion amplitudes are limited. This information can be used for adaptive RT planning, and to develop preoperative partial-breast RT strategies, such asablative RT for early-stage breast-cancer patients.

  4. Proc. of the workshop on pushing the limits of RF superconductivity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K-J., Eyberger, C., editors

    2005-04-13

    For three days in late September last year, some sixty experts in RF superconductivity from around the world came together at Argonne to discuss how to push the limits of RF superconductivity for particle accelerators. It was an intense workshop with in-depth presentations and ample discussions. There was added excitement due to the fact that, a few days before the workshop, the International Technology Recommendation Panel had decided in favor of superconducting technology for the International Linear Collider (ILC), the next major high-energy physics accelerator project. Superconducting RF technology is also important for other large accelerator projects that are either imminent or under active discussion at this time, such as the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) for nuclear physics, energy recovery linacs (ERLs), and x-ray free-electron lasers. For these accelerators, the capability in maximum accelerating gradient and/or the Q value is essential to limit the length and/or operating cost of the accelerators. The technological progress of superconducting accelerators during the past two decades has been truly remarkable, both in low-frequency structures for acceleration of protons and ions as well as in high-frequency structures for electrons. The requirements of future accelerators demand an even higher level of performance. The topics of this workshop are therefore highly relevant and timely. The presentations given at the workshop contained authoritative reviews of the current state of the art as well as some original materials that previously had not been widely circulated. We therefore felt strongly that these materials should be put together in the form of a workshop proceeding. The outcome is this report, which consists of two parts: first, a collection of the scholarly papers prepared by some of the participants and second, copies of the viewgraphs of all presentations. The presentation viewgraphs, in full color, are also available from the Workshop Presentations link on the workshop's web page at http://www.aps.anl.gov/conferences/RFSCLimits/. I would like to thank all of the participants for their lively contributions to the workshop and to these proceedings, and Helen Edwards and Hasan Padamsee for their help in developing the workshop program. I also thank Cathy Eyberger, Kelly Jaje, and Renee Lanham for working very hard to take care of the administrative details, in particular Cathy for editing this report.

  5. Report on the TESLA Engineering Study/Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornuelle, John C.

    2002-08-30

    In March, 2001, the TESLA Collaboration published its Technical Design Report (TDR, see references and links in Appendix), the first sentence of which stated ''...TESLA (TeV-Energy Superconducting Linear Collider) (will be) a superconducting electron-positron collider of initially 500 GeV total energy, extendable to 800 GeV, and an integrated X-ray laser laboratory.'' The TDR included cost and manpower estimates for a 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider (250 on 250 GeV) based on superconducting RF cavity technology. This was submitted as a proposal to the German government. The government asked the German Science Council to evaluate this proposal. The recommendation from this body is anticipated to be available by November 2002. The government has indicated that it will react on this recommendation by mid-2003. In June 2001, Steve Holmes, Fermilab's Associate Director for Accelerators, commissioned Helen Edwards and Peter Garbincius to organize a study of the TESLA Technical Design Report and the associated cost and manpower estimates. Since the elements and methodology used in producing the TESLA cost estimate were somewhat different from those used in preparing similar estimates for projects within the U.S., it is important to understand the similarities, differences, and equivalences between the TESLA estimate and U.S. cost estimates. In particular, the project cost estimate includes only purchased equipment, materials, and services, but not manpower from DESY or other TESLA collaborating institutions, which is listed separately. It does not include the R&D on the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) nor the costs of preparing the TDR nor the costs of performing the conceptual studies so far. The manpower for the pre-operations commissioning program (up to beam) is included in the estimate, but not the electrical power or liquid Nitrogen (for initial cooldown of the cryogenics plant). There is no inclusion of any contingency or management reserve. If the U.S. were to become involved with the TESLA project, either as a collaborator for an LC in Germany, or as host country for TESLA in the U.S., it is important to begin to understand the scope and technical details of the project, what R&D still needs to be done, and how the U.S. can contribute. The charge for this study is included in the Appendix to this report.