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Sample records for oncologist helen vodopick

  1. Yun (Helen) He

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as strategies to improve IO performance. Wendy Hwa-Chun Lin, Yun (Helen) He, and Woo-Sun Yang, "Franklin Job Completion Analysis", Cray User Group 2010 Proceedings, Edinburgh,...

  2. Isotopic Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 2000...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 2000) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt St Helens Area Exploration Technique...

  3. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 2000) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt St Helens Area Exploration Technique...

  4. Geothermometry At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff,...

  5. Isotopic Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt St Helens Area Exploration Technique...

  6. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt St Helens Area Exploration Technique...

  7. How Radiation Oncologists Would Disclose Errors: Results of a Survey of Radiation Oncologists and Trainees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Suzanne B.; Yu, James B.; Chagpar, Anees

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To analyze error disclosure attitudes of radiation oncologists and to correlate error disclosure beliefs with survey-assessed disclosure behavior. Methods and Materials: With institutional review board exemption, an anonymous online survey was devised. An email invitation was sent to radiation oncologists (American Society for Radiation Oncology [ASTRO] gold medal winners, program directors and chair persons of academic institutions, and former ASTRO lecturers) and residents. A disclosure score was calculated based on the number or full, partial, or no disclosure responses chosen to the vignette-based questions, and correlation was attempted with attitudes toward error disclosure. Results: The survey received 176 responses: 94.8% of respondents considered themselves more likely to disclose in the setting of a serious medical error; 72.7% of respondents did not feel it mattered who was responsible for the error in deciding to disclose, and 3.9% felt more likely to disclose if someone else was responsible; 38.0% of respondents felt that disclosure increased the likelihood of a lawsuit, and 32.4% felt disclosure decreased the likelihood of lawsuit; 71.6% of respondents felt near misses should not be disclosed; 51.7% thought that minor errors should not be disclosed; 64.7% viewed disclosure as an opportunity for forgiveness from the patient; and 44.6% considered the patient's level of confidence in them to be a factor in disclosure. For a scenario that could be considerable, a non-harmful error, 78.9% of respondents would not contact the family. Respondents with high disclosure scores were more likely to feel that disclosure was an opportunity for forgiveness (P=.003) and to have never seen major medical errors (P=.004). Conclusions: The surveyed radiation oncologists chose to respond with full disclosure at a high rate, although ideal disclosure practices were not uniformly adhered to beyond the initial decision to disclose the occurrence of the error.

  8. Aeromagnetic Survey At Mt St Helens Area (Towle, 1983) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    structure of Mount St. Helens in more detail. Electrical and electromagnetic methods would be especially useful in determining the actual electrical conductivity of...

  9. Water Sampling At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) Exploration Activity Details...

  10. LWA-0006- In the Matter of Helen Gaidine Oglesbee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Decision involves a whistleblower complaint filed by Helen Gaidine Oglesbee (Oglesbee) under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Oglesbee has...

  11. Coordination of Breast Cancer Care Between Radiation Oncologists and Surgeons: A Survey Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Abrahamse, Paul; Morrow, Monica; Hamilton, Ann S.; Katz, Steven J.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To assess whether radiation oncologists and surgeons differ in their attitudes regarding the local management of breast cancer, and to examine coordination of care between these specialists. Methods and Materials: We surveyed attending surgeons and radiation oncologists who treated a population-based sample of patients diagnosed with breast cancer in metropolitan Detroit and Los Angeles. We identified 419 surgeons, of whom 318 (76%) responded, and 160 radiation oncologists, of whom 117 (73%) responded. We assessed demographic, professional, and practice characteristics; challenges to coordinated care; and attitudes toward management in three scenarios. Results: 92.1% of surgeons and 94.8% of radiation oncologists indicated access to a multidisciplinary tumor board. Nevertheless, the most commonly identified challenge to radiation oncologists, cited by 27.9%, was failure of other providers to include them in the treatment decision process early enough. Nearly half the surgeons (49.7%) stated that few or almost none of the breast cancer patients they saw in the past 12 months had consulted with a radiation oncologist before undergoing definitive surgery. Surgeons and radiation oncologists differed in their recommendations in management scenarios. Radiation oncologists were more likely to favor radiation than were surgeons for a patient with 3/20 lymph nodes undergoing mastectomy (p = 0.03); surgeons were more likely to favor more widely clear margins after breast conservation than were radiation oncologists (p = 0.001). Conclusions: Despite the widespread availability of tumor boards, a substantial minority of radiation oncologists indicated other providers failed to include them in the breast cancer treatment decision-making process early enough. Earlier inclusion of radiation oncologists may influence patient decisions, and interventions to facilitate this should be considered.

  12. Boise Inc. St. Helens Paper Mill Achieves Significant Fuel Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This case study describes how the Boise Inc. paper mill in St. Helens, Oregon, achieved annual savings of approximately 154,000 MMBtu and more than $1 million. This was accomplished after receiving a DOE energy assessment and implementing recommendations to improve the efficiency of its steam system.

  13. Richard Gerber Helen He, Zhengji Zhao, Chris Daley NUG Monthly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gerber Helen He, Zhengji Zhao, Chris Daley NUG Monthly Meeting --- 1 --- NUG M onthly M ee-ng October 2 , 2 014 Agenda * Hopper and Edison Status Updates * ERCAP ( Alloca-ons) U pdate * Queue C ommiIee T opics * NUGEX Elec-ons * NUG 2 015 M ee-ng P lanning * Mini---Seminar: S teps t o i mprove t he p erformance o f a h ydrodynamics a pplica-on o n t he I ntel M IC architecture --- 2 --- Edison Update" Zhengji Zhao, User Services --- 3 --- Edison Updates * 9/25 7 :30 P DT --- 9 /28 1 :30 P

  14. Mike Stewart and Helen He NERSC User Services Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Benchmark Performance of Different Compilers on a Cray XE6 Mike Stewart and Helen He NERSC User Services Group May 23-26, CUG 2011 2 Outline * Introduction * Available Compilers on Hopper * Recommended Compiler Options * Benchmarks Used in the study * Performance Results from Each Compiler * Summary and Recommendations 3 Hopper * Cray XE6, 6,384 nodes, 153,126 cores. * Each node has 2 twelve-core AMD MagnyCours 2.1 GHz procs. * 1.28 Pflops/peak, 212 TB memory. 4 Available Compilers on Hopper *

  15. PDF Document (2432k)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE/EH-0482 A ugust 1995 Interview with Helen Vodopick, M.D. Setting: D ecem ber 2 8,1994, Oak Ridge, T en n e ssee Interviewers: Marisa Caputo and David Harrell, DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments Did you have any mentors that you feel especially attached to or espe- cially grateful to for where your career has progressed? VODOPICK: When I was in training, we had several doctors who were very influen- tial. CAPUTO: Public Perception of Radiation and Medical Research CAPUTO: So, what do

  16. Helen T. Edwards, 1986 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Helen T. Edwards, 1986 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony...

  17. LWA-0006- Deputy Secretary Decision- In the Matter of Helen Gaidine Oglesbee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is an appeal by complainant Helen Gaidine Oglesbee of an Initial Agency Decision by an Office of Hearings and Appeals ("OHA") Hearing Officer. Following two days of hearings, the Hearing...

  18. Boise Inc. St. Helens Paper Mill Achieves Significant Fuel Savings; Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) Save Energy Now (SEN) Case Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boise Inc. St. Helens mill produces nearly 1,000 tons of pulp and specialty paper per day, including a wide variety of light-to-heavy paper and napkin grade tissues. Boise Inc. St. Helens Paper Mill Achieves Significant Fuel Savings Annual Energy Savings Exceed $1 Million Industrial Technologies Program Case Study Benefits * Achieved annual energy cost savings of more than $1 million * Achieved annual fuel savings of approximately 154,000 MMBtu * Revealed innovative method to save energy *

  19. Carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide from the eruptions of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, R.A.; Khalil, M.A.K.; Dalluge, R.W.; Penkett, S.A.; Jones, B.

    1982-01-01

    Ash from the massive 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens readily gave off large amounts of carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide gases at room temperature. These findings suggest that the sulfur that enhances the Junge sulfate layer in the stratosphere after volcanic eruptions could be carried directly to the upper atmosphere as carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide adsorbed on ash particles from major volcanic eruptions.

  20. Richard Gerber, Lisa Gerhardt, Harvey Wasserman, Helen He, Scott French, Zhengji

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lisa Gerhardt, Harvey Wasserman, Helen He, Scott French, Zhengji Zhao NUG Monthly Meeting --- 1 --- NUG M onthly M ee-ng September 11, 2014 Agenda * Hopper a nd E dison U -liza-on, B acklog, a nd Q ueue Waits * Edison memory replacement: down-me 9/25/14---9/29/14 * Carver S L6 O S u pgrade a nd C HOS * Hopper apsched e rrors * Update o n t he N ESAP p rogram a nd N ERSC A pplica-on Readiness f or C ori ( NERSC---8) * Dirac a nd C arver r e-rement r eminder * NUGEX Elec-ons * Mini---Seminar: P

  1. Franklin Job Completion Analysis Yun (Helen) He, Hwa-Chun Wendy Lin, and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Job Completion Analysis Yun (Helen) He, Hwa-Chun Wendy Lin, and Woo-Sun Yang National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center CUG 2010, May 24-27, Edinburgh 2 Our Goal * Identify and track system issues that cause user jobs to fail. Work with Cray to get them fixed. * Job completion report, i.e. how many jobs ran successfully and how many jobs failed for what reasons. 3 Our Data Job Completion rate = Success + User related failures 4 User Related Job Failures * Application Errors: APEXIT,

  2. Franklin XT4 to Hopper XE6 Katie Antypas and Helen He NERSC User Services Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transitioning Users from Franklin XT4 to Hopper XE6 Katie Antypas and Helen He NERSC User Services Group May 23-26, CUG 2011 2 Outline * Introduction * Hopper Early User Program * Effectively Using 24 Cores Per Node * I/O Performance * Bugs Found and Fixed * Error Messages * User Feedback * Ongoing Issues * Summary 3 Franklin and Hopper Franklin: Cray XT4 * 9,532 nodes, 38,128 cores * ~32 TFlop/s sustained * 356 TFlop/s peak Hopper: * Phase 1: Cray XT5, 668 nodes, 5,344 cores * Phase 2: Cray

  3. James M. Craw, Nicholas P. Cardo, Yun (Helen) He Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Post-Mortem of the NERSC Franklin XT Upgrade to CLE 2.1 James M. Craw, Nicholas P. Cardo, Yun (Helen) He Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA craw@nersc.gov, cardo@nersc.gov, yhe@lbl.gov And Janet M. Lebens Cray, Inc. jml@cray.com May 4, 2009 Atlanta CUG This presentation will discuss the lessons learned of the events leading up to the production deployment of CLE 2.1 and the post install issues experienced in upgrading NERSC's XT4(tm) system called Franklin CUG 2008 page 2

  4. Evaluation of radon progeny from Mount St. Helens eruptions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepel, E.A.; Olsen, K.B.; Thomas, V.W.; Eichner, F.N.

    1982-09-01

    A network of twelve monitoring sites around Mount St. Helens was established to evaluate possible short-lived radioactivity in the fallen ash. Seven sites were located near major population centers of Washington and Oregon, and five sites were located within 80 km of the volcano. Each site monitored the radioactivity present by the use of thermoluminescent dosimeters which recorded the total exposure to radioactivity over the exposure period. Eruptions occurring on July 22, August 7, and October 16 to 18, 1980 were monitored. No statistically significant quantities of measurable radon daughters were observed.

  5. Magmatic model for the Mount St. Helens blast of May 18, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichelberger, J.C.; Hayes, D.B.

    1982-09-10

    Analytical and numerical solutions to the hydrodynamic equations of motion, constrained by physical properties of juvenile ejecta in the Mount St. Helens blast deposit, were used to investigate magmatic conditions required to produce the initial devastating blast phase of the eruption of May 18, 1980. Evidence that the blast was magmatic includes equivalence in volume of juvenile blast ejecta to preeruption inflation of the cone, substantial vesicularity of this ejecta, and continued vesiculation of large juvenile clasts after eruption. Observed or inferred ejecta velocities of 100 to 250 m/s are shown to require 0.2 to 0.7 wt% water vapor preexisting in magma unloaded by a landslide 200 to 900 m thick. These conditions imply total magmatic water contents of 0.7 to 1.7 wt%, respectively. Such low required water content suggests that volcanic blasts may be regarded as a normal consequence of magma intrusion into an unstable edifice.

  6. Helen He!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NUG Meeting, 10/08/2015 Nested OpenMP OpenMP Execution Model * Fork and Join Model - Master thread forks new threads at the beginning of parallel regions. - Mul6ple threads share work in parallel. - Threads join at the end of the parallel regions. - 2 - Hopper/Edison Compute Nodes - 3 - * Hopper: NERSC Cray XE6, 6,384 nodes, 153,126 cores. * 4 NUMA domains per node, 6 cores per NUMA domain. * Edison: NERSC Cray XC30, 5,576 nodes, 133,824 cores. * 2 NUMA domains per node, 12 cores per NUMA

  7. Four-year prospective study of the respiratory effects of volcanic ash from Mt. St. Helens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buist, A.S.; Vollmer, W.M.; Johnson, L.R.; Bernstein, R.S.; McCamant, L.E.

    1986-04-01

    This report describes the 4-yr follow-up of 712 loggers exposed over an extended period to varying levels of fresh volcanic ash from the 1980 eruptions of Mt. St. Helens. Concerns related to the irritant effect the ash might have on the airways and also to its fibrogenic potential if exposures were intense and continued over many years. Our subjects were divided into 3 groups: high, low, and no exposure. Baseline testing was begun in June 1980, 1 month after the major eruption, and follow-up testing continued on an annual basis through 1984; 88% of the loggers have been tested at least 3 times. Analysis of lung function data showed that a significant, exposure-related decline in FEV1 occurred during the first year after the eruption. The decline was short-lived, however, and by 1984 the differences between exposure groups were no longer significant. Self-reported symptoms of cough, phlegm, and wheeze showed a similar pattern. No ash-related changes were seen in chest roentgenograms taken in 1980 and in 1984. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the inhaled ash caused mucus hypersecretion and/or airway inflammation that reversed when the exposure levels decreased. The ash levels to which the loggers were exposed were low compared with permissible occupational levels for nuisance dusts, but generally higher than the total suspended particulate levels permissible in ambient air.

  8. Mobile Technology and Social Media in the Clinical Practice of Young Radiation Oncologists: Results of a Comprehensive Nationwide Cross-sectional Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bibault, Jean-Emmanuel; Leroy, Thomas; Blanchard, Pierre; Biau, Julian; Cervellera, Mathilde; Diaz, Olivia; Faivre, Jean Christophe; and others

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Social media and mobile technology are transforming the way in which young physicians are learning and practicing medicine. The true impact of such technologies has yet to be evaluated. Methods and Materials: We performed a nationwide cross-sectional survey to better assess how young radiation oncologists used these technologies. An online survey was sent out between April 24, 2013, and June 1, 2013. All residents attending the 2013 radiation oncology French summer course were invited to complete the survey. Logistic regressions were performed to assess predictors of use of these tools in the hospital on various clinical endpoints. Results: In all, 131 of 140 (93.6%) French young radiation oncologists answered the survey. Of these individuals, 93% owned a smartphone and 32.8% owned a tablet. The majority (78.6%) of the residents owning a smartphone used it to work in their department. A total of 33.5% had more than 5 medical applications installed. Only 60.3% of the residents verified the validity of the apps that they used. In all, 82.9% of the residents had a social network account. Conclusions: Most of the residents in radiation oncology use their smartphone to work in their department for a wide variety of tasks. However, the residents do not consistently check the validity of the apps that they use. Residents also use social networks, with only a limited impact on their relationship with their patients. Overall, this study highlights the irruption and the risks of new technologies in the clinical practice and raises the question of a possible regulation of their use in the hospital.

  9. Helen He, NERSC!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC! ! Oct 20, 2015, Cray Quarterly Meeting! CCE/8.4.0 Beta Feedback from NERSC Users CCE/8.4.0 Beta Program * NERSC par*cipated the beta program to help improving the quality of the Cray's official CCE release. * Beta program dura*on: July 20 - Aug 14 (later extended to Sept 24, when CCE/8.4.0 was officially released) * CCE/8.4.0.215 installed on Edison on July 22. However license was not available un*l July 30. * No*fied 90 users who have used CCE this year. Collected feedback. *

  10. Yun (Helen) He, NERSC!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    :: id, nthreads OMP PARALLEL PRIVATE(id) id ompgetthreadnum() write (*,*) "Hello World from thread", id OMP BARRIER if ( id 0 ) then nthreads ...

  11. Yun (Helen) He

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    handshaking in a flexible way. A.P. Craig, R.L. Jacob, B. Kauffman, T. Bettge, J. Larson, E. Ong, C. Ding, and Y. He, "CPL6: The New Extensible, High-Performance Parallel...

  12. Analysis of long-period seismic waves excited by the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens: a terrestrial monopole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanamori, H.; Given, J.W.

    1982-07-10

    Long-period (100 to 260 s) Love and Rayleigh waves excited by the eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980, and recorded by ID, SRO, and ASRO stations were analyzed to determine the mechanism of the eruption. The amplitude radiation patterns of both Rayleigh and Love waves are two lobed with nodal direction in E5/sup 0/S for Rayleigh waves and in N5/sup 0/E for Love waves. These radiation patterns preclude any double-couple mechanism. The radiation pattern, the initial phase, the relatively large amplitude ratio of Love to Rayleigh waves and the existence of clear nodes in the radiation patterns of fundamental mode and higher-mode Rayleigh waves suggest that the source is represented by an almost horizontal (less than 15/sup 0/ from the horizontal) single force pointed toward S5/sup 0/W. The surface wave spectra fall off very rapidly at periods shorter than 75 s suggesting a very slow source process. Although the details of the source time history could not be determined, a smooth bell-shaped time function: f/sub 0/s(t) = (1/2)f/sub 0/(1-cos( (t)/(tau) ..pi..)) for 0< or =t< or =2tau and f/sub 0/s(t) = 0 for t> or =2tau, with tau = 75 s is considered appropriate on the basis of comparison between synthetic and observed seismograms and of the shape of the source spectrum. The peak value of the force f/sub 0/ is about 10/sup 18/ dynes. The tailing end of the source time function could not be resolved, and some overshoot may be added. The magnitude and the time history of the force can be explained by a northward landslide followed by a lateral blast observed at the time of the eruption. Two distinct events about 110 apart can be identified on body wave and short-period surface wave records. The first event may correspond to the earthquake which triggered the landslide and the lateral blast. The second event appears to correspond to a second large earthquake and explosion which took place about 2 minutes after the first earthquake.

  13. Helen He! NERSC User Services Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Adding OpenMP to Your Code Using Cray Reveal --- 1 --- October 1 0, 2 013 Current Architecture Trend * Mul1---socket n odes w ith r apidly i ncreasing c ore c ounts * Memory p er c ore d ecreases * Memory b andwidth p er c ore d ecreases * Network b andwidth p er c ore d ecreases * Need a hybrid programming model with three levels of parallelism - MPI b etween n odes o r s ockets - Shared m emory ( such a s O penMP) o n t he n odes/sockets - Increase vectoriza@on f or l ower l evel l oop s

  14. Helen He! NERSC User Services Group!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    % m pirun --- n 2 --- hosrile h osrile.PBSJOBID --- ppn 1 . xthi.host Hello f rom r ank 0 , t hread 0 , o n b c1012. ( core a ffinity 0 ---15) Hello f rom r ank...

  15. Helen He! NERSC User Services Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    u ser f unc)ons - MPI i nforma)on, e tc. * A * .rpt t ext fi le w ith t he s ame i nfo a s a bove * A * .ap2 fi le t hat c an b e u sed w ith: - "patreport" f or m ore...

  16. Helen He! NERSC User Services Group!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    o f C ores p er S ocket: 1 2 Execuon s tart me: S un F eb 2 1 3:38:33 2 014 System n ame a nd s peed: n id01665 2 401 M Hz ... Wall C lock T ime: 2 90.822940 s ecs High M...

  17. Yun (Helen) He, Alice Koniges, Richard Gerber, Katie Antypas!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alice Koniges, Richard Gerber, Katie Antypas! ! OpenMPCon, Sept 28-30, 2015 Using OpenMP at NERSC Outline * NERSC a nd o ur n ew s ystem - Why M PI + O penMP i s p referred * OpenMP u sage a t N ERSC * What d o w e t ell u sers a bout O penMP s caling - Process a nd t hread a ffinity - Scaling : ps - Tools f or O penMP * Case s tudies o f u sing a nd t uning M PI/OpenMP performance --- 2 --- NERSC and our new system --- 3 --- What is NERSC/LBNL * NaAonal E nergy R esearch S cienAfic C ompuAng

  18. Richard Gerber, Helen He, Zhengji Zhao, David Turner NUG Monthly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    c hange - Some l icensed s oeware p roducts u navailable o vernight * Web s ervers - NFS s erver u pgrade --- 8 --- Edison Update" Zhengji Zhao, User Services --- 9 --- Edison...

  19. Boise Inc. St. Helens Paper Mill Achieves Significant Fuel Savings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ways to Save Energy Steam System Opportunity Assessment for the Pulp and Paper, Chemical Manufacturing, and Petroleum Refining Industries ITP Forest Products: Report for AIChE...

  20. Hydrothermal Circulation At Mount St Helens Determined By Self...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and modulated on short time scales by surface recharge. Authors Paul A. Bedrosian, Martyn J. Unsworth and Malcolm J. S. Johnston Published Journal Journal of Volcanology and...

  1. Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sheets, yet have thus far been largely undocumented. Authors Lisa Shevenell and Fraser Goff Published Journal Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 1995 DOI Not Provided...

  2. Mt St Helens Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    -122.04050509296 Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean...

  3. Mt St Helens Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With...

  4. Hopper* Suren Byna, Prabhat, Andrew Uselton, David Knaak, Helen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reconnection, Turbulence * Accurate 3D simulation requires O(10 12 ) particles VPIC: BIG Data * 2 Trillion particles simulated o checkpointrestart * 1 Trillion electrons used...

  5. Helen He, David Turner, Richard Gerber NUG Monthly Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    % m pirun --- n 2 --- hosTile h osTile.PBSJOBID --- ppn 1 . xthi.host Hello f rom r ank 0 , t hread 0 , o n b c1012. ( core a ffinity 0 ---15) Hello f rom r ank...

  6. Nazim Bharmal Anthony Slingo Jeff Settle Gary Robinson Helen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the TOA radiances every 15 min from Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB). * Edwards-Slingo RT code used to calculate consistent flux components. * Or, use measurements...

  7. Self Potential At Mt St Helens Area (Bedrosian, Et Al., 2007...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Paul A. Bedrosian, Martyn J. Unsworth, Malcolm J. S. Johnston (2007) Hydrothermal...

  8. Dr Helen Kerch | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    and instruments in the United States. Her graduate research included the topics of sol-gel processing, quantitative electron microscopy, and small-angle scattering. She...

  9. Vlf Electromagnetic Investigations Of The Crater And Central...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of Mount St Helens, Washington Abstract A very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic induction survey in the crater of Mount St. Helens has identified several electrically...

  10. Tracking Algorithm for Multi- Dimensional Array Transposition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    192002 Yun (Helen) He, SC2002 1 MPI and OpenMP Paradigms on Cluster of SMP Architectures: the Vacancy Tracking Algorithm for Multi- Dimensional Array Transposition Yun (Helen) He...

  11. Coupling MM5 with ISOLSM:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yun (Helen) He 1 Coupling MM5 with ISOLSM: Development, Testing, and Application W.J. Riley, H.S. Cooley, Y. He*, M.S. Torn Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory June 2003 Yun (Helen) He 2 Outline ! Introduction ! Model Integration ! Model Configuration ! Model Testing ! Simulation and Impacts of Winter Wheat Harvest ! Conclusions ! Observations and Future Work June 2003 Yun (Helen) He 3 Introduction ! CO 2 fluxes and other trace-gas exchanges are tightly coupled to the surface water and energy

  12. Effective Methods in Reducing Communication Overheads in Solving

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0/2002 Yun (Helen) He, GHC2002 1 Effective Methods in Reducing Communication Overheads in Solving PDE Problems on Distributed-Memory Computer Architectures Chris Ding and Yun (Helen) He Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 10/10/2002 Yun (Helen) He, GHC2002 2 Outline n Introduction n Traditional Method n Ghost Cell Expansion (GCE) Method n GCE Algorithm n Diagonal Communication Elimination (DCE) Technique n Analysis of GCE Method n Message Volume n Communication Time

  13. Franklin retirement date is set: 04/30/2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Announcements Franklin retirement date is set: 04302012 Franklin retirement date is set: 04302012 March 6, 2012 by Helen He The Franklin (and its external login node...

  14. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and project outage September 18, 2012 by Helen He | 0 Comments There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance for Hopper next...

  15. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December 2013 Resolved: "error while loading shared libraries: libalpslli.so.0" with serial codes on login nodes December 13, 2013 by Helen He Symptom: Dynamic executables built...

  16. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 2011 "Unable to open kgni version file sysclassgeminikgni0version" error April 13, 2011 by Helen He Symptom: Dynamic executables built with compiler wrappers running...

  17. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 2013 Resolved: Running jobs error: "inetarpaddresslookup" September 22, 2013 by Helen He Symptom: After the Hopper August 14 maintenance, users reporting get the error...

  18. Columbia County, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Subtype C. Places in Columbia County, Oregon Clatskanie, Oregon Columbia City, Oregon Prescott, Oregon Rainier, Oregon Scappoose, Oregon St. Helens, Oregon Vernonia, Oregon...

  19. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Characterization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at SIRTA Haeffelin, Martial Institut Pierre Simon Laplace Chepfer, Helene IPSL LMD, France Protat, A. Institut Pierre Simon Laplace Morille, Y. Institut Pierre Simon Laplace...

  20. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 2012 Hopper scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and project outage September 18, 2012 by Helen He There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance for...

  1. Hopper scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and /project...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and project outage Hopper scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and project outage September 18, 2012 by Helen He There will be a...

  2. Fermilab | Tevatron | Shutdown Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electricity to various subdetector systems. Then they shut down the Tevatron. Helen Edwards, who was the lead scientist for the construction of the Tevatron in the 1980s,...

  3. Registration List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kavouklis postdoc Cinna Julie Wu UC Berkeley Mathematics Dept Clayton Bagwell NERSC David Turner LBL Dilworth Parkinson ALSLBNL Eric Bylaska PNNL Harvey Wasserman NERSC Helen He...

  4. Microsoft Word - CUG2011_Stewart_Paper.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proceedings 1 of 6 Benchmark Performance of Different Compilers on a Cray XE6 Michael Stewart and Yun (Helen) He National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)...

  5. NNMCAB Board Minutes: September 2005 Santa Fe

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minutes of the September 28, 2005 Board meeting at Santa Fe Community College Presentation Risk Assessment Corporation, Risk Assessments, Helen Grogan Consideration and Action on Recommendations

  6. Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    For DOE, contact Helen Oxberger at (202) 287-1332 or by e-mail at helen.oxberger@hq.doe.gov . For NNSA, contact either Jill Robbins at (202) 586-9678 or via e- mail at jill.robbins...

  7. November 8, 2005 Letter to People Interested in BPA's 2007-2009...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dec. 7, 2005 Sheraton, Ballroom Doubletree Hotel, Mt. St. Helens room 1320 Broadway Plaza 1000 NE Multnomah St Tacoma, WA 98402 Portland, OR 97232 (800) 325-3535 (503) 281-6111...

  8. max walltime for "low" queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper May 31, 2012 by Helen He (0 Comments) We have increased the...

  9. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wed, June 1 May 26, 2011 by Helen He | 0 Comments There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance followed by a dedicated system testing for Hopper next Wednesday,...

  10. BPA-2014-00787-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gepl@critfc.org 94427, , UT Columbia River PUD Board of Directors Richard Simpson 32501 PITTSBURG RD SAINT HELENS OR 97051-9127 26036, 07, UT Columbia Rural Electric Association...

  11. Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 2012 Franklin retirement date is set: 04/30/2012 March 6, 2012 by Helen He The Franklin (and its external login node Freedom) retirement date has been set to April 30, 2012. Below are the related schedules:

  12. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 2013 Unable to allocate hugepages in running jobs January 14, 2013 by Helen He Symptom User job sometimes get an error message similar to the following, usually at the start of a batch job, causing the job to abort:

  13. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 2013 Resolved: Running jobs error: "inet_arp_address_lookup" September 22, 2013 by Helen He Symptom: After the Hopper August 14 maintenance, users reporting get the error message similar as follows occassionaly

  14. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 2012 Resolved -- Error Message: "ModuleCmdSwitch.c(172):ERROR:152: Module 'PrgEnv---cray' is currently not loaded" June 28, 2012 by Helen He Symptom: User batch jobs with...

  15. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 2012 Resolved -- "cannot find -lhdf5hlcpp" compiler error with C++ code using hdf5 January 24, 2012 by Helen He Symptom: After the 118 system maintenance, C++ code...

  16. Poly 3D fault modeling scripts/data for permeability potential of Washington State geothermal prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Swyer

    2015-02-05

    Matlab scripts/functions and data used to build Poly3D models and create permeability potential GIS layers for 1) Mount St Helen's, 2) Wind River Valley, and 3) Mount Baker geothermal prospect areas located in Washington state.

  17. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Allan, Helen White (ESSC, UK) * Peter Lamb and M. Issa Ll (CIMMS, Oklahoma) * Mark Miller (BNL and Rutgers) and Pavlos Kollias (McGill) * Jim Haywood, Sean Milton and...

  18. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 2011 Resolved -- Linking error when mixing C++ and Fortran using PGI under xt-asyncpe4.9 July 1, 2011 by Helen He Symptom Mixed C++ and Fortran codes had the linking error...

  19. VectorIntro3.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deslippe, Helen He, Harvey Wasserman, Woo-Sun Yang NERSC App Readiness Team OpenMP and Vectorization Training Introduction Reason for These Tutorials * Prepara&on f or N ERSC's...

  20. LWJ-0004- In the Matter of Westinghouse Hanford Company

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On February 28, 1994, Helen "Gai" Oglesbee filed a request for hearing under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. This request has been assigned...

  1. Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 2011 Franklin scheduled maintenance and new software available July 6, 2011 by Helen He In conjunction with the NERSC systems Outages next week (for NERSC Global File Systems...

  2. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    27 February 21, 2013 by Helen He 1) There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance for Hopper next Wednesday, February 27, from 7 am to 7 pm Pacific time. This is a...

  3. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 2012 Hopper scheduled maintenance and SW new default versions on Wednesday, Jan 18 January 11, 2012 by Helen He 1) There will be a scheduled hardware and software...

  4. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May 2011 Hopper scheduled maintenance on Wed, June 1 May 26, 2011 by Helen He There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance followed by a dedicated system testing for...

  5. Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 2011 Scheduled maintenance next Wed (June 15) and new software available June 8, 2011 by Helen He 1) There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance for Franklin...

  6. Named Fellowships Luminary - David Schramm | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J. Trumpler Award of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific in 1974, the Helen B. Warner Prize for Astronomy from the American Astronomical Society in 1978, and he was awarded...

  7. CX-004263: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    L0295 - Saint Johns-Saint Helens Number 1 Interconnection ProjectCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 10/15/2010Location(s): Columbia County, OregonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  8. 1980's | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    James J. Duderstadt Helen T. Edwards Joe W. Gray C. Bradley Moore Gustavus J. Simmons James L. Smith 1985 Anthony P. Malinauskas William H. Miller David R. Nygren Gordon C. Osbourn ...

  9. Update on Franklin retirement plans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Update on Franklin retirement plans Update on Franklin retirement plans February 21, 2012 by Helen He NERSC is making progress on plans to acquire our next major system. Franklin's...

  10. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OS upgrade and new SW set to default next Wed, Feb 27 February 21, 2013 by Helen He | 0 Comments 1) There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance for Hopper next...

  11. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hopper scheduled maintenance and SW new default versions on Wednesday, Jan 18 January 11, 2012 by Helen He | 0 Comments 1) There will be a scheduled hardware and software...

  12. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Announcements Hopper Featured Announcements Hopper OS upgrade and new SW set to default next Wed, Feb 27 February 21, 2013 by Helen He | 0 Comments 1) There will be a scheduled...

  13. BPA-2015-00596-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fr FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACTPRIVACY PROGRAM February 9, 2015 In reply refer to: FOIA BPA-201 5-00596-F Helen Hall Gunnerson Consulting 231 River Run Rd Sequim, WA 98382 Dear...

  14. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Fission and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear Technologies -- Energy, science, and technology for the research community -- hosted by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, U.S. Department of Energy O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Nelson, Michael P. (Michael P. Nelson) - Institute for Conservation Ethics, Michigan State University Nickel, Bernhard (Bernhard Nickel) - Department of Philosophy, Harvard University Nissenbaum, Helen (Helen Nissenbaum) - Department of Culture and Communications & Computer Science Department,

  15. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL Office of Acquisition and Project Management Office of Property Management Personal Property Policy Division In conjunction with: National Nuclear Security Administration - OPMO National Nuclear Security Administration - Nonproliferation & International Security Environmental Management - OPMO Savannah River Department of Energy 1 Property Management & Control Your Panel Presenters: Helene Abbott MA-653 Policy helene.abbott@hq.doe.gov Tyrone Ware MA-653

  16. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 2011 Resolved: some OpenMP flags ignored in PGI C/C++ compiler March 29, 2011 by Helen He Description: OpenMP flags other than -mp=nonuma are ignored with the PGI C and C++ wrapper on Hopper. The PGI Fortran wrapper behaves correctly. Read the full post "gni_pub.h" not found in compilation March 29, 2011 by Helen He Description: After the OS upgrade to CLE3.1UP03, codes using "gni_pub.h" are getting the "gni_pub.h not found" error at compile time. The

  17. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 2011 "Unable to open kgni version file /sys/class/gemini/kgni0/version" error April 13, 2011 by Helen He Symptom: Dynamic executables built with compiler wrappers running directly on the external login nodes are getting the following error message: Read the full post Resolved -- Default version not shown in "module avail module_name" command April 13, 2011 by Helen He Symptom: The default software version is not shown when "module avail module_name" is issued.

  18. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 2011 Resolved -- Linking error when mixing C++ and Fortran using PGI under xt-asyncpe/4.9 July 1, 2011 by Helen He Symptom Mixed C++ and Fortran codes had the linking error using PGI under xt-asyncpe: Read the full post Resolved -- Incorrect path with bash under csh July 1, 2011 by Helen He Symptom: With default csh or tcsh shell, entering bash (as login or non-login) messes up the path, causing qsub or ftn command either not found or uses wrong path. Unloadind and loading the PrgEnv-xxx

  19. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 2012 Resolved -- "cannot find -lhdf5_hl_cpp" compiler error with C++ code using hdf5 January 24, 2012 by Helen He Symptom: After the 1/18 system maintenance, C++ code compilation gets an error if the default hdf5/1.8.5.0 module is loaded: "/usr/bin/ld: cannot find -lhdf5_hl_cpp". Read the full post "module: command not found" in batch jobs January 6, 2012 by Helen He Sympotom: Users with csh/tcsh as default login shells will get this error when trying to use

  20. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 2011 /project and /global/scratch expected available time July 13, 2011 by Helen He As announced yesterday, expected available time for /global/scratch is 5pm today (July 13), and expected available time for /project is 5pm tomorrow (July 14): http://www.nersc.gov/REST/announcements/message_text.php?id=2073 Read the full post Hopper scheduled maintenance and new software available July 6, 2011 by Helen He In conjunction with the NERSC systems Outages next week (for NERSC Global File Systems

  1. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Biotechnology --

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy, science, and technology for the research community -- hosted by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, U.S. Department of Energy E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z D'Andrea, Fabio (Fabio D'Andrea) - Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, Ecole Normale Supérieure D'Odorico, Paolo (Paolo D'Odorico) - Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia Dacre, Helen (Helen Dacre) - Department of Meteorology, University of Reading Daczko, Nathan (Nathan

  2. Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Announcements Announcements Franklin was Retired on April 30, 2012 May 9, 2012 by Richard Gerber Franklin was retired on April 30, 2012. Read the full post Final Reminder: Please save your $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2 imporant files by 4/30/12 April 27, 2012 by Helen He Franklin batch system is drained, and all batch queues are stopped as of 4/26 23:59pm. Read the full post Franklin retirement date is set: 04/30/2012 March 6, 2012 by Helen He The Franklin (and its external login node Freedom)

  3. NAME

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Liaison Officers (RLO) Distribution List NAME PROGRAM PROGRAM OFFICE PHONE EMAIL Auch, Joan NA-122.21 National Nuclear Security Administration 202-586-1852 Joan.auch@nnsa.doe.gov Barnes, Claude GC Office of the General Counsel 202-586-2957 claude.barnes@hq.doe.gov Black, Helen EE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 202-586-8563 helen.black@hq.doe.gov Briggs, Felecia (alternate POC) HS Office of Health, Safety and Security 301-903-8803 felecia.briggs@hq.doe.gov Cambrel, Shirley MA-70

  4. Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 2012 Final Reminder: Please save your $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2 imporant files by 4/30/12 April 27, 2012 by Helen He Franklin batch system is drained, and all batch queues are stopped as of 4/26 23:59pm

  5. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 2011 Resolved: Pathscale/4.0.9 not compatible with default libraries October 14, 2011 by Helen He Symptom: New xt-libsci/11.x.x does not have pathscale support. Other default libraries (netcdf, hdf5, fftw, petsc, etc.) have no pathscale/4.0.9 support

  6. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December 2013 Resolved: "error while loading shared libraries: libalpslli.so.0" with serial codes on login nodes December 13, 2013 by Helen He Symptom: Dynamic executables built with compiler wrappers running directly on the external login nodes are getting the following error message

  7. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 2011 Hopper scheduled maintenance and new software available September 14, 2011 by Helen He Hopper will have a scheduled maintenance on next Wed, September 21, from 8am to 4pm Pacific time. A long list of new software versions are now available (as non-default) on Hopper. Details can be found in this announcement

  8. CCSM is currently a multi-executable system based on the Multi-Program Multi-Data (MPMD) mechanism

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Concurrent Single-Executable CCSM with MPH Library Yun (Helen) He and Chris Ding Computational Research Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory May 2006 Abstract Community Climate System Model (CCSM) is currently a multi-executable system based on the Multi-Program Multi-Data (MPMD) mechanism. Each component is compiled into a separate executable. MPMD is normally cumbersome in usage and vendor support is sometimes limited or completely unavailable, such as on BlueGene/L. Also smaller

  9. Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 2011 Franklin scheduled maintenance and new software available July 6, 2011 by Helen He In conjunction with the NERSC systems Outages next week (for NERSC Global File Systems maintenance) announced earlier today (see details at: http://www.nersc.gov/REST/announcements/message_text.php?id=2070), Franklin will have a scheduled maintenance on next Wed, July 14, from 8am to 1pm Pacific time

  10. Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 2012 Update on Franklin retirement plans February 21, 2012 by Helen He NERSC is making progress on plans to acquire our next major system. Franklin's retirement is necessary to prepare the machine room for the new system. At this point in our planning we can say that Franklin will retire no sooner than April 30. Additional announcements will be made with more details when a firm date is set

  11. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Experiences Helen He, William Kramer, Jonathan Carter, Nicholas Cardo Cray User Group Meeting May 5-8, 2008 1 Outline * Introduction * Franklin Early User Program * CVN vs. CLE * Franklin Into Production * Selected Successful User Stories * Top Issues Affecting User Experiences * Other Topics * Summary 2 Benjamin Franklin, one of America's first scientists, performed ground breaking work in energy efficiency, electricity, materials, climate, ocean currents, transportation, health, medicine,

  12. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Performance Impacts from Franklin Upgrades Yun (Helen) He National Energy Research Supercomputing Center Cray User Group Meeting May 4-7, 2009 1 Outline * Franklin Introduction * Benchmarks * Quad Core Upgrade * CLE 2.1 Upgrade * IO Upgrade * Summary 2 Franklin's Role at NERSC * NERSC is the US DOE's keystone high performance computing center. * Franklin is the "flagship" system at NERSC serving ~3,100 scientific users in different application disciplines. * Serves the needs for

  13. Resolved: "error while loading shared libraries: libalpslli.so.0" with

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    serial codes on login nodes "error while loading shared libraries: libalpslli.so.0" with serial codes on login nodes Resolved: "error while loading shared libraries: libalpslli.so.0" with serial codes on login nodes December 13, 2013 by Helen He Symptom: Dynamic executables built with compiler wrappers running directly on the external login nodes are getting the following error message: % ftn -dynamic -o testf testf.f % ./testf ./testf: error while loading shared

  14. Goals:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Experiences Yun (Helen) He, William T.C. Kramer, Jonathan Carter, and Nicholas Cardo National Energy Research Supercomputing Center Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 ABSTRACT: The newest workhorse of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center is a Cray XT4 with 9,736 dual core nodes. This paper summarizes Franklin user experiences from friendly early user period to production period. Selected successful user stories along with top issues affecting user

  15. Goals:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CUG 2009 Proceedings 1 of 8 User and Performance Impacts from Franklin Upgrades Yun (Helen) He National Energy Research Supercomputing Center Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 ABSTRACT: The NERSC flagship computer Cray XT4 system "Franklin" has gone through three major upgrades: quad core upgrade, CLE 2.1 upgrade, and IO upgrade, during the past year. In this paper, we will discuss the various aspects of the user impacts such as user access, user environment, and

  16. Microsoft Word - Pss paper 06-08-05_with tables and figures.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    8214 Preprint Comparison of the complete genome sequences of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a and pv. tomato DC3000 Helene Feil, William S. Feil, Patrick Chain, Frank Larimer, Genevieve DiBartolo, Alex Copeland, Athanasios Lykidis, Stephen Trong , Matt Nolan, Eugene Goltsman, James Thiel, Stephanie Malfatti, Joyce E. Loper, Alla Lapidus, John C. Detter, Miriam Land , Paul M. Richardson, Nikos C. Kyrpides, Natalia Ivanova, and Steven E. Lindow Division: Genomics Comparison of the complete

  17. Molecular design for growth of supramolecular membranes with hierarchical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    structure (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Molecular design for growth of supramolecular membranes with hierarchical structure Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular design for growth of supramolecular membranes with hierarchical structure Authors: Zha, R. Helen ; Velichko, Yuri S. ; Bitton, Ronit ; Stupp, Samuel I. [1] + Show Author Affiliations (NWU) Publication Date: 2016-02-10 OSTI Identifier: 1237763 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Soft

  18. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Announcements Hopper Featured Announcements Hopper OS upgrade and new SW set to default next Wed, Feb 27 February 21, 2013 by Helen He 1) There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance for Hopper next Wednesday, February 27, from 7 am to 7 pm Pacific time. This is a major OS upgrade. Most applications are highly recommended to recompile (or at least relink) after the maintenance. C++ and PGAS applications are recommended to recompile and relink. Please plan your work accordingly and

  19. CNS helps provide housing to homeless veterans | Y-12 National Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex helps provide housing ... CNS helps provide housing to homeless veterans Posted: January 23, 2015 - 2:31pm This eight-unit apartment building on Coster Road in Knoxville was built to house homeless veterans who have mental illness or a behavioral health disability. By springtime, the Helen Ross McNabb Veterans Housing Project will provide permanent apartment homes to 23 veterans, who will also receive ongoing case management. Consolidated Nuclear Security's donation of $25,000 to the

  20. Microsoft Word - LBNL-62500.v3.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    62500 Understanding and Mitigating Multicore Performance Issues on the AMD Opteron Architecture John Levesque, Jeff Larkin, Martyn Foster, Joe Glenski, Garry Geissler, Stephen Whalen Cray Inc. Brian Waldecker AMD Inc. Jonathan Carter, David Skinner, Helen He, Harvey Wasserman, John Shalf NERSC Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Hongzhang Shan, Erich Strohmaier Computational Research Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory March 7, 2007 This work was supported by the

  1. Feb01_tribenotes

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TEC Tribal Issues Topic Group Meeting February 6, 2001 Portland, Oregon Participants: Richard Arnold (Las Vegas Indian Center), Helen Belencan (DOE/EM- 22), Kevin Blackwell (DOT/FRA), Wynona Boyer (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes), Mike Calhoun (DOT/FRA), Michael Chavarria/Joseph Mark Chavarria (Santa Clara Pueblo), Kevin Clarke (DOE/RL), Sandra Covi (UPR), Martha Crosland (DOE/EM- 11), Jim Daust (CVSA), Ed Gonzales (ELG Engineering), Ken Gray (CTUIR), Veronica Herkshan (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes), Robert

  2. Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: A Survey in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Naoki; Shikama, Naoto; Wada, Hitoshi; Harada, Hideyuki; Nozaki, Miwako; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Tago, Masao; Oguchi, Masahiko; Uchida, Nobue

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the current patterns of practice in Japan and to investigate factors that may make clinicians reluctant to use single-fraction radiotherapy (SF-RT). Methods and Materials: Members of the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) completed an Internet-based survey and described the radiotherapy dose fractionation they would recommend for four hypothetical cases describing patients with painful bone metastasis (BM). Case 1 described a patient with an uncomplicated painful BM in a non-weight-bearing site from non-small-cell lung cancer. Case 2 investigated whether management for a case of uncomplicated spinal BM would be different from that in Case 1. Case 3 was identical with Case 2 except for the presence of neuropathic pain. Case 4 investigated the prescription for an uncomplicated painful BM secondary to oligometastatic breast cancer. Radiation oncologists who recommended multifraction radiotherapy (MF-RT) for Case 2 were asked to explain why they considered MF-RT superior to SF-RT. Results: A total of 52 radiation oncologists from 50 institutions (36% of JROSG institutions) responded. In all four cases, the most commonly prescribed regimen was 30 Gy in 10 fractions. SF-RT was recommended by 13% of respondents for Case 1, 6% for Case 2, 0% for Case 3, and 2% for Case 4. For Case 4, 29% of respondents prescribed a high-dose MF-RT regimen (e.g., 50 Gy in 25 fractions). The following factors were most often cited as reasons for preferring MF-RT: 'time until first increase in pain' (85%), 'incidence of spinal cord compression' (50%), and 'incidence of pathologic fractures' (29%). Conclusions: Japanese radiation oncologists prefer a schedule of 30 Gy in 10 fractions and are less likely to recommend SF-RT. Most Japanese radiation oncologists regard MF-RT as superior to SF-RT, based primarily on the time until first increase in pain.

  3. Patient-Physician Communication About Complementary and Alternative Medicine in a Radiation Oncology Setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ge Jin; Fishman, Jessica; Annenberg School for Communication at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ; Vapiwala, Neha; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ; Li, Susan Q.; Desai, Krupali; Xie, Sharon X.; Mao, Jun J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the extensive use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among cancer patients, patient-physician communication regarding CAM therapies remains limited. This study quantified the extent of patient-physician communication about CAM and identified factors associated with its discussion in radiation therapy (RT) settings. Methods and Materials: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 305 RT patients at an urban academic cancer center. Patients with different cancer types were recruited in their last week of RT. Participants self-reported their demographic characteristics, health status, CAM use, patient-physician communication regarding CAM, and rationale for/against discussing CAM therapies with physicians. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify relationships between demographic/clinical variables and patients' discussion of CAM with radiation oncologists. Results: Among the 305 participants, 133 (43.6%) reported using CAM, and only 37 (12.1%) reported discussing CAM therapies with their radiation oncologists. In multivariate analyses, female patients (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21-0.98) and patients with full-time employment (AOR 0.32, 95% CI 0.12-0.81) were less likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists. CAM users (AOR 4.28, 95% CI 1.93-9.53) were more likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists than were non-CAM users. Conclusions: Despite the common use of CAM among oncology patients, discussions regarding these treatments occur rarely in the RT setting, particularly among female and full-time employed patients. Clinicians and patients should incorporate discussions of CAM to guide its appropriate use and to maximize possible benefit while minimizing potential harm.

  4. SLURM Resource Manager is

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SLURM Resource Manager is Coming to NERSC - 1 - Helen He NUG Meeting, 11/06/2015 What is SLURM * In simple word, SLURM is a workload manager, or a batch scheduler. * SLURM stands for Simple Linux U?lity for Resource Management. * SLURM unites the cluster resource management (such as Torque) and job scheduling (such as Moab) into one system. Avoids inter-tool complexity. * As of June 2015, SLURM is used in 6 of the top 10 computers, including the #1 system, Tianhe-2, with over 3M cores. - 2 -

  5. CUG2011_Hopper2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cray User Group 2011 Proceedings 1 of 13 Transitioning Users from the Franklin XT4 System to the Hopper XE6 System Katie Antypas and Yun (Helen) He, National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center ABSTRACT: The Hopper XE6 system, NERSC's first peta-flop system with over 153,000 cores has increased the computing hours available to the Department of Energy's Office of Science users by more than a factor of 4. As NERSC users transition from the Franklin XT4 system with 4 cores per node to the

  6. Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 2011 Scheduled maintenance next Wed (June 15) and new software available June 8, 2011 by Helen He 1) There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance for Franklin next Wednesday, June 15, from 8am to 8pm Pacific time. Please plan your work accordingly and check the NERSC Message of the Day (MOTD) for status update: http://www.nersc.gov/live-status/motd/ 2) The following new software versions are available now (as non-default version) on Franklin: -- pgi/11.3.0 -- perftools/5.2.0

  7. Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December 2011 Franklin to retire no sooner than Apr 30 December 20, 2011 by Helen NERSC is making progress on plans to acquire our next major system. Franklin's retirement is necessary to prepare the machine room for the new system. At this point in our planning we can say that Franklin will retire no sooner than April 30. Additional announcements will be made with more details when a firm date is set. If you are currently only using Franklin you should start migrating to Hopper. If you need

  8. Please use "gres" settings in your batch scripts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Please use "gres" settings in your batch scripts Please use "gres" settings in your batch scripts September 4, 2012 by Helen He We would like to encourage you to use the generic resources ("gres") setting for various file systems that your batch jobs use. This feature is currently available on Hopper and Carver. The advantage of this setting is that your jobs won't start (thus won't fail) during a scheduled file system maintenance. The syntax for the

  9. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Franklin Quad Core Update/Differences October 2, 2008 | Author(s): Yun (Helen) He | Download File: HeQuadCoreNUG2008.pdf | pdf | 238 KB File Transfer Best Practices October 2, 2008 | Author(s): David Turner | Download File: turner.pdf | pdf | 197 KB Enabling Grid File Transfers: The NERSC CA October 2, 2008 | Author(s): Sheryas Cholia | Download File: cholia-train.pdf | pdf | 157 KB Franklin IO: Systems Overview October 2, 2008 | Author(s): Richard A. Gerber | Download File: gerber.pdf | pdf |

  10. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 2012 Resolved -- Error Message: "ModuleCmd_Switch.c(172):ERROR:152: Module 'PrgEnv---cray' is currently not loaded" June 28, 2012 by Helen He Symptom: User batch jobs with "#PBS -V" in the script are seeing an error message: "ModuleCmd_Switch.c(172):ERROR:152: Module 'PrgEnv---cray' is currently not loaded". This is caused by overwriting the default Cray Programming Environment from Cray to PGI. This message can also be seen with "script" on the login

  11. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 2013 Resolved: qstat -a does not show correct hours in elpsed time for running jobs July 12, 2013 by Helen He Sympton: After the Torque/Moab upgrade on 6/19, the elapsed run time display from "qstat -a" does not show correct values for hours field for running jobs. The minutes and seconds numbers are correct. A job uses less than one hour displays correct elapsed time such as 50:03, but once a job's running time is over 59 min, the hours field is always displayed as 0.

  12. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 2011 Rebooting some Hopper login nodes this afternoon February 25, 2011 by Katie Antypas We will be rebooting some of the login nodes this afternoon, one at a time. You may see a broadcast message asking you to log off. You should log out and log back in to hopper.nersc.gov. Read the full post Users should access Hopper2 via hopper.nersc.gov now February 24, 2011 by Helen He You should now use "hopper.nersc.gov" to access the Hopper phase 2 system. "hopp2.nersc.gov"

  13. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 2011 Hopper Charging May 1st April 29, 2011 by Katie Antypas For jobs that span April 30 and May : the portion that runs before May 1 will not be charged; the portion that runs in May will be charged. Read the full post Hopper scratch quotas now enforced April 25, 2011 by Helen He Quotas on Hopper $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2 file systems are now enforced. The default user quotas for $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2 combined are 5 TB of space usage, and 5 Millions inodes (i.e., number of files and

  14. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May 2011 Hopper scheduled maintenance on Wed, June 1 May 26, 2011 by Helen He There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance followed by a dedicated system testing for Hopper next Wednesday, June 1, from 8am to 6pm. This is in conjunction with the network maintenance planned on the same day. Hopper login nodes will NOT be available during this entire period. Following the maintenance, there will be a few changes to the user environment: 1) pgi/11.2.0 will be set to the default

  15. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 2011 Hopper batch walltime increase and new xfer queue June 29, 2011 by Helen He There are two batch queue configuration changes on Hopper: 1) User jobs using fewer than 4,096 nodes can now run for up to 36 hrs. In particular, the max wall time limits for reg_small (1-683 nodes), reg_med (684-2,048 nodes), and reg_big (2,049-4,096 nodes) jobs have been increased from 24 to 36 hrs. 2) A new "xfer" queue has been introduced. Users can use the xfer job to pre-stage input files for a

  16. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 2011 Intel compiler available on Hopper August 10, 2011 by Helen He The Intel compiler suite is now available on Hopper. The current installed version is 12.0.4.191. To use the Intel compiler: % module swap PrgEnv-pgi PrgEnv-intel Then use the Cray wrappers ftn, cc, and CC to compile the Fortran, C, and C++ codes, respectively. Read the full post Problems submitting Jobs on Hopper -- Fixed August 3, 2011 by Katie Antypas We are experiencing problems submitting jobs to Hopper. We are

  17. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 2012 Hopper scheduled maintenance and SW new default versions on Wednesday, Jan 18 January 11, 2012 by Helen He 1) There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance for Hopper next Wednesday, January 18, from 7 am to 10 pm Pacific time. This is a major OS upgrade. Users are recommended to recompile your applications after the maintenance. Please plan your work accordingly and check the NERSC Message of the Day (MOTD) for status update: http://www.nersc.gov/live-status/motd/. 2)

  18. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 2012 Purging of Hopper scratch file systems to start on Mar 14 February 28, 2012 by Helen He The purging for the Hopper scratch file systems will start from Wednesday, March 14. The files in your $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2 will be deleted ("purged") if they are older (defined by last access time) than 12 weeks once the purge starts. Please take some time now to clean up contents, back up all important files (eg. to HPSS), and reduce your overall usage as much as you can

  19. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 2012 Hopper scheduled maintenance on Tue March 20 and new software available March 13, 2012 by Helen He 1) There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance for Hopper next Tuesday, March 20, from 8 am to 4 pm Pacific time. Please plan your work accordingly and check the NERSC Message of the Day (MOTD) for status update: http://www.nersc.gov/live-status/motd/. 2) The following new software versions are now available on Hopper: -- pgi/11.10.0 -- cce/8.0.0, 8.0.1, 8.0.2 --

  20. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May 2012 max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper May 31, 2012 by Helen He We have increased the max walltime for the low queue on Hopper from 12 to 24 hrs. Read the full post Hopper compilers and DDT short outage next Wed, May 16 May 10, 2012 Due to a scheduled maintenance for the License Servers, most of the compilers (except GNU) and the DDT debugger on Hopper will not be available from 10:30 am to 12:30 pm on Wednesday, May 16. If there are any questions or concerns,

  1. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 2012 high thruput queue now available on Hopper August 30, 2012 by Helen He A new batch queue named "thruput" has been implemented on Hopper to support the increased high throughput computing needs from the user community. The queue limits for this queue are as follows: -- max wall time is 168 hrs -- max node count is 2 (max core count is 48) -- max queue-able jobs per user is 500 -- max running jobs from all users in this queue is 500 -- has same priority as of the

  2. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 2012 Hopper scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and /project outage September 18, 2012 by Helen He There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance for Hopper next Wednesday, Sept 19, from 6:30 am to midnight Pacific time. Please plan your work accordingly and check the NERSC Message of the Day (MOTD) for status update: http://www.nersc.gov/live-status/motd/. The /project file system (also known as /global/project) will be unavailable from 8am Wednesday, Sept 19 until

  3. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 2013 Hopper OS upgrade and new SW set to default next Wed, Feb 27 February 21, 2013 by Helen He 1) There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance for Hopper next Wednesday, February 27, from 7 am to 7 pm Pacific time. This is a major OS upgrade. Most applications are highly recommended to recompile (or at least relink) after the maintenance. C++ and PGAS applications are recommended to recompile and relink. Please plan your work accordingly and check the NERSC Message of

  4. Hopper OS upgrade and new SW set to default next Wed, Feb 27

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OS upgrade and new SW set to default next Wed, Feb 27 Hopper OS upgrade and new SW set to default next Wed, Feb 27 February 21, 2013 by Helen He 1) There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance for Hopper next Wednesday, February 27, from 7 am to 7 pm Pacific time. This is a major OS upgrade. Most applications are highly recommended to recompile (or at least relink) after the maintenance. C++ and PGAS applications are recommended to recompile and relink. Please plan your work

  5. Hopper scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and /project outage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and /project outage Hopper scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and /project outage September 18, 2012 by Helen He There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance for Hopper next Wednesday, Sept 19, from 6:30 am to midnight Pacific time. Please plan your work accordingly and check the NERSC Message of the Day (MOTD) for status update: http://www.nersc.gov/live-status/motd/. The /project file system (also known as /global/project) will be

  6. Untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Professor Frans Spaepen John C. & Helen F. Franklin Professor of Applied Physics Harvard University Cambridge, MA Structure of Liquids and the Crystal-Liquid Interface Wednesday, April 27, 2016 2:00 - 3:00pm MSL Auditorium (TA-03 - Bldg 1698 - Room A103) Abstract: Iden%fying the principle that underlies the structure of even the simplest liquids is an enduring scien%fic challenge. Star%ng with the basic facts about liquids, this talk will cri%cally review the structural models that have been

  7. Update on Franklin retirement plans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Update on Franklin retirement plans Update on Franklin retirement plans February 21, 2012 by Helen He NERSC is making progress on plans to acquire our next major system. Franklin's retirement is necessary to prepare the machine room for the new system. At this point in our planning we can say that Franklin will retire no sooner than April 30. Additional announcements will be made with more details when a firm date is set. If you are currently only using Franklin you should start migrating to

  8. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Presentations Presentations Sort by: Default | Name | Date (low-high) | Date (high-low) | Source | Category Franklin Quad Core Update/Differences October 2, 2008 | Author(s): Yun (Helen) He | Download File: HeQuadCoreNUG2008.pdf | pdf | 238 KB File Transfer Best Practices October 2, 2008 | Author(s): David Turner | Download File: turner.pdf | pdf | 197 KB Enabling Grid File Transfers: The NERSC CA October 2, 2008 | Author(s): Sheryas Cholia | Download File: cholia-train.pdf | pdf | 157 KB

  9. high thruput queue now available on Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    high thruput queue now available on Hopper high thruput queue now available on Hopper August 30, 2012 by Helen He A new batch queue named "thruput" has been implemented on Hopper to support the increased high throughput computing needs from the user community. The queue limits for this queue are as follows: -- max wall time is 168 hrs -- max node count is 2 (max core count is 48) -- max queue-able jobs per user is 500 -- max running jobs from all users in this queue is 500 -- has same

  10. max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper May 31, 2012 by Helen He We have increased the max walltime for the low queue on Hopper from 12 to 24 hrs. Subscribe via RSS Subscribe Browse by Date February 2013 September 2012 August 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 November 2011 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 June 2011 May 2011 April 2011 March 2011 February 2011 January 2011

  11. Franklin retirement date is set: 04/30/2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Announcements » Franklin retirement date is set: 04/30/2012 Franklin retirement date is set: 04/30/2012 March 6, 2012 by Helen He The Franklin (and its external login node Freedom) retirement date has been set to April 30, 2012. Below are the related schedules: Effective immediately: Software frozen except for critical updates Mon Apr 2: No new accounts will be created Thurs Apr 26, 23:59: Batch system is drained, batch queues are stopped (no jobs will be running at this point) Mon Apr 30: Last

  12. Final Reminder: Please save your $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2 imporant files by

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4/30/12 Final Reminder: Final Reminder: Please save your $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2 imporant files by 4/30/12 April 27, 2012 by Helen He Franklin batch system is drained, and all batch queues are stopped as of 4/26 23:59pm. This is the final reminder that please make sure to save important files on your Franklin $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2. ALL FILES THERE WILL BE DELETED, and there will be no mechanisms to recover any of the files after May 1. Mon Apr 30: Last day to retrieve files from Franklin

  13. Franklin to retire no sooner than Apr 30

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to retire no sooner than Apr 30 Franklin to retire no sooner than Apr 30 December 20, 2011 by Helen NERSC is making progress on plans to acquire our next major system. Franklin's retirement is necessary to prepare the machine room for the new system. At this point in our planning we can say that Franklin will retire no sooner than April 30. Additional announcements will be made with more details when a firm date is set. If you are currently only using Franklin you should start migrating to

  14. Advanced OpenMP Training, February 4, 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced OpenMP Training, February 4, 2016 Speakers: Dr. Michael Klemm, Intel; Dr. Bronis R. de Supinski, LLNL. Location: NERSC/LBNL, CRT Building, Room 59-3101. Berkeley, CA Time: 8:30am - 5:00pm PDT, February 4, 2016. Hosts: Helen He and Alice Koniges Tutorial Description Michael Klemm (an Intel representative in the OpenMP Language Committee) and Bronis R. de Supinski (Chair of the OpenMP Language Committee) will present a one-day tutorial with lectures and hands-on exercises on Advanced

  15. Agenda

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agenda Agenda Training Day - Thursday, October 2, 2008 Oakland Scientific Facility, Conference Room 238 Time (Pacific) Topic Presenter 8:30 Registration and Welcome 9:00 Franklin Quad Core Update/Differences Helen He 9:30 File Transfer Best Practices David Turner 10:00 Enabling Grid File Transfers: The NERSC CA Shreyas Cholia 10:30 Break 10:45 Franklin IO: Systems Overview Richard Gerber 11:15 Franklin IO: Best Practices for Application Performance Katie Antypas 12:00 Lunch and optional

  16. Cori and Edison Queues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cori and Edison Queues - 1 - Helen He NUG Meeting, 1/21/2016 Goals for Cori and Edison * Where to run what type of jobs a2er Carver and Hopper re7red? * The Cori Phase 1 (also known as the "Cori Data Par77on") system is designed to accelerate data-intensive applica7ons, with high throughput and "real 7me" need. - "shared" par--on. Mul-ple jobs on the same node. Larger submit and run limits. - The 1-2 node bin in the "regular" par--on (mimics

  17. Cray Quarterly Meeting!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MG2 team) ! ! Cray Quarterly Meeting! July 22, 2015 NESAP CESM MG2 Update CESM NESAP MG2 Team Members * NCAR: John Dennis, Chris K err, S ean S antos * Cray: M arcus W agner * Intel: N adezhda P lotnikova, M artyn C orden * NERSC L iaison: Helen H e --- 2 --- MG2 Kernel * MG2 i s a k ernel f or C ESM t hat r epresents i ts radia>ve transfer w orkload. T ypically c onsumes a bout 1 0% o f C ESM run > me. - Brought t o D ungeon S ession i n M arch * Kernel is core bound - Not b andwidth l

  18. Microsoft Word - CLE_2.1_Post-Mortem_2009-v9-Accepted.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    08 Proceedings 1 of 8 Post-Mortem of the NERSC Franklin XT Upgrade to CLE 2.1 James M. Craw, Nicholas P. Cardo, Yun (Helen) He Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center Berkeley, CA 94720 craw@nersc.gov, cardo@nersc.gov, yhe@lbl.gov And Janet M. Lebens Cray, Inc. jml@cray.com ABSTRACT: This paper will discuss the lessons learned of the events leading up to the production deployment of CLE 2.1 and the post install issues experienced in upgrading

  19. Microsoft Word - cug2010_JobComp.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 Proceedings 1 of 12 Franklin Job Completion Analysis Hwa-Chun Wendy Lin, Yun (Helen) He, Woo-Sun Yang National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) ABSTRACT: The NERSC Cray XT4 machine Franklin has been in production for 3000+ users since October 2007, where about 1800 jobs run each day. There has been an on-going effort to better understand how well these jobs run, whether failed jobs are due to application errors or system issues, and to further reduce system related job

  20. Consideration of Dose Limits for Organs at Risk of Thoracic Radiotherapy: Atlas for Lung, Proximal Bronchial Tree, Esophagus, Spinal Cord, Ribs, and Brachial Plexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, Feng-Ming; Ritter, Timothy; Quint, Douglas J.; Senan, Suresh; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Komaki, Ritsuko U.; Hurkmans, Coen W.; Timmerman, Robert; Bezjak, Andrea; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Movsas, Benjamin; Marsh, Lon; Okunieff, Paul; Choy, Hak; Curran, Walter J.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To review the dose limits and standardize the three-dimenional (3D) radiographic definition for the organs at risk (OARs) for thoracic radiotherapy (RT), including the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: The present study was performed by representatives from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, and Soutwestern Oncology Group lung cancer committees. The dosimetric constraints of major multicenter trials of 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT were reviewed and the challenges of 3D delineation of these OARs described. Using knowledge of the human anatomy and 3D radiographic correlation, draft atlases were generated by a radiation oncologist, medical physicist, dosimetrist, and radiologist from the United States and reviewed by a radiation oncologist and medical physicist from Europe. The atlases were then critically reviewed, discussed, and edited by another 10 radiation oncologists. Results: Three-dimensional descriptions of the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus are presented. Two computed tomography atlases were developed: one for the middle and lower thoracic OARs (except for the heart) and one focusing on the brachial plexus for a patient positioned supine with their arms up for thoracic RT. The dosimetric limits of the key OARs are discussed. Conclusions: We believe these atlases will allow us to define OARs with less variation and generate dosimetric data in a more consistent manner. This could help us study the effect of radiation on these OARs and guide high-quality clinical trials and individualized practice in 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT.

  1. 1983 temperature gradient and heat flow drilling project for the State of Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korosec, M.A.

    1983-11-01

    During the Summer of 1983, a three-hole drilling program was carried out to collect temperature gradient and heat flow information near potential geothermal resource target areas. The general locations of the project areas are shown. The first hole, DNR 83-1, was located within the Green River valley northwest of Mount St. Helens. This site is near the Green River Soda Springs and along the projection of the Mount St. Helens - Elk Lake seismic zone. The other two holes were drilled near Mount Baker. Hole DNR 83-3 was sited about 1/4 km west of the Baker Hot Springs, 10.5 km east of Mount Baker, while hole DNR 83-5 was located along Rocky Creek in the Sulphur Creek Valley. The Rocky Creek hole is about 10 km south-southwest of the peak. Two other holes, DNR 83-2 and DNR 83-4, were located on the north side of the Sulphur Creek Valley. Both holes were abandoned at early stages of drilling because of deep overburden and severe caving problems. The sites were apparently located atop old landslide deposits.

  2. The 1983 Temperature Gradient and Heat Flow Drilling Project for the State of Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korosec, Michael A.

    1983-11-01

    During the Summer of 1983, the Washington Division of Geology and Earth Resources carried out a three-hole drilling program to collect temperature gradient and heat flow information near potential geothermal resource target areas. The project was part of the state-coupled US Department of Energy Geothermal Program. Richardson Well Drilling of Tacoma, Washington was subcontracted through the State to perform the work. The general locations of the project areas are shown in figure 1. The first hole, DNR 83-1, was located within the Green River valley northwest of Mount St. Helens. This site is near the Green River Soda Springs and along the projection of the Mount St. Helens--Elk Lake seismic zone. The other two holes were drilled near Mount Baker. Hole DNR 83-3 was sited about 1/4 km west of the Baker Hot Springs, 10.5 km east of Mount Baker, while hole DNR 83-5 was located along Rocky Creek in the Sulphur Creek Valley. The Rocky Creek hole is about 10 km south-southwest of the peak. Two other holes, DNR 83-2 and DNR 83-4, were located on the north side of the Sulphur Creek Valley. Both holes were abandoned at early stages of drilling because of deep overburden and severe caving problems. The sites were apparently located atop old landslide deposits.

  3. Chemical and Physical Signatures for Microbial Forensics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cliff, John B.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Wunschel, David S.

    2012-01-03

    Chemical and physical signatures for microbial forensics John Cliff and Helen Kreuzer-Martin, eds. Humana Press Chapter 1. Introduction: Review of history and statement of need. Randy Murch, Virginia Tech Chapter 2. The Microbe: Structure, morphology, and physiology of the microbe as they relate to potential signatures of growth conditions. Joany Jackman, Johns Hopkins University Chapter 3. Science for Forensics: Special considerations for the forensic arena - quality control, sample integrity, etc. Mark Wilson (retired FBI): Western Carolina University Chapter 4. Physical signatures: Light and electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, gravimetry etc. Joseph Michael, Sandia National Laboratory Chapter 5. Lipids: FAME, PLFA, steroids, LPS, etc. James Robertson, Federal Bureau of Investigation Chapter 6. Carbohydrates: Cell wall components, cytoplasm components, methods Alvin Fox, University of South Carolina School of Medicine David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 7. Peptides: Peptides, proteins, lipoproteins David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 8. Elemental content: CNOHPS (treated in passing), metals, prospective cell types John Cliff, International Atomic Energy Agency Chapter 9. Isotopic signatures: Stable isotopes C,N,H,O,S, 14C dating, potential for heavy elements. Helen Kreuzer-Martin, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Michaele Kashgarian, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chapter 10. Extracellular signatures: Cellular debris, heme, agar, headspace, spent media, etc Karen Wahl, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 11. Data Reduction and Integrated Microbial Forensics: Statistical concepts, parametric and multivariate statistics, integrating signatures Kristin Jarman, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Target Volume Delineation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Brain Tumors Using Localized Region-Based Active Contour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aslian, Hossein; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Mahdavi, Seied Rabie; Babapour Mofrad, Farshid; Astarakee, Mahdi; Khaledi, Navid; Fadavi, Pedram

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical application of a robust semiautomatic image segmentation method to determine the brain target volumes in radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: A local robust region-based algorithm was used on MRI brain images to study the clinical target volume (CTV) of several patients. First, 3 oncologists delineated CTVs of 10 patients manually, and the process time for each patient was calculated. The averages of the oncologists contours were evaluated and considered as reference contours. Then, to determine the CTV through the semiautomatic method, a fourth oncologist who was blind to all manual contours selected 4-8 points around the edema and defined the initial contour. The time to obtain the final contour was calculated again for each patient. Manual and semiautomatic segmentation were compared using 3 different metric criteria: Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance. A comparison also was performed between volumes obtained from semiautomatic and manual methods. Results: Manual delineation processing time of tumors for each patient was dependent on its size and complexity and had a mean (SD) of 12.33 2.47 minutes, whereas it was 3.254 1.7507 minutes for the semiautomatic method. Means of Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance between manual contours were 0.84 0.02, 2.05 0.66 cm, and 0.78 0.15 cm, and they were 0.82 0.03, 1.91 0.65 cm, and 0.7 0.22 cm between manual and semiautomatic contours, respectively. Moreover, the mean volume ratio (=semiautomatic/manual) calculated for all samples was 0.87. Conclusions: Given the deformability of this method, the results showed reasonable accuracy and similarity to the results of manual contouring by the oncologists. This study shows that the localized region-based algorithms can have great ability in determining the CTV and can be appropriate alternatives for manual approaches in brain cancer.

  5. Delayed Workforce Entry and High Emigration Rates for Recent Canadian Radiation Oncology Graduates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loewen, Shaun K.; Halperin, Ross; Lefresne, Shilo; Trotter, Theresa; Stuckless, Teri; Brundage, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the employment status and location of recent Canadian radiation oncology (RO) graduates and to identify current workforce entry trends. Methods and Materials: A fill-in-the-blank spreadsheet was distributed to all RO program directors in December 2013 and June 2014, requesting the employment status and location of their graduates over the last 3 years. Visa trainee graduates were excluded. Results: Response rate from program directors was 100% for both survey administrations. Of 101 graduates identified, 99 (98%) had known employment status and location. In the December survey, 5 2013 graduates (16%), 17 2012 graduates (59%), and 18 2011 graduates (75%) had permanent staff employment. Six months later, 5 2014 graduates (29%), 15 2013 graduates (48%), 24 2012 graduates (83%), and 21 2011 graduates (88%) had secured staff positions. Fellowships and temporary locums were common for those without staff employment. The proportion of graduates with staff positions abroad increased from 22% to 26% 6 months later. Conclusions: Workforce entry for most RO graduates was delayed but showed steady improvement with longer time after graduation. High emigration rates for jobs abroad signify domestic employment challenges for newly certified, Canadian-trained radiation oncologists. Coordination on a national level is required to address and regulate radiation oncologist supply and demand disequilibrium in Canada.

  6. Compliance Monitoring of Underwater Blasting for Rock Removal at Warrior Point, Columbia River Channel Improvement Project, 2009/2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Skalski, J. R.; Seaburg, Adam

    2011-05-10

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) conducted the 20-year Columbia River Channel Improvement Project (CRCIP) to deepen the navigation channel between Portland, Oregon, and the Pacific Ocean to allow transit of fully loaded Panamax ships (100 ft wide, 600 to 700 ft long, and draft 45 to 50 ft). In the vicinity of Warrior Point, between river miles (RM) 87 and 88 near St. Helens, Oregon, the USACE conducted underwater blasting and dredging to remove 300,000 yd3 of a basalt rock formation to reach a depth of 44 ft in the Columbia River navigation channel. The purpose of this report is to document methods and results of the compliance monitoring study for the blasting project at Warrior Point in the Columbia River.

  7. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 2011 New software set to default March 23, 2011 by Helen He We have set new default versions for the following software after the OS upgrade on 3/23: --- xt-mpich2 and xt-shmem 5.2.1 (changed from 5.1.5.1) --- cce 7.3.3 (changed from 7.3.1) --- xt-libsci 10.5.01 (changed from 10.5.0) --- ga 4.3.3 (changed from 4.3.2) --- hdf5 and hdf5-parallel 1.8.5.0 (changed from 1.8.4.1) --- petsc and petsc-complex 3.1.05 (changed from 3.1.04) Read the full post Rebooting some Hopper login nodes this

  8. H

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H ybrid M PI/OpenMP, UPC, a nd C AF a t N ERSC Yun ( Helen) H e a nd W oo---Sun Y ang NERSC U ser G roup M eeFng February 2 , 2 012 2 Outline * Architecture T rend * Benefits o f H ybrid M PI/OpenMP * Hybrid M PI/OpenMP P rogramming M odel * Hybrid M PI/OpenMP I ssues * Compile a nd R un h ybrid M PI/OpenMP * Using U PC a nd C AF o n H opper 3 Common A rchitectures * Shared M emory A rchitecture - MulFple C PUs s hare g lobal m emory, c ould h ave l ocal c ache - Uniform M emory A ccess ( UMA) -

  9. Genes and the Microenvironment: Two Faces of Breast Cancer (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe; Love, Susan M.; Bissell, Min; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2011-10-04

    In this April 21, 2008 Berkeley Lab event, a dynamic panel of Berkeley Lab scientists highlight breast cancer research advances related to susceptibility, early detection, prevention, and therapy - a biological systems approach to tackling the disease from the molecular and cellular levels, to tissues and organs, and ultimately the whole individual. Joe Gray, Berkeley Lab Life Sciences Division Director, explores how chromosomal abnormalities contribute to cancer and respond to gene-targeted therapies. Mina Bissell, former Life Sciences Division Director, approaches the challenge of breast cancer from the breast's three dimensional tissue microenvironment and how the intracellular ''conversation'' triggers malignancies. Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff, Deputy Director, Life Sciences Division, identifies what exposure to ionizing radiation can tell us about how normal tissues suppress carcinogenesis. The panel is moderated by Susan M. Love, breast cancer research pioneer, author, President and Medical Director of the Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation.

  10. Deformable image registration based automatic CT-to-CT contour propagation for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy in the routine clinical setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumarasiri, Akila Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Chang; Yechieli, Raphael; Shah, Mira; Pradhan, Deepak; Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J.; Kim, Jinkoo

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical potential of deformable image registration (DIR)-based automatic propagation of physician-drawn contours from a planning CT to midtreatment CT images for head and neck (H and N) adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Ten H and N patients, each with a planning CT (CT1) and a subsequent CT (CT2) taken approximately 3–4 week into treatment, were considered retrospectively. Clinically relevant organs and targets were manually delineated by a radiation oncologist on both sets of images. Four commercial DIR algorithms, two B-spline-based and two Demons-based, were used to deform CT1 and the relevant contour sets onto corresponding CT2 images. Agreement of the propagated contours with manually drawn contours on CT2 was visually rated by four radiation oncologists in a scale from 1 to 5, the volume overlap was quantified using Dice coefficients, and a distance analysis was done using center of mass (CoM) displacements and Hausdorff distances (HDs). Performance of these four commercial algorithms was validated using a parameter-optimized Elastix DIR algorithm. Results: All algorithms attained Dice coefficients of >0.85 for organs with clear boundaries and those with volumes >9 cm{sup 3}. Organs with volumes <3 cm{sup 3} and/or those with poorly defined boundaries showed Dice coefficients of ∼0.5–0.6. For the propagation of small organs (<3 cm{sup 3}), the B-spline-based algorithms showed higher mean Dice values (Dice = 0.60) than the Demons-based algorithms (Dice = 0.54). For the gross and planning target volumes, the respective mean Dice coefficients were 0.8 and 0.9. There was no statistically significant difference in the Dice coefficients, CoM, or HD among investigated DIR algorithms. The mean radiation oncologist visual scores of the four algorithms ranged from 3.2 to 3.8, which indicated that the quality of transferred contours was “clinically acceptable with minor modification or major modification in a small number of contours.” Conclusions: Use of DIR-based contour propagation in the routine clinical setting is expected to increase the efficiency of H and N replanning, reducing the amount of time needed for manual target and organ delineations.

  11. SU-E-J-07: A Functional MR Protocol for the Pancreatic Tumor Delineation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreychenko, A; Heerkens, H; Meijer, G; Vulpen, M van; Lagendijk, J; Berg, C van den

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Pancreatic cancer is one of the cancers with the poorest survival prognosis. At the time of diagnosis most of pancreatic cancers are unresectable and those patients can be treated by radiotherapy. Radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer is limited due to uncertainties in CT-based delineations. MRI provides an excellent soft tissue contrast. Here, an MR protocol is developed to improve delineations for radiotherapy treatment of pancreatic cancer. In a later stage this protocol can also be used for on-line visualization of the pancreas during MRI guided treatments. Methods: Nine pancreatic cancer patients were included. The MR protocol included T2 weighted(T2w), T1 weighted(T1w), diffusion weighted(DWI) and dynamic contrast enhanced(DCE) techniques. The tumor was delineated on T2w and T1w MRI by an experienced radiation oncologist. Healthy pancreas or pancreatitis (assigned by the oncologist based on T2w) areas were also delineated. Apparent diffusion coefficient(ADC), and area under the curve(AUC)/time to peak(TTP) maps were obtained from DWI and DCE scans, respectively. Results: A clear demarcation of tumor area was visible on b800 DWI images in 5 patients. ADC maps of those patients characterized tumor as an area with restricted water diffusion. Tumor delineations based on solely DCE were possible in 7 patients. In 6 of those patients AUC maps demonstrated tumor heterogeneity: a hypointense area with a hyperintense ring. TTP values clearly discriminated the tumor and the healthy pancreas but could not distinguish tumor and the pancreatitis accurately. Conclusion: MR imaging results in a more pronounced tumor contrast than contrast enhanced CT. The addition of quantitative, functional MRI provides valuable, additional information to the radiation oncologist on the spatial tumor extent by discriminating tumor from the healthy pancreas(TTP, DWI) and characterizing the tumor(ADC). Our findings indicate that tumor delineation in pancreatic cancer can greatly benefit from the addition of MRI and especially functional MR techniques.

  12. SU-E-J-148: Evaluating Tumor Response with a Commercially Available Deformable Registration System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowling, J; Ramsey, C [Thompson Cancer Survival Center, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to present a method for evaluating the response to treatment using a commercially available deformable image registration software package (Velocity Medical Systems) and repeat PET/CT imaging. This technique can be used to identify volumes that are risk for tumor recurrence. Methods: Response to treatment was evaluated using PET/CT images acquired prior-to and post-treatment for radiation therapy patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy. Velocity (Version 3.0.1) was used to deform the initial PET/CT to the post treatment PET/CT. The post-treatment PET images were then subtracted from the pre-treatment PET images. The resulting re-sampled image is a three-dimensional SUV difference map that shows pixels with increasing SUV values. SUV values increases greater than 2.5 in the post treatment images were identified for additional follow-up. Results: A total of 5 Lung patients were analyzed as part of this study. One lung patient in the cohort had an SUV increase of +3.28 that was identified using the SUV difference map. This volume of increased uptake was located outside the treatment field and adjacent to the 35 Gy isodose line. The remaining four patients all had SUV decreases inside the planning target volume, and no unexpected areas of increase outside the irradiated volumes. All five patients were analyzed using standard tools inside the Velocity application. Conclusion: The response to treatment can easily be measured using serial PET/CT images and a commercially available deformable image registration. This provides both the radiation oncologists and medical oncologists with a quantitative assessment of their treatment to use in patient follow-up.

  13. SU-E-J-201: Position Verification in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Using Tantalum Clips in the Lumpectomy Cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santvoort, J van; Van der Drift, M; Kuipers, J; Mast, M; Van Egmond, J; Struikmans, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To find out whether tantalum surgical clips can be used for online position verification in treatment of the lumpectomy cavity (LC) in breast cancer patients. Tantalum is a high density metal that could be visible on Electronic Portal Images (EPIs) and be an affordable alternative to gold markers. Clips are considered more representative for the LC position than nearby bony structures. Methods: In twelve patients the surgeon had placed 2 to 5 tantalum clips in the LC. The AP and lateral fields used for portal imaging, were adapted. In doing so, both bony structures and tantalum clips were visible on EPIs. The following analyses were performed:1. Image degradation, with respect to delineating the CTV, of the axial CT slices by artefacts because of the tantalum clips was evaluated by a radiation oncologist;2. The visibility of the tantalum clips on the EPIs was evaluated by four radiation therapists (RTTs);3. Bony anatomy and tantalum clip matches were performed on the same images independently by two observers. Results: 1. Delineation of the CTV by the radiation oncologist was not hampered by CT image artefacts because of the clips.2. The mean score for visibility of the clips on the EPIs, analysed by the four RTTs, was 5.6 on a scale of 10 (range 3.9 8.0).3. In total 12 patients with 16 fractions each were analysed. The differences between clip match and bone match are significant with a mean vector length of 5.2 mm (SD 1.9 mm) for the difference. Conclusion: Results of matches on tantalum clips as compared to matches on bony structures differ substantially. Therefore clip matches can result in smaller CTV to PTV margins than bone matches. Visibility of the clips on EPIs is sufficient, so they can be an alternative to gold markers.

  14. The Adoption of New Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Modalities Among Medicare Beneficiaries With Breast Cancer: Clinical Correlates and Cost Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Kenneth B.; Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut ; Soulos, Pamela R.; Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut ; Herrin, Jeph; Health Research and Educational Trust, Chicago, Illinois ; Yu, James B.; Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut ; Long, Jessica B.; Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut ; Dostaler, Edward; and others

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: New radiation therapy modalities have broadened treatment options for older women with breast cancer, but it is unclear how clinical factors, geographic region, and physician preference affect the choice of radiation therapy modality. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database to identify women diagnosed with stage I-III breast cancer from 1998 to 2007 who underwent breast-conserving surgery. We assessed the temporal trends in, and costs of, the adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and brachytherapy. Using hierarchical logistic regression, we evaluated the relationship between the use of these new modalities and patient and regional characteristics. Results: Of 35,060 patients, 69.9% received conventional external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Although overall radiation therapy use remained constant, the use of IMRT increased from 0.0% to 12.6% from 1998 to 2007, and brachytherapy increased from 0.7% to 9.0%. The statistical variation in brachytherapy use attributable to the radiation oncologist and geographic region was 41.4% and 9.5%, respectively (for IMRT: 23.8% and 22.1%, respectively). Women undergoing treatment at a free-standing radiation facility were significantly more likely to receive IMRT than were women treated at a hospital-based facility (odds ratio for IMRT vs EBRT: 3.89 [95% confidence interval, 2.78-5.45]). No such association was seen for brachytherapy. The median radiation therapy cost per treated patient increased from $5389 in 2001 to $8539 in 2007. Conclusions: IMRT and brachytherapy use increased substantially from 1998 to 2007; overall, radiation therapy costs increased by more than 50%. Radiation oncologists played an important role in treatment choice for both types of radiation therapy, whereas geographic region played a bigger role in the use of IMRT than brachytherapy.

  15. Late Toxicity and Patient Self-Assessment of Breast Appearance/Satisfaction on RTOG 0319: A Phase 2 Trial of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy-Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Following Lumpectomy for Stages I and II Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chafe, Susan; Moughan, Jennifer; McCormick, Beryl; Wong, John; Pass, Helen; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Arthur, Douglas W.; Petersen, Ivy; White, Julia; Vicini, Frank A.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Late toxicities and cosmetic analyses of patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) on RTOG 0319 are presented. Methods and Materials: Patients with stages I to II breast cancer ?3 cm, negative margins, and ?3 positive nodes were eligible. Patients received three-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT; 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions twice daily over 5 days). Toxicity and cosmesis were assessed by the patient (P), the radiation oncologist (RO), and the surgical oncologist (SO) at 3, 6, and 12 months from the completion of treatment and then annually. National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, was used to grade toxicity. Results: Fifty-two patients were evaluable. Median follow-up was 5.3 years (range, 1.7-6.4 years). Eighty-two percent of patients rated their cosmesis as good/excellent at 1 year, with rates of 64% at 3 years. At 3 years, 31 patients were satisfied with the treatment, 5 were not satisfied but would choose 3D-CRT again, and none would choose standard radiation therapy. The worst adverse event (AE) per patient reported as definitely, probably, or possibly related to radiation therapy was 36.5% grade 1, 50% grade 2, and 5.8% grade 3 events. Grade 3 AEs were all skin or musculoskeletal-related. Treatment-related factors were evaluated to potentially establish an association with observed toxicity. Surgical bed volume, target volume, the number of beams used, and the use of bolus were not associated with late cosmesis. Conclusions: Most patients enrolled in RTOG 0319 were satisfied with their treatment, and all would choose to have the 3D-CRT APBI again.

  16. Biologically based multistage modeling of radiation effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Hazelton; Suresh Moolgavkar; E. Georg Luebeck

    2005-08-30

    This past year we have made substantial progress in modeling the contribution of homeostatic regulation to low-dose radiation effects and carcinogenesis. We have worked to refine and apply our multistage carcinogenesis models to explicitly incorporate cell cycle states, simple and complex damage, checkpoint delay, slow and fast repair, differentiation, and apoptosis to study the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation in mouse intestinal crypts, as well as in other tissues. We have one paper accepted for publication in ''Advances in Space Research'', and another manuscript in preparation describing this work. I also wrote a chapter describing our combined cell-cycle and multistage carcinogenesis model that will be published in a book on stochastic carcinogenesis models edited by Wei-Yuan Tan. In addition, we organized and held a workshop on ''Biologically Based Modeling of Human Health Effects of Low dose Ionizing Radiation'', July 28-29, 2005 at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. We had over 20 participants, including Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff as keynote speaker, talks by most of the low-dose modelers in the DOE low-dose program, experimentalists including Les Redpath (and Mary Helen), Noelle Metting from DOE, and Tony Brooks. It appears that homeostatic regulation may be central to understanding low-dose radiation phenomena. The primary effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are cell killing, delayed cell cycling, and induction of mutations. However, homeostatic regulation causes cells that are killed or damaged by IR to eventually be replaced. Cells with an initiating mutation may have a replacement advantage, leading to clonal expansion of these initiated cells. Thus we have focused particularly on modeling effects that disturb homeostatic regulation as early steps in the carcinogenic process. There are two primary considerations that support our focus on homeostatic regulation. First, a number of epidemiologic studies using multistage carcinogenesis models that incorporate the ''initiation, promotion, and malignant conversion'' paradigm of carcinogenesis are indicating that promotion of initiated cells is the most important cellular mechanism driving the shape of the age specific hazard for many types of cancer. Second, we have realized that many of the genes that are modified in early stages of the carcinogenic process contribute to one or more of four general cellular pathways that confer a promotional advantage to cells when these pathways are disrupted.

  17. Image plates as x-ray detectors in plasma physics experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gales, S.G.; Bentley, C.D.

    2004-10-01

    The performance of image plates based on the photostimulable phosphor BaF(Br,l):Eu{sup 2+} has been investigated and compared with x-ray film. Evaluation of detective quantum efficiency (DQE), sensitivity, dynamic range, and linearity was carried out for several types of commercially available image plate, using the Excalibur soft x-ray calibration facility at AWE. Image plate response was found to be linear over a dynamic range of 5 orders of magnitude. One type of image plate was found to have a number of advantages for soft x-ray detection, with a measured sensitivity 1 order of magnitude greater than that of Kodak Industrex CX and DEF-5 x-ray film. The DQE of this plate was found to be superior to that of film at low [less than 10{sup 3} photons/(50 {mu}m){sup 2}] and high fluxes [greater than 10{sup 4} photons/(50 {mu}m){sup 2}]. The spatial resolution of image plates, scanned with several models of commercial image plate readers, has been evaluated using a USAF resolution test target. The highest spatial resolution measured is 35 {mu}m. Though this is significantly lower than the resolution possible with film, it is sufficient for many applications. Image plates were fielded in a refractive x-ray lens imaging diagnostic on the 1 TW Helen laser and these results are discussed.

  18. Prototype demonstration of radiation therapy planning code system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, R.C.; Adams, K.J.; Estes, G.P.; Hughes, L.S. III; Waters, L.S.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Radiation therapy planning is the process by which a radiation oncologist plans a treatment protocol for a patient preparing to undergo radiation therapy. The objective is to develop a protocol that delivers sufficient radiation dose to the entire tumor volume, while minimizing dose to healthy tissue. Radiation therapy planning, as currently practiced in the field, suffers from inaccuracies made in modeling patient anatomy and radiation transport. This project investigated the ability to automatically model patient-specific, three-dimensional (3-D) geometries in advanced Los Alamos radiation transport codes (such as MCNP), and to efficiently generate accurate radiation dose profiles in these geometries via sophisticated physics modeling. Modem scientific visualization techniques were utilized. The long-term goal is that such a system could be used by a non-expert in a distributed computing environment to help plan the treatment protocol for any candidate radiation source. The improved accuracy offered by such a system promises increased efficacy and reduced costs for this important aspect of health care.

  19. Poster Thur Eve 16: 4DCT simulation with synchronized contrast injection of liver SBRT patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karotki, A.; Korol, R.; Milot, L.; Chu, W.; Chung, H. T.; Erler, D.

    2014-08-15

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has recently emerged as a valid option for treating liver metastases. SBRT delivers highly conformai dose over a small number of fractions. As such it is particularly sensitive to the accuracy of target volume delineation by the radiation oncologist. However, contouring liver metastases remains challenging for the following reasons. First, the liver usually undergoes significant motion due to respiration. Second, liver metastases are often nearly indistinguishable from the surrounding tissue when using computed tomography (CT) for imaging making it difficult to identify and delineate them. Both problems can be overcome by using four dimensional CT (4DCT) synchronized with intravenous contrast injection. We describe a novel CT simulation process which involves two 4DCT scans. The first scan captures the tumor and immediately surrounding tissue which in turn reduces the 4DCT scan time so that it can be optimally timed with intravenous contrast injection. The second 4DCT scan covers a larger volume and is used as the primary CT dataset for dose calculation, as well as patient setup verification on the treatment unit. The combination of two 4DCT scans, short and long, allows visualization of the liver metastases over all phases of breathing cycle while simultaneously acquiring long enough 4DCT dataset suitable for planning and patient setup verification.

  20. Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine Project for an Integral Oncology Center at the Oaxaca High Specialization Regional Hospital

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Jesus, M.; Trujillo-Zamudio, F. E.

    2010-12-07

    A building project of Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine services (diagnostic and therapy), within an Integral Oncology Center (IOC), requires interdisciplinary participation of architects, biomedical engineers, radiation oncologists and medical physicists. This report focus on the medical physicist role in designing, building and commissioning stages, for the final clinical use of an IOC at the Oaxaca High Specialization Regional Hospital (HRAEO). As a first step, during design stage, the medical physicist participates in discussions about radiation safety and regulatory requirements for the National Regulatory Agency (called CNSNS in Mexico). Medical physicists propose solutions to clinical needs and take decisions about installing medical equipment, in order to fulfill technical and medical requirements. As a second step, during the construction stage, medical physicists keep an eye on building materials and structural specifications. Meanwhile, regulatory documentation must be sent to CNSNS. This documentation compiles information about medical equipment, radioactivity facility, radiation workers and nuclear material data, in order to obtain the license for the linear accelerator, brachytherapy and nuclear medicine facilities. As a final step, after equipment installation, the commissioning stage takes place. As the conclusion, we show that medical physicists are essentials in order to fulfill with Mexican regulatory requirements in medical facilities.

  1. Medical Malpractice Claims in Radiation Oncology: A Population-Based Study 1985-2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, Deborah C.; Punglia, Rinaa S.; Fox, Dov; Recht, Abram; Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A.

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine trends in radiation oncology malpractice claims and expenses during the last 28 years and to compare radiation oncology malpractice claims to those of other specialties. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis of closed malpractice claims filed from 1985 to 2012, collected by a nationwide medical liability insurance trade association. We analyzed characteristics and trends among closed claims, indemnity payments (payments to plaintiff), and litigation expenses. We also compared radiation oncology malpractice claims to those of 21 other medical specialties. Time series dollar amounts were adjusted for inflation (2012 was the index year). Results: There were 1517 closed claims involving radiation oncology, of which 342 (22.5%) were paid. Average and median indemnity payments were $276,792 and $122,500, respectively, ranking fifth and eighth, respectively, among the 22 specialty groups. Linear regression modeling of time trends showed decreasing total numbers of claims (β = −1.96 annually, P=.003), increasing average litigation expenses paid (β = +$1472 annually, P≤.001), and no significant changes in average indemnity payments (β = −$681, P=.89). Conclusions: Medical professional liability claims filed against radiation oncologists are not common and have declined in recent years. However, indemnity payments in radiation oncology are large relative to those of many other specialties. In recent years, the average indemnity payment has been stable, whereas litigation expenses have increased.

  2. 2003 survey of Canadian radiation oncology residents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yee, Don . E-mail: donyee@cancerboard.ab.ca; Fairchild, Alysa; Keyes, Mira; Butler, Jim; Dundas, George

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncology's popularity as a career in Canada has surged in the past 5 years. Consequently, resident numbers in Canadian radiation oncology residencies are at all-time highs. This study aimed to survey Canadian radiation oncology residents about their opinions of their specialty and training experiences. Methods and Materials: Residents of Canadian radiation oncology residencies that enroll trainees through the Canadian Resident Matching Service were identified from a national database. Residents were mailed an anonymous survey. Results: Eight of 101 (7.9%) potential respondents were foreign funded. Fifty-two of 101 (51.5%) residents responded. A strong record of graduating its residents was the most important factor residents considered when choosing programs. Satisfaction with their program was expressed by 92.3% of respondents, and 94.3% expressed satisfaction with their specialty. Respondents planning to practice in Canada totaled 80.8%, and 76.9% plan to have academic careers. Respondents identified job availability and receiving adequate teaching from preceptors during residency as their most important concerns. Conclusions: Though most respondents are satisfied with their programs and specialty, job availability and adequate teaching are concerns. In the future, limited time and resources and the continued popularity of radiation oncology as a career will magnify the challenge of training competent radiation oncologists in Canada.

  3. Impact of Radiotherapy on Fertility, Pregnancy, and Neonatal Outcomes in Female Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wo, Jennifer Y.; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation has many potential long-term effects on cancer survivors. Female cancer patients may experience decreased fertility depending on the site irradiated. Oncologists should be aware of these consequences and discuss options for fertility preservation before initiating therapy. Methods and Materials: A comprehensive review of the existing literature was conducted. Studies reporting the outcomes for female patients treated with cranio-spinal, abdominal, or pelvic radiation reporting fertility, pregnancy, or neonatal-related outcomes were reviewed. Results: Cranio-spinal irradiation elicited significant hormonal changes in women that affected their ability to become pregnant later in life. Women treated with abdomino-pelvic radiation have an increased rate of uterine dysfunction leading to miscarriage, preterm labor, low birth weight, and placental abnormalities. Early menopause results from low-dose ovarian radiation. Ovarian transposition may decrease the rates of ovarian dysfunction. Conclusions: There is a dose-dependent relationship between ovarian radiation therapy (RT) and premature menopause. Patients treated with RT must be aware of the impact of treatment on fertility and explore appropriate options.

  4. SciFri PM: Topics 03: The Global Task Force on Radiotherapy for Cancer Control: Core Investments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Dyk, J.; Jaffray, D. A.; MacPherson, M. S.

    2014-08-15

    The Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) is a membership-based, non-governmental organization with a mandate to to unite the cancer community to reduce the global cancer burden, to promote greater equity, and to integrate cancer control into the world health and development agenda. COMP is an associate member of the UICC. It is well recognized by the UICC that there are major gaps between high, and low and middle income countries, in terms of access to cancer services including access to radiation therapy. In this context, the UICC has developed a Global Task Force on Radiotherapy for Cancer Control with a charge to answer a single question: What does it cost to close the gap between what exists today and reasonable access to radiotherapy globally? The Task Force consists of leaders internationally recognized for their radiation treatment related expertise (radiation oncologists, medical physicists, radiation therapists) as well as those with global health and economics specialization. The Task Force has developed three working groups: (1) to look at the global burden of cancer; (2) to look at the infrastructure requirements (facilities, equipment, personnel); and (3) to consider outcomes in terms of numbers of lives saved and palliated patients. A report is due at the World Cancer Congress in December 2014. This presentation reviews the infrastructure considerations under analysis by the second work group. The infrastructure parameters being addressed include capital costs of buildings and equipment and operating costs, which include human resources, equipment servicing and quality control, and general overhead.

  5. Numerical study of nucleation and growth of bubbles in viscous magmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toramaru, A.

    1995-02-01

    The nucleation and growth processes of bubbles in viscous magmas with a constant decompression rate have been numerically investigated based on a formation which accounts for effects of viscosity, as well as diffusivity, interfacial tension, and decompression rate. The numerical solutions show two regimes in the nucleation and growth process, a diffusion-controlled regime and a viscosity-controlled regime, mainly depending on the decompression rate, initial saturation pressure and viscosity. The basic mechanism common to both regimes is that growth governs nucleation through depletion of degassing components. In basaltic eruptions the vesiculation is essentially controlled by diffusion, and the viscosity-controlled regime is limited to very high decompression rate and very small water content. When andesitic magma saturated by water at 10 MPa is decompressed through the propagation of rarefraction wave induced by a landslide, as took place in the Mount St. Helens 1980 eruption, the vesiculation is controlled by the viscosity up to 100 m depth. On the other hand, in a rhyolitic magma for the same situation, vesiculation is controlled by the viscosity over the whole depth of the magma column. In the viscosity-controlled regime, the vesicularity may be 90% or less as seen in silicic pumice, whereas in the diffusion-controlled regime the vesicularity equals or exceeds 98% such as in reticulite in Hawaiian basalt. An observed variation of the number density of bubbles by several orders of magnitude in plinian eruptions and the correlation with the SiO2 content can be attributed approximately to the dependence of diffusivity of viscosity on SiO2 content and temperature, assuming the apparent correlation between SiO2 content and temperature of magma.

  6. MO-G-BRE-09: Validating FMEA Against Incident Learning Data: A Study in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, F; Cao, N; Young, L; Howard, J; Sponseller, P; Logan, W; Arbuckle, T; Korssjoen, T; Meyer, J; Ford, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Though FMEA (Failure Mode and Effects Analysis) is becoming more widely adopted for risk assessment in radiation therapy, to our knowledge it has never been validated against actual incident learning data. The objective of this study was to perform an FMEA analysis of an SBRT (Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy) treatment planning process and validate this against data recorded within an incident learning system. Methods: FMEA on the SBRT treatment planning process was carried out by a multidisciplinary group including radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and dosimetrists. Potential failure modes were identified through a systematic review of the workflow process. Failure modes were rated for severity, occurrence, and detectability on a scale of 1 to 10 and RPN (Risk Priority Number) was computed. Failure modes were then compared with historical reports identified as relevant to SBRT planning within a departmental incident learning system that had been active for two years. Differences were identified. Results: FMEA identified 63 failure modes. RPN values for the top 25% of failure modes ranged from 60 to 336. Analysis of the incident learning database identified 33 reported near-miss events related to SBRT planning. FMEA failed to anticipate 13 of these events, among which 3 were registered with severity ratings of severe or critical in the incident learning system. Combining both methods yielded a total of 76 failure modes, and when scored for RPN the 13 events missed by FMEA ranked within the middle half of all failure modes. Conclusion: FMEA, though valuable, is subject to certain limitations, among them the limited ability to anticipate all potential errors for a given process. This FMEA exercise failed to identify a significant number of possible errors (17%). Integration of FMEA with retrospective incident data may be able to render an improved overview of risks within a process.

  7. Is Primary Prostate Cancer Treatment Influenced by Likelihood of Extraprostatic Disease? A Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Patterns of Care Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, Jordan A.; Wang, Andrew Z.; University of North Carolina-Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC ; Hoffman, Karen E.; Hendrix, Laura H.; Rosenman, Julian G.; University of North Carolina-Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC ; Carpenter, William R.; Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; Department of Health Policy and Management, University of North Carolina School of Public Health, Chapel Hill, NC ; Godley, Paul A.; Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; Division of Hematology-Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC ; Chen, Ronald C.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To examine the patterns of primary treatment in a recent population-based cohort of prostate cancer patients, stratified by the likelihood of extraprostatic cancer as predicted by disease characteristics available at diagnosis. Methods and Materials: A total of 157,371 patients diagnosed from 2004 to 2008 with clinically localized and potentially curable (node-negative, nonmetastatic) prostate cancer, who have complete information on prostate-specific antigen, Gleason score, and clinical stage, were included. Patients with clinical T1/T2 disease were grouped into categories of <25%, 25%-50%, and >50% likelihood of having extraprostatic disease using the Partin nomogram. Clinical T3/T4 patients were examined separately as the highest-risk group. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between patient group and receipt of each primary treatment, adjusting for age, race, year of diagnosis, marital status, Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database region, and county-level education. Separate models were constructed for primary surgery, external-beam radiotherapy (RT), and conservative management. Results: On multivariable analysis, increasing likelihood of extraprostatic disease was significantly associated with increasing use of RT and decreased conservative management. Use of surgery also increased. Patients with >50% likelihood of extraprostatic cancer had almost twice the odds of receiving prostatectomy as those with <25% likelihood, and T3-T4 patients had 18% higher odds. Prostatectomy use increased in recent years. Patients aged 76-80 years were likely to be managed conservatively, even those with a >50% likelihood of extraprostatic cancer (34%) and clinical T3-T4 disease (24%). The proportion of patients who received prostatectomy or conservative management was approximately 50% or slightly higher in all groups. Conclusions: There may be underutilization of RT in older prostate cancer patients and those with likely extraprostatic disease. Because more than half of prostate cancer patients do not consult with a radiation oncologist, a multidisciplinary consultation may affect the treatment decision-making process.

  8. Interobserver Variability in Target Definition for Hepatocellular Carcinoma With and Without Portal Vein Thrombus: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Theodore S.; Bosch, Walter R.; Krishnan, Sunil; Kim, Tae K.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Seong, Jinsil; Haddock, Michael G.; Cheng, Jason C.; Feng, Mary U.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Roberge, David; and others

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Defining hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) gross tumor volume (GTV) requires multimodal imaging, acquired in different perfusion phases. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the variability in contouring and to establish guidelines and educational recommendations for reproducible HCC contouring for treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Anonymous, multiphasic planning computed tomography scans obtained from 3 patients with HCC were identified and distributed to a panel of 11 gastrointestinal radiation oncologists. Panelists were asked the number of HCC cases they treated in the past year. Case 1 had no vascular involvement, case 2 had extensive portal vein involvement, and case 3 had minor branched portal vein involvement. Theagreement between the contoured total GTVs (primary+vascular GTV) was assessed using the generalized kappa statistic. Agreement interpretation was evaluated using Landis and Koch's interpretation of strength of agreement. The S95 contour, defined using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm consensus at the 95% confidence level, was created for each case. Results: Of the 11 panelists, 3 had treated >25 cases in the past year, 2 had treated 10to 25 cases, 2 had treated 5 to 10 cases, 2 had treated 1 to 5 cases, 1 had treated 0 cases, and 1 did not respond. Near perfect agreement was seen for case 1, and substantial agreement was seen for cases 2 and 3. For case 2, there was significant heterogeneity in the volume identified as tumor thrombus (range 0.58-40.45cc). For case 3, 2 panelists did not include the branched portal vein thrombus, and 7 panelists contoured thrombus separately from the primary tumor, also showing significant heterogeneity in volume of tumor thrombus (range 4.52-34.27cc). Conclusions: In a group of experts, excellent agreement was seen in contouring total GTV. Heterogeneity exists in the definition of portal vein thrombus that may impact treatment planning, especially if differential dosing is contemplated. Guidelines for HCC GTV contouring are recommended.

  9. Physician Beliefs and Practices for Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Showalter, Timothy N.; Ohri, Nitin; Teti, Kristopher G.; Foley, Kathleen A.; Keith, Scott W.; Trabulsi, Edouard J.; Lallas, Costas D.; Dicker, Adam P.; Hoffman-Censits, Jean; Pizzi, Laura T.; Gomella, Leonard G.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Despite results of randomized trials that support adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer with adverse pathologic features (APF), many clinicians favor selective use of salvage RT. This survey was conducted to evaluate the beliefs and practices of radiation oncologists (RO) and urologists (U) regarding RT after RP. Methods and Materials: We designed a Web-based survey of post-RP RT beliefs and policies. Survey invitations were e-mailed to a list of 926 RO and 591 U. APF were defined as extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, or positive surgical margin. Differences between U and RO in adjuvant RT recommendations were evaluated by comparative statistics. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate factors predictive of adjuvant RT recommendation. Results: Analyzable surveys were completed by 218 RO and 92 U (overallresponse rate, 20%). Adjuvant RT was recommended based on APF by 68% of respondents (78% RO, 44% U, p <0.001). U were less likely than RO to agree that adjuvant RT improves survival and/or biochemical control (p < 0.0001). PSA thresholds for salvage RT were higher among U than RO (p < 0.001). Predicted rates of erectile dysfunction due to RT were higher among U than RO (p <0.001). On multivariate analysis, respondent specialty was the only predictor of adjuvant RT recommendations. Conclusions: U are less likely than RO to recommend adjuvant RT. Future research efforts should focus on defining the toxicities of post-RP RT and on identifying the subgroups of patients who will benefit from adjuvant vs. selective salvage RT.

  10. Reliability of Quantitative Ultrasonic Assessment of Normal-Tissue Toxicity in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, Emi J.; Chen Hao; Torres, Mylin; Andic, Fundagul; Liu Haoyang; Chen Zhengjia; Sun, Xiaoyan; Curran, Walter J.; Liu Tian

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: We have recently reported that ultrasound imaging, together with ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC), can provide quantitative assessment of radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicity. This study's purpose is to evaluate the reliability of our quantitative ultrasound technology in assessing acute and late normal-tissue toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy. Method and Materials: Our ultrasound technique analyzes radiofrequency echo signals and provides quantitative measures of dermal, hypodermal, and glandular tissue toxicities. To facilitate easy clinical implementation, we further refined this technique by developing a semiautomatic ultrasound-based toxicity assessment tool (UBTAT). Seventy-two ultrasound studies of 26 patients (720 images) were analyzed. Images of 8 patients were evaluated for acute toxicity (<6 months postradiotherapy) and those of 18 patients were evaluated for late toxicity ({>=}6 months postradiotherapy). All patients were treated according to a standard radiotherapy protocol. To assess intraobserver reliability, one observer analyzed 720 images in UBTAT and then repeated the analysis 3 months later. To assess interobserver reliability, three observers (two radiation oncologists and one ultrasound expert) each analyzed 720 images in UBTAT. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate intra- and interobserver reliability. Ultrasound assessment and clinical evaluation were also compared. Results: Intraobserver ICC was 0.89 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.96 for glandular tissue toxicity. Interobserver ICC was 0.78 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.94 for glandular tissue toxicity. Statistical analysis found significant changes in dermal (p < 0.0001), hypodermal (p = 0.0027), and glandular tissue (p < 0.0001) assessments in the acute toxicity group. Ultrasound measurements correlated with clinical Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity scores of patients in the late toxicity group. Patients with RTOG Grade 1 or 2 had greater ultrasound-assessed toxicity percentage changes than patients with RTOG Grade 0. Conclusion: Early and late radiation-induced effects on normal tissue can be reliably assessed using quantitative ultrasound.

  11. SU-E-T-460: Comparison of Proton and IMRT Planning for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fontenla, S; Zhou, Y; Kowalski, A; Mah, D; Leven, T; Cahlon, O; Lee, N; Hunt, M; Mechalakos, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A retrospective study comparing proton and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer Methods: This study consists of six H and N cancer patients that underwent proton as well as IMRT planning. Patients analyzed had unilateral target volumes, one had prior RT. 3D-conformal proton therapy (3D-CPT) plans with multiple field uniform scanning were generated for delivery on the inclined beam line. IMRT was planned using fixed field sliding window. Final plan evaluations were performed by a radiation oncologist and a physicist. Metrics for comparison included tumor coverage, organ sparing with respect to spinal cord, brainstem, parotids, submandibulars, oral cavity, larynx, brachial plexus, cochleas, normal brain tissue, and skin using relevant indices for these structures. Dose volume histograms were generated as well as a qualitative comparison of isodose distributions between the two modalities. Planning and treatment delivery times were compared. Results: Results showed that IMRT plans offered better conformality in the high dose region as demonstrated by the conformality index for each plan. Ipsilateral cochlea, submandibular gland, and skin doses were lower with IMRT than proton therapy. There was significant sparing of larynx, oral cavity, and brainstem with proton therapy compared to IMRT. This translated into direct patient benefit with no evidence of hoarseness, mucositis, or nausea. Contralateral parotid and submandibular glands were equally spared. IMRT had shorter planning/parts fabrication and treatment times which needs to be taken into account when deciding modality. Conclusion: Sparing of clinically significant normal tissue structures such as oral cavity and larynx for unilateral H and N cancers was seen with 3D-CPT versus IMRT. However, this is at the expense of less conformality at the high dose region and higher skin dose. Future studies are needed with full gantry systems and pencil beam scanning as these deliveries would be expected to further improve conformality and normal tissue sparing.

  12. Final LDRD report : development of sample preparation methods for ChIPMA-based imaging mass spectrometry of tissue samples.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maharrey, Sean P.; Highley, Aaron M.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.; Wiese-Smith, Deneille

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this short-term LDRD project was to acquire the tools needed to use our chemical imaging precision mass analyzer (ChIPMA) instrument to analyze tissue samples. This effort was an outgrowth of discussions with oncologists on the need to find the cellular origin of signals in mass spectra of serum samples, which provide biomarkers for ovarian cancer. The ultimate goal would be to collect chemical images of biopsy samples allowing the chemical images of diseased and nondiseased sections of a sample to be compared. The equipment needed to prepare tissue samples have been acquired and built. This equipment includes an cyro-ultramicrotome for preparing thin sections of samples and a coating unit. The coating unit uses an electrospray system to deposit small droplets of a UV-photo absorbing compound on the surface of the tissue samples. Both units are operational. The tissue sample must be coated with the organic compound to enable matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and matrix enhanced secondary ion mass spectrometry (ME-SIMS) measurements with the ChIPMA instrument Initial plans to test the sample preparation using human tissue samples required development of administrative procedures beyond the scope of this LDRD. Hence, it was decided to make two types of measurements: (1) Testing the spatial resolution of ME-SIMS by preparing a substrate coated with a mixture of an organic matrix and a bio standard and etching a defined pattern in the coating using a liquid metal ion beam, and (2) preparing and imaging C. elegans worms. Difficulties arose in sectioning the C. elegans for analysis and funds and time to overcome these difficulties were not available in this project. The facilities are now available for preparing biological samples for analysis with the ChIPMA instrument. Some further investment of time and resources in sample preparation should make this a useful tool for chemical imaging applications.

  13. Internet-Based Survey Evaluating Use of Pain Medications and Attitudes of Radiation Oncology Patients Toward Pain Intervention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simone, Charles B. Vapiwala, Neha; Hampshire, Margaret K.; Metz, James M.

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: Pain is a common symptom among cancer patients, yet many patients do not receive adequate pain management. Few data exist quantifying analgesic use by radiation oncology patients. This study evaluated the causes of pain in cancer patients and investigated the reasons patients fail to receive optimal analgesic therapy. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved, Internet-based questionnaire assessing analgesic use and pain control was posted on the OncoLink (available at (www.oncolink.org)) Website. Between November 2005 and April 2006, 243 patients responded. They were predominantly women (73%), white (71%), and educated beyond high school (67%) and had breast (38%), lung (6%), or ovarian (6%) cancer. This analysis evaluated the 106 patients (44%) who underwent radiotherapy. Results: Of the 106 patients, 58% reported pain from their cancer treatment, and 46% reported pain directly from their cancer. The pain was chronic in 51% and intermittent in 33%. Most (80%) did not use medication to manage their pain. Analgesic use was significantly less in patients with greater education levels (11% vs. 36%, p = 0.002), with a trend toward lower use by whites (16% vs. 32%, p 0.082) and women (17% vs. 29%, p = 0.178). The reasons for not taking analgesics included healthcare provider not recommending medication (87%), fear of addiction or dependence (79%), and inability to pay (79%). Participants experiencing pain, but not taking analgesics, pursued alternative therapies for relief. Conclusions: Many radiation oncology patients experience pain from their disease and cancer treatment. Most study participants did not use analgesics because of concerns of addiction, cost, or failure of the radiation oncologist to recommend medication. Healthcare providers should have open discussions with their patients regarding pain symptoms and treatment.

  14. SU-E-T-568: Improving Normal Brain Sparing with Increasing Number of Arc Beams for Volume Modulated Arc Beam Radiosurgery of Multiple Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossain, S; Hildebrand, K; Ahmad, S; Larson, D; Ma, L; Sahgal, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated arc beams have been newly reported for treating multiple brain metastases. The purpose of this study was to determine the variations in the normal brain doses with increasing number of arc beams for multiple brain metastases treatments via the TrueBeam Rapidarc system (Varian Oncology, Palo Alto, CA). Methods: A patient case with 12 metastatic brain lesions previously treated on the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (GK) was used for the study. All lesions and organs at risk were contoured by a senior radiation oncologist and treatment plans for a subset of 3, 6, 9 and all 12 targets were developed for the TrueBeam Rapidarc system via 3 to 7 intensity modulated arc-beams with each target covered by at least 99% of the prescribed dose of 20 Gy. The peripheral normal brain isodose volumes as well as the total beam-on time were analyzed with increasing number of arc beams for these targets. Results: All intensisty modulated arc-beam plans produced efficient treatment delivery with the beam-on time averaging 0.6–1.5 min per lesion at an output of 1200 MU/min. With increasing number of arc beams, the peripheral normal brain isodose volumes such as the 12-Gy isodose line enclosed normal brain tissue volumes were on average decreased by 6%, 11%, 18%, and 28% for the 3-, 6-, 9-, 12-target treatment plans respectively. The lowest normal brain isodose volumes were consistently found for the 7-arc treatment plans for all the cases. Conclusion: With nearly identical beam-on times, the peripheral normal brain dose was notably decreased when the total number of intensity modulated arc beams was increased when treating multiple brain metastases. Dr Sahgal and Dr Ma are currently serving on the board of international society of stereotactic radiosurgery.

  15. TH-A-BRF-09: Integration of High-Resolution MRSI Into Glioblastoma Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreibmann, E; Cordova, J; Shu, H; Crocker, I; Curran, W; Holder, C; Shim, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Identification of a metabolite signature that shows significant tumor cell infiltration into normal brain in regions that do not appear abnormal on standard MRI scans would be extremely useful for radiation oncologists to choose optimal regions of brain to treat, and to quantify response beyond the MacDonald criteria. We report on integration of high-resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (HR-MRSI) with radiation dose escalation treatment planning to define and target regions at high risk for recurrence. Methods: We propose to supplement standard MRI with a special technique performed on an MRI scanner to measure the metabolite levels within defined volumes. Metabolite imaging was acquired using an advanced MRSI technique combining 3D echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI) with parallel acquisition (GRAPPA) using a multichannel head coil that allows acquisition of whole brain metabolite maps with 108 μl resolution in 12 minutes implemented on a 3T MR scanner. Elevation in the ratio of two metabolites, choline (Cho, elevated in proliferating high-grade gliomas) and N-acetyl aspartate (NAA, a normal neuronal metabolite), was used to image infiltrating high-grade glioma cells in vivo. Results: The metabolite images were co-registered with standard contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR images using in-house registration software and imported into the treatment-planning system. Regions with tumor infiltration are identified on the metabolic images and used to create adaptive IMRT plans that deliver a standard dose of 60 Gy to the standard target volume and an escalated dose of 75 Gy (or higher) to the most suspicious regions, identified as areas with elevated Cho/NAA ratio. Conclusion: We have implemented a state-of-the-art HR-MRSI technology that can generate metabolite maps of the entire brain in a clinically acceptable scan time, coupled with introduction of an imaging co-registration/ analysis program that combines MRSI data with standard imaging studies in a clinically useful fashion.

  16. A Prospective, Multicenter Study of Complementary/Alternative Medicine (CAM) Utilization During Definitive Radiation for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, Meena S.; Ma Shuangge; Jagsi, Reshma; Yang, Tzu-I Jonathan; Higgins, Susan A.; Department of Radiation Therapy, Shoreline Medical Center, Guilford, Connecticut ; Weidhaas, Joanne B.; Wilson, Lynn D.; Department of Radiation Therapy, Lawrence and Memorial Hospital, New London, Connecticut ; Lloyd, Shane; Peschel, Richard; Department of Radiation Therapy, Lawrence and Memorial Hospital, New London, Connecticut ; Gaudreau, Bryant; Rockwell, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Although complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) utilization in breast cancer patients is reported to be high, there are few data on CAM practices in breast patients specifically during radiation. This prospective, multi-institutional study was conducted to define CAM utilization in breast cancer during definitive radiation. Materials/Methods: A validated CAM instrument with a self-skin assessment was administered to 360 Stage 0-III breast cancer patients from 5 centers during the last week of radiation. All data were analyzed to detect significant differences between users/nonusers. Results: CAM usage was reported in 54% of the study cohort (n=194/360). Of CAM users, 71% reported activity-based CAM (eg, Reiki, meditation), 26% topical CAM, and 45% oral CAM. Only 16% received advice/counseling from naturopathic/homeopathic/medical professionals before initiating CAM. CAM use significantly correlated with higher education level (P<.001), inversely correlated with concomitant hormone/radiation therapy use (P=.010), with a trend toward greater use in younger patients (P=.066). On multivariate analysis, level of education (OR: 6.821, 95% CI: 2.307-20.168, P<.001) and hormones/radiation therapy (OR: 0.573, 95% CI: 0.347-0.949, P=.031) independently predicted for CAM use. Significantly lower skin toxicity scores were reported in CAM users vs nonusers, respectively (mild: 34% vs 25%, severe: 17% vs 29%, P=.017). Conclusion: This is the first prospective study to assess CAM practices in breast patients during radiation, with definition of these practices as the first step for future investigation of CAM/radiation interactions. These results should alert radiation oncologists that a large percentage of breast cancer patients use CAM during radiation without disclosure or consideration for potential interactions, and should encourage increased awareness, communication, and documentation of CAM practices in patients undergoing radiation treatment for breast cancer.

  17. Proc. of the workshop on pushing the limits of RF superconductivity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K-J., Eyberger, C., editors

    2005-04-13

    For three days in late September last year, some sixty experts in RF superconductivity from around the world came together at Argonne to discuss how to push the limits of RF superconductivity for particle accelerators. It was an intense workshop with in-depth presentations and ample discussions. There was added excitement due to the fact that, a few days before the workshop, the International Technology Recommendation Panel had decided in favor of superconducting technology for the International Linear Collider (ILC), the next major high-energy physics accelerator project. Superconducting RF technology is also important for other large accelerator projects that are either imminent or under active discussion at this time, such as the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) for nuclear physics, energy recovery linacs (ERLs), and x-ray free-electron lasers. For these accelerators, the capability in maximum accelerating gradient and/or the Q value is essential to limit the length and/or operating cost of the accelerators. The technological progress of superconducting accelerators during the past two decades has been truly remarkable, both in low-frequency structures for acceleration of protons and ions as well as in high-frequency structures for electrons. The requirements of future accelerators demand an even higher level of performance. The topics of this workshop are therefore highly relevant and timely. The presentations given at the workshop contained authoritative reviews of the current state of the art as well as some original materials that previously had not been widely circulated. We therefore felt strongly that these materials should be put together in the form of a workshop proceeding. The outcome is this report, which consists of two parts: first, a collection of the scholarly papers prepared by some of the participants and second, copies of the viewgraphs of all presentations. The presentation viewgraphs, in full color, are also available from the Workshop Presentations link on the workshop's web page at http://www.aps.anl.gov/conferences/RFSCLimits/. I would like to thank all of the participants for their lively contributions to the workshop and to these proceedings, and Helen Edwards and Hasan Padamsee for their help in developing the workshop program. I also thank Cathy Eyberger, Kelly Jaje, and Renee Lanham for working very hard to take care of the administrative details, in particular Cathy for editing this report.

  18. Report on the TESLA Engineering Study/Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornuelle, John C.

    2002-08-30

    In March, 2001, the TESLA Collaboration published its Technical Design Report (TDR, see references and links in Appendix), the first sentence of which stated ''...TESLA (TeV-Energy Superconducting Linear Collider) (will be) a superconducting electron-positron collider of initially 500 GeV total energy, extendable to 800 GeV, and an integrated X-ray laser laboratory.'' The TDR included cost and manpower estimates for a 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider (250 on 250 GeV) based on superconducting RF cavity technology. This was submitted as a proposal to the German government. The government asked the German Science Council to evaluate this proposal. The recommendation from this body is anticipated to be available by November 2002. The government has indicated that it will react on this recommendation by mid-2003. In June 2001, Steve Holmes, Fermilab's Associate Director for Accelerators, commissioned Helen Edwards and Peter Garbincius to organize a study of the TESLA Technical Design Report and the associated cost and manpower estimates. Since the elements and methodology used in producing the TESLA cost estimate were somewhat different from those used in preparing similar estimates for projects within the U.S., it is important to understand the similarities, differences, and equivalences between the TESLA estimate and U.S. cost estimates. In particular, the project cost estimate includes only purchased equipment, materials, and services, but not manpower from DESY or other TESLA collaborating institutions, which is listed separately. It does not include the R&D on the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) nor the costs of preparing the TDR nor the costs of performing the conceptual studies so far. The manpower for the pre-operations commissioning program (up to beam) is included in the estimate, but not the electrical power or liquid Nitrogen (for initial cooldown of the cryogenics plant). There is no inclusion of any contingency or management reserve. If the U.S. were to become involved with the TESLA project, either as a collaborator for an LC in Germany, or as host country for TESLA in the U.S., it is important to begin to understand the scope and technical details of the project, what R&D still needs to be done, and how the U.S. can contribute. The charge for this study is included in the Appendix to this report.

  19. SU-E-J-214: Comparative Assessment On IGRT On Partial Bladder Cancer Treatment Between CT-On-Rails (CTOR) and KV Cone Beam CT (CBCT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, T; Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Image-Guided radiation therapy(IGRT) depends on reliable online patient-specific anatomy information to address random and progressive anatomy changes. Large margins have been suggested to bladder cancer treatment due to large daily bladder anatomy variation. KV Cone beam CT(CBCT) has been used in IGRT localization prevalently; however, its lack of soft tissue contrast makes clinicians hesitate to perform daily soft tissue alignment with CBCT for partial bladder cancer treatment. This study compares the localization uncertainties of bladder cancer IGRT using CTon- Rails(CTOR) and CBCT. Methods: Three T2N0M0 bladder cancer patients (total of 66 Gy to partial bladder alone) were localized daily with either CTOR or CBCT for their entire treatment course. A total of 71 sets of CTOR and 22 sets of CBCT images were acquired and registered with original planning CT scans by radiation therapists and approved by radiation oncologists for the daily treatment. CTOR scanning entailed 2mm slice thickness, 0.98mm axial voxel size, 120kVp and 240mAs. CBCT used a half fan pelvis protocol from Varian OBI system with 2mm slice thickness, 0.98axial voxel size, 125kVp, and 680mAs. Daily localization distribution was compared. Accuracy of CTOR and CBCT on partial bladder alignment was also evaluated by comparing bladder PTV coverage. Results: 1cm all around PTV margins were used in every patient except target superior limit margin to 0mm due to bowel constraint. Daily shifts on CTOR averaged to 0.48, 0.24, 0.19 mms(SI,Lat,AP directions); CBCT averaged to 0.43, 0.09, 0.19 mms(SI,Lat,AP directions). The CTOR daily localization showed superior results of V100% of PTV(102% CTOR vs. 89% CBCT) and bowel(Dmax 69.5Gy vs. 78Gy CBCT). CTOR images showed much higher contrast on bladder PTV alignment. Conclusion: CTOR daily localization for IGRT is more dosimetrically beneficial for partial bladder cancer treatment than kV CBCT localization and provided better soft tissue PTV identification.

  20. A One-Step Cone-Beam CT-Enabled Planning-to-Treatment Model for Palliative Radiotherapy-From Development to Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Rebecca K.S.; Letourneau, Daniel; Varma, Anita; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario ; Bissonnette, Jean Pierre; Fitzpatrick, David; Grabarz, Daniel; Elder, Christine; Martin, Melanie; Bezjak, Andrea; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario ; Panzarella, Tony; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario ; Jaffray, David A.; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To develop a cone-beam computed tomography (CT)-enabled one-step simulation-to-treatment process for the treatment of bone metastases. Methods and Materials: A three-phase prospective study was conducted. Patients requiring palliative radiotherapy to the spine, mediastinum, or abdomen/pelvis suitable for treatment with simple beam geometry ({<=}2 beams) were accrued. Phase A established the accuracy of cone-beam CT images for the purpose of gross tumor target volume (GTV) definition. Phase B evaluated the feasibility of implementing the cone-beam CT-enabled planning process at the treatment unit. Phase C evaluated the online cone-beam CT-enabled process for the planning and treatment of patients requiring radiotherapy for bone metastases. Results: Eighty-four patients participated in this study. Phase A (n = 9) established the adequacy of cone-beam CT images for target definition. Phase B (n = 45) established the quality of treatment plans to be adequate for clinical implementation for bone metastases. When the process was applied clinically in bone metastases (Phase C), the degree of overlap between planning computed tomography (PCT) and cone-beam CT for GTV and between PCT and cone-beam CT for treatment field was 82% {+-} 11% and 97% {+-} 4%, respectively. The oncologist's decision to accept the plan under a time-pressured environment remained of high quality, with the cone-beam CT-generated treatment plan delivering at least 90% of the prescribed dose to 100% {+-} 0% of the cone-beam CT planning target volume (PTV). With the assumption that the PCT PTV is the gold-standard target, the cone-beam CT-generated treatment plan delivered at least 90% and at least 95% of dose to 98% {+-} 2% and 97% {+-} 5% of the PCT PTV, respectively. The mean time for the online planning and treatment process was 32.7 {+-} 4.0 minutes. Patient satisfaction was high, with a trend for superior satisfaction with the cone-beam CT-enabled process. Conclusions: The cone-beam CT-enabled palliative treatment process is feasible and is ready for clinical implementation for the treatment of bone metastases using simple beam geometry, providing a streamlined one-step process toward palliative radiotherapy.

  1. SU-E-T-272: Radiation Damage Comparison Between Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and Field-In-Field Technique in Breast Cancer Treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ai, H; Zhang, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare normal tissue complications between IMRT and FIF treatment in breast cancer. Methods: 16 patients treated with IMRT plan and 20 patients treated with FIF plan were evaluated in this study. Both kinds of plans were generated using Eclipse treatment planning system by dosimetrist following clinical radiotherapy treatment guidelines. The plans were reviewed and approved by radiation oncologist. The average survival fraction (SF) for three different normal tissue cells of each concerned structure can be calculated from differential dose volume histogram (DVH) using linear quadratic model. The three types of normal tissues include radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant that represents 70%, 50% and 30% survival fractions, respectively, for a 2-Gy open field. Equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for corresponding normal tissues of each structure were calculated. Results: The EUDs of the lungs, heart, healthy breast and spinal cord with both IMRT and FIF treatments were calculated. Considering the average value of all IMRT plans, the lung of treated side absorbed 16.0% of dosage prescribed to the tumor if the radiosensitivity of the lung is similar to the radiosensitive cell line. For moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, the average EUDs can be 18.9% and 22.4% of prescription. In contrast, patients treated with FIF plans were delivered 6.0%, 7.5% and 10.3% of prescribed dose for radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, respectively. Comparing heart EUDs between IMRT and FIF plans, average absorbed doses in IMRT treatment were 7.7%, 8.7% and 9.7% of prescription for three types of heart normal tissue cell lines while FIF treatments delivered only 1.3%, 1.5% and 1.6% of prescription dose. For the other organs, the results were similar. Conclusion: The results indicated that breast cancer treatment using IMRT technique had more normal tissue damage than FIF treatment. FIF demonstrated more effective normal tissue dose reduction in breast cancer treatment.

  2. SU-C-17A-05: Quantification of Intra-Fraction Motion of Breast Tumors Using Cine-MRI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heijst, T van; Philippens, M; Bongard, D van den; Asselen, B van; Lagendijk, J; Kleijnen, J; Hartogh, M den

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables direct characterization of intra-fraction motion ofbreast tumors, due to high softtissue contrast and geometric accuracy. The purpose is to analyzethis motion in early-stage breast-cancer patients using pre-operative supine cine-MRI. Methods: MRI was performed in 12 female early-stage breast-cancer patients on a 1.5-T Ingenia (Philips)wide-bore scanner in supine radiotherapy (RT) position, prior to breast-conserving surgery. Twotwodimensional (2D) T2-weighted balanced fast-field echo (cine-MRI) sequences were added tothe RT protocol, oriented through the tumor. They were alternately acquired in the transverse andsagittal planes, every 0.3 s during 1 min. A radiation oncologist delineated gross target volumes(GTVs) on 3D contrast-enhanced MRI. Clinical target volumes (CTV = GTV + 15 mm isotropic)were generated and transferred onto the fifth time-slice of the time-series, to which subsequents lices were registered using a non-rigid Bspline algorithm; delineations were transformed accordingly. To evaluate intra-fraction CTV motion, deformation fields between the transformed delineations were derived to acquire the distance ensuring 95% surface coverage during scanning(P95%), for all in-plane directions: anteriorposterior (AP), left-right (LR), and caudal-cranial(CC). Information on LR was derived from transverse scans, CC from sagittal scans, AP fromboth sets. Results: Time-series with registration errors - induced by motion artifacts - were excluded by visual inspection. For our analysis, 11 transverse, and 8 sagittal time-series were taken into account. Themedian P95% calculated in AP (19 series), CC (8), and LR (11) was 1.8 mm (range: 0.94.8), 1.7mm (0.83.6), and 1.0 mm (0.63.5), respectively. Conclusion: Intra-fraction motion analysis of breast tumors was achieved using cine-MRI. These first results show that in supine RT position, motion amplitudes are limited. This information can be used for adaptive RT planning, and to develop preoperative partial-breast RT strategies, such asablative RT for early-stage breast-cancer patients.