National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for on-site off-site tbd-site

  1. LHCb: The LHCb off-Site HLT Farm Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Guoming

    2012-01-01

    The LHCb High Level Trigger (HLT) farm consists of about 1300 nodes, which are housed in the underground server room of the experiment point. Due to the constraints of the power supply and cooling system, it is difficult to install more servers in this room for the future. Off-site computing farm is a solution to enlarge the computing capacity. In this paper, we will demonstrate the LHCb off-site HLT farm which locate in the CERN computing center. Since we use private IP addresses for the HLT farm, we would need virtual private network (VPN) to bridge both sites. There are two kinds of traffic in the event builder: control traffic for the control and monitoring of the farm and the Data Acquisition (DAQ) traffic. We adopt IP tunnel for the control traffic and Network Address Translate (NAT) for the DAQ traffic. The performance of the off-site farm have been tested and compared with the on-site farm. The effect of the network latency has been studied. To employ a large off-site farm, one of the potential bottle...

  2. Evaluating off-site disposal of low-level waste at LANL-9498

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hargis, Kenneth M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; French, Sean B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyance, Julien A [NORTH WIND, INC.

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory generates a wide range of waste types, including solid low-level radioactive waste (LL W), in conducting its national security mission and other science and technology activities. Although most ofLANL's LLW has been disposed on-site, limitations on expansion, stakeholder concerns, and the potential for significant volumes from environmental remediation and decontamination and demolition (D&D) have led LANL to evaluate the feasibility of increasing off-site disposal. It appears that most of the LL W generated at LANL would meet the Waste Acceptance Criteria at the Nevada Test Site or the available commercial LL W disposal site. Some waste is considered to be problematic to transport to off-site disposal even though it could meet the off-site Waste Acceptance Criteria. Cost estimates for off-site disposal are being evaluated for comparison to estimated costs under the current plans for continued on-site disposal.

  3. Recommendation 222: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater Migration Studies Recommendation 222: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater Migration Studies ORSSAB recommends...

  4. Low-level radioactive waste management: transitioning to off-site disposal at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorries, Alison M

    2010-11-09

    Facing the closure of nearly all on-site management and disposal capability for low-level radioactive waste (LLW), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is making ready to ship the majority of LLW off-site. In order to ship off-site, waste must meet the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facility's (TSDF) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). In preparation, LANL's waste management organization must ensure LANL waste generators characterize and package waste compliantly and waste characterization documentation is complete and accurate. Key challenges that must be addressed to successfully make the shift to off-site disposal of LLW include improving the detail, accuracy, and quality of process knowledge (PK) and acceptable knowledge (AK) documentation, training waste generators and waste management staff on the higher standard of data quality and expectations, improved WAC compliance for off-site facilities, and enhanced quality assurance throughout the process. Certification of LANL generators will allow direct off-site shipping of LLW from their facilities.

  5. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 98-02: DOE Enforcement Activities where Off-site Transportation Issues are also Present.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recently several questions have arisen regarding the scope of Price-Anderson enforcement when transportation issues are directly or indirectly involved in an incident. These questions can be separated into two areas, (1) transportation issues that involve on-site transportation typically not regulated by the Department of Transportation (DOT), and (2) transportation issues that involve off-site transportation. This guidance addresses off-site transportation that is regulated by DOT and other state and federal agencies.

  6. Off-site Lodging (short-term) | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  7. Analyzing the flexibility of inclusionary zoning : should affordable units be built on-site or off-site?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, Rachel (Rachel Margaret)

    2012-01-01

    Inclusionarv zoning (IZ), a strategy first adopted by municipalities in the 1970S to create affordable housing, requires private developers of market-rate residential projects to set-aside a certain percentage of units as ...

  8. HOW TO: Complete Form I-9 Verification for Off-Site Employees 1 Background info

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HOW TO: Complete Form I-9 Verification for Off-Site Employees 1 Background info: By law, the university must have a valid Form I-9 on file for employees. The Form I-9 form must be completed within 3 location to complete their Form I-9 ­ Employment Eligibility Verification. The form has three parts

  9. EA-1924: Consolidation and Relocation of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) OffSite Research Programs to a New Off-Site Location that also Allows for Future Growth, San Francisco East Bay Area, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to consolidate and relocate LBNL research programs that are currently in leased off-site buildings at various locations around the San Francisco East Bay Area in California, to a new single location that also provides room for future growth of LBNL research programs.

  10. "Goodbye Doesn’t Mean Forever:" Selection Strategies for the Transfer of Slavic to Off-Site Remote Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giullian, Jon C.

    2007-01-01

    to the storage crisis, several of the nation’s top research libraries have constructed off-site, high-density shelving facilities. This paper first summarizes the discussion about the nature and function of these facilities. The paper goes on to document a case...

  11. EIS-0243: Nevada Test Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the management of low-level waste (LLW) at all sites and continue, to the extent practicable, disposal of on- site LLW at the Idaho...

  12. Analysis of loss of off-site power ATWS in VVER-440 concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeppner, G.; Siltanen, P.; Kotro, J.

    1987-01-01

    During 1985 the Finnish state-owned utility Imatran Voima Oy signed a work order with Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit mbH of the Federal Republic of Germany (GRS) for the analysis of abnormal transients in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) concept based on a Soviet design. The results of these calculations were intended to be introduced into the licensing process and to support a decision to build such a nuclear power station. A computer model was constructed of the VVER-440 concept, a 500-MW(electric) PWR designed in the USSR and modified for Finland. The ALMOD4 code, developed at GRS, was used for the investigation. The ALMOD4 code is a fast running code for the analysis of operational and abnormal transients in PWRs. Input data were set up to calculate anticipated transients without scram, most notably the loss of off-site power case. One-dimensional neutron kinetics was used to correctly model the neutronics feedback of axially distributed moderator density and fuel temperature in a changing axial power profile. Interlocking signals and the engineered safety systems were modeled to assess the overall systems response to this abnormal transient. Special analytical problems were encountered since a detailed and verified model of the steam generator (SG) with horizontally positioned heat exchanger tubes was not available. Therefore, two bounding calculations were performed with different SG models.

  13. EA-1061: The Off-site Volume Reduction of Low-level Radioactive Waste From the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for off-site volume reduction of low-level radioactive wastes generated at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site located...

  14. Costs for off-site disposal of nonhazardous oil field wastes: Salt caverns versus other disposal methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.A.

    1997-09-01

    According to an American Petroleum Institute production waste survey reported on by P.G. Wakim in 1987 and 1988, the exploration and production segment of the US oil and gas industry generated more than 360 million barrels (bbl) of drilling wastes, more than 20 billion bbl of produced water, and nearly 12 million bbl of associated wastes in 1985. Current exploration and production activities are believed to be generating comparable quantities of these oil field wastes. Wakim estimates that 28% of drilling wastes, less than 2% of produced water, and 52% of associated wastes are disposed of in off-site commercial facilities. In recent years, interest in disposing of oil field wastes in solution-mined salt caverns has been growing. This report provides information on the availability of commercial disposal companies in oil-and gas-producing states, the treatment and disposal methods they employ, and the amounts they charge. It also compares cavern disposal costs with the costs of other forms of waste disposal.

  15. OFF-SITE S

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  16. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: On-Site Treatment of Low Level Mixed Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-03-22

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1292) to evaluate the proposed treatment of low level mixed waste (LLMW) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site). The purpose of the action is to treat LLMW in order to meet the Land Disposal Restrictions specified by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and the waste acceptance criteria of the planned disposal site(s). Approximately 17,000 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) of LLMW are currently stored at the Site. Another 65,000 m{sup 3}of LLMW are likely to be generated by Site closure activities (a total of 82,000 m{sup 3} of LLMW). About 35,000 m{sup 3} can be directly disposed of off-site without treatment, and most of the remaining 47,000 m{sup 3} of LLMW can be treated at off-site treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. However, some LLMW will require treatment on-site, either because it does not meet shipping requirements or because off-site treatment is not available for these particular types of LLMW. Currently, this LLMW is stored at the Site pending the development and implementation of effective treatment processes. The Site needs to treat this LLMW on-site prior to shipment to off-site disposal facilities, in order to meet the DOE long-term objective of clean up and closure of the Site. All on-site treatment of LLMW would comply with applicable Federal and State laws designed to protect public health and safety and to enhance protection of the environment. The EA describes and analyzes the environmental effects of the proposed action (using ten mobile treatment processes to treat waste on-site), and the alternatives of treating waste onsite (using two fixed treatment processes), and of taking no action. The EA was the subject of a public comment period from February 3 to 24, 1999. No written or other comments regarding the EA were received.

  17. Assessor Training Evaluating OnSite Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NVLAP Assessor Training Evaluating OnSite Reports and Corrective Actions #12;Assessor Training 2009Site Report form ·NVLAP OnSite Assessment Review form #12;Assessor Training 2009: Evaluating OnSite Reports · Nonconformities cited #12;Assessor Training 2009: Evaluating OnSite Reports & Corrective Actions 44 Evaluating

  18. Library Collections Conservation Discussion Group 2006: The Changing Role of Collections Conservation II: New Workflows and New Collection Paradigms: Conservation's Role in Off-Site Storage Workflows and Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Whitney; McCarthy, Christine

    2006-01-01

    damage might be mini- mized. Another issue that generated interest was how to iden- tify the most valuable materials in case of a disaster. In some institutions, special collections materials are segre- gated into dedicated storage areas, in part to make... materials that could benefit from off-site storage? 50 Preservation Considerations: Brittle, Decorative, Unusual Format, Security Risk, Mold While there was consensus that low-use materials are usually designated for off-site storage, most institutions use...

  19. Corporate Training On-Site Online Global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    MAKE THE RIGHT MOVE Corporate Training On-Site · Online · Global IMPROVE YOUR COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE WITH WORLD-CLASS ON-SITE AND ONLINE SOLUTIONS TAILORED TO MEET YOUR BUSINESS AND EMPLOYEE TRAINING NEEDS a competitive advantage depends on how well your staff executes. UCIrvineExtension's Corporate Training helps

  20. Microgrids: distributed on-site generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    of the study is a microgrid of domestic users powered by small Combined Heat and Power generators and energy storage in the microgrid. It is found that a microgrid consisting of around 1.4 kWp PV array perMicrogrids: distributed on-site generation Suleiman Abu-Sharkh, Rachel Li, Tom Markvart, Neil Ross

  1. Adapting On-Site Electrical Generation Platforms for Producer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Adapting On-Site Electrical Generation Platforms for Producer Gas - Fact Sheet, April 2014 Adapting On-Site Electrical Generation Platforms for Producer Gas - Fact Sheet, April...

  2. On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Project Financing On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides information,...

  3. Collecting and Using Condensate on Site 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glawe, D.

    2013-01-01

    o n – D e c e m b e r 1 8 , 2 0 1 3 D i a n a D . G l a w e , P h D , P E , L E E D A P E n g i n e e r i n g S c i e n c e D e p a r t m e n t Collecting & using condensate on site ESL-KT-13-12-43 CATEE 2013: Clean Air... the other way around too…… saving energy saves water) ESL-KT-13-12-43 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 On site water sources • Condensate • Rainwater • Cooling...

  4. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Graywater 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melton, Rebecca; Lesikar, Bruce J.; Smith, David; O'Neill, Courtney

    2008-04-03

    . meet plant water requirements during peak-water-use months. However, such sizing can follow the guidelines for the soil-absorption component of an onsite wastewater treatment system. These sizing guidelines are based on type of soil accepting... State Soil and Water Conservation Board USEPA 319(h) Program Texas On-Site Wastewater Treatment Research Council Texas AgriLife Extension Service Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Texas AgriLife Research USDA Water Quality Demonstration...

  5. Potential Federal On-Site Solar Aggregation in Washington, D...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential Federal On-Site Solar Aggregation in Washington, D.C., and Maryland Potential Federal On-Site Solar Aggregation in Washington, D.C., and Maryland Presentation describes...

  6. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Selecting and Permitting (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2005-04-30

    This publication explains how to select and obtain a permit for an on-site wastewater treatment system in Texas....

  7. Adapting On-site Electrical Generation Platforms for Producer Gas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Internal combustion reciprocating engine generators (gensets) are regularly deployed at distribution centers, small municipal utilities, and public institutions to provide on-site electricity...

  8. NIS codes: OS = new/renewal on-site visit PT = proficiency testing on-site FOLUP = follow-up assessment MV = monitoring visit PRE = pre-assessment MOVE = on-site after lab move ADDTM = on-site to assess additions to scope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NIS codes: OS = new/renewal on-site visit PT = proficiency testing on-site FOLUP = follow nonconformities only) #12;NIS codes: OS = new/renewal on-site visit PT = proficiency testing on-site FOLUP

  9. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 1 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck Colleen M,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  10. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 3 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  11. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 2 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  12. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Selecting and Permitting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2005-04-30

    This publication explains factors to consider when choosing an on-site wastewater treatment system and lists the nine steps required to obtain a permit for one. It includes addresses and phone numbers of Texas Natural Resource Conservation...

  13. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Spray Distribution (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    1999-08-12

    Spray distribution systems for wastewater treated on site are much like lawn irrigation systems. This publication explains the advantages, disadvantages, maintenance steps and estimated costs of spray distribution systems.

  14. Sample Documents for On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) works with federal agencies and partners to assemble sample documents from past on-site renewable power purchase agreement (PPA) projects to help streamline the PPA process.

  15. Off-site Intensive Operational Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  16. On-site Destruction of Radioactive Oily Wastes Using Adsorption Coupled with Electrochemical Regeneration - 12221

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, N.W.; Wickenden, D.A.; Roberts, E.P.L.

    2012-07-01

    Arvia{sup R}, working with Magnox Ltd, has developed the technology of adsorption coupled with electrochemical regeneration for the degradation of orphan radioactive oil wastes. The process results in the complete destruction of the organic phase where the radioactivity is transferred to liquid and solid secondary wastes that can then be processed using existing authorised on-site waste-treatment facilities.. Following on from successful laboratory and pilot scale trials, a full scale, site based demonstrator unit was commissioned at the Magnox Trawsfynydd decommissioning site to destroy 10 l of LLW and ILW radioactive oils. Over 99% of the emulsified oil was removed and destroyed with the majority of activity (80 - 90%) being transferred to the aqueous phase. Secondary wastes were disposed of via existing routes with the majority being disposed of via the sites active effluent treatment plant. The regeneration energy required to destroy a litre of oil was 42.5 kWh/l oil. This on-site treatment approach eliminates the risks and cost associated with transporting the active waste oils off site for incineration or other treatment. The Arvia{sup R} process of adsorption coupled with electrochemical regeneration has successfully demonstrated the removal and destruction of LLW and ILW radioactive oils on a nuclear site. Over 99.9% of the emulsified oil was removed, with the majority of the radioactive species transferred to the aqueous, supernate, phase (typically 80 - 90 %). The exception to this is Cs-137 which appears to be more evenly distributed, with 43% associated with the liquid phase and 33 % with the Nyex, the remainder associated with the electrode bed. The situation with Plutonium may be similar, but this requires confirmation, hence further work is underway to understand the full nature of the electrode bed radioactive burden and its distribution within the body of the electrodes. - Tritium gaseous discharges were negligible; hence no off-gas treatment before direct discharge to atmosphere is necessary. All secondary wastes were suitable for disposal using existing disposal routes, with the majority of the activity being successfully discharged as active water via the site active drains. - Oil destruction was achieved at a rate of 28.2 ml/hr using a regeneration energy of 42.5 kWh/l oil. The treatment of different active and non-active oils was achieved using the same operating parameters, providing strong evidence that the process is robust and will treat a wide range of oils, organic wastes and additives. - Currently the design of a plant capable of processing 1000 ml/hr is being established in discussion with Magnox Ltd. The plant will run automatically with little operator attention and so process between 5-8 m{sup 3} of ILW oil per annum. (authors)

  17. Reduce completion fluid costs with on-site brine tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D.C.; Darlington, R.K.; Kinney, W.R.; Lowell, J.L.

    1982-09-01

    A newly developed field kit makes on-site brine completion fluid testing practical. Simple titration procedures are used to analyze brine for calcium, zinc, chloride and bromide with an accuracy and repeatability that compares favorably with expensive laboratory techniques. This article describes the field testing theory and details analytical procedures used.

  18. On-Site Generation Simulation with EnergyPlus for Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael; Firestone, Ryan; Curtil, Dimitri; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-01

    L ABORATORY On-Site Generation Simulation with EnergyPlusemployer. On-Site Generation Simulation with EnergyPlus forin modeling distributed generation (DG), including DG with

  19. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Mound System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, B.; Waynard, V.

    2002-01-01

    system is generally a septic tank, which re- moves the settleable and floatable solids from the wastewater. Advanced pretreatment systems, such as aerobic treatment units or media filters, can also be used to remove additional solids and organic matter..., New For Sale Only $1 The On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems series of publications is a result of collaborative efforts of various agencies, organizations and funding sources. We would like to acknowledge the following collaborators: Texas State Soil...

  20. Modeling On-Site Utility Systems Using "APLUS" 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ranade, S. M.; Jones, D. H.; Shrec, S. C.

    1988-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-88-09-06.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 20190 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-88-09-06.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 MODELING ON-SITE... UTILITY SYSTEMS USING "APLUS" S. M. RANADE D. H. JONES S. C. SHREC Res. & Tech.Coord. Consultant Engineer ConsultantEngineer ICI-TENSA Services, Houston, Texas ABSTRACT Most energy saving schemes on industrial sites lead to reductions in the steam...

  1. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Gravel-less Pipe 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2000-04-10

    absorption field Gravel-less pipe On-site wastewater treatment systems Gravel-less pipe Bruce Lesikar and Russell Persyn Extension Agricultural Engineering Specialist, Extension Assistant-Water Conservation The Texas A&M University System L-5343 1-00 Figure... are surrounded by geotextile fabric instead of gravel. A gravel-less pipe system includes: 3 A treatment device, generally a septic tank, but it can be an advanced treatment system. 3 Gravel-less pipe, which is made of corrugated, perforated polyeth- ylene...

  2. Idaho On-Site Wastewater Systems Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  3. On-Site Notaries Public * Name Location Phone

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  4. Voluntary Protection Program On-site Evaluations | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutoryinEnableVisualization & ControlsforEnergy-On-site

  5. The On-Site Analysis of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulgarelli, Andrea; Zoli, Andrea; Aboudan, Alessio; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Juan José; De Cesare, Giovanni; De Rosa, Adriano; Maier, Gernot; Lyard, Etienne; Bastieri, Denis; Lombardi, Saverio; Tosti, Gino; Bergamaschi, Sonia; Beneventano, Domenico; Lamanna, Giovanni; Jacquemier, Jean; Kosack, Karl; Antonelli, Lucio Angelo; Boisson, Catherine; Borkowski, Jerzy; Buson, Sara; Carosi, Alessandro; Conforti, Vito; Colomé, Pep; Reyes, Raquel de los; Dumm, Jon; Evans, Phil; Fortson, Lucy; Fuessling, Matthias; Gotz, Diego; Graciani, Ricardo; Gianotti, Fulvio; Grandi, Paola; Hinton, Jim; Humensky, Brian; Inoue, Susumu; Knödlseder, Jürgen; Flour, Thierry Le; Lindemann, Rico; Malaguti, Giuseppe; Markoff, Sera; Marisaldi, Martino; Neyroud, Nadine; Nicastro, Luciano; Ohm, Stefan; Osborne, Julian; Oya, Igor; Rodriguez, Jerome; Rosen, Simon; Ribo, Marc; Tacchini, Alessandro; Schüssler, Fabian; Stolarczyk, Thierry; Torresi, Eleonora; Testa, Vincenzo; Wegner, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory will be one of the largest ground-based very high-energy gamma-ray observatories. The On-Site Analysis will be the first CTA scientific analysis of data acquired from the array of telescopes, in both northern and southern sites. The On-Site Analysis will have two pipelines: the Level-A pipeline (also known as Real-Time Analysis, RTA) and the level-B one. The RTA performs data quality monitoring and must be able to issue automated alerts on variable and transient astrophysical sources within 30 seconds from the last acquired Cherenkov event that contributes to the alert, with a sensitivity not worse than the one achieved by the final pipeline by more than a factor of 3. The Level-B Analysis has a better sensitivity (not be worse than the final one by a factor of 2) and the results should be available within 10 hours from the acquisition of the data: for this reason this analysis could be performed at the end of an observation or next morning. The latency (in part...

  6. Oak Ridge Health Studies Phase 1 report, Volume 2: Part A, Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. Tasks 1 and 2, A summary of historical activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation with emphasis on information concerning off-site emissions of hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce, G.M.; Buddenbaum, J.E.; Lamb, J.K.; Widner, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    The Phase I feasibility study has focused on determining the availability of information for estimating exposures of the public to chemicals and radionuclides released as a result of historical operation of the facilities at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The estimation of such past exposures is frequently called dose reconstruction. The initial project tasks, Tasks 1 and 2 were designed to identify and collect information that documents the history of activities at the ORR that resulted in the release of contamination and to characterize the availability of data that could be used to estimate the magnitude of the contaminant releases or public exposures. A history of operations that are likely to have generated off-site releases has been documented as a result of Task 1 activities. The activities required to perform this task involved the extensive review of historical operation records and interviews with present and past employees as well as other knowledgeable individuals. The investigation process is documented in this report. The Task 1 investigations have led to the documentation of an overview of the activities that have taken place at each of the major complexes, including routine operations, waste management practices, special projects, and accidents and incidents. Historical activities that appear to warrant the highest priority in any further investigations were identified based on their likely association with off-site emissions of hazardous materials as indicated by the documentation reviewed or information obtained in interviews.

  7. Assessing the Benefits of On-Site Combined Heat and Power During...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessing the Benefits of On-Site Combined Heat and Power During the August 14, 2003, Blackout, June 2004 Assessing the Benefits of On-Site Combined Heat and Power During the...

  8. Potential Federal On-Site Solar Aggregation in Washington, D.C., and Maryland

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation describes potential Federal on-site solar aggregation opportunities in Washington, D.C., and Maryland.

  9. University of Delaware Technical Analysis for On-Site Wind Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Sustainable Energy Developments, Inc. (SED) performed a technical assessment for an on-site wind turbineUniversity of Delaware Technical Analysis for On-Site Wind Generation Lewes Campus Summary overview of the detailed feasibility study performed for an on-site wind turbine development

  10. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2Geological Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-02-23

    Several technological options have been proposed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2}. One proposed remedy is to separate and capture CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel power plants and other stationary industrial sources and to inject the CO{sub 2} into deep subsurface formations for long-term storage and sequestration. Characterization of geologic formations for sequestration of large quantities of CO{sub 2} needs to be carefully considered to ensure that sites are suitable for long-term storage and that there will be no adverse impacts to human health or the environment. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (Final Draft, October 2005) states that ''Site characterization, selection and performance prediction are crucial for successful geological storage. Before selecting a site, the geological setting must be characterized to determine if the overlying cap rock will provide an effective seal, if there is a sufficiently voluminous and permeable storage formation, and whether any abandoned or active wells will compromise the integrity of the seal. Moreover, the availability of good site characterization data is critical for the reliability of models''. This International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO{sub 2} Geological Storage (CO2SC) addresses the particular issue of site characterization and site selection related to the geologic storage of carbon dioxide. Presentations and discussions cover the various aspects associated with characterization and selection of potential CO{sub 2} storage sites, with emphasis on advances in process understanding, development of measurement methods, identification of key site features and parameters, site characterization strategies, and case studies.

  11. REPORT OF ON-SITE INSPECTION WORKSHOP-16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, J J

    2009-07-07

    The central issue addressed by this workshop was the task of making the on-site inspection (OSI) part of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty verification system operationally ready at entry into force of the Treaty. It is recognized, and this was emphasized by the 2008 OSI Integrated Field Exercise (IFE), that it is not possible to develop every part of the OSI regime simultaneously. Therefore, it is necessary to prioritize the approach to OSI readiness. The reviews of the IFE have pointed to many elements of OSI readiness that still need development. The objective of this workshop was to provide priorities for the path forward for Working Group B to consider. Several critical areas have been identified that are related to the development of OSI readiness: (1) Technology development: Priorities are radionuclide and noble gas sampling and analysis, visual observation, multispectral/infrared imaging methods, active seismic methods and the recognition of the importance of signatures. (2) Organizational development: Priorities are health and safety, the Operations Support Centre, the Equipment Storage and Maintenance Facility, information technology data flow and communications. (3) Resources: The expertise to develop key parts of the OSI regime is not available within the current OSI Division staff. To develop these aspects of the regime will require more staff or supplements to the staff with cost-free experts or other means. Aspects of the system that could benefit from more staff include radionuclide and noble gas detection methods, data flow and communications, visual observation, multispectral/infrared methods and health and safety. As the path forward, participants of this workshop recognized a need to optimize the development of OSI priorities. The outcome of this workshop is to suggest for consideration an operational approach to OSI readiness that utilizes results of an evaluation of the relative effectiveness of OSI elements versus their relative maturity. By integrating such an assessment with considerations of integrated operational capabilities and the anticipated level of inspection team self-sufficiency and measurable milestone criteria, a set of priorities for OSI development can be developed. Once these priorities have been established, the Policy Making Organs can decide upon the milestones, strategic plan and action plan to serve as guidance for implementation by the Provisional Technical Secretariat. The suggested operational approach is as follows: (1) Assess the relative effectiveness (importance) of OSI elements versus their relative maturity; (2) Determine the anticipated level of self-sufficiency; (3) Define measurable milestone criteria; and (4) Result: Milestones for OSI readiness.

  12. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Characterizations”,and J.L. Edwards, “Distributed Energy Resources CustomerN ATIONAL L ABORATORY Distributed Energy Resources On-Site

  13. FEMP Offers Training on Federal On-Site Renewable Power Purchase...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and restrictions Consider the technical and site feasibility for an on-site renewable energy project Establish a multidisciplinary team to successfully implement the PPA...

  14. On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements for Renewable Energy Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An on-site renewable power purchase agreement (PPA) enables Federal agencies to fund a renewable energy project by contracting to purchase the power generated by the system. The renewable energy equipment is installed and owned by a developer but located on-site at the agency facility.

  15. Sample Documents for Federal On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To help streamline the on-site renewable power purchase agreement (PPA) process, the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) works with federal agencies and partners to assemble sample documents from PPA projects.

  16. UTILITY INVESTMENT IN ON-SITE SOLAR: RISK AND RETURN ANALYSIS FOR CAPITALIZATION AND FINANCING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, E.

    2011-01-01

    electric back- for on-site solar may cost more on the marginAssumptions Solar Hot Water Heater Capital Cost AnnualThe Cost of Energy from Utility-Owned Solar Electric

  17. On-Site Diesel Generation- How You Can Reduce Your Energy Costs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles, D.

    1996-01-01

    Interruptible power rates, Utility special rate negotiations, and the emergence of a spot electrical power market all can lead to lower industrial energy costs. The installation of low cost on-site diesel powered generation, or the proposed...

  18. The Energy Resource Center: On-Site Technical Assistance and Training Programs for Texas School Districts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, M.; Sanders, M.

    1988-01-01

    in controlling a major operational expense -- the cost of energy -- through tailoring and implementing services to meet "real world" needs. On-site services available from the ERC range from basic training in analyzing utility bills, tracking energy consumption...

  19. Proposed On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) at the Portsmouth...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Proposed On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Why DOE-EM Did...

  20. Customer adoption of small-scale on-site power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Rubio, F. Javier

    2001-01-01

    of Small-Scale On-Site Power Generation Afzal S. Siddiqui,technologies will tilt power generation economics in favourquality. This pattern of power generation and consumption is

  1. Investigating the Relationship between the Perceptions of Principals and Teachers on Site-Based Decision Making 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, Sandra Deshon

    2013-12-06

    The purpose of this record of study was to investigate the nature of relationships between the perceptions of principals and teachers on site-based decision making (SBDM) and to uncover patterns existing in relationships between and among state...

  2. Recommendation 222: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProvedTravelInformationCollectionGrid Workshop, AprilDepartment ofRidgeMission

  3. Brad Hanson, UC Davis 1 OFF-SITE MOVEMENT OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Brad

    conditions Herbicide Availability AIRKH WATERWATER Henry's Law Constant - Related to solid:gas phase shoulders, fence rows, lawn/landscape) Individual plants Any herbicide that misses or moves from) but normalized for carbon content Rules of Thumb Henry's Law Constant (KH) Lower value = product tends toward

  4. Off Site University Research (OSUR) | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeatMaRIEdioxideUser WorkEPVisiting UsInnovation Portal1663

  5. Engineering Facilities Having the facilities to develop and test spacecraft on-site is a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    concerning the level of allowable contamination for space-bound products. LASP's four on-site cleanrooms. Cleanroom standards are federally and internationally regulated and designated by class, which for Standardization (ISO) Class-5 cleanroom has at most 100,000 particles bigger than a half micron per cubic meter

  6. Introduction On-site power generation is rising. Currently 35% of total

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with a gas turbine creating a combined cycle power plant. It has expected electrical efficiency of greater than 70 percent with low CO2 and NOx and virtually zero SOx. The expected power levels range from 250-kIntroduction On-site power generation is rising. Currently 35% of total US industrial electric

  7. Monday, February 23, 2004 Decision on site for fusion project is put off again

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monday, February 23, 2004 Decision on site for fusion project is put off again VIENNA (Kyodo) The six parties involved in an international nuclear fusion project have again failed to decide on either in March. Senior officials of the parties to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project

  8. Technical Assistance to Ohio Closure Site Technologies to Address Leachate from the On-Site Disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    LBNL-51387 Technical Assistance to Ohio Closure Site Technologies to Address Leachate from the On Management Project ­ On-Site Disposal Facility Leachate Treatment Final Report, October 7, 2002 Disclaimer.1.1 Leachate Recirculation (with air injection as an option)........................... 4 3.1.2 Reverse Osmosis

  9. Technical assistance to Ohio closure sites; Technologies to address leachate from the on-site disposal facility at Fernald Environmental Management Project, Ohio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    2002-01-01

    On-Site Disposal Facility Leachate Treatment Final Report,for such a dilute leachate. Monitored Natural AttenuationOn-Site Disposal Facility Leachate Treatment Final Report,

  10. Portable Analytical Systems for On-Site Diagnosis of Exposure to Pesticides and Nerve Agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Timchalk, Chuck

    2009-12-01

    In this chapter, we summarize recent work in our laboratory on the development of sensitive portable analytical systems for use in on-site detection of exposure to organophosphate (OP) pesticides and chemical nerve agents. These systems are based on various nanomaterials functioning as transducers; recognition agents or labels and various elelectrochemical/immunoassay techniques. The studied nanomaterials included functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNT), zirconia nanoparticles (NPs) and quantum dots (QDs). Three biomarkers e.g. the free OPs, metabolites of OPs and protein-OP adducts in biological matrices have been employed for biomonitoring of OP exposure with our developed system. It has been found that the nanomaterial-based portable analytical systems have high sensitivity for the detection of the biomarkers, which suggest that these technologies offer great promise for the rapid and on-site detection and evaluation of OP exposure.

  11. Portable gas chromatograph mass spectrometer for on-site chemical analyses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, Jeffrey S. (San Ramon, CA); Bushman, John F. (Oakley, CA); Howard, Douglas E. (Livermore, CA); Wong, James L. (Livermore, CA); Eckels, Joel D. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A portable, lightweight (approximately 25 kg) gas chromatograph mass spectrometer, including the entire vacuum system, can perform qualitative and quantitative analyses of all sample types in the field. The GC/MS has a conveniently configured layout of components for ease of serviceability and maintenance. The GC/MS system can be transported under operating or near-operating conditions (i.e., under vacuum and at elevated temperature) to reduce the downtime before samples can be analyzed on-site.

  12. Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat andpower applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; HamachiLaCommare, Kristina

    2004-11-30

    While demand for electricity continues to grow, expansion of the traditional electricity supply system, or macrogrid, is constrained and is unlikely to keep pace with the growing thirst western economies have for electricity. Furthermore, no compelling case has been made that perpetual improvement in the overall power quality and reliability (PQR)delivered is technically possible or economically desirable. An alternative path to providing high PQR for sensitive loads would generate close to them in microgrids, such as the Consortium for Electricity Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid. Distributed generation would alleviate the pressure for endless improvement in macrogrid PQR and might allow the establishment of a sounder economically based level of universal grid service. Energy conversion from available fuels to electricity close to loads can also provide combined heat and power (CHP) opportunities that can significantly improve the economics of small-scale on-site power generation, especially in hot climates when the waste heat serves absorption cycle cooling equipment that displaces expensive on-peak electricity. An optimization model, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), developed at Berkeley Lab identifies the energy bill minimizing combination of on-site generation and heat recovery equipment for sites, given their electricity and heat requirements, the tariffs they face, and a menu of available equipment. DER-CAM is used to conduct a systemic energy analysis of a southern California naval base building and demonstrates atypical current economic on-site power opportunity. Results achieve cost reductions of about 15 percent with DER, depending on the tariff.Furthermore, almost all of the energy is provided on-site, indicating that modest cost savings can be achieved when the microgrid is free to select distributed generation and heat recovery equipment in order to minimize its over all costs.

  13. Federal On-Site Renewable Power Purchasing Issues | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14, 20111,FYDepartmentBillion InvestmentofOn-Site

  14. Home and community composting for on-site treatment of urban organic waste: perspective for Europe and Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Home and community composting for on-site treatment of urban organic waste: perspective for Europe practice (Base Sce), this paper examines on-site UOW composting strategies using a combination of centralized composting facilities (CCF), community composting centres (CCC) and home composting (HC) (Sce 1, 2

  15. Property:On-Site fabrication capability/equipment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 Jump to:NumberOfNonCorporateOrganizationsNumberOfSolarResourcesOn-Site

  16. On-Site Oxy-Lance Size Reduction of South Texas Project Reactor Vessel Heads - 12324

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Posivak, Edward [WMG, inc. (United States); Keeney, Gilbert; Wheeler, Dean [Shaw Group (United States)

    2012-07-01

    On-Site Oxy-Lance size reduction of mildly radioactive large components has been accomplished at other operating plants. On-Site Oxy-Lance size reduction of more radioactive components like Reactor Vessel Heads had previously been limited to decommissioning projects. Building on past decommissioning and site experience, subcontractors for South Texas Project Nuclear Operating Company (STPNOC) developed an innovative integrated system to control smoke, radioactive contamination, worker dose, and worker safety. STP's innovative, easy to use CEDM containment that provided oxy lance access, smoke control, and spatter/contamination control was the key to successful segmentation for cost-effective and ALARA packaging and transport for disposal. Relative to CEDM milling, STP oxy-lance segmentation saved approximately 40 person- REM accrued during 9,000 hours logged into the radiological controlled area (RCA) during more than 3,800 separate entries. Furthermore there were no personnel contamination events or respiratory uptakes of radioactive material during the course of the entire project. (authors)

  17. Customer adoption of small-scale on-site power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Rubio, F. Javier

    2001-04-01

    The electricity supply system is undergoing major regulatory and technological change with significant implications for the way in which the sector will operate (including its patterns of carbon emissions) and for the policies required to ensure socially and environmentally desirable outcomes. One such change stems from the rapid emergence of viable small-scale (i.e., smaller than 500 kW) generators that are potentially competitive with grid delivered electricity, especially in combined heat and power configurations. Such distributed energy resources (DER) may be grouped together with loads in microgrids. These clusters could operate semi-autonomously from the established power system, or macrogrid, matching power quality and reliability more closely to local end-use requirements. In order to establish a capability for analyzing the effect that microgrids may have on typical commercial customers, such as office buildings, restaurants, shopping malls, and grocery stores, an economic mod el of DER adoption is being developed at Berkeley Lab. This model endeavors to indicate the optimal quantity and type of small on-site generation technologies that customers could employ given their electricity requirements. For various regulatory schemes and general economic conditions, this analysis produces a simple operating schedule for any installed generators. Early results suggest that many commercial customers can benefit economically from on-site generation, even without considering potential combined heat and power and reliability benefits, even though they are unlikely to disconnect from the established power system.

  18. PORTSMOUTH ON-SITE DISPOSAL CELL HIGH DENSITY POLYETHYLENE GEOMEMBRANE LONGEVITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, M.

    2012-01-31

    It is anticipated that high density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembranes will be utilized within the liner and closure cap of the proposed On-Site Disposal Cell (OSDC) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The likely longevity (i.e. service life) of HDPE geomembranes in OSDC service is evaluated within the following sections of this report: (1) Section 2.0 provides an overview of HDPE geomembranes, (2) Section 3.0 outlines potential HDPE geomembranes degradation mechanisms, (3) Section 4.0 evaluates the applicability of HDPE geomembrane degradation mechanisms to the Portsmouth OSDC, (4) Section 5.0 provides a discussion of the current state of knowledge relative to the longevity (service life) of HDPE geomembranes, including the relation of this knowledge to the Portsmouth OSDC, and (5) Section 6.0 provides summary and conclusions relative to the anticipated service life of HDPE geomembranes in OSDC service. Based upon this evaluation it is anticipated that the service life of HDPE geomembranes in OSDC service would be significantly greater than the 200 year service life assumed for the OSDC closure cap and liner HDPE geomembranes. That is, a 200 year OSDC HDPE geomembrane service life is considered a conservative assumption.

  19. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacommare, Kristina S H; Stadler, Michael; Aki, Hirohisa; Firestone, Ryan; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal

    2008-05-15

    The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g., PV, fuel cells, reciprocating engines or microturbines operating with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and carbon emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that has the minimization of annual energy costs as its objective function. By implementing this approach in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS), the problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, such as schools and nursing homes, to obtain not only the level of technology investment, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in DER optimization on a building level, with example applications for commercial buildings. Preliminary analysis indicates that storage technologies respond effectively to time-varying electricity prices, i.e., by charging batteries during periods of low electricity prices and discharging them during peak hours. The results also indicate that storage technologies significantly alter the residual load profile, which can contribute to lower carbon emissions depending on the test site, its load profile, and its adopted DER technologies.

  20. A C. elegans-based foam for rapid on-site detection of residual live virus.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negrete, Oscar A.; Branda, Catherine; Hardesty, Jasper O. E. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Tucker, Mark David (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Kaiser, Julia N. (Global Product Management, Hilden, Germany); Kozina, Carol L.; Chirica, Gabriela S.

    2012-02-01

    In the response to and recovery from a critical homeland security event involving deliberate or accidental release of biological agents, initial decontamination efforts are necessarily followed by tests for the presence of residual live virus or bacteria. Such 'clearance sampling' should be rapid and accurate, to inform decision makers as they take appropriate action to ensure the safety of the public and of operational personnel. However, the current protocol for clearance sampling is extremely time-intensive and costly, and requires significant amounts of laboratory space and capacity. Detection of residual live virus is particularly problematic and time-consuming, as it requires evaluation of replication potential within a eukaryotic host such as chicken embryos. The intention of this project was to develop a new method for clearance sampling, by leveraging Sandia's expertise in the biological and material sciences in order to create a C. elegans-based foam that could be applied directly to the entire contaminated area for quick and accurate detection of any and all residual live virus by means of a fluorescent signal. Such a novel technology for rapid, on-site detection of live virus would greatly interest the DHS, DoD, and EPA, and hold broad commercial potential, especially with regard to the transportation industry.

  1. Testing in support of on-site storage of residues in the Pipe Overpack Container

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D.J.; Bobbe, J.G.; Arviso, M.

    1997-02-01

    The disposition of the large back-log of plutonium residues at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) will require interim storage and subsequent shipment to a waste repository. Current plans call for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the transportation to WIPP in the TRUPACT-II. The transportation phase will require the residues to be packaged in a container that is more robust than a standard 55-gallon waste drum. Rocky Flats has designed the Pipe Overpack Container to meet this need. It is desirable to use this same waste packaging for interim on-site storage in non-hardened buildings. To meet the safety concerns for this storage the Pipe Overpack Container has been subjected to a series of tests at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In addition to the tests required to qualify the Pipe Overpack Container as a waste container for shipment in the TRUPACT-II several tests were performed solely for the purpose of qualifying the container for interim storage. This report will describe these tests and the packages response to the tests. 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. On-Site Decontamination System for Liquid Low Level Radioactive Waste - 13010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OSMANLIOGLU, Ahmet Erdal [Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center, Kucukcekmece Istanbul (Turkey)] [Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center, Kucukcekmece Istanbul (Turkey)

    2013-07-01

    This study is based on an evaluation of purification methods for liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) by using natural zeolite. Generally the volume of liquid low-level waste is relatively large and the specific activity is rather low when compared to other radioactive waste types. In this study, a pilot scale column was used with natural zeolite as an ion exchanger media. Decontamination and minimization of LLLW especially at the generation site decrease operational cost in waste management operations. Portable pilot scale column was constructed for decontamination of LLW on site. Effect of temperature on the radionuclide adsorption of the zeolite was determined to optimize the waste solution temperature for the plant scale operations. In addition, effect of pH on the radionuclide uptake of the zeolite column was determined to optimize the waste solution pH for the plant scale operations. The advantages of this method used for the processing of LLLW are discussed in this paper. (authors)

  3. MHWMF Part I Permit Modifications

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    stored on site under generator storage requirements until their disposal at off-site Resource Conservation and Recovery Act-permitted facilities or are treated at the KCP's...

  4. Balloon Coating with Rapamycin Using an On-site Coating Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmehl, Joerg; Ruhr, Juergen von der; Dobratz, Markus; Kehlbach, Rainer; Braun, Isabelle; Greiner, Tim-Oliver; Claussen, Claus D.; Behnisch, Boris

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. The efficacy of drug-eluting balloons has been demonstrated in clinical trials. The drug predominantly used is paclitaxel because of its lipophilic properties and the rapid onset of action. The aim of the investigation was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of an alternative balloon coating with rapamycin that can be applied on site.MethodsThe balloon coating (3.0/18 and 3.0/12 mm, Cathy No. 4, Translumina GmbH) with rapamycin was conducted with a coating machine (Translumina GmbH). Concentrations were 2, 2 Multiplication-Sign 2, 3, and 4 %. Measurements regarding the amount of substance released to the vessel wall were carried out on explanted porcine coronaries by means of ultraviolet and visible-light spectroscopy. Inflation time varied between 30 and 120 s. The biological effect of the coating was evaluated in a porcine peripheral overstretch and stent implantation model. Results. The amount of rapamycin on the balloon surface ranged from 558 {+-} 108 {mu}g for the 2 % solution to 1,441 {+-} 228 {mu}g in the 4 % solution. An amount of 95 {+-} 63-193 {+-} 113 {mu}g was released into the vessel wall. The quantitative measurements of the angiographic examinations 4 weeks after treatment revealed a reduction of diameter stenosis from 20.6 {+-} 17.4 % in the control group to 11.6 {+-} 5.5 % in the drug-eluting balloon group. Conclusion. A balloon coating with rapamycin omitting an excipient is possible with a dose-adjustable coating machine. However, the biological effects are moderate, which make further optimization of the coating process and evaluation of appropriate excipients necessary.

  5. Measurement of ozone in ambient air with microsensors : on-site campaign Isabelle ZDANEVITCH*. Nicolas MOSER**, Caroline CHARPENTIER*, Alexis MOQUET*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Measurement of ozone in ambient air with microsensors : on-site campaign Isabelle ZDANEVITCH, Switzerland E-mail : Isabelle.Zdanevitch(a),iner is.fr (corresponding author) ABSTRACT Ozone is actually one by continuous monitors but a better information on ozone levels would be given by a denser monitoring network

  6. Epistemic uncertainty in on-site earthquake early warning on the use of PGVPD3 empirical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    of Taiwan and Japan. & 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Earthquake prediction hasEpistemic uncertainty in on-site earthquake early warning on the use of PGV­PD3 empirical models J 20 March 2014 Accepted 7 June 2014 Keywords: Earthquake early warning Epistemic uncertainty PGV­PD3

  7. ALL-PATHWAYS DOSE ANALYSIS FOR THE PORTSMOUTH ON-SITE WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, F.; Phifer, M.

    2014-04-10

    A Portsmouth On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) All-Pathways analysis has been conducted that considers the radiological impacts to a resident farmer. It is assumed that the resident farmer utilizes a farm pond contaminated by the OSWDF to irrigate a garden and pasture and water livestock from which food for the resident farmer is obtained, and that the farmer utilizes groundwater from the Berea sandstone aquifer for domestic purposes (i.e. drinking water and showering). As described by FBP 2014b the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) model (Schroeder et al. 1994) and the Surface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) model (White and Oostrom 2000, 2006) were used to model the flow and transport from the OSWDF to the Points of Assessment (POAs) associated with the 680-ft elevation sandstone layer (680 SSL) and the Berea sandstone aquifer. From this modeling the activity concentrations radionuclides were projected over time at the POAs. The activity concentrations were utilized as input to a GoldSimTM (GTG 2010) dose model, described herein, in order to project the dose to a resident farmer over time. A base case and five sensitivity cases were analyzed. The sensitivity cases included an evaluation of the impacts of using a conservative inventory, an uncased well to the Berea sandstone aquifer, a low waste zone uranium distribution coefficient (Kd), different transfer factors, and reference person exposure parameters (i.e. at 95 percentile). The maximum base case dose within the 1,000 year assessment period was projected to be 1.5E-14 mrem/yr, and the maximum base case dose at any time less than 10,000 years was projected to be 0.002 mrem/yr. The maximum projected dose of any sensitivity case was approximately 2.6 mrem/yr associated with the use of an uncased well to the Berea sandstone aquifer. This sensitivity case is considered very unlikely because it assumes leakage from the location of greatest concentration in the 680 SSL in to the Berea sandstone aquiver over time and does not conform to standard private water well construction practices. The bottom-line is that all predicted doses from the base case and five sensitivity cases fall well below the DOE all-pathways 25 mrem/yr Performance Objective.

  8. Primer on Use of Multi-Spectral and Infra Red Imaging for On-Site Inspections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, J R

    2010-10-26

    The purpose of an On-Site Inspection (OSI) is to determine whether a nuclear explosion has occurred in violation of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), and to gather information which might assist in identifying the violator (CTBT, Article IV, Paragraph 35) Multi-Spectral and Infra Red Imaging (MSIR) is allowed by the treaty to detect observables which might help reduce the search area and thus expedite an OSI and make it more effective. MSIR is permitted from airborne measurements, and at and below the surface to search for anomalies and artifacts (CTBT, Protocol, Part II, Paragraph 69b). The three broad types of anomalies and artifacts MSIR is expected to be capable of observing are surface disturbances (disturbed earth, plant stress or anomalous surface materials), human artifacts (man-made roads, buildings and features), and thermal anomalies. The purpose of this Primer is to provide technical information on MSIR relevant to its use for OSI. It is expected that this information may be used for general background information, to inform decisions about the selection and testing of MSIR equipment, to develop operational guidance for MSIR use during an OSI, and to support the development of a training program for OSI Inspectors. References are provided so readers can pursue a topic in more detail than the summary information provided here. The following chapters will provide more information on how MSIR can support an OSI (Section 2), a short summary what Multi-Spectral Imaging and Infra Red Imaging is (Section 3), guidance from the CTBT regarding the use of MSIR (Section 4), and a description of several nuclear explosion scenarios (Section 5) and consequent observables (Section 6). The remaining sections focus on practical aspects of using MSIR for an OSI, such as specification and selection of MSIR equipment, operational considerations for deployment of MISR equipment from an aircraft, and the conduct of field exercises to mature MSIR for an OSI. Finally, an appendix provides detail describing the magnitude and spatial extent of the surface shock expected from an underground nuclear explosion. If there is a seismic event or other data to suggest there has been a nuclear explosion in violation of the CTBT, an OSI may be conducted to determine whether a nuclear explosion has occurred and to gather information which may be useful in identifying the party responsible for conducting the explosion. The OSI must be conducted in the area where the event that triggered the inspection request occurred, and the inspected area must not exceed 1,000 square kilometers, or be more than 50 km on aside (CTBT Protocol, Part II, Paragraphs 2 and 3). One of the guiding principles for an inspection is that it be effective, minimally intrusive, timely, and cost-effective [Hawkins, Feb 1998]. In that context, MSIR is one of several technologies that can be used during an aircraft overflight to identify ground regions of high interest in a timely and cost-effective manner. This allows for an optimized inspection on the ground. The primary purpose for MSIR is to identify artifacts and anomalies that might be associated with a nuclear explosion, and to use the location of those artifacts and anomalies to reduce the search area that must be inspected from the ground. The MSIR measurements can have additional utility. The multi-spectral measurements of the ground can be used for terrain classification, which can aid in geological characterization of the Inspected Area. In conditions of where light smoke or haze is present, long-wave infrared imaging can provide better imaging of the ground than is possible with standard visible imagery.

  9. The implications of carbon taxation on microgrid adoption of small-scale on-site power generation using a multi-criteria approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; de Almeida, Anibal T.; Marnay, Chris; Rubio, F. Javier

    2002-01-01

    Small-Scale On-Site Power Generation Using a Multi-Criteriatechnologies will tilt power generation economics in favorquality. This pattern of power generation and consumption is

  10. All Hands Program Review Off-site | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a larger view) Time Presenter 8:30-9:00AM Continental Breakfast 9:00AM Opening remarks-Marc Baldo EFRC - Seeds 9:10AM Natalia Shustova 9:15AM David Ciudad 9:20AM YongJoo Kim...

  11. H FINAL REPORT OF OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE FOR THE FAULTLESS EVENT,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadisonAMOCOELIkNATION ;.7,? ._

  12. OFF-SITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT F O R THE NEVADA TEST SITE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the Weldon Spring,7=cr5rnP 7694 i+lJNew York,' ,9229409F

  13. OFF-SITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the Weldon Spring,7=cr5rnP 7694 i+lJNew York,'

  14. OFF-SITE RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY PROGRAM FOR PROJECT RULISON FLARING, PHASE I11

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the Weldon Spring,7=cr5rnP 7694 i+lJNew

  15. OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES OF TFE SOUTHWESTERN RADIOLOG1 CAL BEALTH LABORATORY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the Weldon Spring,7=cr5rnP 7694 i+lJNewS e T B ~ I L L

  16. Table 1c. Off-Site Produced Energy (Site Energy)For Selected Industries,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan3 November 2013AdditionsExports ofChanges,50979049 1555Square1998,

  17. COT"IPREITENS IVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OFF-SITE PROPERTY P NIAGARA FALIS STORAGE SITE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M P R E H E N S I V E R A D T

  18. I COMPRE}IENSIVE RADIOLOGICAI SURVEY OFF-SITE PROPERTY N,-NORTS

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M P R E H E N SGwen} ;im

  19. OFermilab OFF-SITE SHORT-TERM HOUSING-2013--2014 Housing Office/Aspen East

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSE The 2014 surveyNuclear andTwo-Phase FlowMealsOFermilab

  20. A Discussion of Procedures and Equipment for the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty On-Site Inspection Environmental Sampling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wogman, Ned A.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Payne, Rosara F.; Seifert, Carolyn E.; Friese, Judah I.; Miley, Harry S.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hanlen, Richard C.; Onishi, Yasuo; Hayes, James C.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2011-02-01

    This paper is intended to serve as a scientific basis to start discussions of the available environmental sampling techniques and equipment that have been used in the past that could be considered for use within the context of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) on-site inspections (OSI). This work contains information on the techniques, equipment, costs, and some operational procedures associated with environmental sampling that have actually been used in the past by the United States for the detection of nuclear explosions. This paper also includes a discussion of issues, recommendations, and questions needing further study within the context of the sampling and analysis of aquatic materials, atmospheric gases, atmospheric particulates, vegetation, sediments and soils, fauna, and drill-back materials.

  1. Recommended Method To Account For Daughter Ingrowth For The Portsmouth On-Site Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, Mark A.; Smith, Frank G. III

    2013-06-21

    A 3-D STOMP model has been developed for the Portsmouth On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) at Site D as outlined in Appendix K of FBP 2013. This model projects the flow and transport of the following radionuclides to various points of assessments: Tc-99, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Am-241, Np-237, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Th-228, and Th-230. The model includes the radioactive decay of these parents, but does not include the associated daughter ingrowth because the STOMP model does not have the capability to model daughter ingrowth. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provides herein a recommended method to account for daughter ingrowth in association with the Portsmouth OSWDF Performance Assessment (PA) modeling.

  2. US DOE-EM On-Site Disposal Cell Working Group - Fostering Communication On Performance Assessment Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, Roger R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Suttora, Linda C. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Site Restoration, Germantown, MD (United States); Phifer, Mark [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2014-03-01

    On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These facilities are typically developed with regulatory oversight from States and/or the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in addition to USDOE. The facilities are developed to meet design standards for disposal of hazardous waste as well as the USDOE performance based standards for disposal of radioactive waste. The involvement of multiple and different regulators for facilities across separate sites has resulted in some differences in expectations for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RA) that are developed for the disposal facilities. The USDOE-EM Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to performance and risk assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement. The working group holds teleconferences, as needed, focusing on specific topics of interest. The topics addressed to date include an assessment of the assumptions used for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RAs) for on-site disposal cells, requirements and assumptions related to assessment of inadvertent intrusion, DOE Manual 435.1-1 requirements, and approaches for consideration of the long-term performance of liners and covers in the context of PAs. The working group has improved communication among the staff and oversight personnel responsible for onsite disposal cells and has provided a forum to identify and resolve common concerns.

  3. On-Site Pilot Study - Removal of Uranium, Radium-226 and Arsenic from Impacted Leachate by Reverse Osmosis - 13155

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMurray, Allan; Everest, Chris; Rilling, Ken; Vandergaast, Gary; LaMonica, David

    2013-07-01

    Conestoga-Rovers and Associates (CRA-LTD) performed an on-site pilot study at the Welcome Waste Management Facility in Port Hope, Ontario, Canada, to evaluate the effectiveness of a unique leachate treatment process for the removal of radioactive contaminants from leachate impacted by low-level radioactive waste. Results from the study also provided the parameters needed for the design of the CRA-LTD full scale leachate treatment process design. The final effluent water quality discharged from the process to meet the local surface water discharge criteria. A statistical software package was utilized to obtain the analysis of variance (ANOVA) for the results from design of experiment applied to determine the effect of the evaluated factors on the measured responses. The factors considered in the study were: percent of reverse osmosis permeate water recovery, influent coagulant dosage, and influent total dissolved solids (TDS) dosage. The measured responses evaluated were: operating time, average specific flux, and rejection of radioactive contaminants along with other elements. The ANOVA for the design of experiment results revealed that the operating time is affected by the percent water recovery to be achieved and the flocculant dosage over the range studied. The average specific flux and rejection for the radioactive contaminants were not affected by the factors evaluated over the range studied. The 3 month long on-site pilot testing on the impacted leachate revealed that the CRA-LTD leachate treatment process was robust and produced an effluent water quality that met the surface water discharge criteria mandated by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission and the local municipality. (authors)

  4. Visual Sample Plan (VSP) Statistical Software as Related to the CTBTO’s On-Site Inspection Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Walsh, Stephen J.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Milbrath, Brian D.

    2010-09-01

    In the event of a potential nuclear weapons test the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is commissioned to conduct an on-site investigation (OSI) of the suspected test site in an effort to find confirmatory evidence of the nuclear test. The OSI activities include collecting air, surface soil, and underground samples to search for indications of a nuclear weapons test - these indicators include radionuclides and radioactive isotopes Ar and Xe. This report investigates the capability of the Visual Sample Plan (VSP) software to contribute to the sampling activities of the CTBTO during an OSI. VSP is a statistical sampling design software, constructed under data quality objectives, which has been adapted for environmental remediation and contamination detection problems for the EPA, US Army, DoD and DHS among others. This report provides discussion of a number of VSP sample designs, which may be pertinent to the work undertaken during an OSI. Examples and descriptions of such designs include hot spot sampling, combined random and judgment sampling, multiple increment sampling, radiological transect surveying, and a brief description of other potentially applicable sampling methods. Further, this work highlights a potential need for the use of statistically based sample designs in OSI activities. The use of such designs may enable canvassing a sample area without full sampling, provide a measure of confidence that radionuclides are not present, and allow investigators to refocus resources in other areas of concern.

  5. Slimhole drilling and directional drilling for on-site inspections under a Comprehensive Test Ban: An initial assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heuze, F. E.

    1995-07-01

    On Site-Inspection (OSI), under the Comprehensive Test Ban being negotiated in the Conference on Disarmament in Geneva, may include drilling at the site of a suspected clandestine underground nuclear explosion to recover radioactive samples. It is in the interest of the drilling party to operate as light and compact a system as possible because it is likely that the drilling equipment will first be airlifted to the country being inspected, and then will be carried by air or surface to the inspection site. It will be necessary for the inspection party to have the capability for more than vertical drilling since there may not be a drilling site available vertically above the suspected nuclear cavity location. This means having, the ability to perform directional drilling and to obtain accurate positioning of the drilling tool. Consequently, several directions may be explored from a single surface drilling pad. If the target depth is expected to be at or less than 600 m (2000 ft), slant drilling may be required to a length well in excess of 600 m. Clearly, the operation must be designed with health and safety features to prevent radioactive exposure if the drilling encounters a nuclear source region. The DOE/LLNL community has developed a strong expertise in this regard. In this initial assessment we focus on the portability and directionality of drilling systems.

  6. Mobile on-site sample collection, preparation, and analysis in Iraq. Final report, January-April 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swahn, I.D.; Brzezinski, J.H.

    1996-11-01

    The U.S. Army Edgewood Research, Development and Engineering Center has developed mobile on-site sample collection, preparation, and analysis equipment to collect environmental samples in highly contaminated areas. This equipment is being used by the United Nations Special Commission at the Baghdad Monitoring and Verification Center (BMVC), which provides long-term monitoring of dual-purpose chemical sites in Iraq, especially those with potential for chemical warfare (CW) production. A mobile laboratory was set-up in the BMVC to prepare and analyze samples collected throughout Iraq. Automatic air samplers were installed at various sites to collect vapor samples on absorption tubes that were analyzed using a gas chromatographic (GC) flame photometric detector (FPD). Mobile sample collection kits were used to collect solid, liquid, air, and wipe samples during challenge inspections. These samples were prepared using a sample preparation kit, which concentrates CW agent, breakdown products, and their precursors in complex matrices down to sub part per million levels for chemical analysis by a GC mass selective detector (MSD). This report describes the problems and solutions encountered with setting up a self-sufficient mobile analytical laboratory. Details of the various components associated with the laboratory and the collection kits are included.

  7. Name and Address form for Employee Data This for should be used for you ON-SITE and HOME information. The information that you provide will update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    Name and Address form for Employee Data This for should be used for you ON-SITE and HOME published and online version of the Fermilab Telephone Directory. COMPLETE YOUR NAME, ID, AND OTHER INFORMATION BELOW BADGE/ID NUMBER: ________________ EMPLOYEE NAME

  8. Proceedings of the Fifth International Symposium of In-situ and On-site Bioremediation, April 19-22, San Diego, ENHANCING BIOCOLLOID TRANSPORT TO IMPROVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proceedings of the Fifth International Symposium of In-situ and On-site Bioremediation, April 19 was not as effective as using low ionic strength (IS) water or surfactants. Filtration models predict reduced bacterial) water, and that they be injected at low pumping velocities (~1 m/d) to minimize bacterial attachment

  9. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Scaling-Up On-Site Composting in the Student Union Building ~UBC Vancouver~

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Site Composting in the Student Union Building ~UBC Vancouver~ GRS 497B November 01, 2013 282 1667 University-Site Composting in the Student Union Building ~UBC Vancouver~ 2 Conducted by: Emme Lee Email: Phone: Conducted for: November 2013 #12;Author: Emme Lee Scaling-Up On-Site Composting in the Student Union Building ~UBC

  10. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Scaling-Up On-Site Composting in the Student Union Building ~UBC Vancouver~

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Site Composting in the Student Union Building ~UBC Vancouver~ GRS 397 August 26, 2014 891 1673 University-Site Composting in the Student Union Building ~UBC Vancouver~ 2 Conducted by: Emme Lee Conducted for: AMS;Author: Emme Lee Scaling-Up On-Site Composting in the Student Union Building ~UBC Vancouver~ 3 CONTEXT

  11. Tips for Working with Microsoft Word Forms NVLAP has converted several of its most used on-site assessment forms to Microsoft Word

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tips for Working with Microsoft Word Forms NVLAP has converted several of its most used on-site assessment forms to Microsoft Word forms to allow you to fill out the forms on your computer. There are both advantages and disadvantages to Word forms that you should be aware of when deciding whether to use the form

  12. Statement of position of the United States Department of Energy in the matter of proposed rulemaking on the storage and disposal of nuclear waste (waste confidence rulemaking)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-04-15

    Purpose of this proceeding is to assess generically the degree of assurance that the radioactive waste can be safely disposed of, to determine when such disposal or off-site storage will be available, and to determine whether wastes can be safely stored on-site past license expiration until off-site disposal/storage is available. (DLC)

  13. WESTLAKE LANDFILL EPA Region 7 03/29/2012 City: Bridgeton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    threats are generally limited to people who might come into direct contact with landfilled waste materials and disposal either off-site or in a new, on-site engineered disposal cell outside of the Missouri River

  14. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 98-02: DOE Enforcement Activities where Off-site Transportation Issues are also Present

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity to the Office of Enforcement and Investigation to issue clarifying guidance from time to...

  15. Guidance on site selection for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a range ofpossible methods,includingthe harvesting ofcompact brash from timber extraction routes and potassium) reducingsoilbufferingcapacity and leadingto increased soiland stream water acidification "Whole-Tree Harvesting:A Guide to Good Practice`(Forestry Commission,1997),Forests and Soil

  16. Guidance on site selection for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    harvestingbrash materialfollowingtimber harvestingto supply biomass for heat and power generation. A number 4 Soil fertility 5 Acidification 7 Combined Hazard Assessment 8 OTHER ISSUES 8 INCREASING

  17. Electronic structure of antifluorite Cu{sub 2}X (X = S, Se, Te) within the modified Becke-Johnson potential plus an on-site Coulomb U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yubo; Wang, Youwei; Xi, Lili; Qiu, Ruihao; Shi, Xun; Zhang, Peihong E-mail: pzhang3@buffalo.edu; Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 ; Zhang, Wenqing E-mail: pzhang3@buffalo.edu; School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, and Sate Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, Nanjing University, Jiangsu 210093

    2014-02-21

    The traditional photon absorbers Cu{sub 2?x}X (X = S, Se, and Te) have regained significant research attention in the search of earth-abundant photovoltaic materials. These moderate- and narrow-gap materials have also been shown to exhibit excellent thermoelectric properties recently. However, semimetallic band structures with inverted band orderings are predicted for antifluorite structure Cu{sub 2}X using density functional theory with the local density approximation or the generalized gradient approximation. We find that semiconducting band structures and normal band orderings can be obtained using the modified Becke-Johnson potential plus an on-site Coulomb U (the mBJ+U approach), which is consistent with our earlier finding for diamond-like Cu-based multinary semiconductors [Y. Zhang, J. Zhang, W. Gao, T. A. Abtew, Y. Wang, P. Zhang, and W. Zhang, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 184706 (2013)]. The trend of the chemical bonding of Cu{sub 2}X is analyzed, which shows that the positions of the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum are strongly affected by the inter-site pd and intra-site sp hybridizations, respectively. The calculated gaps of Cu{sub 2}S and Cu{sub 2}Se still seem to be underestimated compared with experimental results. We also discuss the effects of different structural phases and Cu disordering and deficiency on the bandgaps of these materials.

  18. Microchannel Reactor System Design & Demonstration For On-Site H2O2 Production by Controlled H2/O2 Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adeniyi Lawal

    2008-12-09

    We successfully demonstrated an innovative hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production concept which involved the development of flame- and explosion-resistant microchannel reactor system for energy efficient, cost-saving, on-site H2O2 production. We designed, fabricated, evaluated, and optimized a laboratory-scale microchannel reactor system for controlled direct combination of H2 and O2 in all proportions including explosive regime, at a low pressure and a low temperature to produce about 1.5 wt% H2O2 as proposed. In the second phase of the program, as a prelude to full-scale commercialization, we demonstrated our H2O2 production approach by ‘numbering up’ the channels in a multi-channel microreactor-based pilot plant to produce 1 kg/h of H2O2 at 1.5 wt% as demanded by end-users of the developed technology. To our knowledge, we are the first group to accomplish this significant milestone. We identified the reaction pathways that comprise the process, and implemented rigorous mechanistic kinetic studies to obtain the kinetics of the three main dominant reactions. We are not aware of any such comprehensive kinetic studies for the direct combination process, either in a microreactor or any other reactor system. We showed that the mass transfer parameter in our microreactor system is several orders of magnitude higher than what obtains in the macroreactor, attesting to the superior performance of microreactor. A one-dimensional reactor model incorporating the kinetics information enabled us to clarify certain important aspects of the chemistry of the direct combination process as detailed in section 5 of this report. Also, through mathematical modeling and simulation using sophisticated and robust commercial software packages, we were able to elucidate the hydrodynamics of the complex multiphase flows that take place in the microchannel. In conjunction with the kinetics information, we were able to validate the experimental data. If fully implemented across the whole industry as a result of our technology demonstration, our production concept is expected to save >5 trillion Btu/year of steam usage and >3 trillion Btu/year in electric power consumption. Our analysis also indicates >50 % reduction in waste disposal cost and ~10% reduction in feedstock energy. These savings translate to ~30% reduction in overall production and transportation costs for the $1B annual H2O2 market.

  19. Electronic and thermoelectric properties of Ce{sub 3}Te{sub 4} and La{sub 3}Te{sub 4} computed with density functional theory with on-site Coulomb interaction correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vo, Trinh; Allmen, Paul von; Huang, Chen-Kuo; Ma, James; Bux, Sabah; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2014-10-07

    The electronic properties and Seebeck coefficients of Ce{sub 3}Te{sub 4} and La{sub 3}Te{sub 4} are computed using Density Functional Theory with on-site Coulomb interaction correction. We found that the Seebeck coefficients of Ce{sub 3}Te{sub 4} and La{sub 3}Te{sub 4} are almost equal at temperatures larger than the Curie temperature of Ce{sub 3}Te{sub 4}, and in good agreement with the measurements reported by May et al. [Phys. Rev. B 86, 035135 (2012)]. At temperatures below the Curie temperature, the Seebeck coefficient of Ce{sub 3}Te{sub 4} increases due to the ferromagnetic ordering, which leads the f-electron of Ce to contribute to the Seebeck coefficient in the relevant range of electron concentration.

  20. Radiological Characterization Technical Report on Californium-252 Sealed Source Transuranic Debris Waste for the Off-Site Source Recovery Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, Alexander

    2014-04-24

    This document describes the development and approach for the radiological characterization of Cf-252 sealed sources for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The report combines information on the nuclear material content of each individual source (mass or activity and date of manufacture) with information and data on the radionuclide distributions within the originating nuclear material. This approach allows for complete and accurate characterization of the waste container without the need to take additional measurements. The radionuclide uncertainties, developed from acceptable knowledge (AK) information regarding the source material, are applied to the summed activities in the drum. The AK information used in the characterization of Cf-252 sealed sources has been qualified by the peer review process, which has been reviewed and accepted by the Environmental Protection Agency.

  1. Acceptance of Soil from Off Site Sources In order to guard against receiving contaminated soils to used as fill material on campus,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    regulations governing the remediation of site, and hazardous chemical disposal. Local Oversight Program Agency basic information for determining if there has been a release of a hazardous substance that present specifications. Because most sites requiring fill material are located in or near urban areas, the fill materials

  2. Radiological and Environmental Monitoring at the Clean Slate I and III Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, With Emphasis on the Implications for Off-site Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A; Etyemezian, Vic; McCurdy, Greg; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; Miller, Julianne J

    2014-09-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]) implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in the dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero (GZ). Three tests—Clean Slate I, II, and III—were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat. The fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. The Desert Research Institute (DRI) installed two monitoring stations in 2008, Station 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Range Operations Center (ROC) and Station 401 at Clean Slate III. Station 402 was installed at Clean Slate I in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The monitoring activity was implemented to determine if radionuclide contamination in the soil at the Clean Slate sites was being transported beyond the contamination area boundaries. Some of the data collected also permits comparison of radiological exposure at the TTR monitoring stations to conditions observed at Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations around the NTTR. Annual average gross alpha values from the TTR monitoring stations are higher than values from the surrounding CEMP stations. Annual average gross beta values from the TTR monitoring stations are generally lower than values observed for the surrounding CEMP stations. This may be due to use of sample filters with larger pore space because when glass-fiber filters began to be used at TTR Station 400, gross beta values increased. Gamma spectroscopy typically identified only naturally occurring radionuclides. The radionuclides cesium-134 and -137 were identified in only two samples at each station collected in the weeks following the destruction of the nuclear power reactor in Fukushima, Japan, on March 11, 2011. Observed gamma energy values never exceeded the local background by more than 4 ?R/h. The higher observed gamma values were coincident with wind from any of the cardinal directions, which suggests that there is no significant transport from the Clean Slate contamination areas. Annual average daily gamma values at the TTR stations are higher than at the surrounding CEMP stations, but they are equivalent to or just slightly higher than the background estimates made at locations at equivalent elevations, such as Denver, Colorado. Winds in excess of approximately 15 mph begin to resuspend soil particles and create dust, but dust generation is also affected by soil temperature, relative humidity, and soil water content. Power curves provide good predictive equations for dust concentration as a function of wind speed. However, winds in the highest wind speed category occur infrequently. iii

  3. On-site construction versus prefabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legmpelos, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    The question this thesis tries to answer is "How does one decide whether or not to use prefabrication in a project?" Since this is a broad question, we focus on a more specific topic: "How does one decide whether or not ...

  4. On-Site Disposal Facility Inspection Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Possible) GPS? Erosion Settlement Vegetation Biointrusion Drainage Other Description Photo? (File No.) Corrected Maintenance Req'd Cont. Observation JH1 West inner drain at VH4...

  5. On-Site Wind Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Eligibility This program is offered as part of the Customer-Sited Tier of the state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) program. Consequently, only customers of electricity distribution utilities...

  6. On Site Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt.Information Olinda LandfillShakthi Renergies LtdOmro,On

  7. On-Site Disposal Facility Inspection Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M1 the RFSOGor _^29.1ed8947.1 09/13

  8. On-Site Disposal Facility Inspection Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M1 the RFSOGor _^29.1ed8947.1

  9. Patterns of Fossil-based CO2 Emissions from US Croplands Contact: Tris West, 865-574-7322, westto@ornl.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    fossil-fuel combustion. A method was developed to calculate on-site and off-site energy and CO2 emissionsPatterns of Fossil-based CO2 Emissions from US Croplands Contact: Tris West, 865-574-7322, westto@ornl.gov Funding: DOE Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research; and DOE Office of Biomass

  10. Environmental radioactivity measurements at the Texas A&M University landfill 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riland, Carson Allen

    1993-01-01

    -Stokes pressurized ionization chamber was used for exposure rate measurements. Shallow core soil samples were taken from a gully on-site and from a drainage stream bed off-site. These samples were first analyzed by gamma spectroscopy using a HPGE detector. Soil...

  11. Open Archive TOULOUSE Archive Ouverte (OATAO) OATAO is an open access repository that collects the work of Toulouse researchers and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ]). In many cases, the dual requirements of power and heating in industrial processes are treated separately: power is purchased from an off-site energy provider and heating is produced on-site through fossil fuel Economic and environmental impacts of the energy source for the utility production system in the HDA

  12. EIS-0109: Long-Term Management of the Existing Radioactive Wastes and Residues at the Niagara Falls Storage Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate the environmental impacts of several alternatives for management and control of the radioactive wastes and residues at the Niagara Falls Storage Site, including a no action alternative, an alternative to manage wastes on site, and two off-site management alternatives.

  13. Memorandum, Protective Force Law Enforcement Authority- May 1, 2009

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Investigation allegations that contractor procetive force personnel at a DOE site exceeded their legistative ,regulatory, and policy-based authority by providing on-duty, armed off-site assistance to local law enforcement authorites during other than recapture/recovery operations, and by accessing the local law enforcement database for background checks during the course of on-site administrative traffic stops.

  14. EIS-0111: Remedial Actions at the Former Vanadium Corporation of America Uranium Mill Site, Durango, La Plata County, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate the environmental impacts of several scenarios for management and control of the residual radioactive wastes at the inactive Durango, Colorado, uranium processing site, including a no action alternative, an alternative to manage wastes on site, and three alternatives involving off-site management and decontamination of the Durango site.

  15. Oil field waste disposal costs at commercial disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    The exploration and production segment of the U.S. oil and gas industry generates millions of barrels of nonhazardous oil field wastes annually. In most cases, operators can dispose of their oil fields wastes at a lower cost on-site than off site and, thus, will choose on-site disposal. However, a significant quantity of oil field wastes are still sent to off-site commercial facilities for disposal. This paper provides information on the availability of commercial disposal companies in different states, the treatment and disposal methods they employ, and how much they charge. There appear to be two major off-site disposal trends. Numerous commercial disposal companies that handle oil field wastes exclusively are located in nine oil-and gas-producing states. They use the same disposal methods as those used for on-site disposal. In addition, the Railroad Commission of Texas has issued permits to allow several salt caverns to be used for disposal of oil field wastes. Twenty-two other oil- and gas-producing states contain few or no disposal companies dedicated to oil and gas industry waste. The only off-site commercial disposal companies available handle general industrial wastes or are sanitary landfills. In those states, operators needing to dispose of oil field wastes off-site must send them to a local landfill or out of state. The cost of off-site commercial disposal varies substantially, depending on the disposal method used, the state in which the disposal company is located, and the degree of competition in the area.

  16. Health assessment for Seymour Recycling Corporation, Seymour, Indiana, Region 5. CERCLIS No. IND040313017. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-04-02

    The Seymour Recycling Corporation site (number 57 on the National Priorities List) is located approximately two miles southwest of Seymour, Indiana. From the very early 1970s to 1980, the site was operated as a processing center for waste chemicals. Distillation was the major method of product reclamation with as many as 11 columns operating simultaneously. Overall environmental monitoring has identified more than 70 contaminants on-site within soil and aquifer samples. The shallow and deep aquifers exhibit both on-site and off-site contamination. The existence of the surface clay cap and fencing to restrict access has removed direct contact as an exposure route for remaining on-site contaminants. The existence of the surface cap should also be preventing contaminant-laden dust from moving off-site.

  17. DELPHI expert panel evaluation of Hanford high level waste tank failure modes and release quantities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunford, G.L.; Han, F.C.

    1996-09-30

    The Failure Modes and Release Quantities of the Hanford High Level Waste Tanks due to postulated accident loads were established by a DELPHI Expert Panel consisting of both on-site and off-site experts in the field of Structure and Release. The Report presents the evaluation process, accident loads, tank structural failure conclusion reached by the panel during the two-day meeting.

  18. The use of real-time off-site observations as a methodology for increasing forecast skill in prediction of large wind power ramps one or more hours ahead of their impact on a wind plant.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin Wilde, Principal Investigator

    2012-12-31

    ABSTRACT Application of Real-Time Offsite Measurements in Improved Short-Term Wind Ramp Prediction Skill Improved forecasting performance immediately preceding wind ramp events is of preeminent concern to most wind energy companies, system operators, and balancing authorities. The value of near real-time hub height-level wind data and more general meteorological measurements to short-term wind power forecasting is well understood. For some sites, access to onsite measured wind data - even historical - can reduce forecast error in the short-range to medium-range horizons by as much as 50%. Unfortunately, valuable free-stream wind measurements at tall tower are not typically available at most wind plants, thereby forcing wind forecasters to rely upon wind measurements below hub height and/or turbine nacelle anemometry. Free-stream measurements can be appropriately scaled to hub-height levels, using existing empirically-derived relationships that account for surface roughness and turbulence. But there is large uncertainty in these relationships for a given time of day and state of the boundary layer. Alternatively, forecasts can rely entirely on turbine anemometry measurements, though such measurements are themselves subject to wake effects that are not stationary. The void in free-stream hub-height level measurements of wind can be filled by remote sensing (e.g., sodar, lidar, and radar). However, the expense of such equipment may not be sustainable. There is a growing market for traditional anemometry on tall tower networks, maintained by third parties to the forecasting process (i.e., independent of forecasters and the forecast users). This study examines the value of offsite tall-tower data from the WINDataNOW Technology network for short-horizon wind power predictions at a wind farm in northern Montana. The presentation shall describe successful physical and statistical techniques for its application and the practicality of its application in an operational setting. It shall be demonstrated that when used properly, the real-time offsite measurements materially improve wind ramp capture and prediction statistics, when compared to traditional wind forecasting techniques and to a simple persistence model.

  19. Final environmental assessment for off-site transportation of low-level waste from four California sites under the management of the U.S. Department of Energy Oakland Operations Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The Department of Energy Oakland Operations Office (DOE/OAK) manages sites within California that generate Low Level Waste (LLW) in the course or routine site operations. It is the preference of the DOE to dispose of LLW at federally owned and DOE-operated disposal facilities; however, in some circumstances DOE Headquarters has determined that disposal at commercial facilities is appropriate, as long as the facility meets all regulatory requirements for the acceptance and disposal of LLW, including the passage of a DOE audit to determine the adequacy of the disposal site. The DOE would like to ship LLW from four DOE/OAK sites in California which generate LLW, to NRC-licensed commercial nuclear waste disposal facilities such as Envirocare in Clive, Utah and Chem Nuclear in Barnwell, South Carolina. Transportation impacts for shipment of LLW and MLLW from DOE Oakland sites to other DOE sites was included in the impacts identified in the Department`s Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM-PEIS), published in May, 1997, and determined to be low. The low impacts for shipment to commercial sites identified herein is consistent with the WM-PEIS results.

  20. Supplemental information related to risk assessment for the off-site transportation of low-level waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

    1996-12-01

    This report presents supplemental information to support the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of low-level waste (LLW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Detailed descriptions of the transportation health risk assessment method and results of the assessment are presented in Appendix E of the WM PEIS and are not repeated in this report. This report presents additional information that is not presented in Appendix E but that was needed to conduct the transportation risk assessment for Waste Management (WM) LLW. Included are definition of the LLW alternatives considered in the WM PEIS, data related to the inventory and to the physical and radiological characteristics of WM LLW, an overview of the risk assessment method, and detailed results of the assessment for each WM LLW alternative considered.

  1. Supplemental information related to risk assessment for the off-site transportation of low-level mixed waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Lazaro, M.A.; Antonopoulos, A.A.; Hartmann, H.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

    1996-12-01

    This report provides supplemental information to support the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of low-level mixed waste (LLMW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The assessment considers both the radioactive and chemical hazards associated with LLMW transportation. Detailed descriptions of the transportation health risk assessment methods and results of the assessment are presented in Appendix E of the WM PEIS. This report presents additional information that is not included in Appendix E but that was needed to conduct the transportation risk assessment for Waste Management (WM) LLMW. Included are definitions of the LLMW alternatives considered in the WM PEIS; data related to the inventory and to the physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics of WM LLMW; an overview of the risk assessment methods; and detailed results of the assessment for each WM LLMW case considered.

  2. EIS-0426: Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of the Department of Energy / National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada National Security Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Site-Wide EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of proposed alternatives for continued management and operation of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site) and other U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA)-managed sites in Nevada.

  3. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    clean sources of energy. Asturias, in northern Spain, is theThe CO 2 emissions in Asturias represent the 8% of total COsequestration in Asturias are deep saline aquifers and

  4. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    for the Lorraine coal basin, methane recovery combined withand enhanced coal bed methane recovery (ECBM). Data fromby enhanced coal- bed methane recovery (ECBM). In order to

  5. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Mound Systems (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2002-04-18

    de aguas negras Sistema de mont?culo Bruce Lesikar y Juan Enciso Promotores Especialistas en Ingenier?a Agr?cola El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M Para este tipo de sistema, un ?mont?culo? de tierra elevado se construye encima de la tierra natural... Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, bajo acuerdo no. 2001-45049-01149. TWRI 1102 de operaci?n y mantenimiento para el sistema de pretratamiento. Los sistemas de mont?culo est?ndares se han hecho...

  6. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    Herron et al 1996) Geomechanics Central to managing anSpectroscopy Core analysis Geomechanics Seismic, VSP Densityare slow reactions. A geomechanics module that features the

  7. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    was built according to the seismic interpretation of the Topdimensional surface seismic survey interpretations were not2c 9c Figure 2. Interpretation of seismic lineaments in the

  8. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    Publication 31, p. 127-155, Tulsa, Oklahoma, 1982. Galloway,on Improved Oil Recovery, Tulsa, April 17-21, 2004. King,Oil Recovery Sym- posium, Tulsa, April 21-24. Holm, L.W. ,

  9. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    phase dispersivity test (BTC) Porosity-thickness product oftest Two-phase tracer BTC Evolution of CO 2 saturation

  10. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    WITH SITE SCREENING AND SELECTION FOR CO 2 STORAGE D. A.77 ASSESSING AND EXPANDING CO 2 STORAGE CAPACITY IN DEPLETEDFOR CO 2 GEOLOGICAL STORAGE IN CENTRAL COAL BASIN (NORTHERN

  11. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    in western Canada, where four major coal-fired power plantsCOAL BEDS AND SELECTION OF LARGE-CAPACITY AREAS IN THE ALBERTA BASIN, CANADACOAL BEDS AND SELECTION OF LARGE-CAPACITY AREAS IN THE ALBERTA BASIN, CANADA

  12. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    20-22, 2006 End of CO2 injection Fraction Variation 5E-05 -point. End of CO2 injection Fraction Variation Figure 3.poin Y (m (m X End of CO2 storage Fraction Variation Y (m (m

  13. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Spray Distribution System (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2002-04-18

    efluente de esta calidad: unidades de tratamiento aer?bico de Clase I, y filtros de arena intermi- tentes. Ambos son procesos de tratamiento aer?bicos (usan ox?geno). La Comisi?n para la Conservaci?n de los Recursos Naturales de Texas mantiene una lista de... las unidades de tratamiento aer?bico, Clase I, que han sido aprobadas para su uso en Texas. Los filtros de arena intermitentes deben dise?arse para ajustarse a las condiciones del sitio, y se aprueban seg?n el dise?o para su sitio. Otros tipos de...

  14. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    Formation, Seeligson Field, South Texas, Topi- cal Report GRI-92/0244, Gas Research Institute, Chicago, Illinois,Illinois Basin contains deep coal seams, mature oil reservoirs, and deep, brine-filled formations

  15. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    86 MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP,22, 2006 MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP,Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP),

  16. On-Site Recording of Excavation Data Using Mobile GIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripcevich, Nicholas; Wernke, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Spatial Data Modelling for 3D GIS. Berlin: Springer. Apel,Craig, N. M. 2000. ‘‘Real-Time GIS Construction and DigitalIntra-site Research Using GIS,’’ Journal of Archaeological

  17. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    geothermal reservoir can be estimated by its anhydrite amount. Borehole-geothermal energy in Germany is mainly provided from deep sandstone aquifers. The common arrangement of boreholes

  18. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    the existing Nay- lor-1 well and drilling of a new injectionmay necessitate in drilling additional wells and fur- therin the vicinity of the well during drilling of completion of

  19. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    2c 9c Figure 2. Interpretation of seismic lineaments in thewas built according to the seismic interpretation of the Topdimensional surface seismic survey interpretations were not

  20. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    Geo- logic Carbon Dioxide Sequestration: An Analysis ofnational Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington DC,Annual Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Alexandria, VA,

  1. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    compromised by the drilling of wells. Well bores representoptimal points for drilling new well(s) are automaticallymay necessitate in drilling additional wells and fur- ther

  2. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    of the rock volume. Oil-production data indicate that theal. , 2006). Historical oil production at depths around 2400logs in regionally dis- oil production tributed wells Well

  3. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    ft Figure 3: Computed pores pressure distribution at 53to equilibrate stresses with pore-pressure at the reservoirby the variation of pore pressure. Wellbore instability,

  4. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Trickling Filter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2000-02-04

    A trickling filter is a bed of gravel or plastic media over which pretreated wastewater is sprayed. This publication explains how trickling filters treat wastewater and gives tips on how to maintain them....

  5. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Alternative Collection Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2000-08-30

    Rural Texas communities have new options for wastewater management infrastructure that are cost effective but still protect human health and environmental quality. Such communities now can combine different kinds of systems in a new approach called...

  6. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Leaching Chambers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2000-02-04

    Leaching chambers distribute treated wastewater into the soil. This publication lists the advantages and disadvantages of leaching chamber systems, explains how to maintain them and gives estimates of costs....

  7. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Evapotranspiration Bed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    1999-09-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) beds treat wastewater in the soil by evaporation and by transpiration from plants growing there. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation and maintenance of ET beds....

  8. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Mound System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2002-04-22

    A mound system is a soil absorption system placed above the natural surface of the ground. The system distributes treated wastewater into the soil. This publication discusses the design and maintenance of mound systems....

  9. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetland Media 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Weaver, Richard; Richter, Amanda; O'Neill, Courtney

    2005-02-19

    or installer may know where to buy them. If not, the Texas Commission for Environmental Quality maintains a list of tire-chip processors on its Web site at: http://www.tceq.state.tx.us/assets/pub lic/comm_exec/pubs/sfr/069_03.pdf Configuration Wetland beds can...

  10. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    such as channels and sinkholes. Components of re- flectorinver- sions in limestone sinkholes of different sizes and

  11. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    The wire- line reservoir saturation tool (RST) uses pulsedwhich is close to saturation at reservoir conditions of 65 oReservoir characterization ap- plying residual gas saturation

  12. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    the arrival of CO 2 . The drilling fluids were tagged withSeismic survey Drilling phase Fluid loss record, PWD Leak-as fluid path should be investigated during drilling phase.

  13. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Leaching Chambers (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2000-10-13

    para el tratamiento de aguas negras,? puede obtenerse gratis del World Wide Web en: http://texaserc.tamu.edu/pubs/ewaste Los programas educacionales del Servicio de Extensi?n Agr?cola de Texas est?n disponibles para todas las personas, sin distinci?n de... raza, color, sexo, minusvalid?z, religi?n, edad u origen nacional. Emitido en promoci?n del Trabajo Cooperativo de Extensi?n Agr?cola y Econom?a del Hogar, Decreto del Congreso del 8 de mayo de 1914, seg?n enmienda, y del 30 de junio de 1914, en...

  14. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Aerobic Treatment Unit (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2000-08-29

    causan enfermedades, un tanque bomba para dosificar el agua y rociadores para distribuir el agua sobre el suelo. Para mayor informaci?n sobre los componentes de desinfecci?n, el tanque bomba y la distribuci?n por rociado, vea la publicaci?n de Extensi?n L...&M Toda la serie de publicaciones, ?Sistemas individuales para el tratamiento de aguas negras,? puede obtenerse gratis del World Wide Web en: http://texaserc.tamu.edu Los programas educacionales del Servicio de Extensi?n Agr?cola de Texas est?n disponibles...

  15. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Trickling Filter (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2002-04-18

    orientaci?n sobre la operaci?n y el mantenimiento de los tanques s?pticos y los campos de aplicaci?n superficial, vea las publ- icaciones de Extensi?n Cooperativa sobre esos temas. Se pueden pedir del Servicio de Extensi?n y est?n disponibles en la World... educacionales de Extensi?n Cooperativa de Texas est?n disponibles para todas las personas, sin distinci?n de raza, color, sexo, discapacidad, religi?n, edad u origen nacional. Emitido en promoci?n del Trabajo Cooperativo de Extensi?n Agr?cola y Econom?a del...

  16. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Sand Filters (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2000-10-13

    programas educacionales del Servicio de Extensi?n Agr?cola de Texas est?n disponibles para todas las personas, sin distinci?n de raza, color, sexo, minusvalid?z, religi?n, edad u origen nacional. Emitido en promoci?n del Trabajo Cooperativo de Extensi?n Agr...?cola y Econom?a del Hogar, Decreto del Congreso del 8 de mayo de 1914, seg?n enmienda, y del 30 de junio de 1914, en cooperaci?n con el Departamento de Agricultura de los Estados Unidos. Chester P. Fehlis, Director Comisionado, el Servicio de Extensi?n...

  17. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetlands (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2002-04-18

    en suelo, vea la publicaci?n de Extensi?n Cooperativa, L-5227S, ?Fosa s?ptica y campo de absorci?n?. Los sistemas de humedal quitan los materiales biol?gicos, los s?lidos en suspensi?n, los nutrientes y los pat?geno de las aguas negras. Para... mantenimiento. Vea la publicaci?n de Extensi?n Coopera- tiva, L-5227S, ?Tanque s?ptico/ Campo de absorci?n?, para obtener ideas sobre c?mo mantener el tanque s?ptico y el sistema de aplicaci?n en suelo. En general, d?le mantenimiento al tanque s?ptico peri...

  18. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Subsurface Drip Distribution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    1999-09-06

    A subsurface drip system distributes wastewater to the lawn through a system of tubing installed below the ground. This publication explains the advantages and disadvantages of subsurface drip distribution systems, as well ...

  19. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Subsurface Drip Distribution (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    1999-08-12

    A subsurface drip system distributes wastewater to the lawn through a system of tubing installed below the ground surface. This publication explains the advantages, disadvantages, maintenance steps and estimated costs of ...

  20. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Spray Distribution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    1999-09-06

    A spray distribution system is very similar to a lawn irrigation system. Spray heads are used to distribute treated wastewater to the surface of the yard. This publication explains the advantages and disadvantages of spray ...

  1. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    Interpretation of Aquifer Gas Storage Conditions from Waterthe re- lated problem of gas storage in aquifers and devel-1967) for aquifer gas storage. The other issue discussed in

  2. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    of the buoyancy of supercritical CO2 in the presence ofindividual pock- ets of supercritical CO2 to form, therebydomain. Injection of supercritical CO2 occurs at a depth of

  3. Commissioning & Optimization of On-Site Renewable Energy Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Today, many electrical contractors and photovoltaic (PV) integrators engineer and install custom systems on a variety of existing and new construction. These systems are designed specifically to the building configurations and to required utility...

  4. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    by well/VSP (Vertical Seismic Profile) data. Fractures andat the Frio site, a vertical seismic profile ficult due towells VSP (vertical seismic profile) CO 2 distribution updip

  5. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Soil Particle Analysis Procedure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2005-08-18

    diameter Fine Fine gravelly 5 to 20 mm diameter Medium Medium gravelly 20 to 75 mm diameter Coarse Coarse gravelly 75 to 250 mm diameter Cobbles Cobbly 250 to 600 mm diameter Stones Stony ?600 mm diameter Boulders Bouldery Flat: 2 to 150 mm long Channers... Channery 150 to 380 mm long Flagstones Flaggy 380 to 600 mm long Stones Stony ?600 mm long Boulders Bouldery 1 The roundness of fragments may be indicated as angular (has strongly developed faces with sharp edges), irregular (has prominent flat faces...

  6. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Pump Tank (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2000-08-29

    negras Tanque bomba Sistema de distribuci?n por rociado L-5346S 8-00 Figura 1: Un tanque bomba recolecta las aguas negras tratadas y las dosifica en intervalos al suelo. Sistemas individuales para el tratamiento de aguas negras Tanque bomba Bruce... Lesikar y Juan Enciso Promotores Especialistas de Ingenier?a Agr?cola El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M L os tanques bomba son contendores de hormig?n, fibra de vidrio o polietileno que recolectan las aguas negras que ser?n dosificadas en intervalos al...

  7. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Tablet Chlorination (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Richard; Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2006-01-30

    componentes: ? Las pastillas de cloro. ? Un tubo que sostiene las pastillas. ? Un dispositivo de contacto que pone a las pastillas de cloro en contacto con las aguas negras. ? Un tanque de almacenamiento, por lo general un tanque bomba, donde las... bomba, donde termina el proceso de desinfec- ci?n. En este punto, las aguas negras se llaman aguas recuperadas. Las regula- ciones de Texas exigen que las aguas recuperadas tengan por lo menos 0.2 miligramos de cloro por litro de aguas negras o que...

  8. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    determined in hydraulic well tests ranges between 500 andcreation of hydraulic fractures linked to injecting wells ora hydraulic fracture is generated from injecting wells and

  9. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    CONSTRAIN CO2 INJECTION FEASIBILITY: TEAPOT DOME EOR PILOTEOR, and coupled process modeling will investigate the total system including preliminary estimates of CO2

  10. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    increasing drilling, casing and other costs may argue forthis cost function readily provides the drilling sequence,

  11. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    IN DEEP AQUIFERS OF THE PARIS BASIN - FRANCE D. Bonijoly, F.of the major faults in the Paris basin (the Saint Martin destorage sites in the Paris basin has allowed the elaboration

  12. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Operation and Maintenance (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2000-08-15

    ?o del terreno, su ubicaci?n y el tipo de suelo no permiten otra alternativa para el tratamiento de aguas negras. Mantenimiento y administraci?n Los distintos sistemas individuales para el tratamiento de aguas negras requieren diferentes procedimientos de...

  13. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Alternative Collection Systems (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2002-04-22

    mucho y porque las leyes ambientales, cada vez m?s estrictas, dificultan el descargo de aguas negras tratadas en los r?os, arroyos y aguas costeras, y lo hacen m?s costoso. Opciones descentralizadas En la actualidad, hay muchas alternativas a los...?todo. Sin embargo, los funcionarios gubernamentales que regulan este sector prefieren las alternativas en suelo porque tienen un efecto ambiental m?nimo en los arroyos y los r?os. Los sistemas en suelo cuentan con los sistemas de aplicaci?n en suelo que...

  14. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Evapotranspiration Bed (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2002-04-18

    de escorrent?a alrededor del sistema Tubo perforado de monitoreo de 2 a 3 pulgadas Tela geotextil Suelo arcilloso Colch?n de arena Revestimiento de cloruro de polivinilo Separaci?n de un m?ximo de 2 pies Espacio de 4 pies Cama alternativa de...

  15. Part IV: On-Site Review Handbook (Revised 2012)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAandSummary Areas ofEnergy On October 13,is aof EnergyDavis Bacon

  16. On-Site and Bulk Hydrogen Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014DepartmentCouncilOffice of the ChiefResearchOil Oil

  17. Assembling an On-Site Team | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:I Due DateOpportunity |MarketWind ProgramAssembling an

  18. Industrial cogeneration case study No. 3: Mead Corporation Paper Mill, Kingsport, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    The design, operation, performance, economics and energy efficiency of the 25,000 kW co-generating power plant at the Mead Co. paper mill in Kingsport, TN are described, and compared with the efficiency of producing only process heat at the plant while importing electric power from a local utility. It was established that on-site co-generation consumed 2/3 of the energy that would have been required for on-site process heat generation plus purchased off-site-generated electric power and that co-generation resulted in more than $2.8 million saved during the period from 1975 through 1978. (LCL)

  19. Public health assessment for St. Louis Airport, Hazelwood Interim Storage/Futura Coatings Company, St. Louis, St. Louis County, Missouri, Region 7. Cerclis No. MOD980633176. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-20

    The St. Louis Airport/Hazelwood Iterim Storage/Futura Coatings Company, a National Priorities List site, is in St. Louis County, Missouri. From 1946 to 1973, the site was used to store radioactive materials resulting from uranium processing. High levels of uranium, thorium, radium, and radon were detected in soil, groundwater, and air. The site is still being used to store radioactive materials. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry considers the St. Louis Airport site to be an indeterminate public health hazard. Although there are emissions of radon and the presence of thorium in on-site air and off-site soils and the emission of radiation resulting from the presence of these materials is not currently considered a health hazard. At present conditions, the concentration of radon off-site is indistinguishable from background levels. However, in the past, these contaminants may have been present at levels of health concern.

  20. Releases of UF{sub 6} to the atmosphere after a potential fire in a cylinder storage yard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardi, D.A.; Williams, W.R.; Anderson, J.C. [and others

    1997-06-01

    Uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}), a toxic material, is stored in just over 6200 cylinders at the K-25 site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The safety analysis report (SAR) for cylinder yard storage operations at the plant required the development of accident scenarios for the potential release of UF{sub 6} to the atmosphere. In accordance with DOE standards and guidance, the general approach taken in this SAR was to examine the functions and contents of the cylinder storage yards to determine whether safety-significant hazards were present for workers in the immediate vicinity, workers on-site, the general public off-site, or the environment. and to evaluate the significance of any hazards that were found. A detailed accident analysis was performed to determine a set of limiting accidents that have potential for off-site consequences. One of the limiting accidents identified in the SAR was the rupture of a cylinder engulfed in a fire.

  1. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1984-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1983 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. 19 references, 8 figures, 49 tables.

  2. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1983-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne Ntaional Laboratory for 1982 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and masurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated.

  3. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1982-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1981 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated.

  4. 2006 Long Range Development Plan Final Environmental Impact Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philliber, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    unaffected by grading and project development or off-site atunaffected by grading and project development or off-site atresources during project development and excavation under

  5. West Valley Demonstration Project site environmental report, calendar year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None Available

    2000-06-01

    This report represents a single, comprehensive source of off-site and on-site environmental monitoring data collected during 1999 by environmental monitoring personnel for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), West Valley, New York. The environmental monitoring program and results are discussed in the body of this report. The monitoring data are presented in the appendices. The data collected provide an historical record of radionuclide and radiation levels from natural and manmade sources in the survey area and document the quality of the groundwater on and around the WVDP and the quality of the air and water discharged by the WVDP.

  6. West Valley Demonstration Project site environmental report calendar year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-06-01

    This report represents a single, comprehensive source of off-site and on-site environmental monitoring data collected during 1998 by environmental monitoring personnel for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), West Valley, New York. The environmental monitoring program and results are discussed in the body of this report. The monitoring data are presented in the appendices. The data collected provide an historical record of radionuclide and radiation levels from natural and manmade sources in the survey area and document the quality of the groundwater on and around the WVDP and the quality of the air and water discharged by the WVDP.

  7. West Valley Demonstration Project site environmental report, calendar year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-06-01

    This report represents a single, comprehensive source of off-site and on-site environmental monitoring data collected during 1997 by environmental monitoring personnel for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), West Valley, New York. The environmental monitoring program and results are discussed in the body of this report. The monitoring data are presented in the appendices. The data collected provide an historical record of radionuclide and radiation levels from natural and manmade sources in the survey area and document the quality of the groundwater on and around the WVDP and the quality of the air and water discharged by the WVDP.

  8. Preliminary potentiometric map and flow dynamic characteristics for the upper-basalt confined aquifer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Raymond, R.G.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the first comprehensive Hanford Site-wide potentiometric map for the upper-basalt confined aquifer system (i.e., the upper Saddle Mountains Basalt). In constructing the potentiometric map, over forty on-site and off-site monitoring wells and boreholes were used. The potentiometric map developed for the upper-basalt confined aquifer is consistent with the areal head pattern indicated for the Mabton interbed, which is a deeper and more areally extensive confined aquifer underlying the Hanford Site. Salient features for the upper-basalt confined aquifer system potentiometric map are described.

  9. Environmental Response to Remedial Actions at the Weldon Spring Site--An Environmental Success Story

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, J. A.; Welton, T. D.

    2002-02-27

    Environmental remediation activities have been ongoing at the Weldon Spring Site for over a decade, beginning with small interim response actions and culminating in completion of surface cleanup as represented by closure of the 17 hectare (42-acre) on-site disposal cell. As remedial actions have incrementally been accomplished, the occurrence of site-related contaminants in on and off-site environmental media have effectively been reduced. The DOE-WSSRAP has demonstrated success through the effective reduction or elimination of site related water and airborne contaminants along multiple migration pathways. This paper briefly describes the remedial measures affected at Weldon Spring, and quantifies the environmental responses to those remedial measures.

  10. A rational approach for evaluation and screening of treatment and disposal options for the solar pond sludges at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickerson, K.S.

    1995-12-31

    This document consists of information about the treatment options for the sludge that is located in the evaporation ponds at the Rocky Flats Plant. The sludges are mixed low-level radioactive wastes whose composition and character were variable. Sludges similar to these are typically treated prior to ultimate disposal. Disposal of treated sludges includes both on-site and off-site options. The rational approach described in this paper is useful for technology evaluation and screening because it provides a format for developing objectives, listing alternatives, and weighing the alternatives against the objectives and against each other.

  11. Chemical analyses of soil samples collected from the Sandia National Laboratories, Kauai Test Facility, HI, 1999-2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Mark Laverne

    2007-11-01

    In 1999, 2002, and 2007, the Environmental Programs and Assurance Department of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) at the Kauai Test Facility (KTF), HI, has collected soil samples at numerous locations on-site, on the perimeter, and off-site for determining potential impacts to the environs from operations at KTF. These samples were submitted to an analytical laboratory for metal-in-soil analyses. Intercomparisons of these results were then made to determine if there was any statistical difference between on-site, perimeter, and off-site samples, or if there were increasing or decreasing trends that indicated that further investigation might be warranted. This work provided the SNL Environmental Programs and Assurance Department with a sound baseline data reference against which to compare future operational impacts. In addition, it demonstrates the commitment that the Laboratories have to go beyond mere compliance to achieve excellence in its operations. This data is presented in graphical format with narrative commentaries on particular items of interest.

  12. Standard Guide for Preparing Waste Management Plans for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide addresses the development of waste management plans for potential waste streams resulting from decommissioning activities at nuclear facilities, including identifying, categorizing, and handling the waste from generation to final disposal. 1.2 This guide is applicable to potential waste streams anticipated from decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities whose operations were governed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or Agreement State license, under Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, or Department of Defense (DoD) regulations. 1.3 This guide provides a description of the key elements of waste management plans that if followed will successfully allow for the characterization, packaging, transportation, and off-site treatment or disposal, or both, of conventional, hazardous, and radioactive waste streams. 1.4 This guide does not address the on-site treatment, long term storage, or on-site disposal of these potential waste streams. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address ...

  13. Health assessment for Northwest Transformer Salvage Yard National Priorities List (NPL) Site, Whatcom County, Washington, Region 10. CERCLIS No. WAD027315621. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-14

    The Northwest Transformer Salvage Yard is a National Priorities List site located in Whatcom County, Washington, approximately two miles south of the town of Everson, Washington. Between 1958-1985, the site served as a storage and refurbishing area for electrical transformers, capacitors, and other electrical equipment. Subsequent sampling and analysis of on-site and off-site soils and groundwater revealed polychlorinated biphenyls, chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, and chlorinated dibenzofurans. Potential pathways for human exposure to site contaminants include ingestion of fugitive dusts, and dermal contact with contaminated ground water, surface water, soil, or wood from an on-site building. Under current conditions the site poses a potential threat to human health in the event of unauthorized site entry, or the ingestion of contaminated ground water.

  14. Recommendation 218: Develop a Fact Sheet on Site Transition at On-going

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProvedTravelInformationCollectionGrid Workshop, AprilDepartment ofRidgeMission Sites |

  15. Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in the vadose zone). These alternatives to conventional ground water monitoring and assessment could persuade the regulatory agency to allow siting in a brownfield area. USACOE...

  16. Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat and power applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

    2004-01-01

    Modeling with Combined Heat and Power Applications. LBNL-Tax on Microgrid Combined Heat and Power Adoption. JournalGeneration with Combined Heat and Power Applications Afzal

  17. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Modeling with Combined Heat and Power Applications”,emissions credits) of combined heat and power (CHP), and 2)

  18. Flow injection trace gas analysis method for on-site determination of organoarsenicals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldstadt, J.H. III

    1997-06-24

    A method is described for real-time determination of the concentration of Lewisite in the ambient atmosphere, the method includes separating and collecting a Lewisite sample from the atmosphere in a collection chamber, converting the collected Lewisite to an arsenite ion solution sample, pumping the arsenite ion containing sample to an electrochemical detector connected to the collection chamber, and electrochemically detecting the converted arsenite ions in the sample, whereby the concentration of arsenite ions detected is proportional to the concentration of Lewisite in the atmosphere. 2 figs.

  19. Estimation of E. coli Concentrations from Failing On-Site Wastewater Treatment Facilities (OWTS) Using GIS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virani, Afreen Shiraz

    2014-08-12

    prediction tool was developed using Geographic Information System (GIS) to assess failing OWTS and the potential E. coli contamination to surface waters. This tool will help identify different parameters affecting E. coli concentration in streams, which...

  20. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Characterizations”,National Renewable Energy Resource Laboratory, Golden, CO,Edwards, “Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption

  1. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Septic Tank/Soil Absorption Field (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2000-10-13

    requiere tambi?n depender? de la cantidad de aguas negras que entran al sistema diariamente. Divida el flujo de aguas negras por la carga hidr?ulica del tipo de suelo en donde se construir? el campo de absorci?n. C?mo mantener el sistema funcionando Para... residenciales. Pero para que pueda funcionar apropiadamente, debe escoger el sistema s?ptico adecuado para el tama?o de la familia y el tipo de suelo, y debe d?rserle un mantenimiento peri?dico. Este tipo de sistema de tratamiento de aguas negras tiene dos...

  2. REMOVAL AND FATE OF SPECIFIC MICROBIAL PATHOGENS WITHIN ON-SITE WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pillai, Suresh D.; Lesikar, Bruce A.

    2003-01-01

    46 33 0 0 1.21 1.36 7.28 7.49 8/10/99 58 26 0 6 1.32 1.38 7.19 7.56 8/17/99 36 26 2 0 1.41 1.24 7.63 7.67 8/24/99 61 14 1.44 7.74 9/1/99 30 41 0 0 1.30 1.38 7.58 7.54 The sand filter had a relatively low hydraulic loading rate (Table 5....33 7.43 3/30/99 0 9 14 38 1.105 1.1 7.42 7.50 4/6/99 86 19 36 32 1.461 1.325 7.50 7.83 4/12/99 56 0 44 46 1.53 1.53 7.95 6.97 4/14/99 7 10 52 34 1.23 1.42 7.49 7.09 4/20/99 80 28 46 20 1.41 1.39 7.44 7.59 4/22/99 45 11.1 18 0 1.4 1.59 7.59 7.67 4/27/99...

  3. VRF on-site Measurement by Compressor Curve Method of VRF and the applications-APCBC 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kan,Y.; Shiochi,S.

    2014-01-01

    by Compressor Curve Method and Its Application Sumio Shiochi (Daikin Industries,ltd.) Yurino Kan* (Daikin Industries,ltd.) APCBC presentation in ICEBO (Asia Pacific Conference on Building Commissioning) Sept. 2014, Beijing, China ESL-IC-14...-09-34 Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Beijing, China, September 14-17, 2014 ICEBO 2014 Beijing + APCBC Meeting 2014.9.15-16 1. Background and Purpose of This Study ?Background? Stereotype of VRF from Architectural...

  4. Inadvertent Intruder Analysis For The Portsmouth On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Frank G.; Phifer, Mark A.

    2014-01-22

    The inadvertent intruder analysis considers the radiological impacts to hypothetical persons who are assumed to inadvertently intrude on the Portsmouth OSWDF site after institutional control ceases 100 years after site closure. For the purposes of this analysis, we assume that the waste disposal in the OSWDF occurs at time zero, the site is under institutional control for the next 100 years, and inadvertent intrusion can occur over the following 1,000 year time period. Disposal of low-level radioactive waste in the OSWDF must meet a requirement to assess impacts on such individuals, and demonstrate that the effective dose equivalent to an intruder would not likely exceed 100 mrem per year for scenarios involving continuous exposure (i.e. chronic) or 500 mrem for scenarios involving a single acute exposure. The focus in development of exposure scenarios for inadvertent intruders was on selecting reasonable events that may occur, giving consideration to regional customs and construction practices. An important assumption in all scenarios is that an intruder has no prior knowledge of the existence of a waste disposal facility at the site. Results of the analysis show that a hypothetical inadvertent intruder at the OSWDF who, in the worst case scenario, resides on the site and consumes vegetables from a garden established on the site using contaminated soil (chronic agriculture scenario) would receive a maximum chronic dose of approximately 7.0 mrem/yr during the 1000 year period of assessment. This dose falls well below the DOE chronic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr. Results of the analysis also showed that a hypothetical inadvertent intruder at the OSWDF who, in the worst case scenario, excavates a basement in the soil that reaches the waste (acute basement construction scenario) would receive a maximum acute dose of approximately 0.25 mrem/yr during the 1000 year period of assessment. This dose falls well below the DOE acute dose limit of 500 mrem/yr. Disposal inventory constraints based on the intruder analysis are well above conservative estimates of the OSWDF inventory and, based on intruder disposal limits; about 7% of the disposal capacity is reached with the estimated OSWDF inventory.

  5. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    absorption chiller solar thermal photovoltaics Resultsand fuel cells; photovoltaics and solar thermal collectors;

  6. A case for public sanitation with on-site treatment in Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, LaKisha T. (LaKisha Tawanda)

    2014-01-01

    According to the WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP), 14% of the population in Ghana use improved sanitation facilities and 59% use shared facilities. The objective of this thesis is to offer a situational analysis ...

  7. University of Delaware Technical Analysis for On-Site Wind Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    at the identified wind turbine locations and subsequent foundation design. #12;Final Report ­ Technical Analysis.3 TERRAIN AND ROUGHNESS MAPS 12 2.4 RESOURCE GRID 13 2.5 WIND TURBINE POWER CURVE 14 2.6 SUMMMARY OF MODEL-LEWES ELECTRICITY DATA 19 3.2 NET METERING 19 3.3 USAGE AND RATES 20 3.4 WHOLESALE POWER SALES 22 3.5 WIND DATA 25 3

  8. Scoping study of SNM detection and indentification for adjunct on-site treaty monitoring. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, W.S.; Morgado, R.E.; Frankle, C.M.

    1995-07-01

    Following the fall of the Soviet Union, political pressure to negotiate meaningful nuclear arms agreements with Russia and the former soviet republics has increased. Anticipating the monitoring requirements of a future treaty for the decommissioning and disassembly of nuclear warheads presents opportunities to review existing monitoring technologies and to explore new methods to detect and analyze intrinsic radiation. Fully instrumented radiation-detection systems with a range of monitoring capabilities are available, but special-purpose instruments will still need to be developed to match increasing demands for high-confidence, low-intrusion monitoring in a specific scenario. As a guide to present capabilities in monitoring technologies, we have categorized their relevant attributes to detect and identify special nuclear material based on levels of confidence, intrusiveness, vulnerability, and other critical concerns. To add additional flexibility, we review emerging technologies and estimate the development time to bring them to operational status.

  9. On-Site Generation Simulation with EnergyPlus for Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael; Firestone, Ryan; Curtil, Dimitri; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-01

    http://tariffs.lbl.gov/ NSTAR electricity rates, http://expensive than volumetric electricity rates, DG may still beutilities NSTAR (NSTAR electricity rates) and Keyspan (

  10. DISSOLUTION & RESUSPENSION OF STORED RADIOACTIVE WASTE & ON SITE TRANSPORT & HANDLING FOR CONDITIONING FOR WASTE RETRIEVAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GIBBONS, P.W.

    2001-08-13

    The four primary functions in a waste retrieval system are as follows: accessing all of the waste within the tank configuration; mobilizing all of the waste, which can have varying physical properties; removing the bulk and residual mobilized waste; and transferring the waste to storage or processing equipment. Selection of retrieval and transfer systems must include all of these functions. Limitations on any one of these areas affect the whole process. This section categorizes according to function many available retrieval and transfer processes, with positive attributes and limitations. Additional information on these systems is referenced in the annexes.

  11. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    2003. Hatziargyriou, N. et al. , “Microgrids, An Overview ofand Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings”, IEEEsuccessful deployment of microgrids will depend heavily on

  12. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    of 2.5$/W & low solar thermal costs (minus 10% of originalof 2.5$/W & low solar thermal costs (minus 10% of originalcosts ($/kW or $/kWh) lifetime ( a) thermal storage 11 flow battery absorption chiller solar

  13. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies Michaelwith Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies 1 Michael2006). Electrical and thermal storage is added as an option

  14. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    that growth in electricity demand in developed countriesof displacement of electricity demand by heat- activatedmeets all of its electricity demand via utility purchases

  15. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    could be acquired, e.g. battery storage, the costs for whichlead/acid battery, and thermal storage, capabilities, withis limited by battery size - Heat storage is limited by

  16. A High-Temperature Fuel Cell to Provide On-Site Process Reducing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    nitrogen gas often provides a reducing atmosphere for these processes. High-temperature fuel cells directly convert the chemical energy in its fuel to electricity, with water,...

  17. UTILITY INVESTMENT IN ON-SITE SOLAR: RISK AND RETURN ANALYSIS FOR CAPITALIZATION AND FINANCING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, E.

    2011-01-01

    for Standard and Poor's Utility Index San Diego Gas Pacificof Averaging Interval: Utilities Index. Beta Scatter as aRecord Application to Utility Equity Returns Project

  18. Influence of woody dominated rangelands on site hydrology and herbaceous production, Edwards Plateau, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hester, Justin Wayne

    1996-01-01

    letters within a row with the same letter are not significantly different (pc. 05). Tlm Dripline Dlm DBOm Junipenss ash(d - removed Liucr (kg ha') C4 bunchgrass (kg hs ') C3 bunchgrass (kg ha') Shortgrass (kg hac) Forbs (kg ha ') S0583a 127bc Oa... standing biomass Basal grass cover Total organic cover 69024a Ob Oa Oc Oa Oc Od 100a 31592s 394ab Ia Ob Oa 395ab 7b 89a 56936a 13lsb Ob Ob Oa 13 1b 3c looa 33622a Oc Oa Ob 46a 46c Ob 9 la 3$089a 14c Oa Ob Oa 14c Oc...

  19. Ceramic microreactors for on-site hydrogen production from high temperature steam reforming of propane{

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    of propane{ Christian, Michael Mitchell and Paul J. A. Kenis* Received 31st May 2006, Accepted 10th August of propane into hydrogen at temperatures between 800 and 1000 uC. We characterized these microreactors. Kinetic analysis using a power law model showed reaction orders of 0.50 and 20.23 with respect to propane

  20. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    photovoltaics and solar thermal collectors; electricalfor application of solar thermal and recovered heat to end-absorption chiller solar thermal photovoltaics Results

  1. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    those described by the Electricity Storage Association (see also Electricity Storage Association). The installationtechnologies. References Electricity Storage Association,

  2. Chernobyl NPP: Completion of LRW Treatment Plant and LRW Management on Site - 12568

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorov, Denis; Adamovich, Dmitry [SIA 'RADON', Moscow (Russian Federation); Klimenko, I.; Taranenko, L. [IVL Engineering, Kiev (Ukraine)

    2012-07-01

    Since a beginning of ChNPP operation, and after a tragedy in 1986, a few thousands m3 of LRW have been collected in a storage tanks. In 2004 ChNPP started the new project on creation of LRW treatment plant (LRWTP) financed from EBRD fund. But it was stopped in 2008 because of financial and contract problems. In 2010 SIA RADON jointly with Ukrainian partners has won a tender on completion of LRWTP, in particular I and C system. The purpose of LRTP is to process liquid rad-wastes from SSE 'Chernobyl NPP' site and those liquids stored in the LRWS and SLRWS tanks as well as the would-be wastes after ChNPP Power Units 1, 2 and 3 decommissioning. The LRTP design lifetime - 20 years. Currently, the LRTP is getting ready to perform the following activities: 1. retrieval of waste from tanks stored at ChNPP LWS using waste retrieval system with existing equipment involved; 2. transfer of retrieved waste into LRTP reception tanks with partial use of existing transfer pipelines; 3. laboratory chemical and radiochemical analysis of reception tanks contest to define the full spectrum of characteristics before processing, to acknowledge the necessity of preliminary processing and to select end product recipe; 4. preliminary processing of the waste to meet the requirements for further stages of the process; 5. shrinkage (concentrating) of preliminary processed waste; 6. solidification of preliminary processed waste with concrete to make a solid-state (end product) and load of concrete compound into 200-l drums; 7. curing of end product drums in LRTP curing hall; 8. radiologic monitoring of end product drums and their loading into special overpacks; 9. overpack radiological monitoring; 10. send for disposal (ICSRM Lot 3); The current technical decisions allow to control and return to ChNPP of process media and supporting systems outputs until they satisfy the following quality norms: salt content: < 100 g/l; pH: 1 - 11; anionic surface-active agent: < 25 mg/l; oil dissipated in the liquid: < 2 mg/l; overall gamma-activity: < 3,7 x10{sup 5} Bq/l. (authors)

  3. Summary - Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF) at the Paducah...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    final design and closure of the facility. To view the full ETR reports, please visit this web site: http:www.em.doe.govPagesExternalTechReviews.aspx July 2009 The purpose of an...

  4. On-Site Generation Simulation with EnergyPlus for Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael; Firestone, Ryan; Curtil, Dimitri; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Steps towards an Enhanced EnergyPlus Tool Figure 8.Enhanced EnergyPlus Tool References Crawley, D. B. ,et al. “EnergyPlus: An Update. ” Proceedings of SimBuild

  5. Department of Energy Announces Two Year Pay Freeze on Site and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    federal workers, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced a decision to stop salary and bonus pool increases for site and facility management contractor employees, who...

  6. Supporting AMG on site for QA John Lobbestael, Michigan Department of Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    needs for Construction Engineers and Inspectors · Describe the two approaches to procuring equipment and training for the owner's representatives Every Day Counts | 2 #12;Overview · General Comments · Equipment Construction Accuracy / QA · Measurement Every Day Counts | 3 #12;General Comments · Enable AMG ­ Catch up

  7. Using Satellite Data with on Site Measurements to Create Estimates of Biomass as a Baseline for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alabama in Huntsville, University of

    The sequestration of carbon has become a key interest in Central and South American countries due to the vast amount of forested land in these regions. In order to place monetary value on carbon stocks there must be viable. of using radar satellite imagery to measure carbon levels in tropical forests. This technique is important

  8. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Gravel-less Pipe (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2000-10-13

    &M Toda la serie de publicaciones, ?Sistemas individuales para el tratamiento de aguas negras,? puede obtenerse gratis del World Wide Web en: http://texaserc.tamu.edu/pubs/ewaste Los programas educacionales del Servicio de Extensi?n Agr?cola de Texas est?n... disponibles para todas las personas, sin distinci?n de raza, color, sexo, minusvalid?z, religi?n, edad u origen nacional. Emitido en promoci?n del Trabajo Cooperativo de Extensi?n Agr?cola y Econom?a del Hogar, Decreto del Congreso del 8 de mayo de 1914, seg?n...

  9. Performance Assessment of the Portsmouth On-Site Waste Disposal Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the 2015 Annual Performance and Risk Assessment (P&RA) Community of Practice (CoP) Technical Exchange Meeting held in Richland, Washington on December 15-16, 2015.

  10. On-Site Generation Simulation with EnergyPlus for Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael; Firestone, Ryan; Curtil, Dimitri; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Distributed Energy ProgramEfficiency and Renewable Energy, Distributed Energy Program

  11. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Conventional Septic Tank/Drain Field (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    1999-08-12

    Conventional septic tanks have been the most commonly used technology for treating wastewater. This publication explains the advantages, disadvantages, maintenance steps and estimated costs of septic tank/drain field systems.

  12. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Low-Pressure Dosing System (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    1999-08-12

    A low-pressure dosing system treats wastewater and then pumps it into the soil several times daily. This publication explains the advantages, disadvantages, maintenance steps and estimated costs of low-pressure dosing systems.

  13. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Low-Pressure Dosing System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    1999-09-06

    A low-pressure dosing system treats wastewater and then pumps it into the soil several times daily. This publication explains the advantages and disadvantages of low-pressure dosing systems as well as estimated costs and ...

  14. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Conventional Septic Tank/Drain Field 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    1999-09-06

    Conventional septic systems have traditionally been the most commonly used technology for treating wastewater. This publication explains the advantages and disadvantages of conventional septic tank/drain fields, as well ...

  15. Innovative On-site Integrated Energy System Tested World Renewable Energy Congress VIII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Donnell developed, installed and is testing one of the largest systems in the nation to use a new technology,500 tons of chilled water. By design, the full waste heat output of the natural gas-powered 4.5-MW Solar turbine closely matches the chiller capacity. Operation, which began in June 2004, should verify fuel

  16. The Story of Silanga School Exploring sustainability online and on site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Sriram

    . The aim of the project has been to enable rural communities in Sub-Saharan Africa to use advanced digital University, UK www.veselproject.net - - - UK Kenya The project VeSeL (Village e-Science for Life) is a re- search project, part of the Bridging the Global Digital Divide network sponsored by the Engi- neering

  17. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    fired reciprocating engines, gas turbines, microturbines,engines are the most dominant technologies. Investigations show that no fuel cell or micro turbine

  18. Guide to purchasing green power. Renewable electricity, renewable energy certificates and on-site renewable generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-09-30

    The Guide to Purchasing Green Power is intended for organizations that are considering the merits of buying green power as well as those that have decided to buy it and want help doing so. The Guide was written for a broad audience, including businesses, government agencies, universities, and all organizations wanting to diversify their energy supply and to reduce the environmental impact of their electricity use.The Guide provides an overview of green power markets and describes the necessary steps to buying green power. This section summarizes the Guide to help readers find the information they need.

  19. A Laser-Based Method for On-Site Analysis of UF6 at Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Martinez, Alonzo; Barrett, Christopher A.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Smith, Leon E.

    2014-11-23

    The International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA’s) long-term research and development plan calls for more cost-effective and efficient safeguard methods to detect and deter misuse of gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). The IAEA’s current safeguards approaches at GCEPs are based on a combination of routine and random inspections that include environmental sampling and destructive assay (DA) sample collection from UF6 in-process material and selected cylinders. Samples are then shipped offsite for subsequent laboratory analysis. In this paper, a new DA sample collection and onsite analysis approach that could help to meet challenges in transportation and chain of custody for UF6 DA samples is introduced. This approach uses a handheld sampler concept and a Laser Ablation, Laser Absorbance Spectrometry (LAARS) analysis instrument, both currently under development at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. A LAARS analysis instrument could be temporarily or permanently deployed in the IAEA control room of the facility, in the IAEA data acquisition cabinet, for example. The handheld PNNL DA sampler design collects and stabilizes a much smaller DA sample mass compared to current sampling methods. The significantly lower uranium mass reduces the sample radioactivity and the stabilization approach diminishes the risk of uranium and hydrogen fluoride release. These attributes enable safe sample handling needed during onsite LAARS assay and may help ease shipping challenges for samples to be processed at the IAEA’s offsite laboratory. The LAARS and DA sampler implementation concepts will be described and preliminary technical viability results presented.

  20. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    photovoltaics and solar thermal collectors; electricalelectricity) solar thermal collector (kW) PV (kW) electricelectricity) solar thermal collector (kW) PV (kW) electric

  1. Evaluating the performance of natural ventilation in buildings through simulation and on-site monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Haofan

    2013-01-01

    Natural ventilation in buildings is capable of reducing energy consumption while maintaining a comfortable indoor at the same time. It is important that natural ventilation is taken into consideration in the early design ...

  2. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    and solar thermal collectors; electrical storage, flowis disallowed; 5. a low storage, PV, and solar thermal priceand heat storage; heat exchangers for application of solar

  3. Recent Announcement for UW and Seattle Children's Hospital employees: Housing with no on-site childcare!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    before the general public. Background The University and Children's Hospital have a shared interest: Almost 40% of all faculty members who responded to the 2008 LCVI survey reported being impacted by a lack work-family conflict, and more men than women see the environment as supportive. But lest we think

  4. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    lost per hour electrical flow battery 8 thermal Not alland energy ratings of a flow battery are independent of eacha) thermal storage 11 flow battery absorption chiller solar

  5. EA-1292: On-site Treatment of Low Level Mixed Waste, Golden, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to evaluate the proposed treatment of low level mixed waste at the U.S. Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site.

  6. Response G-1: The decision to construct an on-site disposal facility was reache

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700 GJO-2003-411-TACe -' RIDGE NATIONAL :UN4 MI.

  7. Green Power Partner On-site Renewable Commitments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill Financing Tool Fits27,Network Newsletter Green Power NetworkPartner

  8. OAR 340-071 - On Site Wastewater Treatment Systems Definitions | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New Jumpand Standards |

  9. Department of Energy Announces Two Year Pay Freeze on Site and Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electricLaboratory |

  10. FEMP Offers Training on Federal On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLfor InnovativeProcessing22,673,list includesJune 17,09On|Program (FEMP)|

  11. Assessing the Benefits of On-Site Combined Heat and Power During the August

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Research atDepartment of EnergyOF THE MANAGEMENTthe FUSRAP14,

  12. Sample Documents for Federal On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProjectData Dashboard RutlandSTEAB's PrioritiesFuel CellFlip

  13. Federal On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n cEnergyNaturaldefinesMay 4,ofLeifer U.S.federal interagencyand

  14. DOE/NNSA Participates in Large-Scale CTBT On-Site Inspection Exercise in

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReporteeo | National/%2A en Office ofAmendmentNational

  15. CRS 25-10-101 On-site Wastewater Treatment Systems Act | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County, California: Energy ResourcesCRED: A New Model of Climate

  16. UCRGJC-119213 PREPRINT Signatures of Testing: On-Site. Inspection Technologies

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation FederatedInformationTITLE:ConnectsubchittedUCID-20974UCRGe n

  17. DOE Best Practices Manual Focuses on Site Selection for CO2 Storage |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i pState Efficiency,Energy News Media- The

  18. Adapting On-Site Electrical Generation Platforms for Producer Gas - Fact

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s sconveyance(EPACT)SpringDOE during the DOESheet,

  19. Guide to Purchasing Green Power: Renewable Electricity, Renewable Energy Certificates, and On-Site Renewable Generation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs | Department ofIntegrating Purchasing Green Power

  20. Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuildingBudget || Department of EnergyNo. 154 - Aug. 10, 2011

  1. Proposed On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) at the Portsmouth Gaseous

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuildingBudget || Department of EnergyNo. 154 - Aug. 10,

  2. Federal On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy Services » ProgramPolicy and Guidance »ContactProject Financing

  3. Green Power Partnership On-site Renewables Challenge | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy Services »Information1Department of EnergyEnergy

  4. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.9 On-Site Power

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement U.S. Residential5 Commercial528 Annual New91

  5. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.9 On-Site Power

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement U.S. Residential5 Commercial528 Annual

  6. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.9 On-Site Power

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement U.S. Residential5 Commercial528 Annual3

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.9 On-Site Power

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement U.S. Residential5 Commercial528 Annual34

  8. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.9 On-Site Power

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement U.S. Residential5 Commercial528 Annual345

  9. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.9 On-Site Power

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement U.S. Residential5 Commercial528 Annual3456

  10. Defining the needs for gas centrifuge enrichment plants advanced safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, Brian David; Erpenbeck, Heather H; Miller, Karen A; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Ianakiev, Kiril; Marlow, Johnna B

    2010-04-05

    Current safeguards approaches used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to verify declared low-enriched (LEU) production, detect undeclared LEU production and detect highly enriched uranium (HEU) production with adequate detection probability using nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and {sup 235}U enrichment of declared UF{sub 6} containers used in the process of enrichment at GCEPs. In verifying declared LEU production, the inspectors also take samples for off-site destructive assay (DA) which provide accurate data, with 0.1% to 0.5% measurement uncertainty, on the enrichment of the UF{sub 6} feed, tails, and product. However, taking samples of UF{sub 6} for off-site analysis is a much more labor and resource intensive exercise for the operator and inspector. Furthermore, the operator must ship the samples off-site to the IAEA laboratory which delays the timeliness of results and interruptions to the continuity of knowledge (CofK) of the samples during their storage and transit. This paper contains an analysis of possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems such as process monitoring and possible on-site analysis of DA samples that could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector's measurements and provide more effective and efficient IAEA GCEPs safeguards. We also introduce examples advanced safeguards systems that could be assembled for unattended operation.

  11. Cassini data assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-08-01

    On October 15, 1997, the Cassini spacecraft was launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) and is now on its way to the planet Saturn. The functional support provided to NASA by DOE included the Advance Launch Support Group (ALSG). If there had been a launch anomaly, the ALSG would have provided a level of radiological emergency response support adequate to transition into a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). Additional functional radiological emergency response support, as part of the ALSG, included the: (1) Aerial Measurement System (AMS); (2) Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC); (3) Geographic Information System (GIS); (4) Emergency Response Data System (ERDS); (5) Radiation Emergency Assistance Center and Training Site (REAC/TS); (6) Field monitoring and sampling; (7) Radioanalysis via RASCAL; (8) Source recovery; and (9) Neutron dosimetry and communications support. This functional support provided the capability to rapidly measure and assess radiological impacts from a launch anomaly. The Radiological Control Officer (RCO) on KSC established a Radiological Control Center (RADCC) as the focal point for all on-site and off-site radiological data and information flow. Scientists and radiological response personnel located at the RADCC managed the field monitoring team on the KSC/CCAS federal properties. Off-site radiological emergency response activities for all public lands surrounding the KSC/CCAS complex were coordinated through the Off-site ALSG located at the National Guard Armory in Cocoa, Florida. All of the in situ measurement data of good quality gathered during the dry run, the first launch attempt and the launch day are listed in this document. The RASCAL analysis results of the air filters and impactor planchets are listed.

  12. Development of a container for the transportation and storage of plutonium bearing materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D.; Geinitz, R.; Thorp, D.; Rivera, M.

    1998-03-01

    There is a large backlog of plutonium contaminated materials at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site near Denver, Colorado, USA. The clean-up of this site requires this material to be packaged in such a way as to allow for efficient transportation to other sites or to a permanent geologic repository. Prior to off-site shipment of the material, it may be stored on-site for a period of time. For this reason, it is desirable to have a container capable of meeting the requirements for storage as well as the requirements for transportation. Most of the off-site transportation is envisioned to take place using the TRUPACT-II Type B package, with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as the destination. Prior to the development of this new container, the TRUPACT-II had a limit of 325 FGE (fissile gram equivalents) of plutonium due to criticality control concerns. Because of the relatively high plutonium content in the material to be transported, transporting 325 FGE per TRUPACT-II is uneconomical. Thus, the purpose of the new containers is to provide criticality control to increase the allowed TRUPACT-II payload and to provide a safe method for on-site storage prior to transport. This paper will describe the analysis and testing used to demonstrate that the Pipe Overpack Container provides safe on-site storage of plutonium bearing materials in unhardened buildings and provides criticality control during transportation within the TRUPACT-II. Analyses included worst-case criticality analyses, analyses of fork-lift time impacts, and analyses of roof structure collapse onto the container. Testing included dynamic crush tests, bare pipe impact tests, a 30-minute totally engulfing pool-fire test, and multiple package impact tests in end-on and side-on orientations.

  13. Savannah River Site environmental report for 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, M.W.; Karapatakis, L.K.; Mamatey, A.R.

    1994-08-01

    Savannah River Site (SRS) conducts effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance to ensure the safety of the public and the well-being of the environment. DOE Order 5400,1, ``General Environmental Protection Program,`` requires the submission of an environmental report that documents the impact of facility operations on the environment and on public health. SRS has had an extensive environmental surveillance program in place since 1951 (before site startup). At that time, data generated by the on-site surveillance program were reported in site documents. Beginning in 1959, data from off-site environmental monitoring activities were presented in reports issued for public dissemination. Separate reporting of SRS`s on- and off-site environmental monitoring activities continued until 1985, when data from both surveillance programs were merged into a single public document. The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1993 is an overview of effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance activities conducted on and in the vicinity of SRS from January 1 through December 31, 1993. For complete program descriptions, consult the ``SRS Environmental Monitoring Plan`` (WSRC-3Ql-2-1000). It documents the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring program, the frequency of monitoring and analysis, the specific analytical and sampling procedures, and the quality assurance requirements.

  14. Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program - Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radiological Control Managers' Council

    2008-06-01

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection,' establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This NTS RPP promulgates the radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from NNSA/NSO activities at the NTS and other operational areas as stated in 10 CFR 835.1(a). NNSA/NSO activities (including design, construction, operation, and decommissioning) within the scope of this RPP may result in occupational exposures to radiation or radioactive material. Therefore, a system of control is implemented through specific references to the site-specific NV/YMP RCM. This system of control is intended to ensure that the following criteria are met: (1) occupational exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), (2) DOE's limiting values are not exceeded, (3) employees are aware of and are prepared to cope with emergency conditions, and (4) employees are not inadvertently exposed to radiation or radioactive material.

  15. Annual review of cultural resource investigations by the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program. Fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, M.J.; Brooks, R.D.; Sassaman, K.E.; Crass, D.C.

    1995-10-01

    The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) continued through FY95 with the United States Department of Energy to fulfill a threefold mission of cultural resource management, research, and public education at the Savannah River Site. Over 2,300 acres of land on the SRS came under cultural resources review in FY95. This activity entailed 30 field surveys, resulting in the recording of 86 new sites. Twenty-two existing sites within survey tract boundaries were revisited to update site file records. Research conducted by SRARP was reported in 11 papers and monographs published during FY95. SRARP staff also presented research results in 18 papers at professional meetings. Field research included several testing programs, excavations, and remote sensing at area sites, as well as data collection abroad. Seven grants were acquired by SRARP staff to support off-site research. In the area of heritage education, the SRARP expanded its activities in FY95 with a full schedule of classroom education, public outreach, and on-site tours. Volunteer excavations at the Tinker Creek site were continued with the Augusta Archaeological Society and other avocational groups, and other off-site excavations provided a variety of opportunities for field experience. Some 80 presentations, displays and tours were provided for schools, historical societies, civic groups, and environmental and historical awareness day celebrations. Additionally, SRARP staff taught four anthropology courses at area colleges.

  16. Microsoft Word - 99-2194, Rev. 8

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (e.g., the environmental monitoring procedures of the WP 02-EM series). Packaging and Shipping of Samples Off-Site Environmental samples sent off-site for analysis are packaged...

  17. Attachment Q

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2010 2 TABLE L List of Off-Site Waste Management Facilities that May Return Treatment-Derived Waste or Waste Residuals to the Los Alamos National Laboratory Off-Site Facility EPA...

  18. Fourth report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M. [ed.] [ed.

    1994-04-01

    In response to a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC) and selected tributaries. BMAP currently consists of six major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota, (3) biological indicator studies, (4) instream ecological monitoring, (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment, and (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake. The ecological characterization of the WOC watershed will provide baseline data that can be used to document the ecological effects of the water pollution control program and the remedial action program. The long-term nature of BMAP ensures that the effectiveness of remedial measures will be properly evaluated.

  19. Annual site environmental report, period: January 1994 to June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The environmental management program at the US Department of Energy (DOE), Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), addresses all areas of environmental concern, including surface water and groundwater quality, air quality, and solid and hazardous waste disposal. The program focuses primarily on the treatment and disposal of industrial, contaminated, and sanitary wastewaters; the disposal of solid and hazardous wastes; minimizing air pollutant emissions; the monitoring of surface water, groundwater, and air quality on the METC site and in the surrounding area; the decommissioning, decontamination, and disposal of on-site research facilities no longer in use; and the identification, characterization, and cleanup of off-site property where METC sponsored research and development activities. The environmental management program is conducted to meet the requirements of all applicable Federal, state, and local laws and regulations.

  20. Overview of Low-Level Waste Disposal Operations at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /Navarro

    2007-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Management Program is charged with the responsibility to carry out the disposal of on-site and off-site generated low-level radioactive waste at the Nevada Test Site. Core elements of this mission are ensuring that disposal take place in a manner that is safe and cost-effective while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. This paper focuses on giving an overview of the Nevada Test Site facilities regarding currant design of disposal. In addition, technical attributes of the facilities established through the site characterization process will be further described. An update on current waste disposal volumes and capabilities will also be provided. This discussion leads to anticipated volume projections and disposal site requirements as the Nevada Test Site disposal operations look towards the future.

  1. Second report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Bailey, R.D.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Cox, D.K.; Huston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Loar, J.M.; Olsen, C.R.; Ryon, M.G.; Shugart, L.R.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Talmage, S.S.; Murphy, J.B.; Valentine, C.K.; Appellanis, S.M.; Jimenez, B.D.; Huq, M.V.; Meyers-Schone, L.J.; Mohrbacher, D.A.; Olsen, C.R.; Stout, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. BMAP consists of seven major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota; (3) biological indicator studies; (4) instream ecological monitoring; (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment; (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL); and (7) contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system. This document, the second of a series of annual reports, described the results of BMAP studies conducted in 1987.

  2. Overview of Nevada Test Site Radioactive and Mixed Waste Disposal Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.T. Carilli; S.K. Krenzien; R.G. Geisinger; S.J. Gordon; B. Quinn

    2009-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Management Program is responsible for carrying out the disposal of on-site and off-site generated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and low-level radioactive mixed waste (MW) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Core elements of this mission are ensuring safe and cost-effective disposal while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. This paper focuses on the impacts of new policies, processes, and opportunities at the NTS related to LLW and MW. Covered topics include: the first year of direct funding for NTS waste disposal operations; zero tolerance policy for non-compliant packages; the suspension of mixed waste disposal; waste acceptance changes; DOE Consolidated Audit Program (DOECAP) auditing; the 92-Acre Area closure plan; new eligibility requirements for generators; and operational successes with unusual waste streams.

  3. EIS-0355: Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah, Environmental Impact Statement and associated supplements and amendments provides information on the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) proposal to (1) remediate approximately 11.9 million tons of contaminated materials located on the Moab site and approximately 39,700 tons located on nearby vicinity properties and (2) develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for the Moab site using the framework of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project (DOE/EIS-0198, October 1996). The surface remediation alternatives analyzed in the EIS include on-site disposal of the contaminated materials and off-site disposal at one of three alternative locations in Utah using one or more transportation options: truck, rail, or slurry pipeline.

  4. Health assessment for Vogel Paint and Wax, Maurice, Sioux County, Iowa, Region 7. CERCLIS No. IAD980630487. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-29

    The Vogel Paint and Wax National Priority List site is situated in northwest Iowa in Sioux County. Contaminants found at the site consist of heavy metals (particularly cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury) and volatile organic compounds (benzene, ethylbenzene, methyl ethyl ketone, toluene, and xylene). Two towns, Maurice and Struble, and the Southern Sioux County Rural Water System well field are located within three miles of the site, and two families live within 1600 feet of the waste-disposal site. Environmental pathways include contaminated soil and ground water, as well as potential surface water and air contamination. Although there does not appear to be any immediate public health threat, the site is of potential health concern because of the possibility for further off-site migration of contaminants into the ground water aquifer and for direct on-site contact.

  5. Paper K-05, in: B.C. Alleman and M.E. Kelley (Conference Chairs), In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation--2005. Proceedings of the Eighth International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium (Baltimore, Maryland; June 69,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    .battelle.org/bookstore. Genetic Testing Prerequisites for Effective Tree-Based Phytoremediation Systems D. L. Rockwood (dlrock. Licht (Ecolotree, North Liberty, IA) B. Kanzler (Reichhold Chemicals, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA, but they may be essential in oxidizing contaminants such as TCE. Methane- oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs

  6. Paper K-05, in: B.C. Alleman and M.E. Kelley (Conference Chairs), In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation--2005. Proceedings of the Eighth International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium (Baltimore, Maryland; June 69,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    (Baltimore, Maryland; June 6­9, 2005). ISBN 1-57477-152-3, published by Battelle Press, Columbus, OH, www

  7. Health assessment for Northwest Transformer, Salvage Yard, Everson, Whatcom County, Washington, Region 10. CERCLIS No. WAD980833974. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-14

    The Northwest Transformer Salvage Yard is a National Priorities List (NPL) Site located in Whatcom County, Washington, approximately two miles south of the town of Everson, Washington. Between 1958-1985, the site served as a storage and refurbishing area for electrical transformers, capacitors, and other electrical equipment. An Immediate Removal Action was performed at the site in 1985, and included the excavation and removal of on-site contaminated soils, liquids, and electrical equipment. Subsequent sampling and analysis of on-site and off-site soils and groundwater revealed polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, and chlorinated dibenzofurans. Identified pathways for the migration of site-associated contaminants include those associated with groundwater, surface water, soil, and bioaccumulation. Potential pathways for human exposure to site contaminants include ingestion of contaminated groundwater, soils, or foodchain entities, inhalation of fugitive dusts, and dermal contact with contaminated groundwater, surface water, soil, or wood from an on-site building. Under current conditions the site poses a potential threat to human health in the event of unauthorized site entry, or the ingestion of contaminated groundwater.

  8. Review of project definition studies of possible on-site uses of superconducting super collider assets and facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-01

    This document reports on the results of a peer review and evaluation of studies made of potential uses of assets from the terminated Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project. These project definition studies focused on nine areas of use of major assets and facilities at the SSC site near Waxahachie, Texas. The studies were undertaken as part of the effort to maximize the value of the investment made in the SSC and were supported by two sets of grants, one to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNRLC) and the second to various universities and other institutions for studies of ideas raised by a public call for expressions of interest. The Settlement Agreement, recently signed by the Department of Energy (DOE) and TNRLC, provides for a division of SSC property. As part of the goal of maximizing the value of the SSC investment, the findings contained in this report are thus addressed to officials in both the Department and TNRLC. In addition, this review had several other goals: to provide constructive feedback to those doing the studies; to judge the benefits and feasibility (including funding prospects) of the projects studied; and to help worthy projects become reality by matching projects with possible funding sources.

  9. Review of project definition studies of possible on-site uses of superconducting super collider assets and facilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-01

    This document reports on the results of a peer review and evaluation of studies made of potential uses of assets from the terminated Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project. These project definition studies focused on nine areas of use of major assets and facilities at the SSC site near Waxahachie, Texas. The studies were undertaken as part of the effort to maximize the value of the investment made in the SSC and were supported by two sets of grants, one to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNRLC) and the second to various universities and other institutions for studies of ideas raised by a public call for expressions of interest. The Settlement Agreement, recently signed by the Department of Energy (DOE) and TNRLC, provides for a division of SSC property. As part of the goal of maximizing the value of the SSC investment, the findings contained in this report are thus addressed to officials in both the Department and TNRLC. In addition, this review had several other goals: to provide constructive feedback to those doing the studies; to judge the benefits and feasibility (including funding prospects) of the projects studied; and to help worthy projects become reality by matching projects with possible funding sources.

  10. Rapid Deployment Drilling System for on-site inspections under a Comprehensive Test Ban Preliminary Engineering Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maurer, W.C.; Deskins, W.G.; McDonald, W.J.; Cohen, J.H. [Maurer Engineering, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Heuze, F.E.; Butler, M.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    While not a new drilling technology, coiled-tubing (CT) drilling continues to undergo rapid development and expansion, with new equipment, tools and procedures developed almost daily. This project was undertaken to: analyze available technological options for a Rapid Deployment Drilling System (RDDS) CT drilling system: recommend specific technologies that best match the requirements for the RDDS; and highlight any areas where adequate technological solutions are not currently available. Postshot drilling is a well established technique at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Drilling provides essential data on the results of underground tests including obtaining samples for the shot zone, information on cavity size, chimney dimensions, effects of the event on surrounding material, and distribution of radioactivity.

  11. Comparison of Construction Labor Productivity between U.S. and China: Using On-Site Productivity Measurement Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chui, Ka Wah

    2010-12-30

    .2.2 Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning System........................................84 4.2.3 Masonry ...........................................................................................................85 4.3 Data Analyses.....................................................................................................................87 5.2 Productivity Data Set in the U.S..................................................................................88 5.3 Productivity Data Set in China ..................................................................................100...

  12. Use of fuel cells for improving on-site emergency power availability and reliability ad nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akkaynak, Derya

    2005-01-01

    To assure safe shutdown of a nuclear power plant, there must always be reliable means of decay heat removal provided, in last resort, by an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS). Currently the majority of nuclear power ...

  13. Project RU LlSON COPY ON-SITE RADIOLOGICAL PROGRAMS DURING REENTRY DISILLING THROUGH PRODUCTION TESTING

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the Weldon Spring,7=cr5rnP 7694Performed Under OnlyRU

  14. Assessment of Potential Flood Events and Impacts at INL's Proposed Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Jeff Sondrup; Annette L. Schafter

    2010-09-01

    Rates, depths, erosion potential, increased subsurface transport rates, and annual exceedance probability for potential flooding scenarios have been evaluated for the on-site alternatives of Idaho National Laboratory’s proposed remote handled low-level waste disposal facility. The on-site disposal facility is being evaluated in anticipation of the closure of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INL. An assessment of flood impacts are required to meet the Department of Energy’s Low-Level Waste requirements (DOE-O 435.1), its natural phenomena hazards assessment criteria (DOE-STD-1023-95), and the Radioactive Waste Management Manual (DOE M 435.1-1) guidance in addition to being required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) environmental assessment (EA). Potential sources of water evaluated include those arising from (1) local precipitation events, (2) precipitation events occurring off of the INL (off-site precipitation), and (3) increased flows in the Big Lost River in the event of a Mackay Dam failure. On-site precipitation events include potential snow-melt and rainfall. Extreme rainfall events were evaluated for the potential to create local erosion, particularly of the barrier placed over the disposal facility. Off-site precipitation carried onto the INL by the Big Lost River channel was evaluated for overland migration of water away from the river channel. Off-site precipitation sources evaluated were those occurring in the drainage basin above Mackay Reservoir. In the worst-case scenarios, precipitation occurring above Mackay Dam could exceed the dam’s capacity, leading to overtopping, and eventually complete dam failure. Mackay Dam could also fail during a seismic event or as a result of mechanical piping. Some of the water released during dam failure, and contributing precipitation, has the potential of being carried onto the INL in the Big Lost River channel. Resulting overland flows from these flood sources were evaluated for their erosion potential, ability to overflow the proposed disposal facility, and for their ability to increase migration of contaminants from the facility. The assessment of available literature suggests that the likelihood of detrimental flood water impacting the proposed RH-LLW facility is extremely low. The annual exceedance probability associated with uncontrolled flows in the Big Lost River impacting either of the proposed sites is 1x10-5, with return interval (RI) of 10,000yrs. The most probable dam failure scenario has an annual exceedance probability of 6.3x10-6 (1.6x105 yr RI). In any of the scenarios generating possible on-site water, the duration is expected to be quite short, water depths are not expected to exceed 0.5 m, and the erosion potential can easily be mitigated by emplacement of a berm (operational period), and an engineered cover (post closure period). Subsurface mobilization of radionuclides was evaluated for a very conservative flooding scenario resulting in 50 cm deep, 30.5 day on-site water. The annual exceedance probability for which is much smaller than 3.6x10-7 (2.8x106 yr RI). For the purposes of illustration, the facility was assumed to flood every 500 years. The periodically recurring flood waters were predicted to marginally increase peak radionuclide fluxes into the aquifer by at most by a factor of three for non-sorbing radionuclides, and to have limited impact on peak radionuclide fluxes into the aquifer for contaminants that do sorb.

  15. Nevada National Security Site Radiation Protection Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-04-30

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, “Occupational Radiation Protection,” establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This RPP section consists of general statements that are applicable to the NNSS as a whole. The RPP also includes a series of appendices which provide supporting detail for the associated NNSS Tennant Organizations (TOs). Appendix H, “Compliance Demonstration Table,” contains a cross-walk for the implementation of 10 CFR 835 requirements. This RPP does not contain any exemptions from the established 10 CFR 835 requirements. The RSPC and TOs are fully compliant with 10 CFR 835 and no additional funding is required in order to meet RPP commitments. No new programs or activities are needed to meet 10 CFR 835 requirements and there are no anticipated impacts to programs or activities that are not included in the RPP. There are no known constraints to implementing the RPP. No guides or technical standards are adopted in this RPP as a means to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 835.

  16. Vermont Yankee experience with interim storage of low level radioactive waste in concrete modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, S.; Weyman, D. [Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Corporation, Vernon, VT (United States)

    1995-05-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of interim storage of low level radioactive waste using concrete modules at the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station in Vernon, Vermont. Under the threat of possible loss of disposal capability in 1986, Vermont Yankee first considered the on-site storage option in 1985. prior to settling on a design, an investigation and economic analysis was performed of several designs. Modular concrete storage on a gravel pad was chosen as the most economical and the one providing the greatest flexibility. The engineering work, safety analysis, and pad construction were completed in 1985. Because of the passage of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Policy amendments Act in 1985, the loss of disposal capability did not occur in 1986. However, because the State of Vermont failed to meet the milestones of the Amendments Act, Vermont Yankee was restricted from the existing disposal sites on January 31, 1989. As a result, modules were purchased and waste was stored on site from 1989 until 1991. In 1991, the State of Vermont came back into compliance with the Amendments Act, and all waste stored on-site was shipped for burial. During the storage period 2 types of modules (1 box type and 1 cylinder type) were used. Lessons were learned, and changes were made to better control the off-site dose contribution of the waste. Recommendations are made to enhance the usability of the facility, such s lighting power, phones, etc. A shortcoming of the module storage concept is the inability to move waste during inclement weather. Despite this, the modules have provided an economical, technically sound, method of waste storage. The storage pad has not been used since 1991, but work is under way to review, and update as necessary, the safety analysis and procedures in preparation for reuse of the on-site storage facility after June 30, 1994.

  17. Proposed rulemaking on the storage and disposal of nuclear waste. Cross-statement of the United States Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-05

    The US DOE cross-statement in the matter of proposed rulemaking in the storage and disposal of nuclear wastes is presented. It is concluded from evidence contained in the document that: (1) spent fuel can be disposed of in a manner that is safe and environmentally acceptable; (2) present plans for establishing geological repositories are an effective and reasonable means of disposal; (3) spent nuclear fuel from licensed facilities can be stored in a safe and environmentally acceptable manner on-site or off-site until disposal facilities are ready; (4) sufficient additional storage capacity for spent fuel will be established; and (5) the disposal and interim storage systems for spent nuclear fuel will be integrated into an acceptable operating system. It was recommended that the commission should promulgate a rule providing that the safety and environmental implications of spent nuclear fuel remaining on site after the anticipated expiration of the facility licenses involved need not be considered in individual facility licensing proceedings. A prompt finding of confidence in the nuclear waste disposal and storage area by the commission is also recommeded. (DMC)

  18. Solid waste management of coal conversion residuals from a commercial-size facility: environmental engineering aspects. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bern, J.; Neufeld, R. D.; Shapiro, M. A.

    1980-11-30

    Major residuals generated by the conversion process and its auxiliary operations include: (a) coal preparation wastes; (b) gasifier ash; (c) liquefaction solids-char; (d) tail gas or flue gas desulfurization sludge; (e) boiler flyash and bottom ash; (f) raw water treatment sludge, and; (g) biosludges from process wastewater treatment. Recovered sulfur may also require disposal management. Potential environmental and health impacts from each of the residues are described on the basis of characterization of the waste in the perspective of water quality degradation. Coal gasification and liquefaction systems are described in great detail with respect to their associated residuals. Management options are listed with the conclusion that land disposal of the major residual streams is the only viable choice. On-site versus off-site disposal is analyzed with the selection of on-site operations to reduce political, social and institutional pressures, and to optimize the costs of the system. Mechanisms for prevention of leachate generation are described, and various disposal site designs are outlined. It is concluded that co-disposal feasibility of some waste streams must be established in order to make the most preferred solid waste management system feasible. Capacity requirements for the disposal operation were calculated for a 50,000 bbl/day coal liquefaction plant or 250 million SCF/day gasification operation.

  19. Confirmatory Tree Sampling for Tritium in Trees at the Salmon Site, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-06-01

    The sampling was conducted on April 20, 21, and 22, 2010. DOE acquired 36 samples for analysis, approximately 10 percent of the total number of samples the Mississippi Forestry Commission acquired. The plan was to sample trees that the Mississippi Forestry Commission also sampled, so that a tree-by-tree comparison of analysis results could be made. The Mississippi Forestry Commission provided DOE with latitude and longitude coordinates, determined by a global positioning system (GPS), for each sampled tree. The Mississippi Forestry Commission also placed a blaze-orange number on each sampled tree. DOE used a GPS unit to assist in locating trees for sampling. DOE acquired one sample from an off-site location to have a reference for comparison to on-site results if necessary. The other 35 samples were acquired on site, for a total of 36 samples. Figure 1 shows the sampling locations, the sample identifiers DOE assigned, and the corresponding tree numbers the Mississippi Forestry Commission assigned

  20. Cropland carbon fluxes in the United States: increasing Geospatial Resolution of Inventory-Based Carbon Accounting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Tristram O. [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Baskaran, Latha Malar [ORNL; Hellwinckel, Chad M [ORNL; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Nelson, Richard G [ORNL; De La Torre Ugarte, Daniel G [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Net annual soil carbon change, fossil fuel emissions from cropland production, and cropland net primary productivity were estimated and spatially distributed using land cover defined by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and by the Cropland Data Layer (CDL). Spatially resolved estimates of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB) were developed. NEE represents net on-site vertical fluxes of carbon. NECB represents all on-site and off-site carbon fluxes associated with crop production. Estimates of cropland NEE using moderate resolution (~1km2) land cover data were generated for the conterminous US and compared with higher resolution (30m) estimates of NEE and with direct measurements of CO2 flux from croplands in Illinois and Nebraska. Estimates of NEE using the CDL (30m resolution) had a higher correlation with eddy covariance flux tower estimates compared with estimates of NEE using MODIS. Estimates of NECB are primarily driven by net soil carbon change, fossil-fuel emissions associated with crop production, and CO2 emissions from the application of agricultural lime. NEE and NECB for US croplands were -274 and 7 Tg C yr-1 for 2004, respectively. Use of moderate to high resolution satellite-based land cover data enables improved estimates of cropland carbon dynamics.

  1. Proceedings of the Symposium on the Non-Proliferation Experiment: Results and Implications for Test Ban Treaties, Rockville, Maryland, April 19-21, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denny, Marvin D

    1994-01-01

    To address a critical verification issue for the current Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and for a possible future Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), the Department of Energy sought to measure certain differences between an underground nuclear test and a chemical test in the same geology, so that other explosions could be identified. This was done in a field experiment code-named the NonProliferation Experiment (NPE).This comprehensive experiment was designed to determine the signatures of chemical explosions for a broad range of phenomena for comparison with those of previous nuclear tests. If significant differences can be measured, then these measures can be used to discriminate between the two types of explosions. In addition, when these differences are understood, large chemical explosions can be used to seismically calibrate regions to discriminate earthquakes from explosions. Toward this end, on-site and off-site measurements of transient phenomena were made, and on-site measurements of residual effects are in progress.Perhaps the most striking result was that the source function for the chemical explosion was identical to that of a nuclear one of about twice the yield. These proceedings provide more detailed results of the experiment.

  2. Final environmental assessment for the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    The proposed project is to demonstrate on a commercial scale the production of methanol from coal-derived synthesis gas using the LPMEOH{trademark} process. The methanol produced during this demonstration will be used as a chemical feedstock (on-site) and/or as an alternative fuel in stationary and transportation applications (off-site). In addition, the production of dimethyl ether (DME) as a mixed co-product with methanol may be demonstrated for a six month period under the proposed project pending the results of laboratory/pilot-scale research on scale-up. The DME would be used as fuel in on-site boilers. The proposed LPMEOH facility would occupy approximately 0.6 acres of the 3,890-acre Eastman Chemical facility in Kingsport, TN. The effects of the proposed project include changes in air emissions, wastewater discharge, cooling water discharge, liquid waste quantities, transportation activities, socioeconomic effects, and quantity of solids for disposal. No substantive negative impacts or environmental concerns were identified.

  3. Physical Objects of Dark Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Novikov-Borodin

    2006-09-11

    The hypothesis of existence of off-site continuums is investigated. Principles of the physical description are formulated. The structure of off-site continuums and opportunities of observation of off-site physical objects from the continuum of the observer is investigated. There are found conformities between properties of the considered objects with properties of known physical objects and fundamental interactions both in micro-, and macro-scales.

  4. PPPL_OrgChart_05.04.2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B. Stratton Innovative Fusion Concepts and Technology R. Majeski Projects: LTX, FRC Plasma Technology and Off-Site Research Y. Raitses Projects: HTX, MNX,OSUR Beam...

  5. Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lackner, Regina

    2009-01-01

    Power Authority (WAPA). Power purchases are arranged throughDOE’s Northern California Power Purchase Consortium. Thisincluding power to off-site facilities, through the purchase

  6. HOSPITAL ENERGY AUDITS: A BIBLIOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollack, R. I.

    2011-01-01

    data base, an instrumented engineering survey, off-site engineer- ing analysis, cost containment reporting, implementation of a management information system, and "

  7. Water, Neighborhoods and Urban Design: Micro-Utilities and the Fifth Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmer, Vicki; Fraker, Harrison

    2011-01-01

    heating and electric cogeneration plant (off-site), theheating and electric cogeneration plant, which provides theheating and electric cogeneration plant powered by waste

  8. External Resources | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    for maintaining the appearance of independence and neutrality in the Administrative Law System Visit The Office of Personnel Management off site Energy Recovery Act The...

  9. Defining the needs for non-destructive assay of UF6 feed, product, and tails at gas centrifuge enrichment plants and possible next steps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, Brian D; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Moran, Bruce W; Lebrun, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Current safeguards approaches used by the IAEA at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to detect undeclared LEU production with adequate detection probability using non destructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and {sup 235}U enrichment of UF{sub 6} bulk material used in the process of enrichment at GCEPS. The inspectors also take destructive assay (DA) samples for analysis off-site which provide accurate, on the order of 0.1 % to 0.5% uncertainty, data on the enrichment of the UF{sub 6} feed, tails, and product. However, DA sample taking is a much more labor intensive and resource intensive exercise for the operator and inspector. Furthermore, the operator must ship the samples off-site to the IAEA laboratory which delays the timeliness of the results and contains the possibility of the loss of the continuity of knowledge of the samples during the storage and transit of the material. Use of the IAEA's inspection sampling algorithm shows that while total sample size is fixed by the total population of potential samples and its intrinsic qualities, the split of the samples into NDA or DA samples is determined by the uncertainties in the NDA measurements. Therefore, the larger the uncertainties in the NDA methods, more of the sample taken must be DA samples. Since the DA sampling is arduous and costly, improvements in NDA methods would reduce the number of DA samples needed. Furthermore, if methods of on-site analysis of the samples could be developed that have uncertainties in the 1-2% range, a lot of the problems inherent in DA sampling could be removed. The use of an unattended system that could give an overview of the entire process giving complementary data on the enrichment process as well as accurate measures of enrichment and weights of the UF{sub 6} feed, tails, and product would be a major step in enhancing the ability of NDA beyond present attended systems. The possibility of monitoring the feed, tails, and product header pipes in such a way as to gain safeguards relevant flow and enrichment information without compromising the intellectual property of the operator including proprietary equipment and operational parameters would be a huge step forward. This paper contains an analysis of possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems including such process monitoring and possible on-site analysis of DA samples that could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector measurements reducing the difference between the operator's and inspector's measurements providing more effective and efficient IAEA GeEPs safeguards.

  10. Gamma-Ray Simulated Spectrum Deconvolution of a LaBr? 1-in. x 1-in. Scintillator for Nondestructive ATR Fuel Burnup On-Site Predictions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Navarro, Jorge; Ring, Terry A.; Nigg, David W.

    2015-03-01

    A deconvolution method for a LaBr? 1"x1" detector for nondestructive Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel burnup applications was developed. The method consisted of obtaining the detector response function, applying a deconvolution algorithm to 1”x1” LaBr? simulated, data along with evaluating the effects that deconvolution have on nondestructively determining ATR fuel burnup. The simulated response function of the detector was obtained using MCNPX as well with experimental data. The Maximum-Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) deconvolution algorithm was selected to enhance one-isotope source-simulated and fuel- simulated spectra. The final evaluation of the study consisted of measuring the performance of the fuel burnup calibrationmore »curve for the convoluted and deconvoluted cases. The methodology was developed in order to help design a reliable, high resolution, rugged and robust detection system for the ATR fuel canal capable of collecting high performance data for model validation, along with a system that can calculate burnup and using experimental scintillator detector data.« less

  11. Near-edge band structures and band gaps of Cu-based semiconductors predicted by the modified Becke-Johnson potential plus an on-site Coulomb U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yubo; Zhang, Jiawei; Wang, Youwei; Gao, Weiwei; Abtew, Tesfaye A.; Zhang, Peihong E-mail: wqzhang@mail.sic.ac.cn; Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 ; Zhang, Wenqing E-mail: wqzhang@mail.sic.ac.cn; School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering and Sate Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, Nanjing University, Jiangsu 210093

    2013-11-14

    Diamond-like Cu-based multinary semiconductors are a rich family of materials that hold promise in a wide range of applications. Unfortunately, accurate theoretical understanding of the electronic properties of these materials is hindered by the involvement of Cu d electrons. Density functional theory (DFT) based calculations using the local density approximation or generalized gradient approximation often give qualitative wrong electronic properties of these materials, especially for narrow-gap systems. The modified Becke-Johnson (mBJ) method has been shown to be a promising alternative to more elaborate theory such as the GW approximation for fast materials screening and predictions. However, straightforward applications of the mBJ method to these materials still encounter significant difficulties because of the insufficient treatment of the localized d electrons. We show that combining the promise of mBJ potential and the spirit of the well-established DFT + U method leads to a much improved description of the electronic structures, including the most challenging narrow-gap systems. A survey of the band gaps of about 20 Cu-based semiconductors calculated using the mBJ + U method shows that the results agree with reliable values to within ±0.2 eV.

  12. Technical assistance to Ohio closure sites; Technologies to address leachate from the on-site disposal facility at Fernald Environmental Management Project, Ohio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    2002-01-01

    based on the design of the Rocky Flats Mound Plume treatmentsystem. The Rocky Flats system utilizes a passive treatment

  13. All programs listed are available either on-site and or web-based Undergraduate Programs Available at ODU-Virginia Beach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) (MSEd) Engineering Management (MEM/MS) Environmental Engineering (ME/MS) Nursing - Adult Gerontology) Nursing - RN to BSN (BSN) Occupational & Technical Studies - Industrial Tech Emphasis (BS) Occupational Clinical Nursing Specialist Educator (MSN) Nursing - Anesthesia (MSN) Nursing - Family Nurse Practitioner

  14. Gamma-Ray Simulated Spectrum Deconvolution of a LaBr3 1- ×1-in. Scintillator for Nondestructive ATR Fuel Burnup On-Site Predictions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Navarro, Jorge; Ring, Terry A.; Nigg, David W.

    2015-03-01

    A deconvolution method for a LaBr3 1"x1" detector for nondestructive Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel burnup applications was developed. The method consisted of obtaining the detector response function, applying a deconvolution algorithm to 1”x1” LaBr3 simulated, data along with evaluating the effects that deconvolution have on nondestructively determining ATR fuel burnup. The simulated response function of the detector was obtained using MCNPX as well with experimental data. The Maximum-Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) deconvolution algorithm was selected to enhance one-isotope source-simulated and fuel- simulated spectra. The final evaluation of the study consisted of measuring the performance of the fuel bumup calibration curve for the convoluted and deconvoluted cases. The methodology was developed in order to help design a reliable, high resolution, rugged and robust detection system for the ATR fuel canal capable of collecting high performance data for model validation, along with a system that can calculate burnup and using experimental scintillator detector data.

  15. Development of a New ASHRAE Protocol for Measuring and Reporting the On-Site Performance of Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, Jeff; Case, Mark; Kettler, Herald; Hunn, Bruce; Owens, Brendan

    2006-01-01

    regarding the specification of a performance monitoring system. • NEMVP, IPMVP (1996 – 2003). The US DOE has developed the International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocols (IPMVP), beginning in 1996 and revised up through 2003.... It included a 4-116© 2006 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings purpose/scope, an overview, three M&V options, a section of other issues and references. o International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol (IPMVP), 1997...

  16. Gamma-Ray Simulated Spectrum Deconvolution of a LaBr3 1- ×1-in. Scintillator for Nondestructive ATR Fuel Burnup On-Site Predictions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Navarro, Jorge; Ring, Terry A.; Nigg, David W.

    2015-03-01

    A deconvolution method for a LaBr3 1"x1" detector for nondestructive Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel burnup applications was developed. The method consisted of obtaining the detector response function, applying a deconvolution algorithm to 1”x1” LaBr3 simulated, data along with evaluating the effects that deconvolution have on nondestructively determining ATR fuel burnup. The simulated response function of the detector was obtained using MCNPX as well with experimental data. The Maximum-Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) deconvolution algorithm was selected to enhance one-isotope source-simulated and fuel- simulated spectra. The final evaluation of the study consisted of measuring the performance of the fuel bumup calibrationmore »curve for the convoluted and deconvoluted cases. The methodology was developed in order to help design a reliable, high resolution, rugged and robust detection system for the ATR fuel canal capable of collecting high performance data for model validation, along with a system that can calculate burnup and using experimental scintillator detector data.« less

  17. Eagle Point Golf Course Stormwater Assessment UNCW-CMS Report 09-05

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    Eagle Point Golf Course Stormwater Assessment UNCW-CMS Report 09-05 To New Hanover County Planning of the input sites that receive stormwater runoff from off-site. Concurrent with these elevated counts, the two entering the course from off-site via stormwater runoff is a significant problem to Eagle Point Golf Course

  18. Clearwater Subbasin Assessment November 2003278 7 Aquatic Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and indirect mortalities associated with the Federal Columbia River hydropower system (FCRPS), tributary 2000 BIOP that tributary habitat improvements are required as part of off-site mitigation activities Administration for continued operation. The potential for habitat-based off-site mitigation within the Clearwater

  19. 1993 Annual PCB Document for Los Alamos National Laboratory EPA Region VI, January 1, 1993 through December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wechsler, R.J.; Sandoval, T.M.; Bryant, D.E.; Hupke, L.; Esquibel, L.

    1995-12-31

    This document, the {open_quotes}1993 Annual PCB Document for Los Alamos National Laboratory{close_quotes} was prepared to fulffill the requirements of the federal PCB (Polychlorinated Biphenyl) regulation: 40 CFR 761 Subpart J General Records and Reports. The PCB Management Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Environmental Protection Group, compiled this 1993 Annual PCB Document. The overall format generally follows the sequence of the applicable regulations. Subsection 1.2 cross references those regulatory requirements with the applicable Document Section. The scope of this document also includes status summaries of various aspects of LANL`s PCB Management Program. The intent of this approach to the Annual Document is to provide an overview of LANL`s PCB Management Program and to increase the usefulness of this document as a management tool. Section 2.0, {open_quotes}Status of the PCB Management Program{close_quotes}, discusses the use, generation of waste, and storage of PCBs at LANL. Section 3.0 is the 1993 Annual Document Log required by 761.180(a). This Section also discusses the PCB Management Program`s policies for reporting under those regulatory requirements. Sections 4.0 and 5.0 contain the 1993 Annual Records for off-site and on-site disposal as required by 761.180(b). There is a tab for each manifest and its associated continuation sheets, receipt letters, and certificates of disposal.

  20. West Valley Demonstration Project site environmental report for calendar year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), the site of a US Department of Energy environmental cleanup activity operated by West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc., (WVNS), is in the process of solidifying liquid high-level radioactive waste remaining at the site after commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing was discontinued. The Project is located in Western New York State, about 30 miles south of Buffalo, within the New York State-owned Western New York Nuclear Service Center (WNYNSC). This report represents a single, comprehensive source of off-site and on-site environmental monitoring data collected during 1996 by environmental monitoring personnel. The environmental monitoring program and results are discussed in the body of this report. The monitoring data are presented in the appendices. Appendix A is a summary of the site environmental monitoring schedule. Appendix B lists the environmental permits and regulations pertaining to the WVDP. Appendices C through F contain summaries of data obtained during 1996 and are intended for those interested in more detail than is provided in the main body of the report.

  1. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF MANAGEMENT OF STORMWATER AND WASTEWATER AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT (SPRU) DISPOSITION PROJECT, NEW YORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abitz, R.; Jackson, D.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

    2011-06-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently evaluating the water management procedures at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU). The facility has three issues related to water management that require technical assistance: (1) due to a excessive rainfall event in October, 2010, contaminated water collected in basements of G2 and H2 buildings. As a result of this event, the contractor has had to collect and dispose of water offsite; (2) The failure of a sump pump at a KAPL outfall resulted in a Notice of Violation issued by the New York State Department of Environment and Conservation (NYSDEC) and subsequent Consent Order. On-site water now requires treatment and off-site disposition; and (3) stormwater infiltration has resulted in Strontium-90 levels discharged to the storm drains that exceed NR standards. The contractor has indicated that water management at SPRU requires major staff resources (at least 50 persons). The purpose of this review is to determine if the contractor's technical approach warrants the large number of staff resources and to ensure that the technical approach is compliant and in accordance with federal, state and NR requirements.

  2. Hazard screening application guide. Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-06-01

    The basic purpose of hazard screening is to group precesses, facilities, and proposed modifications according to the magnitude of their hazards so as to determine the need for and extent of follow on safety analysis. A hazard is defined as a material, energy source, or operation that has the potential to cause injury or illness in human beings. The purpose of this document is to give guidance and provide standard methods for performing hazard screening. Hazard screening is applied to new and existing facilities and processes as well as to proposed modifications to existing facilities and processes. The hazard screening process evaluates an identified hazards in terms of the effects on people, both on-site and off-site. The process uses bounding analyses with no credit given for mitigation of an accident with the exception of certain containers meeting DOT specifications. The process is restricted to human safety issues only. Environmental effects are addressed by the environmental program. Interfaces with environmental organizations will be established in order to share information.

  3. Safety analysis approaches or mixed transuranic waste.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courtney, J. C.; Dwight, C. C.; Forrester, R. J.; Lehto, M. A.; Pan, Y. C.

    1999-02-10

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed a survey of assumptions and techniques used for safety analyses at seven sites that handle or store mixed transuranic (TRU) waste operated by contractors for the US Department of Energy (DOE). While approaches to estimating on-site and off-site consequences of hypothetical accidents differ, there are commonalities in all of the safety studies. This paper identifies key parameters and methods used to estimate the radiological consequences associated with release of waste forms under abnormal conditions. Specific facilities are identified by letters with their safety studies listed in a bibliography rather than as specific references so that similarities and differences are emphasized in a nonjudgmental manner. References are provided for specific parameters used to project consequences associated with compromise of barriers and dispersion of potentially hazardous materials. For all of the accidents and sites, estimated dose commitments are well below guidelines even using highly conservative assumptions. Some of the studies quantified the airborne concentrations of toxic materials; this paper only addresses these analyses briefly, as an entire paper could be dedicated to this subject.

  4. Low-Level Waste Disposal Alternatives Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy Carlson; Kay Adler-Flitton; Roy Grant; Joan Connolly; Peggy Hinman; Charles Marcinkiewicz

    2006-09-01

    This report identifies and compares on-site and off-site disposal options for the disposal of contract-handled and remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Potential disposal options are screened for viability by waste type resulting in a short list of options for further consideration. The most crediable option are selected after systematic consideration of cost, schedule constraints, and risk. In order to holistically address the approach for low-level waste disposal, options are compiled into comprehensive disposal schemes, that is, alternative scenarios. Each alternative scenario addresses the disposal path for all low-level waste types over the period of interest. The alternative scenarios are compared and ranked using cost, risk and complexity to arrive at the recommended approach. Schedule alignment with disposal needs is addressed to ensure that all waste types are managed appropriately. The recommended alternative scenario for the disposal of low-level waste based on this analysis is to build a disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  5. Survey of plutonium and uranium atom ratios and activity levels in Mortandad Canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallaher, B.M.; Benjamin, T.M.; Rokop, D.J.; Stoker, A.K.

    1997-09-22

    For more than three decades Mortandad Canyon has been the primary release area of treated liquid radioactive waste from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory). In this survey, six water samples and seven stream sediment samples collected in Mortandad Canyon were analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) to determine the plutonium and uranium activity levels and atom ratios. Be measuring the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios, the Laboratory plutonium component was evaluated relative to that from global fallout. Measurements of the relative abundance of {sup 235}U and {sup 236}U were also used to identify non-natural components. The survey results indicate the Laboratory plutonium and uranium concentrations in waters and sediments decrease relatively rapidly with distance downstream from the major industrial sources. Plutonium concentrations in shallow alluvial groundwater decrease by approximately 1000 fold along a 3000 ft distance. At the Laboratory downstream boundary, total plutonium and uranium concentrations were generally within regional background ranges previously reported. Laboratory derived plutonium is readily distinguished from global fallout in on-site waters and sediments. The isotopic ratio data indicates off-site migration of trace levels of Laboratory plutonium in stream sediments to distances approximately two miles downstream of the Laboratory boundary.

  6. Biological assessment for the remedial action at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Dunn, C.P.

    1992-11-01

    The Weldon Spring site in St.Charles County, Missouri, became contaminated during the 1940s through the 1960s as a result of explosives production by the US Army and uranium and thorium processing by the predecessor agency of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency, and DOE is responsible for its cleanup. Contaminants are present in soil, surface water, and aquatic sediments. Alternatives identified for site remediation are no action (included as baseline for comparison), treatment and disposal of the wastes at the Weldon Spring site, and on-site treatment followed by off-site disposal at either a commercial facility near Clive, Utah, or at DOE`s Hanford site near Richland, Washington. In accordance with the requirements of the Endangered Species Act, this biological assessment has been prepared to evaluate the potential effects of proposed remedial action alternatives on federal listed (endangered or threatened) and candidate species at the respective sites. The assessment includes consideration of the environmental setting at each site; the federal listed and candidate species that could occur at each site; the construction, excavation, and treatment activities under each alternative; and the amount of land area affected at each site.

  7. Biological assessment for the remedial action at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Dunn, C.P.

    1992-11-01

    The Weldon Spring site in St.Charles County, Missouri, became contaminated during the 1940s through the 1960s as a result of explosives production by the US Army and uranium and thorium processing by the predecessor agency of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency, and DOE is responsible for its cleanup. Contaminants are present in soil, surface water, and aquatic sediments. Alternatives identified for site remediation are no action (included as baseline for comparison), treatment and disposal of the wastes at the Weldon Spring site, and on-site treatment followed by off-site disposal at either a commercial facility near Clive, Utah, or at DOE's Hanford site near Richland, Washington. In accordance with the requirements of the Endangered Species Act, this biological assessment has been prepared to evaluate the potential effects of proposed remedial action alternatives on federal listed (endangered or threatened) and candidate species at the respective sites. The assessment includes consideration of the environmental setting at each site; the federal listed and candidate species that could occur at each site; the construction, excavation, and treatment activities under each alternative; and the amount of land area affected at each site.

  8. Final report on the Background Soil Characterization Project at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3: Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatmaker, T.L.; Hook, L.A.; Jackson, B.L.

    1993-10-01

    The Background Soil Characterization Project (BSCP) will provide background concentration levels of selected metals, organic compounds, and radionuclides in soils from uncontaminated on-site areas at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and off-site in the western part of Roane County and the eastern part of Anderson County. The BSCP will establish a database, recommend how to use the data for contaminated site assessment, and provide estimates of the potential human health and environmental risks associated with the background level concentrations of potentially hazardous constituents. ORR background soil characterization data will be used for two purposes. The first application will be in differentiating between naturally occurring constituents and site-related contamination. This is a very important step in a risk assessment because if sufficient background data are not available, no constituent known to be a contaminant can be eliminated from the assessment even if the sampled concentration is measured at a minimum level. The second use of the background data will be in calculating baseline risks against which site-specific contamination risks can be compared.

  9. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N.W.; Kolzow, R.G.

    1997-09-01

    This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) for 1996. To evaluate the effects of ANL-E operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL-E site were analyzed and compared to applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, soil, grass, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL-E effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. The results of the surveillance program are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, ANL-E, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the CAP-88 version of the EPA-AIRDOSE/RADRISK computer code, is used in this report. The status of ANL-E environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations that govern waste handling and disposal is discussed. This report also discusses progress being made on environmental corrective actions and restoration projects.

  10. Argonne National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N. W.; Kolzow, R. G.

    2005-09-02

    This report discusses the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for calendar year 2004. The status of ANL environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, ANL, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  11. Argonne National Laboratory Site Environmental report for calendar year 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N. W.; Davis, T. M.; Moos, L. P.

    2010-08-04

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2009. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  12. Argonne National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N. W.; ESH /QA Oversight

    2007-09-13

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2006. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  13. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1998.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N.W.; Kolzow, R.G.

    1999-08-26

    This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) for 1998. To evaluate the effects of ANL-E operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL-E site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL-E effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, ANL-E, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the US Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report. The status of ANL-E environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations that govern waste handling and disposal is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects.

  14. Argonne National Laboratory site enviromental report for calendar year 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N. W.; Davis, T. M.; Moos, L. P.

    2009-09-02

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2008. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  15. Argonne National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N. W.; Davis, T. M.; Moos, L. P.; ESH /QA Oversight

    2008-09-09

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2007. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  16. First annual report on the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Frank, M.L.; Garten, C.T.; Houston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Berry, J.B.; Talmage, S.S.; Amano, H.; Jimenez, B.D.; Kitchings, J.T.; Meyers-Schoene, L.; Mohrbacher, D.A.; Olsen, C.R.

    1992-08-01

    As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. BMAP consists of seven major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota; (3) biological indicator studies; (4) instream ecological monitoring; (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment; (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL); and (7) contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system. This document, the first of a series of annual reports presenting the results of BMAP, describes studies that were conducted from March through December 1986.

  17. Operational Strategies for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Site in Egypt - 13513

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohamed, Yasser T. [Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center, Atomic Energy Authority, 3 Ahmed El-Zomor St., El-Zohour District, Naser City, 11787, Cairo (Egypt)] [Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center, Atomic Energy Authority, 3 Ahmed El-Zomor St., El-Zohour District, Naser City, 11787, Cairo (Egypt)

    2013-07-01

    The ultimate aims of treatment and conditioning is to prepare waste for disposal by ensuring that the waste will meet the waste acceptance criteria of a disposal facility. Hence the purpose of low-level waste disposal is to isolate the waste from both people and the environment. The radioactive particles in low-level waste emit the same types of radiation that everyone receives from nature. Most low-level waste fades away to natural background levels of radioactivity in months or years. Virtually all of it diminishes to natural levels in less than 300 years. In Egypt, The Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center has been established since 1983, as a waste management facility for LLW and ILW and the disposal site licensed for preoperational in 2005. The site accepts the low level waste generated on site and off site and unwanted radioactive sealed sources with half-life less than 30 years for disposal and all types of sources for interim storage prior to the final disposal. Operational requirements at the low-level (LLRW) disposal site are listed in the National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control NCNSRC guidelines. Additional procedures are listed in the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility Standards Manual. The following describes the current operations at the LLRW disposal site. (authors)

  18. Utilities respond to nuclear station blackout rule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, A.M.; Beasley, B.; Tenera, L.P

    1990-02-01

    The authors discuss how nuclear plants in the United States have taken actions to respond to the NRC Station Blackout Rule, 10CFR50.63. The rule requires that each light water cooled nuclear power plant licensed to operate must be able to withstand for a specified duration and recover from a station blackout. Station blackout is defined as the complete loss of a-c power to the essential and non-essential switch-gear buses in a nuclear power plant. A station blackout results from the loss of all off-site power as well as the on-site emergency a-c power system. There are two basic approaches to meeting the station blackout rule. One is to cope with a station blackout independent of a-c power. Coping, as it is called, means the ability of a plant to achieve and maintain a safe shutdown condition. The second approach is to provide an alternate a-c power source (AAC).

  19. Argonne National Laboratory Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, T. M.; Gomez, J. L.; Moos, L. P.

    2014-09-02

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2013. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with environmental management, sustainability efforts, environmental corrective actions, and habitat restoration. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable standards intended to protect human health and the environment. A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) CAP-88 Version 3 computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  20. Environmental assessment for the demonstration of uranium-atomic vapor laser isotope separation (U-AVLIS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, proposes to use full-scale lasers and separators to demonstrate uranium enrichment as part of the national Uranium-Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) Program. Demonstration of uranium enrichment is planned to be conducted in Building 490 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), near Livermore, California in 1991 and 1992. The collective goal of the U-AVLIS Program is to develop and demonstrate an integrated technology for low-cost enrichment of uranium for nuclear reactor fuel. Alternatives to the proposed LLNL demonstration activity are no action, use of alternative LLNL facilities, and use of an alternative DOE site. This EA describes the existing LLNL environment and surroundings that could be impacted by the proposed action. Potential impacts to on- site and off-site environments predicted during conduct of the Uranium Demonstration System (UDS) at LLNL and alternative actions are reported in this EA. The analysis covers routine activities and potential accidents. 81 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. AP1000{sup R} nuclear power plant safety overview for spent fuel cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorgemans, J.; Mulhollem, L.; Glavin, J.; Pfister, A.; Conway, L.; Schulz, T.; Oriani, L.; Cummins, E.; Winters, J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The AP1000{sup R} plant is an 1100-MWe class pressurized water reactor with passive safety features and extensive plant simplifications that enhance construction, operation, maintenance, safety and costs. The AP1000 design uses passive features to mitigate design basis accidents. The passive safety systems are designed to function without safety-grade support systems such as AC power, component cooling water, service water or HVAC. Furthermore, these passive features 'fail safe' during a non-LOCA event such that DC power and instrumentation are not required. The AP1000 also has simple, active, defense-in-depth systems to support normal plant operations. These active systems provide the first level of defense against more probable events and they provide investment protection, reduce the demands on the passive features and support the probabilistic risk assessment. The AP1000 passive safety approach allows the plant to achieve and maintain safe shutdown in case of an accident for 72 hours without operator action, meeting the expectations provided in the U.S. Utility Requirement Document and the European Utility Requirements for passive plants. Limited operator actions are required to maintain safe conditions in the spent fuel pool via passive means. In line with the AP1000 approach to safety described above, the AP1000 plant design features multiple, diverse lines of defense to ensure spent fuel cooling can be maintained for design-basis events and beyond design-basis accidents. During normal and abnormal conditions, defense-in-depth and other systems provide highly reliable spent fuel pool cooling. They rely on off-site AC power or the on-site standby diesel generators. For unlikely design basis events with an extended loss of AC power (i.e., station blackout) or loss of heat sink or both, spent fuel cooling can still be provided indefinitely: - Passive systems, requiring minimal or no operator actions, are sufficient for at least 72 hours under all possible pool heat load conditions. - After 3 days, several different means are provided to continue spent fuel cooling using installed plant equipment as well as off-site equipment with built-in connections. Even for beyond design basis accidents with postulated pool damage and multiple failures in the passive safety-related systems and in the defense-in-depth active systems, the AP1000 multiple spent fuel pool spray and fill systems provide additional lines of defense to prevent spent fuel damage. (authors)

  2. Revised FINAL–REPORT NO. 2: INDEPENDENT CONFIRMATORY SURVEY SUMMARY AND RESULTS FOR THE ENRICO FERMI ATOMIC POWER PLANT, UNIT 1, NEWPORT, MICHIGAN (DOCKET NO. 50 16; RFTA 10-004) 2018-SR-02-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erika Bailey

    2011-10-27

    The Enrico Fermi Atomic Power Plant, Unit 1 (Fermi 1) was a fast breeder reactor design that was cooled by sodium and operated at essentially atmospheric pressure. On May 10, 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) granted an operating license, DPR-9, to the Power Reactor Development Company (PRDC), a consortium specifically formed to own and operate a nuclear reactor at the Fermi 1 site. The reactor was designed for a maximum capability of 430 megawatts (MW); however, the maximum reactor power with the first core loading (Core A) was 200 MW. The primary system was filled with sodium in December 1960 and criticality was achieved in August 1963. The reactor was tested at low power during the first couple years of operation. Power ascension testing above 1 MW commenced in December 1965 immediately following the receipt of a high-power operating license. In October 1966 during power ascension, zirconium plates at the bottom of the reactor vessel became loose and blocked sodium coolant flow to some fuel subassemblies. Two subassemblies started to melt and the reactor was manually shut down. No abnormal releases to the environment occurred. Forty-two months later after the cause had been determined, cleanup completed, and the fuel replaced, Fermi 1 was restarted. However, in November 1972, PRDC made the decision to decommission Fermi 1 as the core was approaching its burn-up limit. The fuel and blanket subassemblies were shipped off-site in 1973. Following that, the secondary sodium system was drained and sent off-site. The radioactive primary sodium was stored on-site in storage tanks and 55 gallon (gal) drums until it was shipped off-site in 1984. The initial decommissioning of Fermi 1 was completed in 1975. Effective January 23, 1976, DPR-9 was transferred to the Detroit Edison Company (DTE) as a 'possession only' license (DTE 2010a). This report details the confirmatory activities performed during the second Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) site visit to Fermi 1 in November 2010. The survey was strategically planned during a Unit 2 (Fermi 2) outage to take advantage of decreased radiation levels that were observed and attributed to Fermi 2 from the operating unit during the first site visit. However, during the second visit there were elevated radiation levels observed and attributed to the partially dismantled Fermi 1 reactor vessel and a waste storage box located on the 3rd floor of the Fermi 1 Turbine Building. Confirmatory surveys (unshielded) performed directly in the line of sight of these areas were affected. The objective of the confirmatory survey was to verify that the final radiological conditions were accurately and adequately described in Final Status Survey (FSS) documentation, relative to the established release criteria. This objective was achieved by performing document reviews, as well as independent measurements and sampling. Specifically, documentation of the planning, implementation, and results of the FSS were evaluated; side-by-side FSS measurement and source comparisons were performed; site areas were evaluated relative to appropriate FSS classification; and areas were assessed for residual, undocumented contamination.

  3. A model for a national low level waste program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blankenhorn, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    A national program for the management of low level waste is essential to the success of environmental clean-up, decontamination and decommissioning, current operations and future missions. The value of a national program is recognized through procedural consistency and a shared set of resources. A national program requires a clear waste definition and an understanding of waste characteristics matched against available and proposed disposal options. A national program requires the development and implementation of standards and procedures for implementing the waste hierarchy, with a specitic emphasis on waste avoidance, minimization and recycling. It requires a common set of objectives for waste characterization based on the disposal facility's waste acceptance criteria, regulatory and license requirements and performance assessments. Finally, a national waste certification program is required to ensure compliance. To facilitate and enhance the national program, a centralized generator services organization, tasked with providing technical services to the generators on behalf of the national program, is necessary. These subject matter experts are the interface between the generating sites and the disposal facility(s). They provide an invaluable service to the generating organizations through their involvement in waste planning prior to waste generation and through championing implementation of the waste hierarchy. Through their interface, national treatment and transportation services are optimized and new business opportunities are identified. This national model is based on extensive experience in the development and on-going management of a national transuranic waste program and management of the national repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The Low Level Program at the Savannah River Site also successfully developed and implemented the waste hierarchy, waste certification and waste generator services concepts presented below. The Savannah River Site services over forty generators and has historically managed over 12,000 cubic meters of low level waste annually. The results of the waste minimization program at the site resulted in over 900 initiatives, avoiding over 220,000 cubic meters of waste for a life cycle cost savings of $275 million. At the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the low level waste program services over 20 major generators and several hundred smaller generators that produce over 4,000 cubic meters of low level waste annually. The Los Alamos National Laboratory low level waste program utilizes both on-site and off-site disposal capabilities. Off-site disposal requires the implementation of certification requirements to utilize both federal and commercial options. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is the US Department of Energy's first deep geological repository for the permanent disposal of Transuanic waste. Transuranic waste was generated and retrievably stored at 39 sites across the US. Transuranic waste is defined as waste with a radionuclide concentration equal to or greater than 100 nCi/g consisting of radionuclides with half-lives greater than 20 years and with an atomic mass greater than uranium. Combining the lessons learned from the national transuranic waste program, the successful low level waste program at Savannah River Site and the experience of off-site disposal options at Los Alamos National Laboratory provides the framework and basis for developing a viable national strategy for managing low level waste.

  4. Using Process Load Cell Information for IAEA Safeguards at Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laughter, Mark D; Whitaker, J Michael; Howell, John

    2010-01-01

    Uranium enrichment service providers are expanding existing enrichment plants and constructing new facilities to meet demands resulting from the shutdown of gaseous diffusion plants, the completion of the U.S.-Russia highly enriched uranium downblending program, and the projected global renaissance in nuclear power. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducts verification inspections at safeguarded facilities to provide assurance that signatory States comply with their treaty obligations to use nuclear materials only for peaceful purposes. Continuous, unattended monitoring of load cells in UF{sub 6} feed/withdrawal stations can provide safeguards-relevant process information to make existing safeguards approaches more efficient and effective and enable novel safeguards concepts such as information-driven inspections. The IAEA has indicated that process load cell monitoring will play a central role in future safeguards approaches for large-scale gas centrifuge enrichment plants. This presentation will discuss previous work and future plans related to continuous load cell monitoring, including: (1) algorithms for automated analysis of load cell data, including filtering methods to determine significant weights and eliminate irrelevant impulses; (2) development of metrics for declaration verification and off-normal operation detection ('cylinder counting,' near-real-time mass balancing, F/P/T ratios, etc.); (3) requirements to specify what potentially sensitive data is safeguards relevant, at what point the IAEA gains on-site custody of the data, and what portion of that data can be transmitted off-site; (4) authentication, secure on-site storage, and secure transmission of load cell data; (5) data processing and remote monitoring schemes to control access to sensitive and proprietary information; (6) integration of process load cell data in a layered safeguards approach with cross-check verification; (7) process mock-ups constructed to provide simulated load cell data; (8) hardware and software implementation for process load cell data collection; (9) costs associated with unattended monitoring of load cells (for both operator and inspector) weighed against the potential benefits of having access to such data; (10) results from field tests of load cell data collection systems in operating facilities; and (11) use of unattended load cell data to increase efficiency of on-site inspection schedules and activities.

  5. Evaluation of Laboratory Conditioning Protocols for Warm-Mix Asphalt 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Fan 1990-

    2012-10-26

    ) and off-site Plant Mixed Laboratory Compacted (PMLC) specimens were selected, and their effects on mixture properties were evaluated. Mixture stiffness evaluated in a dry condition using the Resilient Modulus (MR) test (ASTM D-7369) was the main parameter...

  6. Environmental guidance regulatory bulletin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    On September 22,1993, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published [58 Federal Register (FR) 492001 the final OffSite Rule, which defines criteria for approving facilities for receiving waste from response actions taken under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The off-site requirements apply to the off-site management of hazardous substances, pollutants, and contaminants, as defined under CERCLA, that are generated from remedial and removal actions funded or authorized, at least in part, by CERCLA. CERCLA-authorized cleanups include those taken under lead-agency authority, Section 106 Consent Orders, Consent Agreements, Consent Degrees, and Records of Decision (RODs). EPA requires that remedial actions at Federal facilities taken under Sections 104, 106, or 120 of CERCLA comply with the Off-Site Rule for all cleanups enacted through DOE`s lead-agency authority.

  7. Annual Fire Protection Program Summary for Calendar Year 2012...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE experienced no fire-related fatalities, but three off-site firefighters from the nearby Manorville fire department were injured during a BNL range fire on April 9, 2012. There...

  8. Development of a pilot safety information document (PSID) for the replacement of radioactive liquid waste treatment facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selvage, Ronald Derek

    1995-01-01

    Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility. The PSID documents risk analysis for the proposed facility and some of the alternatives, accident analysis, radioactive and hazardous material doses to off-site individuals, and the cumulative safety risk from...

  9. Advances in Aerial Herbicide Application for Drift Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    and direction, height of inversion layer Tank mix effects, product formulations, surfactants, emulsifiers Costs More Potential for Off-Site Movement Not Permitted with Some Herbicides #12;Solids: Iso

  10. Exhibit G / working draft

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Low Risk Cloud Computing Services (Rev 1, 2282014) P.R. No. * Date * Page 1 of 4 Subcontract No. or PO No. * EXHIBIT G OFF-SITE LOW RISK CLOUD COMPUTING SERVICES SECURITY...

  11. EIS-0426: Notice of Extension of Public Comment Period for the...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Office is extending the public comment period for the Draft Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and Off-Site Locations in...

  12. NNSA Corporate CPEP Process NNSA LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL SECURITY...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    a positive review of the Lujan Center after a difficult recovery from an off-site contamination issue, and has received four R&D 100 Awards demonstrating the continued vibrancy...

  13. MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research>alcator>facility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    follow the directions below. Off-sute data access is availble via remote login (SSH and NX) Off-site data access is availabe via mdsip over ssh mdsconnect via ssh using a...

  14. 2011-2012 Efficient Irrigation for Water Conservation in the Rio Grande Basin Progress and Accomplishments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalisek, D.

    2012-01-01

    of desalination water-treatment facilities; 2) mitigation cost investigations of increased off-site sediment runoff and nutrients associated with biofuels production; 3) economic and water conservation effects of drip irrigation compared to traditional strategies...

  15. Microsoft Word - S05212_2008 Post-Closure InspRpt.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Pond Lower Little Cr. 1 Lower Little Cr. 2 James Lowe Pond Nobles Pond Howard Smith Pond Figure 7. Tritium Decay Trend and Off-Site Surface Water Sample Concentrations...

  16. Research Areas | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    more information on the NLUF program, the capabilities of the OMEGA (including OMEGA EP) laser system, and the updated users guide can be found on the NLUF web site off site link ....

  17. Nonproliferation Graduate Program | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    about the program and application information and deadlines, please visit the NGP web site off site link or call Program Manager Phyllis B. Byrd at (202) 586-2061 or e-mail...

  18. New Servers Implemented | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Servers Implemented Cyber Train Changes have been made to the implementation of Cyber Train. More information about how to acces Cyber Train from either on or off site can be...

  19. Energy-Efficient Melting and Direct Delivery of High Quality Molten Aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-05-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose main objective is demonstrating a technology that will eliminate melting and holding furnaces at the casting cell and move these operations to centralized and optimized off-site facilities.

  20. Fluid sampling apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeamans, D.R.

    1998-02-03

    Incorporation of a bellows in a sampling syringe eliminates ingress of contaminants, permits replication of amounts and compression of multiple sample injections, and enables remote sampling for off-site analysis. 3 figs.

  1. CX-006231: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Off-Site Solar-Assisted Electric Vehicle Charging StationsCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 07/15/2011Location(s): Knoxville, TennesseeOffice(s): Science, Oak Ridge Office

  2. bcpcfil-liqmeth | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synthesis Gas, Topical Report PDF-3.6MB (Mar 2003) Market Outlook for Dimethyl Ether (DME), Topical Report PDF-92KB (Apr 2002) Off-Site Testing of Stabilized Methanol from...

  3. Risk assessment of the retrieval of transuranic waste: Pads 1, 2, and 4, Technical Area-54, Area G, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilbert, K.A.; Lyon, B.F.; Hutchison, J.; Holmes, J.A.; Legg, J.L.; Simek, M.P.; Travis, C.C.; Wollert, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    The Risk Assessment for the Retrieval of Transuranic Waste is a comparative risk assessment of the potential adverse human health effects resulting from exposure to contaminants during retrieval and post-retrieval aboveground storage operations of post-1970 earthen-covered transuranic waste. Two alternatives are compared: (1) Immediate Retrieval and (2) Delayed Retrieval. Under the Immediate Retrieval Alternative, retrieval of the waste is assumed to begin immediately, Under the Delayed Retrieval Alternative, retrieval is delayed 10 years. The current risk assessment is on Pads 1, 2, and 4, at Technical Area-54, Area-G, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Risks are assessed independently for three scenarios: (1) incident-free retrieval operations, (2) incident-free storage operations, and (3) a drum failure analysis. The drum failure analysis evaluates container integrity under both alternatives and assesses the impacts of potential drum failures during retrieval operations. Risks associated with a series of drum failures are potentially severe for workers, off-site receptors, and general on-site employees if retrieval is delayed 10 years and administrative and engineering controls remain constant. Under the Delayed Retrieval Alternative, an average of 300 drums out of 16,647 are estimated to fail during retrieval operations due to general corrosion, while minimal drums are predicted to fail under the Immediate Retrieval Alternative. The results of the current study suggest that, based on risk, remediation of Pads 1, 2, and 4 at LANL should not be delayed. Although risks from incident-free operations in the Delayed Retrieval Alternative are low, risks due to corrosion and drum failures are potentially severe.

  4. Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Mahlon Heileson

    2006-10-01

    The Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) has been designed to accept CERCLA waste generated within the Idaho National Laboratory. Hazardous, mixed, low-level, and Toxic Substance Control Act waste will be accepted for disposal at the ICDF. The purpose of this document is to provide criteria for the quantities of radioactive and/or hazardous constituents allowable in waste streams designated for disposal at ICDF. This ICDF Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria is divided into four section: (1) ICDF Complex; (2) Landfill; (3) Evaporation Pond: and (4) Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF). The ICDF Complex section contains the compliance details, which are the same for all areas of the ICDF. Corresponding sections contain details specific to the landfill, evaporation pond, and the SSSTF. This document specifies chemical and radiological constituent acceptance criteria for waste that will be disposed of at ICDF. Compliance with the requirements of this document ensures protection of human health and the environment, including the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Waste placed in the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond must not cause groundwater in the Snake River Plain Aquifer to exceed maximum contaminant levels, a hazard index of 1, or 10-4 cumulative risk levels. The defined waste acceptance criteria concentrations are compared to the design inventory concentrations. The purpose of this comparison is to show that there is an acceptable uncertainty margin based on the actual constituent concentrations anticipated for disposal at the ICDF. Implementation of this Waste Acceptance Criteria document will ensure compliance with the Final Report of Decision for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. For waste to be received, it must meet the waste acceptance criteria for the specific disposal/treatment unit (on-Site or off-Site) for which it is destined.

  5. TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FOR TANK WASTE PRETREATMENT AT THE DOE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAMILTON, D.W.

    2006-01-03

    Radioactive wastes from one hundred seventy-seven underground storage tanks in the 200 Area of the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State will be retrieved, treated and stored either on site or at an approved off-site repository. DOE is currently planning to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, which would be treated and permanently disposed in separate facilities. A significant volume of the wastes in the Hanford tanks is currently classified as medium Curie waste, which will require separation and treatment at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). Because of the specific challenges associated with treating this waste stream, DOE EM-21 funded a project to investigate the feasibility of using fractional crystallization as a supplemental pretreatment technology. The two process requirements for fractional crystallization to be successfully applied to Hanford waste include: (1) evaporation of water from the aqueous solution to enrich the activity of soluble {sup 137}Cs, resulting in a higher activity stream to be sent to the WTP, and (2) separation of the crystalline salts that are enriched in sodium, carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate and sufficiently depleted in {sup 137}Cs, to produce a second stream to be sent to Bulk Vitrification. Phase I of this project has just been completed by COGEMA/Georgia Institute of Technology. The purpose of this report is to document an independent expert review of the Phase I results with recommendations for future testing. A team of experts with significant experience at both the Hanford and Savannah River Sites was convened to conduct the review at Richland, Washington the week of November 14, 2005.

  6. Accident management for indian pressurized heavy water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hajela, S.; Grover, R.; Ghadge, S.G.; Bajaj, S.S. [Directorate of Safety, Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited Nabhikiya Urja Bhawan, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai-400 094 (India)

    2006-07-01

    Indian nuclear power program as of now is mainly based on Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs). Operating Procedures for normal power operation and Emergency Operating Procedures for operational transients and accidents within design basis exist for all Indian PHWRs. In addition, on-site and off-site emergency response procedures are also available for these NPPs. The guidelines needed for severe accidents mitigation are now formally being documented for Indian PHWRs. Also, in line with International trend of having symptom based emergency handling, the work is in advanced stage for preparation of symptom-based emergency operating procedures. Following a plant upset condition; a number of alarms distributed in different information systems appear in the control room to aid operator to identify the nature of the event. After identifying the event, appropriate intervention in the form of event based emergency operating procedure is put into use by the operating staff. However, if the initiating event cannot be unambiguously identified or after the initial event some other failures take place, then the selected event based emergency operating procedure will not be optimal. In such a case, reactor safety is ensured by monitoring safety functions (depicted by selected plant parameters grouped together) throughout the event handling so that the barriers to radioactivity release namely, fuel and fuel cladding, primary heat transport system integrity and containment remain intact. Simultaneous monitoring of all these safety functions is proposed through status trees and this concept will be implemented through a computer-based system. For beyond design basis accidents, event sequences are identified which may lead to severe core damage. As part of this project, severe accident mitigation guidelines are being finalized for the selected event sequences. The paper brings out the details of work being carried out for Indian PHWRs for symptom based event handling and severe accident management. (authors)

  7. Comparison of {sup 241}Am, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 137}Cs concentrations in soil around Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulse, S.E.; Ibrahim, S.A.; Whicker, F.W.; Chapman, P.L.

    1999-03-01

    Gamma spectroscopy measurements were used to estimate concentrations of {sup 241}Am and {sup 137}Cs in soil profiles to depths of 21 cm at on-site and off-site locations around the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site and at regional background locations east of the Front Range between Colorado`s borders with New Mexico and Wyoming. Concentrations of these radionuclides were compared with concentrations of {sup 239,240}Pu in the same samples. Concentrations of {sup 241}Am in soil from depths of 0 to 3 cm decreased in an easterly direction from more than 5.3 kBq kg{sup {minus}1} 5 to 7 km away at a rate that was nearly proportional to the inverse square of distance. Deposits of {sup 137}Cs were ubiquitous, averaging 0.12 kBq kg{sup {minus}1} in soil from depths of 0 to 3 cm, but were unevenly distributed around Rocky Flats and the regional background locations. Deviations from the uniform exponential rate at which soil concentrations of {sup 137}Cs typically decreased with depth, {minus}0.25 cm{sup {minus}1} at undisturbed sites, enabled the authors to determine that about 10% of their sampling sites had been disturbed by erosion, tillage, or other factors. The mean rate at which {sup 239,240}Pu decreased with depth was about the same, {minus}0.23 cm{sup {minus}1}, throughout the study area. Soil concentrations of {sup 241}Am decreased with depth at a similar mean rate of {minus}0.22 cm{sup {minus}1} at locations close to the 903 pad where measurements were robust. Ratios between {sup 241}Am or {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 137}Cs proved more useful for delineating the extent and pattern of contamination from Rocky Flats than did activity concentrations in soil.

  8. Results of mobile gamma scanning activities in St. Louis, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, R E; Witt, D A; Cottrell, W D; Carrier, R F

    1991-06-01

    From 1942 through approximately 1966, the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works operated four plants in St. Louis, Missouri, for the Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission. A variety of production processes using uranium- and radium-bearing ore materials were performed at the plants. It is the policy of the DOE to verify that radiological conditions at such sites or facilities comply with current DOE guidelines. Guidelines for release and use of such sites have become more stringent as research has provided more information since previous cleanups. The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was established as part of that effort to confirm the closeout status of facilities under contract to agencies preceding DOE during early nuclear energy development. Under the FUSRAP program, the Mallinckrodt properties have been previously investigated to determine the extent of on-site radiological contamination. At the request of DOE, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted a survey in May 1990, of public roadways and suspected haul routes between the Mallinckrodt plant and storage sites in St. Louis to ensure that no residual radioactive materials were conveyed off-site. A mobile gamma scanning van with an on-board computer system was used to identify possible anomalies. Suspect areas are those displaying measurements deviating from gamma exposure rates identified as typical for radiologically unenhanced areas in the vicinity of the areas of interest. The instrumentation highlighted three anomaly locations each of which measured less than 1m{sup 2} in size. None of the slightly elevated radiation levels originated from material associated with former AEC-related processing operations in the area. The anomalies resulted from elevated concentrations of radionuclides present in phosphate fertilizers, increased thorium in road-base gravel, and emanations from the radioactive storage site near the Latty Avenue airport. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Demonstrating the Safety of Long-Term Dry Storage - 13468

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCullum, Rod; Brookmire, Tom; Kessler, John; Leblang, Suzanne; Levin, Adam; Martin, Zita; Nesbit, Steve; Nichol, Marc; Pickens, Terry

    2013-07-01

    Commercial nuclear plants in the United States were originally designed with the expectation that used nuclear fuel would be moved directly from the reactor pools and transported off site for either reprocessing or direct geologic disposal. However, Federal programs intended to meet this expectation were never able to develop the capability to remove used fuel from reactor sites - and these programs remain stalled to this day. Therefore, in the 1980's, with reactor pools reaching capacity limits, industry began developing dry cask storage technology to provide for additional on-site storage. Use of this technology has expanded significantly since then, and has today become a standard part of plant operations at most US nuclear sites. As this expansion was underway, Federal programs remained stalled, and it became evident that dry cask systems would be in use longer than originally envisioned. In response to this challenge, a strong technical basis supporting the long term dry storage safety has been developed. However, this is not a static situation. The technical basis must be able to address future challenges. Industry is responding to one such challenge - the increasing prevalence of high burnup (HBU) used fuel and the need to provide long term storage assurance for these fuels equivalent to that which has existed for lower burnup fuels over the past 25 years. This response includes a confirmatory demonstration program designed to address the aging characteristics of HBU fuel and set a precedent for a learning approach to aging management that will have broad applicability across the used fuel storage landscape. (authors)

  10. Environmental assessment for the treatment of Class A low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste generated by the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently evaluating low-level radioactive waste management alternatives at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) located on the Western New York Nuclear Service Center (WNYNSC) near West Valley, New York. The WVDP`s mission is to vitrify high-level radioactive waste resulting from commercial fuel reprocessing operations that took place at the WNYNSC from 1966 to 1972. During the process of high-level waste vitrification, low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level waste (MILLW) will result and must be properly managed. It is estimated that the WVDP`s LLW storage facilities will be filled to capacity in 1996. In order to provide sufficient safe storage of LLW until disposal options become available and partially fulfill requirements under the Federal Facilities Compliance Act (FFCA), the DOE is proposing to use U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission-licensed and permitted commercial facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Clive, Utah; and Houston, Texas to treat (volume-reduce) a limited amount of Class A LLW and MLLW generated from the WVDP. Alternatives for ultimate disposal of the West Valley LLW are currently being evaluated in an environmental impact statement. This proposed action is for a limited quantity of waste, over a limited period of time, and for treatment only; this proposal does not include disposal. The proposed action consists of sorting, repacking, and loading waste at the WVDP; transporting the waste for commercial treatment; and returning the residual waste to the WVDP for interim storage. For the purposes of this assessment, environmental impacts were quantified for a five-year operating period (1996 - 2001). Alternatives to the proposed action include no action, construction of additional on-site storage facilities, construction of a treatment facility at the WVDP comparable to commercial treatment, and off-site disposal at a commercial or DOE facility.

  11. The Community Environmental Monitoring Program in the 21st Century: The Evolution of a Monitoring Network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartwell, W.T.; Tappen, J.; Karr, L.

    2007-01-19

    This paper focuses on the evolution of the various operational aspects of the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) network following the transfer of program administration from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education in 1999-2000. The CEMP consists of a network of 29 fixed radiation and weather monitoring stations located in Nevada, Utah, and California. Its mission is to involve stakeholders directly in monitoring for airborne radiological releases to the off site environment as a result of past or ongoing activities on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and to make data as transparent and accessible to the general public as feasible. At its inception in 1981, the CEMP was a cooperative project of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), DRI, and EPA. In 1999-2000, technical administration of the CEMP transitioned from EPA to DRI. Concurrent with and subsequent to this transition, station and program operations underwent significant enhancements that furthered the mission of the program. These enhancements included the addition of a full suite of meteorological instrumentation, state-of-the-art electronic data collectors, on-site displays, and communications hardware. A public website was developed. Finally, the DRI developed a mobile monitoring station that can be operated entirely on solar power in conjunction with a deep-cell battery, and includes all meteorological sensors and a pressurized ion chamber for detecting background gamma radiation. Final station configurations have resulted in the creation of a platform that is well suited for use as an in-field multi-environment test-bed for prototype environmental sensors and in interfacing with other scientific and educational programs. Recent and near-future collaborators have included federal, state, and local agencies in both the government and private sectors. The CEMP also serves as a model for other programs wishing to involve stakeholders with a meaningful role in the process of monitoring and data collection.

  12. Inorganic soil and groundwater chemistry near Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, G.K. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Near-surface soils, boreholes, and sediments near the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) were sampled in 1989-91 as were monitoring wells, TVA wells, and privately-owned wells. Most wells were sampled two or three times. The resulting chemical analyses have been published in previous reports and have been previously described (CH2M HILL 1991, 1992; Clausen et al. 1992). The two reports by CH2M HILL are controversial, however, because, the concentrations of some constituents were reported to exceed background levels or drinking water standards and because both on-site (within the perimeter fence at PGDP) and off-site pollution was reported to have occurred. The groundwater samples upon which these interpretations were based may not be representative, however. The CH2M HILL findings are discussed in the report. The purpose of this report is to characterize the inorganic chemistry of groundwater and soils near PGDP, using data from the CH2M HILL reports (1991, 1992), and to determine whether or not any contamination has occurred. The scope is limited to analysis and interpretation of data in the CH2M HILL reports because previous interpretations of these data may not be valid, because samples were collected in a relatively short period of time at several hundred locations, and because the chemical analyses are nearly complete. Recent water samples from the same wells were not considered because the characterization of inorganic chemistry for groundwater and soil requirements only one representative sample and an accurate analysis from each location.

  13. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Environmental Monitoring Program in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 is a hazardous and low-level radioactive waste disposal site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Extensive site investigations have revealed contaminated surface water, sediments, groundwater, and soils. Based on the results of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) conducted from 1989--1991 and on recent interactions with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), a decision was made to defer implementing source control remedial measures at the WAG. The information shows WAG 6 contributes < 2% of the total off-site contaminant risk released over White Oak Dam (WOD). The alternative selected to address hazards at WAG 6 involves maintenance of site access controls to prevent public exposure to on-site contaminants, continued monitoring of contaminant releases to determine if source control measures will be required in the future, and development of technologies to support final remediation of WAG 6. This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) has been developed as part of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-1192&D1). Environmental monitoring will be conducted in two phases: the baseline monitoring phase and the routine annual monitoring phase. The baseline monitoring phase will be conducted to establish the baseline contaminant release conditions at the Waste Area Grouping (WAG), to confirm the site-related chemicals of concern (COC), and to gather data to confirm the site hydrologic model. The baseline monitoring phase is expected to begin in 1994 and continue for 12-18 months. The routine annual monitoring phase will consist of continued sampling and analyses of COC to determine off-WAG contaminant flux, to identify trends in releases, and to confirm the COC. The routine annual monitoring phase will continue for {approximately}4 years.

  14. Baseline biological risk assessment for aquatic populations occurring near Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, D.; Brandt, C.; Lewis, R.; Smith, R.

    1995-12-31

    Eielson Air Force Base (AFB), Alaska was listed as a Superfund site in November 1989 with 64 potential source areas of contamination. As part of a sitewide remedial investigation, baseline risk assessments were conducted in 1993 and 1994 to evaluate hazards posed to biological receptors and to human health. Fish tissue, aquatic invertebrates, aquatic vegetation, sediment, and surface water data were collected from several on-site and off-site surface water bodies. An initial screening risk assessment indicated that several surface water sites along two major tributary creeks flowing through the base had unacceptable risks to both aquatic receptors and to human health because of DDTs. Other contaminants of concern (i.e., PCBs and PAHs) were below screening risk levels for aquatic organisms, but contributed to an unacceptable risk to human health. Additional samples was taken in 1994 to characterize the site-wide distribution of PAHs, DDTs, and PCBs in aquatic biota and sediments. Concentrations of PAHs were invertebrates > aquatic vegetation > fish, but concentrations were sufficiently low that they posed no significant risk to biological receptors. Pesticides were detected in all fish tissue samples. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were also detected in most fish from Garrison Slough. The pattern of PCB concentrations in Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus) was related to their proximity to a sediment source in lower Garrison Slough. Ingestion of PCB-contaminated fish is the primary human-health risk driver for surface water bodies on Eielson AFB, resulting in carcinogenic risks > 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} for future recreational land-use at some sites. Principal considerations affecting uncertainty in the risk assessment process included spatial and temporal variability in media contaminant concentrations and inconsistencies between modelled and measured body burdens.

  15. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory annual environmental monitoring report. Calendar Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the three KAPL sites resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each site and at off-site background locations. KAPL environmental controls are subject to applicable state and federal regulations governing use, emission, treatment, storage and/or disposal of solid, liquid and gaseous materials. Some non-radiological water and air emissions are generated and treated on-site prior to discharge to the environment. Liquid effluents and air emissions are controlled and monitored in accordance with permits issued by the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CTDEP) for the Windsor Site and by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) for the Knolls and Kesselring Sites. The liquid effluent monitoring data show that KAPL has maintained a high degree of compliance with permit requirements. Where required, radionuclide air emission sources are authorized by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The non-radiological air emissions, with the exception of opacity for the boilers, are not required to be monitored.

  16. Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums) to locate high temperature ground anomalies in Colorado. Confirm heat flow potential with on-site surveys to drill deep resource wells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Technologies Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project Objectives: A cost effective three (3) Phased Program to locate and confirm up to Five (5) commercial geothermal resources in Colorado. The heat resources to be prioritized will be those able to support a minimum electrical generation capacity of 10 MW by location.

  17. ( )Ministers delay decision on site for 10-billion-dollar nuclear fusion reactor 20/12/2003 The European Union, the United States and four other countries failed in talks agree on a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in 1998 but returned in January, as President George W. Bush changed his energy policy. "Fusion power of hydrogen), and in so doing releases huge amounts of energy. There is a virtually limitless source from there to a workable prototype plant of commercial size is what ITER is all about. ©AFP 12/20/03 8

  18. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 34: Area 3 Contaminated Waste Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0, March 2001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office

    2001-03-27

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 34 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 34 consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs). The CAU is located within the Area 3 Compound at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in the vicinity of the Mud Plant Facility in Yucca Valley. Historically, CAS 03-09-07, Mud Pit, was used for disposal of excess mud from washing drilling equipment from 1968 to 1974, at which time it began to be used for excess mud disposal (currently inactive); CAS 03-44-01, Chromium Contamination Spill, was used to store additives used in the formulation of drilling mud from the early 1960s to the mid-1990s; CAS 03-47-02, Area 3 Mud Plant Pond, was used as a freshwater storage reservoir for the mud plant as well as supplied water for a number of activities including the mixing of mud, the rinsing and cleaning of tanks, and various washdowns from the 1960s through 1990s; and CAS 03-09-06, Mud Disposal Crater, was created in 1962 by an underground nuclear detonation (i.e., Chinchilla test) and was used to mix and store mud, dispose of receiving waste from the mud plant floor drains and excess drilling mud, and clean/flush mix tanks through the mid-1990s. Based on site history, the scope of this plan is to identify potentially contaminated ground soil at each of the four CASs and determine the quantity, nature, and extent of contaminants of potential concern (COPCs). The investigation will include systematic and biased surface and subsurface soil and mud sampling using hand-auguring and direct-push techniques; visual, video, and/or electromagnetic surveys of pipes; field screening for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and alpha/beta-emitting radionuclides; and laboratory analysis to characterize any investigation-derived waste for disposal both on site at NTS and at off-site locations. Historical information provided by former NTS employees indicates that COPCs include VOCs, semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, gamma-emitting radionuclides, isotopic plutonium, and strontium-90. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  19. Fluor Hanford ALARA Center is a D and D Resource

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waggoner, L.O. [Fluor Hanford Inc, P.O. Box 1000, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2008-01-15

    The mission at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation changed when the last reactor plant was shut down in 1989 and work was started to place all the facilities in a safe condition and begin decontamination, deactivation, decommissioning, and demolition (D and D). These facilities consisted of old shutdown reactor plants, spent fuel pools, processing facilities, and 177 underground tanks containing 53 million gallons of highly radioactive and toxic liquids and sludge. New skills were needed by the workforce to accomplish this mission. By 1995, workers were in the process of getting the facilities in a safe condition and it became obvious improvements were needed in their tools, equipment and work practices. The Hanford ALARA Program looked good on paper, but did little to help contractors that were working in the field. The Radiological Control Director decided that the ALARA program needed to be upgraded and a significant improvement could be made if workers had a place they could visit that had samples of the latest technology and could talk to experienced personnel who have had success doing D and D work. Two senior health physics personnel who had many years experience in doing radiological work were chosen to obtain tools and equipment from vendors and find a location centrally located on the Hanford site. Vendors were asked to loan their latest tools and equipment for display. Most vendors responded and the Hanford ALARA Center of Technology opened on October 1, 1996. Today, the ALARA Center includes a classroom for conducting training and a mockup area with gloveboxes. Two large rooms have a containment tent, several glove bags, samples of fixatives/expandable foam, coating displays, protective clothing, heat stress technology, cutting tools, HEPA filtered vacuums, ventilation units, pumps, hydraulic wrenches, communications equipment, shears, nibblers, shrouded tooling, and several examples of innovative tools developed by the Hanford facilities. See Figures I and II. The ALARA Center staff routinely researches and tests new technology, sponsor vendor demonstrations, and redistribute tools, equipment and temporary shielding that may not be needed at one facility to another facility that needs it. The ALARA Center staff learns about new technology in several ways. This includes past radiological work experience, interaction with vendors, lessons learned, networking with other DOE sites, visits to the Hanford Technical Library, attendance at off-site conferences and ALARA Workshops. Personnel that contact the ALARA Center for assistance report positive results when they implement the tools, equipment and work practices recommended by the ALARA Center staff. This has translated to reduced exposure for workers and reduced the risk of contamination spread. For example: using a hydraulic shear on one job saved 16 Rem of exposure that would have been received if workers had used saws-all tools to cut piping in twenty-nine locations. Currently, the ALARA Center staff is emphasizing D and D techniques on size-reducing materials, decontamination techniques, use of remote tools/video equipment, capture ventilation, fixatives, using containments and how to find lessons learned. The ALARA Center staff issues a weekly report that discusses their interaction with the workforce and any new work practices, tools and equipment being used by the Hanford contractors. Distribution of this weekly report is to about 130 personnel on site and 90 personnel off site. This effectively spreads the word about ALARA throughout the DOE Complex. DOE EM-23, in conjunction with the D and D and Environmental Restoration work group of the Energy Facility Contractors Organization (EFCOG) established the Hanford ALARA Center as the D and D Hotline for companies who have questions about how D and D work is accomplished. The ALARA Center has become a resource to the nuclear industry and routinely helps contractors at other DOE Sites, power reactors, DOD sites, and sites in England, Europe and Indonesia. Other ALARA Centers are located at the Savannah River Si

  20. Managing Waste Inventory and License Limits at the Perma-Fix Northwest Facility to Meet CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Deliverables - 12335

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moak, Don J.; Grondin, Richard L. [Perma-Fix Environmental Services, Inc. - PESI, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Triner, Glen C.; West, Lori D. [East Tennessee Materials and Energy Corporation - M and EC, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHRPC) is a prime contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) focused on the largest ongoing environmental remediation project in the world at the DOE Hanford Site Central Plateau, i.e. the DOE Hanford Plateau Remediation Contract. The East Tennessee Materials and Energy Corporation (M and EC); a wholly owned subsidiary of Perma-Fix Environmental Services, Inc. (PESI), is a small business team member to CHPRC. Our scope includes project management; operation and maintenance of on-site storage, repackaging, treatment, and disposal facilities; and on-site waste management including waste receipt from generators and delivery to on-site and off-site treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. As part of this scope, M and EC staffs the centralized Waste Support Services organization responsible for all waste characterization and acceptance required to support CHPRC and waste generators across the Hanford Site. At the time of the CHPRC contract award (August 2008) slightly more than 9,000 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) of legacy waste was defined as 'no-path-forward waste'. A significant portion of this waste (7,650 m{sup 3}) comprised wastes with up to 50 grams of special nuclear materials (SNM) in oversized packages recovered during retrieval operations and large glove boxes removed from the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Through a collaborative effort between the DOE, CHPRC, and Perma-Fix Environmental Services, Inc. (PESI), pathways for these problematic wastes were developed that took advantage of commercial treatment capabilities at a nearby vendor facility, Perma-Fix Northwest (PFNW). In the spring of 2009, CHPRC initiated a pilot program under which they began shipping large package, low gram suspect TRU (<15 g SNM per container), and large package contact and remote handled MLLW to the off-site PFNW facility for treatment. PFNW is restricted by the SNM limits set for the total quantity of SNM allowed at the facility in accordance with the facility's radioactive materials license(s) (RML). While both CHPRC and PFNW maintain waste databases to track all waste movements, it became evident early in the process that a tool was needed that married the two systems to better track SNM inventories and sequence waste from the point of generation, through the PFNW facility, and back to the Hanford site for final disposition. This tool, known as the Treatment Integration and Planning Tool (TIPT), has become a robust planning tool that provides real-time data to support compliant and efficient waste generation, transportation, treatment, and disposition. TIPT is developing into the next generation tool that will change the way in which legacy wastes, retrieval wastes and decontamination and decommissioning operations are conducted on the Plateau Remediation Contract (PRC). The real value of the TIPT is its predictive capability. It allows the W and FMP to map out optimal windows for processing waste through the PFNW facility, or through any process that is in some way resource limited. It allows project managers to identify and focus on problem areas before shipments are affected. It has been modified for use in broader applications to predict turnaround times and identify windows of opportunity for processing higher gram wastes through PFNW and to allow waste generators, site-wide, to accurately predict scope, cost, and schedule for waste generation to optimize processing and eliminate storage, double handling, and related costs and unnecessary safety risks. The TIPT addresses the years old problem of how to effectively predict not only what needs to be done, but when. 'When' is the key planning parameter that has been ignored by the generator and processor for many years, but has proven to be the most important parameter for both parties. While further refinement is a natural part of any development process, the current improvements on the TIPT have shown that prediction is a powerful consideration. Even in lean times expected for the foreseeable future, the improved TIPT continues to

  1. Technitium Management at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robbins, Rebecca A.

    2013-08-15

    Long Abstract. Full Text. The Hanford tank waste contains approx 26,000 Ci of technetium-99 (Tc-99), the majority of which is in the supernate fraction. Tc-99 is a long-lived radionuclide with a half-life of approx 212,000 years and, in its predominant pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}) form, is highly soluble and very mobile in the vadose zone and ultimately the groundwater. Tc-99 is identified as the major dose contributor (in groundwater) by past Hanford site performance assessments and therefore considered a key radionuclide of concern at Hanford. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) River Protection Project's (RPP) long-term Tc-99 management strategy is to immobilize the Tc-99 in a waste form that will retain the Tc-99 for many thousands of years. To achieve this, the RPP flowsheet will immobilize the majority of the Tc-99 as a vitrified low-activity waste product that will be ultimately disposed on site in the Integrated Disposal Facility. The Tc-99 will be released gradually from the glass at very low rates such that the groundwater concentrations at any point in time would be substantially below regulatory limits.The liquid secondary waste will be immobilized in a low-temperature matrix (cast stone) and the solid secondary waste will be stabilized using grout. Although the Tc-99 that is immobilized in glass will meet the release rate for disposal in IDF, a proportion is driven into the secondary waste stream that will not be vitrified and therefore presents a disposal risk. If a portion of the Tc-99 were to be removed from the Hanford waste inventory and disposed off-site, (e.g., as HLW), it could lessen a major constraint on LAW waste form performance, i.e., the requirement to retain Tc-99 over thousands of years and have a positive impact on the IDF Performance Assessment. There are several technologies available at various stages of technical maturity that can be employed for Tc-99 removal. The choice of technology and the associated efficacy of the technology are dependent on the chemical fonn of the technetium in the waste, the removal location in the tlowsheet. and the ultimate disposition path chosen for the technetium product. This paper will discuss the current plans for the management of the technetium present in the Hanford tank waste. It will present the risks associated with processing technetium in the current treatment flowsheet and present potential mitigation opportunities, the status of available technetium removal technologies, the chemical speciation of technetium in the tank waste, and the available disposition paths and waste forms for technetium containing streams.

  2. Site Characterization Work Plan for Gasbuggy, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV

    2000-12-14

    Project Gasbuggy was the first of three joint government-industry experiments conducted to test the effectiveness of nuclear explosives to fracture deeply buried, low-permeability natural gas reservoirs to stimulate production. The scope of this work plan is to document the environmental objectives and the proposed technical site investigation strategies that will be utilized for the site characterization of the Project Gasbuggy Site. Its goal is the collection of data in sufficient quantity and quality to determine current site conditions, support a risk assessment for the site surfaces, and evaluate if further remedial action is required to achieve permanent closure of the site that is both protective of human health and the environment. The Gasbuggy Site is located approximately 55 air miles east of Farmington, New Mexico, in Rio Arriba County within the Carson National Forest in the northeast portion of the San Juan Basin. Historically, Project Gasbuggy consisted of the joint government-industry detonation of a nuclear device on December 10, 1967, followed by reentry drilling and gas production testing and project evaluation activities in post-detonation operations from 1967 to 1976. Based on historical documentation, no chemical release sites other than the mud pits were identified; additionally, there was no material buried at the Gasbuggy Site other than drilling fluids and construction debris. Although previous characterization and restoration activities including sensitive species surveys, cultural resources surveys, surface geophysical surveys, and limited soil sampling and analysis were performed in 1978 and again in 2000, no formal closure of the site was achieved. Also, these efforts did not adequately address the site's potential for chemical contamination at the surface/shallow subsurface ground levels or the subsurface hazards for potential migration outside of the current site subsurface intrusion restrictions. Additional investigation activities will focus on the surface/shallow subsurface sampling and modeling. Suspected potential contaminants of concern for investigative analysis at the Gasbuggy Site include total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel- and gasoline-range), volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and radionuclides. The results of this characterization and risk assessment will be used to evaluate corrective action alternatives to include no further action, the implementation of institutional controls, capping on site, or off-site disposal of contaminated waste which will be presented in a subsequent corrective action decision document.

  3. Site Characterization Work Plan for Gasbuggy, New Mexico (Rev.1, Jan. 2002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office

    2002-01-25

    Project Gasbuggy was the first of three joint government-industry experiments conducted to test the effectiveness of nuclear explosives to fracture deeply buried, low-permeability natural gas reservoirs to stimulate production. The scope of this work plan is to document the environmental objectives and the proposed technical site investigation strategies that will be utilized for the site characterization of the Project Gasbuggy Site. Its goal is the collection of data in sufficient quantity and quality to determine current site conditions, support a risk assessment for the site surfaces, and evaluate if further remedial action is required to achieve permanent closure of the site that is both protective of human health and the environment. The Gasbuggy Site is located approximately 55 air miles east of Farmington, New Mexico, in Rio Arriba County within the Carson National Forest in the northeast portion of the San Juan Basin. Historically, Project Gasbuggy consisted of the joint government-industry detonation of a nuclear device on December 10, 1967, followed by reentry drilling and gas production testing and project evaluation activities in post-detonation operations from 1967 to 1976. Based on historical documentation, no chemical release sites other than the mud pits were identified; additionally, there was no material buried at the Gasbuggy Site other than drilling fluids and construction debris. Although previous characterization and restoration activities including sensitive species surveys, cultural resources surveys, surface geophysical surveys, and limited soil sampling and analysis were performed in 1978 and again in 2000, no formal closure of the site was achieved. Also, these efforts did not adequately address the site's potential for chemical contamination at the surface/shallow subsurface ground levels or the subsurface hazards for potential migration outside of the current site subsurface intrusion restrictions. Additional investigation activities will focus on the surface/shallow subsurface sampling and deep subsurface modeling. Suspected potential contaminants of concern for investigative analysis at the Gasbuggy Site include total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel- and gasoline-range), volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and radionuclides. The results of this characterization and risk assessment will be used to evaluate corrective action alternatives to include no further action, the implementation of institutional controls, capping on site, or off-site disposal of contaminated waste which will be presented in a subsequent corrective action decision document.

  4. The Fernald Closure Project: Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Cornelius M.; Carr, Dennis

    2008-01-15

    For nearly 37 years, the U.S. Department of Energy site at Fernald - near Cincinnati, Ohio - produced 230,000 metric tons (250,000 short tons) of high-purity, low-enriched uranium for the U.S. Defense Program, generating more than 5.4 million metric tons (6 million short tons) of liquid and solid waste as it carried out its Cold War mission. The facility was shut down in 1989 and clean up began in 1992, when Fluor won the contract to clean up the site. Cleaning up Fernald and returning it to the people of Ohio was a $4.4 billion mega environmental-remediation project that was completed in October 2006. Project evolved through four phases: - Conducting remedial-investigation studies to determine the extent of damage to the environment and groundwater at, and adjacent to, the production facilities; - Selecting cleanup criteria - final end states that had to be met that protect human health and the environment; - Selecting and implementing the remedial actions to meet the cleanup goals; - Executing the work in a safe, compliant and cost-effective manner. In the early stages of the project, there were strained relationships - in fact total distrust - between the local community and the DOE as a result of aquifer contamination and potential health effects to the workers and local residents. To engage citizens and interested stakeholders groups in the decision-making process, the DOE and Fluor developed a public-participation strategy to open the channels of communication with the various parties: site leadership, technical staff and regulators. This approach proved invaluable to the success of the project, which has become a model for future environmental remediation projects. This paper will summarize the history and shares lessons learned: the completion of the uranium-production mission to the implementation of the Records of Decision defining the cleanup standards and the remedies achieved. Lessons learned fall into ten categories: - Regulatory approach with end-state determinations; - Interaction with stakeholders; - The balanced approach - on-site and off-site waste-disposal alternatives; - The contracting model; - Site safety performance; - Effectiveness of cleanup remedies; - Worker training and transition; - Client interface; - Cost and schedule performance; - Legacy management. Lessons learned can be applied: While each site and project has its own issues, the various lessons learned from the Fernald Closure Project, when taken from a global perspective, can be applied to similar efforts so that pitfalls are avoided and efficiencies realized.

  5. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virginia L. Finley

    2002-04-22

    The results of the 2000 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants (if any) that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 2000. The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The long-range goal of the U.S. Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to create innovations to make fusion power a practical reality -- an alternative energy source. The year 2000 marked the second year of National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) operations and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) dismantlement and deconstruction activities. A collaboration among fourteen national laboratories, universities, and research institutions, the NSTX is a major element in the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program. It has been designed to test the physics principles of spherical torus (ST) plasmas. The ST concept could play an important role in the development of smaller, more economical fusion power plants. With its completion within budget and ahead of its target schedule, NSTX first plasma occurred on February 12, 1999. In 2000, PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program measured tritium in the air at on-site and off-site sampling stations. PPPL is capable of detecting small changes in the ambient levels of tritium by using highly sensitive monitors. The operation of an in-stack monitor located on D-site is a requirement of the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) regulations with limits set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Also included in PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program, are precipitation, surface, ground, a nd waste water monitoring. Groundwater investigations continued under a voluntary agreement with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. PPPL monitored for the presence of nonradiological contaminants, mainly volatile organic compounds (components of degreasing solvents). Monitoring revealed the presence of low levels of volatile organic compounds in an area adjacent to PPPL. Also, PPPL's radiological monitoring program characterized the ambient, background levels of tritium in the environment and from the D-site stack; the data are presented in this report.

  6. GTRI Remote Monitoring System: Training and Operational Needs Assessment Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day, Debra E.; Fox, Sorcha

    2012-04-20

    The mission of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administrations (NNSA's) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is to identify, secure, recover and facilitate the disposition of vulnerable nuclear and high-risk radioactive materials around the world that pose a threat to the United States and the international community. The GTRI's unique mission to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide directly addresses recommendations of the 9/11 Commission1, and is a vital part of the President's National Security Strategy and the Global Initiative. The GTRI Remote Monitoring System (RMS) is a standalone security system that includes radiation and tamper alarms, and CCTV; which can be transmitted securely over the Internet to multiple on-site and off-site locations. Through our experiences during installation of the system at 162 sites, plus feedback received from Alarm Response Training course participants, site input to project teams and analysis of trouble calls; indications were that current system training was lacking and inconsistent. A survey was undertaken to gather information from RMS users across the nation, to evaluate the current level of training and determine what if any improvements needed to be made. Additional questions were focused on the operation of the RMS software. The training survey was initially sent electronically to 245 users at the RMS sites and achieved a 37.6% return rate. Analysis of the resulting data revealed that 34.6% of the respondents had not received training or were unsure if they had, despite the fact that vendor engineers provide training at installation of the system. Any training received was referred to as minimal, and brief, not documented, and nothing in writing. 63.7% of respondents said they were either not at all prepared or only somewhat prepared to use the RMS software required to effectively operate the system. As a result of this analysis, a formal training curriculum will be designed and implemented to include several blended learning delivery options. This training will be piloted at RMS sites; initial training will become a required element of RMS installation and refresher training will be considered for sustainability of operations.

  7. Integrated Energy System Dispatch Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Abstract - On-site cogeneration of heat and electricity,containing an on-site cogeneration system subject to random

  8. Do LEED-certified buildings save energy? Not really. . . John H. Scofield *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scofield, John H.

    Do LEED-certified buildings save energy? Not really. . . John H. Scofield * Department of Physics consumed off-site in generating and delivering electric energy to the building, whose inclusion is crucial (USGBC) introduced the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building rating system. While

  9. DOI: 10.1126/science.1117926 , 1947 (2005);310Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01

    .sciencemag.orgDownloadedfrom #12;data are available from second-rotation planta- tions, these effects would likely be exacerbated after harvesting, owing to the export of cations and other nutrients off site. In the framework described above, the potential positive and negative benefits of plantations for salinity are predictable

  10. INHABITANTS OF LANDSCAPE SCARS: SUCCESSION OF WOODY PLANTS AFTER LARGE, SEVERE FOREST FIRES IN ARIZONA AND NEW MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGarigal, Kevin

    IN ARIZONA AND NEW MEXICO SANDRA L. HAIRE* AND KEVIN MCGARIGAL Department of Natural Resources Conservation years after the La Mesa fire in New Mexico. Species that reproduce from off-site seed, including Pinus los cambios de clima y de re´gimen de incendios en la sucesio´n de comunidades de plantas es crucial

  11. Notice of Intent to Develop Guide: Workplace Violence Prevention and Response

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-08-21

    An appropriate directive does not exist that adequately addresses domestic violence, sexual assault and harassment, and bullying and stalking that occurs on or off site, not are there any programs or procedures available on how to respond to an employees's request for help regarding domestic other than the EAP.

  12. NEZ PERCE SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION DISTRICT CULDESAC, IDAHO 83524

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Idaho Department of Corrections labor for installation. We #12;2 have lowered costs of off-site watering-2008. The District's use of BPA funds is unique in that it has a comparatively low indirect administration cost of 10 and federal sources. We are estimating similar results for the 2007 to 2009 period. Sources of cost

  13. EIS-0397: Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA's decision to modify funding to the existing Lyle Falls Fishway on the lower Klickitat River in Klickitat County, WA. The proposed project would help BPA meet its off-site mitigation responsibilities for anadromous fish affected by the development of the Federal Columbia River Power System and increase overall fish production in the Columbia Basin.

  14. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, June 2011, p. 38603869 Vol. 77, No. 11 0099-2240/11/$12.00 doi:10.1128/AEM.01981-10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    . Dynamics of Microbial Community Composition and Function during In Situ Bioremediation of a Uranium to below the Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard (0.03 mg liter 1 ). Microbial of the risk of trans- port off site. Bioremediation via microbial reduction of soluble U(VI) to insoluble U

  15. A n n u A l Campus seCurity And

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    , but nonetheless, no location is free from crime or potentially hazardous situation. The UC Santa Cruz Police on crime and safety can vary widely. Overall, our campus and off-site locations are located in safe areas are primarily responsible for ensuring the safety and security of the UC Santa Cruz community from all hazards

  16. Tree Improvement Forest Health, Productivity & Value

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . · Foresters maintain orchards to supply seed from select native hardwood trees for use in urban landscapes tax base. · The Lost Pines seed source was preserved off-site in a TFS drought- hardy loblolly orchard and is now providing source appropriate seed to aid in the Lost Pines Recovery Effort. · Seed orchards

  17. Multi-query optimization for sketch-based estimation$ Alin Dobra a,, Minos Garofalakis b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garofalakis, Minos

    n f o Article history: Received 3 July 2007 Received in revised form 15 May 2008 Accepted 20 June rights reserved. 1. Introduction Traditional Database Management Systems (DBMS) software is built accumulated and archived in the DBMS of a (perhaps, off-site) data warehouse, often making access

  18. Resources, Conservation and Recycling 54 (2010) 163170 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lupi, Frank

    2010-01-01

    , Malaysia b Department of Agriculture, Food and Resource Economics, Michigan State University, Agriculture: Recycling Drop-off programs Drop-off sites Curbside programs Waste management Recycling behavior a b s t r a c t To reduce the amount of waste entering landfills, policymakers and governments have implemented

  19. Prediction of noise impacts by the proposed Vienna Unit No. 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cwiklewski, M.

    1980-02-01

    Noise predictions are presented for a proposed 600 MWE expansion of a power plant at Vienna, Maryland. Topics include ambient noise, continuous and non-continuous plant noise sources, propagation of noise to off-site areas, annoyance potential, compliance with state noise regulation, and predictions of traffic noise from the proposed rerouting of an adjacent highway.

  20. 2009 Compliance Recertification Application (2009 CRA) Compliance Application Review Document (CARD) No. 21

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (WIPP) and all activities located off-site which provide information included in any compliance prior to the 1998 Certification Decision. EPA used the authority given by Section 194.21 to inspect WIPP(s) shall, at any time: (1) Be afforded unfettered and unannounced access to inspect any area of the WIPP

  1. www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    , and aesthetic and recreational contribu- tions are some of the assets provided by turfgrasses. However, disposal Valuable Nutrients Lost! The most unappreciated problem with off-site clipping disposal is that potentially is partially reduced. Grasscycling: The Solution An environmentally sound option is the direct return of fresh

  2. Does Geographic Distance Between Host Population and Isolate Location Equate to Ranavirus Pathogenicity?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    by temperature. METHODS Wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) eggs are being collected from Tennessee (completed ranaviruses isolated from wood frog die-off sites in Tennessee and Minnesota (5). Experimental Design pellets at 10% body mass every 3 days. ·Necropsy: Liver and kidney homogenate at -80oC. Gross signs

  3. Radiological effluents released from nuclear rocket and ramjet engine tests at the Nevada Test Site 1959 through 1969: Fact Book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friesen, H.N.

    1995-06-01

    Nuclear rocket and ramjet engine tests were conducted on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Area 25 and Area 26, about 80 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, from July 1959 through September 1969. This document presents a brief history of the nuclear rocket engine tests, information on the off-site radiological monitoring, and descriptions of the tests.

  4. The contents of this article and referenced websites, such as text, graphics, images, and other material contained on the site are for informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    The contents of this article and referenced websites, such as text, graphics, images, and other material contained on the site are for informational purposes only. The content is not intended for the contents of any "off-site" web page referenced from this server. © APS Healthcare, Inc., White Plains, NY

  5. ESTIMATING RETARDATION FROM THE FREUNDLICH ISOTHERM FOR MODELING CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Cynthia

    to model leachate migration from landfills is needed to protect the public and the environment. Introduction A concern with landfills, and especially older unlined landfills, is the migration of leachate risk of off-site leachate migration at newer, lined landfills with leachate collection systems

  6. Recovery Act Begins Box Remediation Operations at F Canyon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – The F Canyon box remediation program, an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project at Savannah River Site (SRS), has come online to process legacy transuranic (TRU) waste for off-site shipment and permanent disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a geological repository in New Mexico.

  7. The Bayo Canyon/radioactive lanthanum (RaLa) program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dummer, J.E.; Taschner, J.C.; Courtright, C.C.

    1996-04-01

    LANL conducted 254 radioactive lanthanum (RaLa) implosion experiments Sept. 1944-March 1962, in order to test implosion designs for nuclear weapons. High explosives surrounding common metals (surrogates for Pu) and a radioactive source containing up to several thousand curies of La, were involved in each experiment. The resulting cloud was deposited as fallout, often to distances of several miles. This report was prepared to summarize existing records as an aid in evaluating the off-site impact, if any, of this 18-year program. The report provides a historical setting for the program, which was conducted in Technical Area 10, Bayo Canyon about 3 miles east of Los Alamos. A description of the site is followed by a discussion of collateral experiments conducted in 1950 by US Air Force for developing an airborne detector for tracking atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. All known off-site data from the RaLa program are tabulated and discussed. Besides the radiolanthanum, other potential trace radioactive material that may have been present in the fallout is discussed and amounts estimated. Off-site safety considerations are discussed; a preliminary off-site dose assessment is made. Bibliographical data on 33 persons important to the program are presented as footnotes.

  8. Savannah River Site environmental report for 1993 summary pamphlet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karapatakis, L.

    1994-05-01

    This pamphlet summarizes the impact of 1993 Savannah River Site operations on the environment and the off-site public. It includes an overview of site operations; the basis for radiological and nonradiological monitoring; 1993 radiological releases and the resulting dose to the off-site population; and results of the 1993 nonradiological program. The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1993 describes the findings of the environmental monitoring program for 1993. The report contains detailed information about site operations,the environmental monitoring and surveillance programs, monitoring and surveillance results, environmental compliance activities, and special programs. The report is distributed to government officials, members of the US Congress, universities, government facilities, environmental and civic groups, the news media, and interested individuals.

  9. Determination of station blackout frequency-duration relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griggs, D.P.; Riggs, B.K.; Balakrishna, S.

    1986-01-01

    Station blackout is the loss of all alternating current (ac) power to the essential and nonessential electrical buses in a nuclear power plant. This generally involves the loss of redundant off-site power sources and the failure of two or more emergency diesel generators (EDGs). The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has proposed requiring all commercial reactors to have the capability of coping with a station blackout of a specified duration. The NRC has also proposed 4 or 8 h as acceptable durations, depending on plant susceptibility to the occurrence of station blackout events. Analyses were performed to determine expected station blackout frequencies representative of a majority of domestic nuclear power plants. A methodology based on that developed by the NRC was used. Representative industry data for loss of off-site power (LOOP) events and EDG reliability were used in the analyses.

  10. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F-fly ash. Some developed technologies have similar potential in the longer term. (3) Laboratory studies have been completed that indicate that much higher amounts of fly ash could be added in cement-concrete applications under some circumstances. This could significantly increase use of fly ash in cement-concrete applications. (4) A study of the long-term environmental effects of structural fills in a surface mine in Indiana was completed. This study has provided much sought after data for permitting large-volume management options in both beneficial as well as non-beneficial use settings. (5) The impact of CBRC on CCBs utilization trends is difficult to quantify. However it is fair to say that the CBRC program had a significant positive impact on increased utilization of CCBs in every region of the USA. Today, the overall utilization of CCBs is over 43%. (6) CBRC-developed knowledge base led to a large number of other projects completed with support from other sources of funding. (7) CBRC research has also had a large impact on CCBs management across the globe. Information transfer activities and visitors from leading coal producing countries such as South Africa, Australia, England, India, China, Poland, Czech Republic and Japan are truly noteworthy. (8) Overall, the CBRC has been a truly successful, cooperative research program. It has brought together researchers, industry, government, and regulators to deal with a major problem facing the USA and other coal producing countries in the world.

  11. PROGRESS & CHALLENGES IN CLEANUP OF HANFORDS TANK WASTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HEWITT, W.M.; SCHEPENS, R.

    2006-01-23

    The River Protection Project (RPP), which is managed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP), is highly complex from technical, regulatory, legal, political, and logistical perspectives and is the largest ongoing environmental cleanup project in the world. Over the past three years, ORP has made significant advances in its planning and execution of the cleanup of the Hartford tank wastes. The 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs), 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs), and 60 miscellaneous underground storage tanks (MUSTs) at Hanford contain approximately 200,000 m{sup 3} (53 million gallons) of mixed radioactive wastes, some of which dates back to the first days of the Manhattan Project. The plan for treating and disposing of the waste stored in large underground tanks is to: (1) retrieve the waste, (2) treat the waste to separate it into high-level (sludge) and low-activity (supernatant) fractions, (3) remove key radionuclides (e.g., Cs-137, Sr-90, actinides) from the low-activity fraction to the maximum extent technically and economically practical, (4) immobilize both the high-level and low-activity waste fractions by vitrification, (5) interim store the high-level waste fraction for ultimate disposal off-site at the federal HLW repository, (6) dispose the low-activity fraction on-site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF), and (7) close the waste management areas consisting of tanks, ancillary equipment, soils, and facilities. Design and construction of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), the cornerstone of the RPP, has progressed substantially despite challenges arising from new seismic information for the WTP site. We have looked closely at the waste and aligned our treatment and disposal approaches with the waste characteristics. For example, approximately 11,000 m{sup 3} (2-3 million gallons) of metal sludges in twenty tanks were not created during spent nuclear fuel reprocessing and have low fission product concentrations. We plan to treat these wastes as transuranic waste (TRU) for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which will reduce the WTP system processing time by three years. We are also developing and testing bulk vitrification as a technology to supplement the WTP LAW vitrification facility for immobilizing the massive volume of LAW. We will conduct a full-scale demonstration of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System by immobilizing up to 1,100 m{sup 3} (300,000 gallons) of tank S-109 low-curie soluble waste from which Cs-137 had previously been removed. This past year has been marked by both progress and new challenges. The focus of our tank farm work has been retrieving waste from the old single-shell tanks (SSTs). We have completed waste retrieval from three SSTs and are conducting retrieval operations on an additional three SSTs. While most waste retrievals have gone about as expected, we have faced challenges with some recalcitrant tank heel wastes that required enhanced approaches. Those enhanced approaches ranged from oxalic acid additions to deploying a remote high-pressure water lance. As with all large, long-term projects that employ first of a kind technologies, we continue to be challenged to control costs and maintain schedule. However, it is most important to work safely and to provide facilities that will do the job they are intended to do.

  12. Orange County Government Solar Demonstration and Research Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Renee; Cunniff, Lori

    2015-05-12

    Orange County Florida completed the construction of a 20 kilowatt Solar Demonstration and Research Facility in March 2015. The system was constructed at the Orange County/University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center whose electric service address is 6021 South Conway Road, Orlando, Florida 32802. The Solar Demonstration and Research Facility is comprised of 72 polycrystalline photovoltaic modules and 3 inverters which convert direct current from the solar panels to alternating current electricity. Each module produces 270 watts of direct current power, for a total canopy production of just under 20,000 watts. The solar modules were installed with a fixed tilt of 5 degrees and face south, toward the equator to maximize the amount of sunlight captures. Each year, the electricity generated by the solar array will help eliminate 20 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions as well as provide covered parking for staff and visitors vehicles. The solar array is expected to generate 27,000 kilowatt hours of electricity annually equating to an estimated $266 savings in the monthly electric bill, or $3,180 annually for the Orange County/University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center. In addition to reducing the electric bill for the Extension Center, Orange County’s solar array also takes advantage of a rebate incentive offered by the local utility, Orlando Utility Commission, which provided a meter that measures the amount of power produced by the solar array. The local utility company’s Solar Photovoltaic Production Incentive will pay Orange County $0.05 per kilowatt hour for the power that is produced by the solar array. This incentive is provided in addition to Net Metering benefits, which is an effort to promote the use of clean, renewable energy on the electric grid. The Photovoltaic Solar Demonstration and Research Facility also serves an educational tool to the public; the solar array is tied directly into a data logger that provides real time power generation accessible for public viewing on an interactive kiosk located in the Orange County/University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center’s lobby where visitors can review “real time” power generation, cost savings and environmental benefits of the system. Site commissioning with the software program was delayed due to Internal Security Software issues within Orange County that needed to be resolved, therefore the “real time” capture of the production data for the solar array using the software program commenced on May 1, 2015. In addition an educational flyer was developed and is available in the Orange County Education Center’s main lobby. The project completed under this grant award assisted Orange County in demonstrating leadership by installing the application of a renewable energy technology combined with energy efficiency measures; resulting in reduced energy costs for the Orange County University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center, and helping Orange County citizens and visitors move towards the goals of greater energy independence and climate protection. The addition of the new Solar Demonstration and Research Facility has advanced the Orange County/University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center’s mission of extending, educating and providing research-based information to residents and visitors of Orange County by demonstrating the application of renewable energy technology combined with energy efficiency measures; resulting in reduced energy costs, and helping Orange County move towards the goal of greater energy independence and climate protection. In 2014, the Orange County Cooperative Extension Center hosted nearly 10,800 visitors to their on-site Exploration Gardens plus 12,686 walk-in visitors to their office plant clinic and other services. The Education Center held 2,217 educational events that were attended by 46,434 adults and youth, but about half of those events occurred off-site. Based on the visitation numbers in 2014 the Orange County Cooperative Extension Center Education is a vital partner to Orange County’s

  13. Application for a Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada National Security Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-10-04

    The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) is located approximately 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is the federal lands management authority for the NNSS and National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NNSS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NNSS is posted with signs along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NNSS. The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) is the location of the permitted facility for the Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS). The Area 5 RWMS is located near the eastern edge of the NNSS (Figure 1), approximately 26 km (16 mi) north of Mercury, Nevada. The Area 5 RWMS is used for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) and mixed low-level waste. Many areas surrounding the RWMS have been used in conducting nuclear tests. The site will be used for the disposal of regulated Asbestiform Low-Level Waste (ALLW), small quantities of low-level radioactive hydrocarbon-burdened (LLHB) media and debris, LLW, LLW that contains Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Bulk Product Waste greater than 50 ppm that leaches at a rate of less than 10 micrograms of PCB per liter of water, and small quantities of LLHB demolition and construction waste (hereafter called permissible waste). Waste containing free liquids, or waste that is regulated as hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) or state-of-generation hazardous waste regulations, will not be accepted for disposal at the site. Waste regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) that will be accepted at the disposal site is regulated asbestos-containing materials (RACM) and PCB Bulk Product Waste greater than 50 ppm that leaches at a rate of less than 10 micrograms of PCB per liter of water. The term asbestiform is used throughout this document to describe RACM. The disposal site will be used as a depository of permissible waste generated both on site and off site. All generators designated by NNSA/NSO will be eligible to dispose regulated ALLW at the Asbestiform Low-Level Waste Disposal Site in accordance with the DOE/NV-325, Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC, current revision). Approval will be given by NNSA/NSO to generators that have successfully demonstrated through process knowledge (PK) and/or sampling and analysis that the waste is low-level, contains asbestiform material, or contains PCB Bulk Product Waste greater than 50 ppm that leaches at a rate of less than 10 micrograms of PCB per liter of water, or small quantities of LLHB demolition and construction waste and does not contain prohibited waste materials. Each waste stream will be approved through the Radioactive Waste Acceptance Program (RWAP), which ensures that the waste meets acceptance requirements outlined in the NNSSWAC.

  14. NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William H. Day

    2002-05-03

    The Next Generation Turbine (NGT) Program's technological development focused on a study of the feasibility of turbine systems greater than 30 MW that offer improvement over the 1999 state-of-the-art systems. This program targeted goals of 50 percent turndown ratios, 15 percent reduction in generation cost/kW hour, improved service life, reduced emissions, 400 starts/year with 10 minutes to full load, and multiple fuel usage. Improvement in reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), while reducing operations, maintenance, and capital costs by 15 percent, was pursued. This program builds on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work being carried out by Pratt & Whitney (P&W) for P&W Power Systems (PWPS), which is a company under the auspices of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC). This study was part of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) NGT Program that extends out to the year 2008. A follow-on plan for further full-scale component hardware testing is conceptualized for years 2002 through 2008 to insure a smooth and efficient transition to the marketplace for advanced turbine design and cycle technology. This program teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), P&W, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), kraftWork Systems Inc., a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, and Multiphase Power and Processing Technologies (MPPT), an off-site subcontractor. Under the auspices of the NGT Program, a series of analyses were performed to identify the NGT engine system's ability to serve multiple uses. The majority were in conjunction with a coal-fired plant, or used coal as the system fuel. Identified also was the ability of the NGT system to serve as the basis of an advanced performance cycle: the humid air turbine (HAT) cycle. The HAT cycle is also used with coal gasification in an integrated cycle HAT (IGHAT). The NGT systems identified were: (1) Feedwater heating retrofit to an existing coal-fired steam plant, which could supply both heat and peaking power (Block 2 engine); (2) Repowering of an older coal-fired plant (Block 2 engine); (3) Gas-fired HAT cycle (Block 1 and 2 engines); (4) Integrated gasification HAT (Block 1 and 2 engines). Also under Phase I of the NGT Program, a conceptual design of the combustion system has been completed. An integrated approach to cycle optimization for improved combustor turndown capability has been employed. The configuration selected has the potential for achieving single digit NO{sub x}/CO emissions between 40 percent and 100 percent load conditions. A technology maturation plan for the combustion system has been proposed. Also, as a result of Phase I, ceramic vane technology will be incorporated into NGT designs and will require less cooling flow than conventional metallic vanes, thereby improving engine efficiency. A common 50 Hz and 60 Hz power turbine was selected due to the cost savings from eliminating a gearbox. A list of ceramic vane technologies has been identified for which the funding comes from DOE, NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and P&W.

  15. PROBABILISTIC SAFETY ASSESSMENT OF OPERATIONAL ACCIDENTS AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rucker, D.F.

    2000-09-01

    This report presents a probabilistic safety assessment of radioactive doses as consequences from accident scenarios to complement the deterministic assessment presented in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The International Council of Radiation Protection (ICRP) recommends both assessments be conducted to ensure that ''an adequate level of safety has been achieved and that no major contributors to risk are overlooked'' (ICRP 1993). To that end, the probabilistic assessment for the WIPP accident scenarios addresses the wide range of assumptions, e.g. the range of values representing the radioactive source of an accident, that could possibly have been overlooked by the SAR. Routine releases of radionuclides from the WIPP repository to the environment during the waste emplacement operations are expected to be essentially zero. In contrast, potential accidental releases from postulated accident scenarios during waste handling and emplacement could be substantial, which necessitates the need for radiological air monitoring and confinement barriers (DOE 1999). The WIPP Safety Analysis Report (SAR) calculated doses from accidental releases to the on-site (at 100 m from the source) and off-site (at the Exclusive Use Boundary and Site Boundary) public by a deterministic approach. This approach, as demonstrated in the SAR, uses single-point values of key parameters to assess the 50-year, whole-body committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The basic assumptions used in the SAR to formulate the CEDE are retained for this report's probabilistic assessment. However, for the probabilistic assessment, single-point parameter values were replaced with probability density functions (PDF) and were sampled over an expected range. Monte Carlo simulations were run, in which 10,000 iterations were performed by randomly selecting one value for each parameter and calculating the dose. Statistical information was then derived from the 10,000 iteration batch, which included 5%, 50%, and 95% dose likelihood, and the sensitivity of each assumption to the calculated doses. As one would intuitively expect, the doses from the probabilistic assessment for most scenarios were found to be much less than the deterministic assessment. The lower dose of the probabilistic assessment can be attributed to a ''smearing'' of values from the high and low end of the PDF spectrum of the various input parameters. The analysis also found a potential weakness in the deterministic analysis used in the SAR, a detail on drum loading was not taken into consideration. Waste emplacement operations thus far have handled drums from each shipment as a single unit, i.e. drums from each shipment are kept together. Shipments typically come from a single waste stream, and therefore the curie loading of each drum can be considered nearly identical to that of its neighbor. Calculations show that if there are large numbers of drums used in the accident scenario assessment, e.g. 28 drums in the waste hoist failure scenario (CH5), then the probabilistic dose assessment calculations will diverge from the deterministically determined doses. As it is currently calculated, the deterministic dose assessment assumes one drum loaded to the maximum allowable (80 PE-Ci), and the remaining are 10% of the maximum. The effective average of drum curie content is therefore less in the deterministic assessment than the probabilistic assessment for a large number of drums. EEG recommends that the WIPP SAR calculations be revisited and updated to include a probabilistic safety assessment.

  16. Evaluation of Low-Level Waste Disposal Receipt Data for Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shuman, Robert [WPS: WASTE PROJECTS AND SERVICES

    2012-04-17

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) generates radioactive waste as a result of various activities. Operational or institutional waste is generated from a wide variety of research and development activities including nuclear weapons development, energy production, and medical research. Environmental restoration (ER), and decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) waste is generated as contaminated sites and facilities at LANL undergo cleanup or remediation. The majority of this waste is low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and is disposed of at the Technical Area 54 (TA-54), Area G disposal facility. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 (DOE, 2001) requires that radioactive waste be managed in a manner that protects public health and safety, and the environment. To comply with this order, DOE field sites must prepare and maintain site-specific radiological performance assessments for LLW disposal facilities that accept waste after September 26, 1988. Furthermore, sites are required to conduct composite analyses that account for the cumulative impacts of all waste that has been (or will be) disposed of at the facilities and other sources of radioactive material that may interact with the facilities. Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis was issued in 2008 (LANL, 2008). These analyses estimate rates of radionuclide release from the waste disposed of at the facility, simulate the movement of radionuclides through the environment, and project potential radiation doses to humans for several on-site and off-site exposure scenarios. The assessments are based on existing site and disposal facility data and on assumptions about future rates and methods of waste disposal. The accuracy of the performance assessment and composite analysis depends upon the validity of the data used and assumptions made in conducting the analyses. If changes in these data and assumptions are significant, they may invalidate or call into question certain aspects of the analyses. For example, if the volumes and activities of waste disposed of during the remainder of the disposal facility's lifetime differ significantly from those projected, the doses projected by the analyses may no longer apply. DOE field sites are required to implement a performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program. The purpose of this program is to ensure the continued applicability of the analyses through incremental improvement of the level of understanding of the disposal site and facility. Site personnel are required to conduct field and experimental work to reduce the uncertainty in the data and models used in the assessments. Furthermore, they are required to conduct periodic reviews of waste receipts, comparing them to projected waste disposal rates. The radiological inventory for Area G was updated in conjunction with Revision 4 of the performance assessment and composite analysis (Shuman, 2008). That effort used disposal records and other sources of information to estimate the quantities of radioactive waste that have been disposed of at Area G from 1959, the year the facility started receiving waste on a routine basis, through 2007. It also estimated the quantities of LLW that will require disposal from 2008 through 2044, the year in which it is assumed that disposal operations at Area G will cease. This report documents the fourth review of Area G disposal receipts since the inventory was updated and examines information for waste placed in the ground during fiscal years (FY) 2008 through 2011. The primary objective of the disposal receipt review is to ensure that the future waste inventory projections developed for the performance assessment and composite analysis are consistent with the actual types and quantities of waste being disposed of at Area G. Toward this end, the disposal data that are the subject of this review are used to update the future waste inventory projections for the disposal facility. These projections are compared to the future inventory projections that were develope

  17. Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel from Shutdown Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maheras, Steven J.; Best, Ralph E.; Ross, Steven B.; Buxton, Kenneth A.; England, Jeffery L.; McConnell, Paul E.; Massaro, Lawrence M.; Jensen, Philip J.

    2014-10-01

    This report presents a preliminary evaluation of removing used nuclear fuel (UNF) from 12 shutdown nuclear power plant sites. At these shutdown sites the nuclear power reactors have been permanently shut down and the sites have been decommissioned or are undergoing decommissioning. The shutdown sites are Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, Zion, Crystal River, Kewaunee, and San Onofre. The evaluation was divided into four components: characterization of the UNF and greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC waste) inventory; a description of the on-site infrastructure and conditions relevant to transportation of UNF and GTCC waste; an evaluation of the near-site transportation infrastructure and experience relevant to shipping transportation casks containing UNF and GTCC waste, including identification of gaps in information; and, an evaluation of the actions necessary to prepare for and remove UNF and GTCC waste. The primary sources for the inventory of UNF and GTCC waste are the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) RW-859 used nuclear fuel inventory database, industry sources such as StoreFUEL and SpentFUEL, and government sources such as the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The primary sources for information on the conditions of site and near-site transportation infrastructure and experience included observations and information collected during visits to the Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, and Zion sites; information provided by managers at the shutdown sites; Facility Interface Data Sheets compiled for DOE in 2005; Services Planning Documents prepared for DOE in 1993 and 1994; industry publications such as Radwaste Solutions; and Google Earth. State and Regional Group representatives, a Tribal representative, and a Federal Railroad Administration representative participated in six of the shutdown site visits. Every site was found to have at least one off-site transportation mode option for removing its UNF and GTCC waste; some have multiple options. Experience removing large components during reactor decommissioning provided an important source of information used to identify the transportation mode options for the sites. Especially important in conducting the evaluation were site visits, through which information was obtained that would not have been available otherwise. Extensive photographs taken during the site visits proved to be particularly useful in documenting the current conditions at or near the sites. Additional conclusions from this evaluation include: The 12 shutdown sites use designs from 4 different suppliers involving 9 different (horizontal and vertical) dry storage systems that would require the use of 8 different transportation cask designs to remove the UNF and GTCC waste from the shutdown sites; Although there are common aspects, each site has some unique features and/or conditions; Although some regulatory actions will be required, all UNF at the initial 9 shutdown sites (Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, and Zion) is in licensed systems that can be transported, including a small amount of high-burnup fuel; Each site indicated that 2-3 years of advance time would be required for its preparations before shipments could begin; Most sites have more than one transportation option, e.g., rail, barge, or heavy haul truck, as well as constraints and preferences. It is expected that additional site visits will be conducted to add to the information presented in the evaluation.

  18. ALTERNATIVE FIELD METHODS TO TREAT MERCURY IN SOIL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernie F. Stine

    2002-08-14

    The Department of Energy (DOE) currently has mercury (Hg) contaminated materials and soils at the various sites. Figure 1-1 (from http://www.ct.ornl.gov/stcg.hg/) shows the estimated distribution of mercury contaminated waste at the various DOE sites. Oak Ridge and Idaho sites have the largest deposits of contaminated materials. The majorities of these contaminated materials are soils, sludges, debris, and waste waters. This project concerns treatment of mercury contaminated soils. The technology is applicable to many DOE sites, in-particular, the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge Tennessee and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These sites have the majority of the soils and sediments contaminated with mercury. The soils may also be contaminated with other hazardous metals and radionuclides. At the Y12 plant, the baseline treatment method for mercury contaminated soil is low temperature thermal desorption (LTTD), followed by on-site landfill disposal. LTTD is relatively expensive (estimated cost of treatment which exclude disposal cost for the collect mercury is greater than $740/per cubic yard [cy] at Y-12), does not treat any of the metal or radionuclides. DOE is seeking a less costly alternative to the baseline technology. As described in the solicitation (DE-RA-01NT41030), this project initially focused on evaluating cost-effective in-situ alternatives to stabilize or remove the mercury (Hg) contamination from high-clay content soil. It was believed that ex-situ treatment of soil contaminated with significant quantities of free-liquid mercury might pose challenges during excavation and handling. Such challenges may include controlling potential mercury vapors and containing liquid mercury beads. As described below, the focus of this project was expanded to include consideration of ex-situ treatment after award of the contract to International Technology Corporation (IT). After award of the contract, IT became part of Shaw E&I. The company will be denoted as ''IT'' for the rest of the document since the original contract was awarded to IT. This report details IT, Knoxville, TN and its subcontractor Nuclear Fuels Services (NFS) study to investigate alternative mercury treatment technology. The IT/NFS team demonstrated two processes for the amalgamation/stabilization/fixation of mercury and potentially Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) and radionuclide-contaminated soils. This project was to identify and demonstrate remedial methods to clean up mercury-contaminated soil using established treatment chemistries on soil from the Oak Ridge Reservation, Y-12 National Security Complex, the off-site David Witherspoon properties, and/or other similarly contaminated sites. Soil from the basement of Y-12 Plant Alpha 2 Building at the Oak Ridge Reservation was received at IT and NFS on December 20, 2001. Soils from the other locations were not investigated. The soil had background levels of radioactivity and had all eight RCRA metals well below the Toxicity Characteristic (TC) criteria. This project addresses the new DOE Environmental Management Thrust 2 ''Alternative Approaches to Current High Risk/High Cost Baselines''. Successful completion of this project will provide a step-change in DOE's treatment ability.

  19. Evaluating the energy performance of the first generation of LEED-certified commercial buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond, Rick

    2011-01-01

    available for on-site renewable energy (n=3), additionaland EA-c2 (on-site renewable energy) complicate our analysisemploys on-site renewable energy systems in the design case,

  20. Behavioral Aspects in Simulating the Future US Building Energy Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    forecast to 2050 On-site generation cost & performance (e.g.forecast to 2050 On-site generation cost & performance (e.g.forecast to 2050 On-site generation cost & performance (e.g.

  1. The Energy Impact of Urban Form: An Approach to Morphologically Evaluating the Energy Performance of Neighborhoods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Ye Kang

    2012-01-01

    energy-efficient electric vehicles and on-site solar generationenergy-efficient electric vehicles and on-site solar generationenergy-efficient electric vehicles and on-site solar generation

  2. RAVEN as Control Logic and Probabilistic Risk Assessment Driver for RELAP-7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Rabiti; A. Alfonsi; D. Mandelli; J. Cogliati; R. Martineau

    2012-11-01

    The Next Generation of System Analysis Code (NGSAC) [1] aims to model and simulate the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) thermo-hydraulic behavior with high level of accuracy. In this respect, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is developing a NGSAC (known as RELAP-7) which will allow to model NPP responses for a set of accident scenarios (e.g., loss of off-site power).

  3. CEM KANER, J.D., Ph.D. Law Office of Cem Kaner kaner@kaner.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for an off-site talk at NCCUSL Annual Meeting, July 26, 1998 Also distributed as part of talks at UC Berkeley't-see-the-terms-until-after-you-buy-it contracting, we should expect to routinely see terms like these. For more details on quality/cost analysis or consumers (only to big customers) to cure defects. 2B-606. Lesser right to a refund. (Perfect tender rule

  4. A perspective on atmospheric nuclear tests in Nevada: Fact Book, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friesen, H.N.

    1995-06-01

    This fact book provides historical background and perspective on the nuclear testing program at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Nuclear tests contributing to the off-site deposition of radioactive fallout are identified, and the concept of cumulative estimated exposure is explained. The difficulty of associating health effects with radiation is presented also. The status of litigation against the government and legislation as of September 1994 are summarized.

  5. SOARCA Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station Long-Term Station Blackout Uncertainty Analysis: Knowledge Advancement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Mattie, Patrick D.; Bixler, Nathan E.; Ross, Kyle; Cardoni, Jeffrey N; Kalinich, Donald A.; Osborn, Douglas M.; Sallaberry, Cedric Jean-Marie; Ghosh, S. Tina

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes the knowledge advancements from the uncertainty analysis for the State-of- the-Art Reactor Consequence Analyses (SOARCA) unmitigated long-term station blackout accident scenario at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station. This work assessed key MELCOR and MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Version 2 (MACCS2) modeling uncertainties in an integrated fashion to quantify the relative importance of each uncertain input on potential accident progression, radiological releases, and off-site consequences. This quantitative uncertainty analysis provides measures of the effects on consequences, of each of the selected uncertain parameters both individually and in interaction with other parameters. The results measure the model response (e.g., variance in the output) to uncertainty in the selected input. Investigation into the important uncertain parameters in turn yields insights into important phenomena for accident progression and off-site consequences. This uncertainty analysis confirmed the known importance of some parameters, such as failure rate of the Safety Relief Valve in accident progression modeling and the dry deposition velocity in off-site consequence modeling. The analysis also revealed some new insights, such as dependent effect of cesium chemical form for different accident progressions. (auth)

  6. Mathematical models as tools for probing long-term safety of CO2 storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    Issue on Site Characterization for Geological Storage ofgeological model needs to be acknowledged. Further site characterization

  7. Curriculum Vitae William D. Lipe (July 2012)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, Brian M.

    Board, Society of Professional Archaeologists (SOPA) 1979 On-site peer reviewer, Vandenberg Cult. Res

  8. Enforcement-driven financing of water quality in California: The case of supplemental environmental projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Press, Daniel; Holloran, Pete; Petersen, Brian

    2010-01-01

    water treatment plants, on-site sewage facilities, Edwards Aquifer protection, stormwater, and sludge

  9. Teaching Organic Farming and Gardening: Resources for Instructors, 3rd Edition. Part 1 - Skills and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Energy intensive production • Non-renewable Compost • Moisture retention Produced on-site or purchased • Potential

  10. College of Science and Liberal Arts Bachelor of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are generally involved in testing water sources for contamination. They per- form bioremediation on sites

  11. Waste Area Grouping 4 Site Investigation Sampling and Analysis Plan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4 is one of 17 WAGs within and associated with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. WAG 4 is located along Lagoon Road south of the main facility at ORNL. WAG 4 is a shallow-waste burial site consisting of three separate areas: (1) Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 4, a shallow-land burial ground containing radioactive and potentially hazardous wastes; (2) an experimental Pilot Pit Area, including a pilot-scale testing pit; and (3) sections of two abandoned underground pipelines formerly used for transporting liquid, low-level radioactive waste. In the 1950s, SWSA 4 received a variety of low-and high-activity wastes, including transuranic wastes, all buried in trenches and auger holes. Recent surface water data indicate that a significant amount of {sup 90}Sr is being released from the old burial trenches in SWSA 4. This release represents a significant portion of the ORNL off-site risk. In an effort to control the sources of the {sup 90}Sr release and to reduce the off-site risk, a site investigation is being implemented to locate the trenches containing the most prominent {sup 90}Sr sources. This investigation has been designed to gather site-specific data to confirm the locations of {sup 90}Sr sources responsible for most off-site releases, and to provide data to be used in evaluating potential interim remedial alternatives prepared to direct the site investigation of the SWSA 4 area at WAG 4.

  12. PCB annual report for Oak Ridge National Laboratory EPA Identification Number - TN 1890090003, February 6, 1990--December 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greer, J.K. Jr.; Foley, R.C.

    1991-10-15

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory prepares a report annually as mandated by the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) that summarizes records required of owners/operators of facilities where PCBs are in use. This report provides information of PCB and PCB-contaminated equipment in use or removed from service and PCB wastes generated, stored, and shipped off-site for treatment and disposal during the time period February 6, 1990, through December 31, 1990, as required by the revised TSCA regulations described in the December 21, 1989, Federal Register (54 FR 52716).

  13. Energy Conservation and Waste Reduction in the Metal Fabrication Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirk, M. C. Jr.; Looby, G. P.

    1996-01-01

    , and solvent - is shipped off-site as hazardous waste to be incinerated. Paint overspray from conventional spray guns collects and dries on paint booth filters, which are landfilled. Solvent used for paint thinning and clean-up evaporates. Spent oil...,620 15,000 0.5 proportioning system Use an enclosed 90 2,210 1,750 0.8 spray gun washer Use air-=isted 9 1,300 1,300 1.0 airless paint spray guns Total ppos 31.130 18.050 0.6 Case Study: Manufacturer of Air-cooled Heat Exchangers. This plant...

  14. Future is new focus at energy department`s Rocky Flats facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobsenz, G.

    1993-11-12

    After several years of intensive effort to address radioactive pollution threatening nearby communities, officials at the Energy Department`s Rocky Flats plant now are turning their attention to the site`s plutonium buildings and finding a cleanup challenge of equally daunting proportions. Containing and mopping up off-site soil and water contamination remains the first priority at the Colorado facility, but site environmental managers say the huge volumes of plutonium and associated radioactive waste stored in Rocky Flats` aging building pose increasingly urgent safety concerns.

  15. XANES Identification of Plutonium Speciation in RFETS Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LoPresti, V.; Conradson, S.D.; Clark, D.L.

    2009-06-03

    Using primarily X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) with standards run in tandem with samples, probable plutonium speciation was determined for 13 samples from contaminated soil, acid-splash or fire-deposition building interior surfaces, or asphalt pads from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). Save for extreme oxidizing situations, all other samples were found to be of Pu(IV) speciation, supporting the supposition that such contamination is less likely to show mobility off site. EXAFS analysis conducted on two of the 13 samples supported the validity of the XANES features employed as determinants of the plutonium valence.

  16. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Report, Calendar Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2003-12-31

    The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations.

  17. Methodologies for estimating one-time hazardous waste generation for capacity generation for capacity assurance planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, B.; Hwang, Ho-Ling; Elliot, S.; Peretz, J.; Bohm, R.; Hendrucko, B.

    1994-04-01

    This report contains descriptions of methodologies to be used to estimate the one-time generation of hazardous waste associated with five different types of remediation programs: Superfund sites, RCRA Corrective Actions, Federal Facilities, Underground Storage Tanks, and State and Private Programs. Estimates of the amount of hazardous wastes generated from these sources to be shipped off-site to commercial hazardous waste treatment and disposal facilities will be made on a state by state basis for the years 1993, 1999, and 2013. In most cases, estimates will be made for the intervening years, also.

  18. Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volk Jr., Michael; Wisecarver, Keith D.; Sheppard, Charles M.

    2003-02-07

    The coking test facilities include three reactors (or cokers) and ten utilities. Experiments were conducted using the micro-coker, pilot-coker, and stirred-batch coker. Gas products were analyzed using an on-line gas chromatograph. Liquid properties were analyzed in-house using simulated distillation (HP 5880a), high temperature gas chromatography (6890a), detailed hydrocarbon analysis, and ASTM fractionation. Coke analyses as well as feedstock analyses and some additional liquid analyses (including elemental analyses) were done off-site.

  19. Evaluation of LANL Capabilities for Fabrication of TREAT Conversion Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luther, Erik Paul; Leckie, Rafael M.; Dombrowski, David E.

    2014-03-06

    This report estimates costs and schedule associated with scale up and fabrication of a low-enriched uranium (LEU) core for the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) reactor. This study considers facilities available at Los Alamos National Laboratory, facility upgrades, equipment, installation and staffing costs. Not included are costs associated with raw materials and off-site shipping. These estimates are considered a rough of magnitude. At this time, no specifications for the LEU core have been made and the final schedule needed by the national program. The estimate range (+/-100%) reflects this large uncertainty and is subject to change as the project scope becomes more defined.

  20. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (USDOE), Operable Unit 15, Paducah, KY, August 10, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    This decision document presents the remedial action for the Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 91 of the Waste Area Group (WAG) 27 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) near Paducah, Kentucky. The primary objective of this remedial action is to reduce the level of TCE-contaminated soil thereby reducing the potential future concentrations in ground water that could pose a threat to human health and the environment at the POE (i.e., the DOE property boundary). The potential for migration of the contamination from the soil of the off-site aquifer is the concern associated with the SWMU.

  1. Safety assessment document for the dynamic test complex (Building 836)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odell, B.N.; Pfeifer, H.E.

    1981-11-24

    A safety assessment was performed to determine if potential accidents at the 836 Complex at Site 300 could present undue hazards to the general public, personnel at Site 300, or have an adverse effect on the environment. The credible accidents that might have an effect on these facilities or have off-site consequences were considered. These were earthquake, extreme wind (including missiles), lightning, flood, criticality, high explosive (H) detonation that disperses uranium and beryllium, spontaneous oxidation of plutonium, explosions due to finely divided particles, and a fire.

  2. Guides to pollution prevention: The paint-manufacturing industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    Paint manufacturing facilities generate large quantities of both hazardous and nonhazardous wastes. These wastes are: equipment cleaning wastewater and waste solvent, filter cartridges, off-spec paint, spills, leftover containers; and pigment dusts from air pollution control equipment. Reducing the generation of these wastes at the source, or recycling the wastes on- or off-site, will benefit paint manufacturers by reducing raw material needs, reducing disposal costs; and lowering the liabilities associated with hazardous waste disposal. The guide provides an overview of the paint manufacturing processes and operations that generate waste and presents options for minimizing the waste generation through source reduction or recycling.

  3. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.; Barnett, J. M.

    2011-05-13

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants ([NESHAP]; U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated off-site doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2010.

  4. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory annual environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) sites are summarized and assessed in this report. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each site and at off-site background locations.

  5. Off-the-Shelf, Multi-Purpose, User Configurable Signal Interconnection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctober 1996 - September 2001 The rates BPA chargesOff-siteSystem

  6. Ability Engineering Technology Inc February 7th, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He/H2 Heat Exchanger Module Products & Services for ORNL On-Site Installation Lens Moderator Proto-type

  7. A Green Prison: Santa Rita Jail Creeps Towards Zero Net Energy (ZNE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2011-01-01

    utility electricity bill from on-site PV generation Fuelutility electricity bill from fuel cell generation 5 of 12

  8. QER- Comment of National Resource Defense Council

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please accept this paper as a comment into the QER record on siting energy and transmission resources.

  9. Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in the steel sector in key developing countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Phylipsen, Dian; Worrell, Ernst

    2001-01-01

    blast furnace gas, coke oven gas, residual and distillateexcess fuel gas is used on site in furnaces and coke ovens (

  10. Report to Congress on Server and Data Center Energy Efficiency: Public Law 109-431

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Richard; Alliance to Save Energy; ICF Incorporated; ERG Incorporated; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    2008-01-01

    shutdown or failure of the on-site generator. Use of theand standby diesel generators. The failure modes of these

  11. Understanding the Market for Secondary Units in the East Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wegmann, Jake; Chapple, Karen

    2012-01-01

    street  parking,  dishwashers  and  on-­?site  laundry  facilities  (%)   Dishwasher  (%)   Microwave  (%)  + FREE _ LAUND + MICROW + DISHWASHER   +FULL _ KITCHEN +

  12. Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant U. S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposition Project - 13460

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanochko, Ronald M. [Washington River Protection Solutions, P.O. Box 850, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, P.O. Box 850, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Corcoran, Connie [AEM Consulting, LLC, 1201 Jadwin Avenue, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [AEM Consulting, LLC, 1201 Jadwin Avenue, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will generate an off-gas treatment system secondary liquid waste stream [submerged bed scrubber (SBS) condensate], which is currently planned for recycle back to the WTP Low Activity Waste (LAW) melter. This SBS condensate waste stream is high in Tc-99, which is not efficiently captured in the vitrified glass matrix [1]. A pre-conceptual engineering study was prepared in fiscal year 2012 to evaluate alternate flow paths for melter off-gas secondary liquid waste generated by the WTP LAW facility [2]. This study evaluated alternatives for direct off-site disposal of this SBS without pre-treatment, which mitigates potential issues associated with recycling. This study [2] concluded that SBS direct disposal is a viable option to the WTP baseline. The results show: - Off-site transportation and disposal of the SBS condensate is achievable and cost effective. - Reduction of approximately 4,325 vitrified WTP Low Activity Waste canisters could be realized. - Positive WTP operational impacts; minimal WTP construction impacts are realized. - Reduction of mass flow from the LAW Facility to the Pretreatment Facility by 66%. - Improved Double Shell Tank (DST) space management is a benefit. (authors)

  13. Waste Generation Forecast for DOE-ORO`s Environmental Restoration OR-1 Project: FY 1994--FY 2001. Environmental Restoration Program, September 1993 Revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This Waste Generation Forecast for DOE-ORO`s Environmental Restoration OR-1 Project. FY 1994--FY 2001 is the third in a series of documents that report current estimates of the waste volumes expected to be generated as a result of Environmental Restoration activities at Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO), sites. Considered in the scope of this document are volumes of waste expected to be generated as a result of remedial action and decontamination and decommissioning activities taking place at these sites. Sites contributing to the total estimates make up the DOE-ORO Environmental Restoration OR-1 Project: the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and the off-site contaminated areas adjacent to the Oak Ridge facilities (collectively referred to as the Oak Ridge Reservation Off-Site area). Estimates are available for the entire fife of all waste generating activities. This document summarizes waste estimates forecasted for the 8-year period of FY 1994-FY 2001. Updates with varying degrees of change are expected throughout the refinement of restoration strategies currently in progress at each of the sites. Waste forecast data are relatively fluid, and this document represents remediation plans only as reported through September 1993.

  14. State background-radiation levels: results of measurements taken during 1975-1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Haywood, F.F.

    1981-11-01

    Background radiation levels across the United States have been measured by the Off-Site Pollutant Measurements Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These measurements have been conducted as part of the ORNL program of radiological surveillance at inactive uranium mills and sites formerly utilized during Manhattan Engineer District and early Atomic Energy Commission projects. The measurements included determination of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U concentrations in surface soil samples and measurement of external gamma-ray exposure rates at 1 m above the ground surface at the location of soil sampling. This information is being utilized for comparative purposes to determine the extent of contamination present at the survey sites and surrounding off-site areas. The sampling program to date has provided background information at 356 locations in 33 states. External gamma-ray exposure rates were found to range from less than 1 to 34 ..mu..R/h, with an US average of 8.5 ..mu..R/h. The nationwide average concentrations of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U in surface soil were determined to be 1.1, 0.98, and 1.0 pCi/g, respectively.

  15. Processing mixed-waste compressed-gas cylinders at the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, M.I.; Conley, T.B.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.

    1998-05-01

    Until recently, several thousand kilograms of compressed gases were stored at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, because these cylinders could not be taken off-site in their state of configuration for disposal. Restrictions on the storage of old compressed-gas cylinders compelled the Waste Management Organization of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES) to dispose of these materials. Furthermore, a milestone in the ORR Site Treatment Plan required repackaging and shipment off-site of 21 cylinders by September 30, 1997. A pilot project, coordinated by the Chemical Technology Division (CTD) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was undertaken to evaluate and recontainerize or neutralize these cylinders, which are mixed waste, to meet that milestone. Because the radiological component was considered to be confined to the exterior of the cylinder, the contents (once removed from the cylinder) could be handled as hazardous waste, and the cylinder could be handled as low-level waste (LLW). This pilot project to process 21 cylinders was important because of its potential impact. The successful completion of the project provides a newly demonstrated technology which can now be used to process the thousands of additional cylinders in inventory across the DOE complex. In this paper, many of the various aspects of implementing this project, including hurdles encountered and the lessons learned in overcoming them, are reported.

  16. Groundwater surveillance plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forstrom, J.M.; Smith, E.D.; Winters, S.L.; Haase, C.S.; King, H.L.; McMaster, W.M.

    1994-07-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the preparation of environmental monitoring plans and implementation of environmental monitoring programs for all DOE facilities. The order identifies two distinct components of environmental monitoring, namely effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. In general, effluent monitoring has the objectives of characterizing contaminants and demonstrating compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, whereas environmental surveillance has the broader objective of monitoring the effects of DOE activities on on- and off-site environmental and natural resources. The purpose of this document is to support the Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) by describing the groundwater component of the environmental surveillance program for the DOE facilities on the ORR. The distinctions between groundwater effluent monitoring and groundwater surveillance have been defined in the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Groundwater Surveillance Strategy. As defined in the strategy, a groundwater surveillance program consists of two parts, plant perimeter surveillance and off-site water well surveillance. This document identifies the sampling locations, parameters, and monitoring frequencies for both of these activities on and around the ORR and describes the rationale for the program design. The program was developed to meet the objectives of DOE Order 5400.1 and related requirements in DOE Order 5400.5 and to conform with DOE guidance on environmental surveillance and the Energy Systems Groundwater Surveillance Strategy.

  17. Operating limit study for the proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, D.W.; Wang, J.C.; Kocher, D.C.

    1995-06-01

    A proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) would accept wastes generated during normal operations that are identified as non-radioactive. These wastes may include small amounts of radioactive material from incidental contamination during plant operations. A site-specific analysis of the new solid waste landfill is presented to determine a proposed operating limit that will allow for waste disposal operations to occur such that protection of public health and the environment from the presence of incidentally contaminated waste materials can be assured. Performance objectives for disposal were defined from existing regulatory guidance to establish reasonable dose limits for protection of public health and the environment. Waste concentration limits were determined consistent with these performance objectives for the protection of off-site individuals and inadvertent intruders who might be directly exposed to disposed wastes. Exposures of off-site individuals were estimated using a conservative, site-specific model of the groundwater transport of contamination from the wastes. Direct intrusion was analyzed using an agricultural homesteader scenario. The most limiting concentrations from direct intrusion or groundwater transport were used to establish the concentration limits for radionuclides likely to be present in PGDP wastes.

  18. Pilot-scale testing of paint-waste incineration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    Operations at the U.S. Army depots generate large quantities of paint removal and application wastes. These wastes, many of which are hazardous, are currently disposed of off site. Off-site disposal of solids is often by landfilling, which will be banned or highly restricted in the future. Several research activities have been initiated by USATHAMA to evaluate alternative technologies for management of paint wastes. The project described in this report involved pilot-scale incineration testing of two paint wastes: spent plastic blast media and spent agricultural blast media (ground walnut shells). The objective of this task was to continue development of incineration as an alternative treatment technology for paint wastes through pilot-scale rotary-kiln incineration testing. The results of the pilot test were evaluated to assess how the paint waste characteristics and incinerator operating conditions affected the following: characteristics of ash residue volume reduction achieved, destruction and removal efficiencies (DRE's) for organic compound and characteristics of stack gases.

  19. Application for a Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-09-14

    The NTS solid waste disposal sites must be permitted by the state of Nevada Solid Waste Management Authority (SWMA). The SWMA for the NTS is the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as land manager (owner), and National Security Technologies (NSTec), as operator, will store, collect, process, and dispose all solid waste by means that do not create a health hazard, a public nuisance, or cause impairment of the environment. NTS disposal sites will not be included in the Nye County Solid Waste Management Plan. The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS, and NSTec is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS has signs posted along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The Area 5 RWMS is the location of the permitted facility for the Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS). The Area 5 RWMS is located near the eastern edge of the NTS (Figure 2), approximately 26 km (16 mi) north of Mercury, Nevada. The Area 5 RWMS is used for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) and mixed low-level waste. Many areas surrounding the RWMS have been used in conducting nuclear tests. A Notice of Intent to operate the disposal site as a Class III site was submitted to the state of Nevada on January 28, 1994, and was acknowledged as being received in a letter to the NNSA/NSO on August 30, 1994. Interim approval to operate a Class III SWDS for regulated asbestiform low-level waste (ALLW) was authorized on August 12, 1996 (in letter from Paul Liebendorfer to Runore Wycoff), with operations to be conducted in accordance with the ''Management Plan for the Disposal of Low-Level Waste with Regulated Asbestos Waste.'' A requirement of the authorization was that on or before October 9, 1999, a permit was required to be issued. Because of NDEP and NNSA/NSO review cycles, the final permit was issued on April 5, 2000, for the operation of the Area 5 Low-Level Waste Disposal Site, utilizing Pit 7 (P07) as the designated disposal cell. The original permit applied only to Pit 7, with a total design capacity of 5,831 cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (157,437 cubic feet [ft{sup 3}]). NNSA/NSO is expanding the SWDS to include the adjacent Upper Cell of Pit 6 (P06), with an additional capacity of 28,037 yd{sup 3} (756,999 ft{sup 3}) (Figure 3). The proposed total capacity of ALLW in Pit 7 and P06 will be approximately 33,870 yd{sup 3} (0.9 million ft{sup 3}). The site will be used for the disposal of regulated ALLW, small quantities of low-level radioactive hydrocarbon-burdened (LLHB) media and debris, LLW, LLW that contains PCB Bulk Product Waste greater than 50 ppm that leaches at a rate of less than 10 micrograms of PCB per liter of water, and small quantities of LLHB demolition and construction waste (hereafter called permissible waste). Waste containing free liquids, or waste that is regulated as hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) or state-of-generation hazardous waste regulations, will not be accepted for disposal at the site. The only waste regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) that will be accepted at the disposal site is regulated asbestos-containing materials (RACM). The term asbestiform is used throughout this document to describe this waste. Other TSCA waste (i.e., polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs]) will not be accepted for disposal at the SWDS. The disposal site will be used as a depository of permissible waste generated both on site and off site. All generators designated by NNSA/NSO will be eligible to dispose regulated ALLW at the Asbestiform Low-Level Waste Disposal Site in accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) 325

  20. Renewal of Collaborative Research: Economically Viable Forest Harvesting Practices That Increase Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, E.A.; Dail, D.B., Hollinger, D.; Scott, N.; Richardson, A.

    2012-08-02

    Forests provide wildlife habitat, water and air purification, climate moderation, and timber and nontimber products. Concern about climate change has put forests in the limelight as sinks of atmospheric carbon. The C stored in the global vegetation, mostly in forests, is nearly equivalent to the amount present in atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Both voluntary and government-mandated carbon trading markets are being developed and debated, some of which include C sequestration resulting from forest management as a possible tradeable commodity. However, uncertainties regarding sources of variation in sequestration rates, validation, and leakage remain significant challenges for devising strategies to include forest management in C markets. Hence, the need for scientifically-based information on C sequestration by forest management has never been greater. The consequences of forest management on the US carbon budget are large, because about two-thirds of the {approx}300 million hectare US forest resource is classified as 'commercial forest.' In most C accounting budgets, forest harvesting is usually considered to cause a net release of C from the terrestrial biosphere to the atmosphere. However, forest management practices could be designed to meet the multiple goals of providing wood and paper products, creating economic returns from natural resources, while sequestering C from the atmosphere. The shelterwood harvest strategy, which removes about 30% of the basal area of the overstory trees in each of three successive harvests spread out over thirty years as part of a stand rotation of 60-100 years, may improve net C sequestration compared to clear-cutting because: (1) the average C stored on the land surface over a rotation increases, (2) harvesting only overstory trees means that a larger fraction of the harvested logs can be used for long-lived sawtimber products, compared to more pulp resulting from clearcutting, (3) the shelterwood cut encourages growth of subcanopy trees by opening up the forest canopy to increasing light penetration. Decomposition of onsite harvest slash and of wastes created during timber processing releases CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere, thus offsetting some of the C sequestered in vegetation. Decomposition of soil C and dead roots may also be temporarily stimulated by increased light penetration and warming of the forest floor. Quantification of these processes and their net effect is needed. We began studying C sequestration in a planned shelterwood harvest at the Howland Forest in central Maine in 2000. The harvest took place in 2002 by the International Paper Corporation, who assisted us to track the fates of harvest products (Scott et al., 2004, Environmental Management 33: S9-S22). Here we present the results of intensive on-site studies of the decay of harvest slash, soil respiration, growth of the remaining trees, and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO{sub 2} during the first six years following the harvest. These results are combined with calculations of C in persisting off-site harvest products to estimate the net C consequences to date of this commercial shelterwood harvest operation. Tower-based eddy covariance is an ideal method for this study, as it integrates all C fluxes in and out of the forest over a large 'footprint' area and can reveal how the net C flux, as well as gross primary productivity and respiration, change following harvest. Because the size of this experiment precludes large-scale replication, we are use a paired-airshed approach, similar to classic large-scale paired watershed experiments. Measurements of biomass and C fluxes in control and treatment stands were compared during a pre-treatment calibration period, and then divergence from pre-treatment relationships between the two sites measured after the harvest treatment. Forests store carbon (C) as they accumulate biomass. Many forests are also commercial sources of timber and wood fiber. In most C accounting budgets, forest harvesting is usually considered to cause a net release of C from the terrestrial biosphere to the at

  1. Experimental and Numerical Investigations of the Factors Affecting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the ISO 10780 and EPA method. #12;On-site Measurement Combined Heat and Power Plant Guhjang Energy, KOREA #12;Combined heat and power plant On-site Measurement #12;Combined heat and power plant On;Combined heat and power plant On-site Measurement Difficult to observe the inside of the stack and verify

  2. Max Baumhefner & Ed Pike, Co-Authors Andreas Klugescheid, Contributing Author

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    building efficiency PEV buyers are strong candidates for energy efficiency programs Offset load ownership in California PEV driver population #12;Five Potential Pathways 6 On-site energy efficiency Certificates #12;On-Site Energy Efficiency Upgrades 7 Source: Energy Solutions #12;On-Site Energy Efficiency

  3. Suffolk County Department of Health Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is solely for on-site heating or intermittent stationary power production and whose total on-site storage-site heating or intermittent stationary power production and whose total on-site storage capacity of this same than 10% below the finished floor elevation. 2.2 Article 7 Regulated Area ~ any of the areas delineated

  4. Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Water Resources Restoration Program for Fiscal Year 2009, Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketelle R.H.

    2008-09-25

    The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Water Resources Restoration Program (WRRP) was established by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1996 to implement a consistent approach to long-term environmental monitoring across the ORR. The WRRP has four principal objectives: (1) to provide the data and technical analysis necessary to assess the performance of completed Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) actions on the ORR; (2) to perform monitoring to establish a baseline against which the performance of future actions will be gauged and to support watershed management decisions; (3) to perform interim-status and post-closure permit monitoring and reporting to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) requirements; and (4) to support ongoing waste management activities associated with WRRP activities. Water quality projects were established for each of the major facilities on the ORR: East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP); Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), including Bethel Valley and Melton Valley; and the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex or Y-12), including Bear Creek Valley (BCV), Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC), and Chestnut Ridge. Off-site (i.e., located beyond the ORR boundary) sampling requirements are also managed as part of the Y-12 Water Quality Project (YWQP). Offsite locations include those at Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC), the Clinch River/Poplar Creek (CR/PC), and Lower Watts Bar Reservoir (LWBR). The Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) South Campus Facility (SCF) is also included as an 'off-site' location, although it is actually situated on property owned by DOE. The administrative watersheds are shown in Fig. A.l (Appendix A). The WRRP provides a central administrative and reporting function that integrates and coordinates the activities of the water quality projects, including preparation and administration of the WRRP Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP). A brief summary is given of the organization of the SAP appendices, which provide the monitoring specifics and details of sampling and analytical requirements for each of the water quality programs on the ORR. Section 2 of this SAP provides a brief overview and monitoring strategy for the ETTP. Section 3 discusses monitoring strategy for Bethel Valley, and Melton Valley background information and monitoring strategy is provided in Section 4. BCV and UEFPC monitoring strategies are presented in Sect. 5 and 6, respectively. Section 7 provides background information and monitoring strategy for all off-site locations.

  5. Technical and economical considerations of new DRI melting process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ito, Shuzo; Tokuda, Koji; Sammt, F.; Gray, R.

    1997-12-31

    The new DRI melting process can effectively and economically produce high quality molten iron. This process utilizes hot charging of DRI directly from a reduction furnace into a dedicated new melting furnace. The molten iron from this DRI premelter can be charged into a steelmaking furnace, such as an electric arc furnace (EAF), where the molten iron, together with other iron sources, can be processed to produce steel. Alternatively the molten iron can be pigged or granulated for off-site merchant sales. Comprehensive research and development of the new process has been conducted including operational process simulation, melting tests using FASTMET DRI, slag technology development, and refractory corrosion testing. This paper describes the process concept, its operational characteristics and further applications of the process.

  6. Assessment of SRS radiological liquid and airborne contaminants and pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, G.T.

    1997-04-01

    This report compiles and documents the radiological critical-contaminant/critical-pathway analysis performed for SRS. The analysis covers radiological releases to the atmosphere and to surface water, which are the principal media that carry contaminants off site. During routine operations at SRS, limited amounts of radionuclides are released to the environment through atmospheric and/or liquid pathways. These releases potentially result in exposure to offsite people. Though the groundwater beneath an estimated 5 to 10 percent of SRS has been contaminated by radionuclides, there is no evidence that groundwater contaminated with these constituents has migrated offsite (Arnett, 1996). Therefore, with the notable exception of radiological source terms originating from shallow surface water migration into site streams, onsite groundwater was not considered as a potential exposure pathway to offsite people.

  7. Housekeeping category corrective action unit work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Unit (CAU) Work Plan is to provide a strategy to be used by the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), the US Department of Defense (DoD) Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA) (formerly the Defense Nuclear Agency), and contractor personnel for conducting corrective actions at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and Nevada off-site locations including the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), the Project Shoal Area, and the Central Nevada Test Area. This Work Plan applies to housekeeping category CAUs already listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) Appendices (FFACO, 1996) as well as newly identified Corrective Action Sites (CASs) that will follow the housekeeping process.

  8. Environmental monitoring report for commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (1960`s through 1990`s)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    During the time period covered in this report (1960`s through early 1990`s), six commercial low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) disposal facilities have been operated in the US. This report provides environmental monitoring data collected at each site. The report summarizes: (1) each site`s general design, (2) each site`s inventory, (3) the environmental monitoring program for each site and the data obtained as the program has evolved, and (4) what the program has indicated about releases to off-site areas, if any, including a statement of the actual health and safety significance of any release. A summary with conclusions is provided at the end of each site`s chapter. The six commercial LLRW disposal sites discussed are located near: Sheffield, Illinois; Maxey Flats, Kentucky; Beatty, Nevada; West Valley, New York; Barnwell, South Carolina; Richland, Washington.

  9. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1986-05-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program for CY85 for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. All of the tokamak machines, the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX), and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), has a full year of run time. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak and the RF Test Facility were in operation. The phased approach to TFTR environmental monitoring continued with the establishment of locations for off-site monitoring. An environmental committee established in December 1984 reviewed items of environmental importance. During CY85 no adverse effects to the environmental resulted from any operational program activities at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations.

  10. Uncertainties in source term estimates for a station blackout accident in a BWR with Mark I containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, M.; Cazzoli, E.; Liu, Y.; Davis, R.; Nourbakhsh, H.; Schmidt, E.; Unwin, S.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, attention is limited to a single accident progression sequence, namly a station blackout accident in a BWR with a Mark I containment building. Identified as an important accident in the draft version of NUREG-1150 a station blackout involves loss of both off-site power and dc power resulting in failure of the diesels to start and in the unavailability of the high pressure injection and core isolation cooling systems. This paper illustrates the calculated uncertainties (Probability Density Functions) associated with the radiological releases into the environment for the nine fission product groups at 10 hours following the initiation of core-concrete interactions. Also shown are the results ofthe STCP base case simulation. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site environmental report for Calendar Year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, R.G.; Peterson, D.; Hoff, D.L.

    1995-07-01

    This report presents a compilation of data collected in 1994 for routine environmental surveillance programs conducted on and around INEL. EG&G conducted the onsite surveillance program January-- September; Lockheed Idaho conducted the program October--December. The offsite surveillance program was conducted by the Environmental Science and Research Foundation. Ground water monitoring (both on and off site) was performed by USGS. This report presents summaries of facility effluent monitoring data collected by INEL contractors. It includes collection of foodstuffs at the INEL boundary and distant offsite locations, and the collection of air and water samples at onsite locations and offsite boundary and distant locations. The report also compares and evaluates the sample results to federal regulations and standards.

  12. Identification of chemical hazards for security risk analysis activities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaeger, Calvin Dell

    2005-01-01

    The presentation outline of this paper is: (1) How identification of chemical hazards fits into a security risk analysis approach; (2) Techniques for target identification; and (3) Identification of chemical hazards by different organizations. The summary is: (1) There are a number of different methodologies used within the chemical industry which identify chemical hazards: (a) Some develop a manual listing of potential targets based on published lists of hazardous chemicals or chemicals of concern, 'expert opinion' or known hazards. (b) Others develop a prioritized list based on chemicals found at a facility and consequence analysis (offsite release affecting population, theft of material, product tampering). (2) Identification of chemical hazards should include not only intrinsic properties of the chemicals but also potential reactive chemical hazards and potential use for activities off-site.

  13. Criteria and Processes for the Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous and Non-Hazardous Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominick, J

    2008-12-18

    This document details Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) criteria and processes for determining if potentially volumetrically contaminated or potentially surface contaminated wastes are to be managed as material containing residual radioactivity or as non-radioactive. This document updates and replaces UCRL-AR-109662, Criteria and Procedures for the Certification of Nonradioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 1), also known as 'The Moratorium', and follows the guidance found in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) document, Performance Objective for Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 2). The 1992 Moratorium document (UCRL-AR-109662) is three volumes and 703 pages. The first volume provides an overview of the certification process and lists the key radioanalytical methods and their associated Limits of Sensitivities. Volumes Two and Three contain supporting documents and include over 30 operating procedures, QA plans, training documents and organizational charts that describe the hazardous and radioactive waste management system in place in 1992. This current document is intended to update the previous Moratorium documents and to serve as the top-tier LLNL institutional Moratorium document. The 1992 Moratorium document was restricted to certification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), State and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) hazardous waste from Radioactive Material Management Areas (RMMA). This still remains the primary focus of the Moratorium; however, this document increases the scope to allow use of this methodology to certify other LLNL wastes and materials destined for off-site disposal, transfer, and re-use including non-hazardous wastes and wastes generated outside of RMMAs with the potential for DOE added radioactivity. The LLNL organization that authorizes off-site transfer/disposal of a material or waste stream is responsible for implementing the requirements of this document. The LLNL Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) organization is responsible for the review and maintenance of this document. It should be noted that the DOE metal recycling moratorium is still in effect and is implemented as outlined in reference 17 when metals are being dispositioned for disposal/re-use/recycling off-site. This document follows the same methodology as described in the previously approved 1992 Moratorium document. Generator knowledge and certification are the primary means of characterization. Sampling and analysis are used when there is insufficient knowledge of a waste to determine if it contains added radioactivity. Table 1 (page 12) presents a list of LLNL's analytical methods for evaluating volumetrically contaminated waste and updates the reasonably achievable analytical-method-specific Minimum Detectable Concentrations (MDCs) for various matrices. Results from sampling and analysis are compared against the maximum MDCs for the given analytical method and the sample specific MDC to determine if the sample contains DOE added volumetric radioactivity. The evaluation of an item that has a physical form, and history of use, such that accessible surfaces may be potentially contaminated, is based on DOE Order 5400.5 (Reference 3), and its associated implementation guidance document DOE G 441.1-XX, Control and Release of Property with Residual Radioactive Material (Reference 4). The guidance document was made available for use via DOE Memorandum (Reference 5). Waste and materials containing residual radioactivity transferred off-site must meet the receiving facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria (if applicable) and be in compliance with other applicable federal or state requirements.

  14. The OSHA and EPA programs on preventing chemical accidents and potential applications in the photovoltaic industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fthenakis, V.M.

    1996-08-01

    OSHA issued in 1992, the Process Safety Management (PSM) of Highly Hazardous Substances. This rule requires owners/operators of facilities that handle hazardous chemicals in quantities greater than the listed thresholds to establish all the elements of a PSM. EPA has issued in June 1996, the rules for a Risk Management Program which also refers to specific substances and threshold quantities. These rules are applicable to all the facilities that use or store any of 139 regulated substances at quantities ranging from 100 lb to 10,000 lb. The RMP rule covers off-site hazards, while the OSHA Process Safety Management (PSM) rule covers worker safety issues within the plant boundary. Some of the listed substances may be found in photovoltaic manufacturing facilities. This brief report presents the basic elements of these two rules and discusses their potential applicability in the photovoltaic industry.

  15. 2014 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuehne, David Patrick

    2015-07-21

    This report describes the emissions of airborne radionuclides from operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for calendar year 2014, and the resulting off-site dose from these emissions. This document fulfills the requirements established by the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H – Emissions of Radionuclides other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities, commonly referred to as the Radionuclide NESHAP or Rad-NESHAP. Compliance with this regulation and preparation of this document is the responsibility of LANL’s RadNESHAP compliance program, which is part of the Environmental Protection Division. The information in this report is required under the Clean Air Act and is being submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 6.

  16. RFEDSCHK User's Manual (The RFEDS Lab Data Check routine), Environmental and Scientific Systems Information Resources: Version 1. 00

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The RFEDS Laboratory Data Check routine (RFEDSCHK) preforms checks of the off-site laboratory data to identify missing and/or incorrect data which may exist. The check routine is designed to assist the laboratories to correct deficiencies contained in the data before it is sent to the Rocky Flats Environmental Management Department, there-by improving the quality of the data being placed in RFEDS. If the data passes the checks with no errors, the data will be acceptable for placement into RFEDS and delivery of the electronic data to EG G is appropriate. If errors are detected, the laboratory should correct the errors and perform the check again until the data is free of errors.

  17. RFEDSCHK User`s Manual (The RFEDS Lab Data Check routine), Environmental and Scientific Systems Information Resources: Version 1.00

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The RFEDS Laboratory Data Check routine (RFEDSCHK) preforms checks of the off-site laboratory data to identify missing and/or incorrect data which may exist. The check routine is designed to assist the laboratories to correct deficiencies contained in the data before it is sent to the Rocky Flats Environmental Management Department, there-by improving the quality of the data being placed in RFEDS. If the data passes the checks with no errors, the data will be acceptable for placement into RFEDS and delivery of the electronic data to EG&G is appropriate. If errors are detected, the laboratory should correct the errors and perform the check again until the data is free of errors.

  18. Novel Americium Treatment Process for Surface Water and Dust Suppression Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiepel, E.W.; Pigeon, P.; Nesta, S.; Anderson, J.

    2006-07-01

    The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), a former nuclear weapons production plant, has been remediated under CERCLA and decommissioned to become a National Wildlife Refuge. The site conducted this cleanup effort under the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) that established limits for the discharge of surface and process waters from the site. At the end of 2004, while a number of process buildings were undergoing decommissioning, routine monitoring of a discharge pond (Pond A-4) containing approximately 28 million gallons of water was discovered to have been contaminated with a trace amount of Americium-241 (Am-241). While the amount of Am-241 in the pond waters was very low (0.5 - 0.7 pCi/l), it was above the established Colorado stream standard of 0.15 pCi/l for release to off site drainage waters. The rapid successful treatment of these waters to the regulatory limit was important to the site for two reasons. The first was that the pond was approaching its hold-up limit. Without rapid treatment and release of the Pond A-4 water, typical spring run-off would require water management actions to other drainages onsite or a mass shuttling of water for disposal. The second reason was that this type of contaminated water had not been treated to the stringent stream standard at Rocky Flats before. Technical challenges in treatment could translate to impacts on water and secondary waste management, and ultimately, cost impacts. All of the technical challenges and specific site criteria led to the conclusion that a different approach to the treatment of this problem was necessary and a crash treatability program to identify applicable treatment techniques was undertaken. The goal of this program was to develop treatment options that could be implemented very quickly and would result in the generation of no high volume secondary waste that would be costly to dispose. A novel chemical treatment system was developed and implemented at the RFETS to treat Am-241 contaminated pond water, surface run-off and D and D dust suppression water during the later stages of the D and D effort at Rocky Flats. This novel chemical treatment system allowed for highly efficient, high-volume treatment of all contaminated waste waters to the very low stream standard of 0.15 pCi/1 with strict compliance to the RFCA discharge criteria for release to off-site surface waters. The rapid development and implementation of the treatment system avoided water management issues that would have had to be addressed if contaminated water had remained in Pond A-4 into the Spring of 2005. Implementation of this treatment system for the Pond A-4 waters and the D and D waters from Buildings 776 and 371 enabled the site to achieve cost-effective treatment that minimized secondary waste generation, avoiding the need for expensive off-site water disposal. Water treatment was conducted for a cost of less than $0.20/gal which included all development costs, capital costs and operational costs. This innovative and rapid response effort saved the RFETS cleanup program well in excess of $30 million for the potential cost of off-site transportation and treatment of radioactive liquid waste. (authors)

  19. Waste Treatment And Immobilization Plant U. S. Department Of Energy Office Of River Protection Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposition Project - Abstract # 13460

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanochko, Ronald M; Corcoran, Connie

    2012-11-15

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will generate an off-gas treatment system secondary liquid waste stream [submerged bed scrubber (SBS) condensate], which is currently planned for recycle back to the WTP Low Activity Waste (LAW) melter. This SBS condensate waste stream is high in Tc-99, which is not efficiently captured in the vitrified glass matrix. A pre-conceptual engineering study was prepared in fiscal year 2012 to evaluate alternate flow paths for melter off-gas secondary liquid waste generated by the WTP LAW facility. This study evaluated alternatives for direct off-site disposal of this SBS without pre-treatment, which mitigates potential issues associated with recycling.

  20. Oak Ridge Health Studies Phase 1 report, Volume 2: Part D, Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. Tasks 6, Hazard summaries for important materials at the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce, G.M.; Walker, L.B.; Widner, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of Task 6 of Oak Ridge Phase I Health Studies is to provide summaries of current knowledge of toxic and hazardous properties of materials that are important for the Oak Ridge Reservation. The information gathered in the course of Task 6 investigations will support the task of focussing any future health studies efforts on those operations and emissions which have likely been most significant in terms of off-site health risk. The information gathered in Task 6 efforts will likely also be of value to individuals evaluating the feasibility of additional health,study efforts (such as epidemiological investigations) in the Oak Ridge area and as a resource for citizens seeking information on historical emissions.