Sample records for on land storage

  1. Impact of Pacific and Atlantic sea surface temperatures on interannual and decadal variations of GRACE land water storage in tropical South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Linage, Caroline; Kim, Hyungjun; Famiglietti, James S; Yu, Jin-Yi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stress, i.e. , the ground water storage [Toomey et al. ,and longer time scales, as ground water storage multidecadal

  2. Oil and Gas on Public Lands (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The School Land Board may choose to lease lands for the production of oil and natural gas, on the condition that oil and gas resources are leased together and separate from other minerals. Lands...

  3. Archaeology on Lab Land

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperational Management » History »DeptArchaeology on Lab

  4. Bike Storage on McMaster University BIKE STORAGE ON CAMPUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    Bike Storage on Campus McMaster University BIKE STORAGE ON CAMPUS Secure Bike Storage on Campus Located on the west side of Chester New Hall, the Secure Bike Storage facility features video surveillance

  5. On Storage Rings for Short Wavelength FELs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for a hypothetical 144 m long storage ring optimized for FELin the Proceedings On Storage Rings for Short WavelengthLBL-28483 ESG Note-92 ON STORAGE RINGS FOR SHORT WAVELENGTH

  6. Wind Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

    2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

  7. Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brochure describes the Tribal Energy Program, which provides American Indian tribes with financial and technical assistance for developing renewable energy projects on tribal land.

  8. Minerals on Public Lands (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any tract of land that belongs to the state, including islands, salt and freshwater lakes, bays, inlets, marshes, and reefs owned by the state within tidewater limits, the part of the Gulf of...

  9. On Storage Operators LAMA -Equipe de Logique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nour, Karim

    On Storage Operators Karim NOUR LAMA - Equipe de Logique Universit´e de Savoie 73376 Le Bourget du Lac e-mail nour@univ-savoie.fr Abstract In 1990 Krivine (1990b) introduced the notion of storage shown that there is a very simple type in the AF2 type system for storage operators using Godel

  10. ONLINE STORAGE ON COMPUTERS AS DISTRIBUTED LONG-TERM STORAGE SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Jrg

    ONLINE STORAGE ON COMPUTERS AS DISTRIBUTED LONG-TERM STORAGE SYSTEM Ralf Naues, Jrg Keller Dept.naues@fernuni-hagen.de joerg.keller@fernuni-hagen.de Keywords Long term storage, Distributed storage, preservation of data Abstract Long-term storage is a widely discussed problem. The amount of digital data is growing faster

  11. Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration carbon sequestration Climate change Soil carbon change Historically, Florida soils stored the largest in Florida (FL) have acted as a sink for carbon (C) over the last 40 years. Climate interacting with land

  12. Regulatory Impacts for Renewable Energy Projects on Indian Lands...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Regulatory Impacts for Renewable Energy Projects on Indian Lands Webinar Regulatory Impacts for Renewable Energy Projects on Indian Lands Webinar June 24, 2015 11:00AM to 12:30PM...

  13. Analytical studies on transient groundwater flow induced by land reclamation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Analytical studies on transient groundwater flow induced by land reclamation Litang Hu,1 Jiu Jimmy materials into the sea. Land reclamation may have a significant effect on groundwater regimes, especially when the reclamation is at large scale. Analytical studies on the impact of land reclamation on steady

  14. Wilderness designation of Bureau of Land Management lands and impacts on the availability of energy resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oakes, E.H.; Voelker, A.H.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1964 Congress mandated the establishment of the National Wilderness Preservation System - a collection of federal lands dedicated to the preservation of selected parts of our once vast wilderness. Because wilderness management precludes many traditional land uses, controversy has plagued the efforts of land-management agencies to select and recommend areas for wilderness inclusion. This study examines potential impacts on the supply of energy resources from the possible withdrawal by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) of some part of the 24.3 million acres of public lands now under study for inclusion in the wilderness system. Except for uranium, the energy-resource potential of the total WSA-acreage is low. Wilderness designation of some WSAs is therefore not expected to cause serious impacts on the future availability of energy resources. Because the significance of land withdrawals by the BLM will depend to some extent on the availability of other federal lands for mineral activities, an up-to-date estimate of the current and future status-of-access to western federal lands for mineral activities was prepared. Overall conclusions of the report are that (1) the inclusion of some BLM land in the National Wilderness Preservation System will not interfere with the nation's required supply of energy resources, (2) there is sufficient federal land currently available in the West for mineral activities, (3) the availability of western federal land for mineral activities will increase in the future, (4) the administration should continue to support the major land-review programs, and (5) the administration should accelerate the review process for WSAs in regions that have a high energy-resource potential.

  15. International Conference on Water Harvesting, Storage and Conservation (WHSC-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

    International Conference on Water Harvesting, Storage and Conservation (WHSC-2009) 23rd 25th International Conference on Water Harvesting, Storage and Conservation (WHSC- 2009) was the first guidelines and implementing mechanisms for water harvesting, storage and conservation. The main objectives

  16. Summary Report from DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials Summary Report from DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials This report provides a summary of feedback from...

  17. Summary Report from Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials Summary Report from Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials This report provides information about the Theory Focus...

  18. Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements to Meet the 2017 On Board...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Download presentation slides from the "Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements to Meet the 2017 On Board Hydrogen Storage Technical Targets" webinar presented by the U.S....

  19. Project Profile: Thermochemical Heat Storage for CSP Based on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multivalent Metal Oxides General Atomics logo General Atomics (GA), under the Thermal Storage FOA, is developing a high-density thermochemical heat storage system based on solid...

  20. Minerals on School and Public Lands

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Commissioner of School and Public Lands is authorized to lease the mineral interests of such lands for development. Section 5-7 of the SD Codified Laws describes provisions for the leasing of...

  1. Technical Note/ Impact of Coastal Land Reclamation on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Technical Note/ Impact of Coastal Land Reclamation on Ground Water Level and the Sea Water Interface by Haipeng Guo1 and Jiu Jimmy Jiao2 Abstract Land reclamation in coastal areas may have water (Fetter 1972; Jiao and Tang 1999), but such an interaction may be modified by land reclamation

  2. On the Energy Overhead of Mobile Storage Systems Anirudh Badam*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    On the Energy Overhead of Mobile Storage Systems Jing Li Anirudh Badam* Ranveer Chandra* Steven the energy consumption of the storage stack on mobile platforms. We conduct several experiments on mobile plat- forms to analyze the energy requirements of their re- spective storage stacks. Software storage

  3. DOE Report Assesses Potential for Carbon Dioxide Storage Beneath Federal Lands

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As a complementary document to the U.S. Department of Energy's Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada issued in November 2008, the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory has now released a report that provides an initial estimate of the potential to store carbon dioxide underneath millions of acres of Federal lands.

  4. Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    transmission facilities on federal lands. In most instances, the Departments of Agriculture or Interior will be the Lead Agency, since they have jurisdiction over most of the...

  5. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission on...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission on Water Resource Management Address: Kalanimoku Building 1151 Punchbowl Street Room 227 Place: Honolulu, Hawaii Zip:...

  6. CARBON SEQUESTRATION ON SURFACE MINE LANDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

    2003-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2002-2003 Department of Energy plantings amounted to 164 acres containing 111,520 tree seedlings in eastern and western Kentucky. Data gathered on these trees included an inventory to determine survival of all planted species. A sub-sample of seedlings was selected to assess the height and diameter of individual species of seedlings established. Additional efforts involved collection of soil sample and litter samples, analysis of herbaceous ground cover from vegetation clip plots and leaf area on each tree species, and development of tissue collections. All areas were sampled for penetration resistance, penetration depth (or depth to refusal), and bulk density at various depths. Rain fall events and flow rates were recorded. The water quality of runoff samples involved the determination of total and settleable solids and particle size distribution. A study was initiated that will focus on the colonization of small mammals from forest edges to various areas located on reclaimed surface mines. This effort will provide a better understanding of the role small mammals and birds have in the establishment of plant communities on mine lands that will be useful in developing and improving reclamation techniques.

  7. Hydroelectric Resources on State Lands (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter authorizes the leasing of state lands for the development of hydroelectric resources. It provides regulations for the granting and duration of leases, as well as for the inspection of...

  8. Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United. Building from their work on environmental costs and benefits associated with biofuel production, ORNL positively impact the sustainability of the biofuels industry. Building understanding of land-use change from

  9. Bus Rapid Transit Impacts on Land Uses and Land Values in Seoul, Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervero, Robert; Kang, Chang Deok

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an ambitious campaign of land reclamation, taking valuablehub of Seouls ambitious land reclamation and redevelopment

  10. Geospatial Analysis of Renewable Energy Technical Potential on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doris, E.; Lopez, A.; Beckley, D.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical report uses an established geospatial methodology to estimate the technical potential for renewable energy on tribal lands for the purpose of allowing Tribes to prioritize the development of renewable energy resources either for community scale on-tribal land use or for revenue generating electricity sales.

  11. The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use Suhail Ahmad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use by Suhail Ahmad B.E., Avionics Engineering National, Technology and Policy Program #12;#12;3 The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use by Suhail Ahmad Submitted of Master of Science in Technology and Policy ABSTRACT The use of biofuels in domestic transportation sector

  12. 1998 report on Hanford Site land disposal restrictions for mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, D.G.

    1998-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was submitted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-26-01H. This milestone requires the preparation of an annual report that covers characterization, treatment, storage, minimization, and other aspects of managing land-disposal-restricted mixed waste at the Hanford Facility. The US Department of Energy, its predecessors, and contractors on the Hanford Facility were involved in the production and purification of nuclear defense materials from the early 1940s to the late 1980s. These production activities have generated large quantities of liquid and solid mixed waste. This waste is regulated under authority of both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of l976 and the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. This report covers only mixed waste. The Washington State Department of Ecology, US Environmental Protection Agency, and US Department of Energy have entered into the Tri-Party Agreement to bring the Hanford Facility operations into compliance with dangerous waste regulations. The Tri-Party Agreement required development of the original land disposal restrictions (LDR) plan and its annual updates to comply with LDR requirements for mixed waste. This report is the eighth update of the plan first issued in 1990. The Tri-Party Agreement requires and the baseline plan and annual update reports provide the following information: (1) Waste Characterization Information -- Provides information about characterizing each LDR mixed waste stream. The sampling and analysis methods and protocols, past characterization results, and, where available, a schedule for providing the characterization information are discussed. (2) Storage Data -- Identifies and describes the mixed waste on the Hanford Facility. Storage data include the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 dangerous waste codes, generator process knowledge needed to identify the waste and to make LDR determinations, quantities stored, generation rates, location and method of storage, an assessment of storage-unit compliance status, storage capacity, and the bases and assumptions used in making the estimates.

  13. Ris-M-2191 RESEARCH ON ENERGY STORAGE AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ris-M-2191 RESEARCH ON ENERGY STORAGE AT RIS NATIONAL LABORATORY K. Jensen, S. Krenk, N. This paper was presented at the International Assembly on Energy Storage held from May 27 to June 1, 1979 in Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia. It contains a review of some of the research projects on energy storage at Ris

  14. Analytical Studies on the Impact of Land Reclamation on Ground Water Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Analytical Studies on the Impact of Land Reclamation on Ground Water Flow by Jiu J, Jiaol, Subhas Nandy2, and Hailong LP Abstract Land reclamation has been a common practice to produce valuable land of the ground water system caused by reclamation. Introduction Land reclamation has played a significant role

  15. CARBON SEQUESTRATION ON SURFACE MINE LANDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

    2005-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The October-December Quarter was dedicated to analyzing the first two years tree planting activities and evaluation of the results. This included the analyses of the species success at each of the sites and quantifying the data for future year determination of research levels. Additional detailed studies have been planned to further quantify total carbon storage accumulation on the research areas. At least 124 acres of new plantings will be established in 2005 to bring the total to 500 acres or more in the study area across the state of Kentucky. During the first 2 years of activities, 172,000 tree seedlings were planted on 257 acres in eastern Kentucky and 77,520 seedlings were planted on 119 acres in western Kentucky. The quantities of each species was discussed in the first Annual Report. A monitoring program was implemented to measure treatment effects on above and below ground C and nitrogen (N) pools and fluxes. A sampling strategy was devised that will allow for statistical comparisons of the various species within planting conditions and sites. Seedling heights and diameters are measured for initial status and re-measured on an annual basis. Leaves were harvested and leaf area measurements were performed. They were then dried and weighed and analyzed for C and N. Whole trees were removed to determine biomass levels and to evaluate C and N levels in all components of the trees. Clip plots were taken to determine herbaceous production and litter was collected in baskets and gathered each month to quantify C & N levels. Soil samples were collected to determine the chemical and mineralogical characterization of each area. The physical attributes of the soils are also being determined to provide information on the relative level of compaction. Hydrology and water quality monitoring is being conducted on all areas. Weather data is also being recorded that measures precipitation values, temperature, relative humidity wind speed and direction and solar radiation. Detailed studies to address specific questions pertaining to carbon flux are continuing.

  16. Original article Effect of desiccation during cold storage on planting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Effect of desiccation during cold storage on planting stock quality and field, 1.4°C, 87% RH). An additional treatment consisted in a cold storage for 4 weeks in sealed polythene exhibited lower survival and RGP (except in pine) than those lifted in January and March. Cold storage

  17. Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner; Carmen Agouridis

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the implementation of the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) in May of 1978, many opportunities have been lost for the reforestation of surface mines in the eastern United States. Research has shown that excessive compaction of spoil material in the backfilling and grading process is the biggest impediment to the establishment of productive forests as a post-mining land use (Ashby, 1998, Burger et al., 1994, Graves et al., 2000). Stability of mine sites was a prominent concern among regulators and mine operators in the years immediately following the implementation of SMCRA. These concerns resulted in the highly compacted, flatly graded, and consequently unproductive spoils of the early post-SMCRA era. However, there is nothing in the regulations that requires mine sites to be overly compacted as long as stability is achieved. It has been cultural barriers and not regulatory barriers that have contributed to the failure of reforestation efforts under the federal law over the past 27 years. Efforts to change the perception that the federal law and regulations impede effective reforestation techniques and interfere with bond release must be implemented. Demonstration of techniques that lead to the successful reforestation of surface mines is one such method that can be used to change perceptions and protect the forest ecosystems that were indigenous to these areas prior to mining. The University of Kentucky initiated a large-scale reforestation effort to address regulatory and cultural impediments to forest reclamation in 2003. During the three years of this project 383,000 trees were planted on over 556 acres in different physiographic areas of Kentucky (Table 1, Figure 1). Species used for the project were similar to those that existed on the sites before mining was initiated (Table 2). A monitoring program was undertaken to evaluate growth and survival of the planted species as a function of spoil characteristics and reclamation practice. In addition, experiments were integrated within the reforestation effort to address specific questions pertaining to sequestration of carbon (C) on these sites.

  18. Wind Generation on Winnebago Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Multiple

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winnebago Wind Energy Study evaluated facility-scale, community-scale and commercial-scale wind development on Winnebago Tribal lands in northeastern Nebraska. The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska has been pursuing wind development in various forms for nearly ten years. Wind monitoring utilizing loaned met towers from NREL took place during two different periods. From April 2001 to April 2002, a 20-meter met tower monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas Casino on the far eastern edge of the Winnebago reservation in Iowa. In late 2006, a 50-meter tower was installed, and subsequently monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas site from late 2006 through late 2008. Significant challenges with the NREL wind monitoring equipment limited the availability of valid data, but based on the available data, average wind speeds between 13.6 14.3 miles were indicated, reflecting a 2+/3- wind class. Based on the anticipated cost of energy produced by a WinnaVegas wind turbine, and the utility policies and rates in place at this time, a WinnaVegas wind project did not appear to make economic sense. However, if substantial grant funding were available for energy equipment at the casino site, and if either Woodbury REC backup rates were lower, or NIPCO was willing to pay more for wind power, a WinnaVegas wind project could be feasible. With funding remaining in the DOE-funded project budget,a number of other possible wind project locations on the Winnebago reservation were considered. in early 2009, a NPPD-owned met tower was installed at a site identified in the study pursuant to a verbal agreement with NPPD which provided for power from any ultimately developed project on the Western Winnebago site to be sold to NPPD. Results from the first seven months of wind monitoring at the Western Winnebago site were as expected at just over 7 meters per second at 50-meter tower height, reflecting Class 4 wind speeds, adequate for commercial development. If wind data collected in the remaining months of the twelve-month collection period is consistent with that collected in the first seven months, the Western Winnebago site may present an interesting opportunity for Winnebago. Given the distance to nearby substations, and high cost of interconnection at higher voltage transmission lines, Winnebago would likely need to be part of a larger project in order to reduce power costs to more attractive levels. Another alternative would be to pursue grant funding for a portion of development or equipment costs, which would also help reduce the cost of power produced. The NREL tower from the WinnaVegas site was taken down in late 2008, re-instrumented and installation attempted on the Thunderway site south of the Winnebago community. Based on projected wind speeds, current equipment costs, and the projects proximity to substations for possible interconnection, a Thunderway community-scale wind project could also be feasible.

  19. Land reform and economic development : case study on Romania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vidican Sgouridis, Georgeta.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Few social arrangements have affected so many people for so long in human history, as the laws and customs governing the ownership and use of land. Taking Romania as a case study, this thesis focuses on the institutional ...

  20. MARS IN A MINUTE: How Do You Land on Mars? How do you land on Mars?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to land safely! Here are some options: 1. With a small- to mid-size rover, use a cushion of airbags along

  1. Penobscot Indian Nation's Strategic Energy Planning Efficiency on tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sockalexis, Mike; Fields, Brenda

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy grant provided the resources to evaluate the wind, hydro, biomass, geothermal and solar resource potential on all Penobscot Indian Naiton's Tribal lands. The two objectives address potential renewable energy resources available on tribal lands and energy efficiency measures to be taken after comprehensive energy audits of commercial facilities. Also, a Long Term Strategic Energy Plan was developed along with a plan to reduce high energy costs.

  2. The effect of dust blowback on spatial orientation estimation during lunar landing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tritchler, Stephanie E. (Stephanie Elaine)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landing is a dangerous and complex phase of any flight. Landing on an airless, dusty world presents unique challenges to perception, including dust blowback. During crewed lunar landings, astronauts will either be directly ...

  3. Production of Wind or Solar Energy on School and Public Lands (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations govern the implementation and development of wind and solar resources on lands under the jurisdiction of the Board of Educational Lands and Funds

  4. OEM Perspective on Cryogenic H2 Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to upcoming infrastructure standard V12 PFI engine Power density Dynamics Durability & cost Efficiency H 2 Drive train H 2 -Storage...

  5. Summary Report from DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials San Francisco, 24 March 2008 In conjunction with the Spring 2008 Materials Research Society Meeting Assessment of Modeling...

  6. Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements to Meet the 2017 On Board...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Meet the 2017 On Board Hydrogen Storage Technical Targets Donald Anton Savannah River National Laboratory Troy Semelsberger Don Siegel Los Alamos National Laboratory...

  7. Influence of capillary pressure on CO2 storage and monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    gabriela

    solutions to mitigate the greenhouse effect. We are interested in analyzing the influence of capillary pressure on CO2 in- jection, storage and monitoring in saline...

  8. Matt Rogers on AES Energy Storage

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rogers, Matt

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy and AES Energy Storage recently agreed to a $17.1M conditional loan guarantee commitment. This project will develop the first battery-based energy storage system to provide a more stable and efficient electrical grid for New York State's high-voltage transmission network. Matt Rogers is the Senior Advisor to the Secretary for Recovery Act Implementation.

  9. Modeling the effect of land cover land use change on estuarine environmental flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahoo, Debabrata

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental flows are important to maintain the ecological integrity of the estuary. In a watershed, it is influenced by land use land cover (LULC) change, climate variability, and water regulations. San Antonio, Texas, ...

  10. An update on land-ice modeling in the CESM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipscomb, William H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass loss from land ice, including the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets as well as smaller glacier and ice caps, is making a large and growing contribution to global sea-level rise. Land ice is only beginning to be incorporated in climate models. The goal of the Land Ice Working Group (LIWG) is to develop improved land-ice models and incorporate them in CESM, in order to provide useful, physically-based sea-level predictions. LJWG efforts to date have led to the inclusion of a dynamic ice-sheet model (the Glimmer Community Ice Sheet Model, or Glimmer-CISM) in the Community Earth System Model (CESM), which was released in June 2010. CESM also includes a new surface-mass-balance scheme for ice sheets in the Community Land Model. Initial modeling efforts are focused on the Greenland ice sheet. Preliminary results are promising. In particular, the simulated surface mass balance for Greenland is in good agreement with observations and regional model results. The current model, however, has significant limitations: The land-ice coupling is one-way; we are using a serial version of Glimmer-CISM with the shallow-ice approximation; and there is no ice-ocean coupling. During the next year we plan to implement two-way coupling (including ice-ocean coupling with a dynamic Antarctic ice sheet) with a parallel , higher-order version of Glimmer-CISM. We will also add parameterizations of small glaciers and ice caps. With these model improvements, CESM will be able to simulate all the major contributors to 21st century global sea-level rise. Results of the first round of simulations should be available in time to be included in the Fifth Assessment Report (ARS) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

  11. Innostock 2012 The 12th International Conference on Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    exchanger (GHE) that may be used with ground source heat pump (GSHP) or underground thermal energy storage Innostock 2012 The 12th International Conference on Energy Storage 1 INNO-U-39 A quasi-two-dimensional standing column well model for ground source heat pump systems Annamalai Ramesh1 , Jeffrey Spitler2 1

  12. Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development. Atmospheric Environment. LBNL the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment to the time scale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure

  13. Stasis: Flexible Transactional Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Russell C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .example system based on log-structured storage 10.1 SystemA storage bottleneck. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  14. Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Because there is currently no designated disposal site for used nuclear fuel in the United States transportation of used fuel at operating and decommissioned nuclear power plant sites. Under U.S. federal for an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) must not exceed 40 years from the date of issuance

  15. Pollution on the Federal Lands II: Water Pollution Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glicksman, Robert L.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    text. FEDERAL LANDS WATER POLLUTION nonpoint sources. 19Comment, Nonpoint Source Pollution, Groundwater, and theat 622. FEDERAL LANDS WATER POLLUTION The third requirement,

  16. Underground storage of oil and gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergman, S.M.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The environmental and security advantages of underground storage of oil and gas are well documented. In many cases, underground storage methods such as storage in salt domes, abandoned mines, and mined rock caverns have proven to be cost effective when compared to storage in steel tanks constructed for that purpose on the surface. In good rock conditions, underground storage of large quantities of hydrocarbon products is normally less costly--up to 50-70% of the surface alternative. Under fair or weak rock conditions, economic comparisons between surface tanks and underground caverns must be evaluated on a case to case basis. The key to successful underground storage is enactment of a realistic geotechnical approach. In addition to construction cost, storage of petroleum products underground has operational advantages over similar storage above ground. These advantages include lower maintenance costs, less fire hazards, less land requirements, and a more even storage temperature.

  17. Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

    2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A major effort this quarter was to inventory all the planted areas to evaluate the diameter and height growth as well as determine survival rates. Soil bulk density and compaction continue to be evaluated on all the areas to determine the effects on tree growth and survival. The hydrologic quantity and quality are continuously monitored and quantified. Much effort was also expended in preparing technical presentations for professional meeting and field trips for a variety of audiences.

  18. Optimum combination of leasing systems on public lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, S.L.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonus bidding for oil and gas leases on public lands has been a reasonably satisfactory system for capturing the average rent available while being neutral with respect to economic decisions such as abandonment. However, it places a heavy burden of risk and uncertainty on the lessee. There is some reason to believe that social gains are to be had from shifting some of the risk and uncertainty to the lessors (governmental units). Profit-share or royalty bidding tends to accomplish such a shift. However, optimality seems to call for a combination of bonus bidding and profit-share (or royalty) bidding, the latter on wildcat tracts and the former on drainage tracts. Profit-share bidding is somewhat superior to royalty bidding, and the best definition of ''profit'' for the purpose is profits in excess of a normal return on investment. The combination suggested above may be especially desirable in a program of accelerated leasing of public lands. 2 figs.

  19. CARBON SEQUESTRATION ON SURFACE MINE LANDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

    2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring program to measure treatment effects on above ground, and below ground carbon and nitrogen pools for the planting areas is being conducted. The collection of soil and tissue samples from both the 2003 and 2004 plantings is complete and are currently being processed in the laboratory. Detailed studies have been initiated to address specific questions pertaining to carbon cycling. Examinations of decomposition and heterotropic respiration on carbon cycling in the reforestation plots were continued during this reporting period. A whole-tree harvesting method was employed to evaluate carbon accumulation as a function of time on the mined site. The trees were extracted from the sites and separated into the following components: foliage, stems, branches, and roots.

  20. Regulatory Impacts on Indian Lands Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar will describe the latest developments surrounding the HEARTH Act and discuss how it can help tribal communities create a bright future. This webinar is held from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mountain Standard Time on June 24, 2015.

  1. Report on Hydrogen Storage Panel Findings in DOE-BES Sponsored...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Storage Panel Findings in DOE-BES Sponsored Workshop on Basic Research for Hydrogen Production, Storage and Use Report on Hydrogen Storage Panel Findings in DOE-BES...

  2. The Impacts of Dry-Storage Canister Designs on Spent Nuclear...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Impacts of Dry-Storage Canister Designs on Spent Nuclear Fuel Handling, Storage, Transportation, and Disposal in the U.S. The Impacts of Dry-Storage Canister Designs on Spent...

  3. Report on Hydrogen Storage Panel Findings in DOE-BES Sponsored...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Basic Energy Sciences Basic Energy Sciences DOEEERE Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting, June 19, 2003 Report on Hydrogen Storage Panel Findings in Report on Hydrogen...

  4. FINAL REPORT: An Integrated Inter-temporal Analysis of Land Use Change in Forestry and Agriculture: An Assessment of the Influence of Technological Change on Carbon Sequestration and Land Use.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Sohngen

    2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project built a global land use model to examine the implications of land based carbon sequestration on land uses. The model also can be used to assess the costs of different land-based actions to reduce carbon emissions.

  5. Stakeholder attitudes on carbon capture and storage -- An international comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnsson, Filip

    This paper presents results from a survey on stakeholder attitudes towards Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). The survey is the first to make a global comparison across three major regions; USA, Japan, and Europe. The ...

  6. On-Farm Storage and Disposal of Sorghum Grain.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Charles W.; Moore, Clarence A.

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    APRIL 1963 ON-FARM - STORAGE AND DISPOSAL OF SORGHUM GRAIN -- THE AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. E. PATTERSON. DIRECTOR. COLLEGE ST+TION, TEXAS IN COOPERATION WITH THE U. S. DEPARTMENT... of its relative feeding value, an increasing number of livestock on feed, increases in concentrates fed per animal unit, a favorable price relative to other feed grains and gains in exports to foreign markets. Off-farm storage space in Texas...

  7. 1996 Hanford site report on land disposal restrictions for mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, D.G.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was submitted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-26-OIF. This milestone requires the preparation of an annual report that covers characterization, treatment, storage, minimization, and other aspects of land disposal-restricted mixed waste management at the Hanford Site.

  8. 1999 Report on Hanford Site land disposal restriction for mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BLACK, D.G.

    1999-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was submitted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-26-011. This milestone requires the preparation of an annual report that covers characterization, treatment, storage, minimization, and other aspects of managing land-disposal-restricted mixed waste at the Hanford Facility.

  9. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2Geological Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Several technological options have been proposed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2}. One proposed remedy is to separate and capture CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel power plants and other stationary industrial sources and to inject the CO{sub 2} into deep subsurface formations for long-term storage and sequestration. Characterization of geologic formations for sequestration of large quantities of CO{sub 2} needs to be carefully considered to ensure that sites are suitable for long-term storage and that there will be no adverse impacts to human health or the environment. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (Final Draft, October 2005) states that ''Site characterization, selection and performance prediction are crucial for successful geological storage. Before selecting a site, the geological setting must be characterized to determine if the overlying cap rock will provide an effective seal, if there is a sufficiently voluminous and permeable storage formation, and whether any abandoned or active wells will compromise the integrity of the seal. Moreover, the availability of good site characterization data is critical for the reliability of models''. This International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO{sub 2} Geological Storage (CO2SC) addresses the particular issue of site characterization and site selection related to the geologic storage of carbon dioxide. Presentations and discussions cover the various aspects associated with characterization and selection of potential CO{sub 2} storage sites, with emphasis on advances in process understanding, development of measurement methods, identification of key site features and parameters, site characterization strategies, and case studies.

  10. Study on concrete cask storage of spent fuel in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itoh, C. [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Abiko, Chiba (Japan). Nuclear Fuel Cycle Dept.; Onodera, A.; Yamada, N. [Hitachi Zosen Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Nuclear Div.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The present report describes the status of the first year`s work of a five-year-long study on concrete cask storage of spent fuel in Japan. Firstly, the proposed study program is elaborated to clarify the position of the present work. Then, the results of the study which have been obtained so far are described and the technical issues are addressed to make the concrete cask storage viable in Japan.

  11. Coal conversion siting on coal mined lands: water quality issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Triegel, E.K.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The siting of new technology coal conversion facilities on land disturbed by coal mining results in both environmental benefits and unique water quality issues. Proximity to mining reduces transportation requirements and restores disrupted land to productive use. Uncertainties may exist, however, in both understanding the existing site environment and assessing the impact of the new technology. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is currently assessing the water-related impacts of proposed coal conversion facilities located in areas disturbed by surface and underground coal mining. Past mining practices, leaving highly permeable and unstable fill, may affect the design and quality of data from monitoring programs. Current mining and dewatering, or past underground mining may alter groundwater or surface water flow patterns or affect solid waste disposal stability. Potential acid-forming material influences the siting of waste disposal areas and the design of grading operations. These and other problems are considered in relation to the uncertainties and potentially unique problems inherent in developing new technologies.

  12. Presidential Address 2007: The end-Permian mass extinction events on land in Russia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    years (Ma) ago, was the largest of all time, with the extinction of some 9095% of all species on landPresidential Address 2007: The end-Permian mass extinction events on land in Russia Michael J. Benton BENTON, M. J. 2008. The end-Permian mass extinction events on land in Russia. Proceedings

  13. Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts Willow on recycled paper #12;1 Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts to agricultural production, including growing biofuels, and (ii) Observed Land Supply Response (OLSR

  14. Safe Advantage on Dry Interim Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romanato, L.S. [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em S.Paulo, Brazilian Navy Technological Center, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper aims to present the advantages of dry cask storage in comparison with the wet storage (cooling water pools) for SNF. When the nuclear fuel is removed from the core reactor, it is moved to a storage unit and it wait for a final destination. Generally, the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) remains inside water pools within the reactors facility for the radioactive activity decay. After some period of time in pools, SNF can be sent to a definitive deposition in a geological repository and handled as radioactive waste or to reprocessing facilities, or still, wait for a future solution. Meanwhile, SNF remains stored for a period of time in dry or wet facilities, depending on the method adopted by the nuclear power plant or other plans of the country. Interim storage, up to 20 years ago, was exclusively wet and if the nuclear facility had to be decommissioned another storage solution had to be found. At the present time, after a preliminary cooling of the SNF elements inside the water pool, the elements can be stored in dry facilities. This kind of storage does not need complex radiation monitoring and it is safer then wet one. Casks, either concrete or metallic, are safer, especially on occurrence of earthquakes, like that occurred at Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant, in Japan on July 16, 2007. (authors)

  15. Impacts of Land Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hallgren, Willow

    2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact on climate of future land use and energy policy scenarios is explored using two landuse frameworks: (i) Pure Cost Conversion Response (PCCR), or 'extensification', where the price of land is the only constraint ...

  16. Reactor On-Off Antineutrino Measurement with KamLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The KamLAND Collaboration

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent long-term shutdown of Japanese nuclear reactors has resulted in a significantly reduced reactor $\\bar{nu}_{e}$ flux at KamLAND. This running condition provides a unique opportunity to confirm and constrain backgrounds for the reactor $\\bar{nu}_{e}$ oscillation analysis. The data set also has improved sensitivity for other $\\bar{nu}_{e}$ signals, in particular $\\bar{nu}_{e}$'s produced in $\\beta$-decays from $^{238}$U and $^{232}$Th within the Earth's interior, whose energy spectrum overlaps with that of reactor $\\bar{nu}_{e}$'s. Including constraints on $\\theta_{13}$ from accelerator and short-baseline reactor neutrino experiments, a combined three-flavor analysis of solar and KamLAND data gives fit values for the oscillation parameters of $tan^{2} \\theta_{12} = 0.436^{+0.029}_{-0.025}$, $\\Delta m^{2}_{21} = 7.53^{+0.18}_{-0.18} \\times 10^{-5} {eV}^{2}$, and $sin^{2} \\theta_{13} = 0.023^{+0.002}_{-0.002}$. Assuming a chondritic Th/U mass ratio, we obtain $116^{+28}_{-27}$ $\\bar{nu}_{e}$ events from $^{238}$U and $^{232}$Th, corresponding to a geo $\\bar{nu}_{e}$ flux of $3.4^{+0.8}_{-0.8} \\times 10^{6} {cm^{-2}s^{-1}}$ at the KamLAND location. We evaluate various bulk silicate Earth composition models using the observed geo $\\bar{nu}_{e}$ rate.

  17. Preliminary assessment of the impacts of deep foundations and land reclamation on groundwater flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Preliminary assessment of the impacts of deep foundations and land reclamation on groundwater flow are increasing. Land reclamation from the sea and high-rise buildings are common approaches to satis- fying in a groundwater system due to land reclamation and con- struction of building foundations in a coastal area

  18. MEDIA PARTNER PRIZE PARTNER ON BEHALF OF FEDERAL LAND MANAGEMENT AGENCIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    .org Bureau of Land Management blm.gov Bureau of Reclamation usbr.gov National Park Service nps.gov U.S. Fish by the Bureau of Land Management, the Bureau of Reclamation, the National Park Service, the U.S. FishMEDIA PARTNER PRIZE PARTNER ON BEHALF OF FEDERAL LAND MANAGEMENT AGENCIES new

  19. 1997 Hanford site report on land disposal restrictions for mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, D.G.

    1997-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The baseline land disposal restrictions (LDR) plan was prepared in 1990 in accordance with the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (commonly referred to as the Tn-Party Agreement) Milestone M-26-00 (Ecology et al, 1989). The text of this milestone is below. ''LDR requirements include limitations on storage of specified hazardous wastes (including mixed wastes). In accordance with approved plans and schedules, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) shall develop and implement technologies necessary to achieve full compliance with LDR requirements for mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. LDR plans and schedules shall be developed with consideration of other action plan milestones and will not become effective until approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (or Washington State Department of Ecology [Ecology]) upon authorization to administer LDRs pursuant to Section 3006 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). Disposal of LDR wastes at any time is prohibited except in accordance with applicable LDR requirements for nonradioactive wastes at all times. The plan will include, but not be limited to, the following: Waste characterization plan; Storage report; Treatment report; Treatment plan; Waste minimization plan; A schedule depicting the events necessary to achieve full compliance with LDR requirements; and A process for establishing interim milestones.

  20. Disk storage management for LHCb based on Data Popularity estimator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hushchyn, Mikhail; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a system providing recommendations for optimizing the LHCb data storage. The LHCb data storage system is a hybrid system. All datasets are kept as archives on magnetic tapes. The most popular datasets are kept on disks. The recommendation system takes the dataset usage history and metadata (size, type, configuration etc.) to generate a recommendation report. In this article present how we use machine learning algorithms to predict future data popularity. Using these predictions it is possible to estimate which datasets should be removed from disk. We use regression algorithms and time series analysis to find the optimal number of replicas for datasets that are kept on disk. Based on the data popularity and the number of replicas optimization, the recommendation system minimizes a loss function to find the optimal data distribution. The loss function represents all requirements for data distribution in the data storage system. We demonstrate how the recommendation system helps to save disk ...

  1. Recovery Act: 'Carbonsheds' as a Framework for Optimizing United States Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Pipeline Transport on a Regional to National Scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratson, Lincoln

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonsheds are regions in which the estimated cost of transporting CO{sub 2} from any (plant) location in the region to the storage site it encompasses is cheaper than piping the CO{sub 2} to a storage site outside the region. We use carbonsheds to analyze the cost of transport and storage of CO{sub 2} in deploying CCS on land and offshore of the continental U.S. We find that onshore the average cost of transport and storage within carbonsheds is roughly $10/t when sources cooperate to reduce transport costs, with the costs increasing as storage options are depleted over time. Offshore transport and storage costs by comparison are found to be roughly twice as expensive but t may still be attractive because of easier access to property rights for sub-seafloor storage as well as a simpler regulatory system, and possibly lower MMV requirements, at least in the deep-ocean where pressures and temperatures would keep the CO{sub 2} negatively buoyant. Agent-based modeling of CCS deployment within carbonsheds under various policy scenarios suggests that the most cost-effective strategy at this point in time is to focus detailed geology characterization of storage potential on only the largest onshore reservoirs where the potential for mitigating emissions is greatest and the cost of storage appears that it will be among the cheapest.

  2. Research on Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation in CRIEPI (Part 2 Concrete Cask Storage)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koji Shirai; Jyunichi Tani; Taku Arai; Masumi Watatu; Hirofumi Takeda; Toshiari Saegusa; Philip L. Winston

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concrete cask storage has been implemented in the world. At a later stage of storage period, the containment of the canister may deteriorate due to stress corrosion cracking phenomena in a salty air environment. High resistant stainless steels against SCC have been tested as compared with normal stainless steel. Taking account of the limited time-length of environment with certain level of humidity and temperature range, the high resistant stainless steels will survive from SCC damage. In addition, the adhesion of salt from salty environment on the canister surface will be further limited with respect to the canister temperature and angle of the canister surface against the salty air flow in the concrete cask. Optional countermeasure against SCC with respect to salty air environment has been studied. Devices consisting of various water trays to trap salty particles from the salty air were designed to be attached at the air inlet for natural cooling of the cask storage building. Efficiency for trapping salty particles was evaluated. Inspection of canister surface was carried out using an optical camera inserted from the air outlet through the annulus of a concrete cask that has stored real spent fuel for more than 15 years. The camera image revealed no gross degradation on the surface of the canister. Seismic response of a full-scale concrete cask with simulated spent fuel assemblies has been demonstrated. The cask did not tip over, but laterally moved by the earthquake motion. Stress generated on the surface of the spent fuel assemblies during the earthquake motion were within the elastic region.

  3. Waterfowl habitats on reclaimed surface mined lands in southwestern Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, W.G.; Klimstra, W.D.; Nawrot, J.R.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Loss of quality wetland habitat is probably the most important factor affecting populations of waterfowl in the United States. To counteract this problem programs for protecting critical habitats have been established and research for innovative methods to create wetlands are being pursued. Recently, attention has been given to evaluation of wetland habitats on lands surface-mined and to methods of reclamation to enhance their development as part of future planning. These data indicate quality wetland habitats can be a legitimate aspect of reclaimed surface-mined lands; and selective overburden handling, grading so as to maximize biologically productive zones and selective plantings contribute importantly to their value. Currently bond release criteria by the Illinois regulatory authority for wildlife habitat and developed water resources discourages reclamation that would maximize quality wetland habitats. Suggested changes in these criteria include alternative vegetation requirements for wetland habitats, more leniency on seasonally inundated shallow water areas, and variation from topsoil requirements when adequate unconsolidated substitute material is available. It is believed that such allowances would result in incentives for the industry to develop wetland habitats so vital to continued enjoyment of waterfowl resources.

  4. LANDS WITH WILDERNESS CHARACTERISTICS, RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN CONSTRAINTS, AND LAND EXCHANGES: CROSS-JURISDICTIONAL MANAGEMENT AND IMPACTS ON UNCONVENTIONAL FUEL DEVELOPMENT IN UTAHS UINTA BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiter, Robert; Ruple, John; Holt, Rebecca; Tanana, Heather; McNeally, Phoebe; Tribby, Clavin

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utah is rich in oil shale and oil sands resources. Chief among the challenges facing prospective unconventional fuel developers is the ability to access these resources. Access is heavily dependent upon land ownership and applicable management requirements. Understanding constraints on resource access and the prospect of consolidating resource holdings across a fragmented management landscape is critical to understanding the role Utahs unconventional fuel resources may play in our nations energy policy. This Topical Report explains the historic roots of the crazy quilt of western land ownership, how current controversies over management of federal public land with wilderness character could impact access to unconventional fuels resources, and how land exchanges could improve management efficiency. Upon admission to the Union, the State of Utah received the right to title to more than one-ninth of all land within the newly formed state. This land is held in trust to support public schools and institutions, and is managed to generate revenue for trust beneficiaries. State trust lands are scattered across the state in mostly discontinuous 640-acre parcels, many of which are surrounded by federal land and too small to develop on their own. Where state trust lands are developable but surrounded by federal land, federal land management objectives can complicate state trust land development. The difficulty generating revenue from state trust lands can frustrate state and local government officials as well as citizens advocating for economic development. Likewise, the prospect of industrial development of inholdings within prized conservation landscapes creates management challenges for federal agencies. One major tension involves whether certain federal public lands possess wilderness character, and if so, whether management of those lands should emphasize wilderness values over other uses. On December 22, 2010, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar issued Secretarial Order 3310, Protecting Wilderness Characteristics on Lands Managed by the Bureau of Land Management. Supporters argue that the Order merely provides guidance regarding implementation of existing legal obligations without creating new rights or duties. Opponents describe Order 3310 as subverting congressional authority to designate Wilderness Areas and as closing millions of acres of public lands to energy development and commodity production. While opponents succeeded in temporarily defunding the Orders implementation and forcing the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to adopt a more collaborative approach, the fundamental questions remain: Which federal public lands possess wilderness characteristics and how should those lands be managed? The closely related question is: How might management of such resources impact unconventional fuel development within Utah? These questions remain pressing independent of the Order because the BLM, which manages the majority of federal land in Utah, is statutorily obligated to maintain an up-to-date inventory of federal public lands and the resources they contain, including lands with wilderness characteristics. The BLM is also legally obligated to develop and periodically update land use plans, relying on information obtained in its public lands inventory. The BLM cannot sidestep these hard choices, and failure to consider wilderness characteristics during the planning process will derail the planning effort. Based on an analysis of the most recent inventory data, lands with wilderness characteristics whether already subject to mandatory protection under the Wilderness Act, subject to discretionary protections as part of BLM Resource Management Plan revisions, or potentially subject to new protections under Order 3310 are unlikely to profoundly impact oil shale development within Utahs Uinta Basin. Lands with wilderness characteristics are likely to v have a greater impact on oil sands resources, particularly those resources found in the southern part of the state. Management requirements independent of l

  5. Energy Management for an Onboard Storage System Based on Multi-Objective Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paderborn, Universität

    Energy Management for an Onboard Storage System Based on Multi-Objective Optimization Tobias Knoke an onboard energy storage, the overhead line peak power and energy consumption can be reduced. The storage. This can be achieved by using an onboard energy storage, which recuperates the power during the braking

  6. Energy Corridors on Federal Lands | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Federal Lands in States Identified by EPAct 2005 (August 2011) Related Links West-wide Energy Corridor Programmatic EIS Information Center East-wide Energy Corridor Programmatic...

  7. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WITH SITE SCREENING AND SELECTION FOR CO 2 STORAGE D. A.77 ASSESSING AND EXPANDING CO 2 STORAGE CAPACITY IN DEPLETEDFOR CO 2 GEOLOGICAL STORAGE IN CENTRAL COAL BASIN (NORTHERN

  8. Important land tenure influences on soil conservation in the southwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern, John Hoyle

    1949-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for landoening bas bosn eoononio returns through inoacs from orops, or froc sale of lend 'Land hunger" as esproseed by en attitude of olinging to the seourity of land through all phases of a Oyelis esmany ie nst generally Oiaraeteriotie Of 1andhslding...

  9. Rock, Mineral, Coal, Oil, and Gas Resources on State Lands (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter authorizes and regulates prospecting permits and mining leases for the exploration and development of rock, mineral, oil, coal, and gas resources on state lands.

  10. EIS-0386: Designation of Energy Corridors on Federal Land in Western States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to designatate corridors on Federal land in the eleven Western States for oil, gas and hydrogen pipelines and electricity transmission and distribution facilities.

  11. An update on corrosion monitoring in cylinder storage yards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henson, H.M.; Newman, V.S.; Frazier, J.L. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Depleted uranium, from US uranium isotope enrichment activities, is stored in the form of solid uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in A285 and A516 steel cylinders designed and manufactured to ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code criteria. In general, storage facilities are open areas adjacent to the enrichment plants where the cylinders are exposed to weather. This paper describes the Oak Ridge program to determine the general corrosion behavior of UF{sub 6} cylinders, to determine cylinder yard conditions which are likely to affect long term storage of this material, and to assess cylinder storage yards against these criteria. This program is targeted at conditions specific to the Oak Ridge cylinder yards. Based on (a) determination of the current cylinder yard conditions, (b) determination of rusting behavior in regions of the cylinders showing accelerated attack, (c) monitoring of corrosion rates through periodic measurement of test coupons placed within the cylinder yards, and (d) establishment of a computer base to incorporate and retain these data, the technical division is working with the enrichment sites to implement an upgraded system for storage of this material until such time as it is used or converted.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Sandian Spoke at the New York Energy Storage Expo On December 12, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, News,...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: hydrogen storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    storage Energy Department Awards 7M to Advance Hydrogen Storage Systems On June 12, 2014, in CRF, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Facilities, Infrastructure...

  14. Targets for on-board hydrogen storage systems: Current R&D focus is on 2010 Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    storage system) 98% (dry basis) Useful constants: 0.2778kWh/MJ, ~33.3kWh/gal gasoline equivalent. #12Targets for on-board hydrogen storage systems: Current R&D focus is on 2010 Targets Table 1. DOE Technical Targets: On-Board Hydrogen Storage Systemsa, b, c Storage Parameter Units 2007* 2010 2015 Usable

  15. Cool Trends on Campus: A Survey of Thermal Energy Storage Use...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on Campus: A Survey of Thermal Energy Storage Use in Campus District Energy Systems, May 2005 Cool Trends on Campus: A Survey of Thermal Energy Storage Use in Campus District...

  16. Effect of Thermal Aging on NO oxidation and NOx storage in a...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermal Aging on NO oxidation and NOx storage in a Fully-Formulated Lean NOx Trap Effect of Thermal Aging on NO oxidation and NOx storage in a Fully-Formulated Lean NOx Trap...

  17. First results of a superconducting undulator on the ACO storage ring (*) (**)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    L-547 First results of a superconducting undulator on the ACO storage ring (*) (**) C. Bazin (1), M. 2014 A superconducting undulator has been fixed on the ACO storage ring. It has been observed

  18. U.S. Department of Energy Theorty Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Theorty Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials An agenda for a four-part, theory-focus session on hydrogen storage materials to identify critical areas, key barriers,...

  19. Modeling the influences of land reclamation on groundwater systems: A case study in Shekou peninsula, Shenzhen, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Modeling the influences of land reclamation on groundwater systems: A case study in Shekou form 16 February 2010 Accepted 18 April 2010 Available online 24 April 2010 Keywords: Land reclamation of land has been reclaimed around the Shekou peninsula, Shenzhen, China. Land reclamation may have

  20. Analysis of the effects of consumptive uses on the value of rural land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faubion, James Forrest

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    significant influence on rural land values. To meet this objective two areas of Texas were chosen in which to study the land market activity during 1969 and 1970. Gillespie and Hamilton counties served as the study areas. Specific information gathered... to determine the significant factors affecting the price of land. in the two areas. Is was determi . cd that five variables had a significant effect upon the price of rural land in these areas. These variables in- cluded (1) distance to county seat on paved...

  1. 1994 Report on Hanford Site land disposal restrictions for mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, D.G.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The baseline land disposal restrictions (LDR) plan was prepared in 1990 in accordance with the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (commonly referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-26-00 (Ecology et al. 1992). The text of this milestone is below. LDR requirements include limitations on storage of specified hazardous wastes (including mixed wastes). In accordance with approved plans and schedules, the US Department of Energy (DOE) shall develop and implement technologies necessary to achieve full compliance with LDR requirements for mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. LDR plans and schedules shall be developed with consideration at other action plan milestones and will not become effective until approved by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (or Washington State Department of Ecology [Ecology]) upon authorization to administer LDRs pursuant to Section 3006 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). Disposal of LDR wastes at any time is prohibited except in accordance with applicable LDR requirements for nonradioactive wastes at all times. The plan will include, but not be limited to, the following: waste characterization plan; storage report; treatment report; treatment plan; waste minimization plan; a schedule depicting the events necessary to achieve full compliance with LDR requirements; a process for establishing interim milestones. The original plan was published in October 1990. This is the fourth of a series of annual updates required by Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-26-01. A Tri-Party Agreement change request approved in March 1992 changed the annual due date from October to April and consolidated this report with a similar one prepared under Milestone M-25-00. The reporting period for this report is from April 1, 1993, to March 31, 1994.

  2. Go No-Go Recommendation for Sodium Borohydride for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Independent review panel recommendation for go/no go decision on use of hydrolysis of sodium borohydride for hydrogen storage.

  3. Pollution on the Federal Lands I: Air Pollution Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glicksman, Robert L.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    supra note 57, at 818-19. FEDERAL LANDS AIR POLLUTION I.Interstate Pollution Before 1990, the CAA required eachof the CAA's interstate pollution provi- sions before the

  4. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max H.; Hult, Erin L.

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde in building materials and the concentration of the species in the indoor air. Storage buffering can decrease the effect of ventilation on the indoor concentration, compared to the inverse dependence of indoor concentration on the air exchange rate that is consistent with a constant emission rate source. If the exposure time of an occupant is long relative to the time scale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure will depend inversely on the air exchange rate. This lumped capacitance model is also applied to moisture buffering in the indoor environment, which occurs over much shorter depletion timescales of the order of days. This model provides a framework to interpret the impact of storage buffering on time-varying concentrations of chemical species and resulting occupant exposure. Pseudo-steady state behavior is validated using field measurements. Model behavior over longer times is consistent with formaldehyde and moisture concentration measurements in previous studies.

  5. ICTSD Project on Trade and Sustainable Land Management International Centre for Trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ICTSD Project on Trade and Sustainable Land Management ICTSD International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development Selected Issue Briefs ICTSD Programme on Agricultural Trade and Sustainable Development Trade and Sustainable Land Management in Drylands August 2007 #12;#12;August 2007 ICTSD Programme

  6. Lakes & Reservoirs: Research and Management 2002 7: 189199 Modelling the impact of historical land uses on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    uses on surface-water quality using groundwater flow and solute-transport models Karen G. Wayland,1-use effects on surface-water quality. Key words groundwater lag time, groundwater modelling, land use, water quality, watersheds. INTRODUCTION The biogeochemistry of surface water and groundwater are related to land

  7. Storage and analysis techniques for fast 2-D camera data on W. M. Davisa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Storage and analysis techniques for fast 2-D camera data on NSTX W. M. Davisa *, D.M. Mastrovitoa, and this year, one new camera alone can acquire 2GB per pulse. The paper will describe the storage strategies

  8. Impact of Cotton Harvesting and Storage Methods on Seed and Fiber Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamann, Mark Thomas

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , sticks, and leaves. Harvested cotton is placed in modules for storage prior to ginning. Recent developments in the industry include on-board module builders that package seed cotton as they harvest. This leads to three methods of storage: 1...

  9. SWEDISH-AMERICAN COOPERATIVE PROGRAM ON RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE IN MINED CAVERNS. PROGRAM SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    field investigations on the general problem of underground waste storage.field work will be carried out aimed at the general nroblen of underground radioacti\\'e waste storage.

  10. The value of schedule update frequency on distributed energy storage performance in renewable energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The value of schedule update frequency on distributed energy storage performance in renewable of Distributed Energy Storage devices for Renewable Energy integration. The primary objective is to describe scheduling on the storage performance in renewable energy integration. Optimal schedules of Distributed

  11. On the Storage Capacity of the Hopfield Model with Biased Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bielefeld, University of

    On the Storage Capacity of the Hopfield Model with Biased Patterns Matthias L¨owe Universit@mathematik.uni­bielefeld.de Keywords: Hopfield model, neural networks, storage capacity, Markov chains, large deviations AMS Subject can store N fl log N or ffN biased patterns (depending on which notion of storage is used

  12. Storage of water on vegetation under simulated rainfall of varying intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keim, Richard

    Storage of water on vegetation under simulated rainfall of varying intensity R.F. Keim a,*, A Little is understood about how storage of water on forest canopies varies during rainfall, even though storage changes intensity of throughfall and thus affects a variety of hydrological processes

  13. Report on Business Case in Hawai`i for Storage Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Report on Business Case in Hawai`i for Storage Options Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy on Business Case in Hawai`i for Storage Options Prepared by Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean, and minimize energy costs. This study will help determine where energy storage technologies can best fit

  14. On the Impact of Storage in Residential Power Distribution Omid Ardakanian, Catherine Rosenberg, and S. Keshav

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterloo, University of

    Report CS-2012-08 ABSTRACT It is anticipated that energy storage will be incorporated of storage on the loading of neighbourhood pole-top transformers. We apply a probabilistic sizing technique to as load) [2]. In this pa- per, we study effect of storage on sizing a neighbourhood pole-top transformer

  15. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vs. Short-Term Energy Storage Technologies Analysis, A Life-Storage Technologies, ACEEE 2008 Summer Study on EnergyStorage Technologies on Microgrid Viability The Distributed Energy

  16. Project Title: Effects of Biosolid Land Application on Pathogens in Irrigation Return Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Project Title: Effects of Biosolid Land Application on Pathogens in Irrigation Return Flow and College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Advisor: Dr. Chris Choi Abstract: Biosolid land application in irrigation return flow from fields applied with biosolids. The results of this study showed that during

  17. Making Sustainable Energy Choices: Insights on the Energy/Water/Land Nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This periodic publication summarizes insights from the body of NREL analysis work. In this issue of Analysis Insights, we examine the implications of our energy choices on water, land use, climate, developmental goals, and other factors. Collectively, NREL's work helps policymakers and investors understand and evaluate energy choices within the complex web of connections, or nexus, between energy, water, and land.

  18. Trade-offs of different land and bioenergy policies on the path to achieving climate targets.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Many papers have shown that bioenergy and land-use are potentially important elements in a strategy to limit anthropogenic climate change. But, significant expansion of bioenergy production can have a large terrestrial footprint. In this paper, we test the implications for land use, the global energy system, carbon cycle, and carbon prices of meeting a specific climate target, using a single fossil fuel and industrial sector policy instrumentthe carbon tax, but with five alternative bioenergy and land-use policy architectures. We find that the policies we examined have differing effects on the different segments of the economy. Comprehensive land policies can reduce land-use change emissions, increasing allowable emissions in the energy system, but have implications for the cost of food. Bioenergy taxes and constraints, on the other hand, have little effect on food prices, but can result in increased carbon and energy prices.

  19. Dynamic Positioning System as Dynamic Energy Storage on Diesel-Electric Ships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    1 Dynamic Positioning System as Dynamic Energy Storage on Diesel-Electric Ships Tor A. Johansen in order to implement energy storage in the kinetic and potential energy of the ship motion using the DP in order to relate the dynamic energy storage capacity to the maximum allowed ship position deviation

  20. Optimal Energy Management for a Hybrid Energy Storage System for Electric Vehicles Based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paderborn, Universität

    Optimal Energy Management for a Hybrid Energy Storage System for Electric Vehicles Based are used as energy storage. The size of the battery depends not only on the driving range, but also Deterministic Dynamic Programming. To determine an energy management to control the power flows to the storage

  1. Effect of continuous exposure to exogenous ethylene during cold storage on postharvest decay development and quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crisosto, Carlos H.

    Effect of continuous exposure to exogenous ethylene during cold storage on postharvest decay benefit could be expected from actively removing ethylene from cold storage rooms or transport containers million) induces flesh soft- ening, limiting long-term cold storage (Mitchell, 1990). Recently, Wills et

  2. On the Storage Capacity of Hopfield Models with Weakly Correlated Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bielefeld, University of

    On the Storage Capacity of Hopfield Models with Weakly Correlated Patterns Matthias L¨owe Universit@mathematik.uni­bielefeld.de Keywords: Hopfield model, neural networks, storage capacity, Markov chains, large deviations AMS Subject Classification: 82C32, 82B44, 60K35 Abstract We analyze the storage capacity of different forms of the Hopfield

  3. Storage-discharge relationships at different catchment scales based on local high-precision gravimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troch, Peter

    Storage-discharge relationships at different catchment scales based on local high, Institute of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Potsdam, Germany Abstract: In hydrology, the storage of catchment science. To date, there are no direct methods to measure water storage at catchment scales (101

  4. Dark Clouds on the Horizon: Using Cloud Storage as Attack Vector and Online Slack Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dark Clouds on the Horizon: Using Cloud Storage as Attack Vector and Online Slack Space Martin this as online slack space. We conclude by discussing security improvements for mod- ern online storage services protocol. With the advent of cloud computing and the shared usage of resources, these centralized storage

  5. TamperEvident, HistoryIndependent, SubliminalFree Data Structures on PROM Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, David

    , even if the vote storage mechanism is reliable, catastrophic events like power loss and battery failureTamper­Evident, History­Independent, Subliminal­Free Data Structures on PROM Storage ­or­ How constructions for the vote storage unit of an electronic voting machine. In this application, the record

  6. THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 134, 214501 (2011) Nanoconfinement effects on the reversibility of hydrogen storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of hydrogen storage in ammonia borane: A first-principles study Kiseok Chang,1 Eunja Kim,2 Philippe F. Weck,3-state materials capable of storing hydrogen, the NH3BH3 compound called ammonia borane (AB), with an ideal storage2 kg-1 ) density targets specified by the U.S. Department of Energy for on-board hydrogen storage.4

  7. On the Benefits of Transparent Compression for Cost-Effective Cloud Data Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    On the Benefits of Transparent Compression for Cost-Effective Cloud Data Storage Bogdan Nicolae of IaaS middleware: excessive storage costs associated with both user data and VM images might make-off resulting from transparently applying data compression to conserve storage space and bandwidth at the cost

  8. Effects of Storage Container Color and Shading on Water Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, James Brent

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    RWH systems has become a concern. Water temperature is a parameter of water quality and storage container color and shading affect this temperature. Four different colors and three different shadings were applied to twelve rainwater storage barrels...

  9. Effect of Land Surface Heterogeneity on Satellite Near-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jeff

    in regulating the energy and water balance at the soil surface and it is therefore a crucial variable for many. SMOS will carry an L-band (1.4GHz) microwave radiometer and will provide near-surface soil moisture highly heterogeneous land surface conditions. The principal objectives of this research are to (i) test

  10. GIS IN LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT On-Campus Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    GIS and geospatial analysis using real-world spatial data. Learning about GIS is fun and a creative process that all, the ArcGIS geographic information system (GIS) and geospatial methods as applied to land resource will be able to independently conduct your own GIS projects and find solutions to geospatial problems. OTHER

  11. Essays on Economic and Environmental Analysis of Taiwanese Bioenergy Production on Set-Aside Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kung, Chih-Chun

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . This dissertation examines Taiwans potential for bioenergy production using feedstocks grown on set-aside land and discusses the consequent effects on Taiwans energy security plus benefits and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The Taiwan Agricultural Sector Model...

  12. Essays on Economic and Environmental Analysis of Taiwanese Bioenergy Production on Set-Aside Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kung, Chih-Chun

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . This dissertation examines Taiwans potential for bioenergy production using feedstocks grown on set-aside land and discusses the consequent effects on Taiwans energy security plus benefits and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The Taiwan Agricultural Sector Model...

  13. Storage Tanks (Arkansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Storage Tanks regulations is a set of rules and permit requirements mandated by the Arkansas Pollution and Ecology Commission in order to protect the public health and the lands and the waters...

  14. Understanding Participation in Wildlife Conservation Programs on Private Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorice, Michael G.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    with the authority to specify resource use designates and/or actively manages that land so that other goals (e.g., economic) are prioritized over ecological goals (including but not limited to ecosystem function, ecosystem services, biodiversity protection....e., maintaining biodiversity) in order to support ecosystem function and services that enhance human well-being. Endangered species recovery often is not situated in a social dilemma framework. As a result, it can be relatively easy to overlook the perverse...

  15. Storage effects on desorption efficiencies of methyl ethyl ketone and styrene collected on activated charcoal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dommer, Richard Alvin

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the worker ' s breathir ng zone cont ir uously during his working day. Solid ad- sorbents are used almost exclusively I' or this type of sampling. Among the marr, adsorbents avail able (s ! i ca gel, activated alumina, Tenax, etc. } acti&!ated charcoa&1 I... efficier&cy nf methyl etiiy', Ketone and styrene monomer adsorbed on activated charcoal samples, and stored under isotherm&al condit'ions, were investigated as a function of storage time. The dependence of the storage time effects on the storage temp...

  16. Modeling the effect of land cover land use change on estuarine environmental flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahoo, Debabrata

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    , whereas upper half experienced decreasing trends. A similar spatial pattern was not observed for rainfall. Winter season observed maximum number of trends. Wavelet analysis on hydrologic variables, suggested presence of multi-scale temporal variability...

  17. The Effect of War and Its Aftermath on Land Use and Land Cover in Jinotega, Nicaragua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeledon, Esther Beatriz

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bosnia- Herzegovina a Decade Beyond War. Annals of AmericanBrauer, J. The Effect of War on the Natural Environment.of the Persian Gulf War, 1990-1991: Remote Sensing Datasets

  18. Characterizing the Impact of Land Use and Land Cover Change on Freshwater Inflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferijal, Teuku

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and anthropogenic impacts on the contributing watersheds. The Guadalupe Estuary is a primary habitat for many endangered species. The Guadalupe River Watershed, which supplies 70% of freshwater inflows, experiences rapid urbanization and agricultural development...

  19. Improving parameter estimation and water table depth simulation in a land surface model using GRACE water storage and estimated base flow data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S; Yeh, P. J.-F.; Syed, T. H

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007), Estimating ground water storage changes in thestorage (i.e. , all of the snow, ice, surface water, soil moisture, and ground-

  20. The Impact of Biofuel and Greenhouse Gas Policies on Land Management, Agricultural Production, and Environmental Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Justin Scott

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation explores the combined effects of biofuel mandates and terrestrial greenhouse gas GHG mitigation incentives on land use, management intensity, commodity markets, welfare, and the full costs of GHG abatement through conceptual...

  1. Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a Coupled Land Surface Mesoscale Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    winter wheat belt on the mesoscale environment, Monthlygeneration Penn State/NCAR mesoscale model (MM5), NCAR,in a Coupled Land Surface Mesoscale Model H.S. Cooley Energy

  2. The Impact of Biofuel and Greenhouse Gas Policies on Land Management, Agricultural Production, and Environmental Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Justin Scott

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation explores the combined effects of biofuel mandates and terrestrial greenhouse gas GHG mitigation incentives on land use, management intensity, commodity markets, welfare, and the full costs of GHG abatement through conceptual...

  3. Marijuana National Forest: Encroachment on California Public Lands for Cannabis Cultivation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallery, Mark

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    citizens began to grow marijuana on public lands because itand successfully grow and harvest marijuana crops. 36 TheMarijuana National Forest Mallery T he remoteness of Cannabis grow

  4. The influence of deer hunting leases on land values in Brazos County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Francis Boyd

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE INFLUENCE OF DEER HUNTING LEASES ON LAND VALUES IN BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS 1959-1963 A Thesis FRANCIS BOYD ANDREWS Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1965 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics THE INFLUENCE OF DEER HUNTING LEASES ON LAND VALUES IN HRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS 1959-196& A Thesis FRANCIS BOYD ANDREWS Approved as to style and content by: - ~ C airman of Committee...

  5. Essays on the Impact of Development on Agricultural Land Amenities and Values in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machingambi, Memory

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Market land prices ignore the non-market value of ecosystem goods and services; hence, too much agricultural land may be developed. Correct land valuation must include these non-market values. Values of ecosystem services provided by the Richland...

  6. Feasibility Study for Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Hendrix, Project Director; Charles Weir, Project Manager; Dr. John Plodinec, Technology Advisor; Dr. Steve Murray, Economic Advisor

    2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Project Objective: The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians (MBCI) conducted a study of the feasibility of siting a renewable energy biomass-based installation on tribal lands. The purpose of the study was to determine whether such an installation can be economically sustainable, as well as consistent with the cultural, social, and economic goals of the Tribe. Scope: To achieve the goal of the feasibility study, the following tasks were carried out: (1) Resource availability assessment--The objective of this assessment was to determine the availability of both poultry litter and wood residues for use in the proposed facility. (2) Power utilization assessment--The objective of this assessment was to determine the potential market size for power produced, the existing infrastructure for delivering power to that market, and the costs and economic returns for doing so. (3) Technology review--The objective of this review was to identify one, or more, technical options for detailed economic and technical assessment. The study considered a range of feedstock and product mixtures of poultry litter; wood residues as feedstock; and electrical power and other ancillary products as outputs. Distributed power sources was also examined. Technologies ranging from gasification to systems that produce both power and value-added chemicals were considered. Technologies selected for detailed review were those that can be sized to process the amount of available feed (poultry litter, or poultry litter and wood residues), and that also appear to make economic sense in terms of the value of their inputs. The technology review leaned heavily on the experience from similar prior DOE projects, particularly those conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). NREL was involved in a consultative role, so that the project team could leverage their experience. (4) Systems Design(s)--Based on the technology review, a pre-conceptual design for an installation was developed. This included identification of unit operations and equipment, maintenance, manpower, feedstock requirements, and output (power and any other ancillary products). Energy and mass flows were identified. (5) Manpower development assessment--The objectives of this assessment was to identify training needs for the selected option(s), and determine how they can best be met. Using the manpower estimates from the pre-conceptual system design, skills and training needs were to be identified. A plan for providing the needed manpower was to be developed, and any associated costs determined. (6) Economic assessment--The objective of this assessment was to determine the economic viability and sustainability of the technology option(s) identified through the technical review option. The costs of bringing the feedstock to the proposed facility were combined with nominal operation costs and potential production distribution costs to identify total costs. Revenue from power distribution (and, possibly, from sale of ancillary products) were combined with any possible government credits or payments to identify gross revenue. Economic viability was determined by net revenue and return on investment. A business plan for the selected option was to be produced that would consider long-term sustainability of the project. (7) MBCI compatibility assessment--The objective of this assessment was to determine whether the renewable energy technology was compatible with the MBCI's cultural, social and economic values. As part of this assessment, the environmental impacts and benefits were to be determined (Environmental stewardship is an important part of the Choctaw culture.). The effects of a project on employment were projected. The compatibility of the renewable energy project with MBCI cultural and social values were determined. Most importantly, the compatibility of the renewable energy installation with the MBCIs economic development goals and directions were determined. A project team led by the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians (MBCI) conducted the feasibility study. The team included th

  7. Effects of flow cell design on charge percolation and storage...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrochemical flow capacitor Energy storage Flow battery Flowable electrode Supercapacitor a b s t r a c t The electrochemical flow capacitor (EFC) is an electrical energy...

  8. Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Reactors More Documents & Publications Information Request, "THE REPORT TO THE PRESIDENT...

  9. On-site storage of low and intermediate level radwaste at INER, R.O.C.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pen, B.L. [Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research, Lung-Tan (Taiwan, Province of China). Chemical Engineering Div.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The radwaste on-site storage at INER has operated since 1977. In this paper the storage facilities including liquid ILW tanks, solid ILW vaults, silos and LLW warehouses were reported. For the sake of complying with the new radiation protection regulations, a facility upgrading plan which contains three programs is on schedule. The main upgrading program is storage buildings construction. This paper also briefly describes the contents of the plan.

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: implement energy storage projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    implement energy storage projects Sandian Spoke at the New York Energy Storage Expo On December 12, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Grid Integration,...

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: evaluate energy storage opportunity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy storage opportunity Sandian Spoke at the New York Energy Storage Expo On December 12, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Grid Integration,...

  12. Acquiring Land Use Rights in Today's China: A Snapshot from on the Ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, Gregory M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the effectiveness of land reclamation, noting that reclaimedand that reclamation of marginally fertile land may havereclamation process as "turning mud into agri- cultural land."

  13. 992 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 5, NO. 2, MARCH 2014 Adaptive Control for Energy Storage Systems in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    992 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 5, NO. 2, MARCH 2014 Adaptive Control for Energy Storage) power generation and energy storage systems into the smart grid will provide a better way of utilizing and storage systems. Index Terms--Control, energy storage, photovoltaic, prediction. I. INTRODUCTION

  14. Potential influence of climate-induced vegetation shifts on future land use and associated land carbon fluxes in Northern Eurasia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kicklighter, D W

    Climate change will alter ecosystem metabolism and may lead to a redistribution of vegetation and changes in fire regimes in Northern Eurasia over the 21st century. Land management decisions will interact with these ...

  15. Foreign experience on effects of extended dry storage on the integrity of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, K.J.; Mitchell, S.J.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a survey of foreign experience in dry storage of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors that was carried out for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The report reviews the mechanisms for degradation of spent fuel cladding and fuel materials in dry storage, identifies the status and plans of world-wide experience and applications, and documents the available information on the expected long-term integrity of the dry-stored spent fuel from actual foreign experience. Countries covered in this survey are: Argentina, Canada, Federal Republic of Germany (before reunification with the former East Germany), former German Democratic Republic (former East Germany), France, India, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the former USSR (most of these former Republics are now in the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS)). Industrial dry storage of Magnox fuels started in 1972 in the United Kingdom; Canada began industrial dry storage of CANDU fuels in 1980. The technology for safe storage is generally considered to be developed for time periods of 30 to 100 years for LWR fuel in inert gas and for some fuels in oxidizing gases at low temperatures. Because it will probably be decades before countries will have a repository for spent fuels and high-level wastes, the plans for expanded use of dry storage have increased significantly in recent years and are expected to continue to increase in the near future.

  16. Foreign experience on effects of extended dry storage on the integrity of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, K.J.; Mitchell, S.J.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a survey of foreign experience in dry storage of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors that was carried out for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The report reviews the mechanisms for degradation of spent fuel cladding and fuel materials in dry storage, identifies the status and plans of world-wide experience and applications, and documents the available information on the expected long-term integrity of the dry-stored spent fuel from actual foreign experience. Countries covered in this survey are: Argentina, Canada, Federal Republic of Germany (before reunification with the former East Germany), former German Democratic Republic (former East Germany), France, India, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the former USSR (most of these former Republics are now in the Commonwealth of Independent States [CIS]). Industrial dry storage of Magnox fuels started in 1972 in the United Kingdom; Canada began industrial dry storage of CANDU fuels in 1980. The technology for safe storage is generally considered to be developed for time periods of 30 to 100 years for LWR fuel in inert gas and for some fuels in oxidizing gases at low temperatures. Because it will probably be decades before countries will have a repository for spent fuels and high-level wastes, the plans for expanded use of dry storage have increased significantly in recent years and are expected to continue to increase in the near future.

  17. Matt Rogers on AES Energy Storage | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to a 17.1M conditional loan guarantee commitment. This project will develop the first battery-based energy storage system to provide a more stable and efficient electrical grid...

  18. Metal-assisted hydrogen storage on Pt-decorated single-walled carbon nanohorns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geohegan, David B.

    to a future hydrogen economy is the lack of suitable on-board hydrogen storage media, which urgently requiresMetal-assisted hydrogen storage on Pt-decorated single-walled carbon nanohorns Yun Liu a,b,*, Craig dissociation of hydrogen molecules by metal nanoparticles and spillover of atomic hydrogen onto various

  19. Implications of a Regime-Switching Model on Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forsyth, Peter A.

    Implications of a Regime-Switching Model on Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation-switching model for the risk adjusted natural gas spot price and study the implications of the model on the valuation and optimal operation of natural gas storage facilities. We calibrate the model parameters to both

  20. Combined on-board hydride slurry storage and reactor system and process for hydrogen-powered vehicles and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brooks, Kriston P; Holladay, Jamelyn D; Simmons, Kevin L; Herling, Darrell R

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An on-board hydride storage system and process are described. The system includes a slurry storage system that includes a slurry reactor and a variable concentration slurry. In one preferred configuration, the storage system stores a slurry containing a hydride storage material in a carrier fluid at a first concentration of hydride solids. The slurry reactor receives the slurry containing a second concentration of the hydride storage material and releases hydrogen as a fuel to hydrogen-power devices and vehicles.

  1. Proceedings of the workshop on polarized targets in storage rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, R.J. (ed.)

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polarization phenomena have played an increasingly important part in the study of nuclei and nucleons in recent years. Polarization studies have been hampered by the relatively few and rather fragile polarized targets which are presently available. The concept of polarized gas targets in storage rings opens a much wider range of possibilities than is available in the external target geometry. This novel method will represent a considerable advance in nuclear physics and will continue to receive much attention in plans for future facilities. An internal, polarized-target station is being planned for the cooler ring at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. Internal targets are compatible with recent designs of electron accelerators proposed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Southeastern Universities Research Association. The key to nuclear-science programs based on internal targets pivots on recent developments in polarized atomic beam methods, which include the more recent laser-driven polarized targets. The workshop drew together a unique group of physicists in the fields of high-energy, nuclear and atomic physics. The meeting was organized in a manner that stimulated discussion among the 58 participants and focused on developments in polarized target technology and the underlying atomic physics. An impressive array of future possibilities for polarized targets as well as current developments in polarized target technology were discussed at the workshop. Abstracts of individual items from the workshop were prepared separately for the data base.

  2. Research project on CO2 geological storage and groundwater resources: Large-scale hydrological evaluation and modeling of impact on groundwater systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin; Rutqvist, Jonny; Jordan, Preston; Zhang, K.; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    storage on shallow groundwater and pressure-controlled72 5.2. Modeling of Regional Groundwater2 Geological Storage and Groundwater Resources Large-Scale

  3. Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a CoupledLand Surface Mesoscale Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The land surface has been shown to form strong feedbacks with climate due to linkages between atmospheric conditions and terrestrial ecosystem exchanges of energy, momentum, water, and trace gases. Although often ignored in modeling studies, land management itself may form significant feedbacks. Because crops are harvested earlier under drier conditions, regional air temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture, for example, affect harvest timing, particularly of rain-fed crops. This removal of vegetation alters the land surface characteristics and may, in turn, affect regional climate. We applied a coupled climate(MM5) and land-surface (LSM1) model to examine the effects of early and late winter wheat harvest on regional climate in the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility in the Southern Great Plains, where winter wheat accounts for 20 percent of the land area. Within the winter wheat region, simulated 2 m air temperature was 1.3 C warmer in the Early Harvest scenario at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Soils in the harvested area were drier and warmer in the top 10 cm and wetter in the 10-20 cm layer. Midday soils were 2.5 C warmer in the harvested area at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Harvest also dramatically altered latent and sensible heat fluxes. Although differences between scenarios diminished once both scenarios were harvested, the short-term impacts of land management on climate were comparable to those from land cover change demonstrated in other studies.

  4. Characterization of oil and gas reservoirs and recovery technology deployment on Texas State Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.; Major, R.P.; Holtz, M.H. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas State Lands oil and gas resources are estimated at 1.6 BSTB of remaining mobile oil, 2.1 BSTB, or residual oil, and nearly 10 Tcf of remaining gas. An integrated, detailed geologic and engineering characterization of Texas State Lands has created quantitative descriptions of the oil and gas reservoirs, resulting in delineation of untapped, bypassed compartments and zones of remaining oil and gas. On Texas State Lands, the knowledge gained from such interpretative, quantitative reservoir descriptions has been the basis for designing optimized recovery strategies, including well deepening, recompletions, workovers, targeted infill drilling, injection profile modification, and waterflood optimization. The State of Texas Advanced Resource Recovery program is currently evaluating oil and gas fields along the Gulf Coast (South Copano Bay and Umbrella Point fields) and in the Permian Basin (Keystone East, Ozona, Geraldine Ford and Ford West fields). The program is grounded in advanced reservoir characterization techniques that define the residence of unrecovered oil and gas remaining in select State Land reservoirs. Integral to the program is collaboration with operators in order to deploy advanced reservoir exploitation and management plans. These plans are made on the basis of a thorough understanding of internal reservoir architecture and its controls on remaining oil and gas distribution. Continued accurate, detailed Texas State Lands reservoir description and characterization will ensure deployment of the most current and economically viable recovery technologies and strategies available.

  5. NERSC HPSS Storage Statistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Trends and Summaries Storage by Scientific Discipline Troubleshooting IO Resources for Scientific Applications at NERSC Optimizing IO performance on the Lustre file...

  6. Storage Alternatives for Mobile Computers \\Lambda Fred Douglis Ram'on C'aceres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    storage technologies offer two alter natives for file storage on mobile computers: magnetic hard disks Laboratories AT&T Bell Laboratories Frans Kaashoek Kai Li Massachusetts Institute of Technology Princeton University Brian Marsh Joshua A. Tauber D.E. Shaw & Co. Massachusetts Institute of Technology To appear

  7. Futurestock'2003 9 International Conference on Thermal Energy Storage, Warsaw, POLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    381 Futurestock'2003 9 th International Conference on Thermal Energy Storage, Warsaw, POLAND is also needed when designing a BTES (Borehole Thermal Energy Storage) system. The ground thermal Thermal Response Test for BTES Applications - State of the Art 2001 Signhild GEHLIN1 and Jeff D. SPITLER2

  8. Remediation of CO2 Leakage from Deep Saline Aquifer Storage Based on Reservoir and Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Remediation of CO2 Leakage from Deep Saline Aquifer Storage Based on Reservoir and Pollution Hazards and Safety of CO2 Storage" Division, Orlans, FRANCE www.brgm.fr References Audigane, P., Chiaberge, C., Lions, J., Humez, P., 2009. Modeling of CO2 leakage through an abandoned well from a deep

  9. Results of the free electron laser oscillation experiments on the ACO storage ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    989 Results of the free electron laser oscillation experiments on the ACO storage ring P. Elleaume. Abstract. 2014 A storage ring free-electron laser oscillator has been operated above threshold at a visible] or from a free electron laser. The free electron laser (F.E.L.) is a very promising source of coherent

  10. The legacy of harvest and fire on ecosystem carbon storage in a north temperate forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis, Peter S.

    to store carbon (C) due to variation in disturbance frequency and intensity, successional status, soil: Disturbance effects on forest carbon storage Final Submission to Global Change Biology 1 #12;Summary1 2 3 4 5 this legacy of disturbance constrains forest carbon (C) storage rates by quantifying C pools and fluxes after

  11. Hierarchical Marginal Land Assessment for Land Use Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL; Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marginal land provides an alternative potential for food and bioenergy production in the face of limited land resources; however, effective assessment of marginal lands is not well addressed. Concerns over environmental risks, ecosystem services and sustainability for marginal land have been widely raised. The objective of this study was to develop a hierarchical marginal land assessment framework for land use planning and management. We first identified major land functions linking production, environment, ecosystem services and economics, and then classified land resources into four categories of marginal land using suitability and limitations associated with major management goals, including physically marginal land, biologically marginal land, environmental-ecological marginal land, and economically marginal land. We tested this assessment framework in south-western Michigan, USA. Our results indicated that this marginal land assessment framework can be potentially feasible on land use planning for food and bioenergy production, and balancing multiple goals of land use management. We also compared our results with marginal land assessment from the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and land capability classes (LCC) that are used in the US. The hierarchical assessment framework has advantages of quantitatively reflecting land functions and multiple concerns. This provides a foundation upon which focused studies can be identified in order to improve the assessment framework by quantifying high-resolution land functions associated with environment and ecosystem services as well as their criteria are needed to improve the assessment framework.

  12. Double Beta Decay Constraints on Neutrino Masses and Mixing; Reanalysis with KamLAND Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hisakazu Minakata; Hiroaki Sugiyama

    2003-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In the light of KamLAND data just released, we reanalyze and update the constraints on neutrino masses and mixing parameters, the most general ones that can be derived in three-flavor mixing scheme of neutrinos with use of the bounds imposed by neutrinoless double beta decay search and reactor experiments. We point out that with KamLAND data and assuming Majorana neutrinos one can derive, for the first time, an upper bound on neutrino contribution to the cosmological \\Omega parameter, \\Omega_{\

  13. Final Report, Wind Power Resource Assessment on the Warm Springs Reservation Tribal Lands, Report No. DOE/GO/12103

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jim Manion, Warm Springs Power & Water Enterprises; David McClain, McClain & Associates; HDR Engineering; Dr. Stel Walker, Oregon State University

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report concludes a five-year assessment of wind energy potential on the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon lands.

  14. Information handbook on independent spent fuel storage installations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raddatz, M.G.; Waters, M.D.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this information handbook, the staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission describes (1) background information regarding the licensing and history of independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs), (2) a discussion of the licensing process, (3) a description of all currently approved or certified models of dry cask storage systems (DCSSs), and (4) a description of sites currently storing spent fuel in an ISFSI. Storage of spent fuel at ISFSIs must be in accordance with the provisions of 10 CFR Part 72. The staff has provided this handbook for information purposes only. The accuracy of any information herein is not guaranteed. For verification or for more details, the reader should refer to the respective docket files for each DCSS and ISFSI site. The information in this handbook is current as of September 1, 1996.

  15. DRAFT, November 2, 1998 Carbon Sequestration via Tree Planting on Agricultural Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    1 DRAFT, November 2, 1998 Carbon Sequestration via Tree Planting on Agricultural Lands: An Economic affect program cost and net carbon sequestration. The focus on the provisions of tree planting agreements the cost and net carbon gains under a sequestration program. We will also investigate design aspects

  16. Impacts of Array Configuration on Land-Use Requirements for Large-Scale Photovoltaic Deployment in the United States: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use is often cited as an important issue for renewable energy technologies. In this paper we examine the relationship between land-use requirements for large-scale photovoltaic (PV) deployment in the U.S. and PV-array configuration. We estimate the per capita land requirements for solar PV and find that array configuration is a stronger driver of energy density than regional variations in solar insolation. When deployed horizontally, the PV land area needed to meet 100% of an average U.S. citizen's electricity demand is about 100 m2. This requirement roughly doubles to about 200 m2 when using 1-axis tracking arrays. By comparing these total land-use requirements with other current per capita land uses, we find that land-use requirements of solar photovoltaics are modest, especially when considering the availability of zero impact 'land' on rooftops. Additional work is need to examine the tradeoffs between array spacing, self-shading losses, and land use, along with possible techniques to mitigate land-use impacts of large-scale PV deployment.

  17. Impacts of Array Configuration on Land Use Requirements for Large-Scale Photovoltaic Deployment in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use is often cited as an important issue for renewable energy technologies. In this paper we examine the relationship between land-use requirements for large-scale photovoltaic (PV) deployment in the U.S. and PV-array configuration. We estimate the per capita land requirements for solar PV and find that array configuration is a stronger driver of energy density than regional variations in solar insolation. When deployed horizontally, the PV land area needed to meet 100% of an average U.S. citizen's electricity demand is about 100 m{sup 2}. This requirement roughly doubles to about 200 m{sup 2} when using 1-axis tracking arrays. By comparing these total land-use requirements with other current per capita land uses, we find that land-use requirements of solar photovoltaics are modest, especially when considering the availability of zero impact 'land' on rooftops. Additional work is need to examine the tradeoffs between array spacing, self-shading losses, and land use, along with possible techniques to mitigate land-use impacts of large-scale PV deployment.

  18. NASA Perspectives on Cryo H2 DOE Hydrogen Storage Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -space, MMOD protection) -Vapor/cryocooler cooled shields - Sun shades - Low conductivity/ cooled support propellant - Inventory (Bookkeeping) - Pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) - High accuracy low-g techniques;7 NASA Cryogenic Technology Objectives To develop storage and distribution technologies for cryogens

  19. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde in building materials to the timescale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure will depend in the indoor environment, which occurs over much shorter depletion timescales of the order of days. This model

  20. Monolithic three-dimensional electrochemical energy storage system on aerogel or nanotube scaffold

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmer, Joseph C; Stadermann, Michael

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithic three-dimensional electrochemical energy storage system is provided on an aerogel or nanotube scaffold. An anode, separator, cathode, and cathodic current collector are deposited on the aerogel or nanotube scaffold.

  1. Monolithic three-dimensional electrochemical energy storage system on aerogel or nanotube scaffold

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmer, Joseph Collin; Stadermann, Michael

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithic three-dimensional electrochemical energy storage system is provided on an aerogel or nanotube scaffold. An anode, separator, cathode, and cathodic current collector are deposited on the aerogel or nanotube scaffold.

  2. The effects of the sequence of land development on the property valuation and taxation of Bryan, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorensen, Gary Lynn

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reasons. First, the assessing rrethod is more defined and more uniformly standard. Second, the city lists separate valuations for land and improvements. 1970, Cit -Land Briefly reviewing the assessment method, the land value is calculated...'IHE ~ OF THE SEQUENCE OF IAND DEVEIDPMENT ON THE PROPERTY VALUATION AND TAXATION OF BRYAN, TEXAS A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas %&1 University in partial fulfi11rrent of the reguireaents for the degree of MASTER...

  3. Urban and land surface effects on the 30 July 2003 mesoscale convective system event observed in the southern Great Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    Urban and land surface effects on the 30 July 2003 mesoscale convective system event observed/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS 1 ) to investigate the impact of urban and land vegetation processes on the prediction of the mesoscale convective system (MCS) observed on 30 July 2003 in the vicinity of Oklahoma City

  4. Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance in Terrestrial Plants Water Regulation on LandWater Regulation on Land --PlantsPlants WWipip= W= Wrr + W+ Waa --WWtt --WWss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    1 Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance in Terrestrial Plants Water Regulation on LandWater waters internal water WWrr =Roots=Roots WWaa = Air= Air WWtt = Transpiration= Transpiration WWss = Secretions= Secretions Water Regulation on Land - Plants Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance

  5. Developing Clean Energy Projects on Tribal Lands: Data and Resources for Tribes (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a outreach brochure (booklet) for the DOE Office of Indian Energy summarizing the renewable energy technology potential on tribal lands. The booklet features tech potential maps for various technologies, information about the activities of DOE-IE, and resources for Tribes.

  6. Short term effects of moderate carbon prices on land use in the New Zealand emissions trading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Short term effects of moderate carbon prices on land use in the New Zealand emissions trading Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (NZ ETS) was introduced through the Climate Change Response Act............................................................................ 14 #12;1 1 Introduction The New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (NZ ETS) was legislated through

  7. Diurnal and seasonal variations of wind farm impacts on land surface temperature over western Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Liming

    Diurnal and seasonal variations of wind farm impacts on land surface temperature over western Texas for the period of 20032011 over a region in West-Central Texas, where four of the world's largest wind farms by comparing the LST changes between wind farm pixels (WFPs) and nearby non wind farm pixels (NNWFPs) using

  8. Tree Biomass Estimates on Forest Land in California's North Coast Region1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Tree Biomass Estimates on Forest Land in California's North Coast Region1 Tian-Ting Shih2 Tree biomass is one essential component in a forest ecosystem and is getting more attention nowadays due to its sequestration, energy production, and other natural and social resources uses and impacts. A biomass estimator

  9. Impacts of Land Management on Agroecosystem Carbon Fluxes in the Upper Midwest, United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Impacts of Land Management on Agroecosystem Carbon Fluxes in the Upper Midwest, United States Investigators: T.J. Griffis and J.M. Baker Funding Source: United States Department of Energy, Office-soybean rotation systems located in the Upper Midwest. The management strategies will include: 1) Conventional corn

  10. 19.1 Introduction Carbon sequestration programs on land and in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Chapter 19 19.1 Introduction Carbon sequestration programs on land and in the oceans are gaining sequestration programs emphasize storing carbon in soil organic matter in agri- cultural fields,in woody sequestration and management include the feasibil- ity and permanence of the carbon sequestered, the scale

  11. Hydraulic Effects of Changes in Bottom-Land Vegetation on Three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydraulic Effects of Changes in Bottom-Land Vegetation on Three Major Floods, Gila RiverKelvey, Director Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data Burkham, D. E. 1927 Hydraulic effects 19.16:655-J 1. Gila River-Floods. 2. Hydraulics. 3. Botany-Ecology-Gila River. 1. Title: Hydraulic

  12. Publications on Land Use/Cover Change and Deforestation Peer-Reviewed Articles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    Publications on Land Use/Cover Change and Deforestation Peer-Reviewed Articles Pricope, N. G., G. López-Carr, D. Redo, M. Bonilla, M. Levy (2013). Deforestation and reforestation of Latin America and the Caribbean (2001-2010). Biotropica. 45(2): 262-271. López-Carr, D. and J. Burgdorfer (2013) "Deforestation

  13. Land Use Change Effects on Forest Carbon Cycling Throughout the Southern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and deforestation on carbon cycling in forest floor and soil from 1900 to 2050 throughout 13 states in the southern because afforestation causes a gradual gain in carbon stocks for many decades, while deforestation causes Tg C, and deforestation caused emission of 49 Tg C. However, the net effect of land use change

  14. Had my water gone bad? Family members have lived on our land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    to find out. Hated to spend the money, but it gave me peace of mind. " " " We're protecting our family. We for more help. Some labs will do the sampling for you, right at your home. 4. After you collect your waterHad my water gone bad? Family members have lived on our land for generations. Never had a problem

  15. RESEARCH ARTICLE Impacts of changing climate and land use on vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bern, Universität

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Impacts of changing climate and land use on vegetation dynamics in a Mediterranean coast and in regions that are expected to experience a mediterranean-type climate in the future. Samartin Á O. Heiri Á W. Tinner Institute of Plant Sciences and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research

  16. Feasibility report on criticality issues associated with storage of K Basin sludge in tanks farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vail, T.S.

    1997-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This feasibility study provides the technical justification for conclusions about K Basin sludge storage options. The conclusions, solely based on criticality safety considerations, depend on the treatment of the sludge. The two primary conclusions are, (1) untreated sludge must be stored in a critically safe storage tank, and (2) treated sludge (dissolution, precipitation and added neutron absorbers) can be stored in a standard Double Contained Receiver Tank (DCRT) or 241-AW-105 without future restrictions on tank operations from a criticality safety perspective.

  17. Status report on the Los Alamos proton storage ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colton, E.; Neuffer, D.; Thiessen, H.A.; Butler, H.; Swain, G.R.; Lombardi, A.; Fitzgerald, D.; Mariam, F.; Plum, M.; Ryder, R.; and others

    1988-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The proton storage ring currently operates at an average current of 30 ..mu..A corresponding to 1.25 x 10/sup 13/ protons per pulse (ppp) at a repetition rate of 15 Hz. The design operating current for the machine is 100 ..mu..A. We are limited to running at the reduced yield because of beam losses during the accumulation period. These losses are understood and arise mainly from emittance growths during the injection and multiple scattering in the stripping foil during the storage. During beam studies we have succeeded in accumulating in excess of 3.7 x 10/sup 13/ ppp. We have also observed a coherent transverse instability at high charge levels. The signture for the instability is rapid coherent growth of the transverse beam size followed by a loss of beam in the machine. The threshold for the instability depends most strongly upon rf voltage and beam size.

  18. Status report on the Los Alamos proton storage ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colton, E.; Neuffer, D.; Thiessen, H.A.; Butler, H.; Swain, G.R.; Lombardi, A.; Fitzgerald, D.; Mariam, F.; Plum, M.; Ryder, R.; Macek, R.; Clark, D.; Hurd, C.J.; Hutson, R.; McGill, J.; Hardek, T.; Shafer, R.; Lawrence, G.; Jason, A.; Blind, B.; Hardekopf, R.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proton storage ring currently operates at an average current of 30 ..mu..A corresponding to 1.25 /times/ 10/sup 13/ protons per pulse (ppp) at a repetition rate of 15 Hz. The design operating current for the machine is 100 ..mu..A. We are limited to running at the reduced yield because of beam losses during the accumulation period. These losses are understood and arise mainly from emittance growths during the injection and multiple scattering in the stripping foil during the storage. During beam studies we have succeeded in accumulating in excess of 3.7 /times/ 10/sup 13/ppp. We have also observed a coherent transverse instability at high charge levels. The signature for the instability is rapid coherent growth of the transverse beam size followed by a loss of beam in the machine. The threshold for the instability depends most strongly upon rf voltage and beam size. 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands (216(h)) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014Contributing Data Contributing Data TheCooperation

  20. Theoretical Investigations on Nanoporpus Materials and Ionic Liquids for Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mani Biswas, Mousumi

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . Hydrogen storage in carbon nanotube scaffold. 2. Mechanical property and stability of various nanoporous Metal Organic Frameworks. 3. Thermodynamic and transport properties of [BMIM][BF4] ionic liquid in bulk, in Li Salt mixture, on graphite surface...

  1. Analysis of Impacts on Prime or Unique Agricultural Lands in...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Environmental Policy Act was developed in cooperation with the Department of Agriculture. It updates and supersedes CEQ's previous memorandum on this subject of August...

  2. Energy Corridors on Federal Lands | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register /of Energy 3 BTOWebinarSupplies; ProposedEnergy

  3. Solar Energy on Public Lands | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment of Energy Ready,SmartEnergy OpeningSolarEnergySolaron

  4. The effects of storage on starch characteristics and chip quality of Texas Irish potatoes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Roy E

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Department c Member) (Member) May, 1966 TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter I. INTRODUCTION II. REVIEW OF LITERATURE Page Starch Starch Grain Size Starch Density Effect of Storage on Specific Gravity Effect of Storage on Starch Potato Chips III.... MATERIALS AND METHODS Measurement of Chemical and Physical Changes Specific Gravity Starch Grain Size Dry Matter Percentage Starch Density Starch Percent Chip Quality Chip Qo1or'~ Chip Oil Content Relationship of Starch Characteristics and Chip...

  5. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan Aggett

    2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this segment of work, our goal was to review methods for estimating tree survival, growth, yield and value of forests growing on surface mined land in the eastern coalfields of the USA, and to determine the extent to which carbon sequestration is influenced by these factors. Public Law 95-87, the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), mandates that mined land be reclaimed in a fashion that renders the land at least as productive after mining as it was before mining. In the central Appalachian region, where prime farmland and economic development opportunities for mined land are scarce, the most practical land use choices are hayland/pasture, wildlife habitat, or forest land. Since 1977, the majority of mined land has been reclaimed as hayland/pasture or wildlife habitat, which is less expensive to reclaim than forest land, since there are no tree planting costs. As a result, there are now hundreds of thousands of hectares of grasslands and scrublands in various stages of natural succession located throughout otherwise forested mountains in the U.S. A literature review was done to develop the basis for an economic feasibility study of a range of land-use conversion scenarios. Procedures were developed for both mixed hardwoods and white pine under a set of low product prices and under a set of high product prices. Economic feasibility is based on land expectation values. Further, our review shows that three types of incentive schemes might be important: (1) lump sum payment at planting (and equivalent series of annual payments); (2) revenue incentive at harvest; and (3) benefit based on carbon volume.

  6. Exploration and Development of Oil and Gas on School and Public Lands (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute authorizes the Board of School Lands and Funds to lease school and public lands under its jurisdiction for oil and gas exploration and development purposes.

  7. Converting Limbo Lands to Energy-Generating Stations: Renewable Energy Technologies on Underused, Formerly Contaminated Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosey, G.; Heimiller, D.; Dahle, D.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Brady-Sabeff, L.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the potential for using 'Limbo Lands' (underused, formerly contaminated sites, landfills, brownfields, abandoned mine lands, etc. ) as sites for renewable energy generating stations.

  8. Assessing the Feasibility of Renewable Energy Development and Energy Efficiency Deployment on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nominelli, Gregg R.

    2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) is committed to preserving our natural environment and reducing the amount of fossil fuels consumed while developing "green" business manufacturing jobs on tribal lands. The Tribe's Comprehensive Strategic Plan seeks to diversify the Tribal Economy through the creation of alternative energy businesses, such as wind, solar and bio-mass facilities while protecting the waters of Lake Superior, tribal inland lakes and streams. In addition, the Community desired to utilize clean/green energy resources to promote the self-sufficiency of the Tribal Nation. The objective of the study is to preserve our environment and maintain our cultural goals of using the resources of the land wisely. To reduce our consumption of fossil fuels, mercury and carbon dioxide emissions, which harm our water and land; we have decided to evaluate the opportunities of utilizing wind power. Preliminary projections show that we may eliminate pollution from our land in a cost effective manner. This study will evaluate wind capacity and our current energy consumption while projecting the feasibility of converting to wind power for operations at our major facilities. This project will study the feasibility of wind power at two locations for the purpose of reducing the Tribe's reliance upon fossil fuels and creating business opportunities, jobs and revenue for the community.

  9. Wind Projects on Native American Lands | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTEDBird,Wilsonville, Oregon: EnergyWindCooperatives Jumpto more

  10. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission on Water

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJumpEnergyStrategy |Hatchet Ridge WindHealth Division

  11. Defense, Interior Departments Pursue Renewable Energy on Federal Lands |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197 This workDayton:| Department of EnergyDepartment

  12. Memorandum of Understanding Regarding Transmission Siting on Federal Land

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend <StevensMcClellan,II Jump to:IncMelissa, Texas:shallow

  13. Memorandum of Understanding Regarding Transmission Siting on Federal Land

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio: Energy8429°,Meeteetse,Illinois: Energy Resources(2009) | Open

  14. Energy Corridors on Federal Lands | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard | DepartmentDepartment of Energy Corps Takes Root

  15. New Energy Frontier: Balancing Energy Development on Federal Lands | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: EnergyEnergyPPCR)Nevis EngineCity, New York:Energy

  16. Regulatory Considerations for Developing Generation Projects on Federal Lands

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+18,new2004_v1.3_5.0.zipFlorida4Visitors CanWebinar May 23, 2012Mason

  17. The impact of biofuel mandates on land use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Suhail, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of biofuels in domestic transportation sector in the United States and European Union is attributed mainly to the binding mandates, Renewable Fuel Standard in the US and European Directive on the Promotion of ...

  18. Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements to Meet the 2017 On Board Hydrogen Storage Technical Targets

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D eReview |Panel HydrogenM M a a r r c

  19. Regulatory Impacts for Renewable Energy Projects on Indian Lands Webinar |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -Department of Energyas ofCheniereDepartment of

  20. Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1,(EAC)TABLE OF CONTENTSTogether with the National6, 2015

  1. Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 atthe DistrictIndependentDepartment4.docfrom Bio-Oil UpgradingColorado |

  2. An Analysis: Outdoor Recreation on Government Lands in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, David J.; Reid, Leslie M.

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and local agencies. Founded by the Franciscans in 1720, it is often referred to as "Queen of the Missions." The Aliba tes Flint Quarries National Monu- ment is located on the southern rim of Lake Meri- tlith in the Panhandle. This facility reveals...

  3. The impact of climate, CO2, nitrogen deposition and land use change on simulated contemporary global river flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Forrest M.

    The impact of climate, CO2, nitrogen deposition and land use change on simulated contemporary., 38, L08704, doi:10.1029/ 2011GL046773. 1. Introduction [2] Climate change and human activities and Fung [2008] found that climate and land use change play more important roles than the stomatal closure

  4. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacommare, Kristina S H; Stadler, Michael; Aki, Hirohisa; Firestone, Ryan; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g., PV, fuel cells, reciprocating engines or microturbines operating with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and carbon emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that has the minimization of annual energy costs as its objective function. By implementing this approach in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS), the problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, such as schools and nursing homes, to obtain not only the level of technology investment, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in DER optimization on a building level, with example applications for commercial buildings. Preliminary analysis indicates that storage technologies respond effectively to time-varying electricity prices, i.e., by charging batteries during periods of low electricity prices and discharging them during peak hours. The results also indicate that storage technologies significantly alter the residual load profile, which can contribute to lower carbon emissions depending on the test site, its load profile, and its adopted DER technologies.

  5. Wind Power on Native American Lands: Process and Progress (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez, A.; Flowers, L.; Gough, R.; Taylor, R.

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States is home to more than 700 American Indian tribes and Native Alaska villages and corporations located on 96 million acres. Many of these tribes and villages have excellent wind resources that could be commercially developed to meet their electricity needs or for electricity export. The Wind Powering America program engages Native Americans in wind energy development. This poster describes the process and progress of Wind Powering America's involvement with Native American wind energy projects.

  6. Evaluation of a land management based infiltration equation on rangelands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouraoui, Faycal

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    de Tunis Chair of Advisory Committee: Mary Leigh Wolfe SPUR is the newest model developed for use on rangelands. It is a comprehensive model simulating all the broad aspects of the range ecosystem. The original SPUR model computes the runoff... of the equations. Aase et al. (1973), Hanks (1974), de Jong and McDonald (1975), Hanson (1976), Ritchie et al. (1976) and Rasmusssen and Hanks (1978) developed such models to predict evapotranspiration from native rangelands. However, rangeland managers were...

  7. 1995 Report on Hanford site land disposal restrictions for mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, D.G.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was submitted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestone M-26-01E. This milestone requires the preparation of an annual report that covers characterization, treatment, storage, minimization, and other aspects of land disposal restricted mixed waste at the Hanford Site. The U.S. Department of Energy, its predecessors, and contractors at the Hanford Site were involved in the production and purification of nuclear defense materials from the early 1940s to the late 1980s. These production activities have generated large quantities of liquid and solid radioactive mixed waste. This waste is subject to regulation under authority of both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 and Atomic Energy Act of 1954. This report covers mixed waste only. The Washington State Department of Ecology, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and U.S. Department of Energy have entered into an agreement, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (commonly referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement) to bring the Hanford Site operations into compliance with dangerous waste regulations. The Tri-Party Agreement required development of the original land disposal restrictions (LDRs) plan and its annual updates to comply with LDR requirements for radioactive mixed waste. This report is the fifth update of the plan first issued in 1990. Tri-Party Agreement negotiations completed in 1993 and approved in January 1994 changed and added many new milestones. Most of the changes were related to the Tank Waste Remediation System and these changes are incorporated into this report.

  8. Q&A on "Impacts of Wind Farms on Land Surface Temperature" Published by Nature Climate Change on April 29, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Liming

    1 Q&A on "Impacts of Wind Farms on Land Surface Temperature" Published by Nature Climate Change? This study presents the first observational evidence of wind farm impacts on land surface temperature downwind of wind farms. Why do the operating wind turbines warm nighttime temperature? This warming effect

  9. ABSTRACT: The effect of the cotton storage trisaccharide raf-finose and cottonseed storage protein (CSP) in combination on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotty, Peter J.

    ABSTRACT: The effect of the cotton storage trisaccharide raf- finose and cottonseed storage protein of ground whole cottonseed and water-extracted cotton- seed meal to support fungal biosynthesis of aflatoxin in raffinose refer- ence media. Results with ground whole cottonseed as a sole carbon/nitrogen source

  10. Aquifer thermal energy storage: a survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, C.F.; Hopkins, D.; Hellstroem, G.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disparity between energy production and demand in many power plants has led to increased research on the long-term, large-scale storage of thermal energy in aquifers. Field experiments have been conducted in Switzerland, France, the United States, Japan, and the People's Republic of China to study various technical aspects of aquifer storage of both hot and cold water. Furthermore, feasibility studies now in progress include technical, economic, and environmental analyses, regional exploration to locate favorable storage sites, and evaluation and design of pilot plants. Several theoretical and modeling studies are also under way. Among the topics being studied using numerical models are fluid and heat flow, dispersion, land subsidence or uplift, the efficiency of different injection/withdrawal schemes, buoyancy tilting, numerical dispersion, the use of compensation wells to counter regional flow, steam injection, and storage in narrow glacial deposits of high permeability. Experiments to date illustrate the need for further research and development to ensure successful implementation of an aquifer storage system. Some of the areas identified for further research include shape and location of the hydrodynamic and thermal fronts, choice of appropriate aquifers, thermal dispersion, possibility of land subsidence or uplift, thermal pollution, water chemistry, wellbore plugging and heat exchange efficiency, and control of corrosion.

  11. Wind Power on Native American Lands: Opportunities, Challenges, and Status (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez, A.; Johnson, P. B.; Gough, R.; Robichaud, R.; Flowers, L.; Taylor, R.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States is home to more than 700 American Indian tribes and Native Alaska villages and corporations located on 96 million acres. Many of these tribes and villages have excellent wind resources that could be commercially developed to meet their electricity needs or for electricity export. This conference poster for Windpower 2007 describes the opportunities, challenges, and status of wind energy projects on Native American lands in the United States.

  12. Land Use Manager Application Ensures Protectiveness Following Remediation on the Oak Ridge Reservation - 13355

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garland, Sid; Brown, Sally; Sims, Lynn [Restoration Services, Inc., P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Restoration Services, Inc., P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Darby, Jason [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Oak Ridge Site (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Oak Ridge Site (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term stewardship is the set of activities necessary to return contaminated land to safe and beneficial use. The activities include physical and legal controls to prevent inappropriate exposure to contamination left in place at a site. It is the longest phase of the Department of Energy's Environmental Management Program and ensures the protection of human health and the environment for varied end uses. At the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation an automated program has been developed and implemented that tracks the multitude of long-term stewardship activities. The Oak Ridge Reservation is a large site that currently has over 50 actions requiring long-term stewardship activities. The Oak Ridge Reservation consists primarily of three plant sites, and long-term stewardship will enable these sites to be leased to private entities (East Tennessee Technology Park), modernized for an evolving national security mission (Y-12 National Security Complex), and revitalized to continue multi-disciplinary research (Oak Ridge National Laboratory). The varied site end uses of the individual plant sites coupled with the multitude of controls required by leaving waste in place presents challenges. A single remedial action may include surveillance and maintenance activities, media monitoring, property record notices as well as physical controls such as fences and signs. Thus, the array of long-term stewardship activities is complex and intermingled (over 200 inspections each year at various frequencies are required currently) and requires an effective tracking program, termed the Land Use Manager. The Land Use Manager is a web-based data management application for use by personnel responsible for implementing, maintaining, and verifying engineering and land use controls on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The program is a data entry and tracking tool, as well as a notification tool. The status and performance of engineering and land use controls are checked annually for evaluation in the required Remediation Effectiveness Report, and the automated Land Use Manager collects, maintains, tracks, notifies, monitors, and manages the information necessary to perform this evaluation. Land Use Manager tracks site information including type of contamination, regulatory requirements, locates land use controls; provides information on inspections, certification, and reporting; and provides reports. Most data access features, e.g., view, print, query, and download, are available to all users; however, data input, updating, and editing are restricted to the personnel directly responsible for monitoring and inspection. The Land Use Manager application was developed for the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office by URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC, Restoration Services Incorporated, and MIJARA Corporation to meet the specific needs of long-term stewardship tracking on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The successful implementation of long-term stewardship enables the future government and private activities being planned on the Oak Ridge Reservation to proceed. (authors)

  13. Application of advanced composites for efficient on-board storage of fuel in natural gas vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sirosh, S.N. [EDO Canada Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following outlines the performance requirements for high pressure containers for on-board storage of fuel in Natural Gas Vehicles. The construction of state-of-the-art carbon-fiber reinforced all-composite cylinders is described and the validation testing and key advantages are discussed. Carbon-fiber reinforced advanced composite technology offers a number of key advantages to the NGV industry, by providing: improved range, including up to 30% more fuel storage for a given storage envelope and up to 300% more fuel storage for a given weight allowance; life-cycle cost advantages, including savings in non-recurring costs (installation), savings in recurring costs (fuel and maintenance), and increased revenues from more passengers/payload; and uncompromising safety, namely, superior resistance to degradation from fatigue or stress rupture and inherent resistance to corrosion; proven toughness/impact resistance.

  14. Iowa Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter establishes remediation standards for land, other than standards for water quality, hazardous conditions, underground storage tanks, and groundwater protection, which are discussed in...

  15. Impact of Wind and Solar on the Value of Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Jorgenson, J.; Hummon, M.; Palchak, D.; Kirby, B.; Ma, O.; O'Malley, M.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis evaluates how the value of energy storage changes when adding variable generation (VG) renewable energy resources to the grid. A series of VG energy penetration scenarios from 16% to 55% were generated for a utility system in the western United States. This operational value of storage (measured by its ability to reduce system production costs) was estimated in each VG scenario, considering provision of different services and with several sensitivities to fuel price and generation mix. Overall, the results found that the presence of VG increases the value of energy storage by lowering off-peak energy prices more than on-peak prices, leading to a greater opportunity to arbitrage this price difference. However, significant charging from renewables, and consequently a net reduction in carbon emissions, did not occur until VG penetration was in the range of 40%-50%. Increased penetration of VG also increases the potential value of storage when providing reserves, mainly by increasing the amount of reserves required by the system. Despite this increase in value, storage may face challenges in capturing the full benefits it provides. Due to suppression of on-/off-peak price differentials, reserve prices, and incomplete capture of certain system benefits (such as the cost of power plant starts), the revenue obtained by storage in a market setting appears to be substantially less than the net benefit (reduction in production costs) provided to the system. Furthermore, it is unclear how storage will actually incentivize large-scale deployment of renewables needed to substantially increase VG penetration. This demonstrates some of the additional challenges for storage deployed in restructured energy markets.

  16. Evaluation of erosion and cover re-establishment following site preparation on east Texas forest lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blume, Timothy Allen

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    damage following mechanical site prepara- tion. (uantitative data characterizing the rate of recovery of soi. l protective cover, used in combination with erosion data, gives planners and forest managers an indication of the total impact of mechanical...EVALUATION OF EROSION AND COVER RE-ESTABLISHMENT 1'OLLOWING SITE PREPARATION ON EAST TEXAS FOREST LANDS A Thesis by Timothy Allen Blume Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M Uniuersity in partial fullfillment of the requir ment...

  17. Aboveground tree biomass on productive forest land in Alaska. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarie, J.; Mead, D.R.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Total aboveground woody biomass of trees on forest land that can produce 1.4 cubic meters per hectare per year of industrial wood in Alaska is 1.33 billion metric tons green weight. The estimated energy value of the standing woody biomass is 11.9 x 10 Btu's. Statewide tables of biomass and energy values for softwoods, hardwoods, and species group are presented.

  18. EIS-0406: Designation of Energy Corridors on Federal Land in 39 States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has canceled this EIS, which was to evaluate the environmental impacts of the designation, under Section 368(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, of energy corridors on federal lands in 39 nonwestern states. The corridors, which were to be jointly identified by the Secretaries of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Energy, and the Interior, might have been used for oil, gas, and hydrogen pipelines and electricity transmission and distribution facilities.

  19. 1993 report on Hanford Site land disposal restrictions for mixed wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, D.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the early 1940s, the contractors at the Hanford Site have been involved in the production and purification of nuclear defense materials. These production activities have resulted in the generation of large quantities of liquid and solid radioactive mixed waste (RMW). This waste is subject to regulation under authority of both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976{sup 2}(RCRA) and Atomic Energy Act{sup 3}. This report covers mixed waste only. Hazardous waste that is not contaminated with radionuclides is not addressed in this report. The Washington State Department of Ecology, US Environmental Protection Agency, and US Department of Energy have entered into an agreement, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order{sup 1} (commonly referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement) to bring the Hanford Site operations into compliance with dangerous waste regulations. The Tri-Party Agreement required development of the original land disposal restrictions (LDR) plan and its annual updates to comply with LDR requirements for RMW. This report is the third update of the plan first issued in 1990. The Tri-Party Agreement requires, and the baseline plan and annual update reports provide, the information that follows: Waste characterization information; storage data; treatment information; waste reduction information; schedule; and progress.

  20. The Influence of Graphene Curvature on Hydrogen Adsorption: Towards Hydrogen Storage Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goler, Sarah; Tozzini, Valentina; Piazza, Vincenzo; Mashoff, Torge; Beltram, Fabio; Pellegrini, Vittorio; Heun, Stefan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of atomic hydrogen to chemisorb on graphene makes the latter a promising material for hydrogen storage. Based on scanning tunneling microscopy techniques, we report on site-selective adsorption of atomic hydrogen on convexly curved regions of monolayer graphene grown on SiC(0001). This system exhibits an intrinsic curvature owing to the interaction with the substrate. We show that at low coverage hydrogen is found on convex areas of the graphene lattice. No hydrogen is detected on concave regions. These findings are in agreement with theoretical models which suggest that both binding energy and adsorption barrier can be tuned by controlling the local curvature of the graphene lattice. This curvature-dependence combined with the known graphene flexibility may be exploited for storage and controlled release of hydrogen at room temperature making it a valuable candidate for the implementation of hydrogen-storage devices.

  1. The Effect of Weld Residual Stress on Life of Used Nuclear Fuel Dry Storage Canisters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald G. Ballinger; Sara E. Ferry; Bradley P. Black; Sebastien P. Teysseyre

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the elimination of Yucca Mountain as the long-term storage facility for spent nuclear fuel in the United States, a number of other storage options are being explored. Currently, used fuel is stored in dry-storage cask systems constructed of steel and concrete. It is likely that used fuel will continue to be stored at existing open-air storage sites for up to 100 years. This raises the possibility that the storage casks will be exposed to a salt-containing environment for the duration of their time in interim storage. Austenitic stainless steels, which are used to construct the canisters, are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in chloride-containing environments if a continuous aqueous film can be maintained on the surface and the material is under stress. Because steel sensitization in the canister welds is typically avoided by avoiding post-weld heat treatments, high residual stresses are present in the welds. While the environment history will play a key role in establishing the chemical conditions for cracking, weld residual stresses will have a strong influence on both crack initiation and propagation. It is often assumed for modeling purposes that weld residual stresses are tensile, high and constant through the weld. However, due to the strong dependence of crack growth rate on stress, this assumption may be overly conservative. In particular, the residual stresses become negative (compressive) at certain points in the weld. The ultimate goal of this research project is to develop a probabilistic model with quantified uncertainties for SCC failure in the dry storage casks. In this paper, the results of a study of the residual stresses, and their postulated effects on SCC behavior, in actual canister welds are presented. Progress on the development of the model is reported.

  2. Charge Retention by Gold Clusters on Surfaces Prepared Using Soft Landing of Mass Selected Ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Priest, Thomas A.; Laskin, Julia

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Monodisperse gold clusters have been prepared on surfaces in different charge states through soft landing of mass-selected ions. Ligand-stabilized gold clusters were prepared in methanol solution by reduction of chloro(triphenylphosphine)gold(I) with borane tert-butylamine complex in the presence of 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane. Electrospray ionization was used to introduce the clusters into the gas-phase and mass-selection was employed to isolate a single ionic cluster species (Au11L53+, L = 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) which was delivered to surfaces at well controlled kinetic energies. Using in-situ time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) it is demonstrated that the Au11L53+ cluster retains its 3+ charge state when soft landed onto the surface of a 1H,1H,2H,2H-

  3. Influence of Airflow on Laboratory Storage of High Moisture Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn M. Wendt; Ian J. Bonner; Amber N. Hoover; Rachel M. Emerson; William A. Smith

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Storing high moisture biomass for bioenergy use is a reality in many areas of the country where wet harvest conditions and environmental factors prevent dry storage from being feasible. Aerobic storage of high moisture biomass leads to microbial degradation and self-heating, but oxygen limitation can aid in material preservation. To understand the influence of oxygen presence on high moisture biomass (50 %, wet basis), three airflow rates were tested on corn stover stored in laboratory reactors. Temperature, carbon dioxide production, dry matter loss, chemical composition, fungal abundance, pH, and organic acids were used to monitor the effects of airflow on storage conditions. The results of this work indicate that oxygen availability impacts both the duration of self-heating and the severity of dry matter loss. High airflow systems experienced the greatest initial rates of loss but a shortened microbially active period that limited total dry matter loss (19 %). Intermediate airflow had improved preservation in short-term storage compared to high airflow systems but accumulated the greatest dry matter loss over time (up to 27 %) as a result of an extended microbially active period. Low airflow systems displayed the best performance with the lowest rates of loss and total loss (10 %) in storage at 50 days. Total structural sugar levels of the stored material were preserved, although glucan enrichment and xylan loss were documented in the high and intermediate flow conditions. By understanding the role of oxygen availability on biomass storage performance, the requirements for high moisture storage solutions may begin to be experimentally defined.

  4. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) Evaluating Powerful Batteries for Modular Electric Grid Energy Storage On December 12, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems,...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: DOE Energy Storage Systems program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Energy Storage Systems program 2013 Electricity Storage Handbook Published On July 31, 2013, in Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety,...

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: NM Renewable Energy Storage Task...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy Storage Task Force New Mexico Renewable Energy Storage Task Force On January 28, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Infrastructure Security,...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: incentivize renewable-energy storage...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    incentivize renewable-energy storage infrastructure development New Mexico Renewable Energy Storage Task Force On January 28, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage...

  9. The role of land surface processes on the mesoscale simulation of the July 26, 2005 heavy rain event over Mumbai, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    The role of land surface processes on the mesoscale simulation of the July 26, 2005 heavy rain Mesoscale convection Weather research and forecast model Indian summer monsoon Land surface processes

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandian Spoke at the New York Energy Storage Expo On December 12, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, News, News &...

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Electricity Storage Handbook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity Storage Handbook Published On July 31, 2013, in Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure...

  12. Investigating the effect of farmer land-use decisions on rural landscapes using an agent-based model approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karali, Eleni

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use and cover change (LUCC) is increasingly recognised as one of the most visible impacts of humans on nature. In rural areas, most of the observed LUCC is associated with agricultural activities. This has traditionally been attributed...

  13. Webinar: DOE Funding Opportunity for the Deployment of Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency on Indian Lands (DE-FOA-0001021)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The intent of this webinar is to provide information for potential applicants to the Energy Departments Funding Opportunity for the Deployment of Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency on Indian Lands ...

  14. A resource complex for Sandy Neck Beach : an exploration in building on an ever-changing land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solarz, Cynthia L. (Cynthia Lynne)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is an exploration into a spit of land, called Sandy Neck Beach on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. It is a barrier beach system which is experiencing many changes. These changes are manifest not only in its physical ...

  15. Department of Energy Will Hold a Batteries and Energy Storage Information Meeting on October 21, 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Friday, October 21, 2011 the Department of Energy will hold a public meeting from 8:00am to 5:00pm at the Bethesda North Marriott Hotel and Conference Center in Bethesda, MD to provide information and receive comments from the public on directions for a potential research effort on batteries and energy storage.

  16. Effects of cavern depth on surface subsidence and storage loss of oil-filled caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, E L

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Finite element analyses of oil-filled caverns were performed to investigate the effects of cavern depth on surface subsidence and storage loss, a primary performance criteria of SPR caverns. The finite element model used for this study was axisymmetric, approximating an infinite array of caverns spaced at 750 ft. The stratigraphy and cavern size were held constant while the cavern depth was varied between 1500 ft and 3000 ft in 500 ft increments. Thirty year simulations, the design life of the typical SPR cavern, were performed with boundary conditions modeling the oil pressure head applied to the cavern lining. A depth dependent temperature gradient of 0.012{degrees}F/ft was also applied to the model. The calculations were performed using ABAQUS, a general purpose of finite element analysis code. The user-defined subroutine option in ABAQUS was used to enter an elastic secondary creep model which includes temperature dependence. The calculations demonstrated that surface subsidence and storage loss rates increase with increasing depth. At lower depths the difference between the lithostatic stress and the oil pressure is greater. Thus, the effective stresses are greater, resulting in higher creep rates. Furthermore, at greater depths the cavern temperatures are higher which also produce higher creep rates. Together, these factors result in faster closure of the cavern. At the end of the 30 year simulations, a 1500 ft-deep cavern exhibited 4 percent storage loss and 4 ft of subsidence while a 3000 ft-deep cavern exhibited 33 percent storage loss and 44 ft of subsidence. The calculations also demonstrated that surface subsidence is directly related to the amount of storage loss. Deeper caverns exhibit more subsidence because the caverns exhibit more storage loss. However, for a given amount of storage loss, nearly the same magnitude of surface subsidence was exhibited, independent of cavern depth.

  17. Optimal Storage Allocation for Serial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yechiali, Uri

    Optimal Storage Allocation for Serial Haim Mendelson, Joseph S. Pliskin, and Uri Yechiali Tel Aviv reside on a direct-access storage device in which storage space is limited. Records are added allocating storage space to the files. Key Words and Phrases: serial files, storage allocation

  18. Quantifying the effect of land use and land cover changes on green water and blue water in northern part of China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, X.; Ren, L.; Yuan, F.; Singh, V. P.; Fang, X.; Yu, Z.; Zhang, W.

    2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 13, 735?747, 2009 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/13/735/2009/ ? Author(s) 2009. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Quantifying the effect of land... al. (1999). These studies, which generally in- dicate that deforestation causes an increase in the mean an- nual discharge, have concentrated on the impacts of forest management on water yield (Siriwardena et al., 2006).While field experiments can...

  19. Large-scale impact of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers: A sensitivity study on pressure response in stratified systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin

    Large-scale impact of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers: A sensitivity study on pressure response storage potential of all the geological CO2 storage options and are widely distributed throughout the globe in all sedimentary basins.ForCO2 storage tohaveasignificantimpact on atmospheric levels

  20. Effects of planning and policy decisions on residential land use in Singapore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Noel R

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of current land use in Singapore shows that through effective long-term space planning, the island city-state has maintained an adequate stock of developable residential land to meet its most ambitious maximum ...

  1. Analysis of Renewable Energy Potential on U. S. National Forest Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zvolanek, E. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Kuiper, J. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Carr, A. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Hlava, K.

    2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) completed an assessment of the potential for solar and wind energy development on National Forest System (NFS) public lands managed by the US Department of Agriculture, U.S. Forest Service (USFS). This report provides an update of the analysis in the NREL report, and extends the analysis with additional siting factors for solar and wind energy. It also expands the scope to biomass and geothermal energy resources. Hydropower is acknowledged as another major renewable energy source on NFS lands; however, it was not analyzed in this project primarily because of the substantially different analysis that would be needed to identify suitable locations. Details about each renewable energy production technology included in the study are provided following the report introduction, including how each resource is converted to electrical power, and examples of existing power plants. The analysis approach was to use current and available Geographic Information System (GIS) data to map the distribution of the subject renewable energy resources, major siting factors, and NFS lands. For each major category of renewable energy power production, a set of siting factors were determined, including minimum levels for the renewable energy resources, and details for each of the other siting factors. Phase 1 of the analysis focused on replicating and updating the 2005 NREL analysis, and Phase 2 introduced additional siting factors and energy resources. Source data were converted to a cell?based format that helped create composite maps of locations meeting all the siting criteria. Acreages and potential power production levels for NFS units were tabulated and are presented throughout this report and the accompanying files. NFS units in the southwest United States were found to have the most potentially suitable land for concentrating solar power (CSP), especially in Arizona and New Mexico. In total, about 136,032 acres of NFS lands were found potentially suitable for CSP development, potentially yielding as much as 13,603 megawatts (MW) of electricity, assuming 10 acres per MW. For photovoltaic solar power (PV), the top NFS units were more widely distributed than CSP. Notably, more than 150,000 acres in Comanche National Grassland in Colorado were found to be potentially suitable for PV development, accounting for more than 25% of the potentially suitable NFS lands combined. In total, about 564,698 acres of NFS lands were found potentially suitable for PV development, potentially yielding as much as 56,469 MW of electricity, assuming 10 acres per MW. NFS units most suitable for wind power are concentrated in the northern Great Plains. In total, about 3,357,792 acres of NFS lands were found potentially suitable for wind development, potentially yielding as much as 67,156 MW of electricity, assuming 50 acres per MW. Of that area, 571,431 acres (11,429 MW) are located within the Bankhead?Jones Farm Tenant Act Land in Montana. NFS lands in Alaska have considerable wind resources, but other siting factors eliminated almost the entire area. The southwest coast of Chugach National Forest, near Seward, Alaska, maintains the majority of the remaining acreage. NFS units with highly suitable biomass resources are located from Idaho to Louisiana. In total, about 13,967,077 acres of NFS lands are potentially highly suitable for biomass from logging and thinning residue development. Of that, 1,542,247 acres is located in Fremont?Winema National Forest in Oregon. Not surprisingly, most NFS units have at least some level of potentially suitable biomass resources. In general, biomass resources such as these could significantly offset consumption of coal and petroleum?based fuels. NFS units deemed potentially highly suitable for enhanced geothermal system (EGS) development were distributed widely from California to Virginia, accounting for some 6,475,459 acres. Mark Twain National Forest in Missouri has the largest area of all the NFS units, with 900,637 acres. While more rigorous studies are needed

  2. Acquiring Land Use Rights in Today's China: A Snapshot from on the Ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, Gregory M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gov- ernment has gained experience, and outside buyers have become more anxious to acquire rights to develop land in China.

  3. Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Two Wheeler with on-board Metal Hydride Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Two Wheeler with on-board Metal Hydride Storage K. Sapru*, S, as a transition, the hydrogen internal combustion engine can lead the way to a hydrogen economy, allowing of these can ease India's dependence on foreign oil, and also eliminate the drastic power shortage, which

  4. The Time Needed to Implement the Blue Ribbon Commission Recommendation on Interim Storage - 13124

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voegele, Michael D. [Consultant, Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office, 7404 Oak Grove Ave, Las Vegas, NV 89117 (United States)] [Consultant, Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office, 7404 Oak Grove Ave, Las Vegas, NV 89117 (United States); Vieth, Donald [1154 Chelttenham Place, Maineville, OH 45039 (United States)] [1154 Chelttenham Place, Maineville, OH 45039 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future [1] makes a number of important recommendations to be considered if Congress elects to redirect U.S. high-level radioactive waste disposal policy. Setting aside for the purposes of this discussion any issues related to political forces leading to stopping progress on the Yucca Mountain project and driving the creation of the Commission, an important recommendation of the Commission was to institute prompt efforts to develop one or more consolidated storage facilities. The Blue Ribbon Commission noted that this recommended strategy for future storage and disposal facilities and operations should be implemented regardless of what happens with Yucca Mountain. It is too easy, however, to focus on interim storage as an alternative to geologic disposal. The Blue Ribbon Commission report does not go far enough in addressing the magnitude of the contentious problems associated with reopening the issues of relative authorities of the states and federal government with which Congress wrestled in crafting the Nuclear Waste Policy Act [2]. The Blue Ribbon Commission recommendation for prompt adoption of an interim storage program does not appear to be fully informed about the actions that must be taken, the relative cost of the effort, or the realistic time line that would be involved. In essence, the recommendation leaves to others the details of the systems engineering analyses needed to understand the nature and details of all the operations required to reach an operational interim storage facility without derailing forever the true end goal of geologic disposal. The material presented identifies a number of impediments that must be overcome before the country could develop a centralized federal interim storage facility. In summary, and in the order presented, they are: 1. Change the law, HJR 87, PL 107-200, designating Yucca Mountain for the development of a repository. 2. Bring new nuclear waste legislation to the floor of the Senate, overcoming existing House support for Yucca Mountain; 3. Change the longstanding focus of Congress from disposal to storage; 4. Change the funding concepts embodied in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to allow the Nuclear Waste fund to be used to pay for interim storage; 5. Reverse the Congressional policy not to give states or tribes veto or consent authority, and to reserve to Congress the authority to override a state or tribal disapproval; 6. Promulgate interim storage facility siting regulations to reflect the new policies after such changes to policy and law; 7. Complete already underway changes to storage and transportation regulations, possibly incorporating changes to reflect changes to waste disposal law; 8. Promulgate new repository siting regulations if the interim storage facility is to support repository development; 9. Identify volunteer sites, negotiate agreements, and get Congressional approval for negotiated benefits packages; 10. Design, License and develop the interim storage facility. The time required to accomplish these ten items depends on many factors. The estimate developed assumes that certain of the items must be completed before other items are started; given past criticisms of the current program, such an assumption appears appropriate. Estimated times for completion of individual items are based on historical precedent. (authors)

  5. Safe Home Food Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Laanen, Peggy

    2002-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper food storage can preserve food quality and prevent spoilage and food/borne illness. The specifics of pantry, refrigerator and freezer storage are given, along with helpful information on new packaging, label dates, etc. A comprehensive table...

  6. Impact of geothermal technology improvements on royalty collections on federal lands: Volume II: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains the appendices for the ''Impact of Geothermal Technology Improvements on Royalty Collections on Federal Lands, Final Report, Volume I.'' The material in this volume supports the conclusions presented in Volume I and details each Known Geothermal Resource Area's (KGRA's) royalty estimation. Appendix A details the physical characteristics of each KGRA considered in Volume I. Appendix B supplies summary narratives on each state which has a KGRA. The information presented in Appendix C shows the geothermal power plant area proxies chosen for each KGRA considered within the report. It also provides data ranges which fit into the IMGEO model for electric energy cost estimates. Appendix D provides detailed cost information from the IMGEO model if no Geothermal Program RandD goals were completed beyond 1987 and if all the RandD goals were completed by the year 2000. This appendix gives an overall electric cost and major system costs, which add up to the overall electric cost. Appendix E supplies information for avoided cost projections for each state involved in the study that were used in the IMGEO model run to determine at what cost/kWh a 50 MWe plant could come on line. Appendix F supplies the code used in the determination of royalty income, as well as, tabled results of the royalty runs (detailed in Appendix G). The tabled results show royalty incomes, assuming a 10% discount rate, with and without RandD and with and without a $0.01/kWh transmission cost. Individual data sheets for each KGRA royalty income run are presented in Appendix G.

  7. Beam dynamics of the superconducting wiggler on the SSRF storage ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Qinglei; Jiang, Bocheng; Xu, Jieping; Zhao, Zhentang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the SSRF Phase-II beamline project, a Superconducting Wiggler (SW) will be installed in the electron storage ring. It may greatly impact on the beam dynamics due to the very high magnetic field. The emittance growth becomes a main problem, even after a well correction of the beam optics. A local achromatic lattice is studied, in order to combat the emittance growth and keep the good performance of the SSRF storage ring, as well as possible. Other effects of the SW are simulated and optimized as well, including the beta beating, the tune shift, the dynamic aperture, and the field error effects.

  8. Some notes on beam dynamics due to vertical oscillations in an all-electric storage ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mane, S R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A document has recently been posted on the arXiv [1], describing analytical formulas and results of particle tracking simulations, for precision tests of numerical integration algorithms for an EDM (electric dipole moment) storage ring. In the context of an all-electric storage ring, the authors cite theoretical formulas by Orlov [2]. However, the reference to Orlov is to a talk at a workshop in 2012, and is unpublished and difficult for independent researchers to access and validate. This note rederives and generalizes some of Orlov's principal results, using a Hamiltonian formalism, and also corrects some details in both Orlov's note [2] and the arXiv post [1].

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Electric Car Challenge Sparks Students' STEM Interest On January 9, 2015, in Energy, Energy Storage, News, News & Events, Partnership, Transportation Energy Aspiring...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collaboration On May 28, 2014, in Biofuels, CRF, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Facilities, Grid Integration,...

  11. Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

    2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reserve University On January 28, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Infrastructure Security, Materials Science,...

  13. Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Presentation on NIST Combinatorial Methods at the...

  14. Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs on drastically disturbed lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, S. [Missouri Dept. of Natural Resources, Jefferson City, MO (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs (WSNGs) has been viewed by landowners, agronomists, natural resource managers and reclamation specialists as being too expensive and difficult, especially for reclamation, which requires early stand closure and erosion control. Natural resource managers have learned a great deal about establishing WSNGs since the implementation of the 1985 Farm Bill`s Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). Reclamation specialists must begin to use this information to improve reclamation success. Quality control of seed equipment and planting methods has been proven to be the crucial first step in successful establishment. Seedling germination, growth and development of WSNGs are different from that of introduced cool-season grasses and legumes. Specialized seed drills and spring planting periods are essential. Because shoot growth lags far behind root growth the first two seasons, WSNGs often are rejected for reclamation use. Usually, the rejection is based on preconceived notions that bare ground will erode and on reclamation specialists` desire for a closed, uniform, grassy lawn. WSNG`s extensive root systems inhibit rill and gully erosion by the fall of the first season. Planting a weakly competitive, short-lived nurse crop such as perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) at low rates with the WSNG mixture can reduce first-season sheet and rill erosion problems and give an appearance of a closed stand. Benefits of WSNGs in soil building and their acid-tolerance make them ideal species for reclamation of drastically disturbed lands. WSNGs and forbs enhance wildlife habitat and promote natural succession and the invasion of the reclamation site by other native species, particularly hardwood trees, increasing diversity and integrating the site into the local ecosystem. This is perhaps their most important attribute. Most alien grasses and legumes inhibit natural succession, slowing the development of a stable mine soil ecosystem. This paper outlines one successful methodology to establish warm-season grasses and forbs on abandoned mine lands in Missouri. The methodology can be successfully adapted for reclamation of all drastically disturbed lands including Title V lands under the Surface Mining Control Reclamation Act of 1977 (PL95-87) to promote ecosystem diversity and stability.

  15. Effect of a Legume Cover Crop on Carbon Storage and Erosion in an Ultisol under Maize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    143 CHAPTER 10 Effect of a Legume Cover Crop on Carbon Storage and Erosion in an Ultisol under...........................................................................................145 10.2.3 Carbon and Nitrogen Determination, and Other Analyses......................................145 10.2.4 Determinations of Runoff, Soil Losses, and Eroded Carbon

  16. An evaluation of the storage systems based on network-attached disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Gang

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    different storage organizations based on network-attached disks and compare the performance of these systems to a traditional system. Trace-driven simulations are used to measure the average response time of the client requests in two different workloads. We...

  17. Determination of the Effect of Geological Reservoir Variability on Carbon Dioxide Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Determination of the Effect of Geological Reservoir Variability on Carbon Dioxide Storage Using'expriences -- Dans le contexte de l'tude du stockage gologique du dioxyde de carbone dans les rservoirs al. (2007) Energy Convers. Manage. 48, 1782-1797; Gunter et al. (1999) Appl. Geochem. 4, 1

  18. T EFFECT OF STORAGE ON TENSILE PROPERTIES OF NATURAL HEART VALVE TISSUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Paul

    T EFFECT OF STORAGE ON TENSILE PROPERTIES OF NATURAL HEART VALVE TISSUE Sophia Nishat Mohammad "" Yourheartisyourlanternandyourselfisyourlight. ( IQBAL the poet of the east ) #12;ABSTRACT Aortic homograft valves are the preferred choiceof replacementvalve in aortic valve replacementprocedures.The major drawbackto their use is their availability

  19. 19th International Conference on Photochemical Conversion and Storage of Solar Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    IPS-19 19th International Conference on Photochemical Conversion and Storage of Solar Energy 29@caltech.edu Prof. Harry Gray hbg@caltech.edu Prof. Jonas Peters jpeters@caltech.edu Dye-Sensitized & Polymer Solar Cells Advanced Photovoltaics Photocatalysis Solar Fuels Production Photoelectrochemistry

  20. Designing a Residential Hybrid Electrical Energy Storage System Based on the Energy Buffering Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    such as the Consolidated Edison Company of New York (conEdison) employ time-of-day pricing policy [2], with higher unitDesigning a Residential Hybrid Electrical Energy Storage System Based on the Energy Buffering companies generally raise electrical energy price during periods of high load demand. A grid

  1. Thermal Attacks on Storage Systems Nathanael Paul Sudhanva Gurumurthi David Evans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurumurthi, Sudhanva

    temperature, known as the thermal envelope. Exceeding the thermal envelope decreases the drive's reliability relationship between disk RPM and viscous heating. If the drive exceeds the thermal envelope, the drive canThermal Attacks on Storage Systems Nathanael Paul Sudhanva Gurumurthi David Evans University

  2. Effects of Sample Storage on Biosolids Compost Stability and Maturity Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Effects of Sample Storage on Biosolids Compost Stability and Maturity Evaluation L. Wu and L. Q. Ma-drying of soil sam-Compost stability and maturity are important parameters of com- ples is the most common practice (Bates, 1993), despitepost quality. To date, nearly all compost characterization has been

  3. Transportation impacts on the Tennessee highway system proposed monitored retrievable storage. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobble, C.

    1985-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The issue of the transport of spent fuels to the proposed monitored retrievable storage facility in Tennessee is discussed. Relevant issues include the ability of the roads and bridges on the transport routes to handle the weight of the trucks. (CBS)

  4. Transportation impacts on the Tennessee highway system proposed monitored retrievable storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobble, C.

    1985-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The issue of the transport of spent fuels to the proposed monitored retrievable storage facility in Tennessee is discussed. Relevant issues include the ability of the roads and bridges on the transport routes to handle the weight of the trucks. (CBS)

  5. An evaluation of the storage systems based on network-attached disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Gang

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    different storage organizations based on network-attached disks and compare the performance of these systems to a traditional system. Trace-driven simulations are used to measure the average response time of the client requests in two different workloads. We...

  6. Office of the University Registrar Policy on Storage of Personal Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Randy

    any file containing personal information, the information must be encrypted and the device must removing mobile devices containing personal information from the University. In addition, when sharingOffice of the University Registrar Policy on Storage of Personal Information Staff in the Office

  7. Protocol for Appraisal of Petroleum Producing Properties on Native American Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum is currently produced on Native American Tribal Lands and has been produced on some of these lands for approximately 100 years. As these properties are abandoned at a production level that is considered the economic limit by the operator, Native American Tribes are considering this an opportunity to assume operator status to keep the properties producing. In addition to operating properties as they are abandoned, Native American Tribes also are assuming liabilities of the former operator(s) and ownership of equipment left upon abandonment. Often, operators are assumed by Native American Tribes without consideration of the liabilities left by the former operators. The purpose of this report is to provide protocols for the appraisal of petroleum producing properties and analysis of the petroleum resource to be produced after assuming operations. The appraisal protocols provide a spreadsheet for analysis of the producing property and a checklist of items to bring along before entering the property for onsite appraisal of the property. The report will provide examples of some environmental flags that may indicate potential liabilities remaining on the property left unaddressed by previous operators. It provides a starting point for appraisal and analysis of a property with a basis to make the decision to assume operations or to pursue remediation and/or closure of the liabilities of previous operators.

  8. Mapping the Potential for Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: Differences in Definitions, Data and Models across Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Sarah M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. Land availability for biofuel production. Environ. Sci.of land available for biofuel production. Environ. Sci.so marginal land for biofuel crops is limited. Energy Policy

  9. 20LRO Sees Apollo 11 on the Moon! The LRO satellite recently imaged the Apollo 11 landing area on the surface of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    20LRO Sees Apollo 11 on the Moon! The LRO satellite recently imaged the Apollo 11 landing area meters long (1/4 the Apollo 11 module) and there are no such shadows in the image, other than the Apollo, which is why it was selected by Apollo-11 astronauts for a landing site. Space Math http

  10. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    could be acquired, e.g. battery storage, the costs for whichlead/acid battery, and thermal storage, capabilities, withis limited by battery size - Heat storage is limited by

  11. Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Electric Grid Workshop, April 19-20, 2011 Before the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power Effects of Multiple Drying Cycles on HBU PWR Cladding Alloys...

  12. An update on modeling land-ice/ocean interactions in CESM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asay-davis, Xylar [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This talk is an update on ongoing land-ice/ocean coupling work within the Community Earth System Model (CESM). The coupling method is designed to allow simulation of a fully dynamic ice/ocean interface, while requiring minimal modification to the existing ocean model (the Parallel Ocean Program, POP). The method makes use of an immersed boundary method (IBM) to represent the geometry of the ice-ocean interface without requiring that the computational grid be modified in time. We show many of the remaining development challenges that need to be addressed in order to perform global, century long climate runs with fully coupled ocean and ice sheet models. These challenges include moving to a new grid where the computational pole is no longer at the true south pole and several changes to the coupler (the software tool used to communicate between model components) to allow the boundary between land and ocean to vary in time. We discuss benefits for ice/ocean coupling that would be gained from longer-term ocean model development to allow for natural salt fluxes (which conserve both water and salt mass, rather than water volume).

  13. Summary Report from Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic Safety Goals Strategicthe Department of Energy |OilOctober

  14. Effect of reductive treatments on Pt behavior and NOx storage...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    represent a promising approach to meet increasingly stringent NOx emission regulations on diesel and other lean-burn engines. Pt material properties, including dispersion and...

  15. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are sensitive to rock properties behind the casing and toAttrib- utes and Rock Properties for Mapping Porositybecause information on rock properties is only available

  16. On-Site and Bulk Hydrogen Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse toOctober 2014Funds for Clean Cities Programto REMSOn-Site

  17. DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department ofDepartment of Energy toDocumentedtoInterim r eport o

  18. On-Board Storage Systems Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment ofOil's Impact on OurDiesel Engines |

  19. Testing in support of on-site storage of residues in the Pipe Overpack Container

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D.J.; Bobbe, J.G.; Arviso, M.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disposition of the large back-log of plutonium residues at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) will require interim storage and subsequent shipment to a waste repository. Current plans call for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the transportation to WIPP in the TRUPACT-II. The transportation phase will require the residues to be packaged in a container that is more robust than a standard 55-gallon waste drum. Rocky Flats has designed the Pipe Overpack Container to meet this need. It is desirable to use this same waste packaging for interim on-site storage in non-hardened buildings. To meet the safety concerns for this storage the Pipe Overpack Container has been subjected to a series of tests at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In addition to the tests required to qualify the Pipe Overpack Container as a waste container for shipment in the TRUPACT-II several tests were performed solely for the purpose of qualifying the container for interim storage. This report will describe these tests and the packages response to the tests. 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Effects of cavern spacing on the performance and stability of gas-filled storage caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, E.L.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-dimensional finite element analyses of gas-filled storage caverns in domal salt were performed to investigate the effects of cavern spacing on surface subsidence, storage loss, and cavern stability. The finite element model used for this study models a seven cavern storage field with one center cavern and six hexagonally spaced surrounding caverns. Cavern spacing is described in terms of the P/D ratio which is the pillar thickness (the width between two caverns) divided by the cavern diameter. With the stratigraphy and cavern size held constant, simulations were performed for P/D ratios of 6.0, 3.0, 2.0, 1.0, and 0.5. Ten year simulations were performed modeling a constant 400 psi gas pressure applied to the cavern lining. The calculations were performed using JAC3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasistatic solids. For the range of P/D ratios studied, cavern deformation and storage volume were relatively insensitive to P/D ratio, while subsidence volume increased with increasing P/D ratio. A stability criterion which describes stability in terms of a limiting creep strain was used to investigate cavern stability. The stability criterion indicated that through-pillar instability was possible for the cases of P/D = 0.5 and 1.0.

  1. Permits and Easements for Construction and Related Activities on Public Lands and Waters (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These rules establish procedures and regulate the evaluation and issuance of permits for construction or other related activities that alter the physical characteristics of public lands and waters...

  2. R E V I E W Liana Impacts on Carbon Cycling, Storage and Sequestration in Tropical Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnitzer, Stefan

    R E V I E W Liana Impacts on Carbon Cycling, Storage and Sequestration in Tropical Forests Geertje for carbon storage and sequestration. Lianas reduce tree growth, survival, and leaf productivity; however liana carbon stocks are unlikely to compensate for liana-induced losses in net carbon sequestration

  3. Impact of Metal and Anion Substitutions on the Hydrogen Storage Properties of MBTT Metal-Organic Frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . For high-pressure storage at ambient temperatures, the M3[(M4Cl)3(BTT)8]2 (M-BTT; BTT3- = 1 applications is of paramount importance due to the increasing atmospheric levels of CO2 resulting fromImpact of Metal and Anion Substitutions on the Hydrogen Storage Properties of MBTT Metal

  4. Jitter-Free Co-Processing on a Prototype Exascale Storage Stack john.bent@emc.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jitter-Free Co-Processing on a Prototype Exascale Storage Stack John Bent john.bent@emc.com Sorin Faibish sfaibish@emc.com Jim Ahrens ahrens@lanl.gov Gary Grider ggrider@lanl.gov John Patchett patchett@lanl.gov Percy Tzelnic tzelnic@emc.com Jon Woodring woodring@lanl.gov Abstract In the petascale era, the storage

  5. Overview on Energy Storage Projects at ARPA-E

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOfEnergyOutreach toOverviewOverview ofActionon

  6. International Battery Presentation - Keeping The Lights On: Smart Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment of EnergyIndustry15Among Statesfor a Smart Grid (July 12, 2011)

  7. On-Site and Bulk Hydrogen Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartmentGas and Oil ResearchEnergyOn October 18th, theHydrogen

  8. OEM Perspective on Cryogenic H2 Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Order No. EA-212-AOAHU2014) | DepartmentOE's SGIGOEM

  9. Policy Questions on Energy Storage Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - T enAmount for Individual Executive4 -Policy Questions on

  10. Energy Department Advances Carbon Capture and Storage Research on Two

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: Final EnvironmentalCounties, Idaho || Department:JuneEnergyEnergy DOEServicesFronts |

  11. DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractions andDefinitionEnergy ImplementEnergy Theory

  12. Project Profile: Thermochemical Heat Storage for CSP Based on Multivalent

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 |of Energy TEES

  13. Policy Questions on Energy Storage Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in235-1Department of60 DATE: March 25, 201131.205-33) | Department2Policy

  14. NASA Perspectives on Cryo H2 Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico |MyriantSafetyLater:NASANASA

  15. Analyses of Hydrogen Storage Materials and On-Board Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for the manufacture of the tank, so no mark-up is included on those components Raw materials and BOP components are assumed to be purchased by the OEM and therefore include...

  16. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Publication 31, p. 127-155, Tulsa, Oklahoma, 1982. Galloway,on Improved Oil Recovery, Tulsa, April 17-21, 2004. King,Oil Recovery Sym- posium, Tulsa, April 21-24. Holm, L.W. ,

  17. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are founded on a detailed reservoir data base of over 1,500Reservoirs Large Oil Reservoirs Data Base Reservoirs OOIP (and gas and water wells, reservoir data, and sample location

  18. Land use and land cover change: the effects of woody plant encroachment and prescribed fire on biodiversity and ecosystem carbon dynamics in a southern great plains mixed grass savanna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollister, Emily Brooke

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    LAND USE AND LAND COVER CHANGE: THE EFFECTS OF WOODY PLANT ENCROACHMENT AND PRESCRIBED FIRE ON BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM CARBON DYNAMICS IN A SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS MIXED GRASS SAVANNA A Dissertation by EMILY BROOKE HOLLISTER Submitted... PLANT ENCROACHMENT AND PRESCRIBED FIRE ON BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM CARBON DYNAMICS IN A SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS MIXED GRASS SAVANNA A Dissertation by EMILY BROOKE HOLLISTER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  19. Worldwide Carbon Capture and Storage Projects on the Increase | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads|ofEventsWorkshop Report:WorkshopsDepartmentof Energy

  20. PRELIMINARY REPORT: EFFECTS OF IRRADIATION AND THERMAL EXPOSURE ON ELASTOMERIC SEALS FOR CASK TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verst, C.; Skidmore, E.; Daugherty, W.

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A testing and analysis approach to predict the sealing behavior of elastomeric seal materials in dry storage casks and evaluate their ability to maintain a seal under thermal and radiation exposure conditions of extended storage and beyond was developed, and initial tests have been conducted. The initial tests evaluate the aging response of EPDM elastomer O-ring seals. The thermal and radiation exposure conditions of the CASTOR V/21 casks were selected for testing as this cask design is of interest due to its widespread use, and close proximity of the seals to the fuel compared to other cask designs leading to a relatively high temperature and dose under storage conditions. A novel test fixture was developed to enable compression stress relaxation measurements for the seal material at the thermal and radiation exposure conditions. A loss of compression stress of 90% is suggested as the threshold at which sealing ability of an elastomeric seal would be lost. Previous studies have shown this value to be conservative to actual leakage failure for most aging conditions. These initial results indicate that the seal would be expected to retain sealing ability throughout extended storage at the cask design conditions, though longer exposure times are needed to validate this assumption. The high constant dose rate used in the testing is not prototypic of the decreasingly low dose rate that would occur under extended storage. The primary degradation mechanism of oxidation of polymeric compounds is highly dependent on temperature and time of exposure, and with radiation expected to exacerbate the oxidation.

  1. Underground Storage of Natural Gas (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any natural gas public utility may appropriate for its use for the underground storage of natural gas any subsurface stratum or formation in any land which the commission shall have found to be...

  2. Influence of Dynamic Land Use and Land Cover Change on Simulated Global Terrestrial Carbon and Nitrogen Cycles, Climate-carbon Cycle Feedbacks, and Interactions with Rising CO2 and Anthropogenic Nitrogen Deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Hurtt, George C [University of Hew Hampshire

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous work has demonstrated the sensitivity of terrestrial net carbon exchange to disturbance history and land use patterns at the scale of individual sites or regions. Here we show the influence of land use and land cover dynamics over the historical period 1850-present on global-scale carbon, nutrient, water, and energy fluxes. We also explore the spatial and temporal details of interactions among land use and disturbance history, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide consentation, and increasing anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. Our simulations show that these interactions are significant, and that their importance grows over time, expressed as a fraction of the independent forcing terms. We conclude with an analysis of the influence of these interactions on the sign and magnitude of global climate-carbon cycle feedbacks.

  3. Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage rings are circular machines that store particle beams at a constant energy. Beams are stored in rings without acceleration for a number of reasons (Tab. 1). Storage rings are used in high-energy, nuclear, atomic, and molecular physics, as well as for experiments in chemistry, material and life sciences. Parameters for storage rings such as particle species, energy, beam intensity, beam size, and store time vary widely depending on the application. The beam must be injected into a storage ring but may not be extracted (Fig. 1). Accelerator rings such as synchrotrons are used as storage rings before and after acceleration. Particles stored in rings include electrons and positrons; muons; protons and anti-protons; neutrons; light and heavy, positive and negative, atomic ions of various charge states; molecular and cluster ions, and neutral polar molecules. Spin polarized beams of electrons, positrons, and protons were stored. The kinetic energy of the stored particles ranges from 10{sup -6} eV to 3.5 x 10{sup 12} eV (LHC, 7 x 10{sup 12} eV planned), the number of stored particles from one (ESR) to 1015 (ISR). To store beam in rings requires bending (dipoles) and transverse focusing (quadrupoles). Higher order multipoles are used to correct chromatic aberrations, to suppress instabilities, and to compensate for nonlinear field errors of dipoles and quadrupoles. Magnetic multipole functions can be combined in magnets. Beams are stored bunched with radio frequency systems, and unbunched. The magnetic lattice and radio frequency system are designed to ensure the stability of transverse and longitudinal motion. New technologies allow for better storage rings. With strong focusing the beam pipe dimensions became much smaller than previously possible. For a given circumference superconducting magnets make higher energies possible, and superconducting radio frequency systems allow for efficient replenishment of synchrotron radiation losses of large current electron or positron beams. Storage rings have instrumentation to monitor the electrical and mechanical systems, and the beam quality. Computers are used to control the operation. Large storage rings have millions of control points from all systems. The time dependent beam intensity I(t) can often be approximated by an exponential function I(t) = I(0) exp(-t/{tau}) (1) where the decay time {tau} and, correspondingly, the store time ranges from a few turns to 10 days (ISR). {tau} can be dominated by a variety of effects including lattice nonlinearities, beam-beam, space charge, intrabeam and Touschek scattering, interaction with the residual gas or target, or the lifetime of the stored particle. In this case, the beam lifetime measurement itself can be the purpose of a storage ring experiment. The main consideration in the design of a storage ring is the preservation of the beam quality over the store length. The beam size and momentum spread can be reduced through cooling, often leading to an increase in the store time. For long store times vacuum considerations are important since the interaction rate of the stored particles with the residual gas molecules is proportional to the pressure, and an ultra-high vacuum system may be needed. Distributed pumping with warm activated NEG surfaces or cold surfaces in machines with superconducting magnets are ways to provide large pumping speeds and achieve low pressures even under conditions with dynamic gas loads. The largest application of storage rings today are synchrotron light sources, of which about 50 exist world wide. In experiments where the beam collides with an internal target or another beam, a storage ring allows to re-use the accelerated beam many times if the interaction with the target is sufficiently small. In hadron collider and ion storage rings store times of many hours or even days are realized, corresponding to up to 1011 turns and thereby target passages. Ref. [3] is the first proposal for a collider storage ring. A number of storage rings exist where the beam itself or its decay products are the object of s

  4. Assessing Naturalness in Northern Great Lakes Forests Based on Historical Land-Cover and Vegetation Changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was developed to assess to what degree landscapes represent a natural state. Protected areas are often regarded Land-use history Land-use change Naturalness Logging Great Lakes Protected areas Introduction the question to what degree protected areas represent a natural state. To assess this question conservation

  5. NREL Simulations Provide New Insight on Polymer-Based Energy Storage Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomistic simulations correlate molecular packing and electron transport in polymer-based energy storage materials.

  6. Regional Cost Estimates for Reclamation Practices on Arid and Semiarid Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. K. Ostler

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army uses the Integrated Training Area Management program for managing training land. One of the major objectives of the Integrated Training Area Management program has been to develop a method for estimating training land carrying capacity in a sustainable manner. The Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity methodology measures training load in terms of Maneuver Impact Miles. One Maneuver Impact Mile is the equivalent impact of an M1A2 tank traveling one mile while participating in an armor battalion field training exercise. The Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity methodology is also designed to predict land maintenance costs in terms of dollars per Maneuver Impact Mile. The overall cost factor is calculated using the historical cost of land maintenance practices and the effectiveness of controlling erosion. Because land maintenance costs and effectiveness are influenced by the characteristics of the land, Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity cost factors must be developed for each ecological region of the country. Costs for land maintenance activities are presented here for the semiarid and arid regions of the United States. Five ecoregions are recognized, and average values for reclamation activities are presented. Because there are many variables that can influence costs, ranges for reclamation activities are also presented. Costs are broken down into six major categories: seedbed preparation, fertilization, seeding, planting, mulching, and supplemental erosion control. Costs for most land reclamation practices and materials varied widely within and between ecological provinces. Although regional cost patterns were evident for some practices, the patterns were not consistent between practices. For the purpose of estimating land reclamation costs for the Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity methodology, it may be desirable to use the ''Combined Average'' of all provinces found in the last row of each table to estimate costs for arid lands in general.

  7. The Impact of Microbially Influenced Corrosion on Spent Nuclear Fuel and Storage Life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. H. Wolfram; R. E. Mizia; R. Jex; L. Nelson; K. M. Garcia

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was performed to evaluate if microbial activity could be considered a threat to spent nuclear fuel integrity. The existing data regarding the impact of microbial influenced corrosion (MIC) on spent nuclear fuel storage does not allow a clear assessment to be made. In order to identify what further data are needed, a literature survey on MIC was accomplished with emphasis on materials used in nuclear fuel fabrication, e.g., A1, 304 SS, and zirconium. In addition, a survey was done at Savannah River, Oak Ridge, Hanford, and the INEL on the condition of their wet storage facilities. The topics discussed were the SNF path forward, the types of fuel, ramifications of damaged fuel, involvement of microbial processes, dry storage scenarios, ability to identify microbial activity, definitions of water quality, and the use of biocides. Information was also obtained at international meetings in the area of biological mediated problems in spent fuel and high level wastes. Topics dis cussed included receiving foreign reactor research fuels into existing pools, synergism between different microbes and other forms of corrosion, and cross contamination.

  8. President Abraham Lincoln signs Morrill Act, paving way for the creation of land-grant colleges focusing on agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the creation of land-grant colleges focusing on agriculture and mechanical arts MARCH7 The North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts established; includes engineering departments 1889 The first's first university-based nuclear reactor opens on NC State's campus 1978 Alumnus Larry K. Monteith named

  9. Storage In C Matt Bishop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Matt

    Storage In C Matt Bishop Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science NASA Ames Research Center. Intimately bound with the idea of scope is that of storage. When a program defines a variable, the compiler storage (such as on a stack) or as more permanent storage (in data space.) Recall that the format of a C

  10. Storage In C Matt Bishop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Matt

    Storage In C Matt Bishop Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science NASA Ames Research Center. Intimately bound with the idea of scope is that of storage. When a program denes a variable, the compiler storage (such as on a stack) or as more permanent storage (in data space.) Recall that the format of a C

  11. Regenerative Fuel Cells: Renewable Energy Storage Devices Based on Neutral Water Input

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GRIDS Project: Proton Energy Systems is developing an energy storage device that converts water to hydrogen fuel when excess electricity is available, and then uses hydrogen to generate electricity when energy is needed. The system includes an electrolyzer, which generates and separates hydrogen and oxygen for storage, and a fuel cell which converts the hydrogen and oxygen back to electricity. Traditional systems use acidic membranes, and require expensive materials including platinum and titanium for key parts of the system. In contrast, Proton Energy Systems new system will use an inexpensive alkaline membrane and will contain only inexpensive metals such as nickel and stainless steel. If successful, Proton Energy Systems system will have similar performance to todays regenerative fuel cell systems at a fraction of the cost, and can be used to store electricity on the electric grid.

  12. Contaminated land and groundwater management at Sellafield, a large operational site with significant legacy and contaminated land challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeve, Phil; Eilbeck, Katherine [British Nuclear Group Sellafield Ltd (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sellafield is a former Royal Ordnance Factory used since the 1940's for the production and reprocessing of fissile materials. Leaks and spills from these plants and their associated waste facilities has led to radioactive contaminated ground legacy of up to 20 million m{sup 3}. Consideration of land contamination at Sellafield began in 1976, following discovery of a major leak from a waste storage silo. Over the past three decades there has been a programme of environmental monitoring and several phases of characterization. The latest phase of characterization is a pounds 10 million contract to develop second generation conceptual and numeric models. The Site Licence Company that operates the site has been subject to structural changes due to reorganizations within the British nuclear industry. There has also been a change in emphasis to place an increased importance on accelerated decommissioning. To address these challenges a new contaminated land team and contaminated land and groundwater management plan have been established. Setting and measuring performance against challenging objectives is important. The management plan has to be cognizant of the long timescales (ca. 80 years) for final remediation. Data review, collation, acquisition, analysis, and storage is critical for success. It is equally important to seize opportunities for early environmental gains. It is possible to accelerate the development and delivery of a contaminated land and groundwater management plan by using international experts. (authors)

  13. Managing aging effects on dry cask storage systems for extended long-term storage and transportation of used fuel - rev. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, O.K.; Diercks, D.; Fabian, R.; Ma, D.; Shah, V.; Tam, S.W.; Liu, Y. (Decision and Information Sciences); ( EVS); ( NE)

    2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The cancellation of the Yucca Mountain repository program in the United States raises the prospect of extended long-term storage (i.e., >120 years) and deferred transportation of used fuel at operating and decommissioned nuclear power plant sites. Under U.S. federal regulations contained in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 72.42, the initial license term for an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) must not exceed 40 years from the date of issuance. Licenses may be renewed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at the expiration of the license term upon application by the licensee for a period not to exceed 40 years. Application for ISFSI license renewals must include the following: (1) Time-limited aging analyses (TLAAs) that demonstrate that structures, systems, and components (SSCs) important to safety will continue to perform their intended function for the requested period of extended operation; and (2) a description of the aging management program (AMP) for management of issues associated with aging that could adversely affect SSCs important to safety. In addition, the application must also include design bases information as documented in the most recent updated final safety analysis report as required by 10 CFR 72.70. Information contained in previous applications, statements, or reports filed with the Commission under the license may be incorporated by reference provided that those references are clear and specific. The NRC has recently issued the Standard Review Plan (SRP) for renewal of used-fuel dry cask storage system (DCSS) licenses and Certificates of Compliance (CoCs), NUREG-1927, under which NRC may renew a specific license or a CoC for a term not to exceed 40 years. Both the license and the CoC renewal applications must contain revised technical requirements and operating conditions (fuel storage, surveillance and maintenance, and other requirements) for the ISFSI and DCSS that address aging effects that could affect the safe storage of the used fuel. The information contained in the license and CoC renewal applications will require NRC review to verify that the aging effects on the SSCs in DCSSs/ ISFSIs are adequately managed for the period of extended operation. To date, all of the ISFSIs located across the United States with more than 1,500 dry casks loaded with used fuel have initial license terms of 20 years; three ISFSIs (Surry, H.B. Robinson and Oconee) have received their renewed licenses for 20 years, and two other ISFSIs (Calvert Cliffs and Prairie Island) have applied for license renewal for 40 years. This report examines issues related to managing aging effects on the SSCs in DCSSs/ISFSIs for extended long-term storage and transportation of used fuels, following an approach similar to that of the Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) report, NUREG-1801, for the aging management and license renewal of nuclear power plants. The report contains five chapters and an appendix on quality assurance for aging management programs for used-fuel dry storage systems. Chapter I of the report provides an overview of the ISFSI license renewal process based on 10 CFR 72 and the guidance provided in NUREG-1927. Chapter II contains definitions and terms for structures and components in DCSSs, materials, environments, aging effects, and aging mechanisms. Chapter III and Chapter IV contain generic TLAAs and AMPs, respectively, that have been developed for managing aging effects on the SSCs important to safety in the dry cask storage system designs described in Chapter V. The summary descriptions and tabulations of evaluations of AMPs and TLAAs for the SSCs that are important to safety in Chapter V include DCSS designs (i.e., NUHOMS{reg_sign}, HI-STORM 100, Transnuclear (TN) metal cask, NAC International S/T storage cask, ventilated storage cask (VSC-24), and the Westinghouse MC-10 metal dry storage cask) that have been and continue to be used by utilities across the country for dry storage of used fuel to date. The goal of this report is to help establish the technical

  14. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 29 APRIL 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/NCLIMATE1505 Impacts of wind farms on land surface temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Liming

    LETTERS PUBLISHED ONLINE: 29 APRIL 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/NCLIMATE1505 Impacts of wind farms on land a region in west-central Texas, where four of the world's largest wind farms are located7 . Our results farms relative to nearby non-wind-farm regions. We attribute this warming primarily to wind farms as its

  15. Automate Monitoring System for the Dynamics of Lands Based on Aerial Photos Assessed by Artificial Neural Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    24 Automate Monitoring System for the Dynamics of Lands Based on Aerial Photos Assessed by Artificial Neural Techniques Ioan Ilean Department of Computer Science "1Decembrie 1918" University Alba. In this project an application of artificial neural networks to human-centered earth science information

  16. THE EFFECT OF WATER MANAGEMENT AND LAND USE PRACTICES ON THE RESTORATION OF LEE VINING AND RUSH CREEKS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . The implications of existing and potential management practices for the restoration of the stream habitat the condition of stream habitat and should be considered in any restoration plan. The in-stream studies can thusTHE EFFECT OF WATER MANAGEMENT AND LAND USE PRACTICES ON THE RESTORATION OF LEE VINING AND RUSH

  17. Utilizing CLASIC observations and multiscale models to study the impact of improved Land surface representation on modeling cloud- convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niyogi, Devdutta S. [Purdue

    2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The CLASIC experiment was conducted over the US southern great plains (SGP) in June 2007 with an objective to lead an enhanced understanding of the cumulus convection particularly as it relates to land surface conditions. This project was design to help assist with understanding the overall improvement of land atmosphere convection initiation representation of which is important for global and regional models. The study helped address one of the critical documented deficiency in the models central to the ARM objectives for cumulus convection initiation and particularly under summer time conditions. This project was guided by the scientific question building on the CLASIC theme questions: What is the effect of improved land surface representation on the ability of coupled models to simulate cumulus and convection initiation? The focus was on the US Southern Great Plains region. Since the CLASIC period was anomalously wet the strategy has been to use other periods and domains to develop the comparative assessment for the CLASIC data period, and to understand the mechanisms of the anomalous wet conditions on the tropical systems and convection over land. The data periods include the IHOP 2002 field experiment that was over roughly same domain as the CLASIC in the SGP, and some of the DOE funded Ameriflux datasets.

  18. Polymers for subterranean containment barriers for underground storage tanks (USTs). Letter report on FY 1992 activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser, J.H.; Colombo, P.; Clinton, J.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) set up the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration Program (USTID) to demonstrate technologies for the retrieval and treatment of tank waste, and closure of underground storage tanks (USTs). There are more than 250 underground storage tanks throughout the DOE complex. These tanks contain a wide variety of wastes including high level, low level, transuranic, mixed and hazardous wastes. Many of the tanks have performed beyond the designed lifetime resulting in leakage and contamination of the local geologic media and groundwater. To mitigate this problem it has been proposed that an interim subterranean containment barrier be placed around the tanks. This would minimize or prevent future contamination of soil and groundwater in the event that further tank leakages occur before or during remediation. Use of interim subterranean barriers can also provide sufficient time to evaluate and select appropriate remediation alternatives. The DOE Hanford site was chosen as the demonstration site for containment barrier technologies. A panel of experts for the USTID was convened in February, 1992, to identify technologies for placement of subterranean barriers. The selection was based on the ability of candidate grouts to withstand high radiation doses, high temperatures and aggressive tank waste leachates. The group identified and ranked nine grouting technologies that have potential to place vertical barriers and five for horizontal barriers around the tank. The panel also endorsed placement technologies that require minimal excavation of soil surrounding the tanks.

  19. Meeting the Demand for Biofuels: Impact on Land Use and Carbon Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanna, Madhu; Jain, Atul; Onal, Hayri; Scheffran, Jurgen; Chen, Xiaoguang; Erickson, Matt; Huang, Haixiao; Kang, Seungmo.

    2011-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research was to develop an integrated, interdisciplinary framework to investigate the implications of large scale production of biofuels for land use, crop production, farm income and greenhouse gases. In particular, we examine the mix of feedstocks that would be viable for biofuel production and the spatial allocation of land required for producing these feedstocks at various gasoline and carbon emission prices as well as biofuel subsidy levels. The implication of interactions between energy policy that seeks energy independence from foreign oil and climate policy that seeks to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions for the optimal mix of biofuels and land use will also be investigated. This project contributes to the ELSI research goals of sustainable biofuel production while balancing competing demands for land and developing policy approaches needed to support biofuel production in a cost-effective and environmentally friendly manner.

  20. Risk assessment involving the land disposal of animal waste on Central Texas dairies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Thomas Chadwick

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land disposal of animal waste is an increasing problem for dairies in central Texas Once isolated, many producers now and themselves surrounded by towns and subdivisions. Many of these new neighbors are showing an increasing concern about potential...

  1. Land conversion in Amazonia and Northern South America : influences on regional hydrology and ecosystem response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knox, Ryan Gary

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical model of the terrestrial biosphere (Ecosystem Demography Model) is compbined with an atmospheric model (Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) to investigate how land conversion in the Amazon and ...

  2. Introduction to special section on the Phoenix Mission: Landing Site Characterization Experiments, Mission Overviews, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duck, Thomas J.

    braking strategy. After a safe landing, twin fan-like solar panels are unfurled and provide the energy. 5 Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. 6 Lockheed Martin, Littleton

  3. The effects of cooking, storage, and ionizing irradiation on carotenoids, antioxidant activity, and phenolics in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blessington, Tyann

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on these levels. Therefore, the changes in carotenoid content, antioxidant activity, and phenolic content were investigated using combinations of cultivars, cooking methods, storage treatments, and low-dose ionizing irradiation. Carotenoid content was measured via...

  4. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 9017: On-Board Hydrogen Storage Systems Projected Performance and Cost Parameters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This program record from the Department of Energy's Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program provides information about the projected performance and cost parameters of on-board hydrogen storage systems.

  5. Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended Long Term

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomyDr.Energy University ofOverviewManagementStorage

  6. The effect of respiration heat of sorghum grain on the design of conditioned-air storage systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haile, Danel Gene

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECT OF RESPIRATION HEAT OF SORGHUM GRAIN ON THE DESIGN OF CONDITIONED-AIR STORAGE SYSTEMS A Thesis by DANEL GENE HAILE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1967 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering THE EFFECT OF RESPIRATION HEAT OF SORGHUM GRAIN ON THE DESIGN OF CONDITIONED-AIR STORAGE SYSTEMS A Thesis by DANEL GENE HAILE Approved as to style and content by: C airman...

  7. DOE Global Energy Storage Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The DOE International Energy Storage Database has more than 400 documented energy storage projects from 34 countries around the world. The database provides free, up-to-date information on grid-connected energy storage projects and relevant state and federal policies. More than 50 energy storage technologies are represented worldwide, including multiple battery technologies, compressed air energy storage, flywheels, gravel energy storage, hydrogen energy storage, pumped hydroelectric, superconducting magnetic energy storage, and thermal energy storage. The policy section of the database shows 18 federal and state policies addressing grid-connected energy storage, from rules and regulations to tariffs and other financial incentives. It is funded through DOEs Sandia National Laboratories, and has been operating since January 2012.

  8. Sustainable systems for the storage and conversion of energy are dependent on interconnected

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisslein, Martin

    SEMTE abstract Sustainable systems for the storage and conversion of energy are dependent energy systems for harvesting low availability thermal energy and for providing integrated power, cooling performance buildings, renewable energy conversion, and energy storage can be streamlined by identifying

  9. Effect of residual stress on the life prediction of dry storage canisters for used nuclear fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Bradley P. (Bradley Patrick)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Used nuclear fuel dry storage canisters will likely be tasked with holding used nuclear fuel for a period longer than originally intended. Originally designed for 20 years, the storage time will likely approach 100 years. ...

  10. On CO2 Behavior in the Subsurface, Following Leakage from a Geologic Storage Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 - 16, 1987. Skinner, L. CO2 Blowouts: An Emerging Problem,Assessment for Underground CO2 Storage, paper 234, presentedReservoir Performance Risk in CO2 Storage Projects, paper

  11. Computational Study on Thermal Properties of HVAC System with Building Structure Thermal Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sato, Y.; Sagara, N.; Ryu, Y.; Maehara, K.; Nagai, T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building structure thermal storage (BSTS) HVAC systems can store heat during nighttime thermal storage operation (nighttime operation hours) by using off-peak electricity and release it in the daytime air-conditioning operation (daytime operation...

  12. The state of energy storage in electric utility systems and its effect on renewable energy resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rau, N.S.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the state of the art of electric energy storage technologies and discusses how adding intermittent renewable energy technologies (IRETs) to a utility network affects the benefits from storage dispatch. Load leveling was the mode of storage dispatch examined in the study. However, the report recommended that other modes be examined in the future for kilowatt and kilowatt-hour optimization of storage. The motivation to install storage with IRET generation can arise from two considerations: reliability and enhancement of the value of energy. Because adding storage increases cost, reliability-related storage is attractive only if the accruing benefits exceed the cost of storage installation. The study revealed that the operation of storage should not be guided by the output of the IRET but rather by system marginal costs. Consequently, in planning studies to quantify benefits, storage should not be considered as an entity belonging to the system and not as a component of IRETS. The study also indicted that because the infusion of IRET energy tends to reduce system marginal cost, the benefits from load leveling (value of energy) would be reduced. However, if a system has storage, particularly if the storage is underutilized, its dispatch can be reoriented to enhance the benefits of IRET integration.

  13. Reliability sensitivity analysis based on probability distribution perturbation with application to CO2 storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to CO2 storage Ekaterina Sergienkoa,b , Paul Lema^itrec,d , Aurelie Arnaudc , Daniel Busbyb , Fabrice a computationally expensive simulation code for evaluating the failure probability such as the CO2 storage risk analysis. An application of the method to a synthetic CO2 storage case study is provided together with some

  14. Influence of slaughter, fabrication and storage conditions on the microbial flora and shelf-life of vacuum-packaged steaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandran, Sasi Kantha

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    levels of hygiene in slaughter (conventional vs. strict hygienic) and in fabrication (conventional vs. strict hygienic) procedures and of two methods of storage (retail display case vs. in the dark) on the bacterial count and sensory characteristics... storage was evaluated. Results obtained indicate that steaks obtained with strict hygienic fabrication procedures had lower bacterial counts than those obtained with conventional fabrication procedures. Differences in slaughter hygiene and method...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: incentivize renewable-energy storage...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technologies New Mexico Renewable Energy Storage Task Force On January 28, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Infrastructure Security, News, News & Events,...

  16. How emissions, climate, and land use change will impact mid-century air quality over the United States: a focus on effects at national parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Val Martin, M.

    We use a global coupled chemistryclimateland model (CESM) to assess the integrated effect of climate, emissions and land use changes on annual surface O[subscript 3] and PM[subscript 2.5] in the United States with a focus ...

  17. 22LRO Explores the Apollo 12 Landing Area on the Moon NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) from a lunar orbit of 21 kilometers (13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    22LRO Explores the Apollo 12 Landing Area on the Moon NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO of the Apollo 12 landing site. Images show the twists and turns of the paths made when the astronauts explored the lunar surface. One of the details that shows up is a bright L-shape in the Apollo 12 image. It marks

  18. Profits and Losses from On-farm Drying and Storage of Rice in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorenson, J.W. Jr.; Hildreth, R.J.

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , depending on the type of unit. The total cost for the round bin with a portable auger was 66 cents per barrel; a building with an air conveyor, 90 cents per barrel; a building with an installed auger, 79 cents per barrel; and a building with a portable... auger, 74 cents. A comparison of the average benefits from drying and storage, $2.17 per barrel, with the total cost of the most common type unit, a build- ing with an installed auger of 79 cents per barrel, indicates a profit of $1.38 per barrel...

  19. HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-Es HEATS program, short for High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage, seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

  20. HIERARCHICAL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR INTERACTIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobagi, Fouad

    HIERARCHICAL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR INTERACTIVE VIDEOONDEMAND ShuengHan Gary Chan and Fouad A; Hierarchical Storage Systems for Interactive VideoOnDemand ShuengHan Gary Chan and Fouad A. Tobagi Technical9040 pubs@shasta.stanford.edu Abstract Ondemand video servers based on hierarchical storage systems

  1. Comparative analysis of environmental impacts of maize-biogas and photovoltaics on a land use basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graebig, Markus; Fenner, Richard [Centre for Sustainable Development, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bringezu, Stefan [Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy. P.B. 100480, 42004 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study aims to stimulate the discussion on how to optimize a sustainable energy mix from an environmental perspective and how to apply existing renewable energy sources in the most efficient way. Ground-mounted photovoltaics (PV) and the maize-biogas-electricity route are compared with regard to their potential to mitigate environmental pressure, assuming that a given agricultural area is available for energy production. Existing life cycle assessment (LCA) studies are taken as a basis to analyse environmental impacts of those technologies in relation to conventional technology for power and heat generation. The life-cycle-wide mitigation potential per area used is calculated for the impact categories non-renewable energy input, green house gas (GHG) emissions, acidification and eutrophication. The environmental performance of each system depends on the scenario that is assumed for end energy use (electricity and heat supply have been contemplated). In all scenarios under consideration, PV turns out to be superior to biogas in almost all studied impact categories. Even when maize is used for electricity production in connection with very efficient heat usage, and reduced PV performance is assumed to account for intermittence, PV can still mitigate about four times the amount of green house gas emissions and non-renewable energy input compared to maize-biogas. Soil erosion, which can be entirely avoided with PV, exceeds soil renewal rates roughly 20-fold on maize fields. Regarding the overall Eco-indicator 99 (H) score under most favourable assumptions for the maize-biogas route, PV has still a more than 100% higher potential to mitigate environmental burden. At present, the key advantages of biogas are its price and its availability without intermittence. In the long run, and with respect to more efficient land use, biogas might preferably be produced from organic waste or manure, whereas PV should be integrated into buildings and infrastructures. (author)

  2. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. James A. Burger

    2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first quarterly Technical Report for the period October-December, 2003. A kick-off meeting was held with NETL administrators and scientists at Morgantown, WV, on December 2, 2002. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During this first quarterly reporting period, five Graduate Research Assistants were recruited, an MOA was drafted between Virginia Tech and three industry cooperators, preliminary field locations for controlled studies were located, and a preliminary analysis of a carbon inventory of forest sites on mined land was made.

  3. Spall formation in solution mined storage caverns based on a creep and fracture analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MUNSON,DARRELL E.

    2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of limited direct observation, understanding of the interior conditions of the massive storage caverns constructed in Gulf Coast salt domes is realizable only through predictions of salt response. Determination of the potential for formation of salt spans, leading to eventual salt falls, is based on salt creep and fracture using the Multimechanism-Deformation Coupled Fracture (MCDF) model. This is a continuum model for creep, coupled to continuum damage evolution. The model has been successfully tested against underground results of damage around several test rooms at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Model simulations, here, evaluate observations made in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) storage caverns, namely, the accumulation of material on cavern floors and evidence of salt falls. A simulation of a smooth cavern wall indicates damage is maximum at the surface but diminishes monotonically into the salt, which suggests the source of salt accumulation is surface sluffing. If a protuberance occurs on the wall, fracture damage can form beneath the protuberance, which will eventually cause fracture, and lead to a salt fall.

  4. Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements, originally presented on June 25, 2013.

  5. Critical Analysis of Dry Storage Temperature Limits for Zircaloy-Clad Spent Nuclear Fuel Based on Diffusion Controlled Cavity Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, T.A.; Rosen, R.S.; Kassner, M.E.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interim dry storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) rods is of critical concern because a shortage of existing SNF wet storage capacity combined with delays in the availability of a permanent disposal repository has led to an increasing number of SNF rods being placed into interim dry storage. Safe interim dry storage must be maintained for a minimum of twenty years according to the Standard Review Plan for Dry Cask Storage Systems [1] and the Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR Part 72 [2]. Interim dry storage licensees must meet certain safety conditions when storing SNF rods to ensure that there is a ''very low probability (e.g. 0.5%) of cladding breach during long-term storage'' [1]. Commercial SNF typically consists of uranium oxide pellets surrounded by a thin cladding. The cladding is usually an {alpha}-zirconium based alloy know as ''Zircaloy''. In dry storage, the SNF rods are confined in one of several types of cask systems approved by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). ''The cask system must be designed to prevent degradation of fuel cladding that results in a type of cladding breach, such as axial-splits or ductile fracture, where irradiated UO{sub 2} particles may be released. In addition, the fuel cladding should not degrade to the point where more than one percent of the fuel rods suffer pinhole or hairline crack type failure under normal storage conditions [1].'' The NRC has approved two models [3,4] for use by proposed dry storage licensees to determine the maximum initial temperature limit for nuclear fuel rods in dry storage that supposedly meet the above criteria and yield consistent temperature limits. Though these two models are based on the same fundamental failure theory, different assumptions have been made including the choice of values for material constants in the failure equation. This report will examine and compare the similarities and inconsistencies of these two models. It will illustrate some of the shortcomings of the current models and suggest modifications as well as some experiments that should be started in the near future. This report will also discuss changes in the current NRC standards with regard to the adoption of a strain-based model to be used to determine maximum allowable temperatures of the SNF.

  6. CHEMICAL STORAGE: MYTHS VERSUS REALITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, F

    2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A large number of resources explaining proper chemical storage are available. These resources include books, databases/tables, and articles that explain various aspects of chemical storage including compatible chemical storage, signage, and regulatory requirements. Another source is the chemical manufacturer or distributor who provides storage information in the form of icons or color coding schemes on container labels. Despite the availability of these resources, chemical accidents stemming from improper storage, according to recent reports (1) (2), make up almost 25% of all chemical accidents. This relatively high percentage of chemical storage accidents suggests that these publications and color coding schemes although helpful, still provide incomplete information that may not completely mitigate storage risks. This manuscript will explore some ways published storage information may be incomplete, examine the associated risks, and suggest methods to help further eliminate chemical storage risks.

  7. The influence of the land surface on hydrometeorology and ecology: new advances from modeling and satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Eric

    Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and EOS Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR and through model initialization of soil moisture from High Resolution Land Data Assimilation System (HRLDAS moisture and sensible heat fluxes. For example, the variations of surface energy and moisture fluxes

  8. Comparison of land use change models with focus on spatial and temporal frameworks and data issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Keith

    remote sensing data Adaptation of the land cover classification scheme for County or a small city.g. MEPLAN, Smart Places, INDEX, DRAM/EPAL CUF 1,2, LUCAS, What If?, UPLAN, LTM, UrbanSim, Clarke Model Other interesting models UGrow, Smart Growth Index - Research sources: USFS Report: Data and Data

  9. The consequences of urban land transformation on net primary productivity in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    regions. In terms of biologically available energy, the loss of NPP due to urbanization of agricultural of carbon fixed through photosynthesis by 0.04 pg per year or 1.6% of the pre-urban input. The reduction is enough to offset the 1.8% gain made by the conversion of land to agricultural use, even though

  10. Impact of land use and precipitation changes on surface temperature trends in Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalnay, Eugenia

    with the introduction of satellite data. [5] It is not clear what causes this lack of apparent warming in this region studies [Lim et al., 2005, 2008] indicate that the response to global warming may be st to most other land areas, over most of Argentina there has been net cooling, not warming (about ?0.04°C

  11. An algorithm for optimal centralized landing location: rectilinear yarding operations on flat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greulich, Francis E.

    that exhibit a rectilinear yarding pattern to a centralized land- ing. The specification of setting boundaries dbusquage est minimis. Un exemple est prsent. [Traduit par la Rdaction] Introduction In a technical note measure serves as a very useful design parameter. It is the purpose of this technical note to provide

  12. Mechanism for high hydrogen storage capacity on metal-coated carbon nanotubes: A first principle analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Jinlian; Xiao, Hong [Department of Physics and Institute for nanophysics and Rare-earth Luminescence, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan Province 411105 (China)] [Department of Physics and Institute for nanophysics and Rare-earth Luminescence, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan Province 411105 (China); Cao, Juexian, E-mail: jxcao@xtu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Institute for nanophysics and Rare-earth Luminescence, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan Province 411105 (China)] [Department of Physics and Institute for nanophysics and Rare-earth Luminescence, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan Province 411105 (China)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrogen adsorption and binding mechanism on metals (Ca, Sc, Ti and V) decorated single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are investigated using first principle calculations. Our results show that those metals coated on SWCNTs can uptake over 8 wt% hydrogen molecules with binding energy range -0.2--0.6 eV, promising potential high density hydrogen storage material. The binding mechanism is originated from the electrostatic Coulomb attraction, which is induced by the electric field due to the charge transfer from metal 4s to 3d. Moreover, we found that the interaction between the H{sub 2}-H{sub 2} further lowers the binding energy. - Graphical abstract: Five hydrogen molecules bound to individual Ca decorated (8, 0) SWCNT : a potential hydrogen-storage material. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Each transition metal atom can adsorb more than four hydrogen molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interation between metal and hydrogen molecule is electrostatic coulomb attraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electric field is induced by the charge transfer from metal 4s to metal 3d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adsorbed hydrogen molecules which form supermolecule can further lower the binding energy.

  13. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration potential of forests growing on 14 mined sites in a seven-state region in the Midwestern and Eastern Coalfields. Carbon contents of these forests were compared to adjacent forests on non-mined land. The study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each location. The treatments include three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Soil samples were collected from each plot to characterize the sites prior to treatment. Analysis of soil samples was completed and these data are being used to prepare fertilizer prescriptions. Fertilizer prescripts will be developed for each site. Fertilizer will be applied during the second quarter 2004. Data are included as appendices in this report. As part of our economic analysis of mined land reforestation, we focused on the implications of a shift in reforestation burden from the landowner to the mine operator. Results suggest that the reforestation of mined lands as part of the mining operation creates a viable and profitable forest enterprise for landowners with greater potential for carbon sequestration.

  14. Storage Viability and Optimization Web Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on MicrogridEPRI-DOE Handbook of Energy Storage for Transmission andLong- vs. Short-Term Energy Storage Technologies Analysis, A

  15. Land-use Leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International offsets are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

  16. Characteristics of fuel crud and its impact on storage, handling, and shipment of spent fuel. [Fuel crud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazelton, R.F.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion products, called ''crud,'' form on out-of-reactor surfaces of nuclear reactor systems and are transported by reactor coolant to the core, where they deposit on external fuel-rod cladding surfaces and are activated by nuclear reactions. After discharge of spent fuel from a reactor, spallation of radioactive crud from the fuel rods could impact wet or dry storage operations, handling (including rod consolidation), and shipping. It is the purpose of this report to review earlier (1970s) and more recent (1980s) literature relating to crud, its characteristics, and any impact it has had on actual operations. Crud characteristics vary from reactor type to reactor type, reactor to reactor, fuel assembly to fuel assembly in a reactor, circumferentially and axially in an assembly, and from cycle to cycle for a specific facility. To characterize crud of pressurized-water (PWRs) and boiling-water reactors (BWRs), published information was reviewed on appearance, chemical composition, areal density and thickness, structure, adhesive strength, particle size, and radioactivity. Information was also collected on experience with crud during spent fuel wet storage, rod consolidation, transportation, and dry storage. From experience with wet storage, rod consolidation, transportation, and dry storage, it appears crud spallation can be managed effectively, posing no significant radiological problems. 44 refs., 11 figs.

  17. Collaborative research on amine borane regeneration and market analysis of hydrogen storage materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Schubert

    2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Amine borane (AB) is a very high capacity hydrogen storage material that meets DOE gravimetric and volumetric targets for on-board delivery of hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles (FCVs). This research helped make process toward the ultimate goal of practical generation of spent AB and added to the understanding of materials and processes required to utilize AB in practical applications. In addition, this work helped to enhance our fundamental understanding of the properties of boron materials now being pursued for new frustrated Lewis pair catalyst systems for activation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide, of interest for carbon capture and fuels production. This project included four primary areas of investigation: (1) synthesis of borate esters for use as amine borane regeneration intermediates, (2) spent ammonia borane fuel generation and analysis, (3) spent fuel digestion for production of borate esters, and (4) worldwide borate resource analysis. Significant progress was made in each of these areas during the two-year course of this project, which involved extensive collaborations with partners in the Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and particularly with partners at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Results of the boron resource analysis studies indicate that sufficient boron reserves exist within the United States to meet forecast requirements for a U.S. fleet of hydrogen FCVs and sufficient resources are available worldwide for a global fleet of FCVs.

  18. Final report on the public involvement process phase 1, Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, L.; Shanteau, C.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the pubic involvement component of Phase 1 of the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility (NM) Feasibility Study in San Juan County, Utah. Part of this summary includes background information on the federal effort to locate a voluntary site for temporary storage of nuclear waste, how San Juan County came to be involved, and a profile of the county. The heart of the report, however, summarizes the activities within the public involvement process, and the issues raised in those various forums. The authors have made every effort to reflect accurately and thoroughly all the concerns and suggestions expressed to us during the five month process. We hope that this report itself is a successful model of partnership with the citizens of the county -- the same kind of partnership the county is seeking to develop with its constituents. Finally, this report offers some suggestions to both county officials and residents alike. These suggestions concern how decision-making about the county's future can be done by a partnership of informed citizens and listening decision-makers. In the Appendix are materials relating to the public involvement process in San Juan County.

  19. Final report on the public involvement process phase 1, Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, L.; Shanteau, C.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the pubic involvement component of Phase 1 of the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility (NM) Feasibility Study in San Juan County, Utah. Part of this summary includes background information on the federal effort to locate a voluntary site for temporary storage of nuclear waste, how San Juan County came to be involved, and a profile of the county. The heart of the report, however, summarizes the activities within the public involvement process, and the issues raised in those various forums. The authors have made every effort to reflect accurately and thoroughly all the concerns and suggestions expressed to us during the five month process. We hope that this report itself is a successful model of partnership with the citizens of the county -- the same kind of partnership the county is seeking to develop with its constituents. Finally, this report offers some suggestions to both county officials and residents alike. These suggestions concern how decision-making about the county`s future can be done by a partnership of informed citizens and listening decision-makers. In the Appendix are materials relating to the public involvement process in San Juan County.

  20. Chit-based Remote Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paluska, Justin Mazzola

    We propose a model for reliable remote storage founded on contract law. Consumers submit their bits to storage providers in exchange for a chit. A chit is a cryptographically secure, verifiable contract between a consumer ...

  1. Gaseous and Liquid Hydrogen Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today's state of the art for hydrogen storage includes 5,000- and 10,000-psi compressed gas tanks and cryogenic liquid hydrogen tanks for on-board hydrogen storage.

  2. Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paranthaman, Parans

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    ORNL Distinguished Scientist Parans Paranthaman is discovering new materials with potential for greatly increasing batteries' energy storage capacity and bring manufacturing back to the US.

  3. Energy Storage

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Paranthaman, Parans

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    ORNL Distinguished Scientist Parans Paranthaman is discovering new materials with potential for greatly increasing batteries' energy storage capacity and bring manufacturing back to the US.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: energy storage resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Outages With New 'Smart Grid' System On June 20, 2013, in Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: energy storage requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accomplishments On March 3, 2015, in Capabilities, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: solar thermal energy storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy storage Sandia Solar Energy Test System Cited in National Engineering Competition On May 16, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National...

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Address Flooding, Water, and Power Systems On June 11, 2013, in Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Infrastructure Security, Microgrid,...

  8. Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November 2012) Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November 2012) On November 7, 2012, Clean...

  9. Hydrogen Storage Materials Workshop Proceedings Workshop, October...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proceedings Workshop, October 16th, 2002 Hydrogen Storage Materials Workshop Proceedings Workshop, October 16th, 2002 A workshop on compressed and liquefied hydrogen storage was a...

  10. Agenda: Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution Agenda: Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution A Public Meeting on the Quadrennial Energy Review, Hosted by the...

  11. Regulatory Perspective on Potential Fuel Reconfiguration and Its Implication to High Burnup Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation - 13042

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhian; Rahimi, Meraj; Tang, David; Aissa, Mourad; Flaganan, Michelle [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission - NRC, Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States)] [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission - NRC, Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States); Wagner, John C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent experiments conducted by Argonne National Laboratory on high burnup fuel cladding material property show that the ductile to brittle transition temperature of high burnup fuel cladding is dependent on: (1) cladding material, (2) irradiation conditions, and (3) drying-storage histories (stress at maximum temperature) [1]. The experiment results also show that the ductile to brittle temperature increases as the fuel burnup increases. These results indicate that the current knowledge in cladding material property is insufficient to determine the structural performance of the cladding of high burnup fuel after it has been stored in a dry cask storage system for some time. The uncertainties in material property and the elevated ductile to brittle transition temperature impose a challenge to the storage cask and transportation packaging designs because the cask designs may not be able to rely on the structural integrity of the fuel assembly for control of fissile material, radiation source, and decay heat source distributions. The fuel may reconfigure during further storage and/or the subsequent transportation conditions. In addition, the fraction of radioactive materials available for release from spent fuel under normal condition of storage and transport may also change. The spent fuel storage and/or transportation packaging vendors, spent fuel shippers, and the regulator may need to consider this possible fuel reconfiguration and its impact on the packages' ability to meet the safety requirements of Part 72 and Part 71 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is working with the scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to assess the impact of fuel reconfiguration on the safety of the dry storage systems and transportation packages. The NRC Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation has formed a task force to work on the safety and regulatory concerns in relevance to high burnup fuel storage and transportation. This paper discusses the staff's preliminary considerations on the safety implication of fuel reconfiguration with respect to nuclear safety (subcriticality control), radiation shielding, containment, the performance of the thermal functions of the packages, and the retrievability of the contents from regulatory perspective. (authors)

  12. Study on Commissioning Process for Control Logic of Thermal Storage System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shioya, M.; Tsubaki, M.; Nakahara, N.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thermal storage system in an actual building using the CLT. Introduction In thermal storage systems, as large temperature difference between the supply water and the return water as possible should be maintained in order to ensure high system..., at the secondary water circuit of a heat exchanger installed between the thermal storage system and secondary HVAC system of an actual building. One of the authors, Nakahara, acted as Commissioning Authority during construction phase and later as a consultant...

  13. Land Use and Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daniel; Polsky, Colin; Bolstad, Paul V.; Brody, Samuel D.; Hulse, David; Kroh, Roger; Loveland, Thomas; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A contribution to the 3rd National Climate Assessment report, discussing the following key messages: 1. Choices about land-use and land-cover patterns have affected and will continue to affect how vulnerable or resilient human communities and ecosystems are to the effects of climate change. 2. Land-use and land-cover changes affect local, regional, and global climate processes. 3. Individuals, organizations, and governments have the capacity to make land-use decisions to adapt to the effects of climate change. 4. Choices about land use and land management provide a means of reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas levels.

  14. Lands & Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home asLCLSLaboratoryRowland to receiveLand ManagementLands

  15. Terrestrial Water Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, Jay

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T. E. Reilly, 2002: Flow and storage in groundwater systems.storage ..2013: Global ocean storage of anthropogenic carbon.

  16. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During the reporting period (October-December 2004) we completed the validation of a forest productivity classification model for mined land. A coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) of 0.68 confirms the model's ability to predict SI based on a selection of mine soil properties. To determine carbon sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio (Figure 1), West Virginia (Figure 2), and Virginia (Figure 3). The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). For hybrid poplar, total plant biomass differences increased significantly with the intensity of silvicultural input. Root, stem, and foliage biomass also increased with the level of silvicultural intensity. Financial feasibility analyses of reforestation on mined lands previously reclaimed to grassland have been completed for conversion to white pine and mixed hardwood species. Examination of potential policy instruments for promoting financial feasibility also have been completed, including lump sum payments at time of conversion, annual payments through the life of the stand, and payments based on carbon sequestration that provide both minimal profitability and fully offset initial reforestation outlays. We have compiled a database containing mine permit information obtained from permitting agencies in Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Kentucky. Due to differences and irregularities in permitting procedures between states, we found it necessary to utilize an alternative method to determine mined land acreages in the Appalachian region. We have initiated a proof of concept study, focused in the State of Ohio, to determine the feasibility of using images from the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and/or Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) to accurately identify mined lands.

  17. University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the third long-term cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoyer, M.C.; Hallgren, J.P.; Uebel, M.H.; Delin, G.N.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Sterling, R.L.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system has been operated as a field test facility (FTF) since 1982. The objectives were to design, construct, and operate the facility to study the feasibility of high-temperature ATES in a confined aquifer. Four short-term and two long-term cycles were previously conducted, which provided a greatly increased understanding of the efficiency and geochemical effects of high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage. The third long-term cycle (LT3) was conducted to operate the ATES system in conjunction with a real heating load and to further study the geochemical impact that heated water storage had on the aquifer. For LT3, the source and storage wells were modified so that only the most permeable portion, the Ironton-Galesville part, of the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville aquifer was used for storage. This was expected to improve storage efficiency by reducing the surface area of the heated volume and simplify analysis of water chemistry results by reducing the number of aquifer-related variables which need to be considered. During LT3, a total volume of 63.2 {times} 10{sup 3} m {sup 3} of water was injected at a rate of 54.95 m{sup 3}/hr into the storage well at a mean temperature of 104.7{degrees}C. Tie-in to the reheat system of the nearby Animal Sciences Veterinary Medicine (ASVM) building was completed after injection was completed. Approximately 66 percent (4.13 GWh) of the energy added to the aquifer was recovered. Approximately 15 percent (0.64 GWh) of the usable (10 building. Operations during heat recovery with the ASVM building`s reheat system were trouble-free. Integration into more of the ASVM (or other) building`s mechanical systems would have resulted in significantly increasing the proportion of energy used during heat recovery.

  18. Chemical Hydrogen Storage R & D | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hydrogen Storage Chemical Hydrogen Storage R & D Chemical Hydrogen Storage R & D DOE's chemical hydrogen storage R&D is focused on developing low-cost energy-efficient...

  19. CONTROLLED GROWTH OF CARBON NANOTUBES ON CONDUCTIVE METAL SUBSTRATES FOR ENERGY STORAGE APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, P.; Engtrakul, C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impressive mechanical and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them ideally suited for use in a variety of nanostructured devices, especially in the realm of energy production and storage. In particular, vertically-aligned CNT forests have been the focus of increasing investigation for use in supercapacitor electrodes and as hydrogen adsorption substrates. Vertically-aligned CNT growth was attempted on metal substrates by waterassisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). CNT growth was catalyzed by iron-molybdenum (FeMo) nanoparticle catalysts synthesized by a colloidal method, which were then spin-coated onto Inconel foils. The substrates were loaded into a custom-built CVD apparatus, where CNT growth was initiated by heating the substrates to 750 C under the fl ow of He, H2, C2H4 and a controlled amount of water vapor. The resultant CNTs were characterized by a variety of methods including Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the growth parameters were varied in an attempt to optimize the purity and growth yield of the CNTs. The surface area and hydrogen adsorption characteristics of the CNTs were quantifi ed by the Brunauer- Emmett-Teller (BET) and Sieverts methods, and their capacitance was measured via cyclic voltammetry. While vertically-aligned CNT growth could not be verifi ed, TEM and SEM analysis indicated that CNT growth was still obtained, resulting in multiwalled CNTs of a wide range in diameter along with some amorphous carbon impurities. These microscopy fi ndings were reinforced by Raman spectroscopy, which resulted in a G/D ratio ranging from 1.5 to 3 across different samples, suggestive of multiwalled CNTs. Changes in gas fl ow rates and water concentration during CNT growth were not found to have a discernable effect on the purity of the CNTs. The specifi c capacitance of a CNT/FeMo/Inconel electrode was found to be 3.2 F/g, and the BET surface area of a characteristic CNT sample was measured to be 232 m2/g with a cryogenic (77K) hydrogen storage of 0.85 wt%. This level of hydrogen adsorption is slightly higher than that predicted by the Chahine rule, indicating that these CNTs may bind hydrogen more strongly than other carbonaceous materials. More work is needed to confi rm and determine the reason for increased hydrogen adsorption in these CNTs, and to test them for use as catalyst support networks. This study demonstrates the feasibility of producing CNTs for energy storage applications using water-assisted CVD.

  20. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. Regression models of chemical and physical soil properties were created in order to estimate the SOC content down the soil profile. Soil organic carbon concentration and volumetric percent of the fines decreased exponentially down the soil profile. The results indicated that one-third of the total SOC content on mined lands was found in the surface 0-13 cm soil layer, and more than two-thirds of it was located in the 0-53 cm soil profile. A relative estimate of soil density may be best in broad-scale mine soil mapping since actual D{sub b} values are often inaccurate and difficult to obtain in rocky mine soils. Carbon sequestration potential is also a function of silvicultural practices used for reforestation success. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Relative to carbon value, our analysis this quarter shows that although short-rotation hardwood management on reclaimed surface mined lands may have higher LEVs than traditional long-rotation hardwood management, it is only profitable in a limited set of circumstances.

  1. Mitigating climate change through land use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    , offsetting the use of fossil fuels and reducing carbon emissions. Avoiding deforestation, increasing plant storage through afforestation or plant management, and substituting bioenergy for fossil fuels all use increasing deforestation by increasing demand for crop land, undermining the primary GHG emissions reduction

  2. Basic Research Needs for Electrical Energy Storage: Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Electrical Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugustDecade5-F,INITIAL JohnEAdvancedReseaRchthe

  3. The impact of new short season rice varieties on drying and storage of rough rice in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhagia, Gobind Shewakram

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE IMPACT OF NEW SHORT SEASON RICE VARIETIES ON DRYING AND STORAGE OF ROUGH RICE IN TEXAS A Thesis by GOBIND SHEWAKRAM BHAGIA Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1967 Ma)or Sub/ect: Agricultural Economics THE IMPACT OF NEW SHORT SEASON RICE VARIETIES ON DRYING AND STORAGE OF ROUGH RICE IN TEXAS A Thesis by GOBIND SHEWAKIUiM BHAGIA Approved as to style and oontent by...

  4. Profits and Losses from On-farm Drying and Storage of Grain Sorghum in Central Texas and the Coastal Bend.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hildreth, R. J.; Moore, C. A.

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SUMMARY The cost of owning and operating round bins and drying equipment when used at capacity for on-farm drying and storage of grain sorghuni in the Coastal Bend area was 34 cents per hundred- weight and 30 cents per... hundredweight in the Central Texas area; These costs- were based on a study of 91 units over two drying and storage seasons, 1954-55 and 1955-56. The costs with a building were slightly higher. The seasonal price spread cannot be compared directly...

  5. Power Consumption in Enterprise-Scale Backup Storage Systems Appears in the tenth USENIX Conference on File and Storage Technologies (FAST 2012)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zadok, Erez

    Power Consumption in Enterprise-Scale Backup Storage Systems Appears in the tenth USENIX Conference Brook University Backup Recovery Systems Division EMC Corporation Abstract Power consumption has become an important factor in modern storage system design. Power efficiency is particularly beneficial in disk

  6. Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other Than State-Owned Marine Waters (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other than State-Owned Marine Waters is applicable to the Natural Gas Sector and the Coal...

  7. Forecasting Recovery Opportunities for the Red-cockaded Woodpecker on Private Lands in Eastern North Carolina Using a Spatial Model of Tree Age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dube, Amanda M

    2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, recovery efforts for the federally endangered red-cockaded woodpecker (RCW; Picoides borealis) primarily occur on public lands throughout the Southeast, where proven management practices ensure availability of mature, open pine savannahs...

  8. New York's Energy Storage System Gets Recharged

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jonathan Silver and Matt Rogers on a major breakthrough for New York state's energy storage capacity.

  9. Nano-sized Lithium Manganese Oxide Dispersed on Carbon Nanotubes for Energy Storage Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bak, S.B.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nano-sized lithium manganese oxide (LMO) dispersed on carbon nanotubes (CNT) has been synthesized successfully via a microwave-assisted hydrothermal reaction at 200 C for 30 min using MnO{sub 2}-coated CNT and an aqueous LiOH solution. The initial specific capacity is 99.4 mAh/g at a 1.6 C-rate, and is maintained at 99.1 mAh/g even at a 16 C-rate. The initial specific capacity is also maintained up to the 50th cycle to give 97% capacity retention. The LMO/CNT nanocomposite shows excellent power performance and good structural reversibility as an electrode material in energy storage systems, such as lithium-ion batteries and electrochemical capacitors. This synthetic strategy opens a new avenue for the effective and facile synthesis of lithium transition metal oxide/CNT nanocomposite.

  10. Effect of Storage on Stability of Biodiesel Produced from Selected Seed Oils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ndana; B. Garba; L. G. Hassan; U. Z. Faruk

    Abstract: This work reports the results of the study of the effect of storage on the physico-chemical properties of biodiesel produced from Ricinus communis (Castor), Heavea brasiliensis (Rubber), Gossypium hirsutum (Cotton), Azadirachta indica (Neem), Glycin max (Soya bean), and Jatropha curcas (Jatropha oils) stored in an open air environment for a period of ten months. At the end of this test period, peroxide value of JME increased to (126.60meq/Kg),CME(71.75meq/Kg),SME(77.80meq/Kg),NME(111.65meq/K g), COME (59.65meq/Kg), RME (162.55meq/Kg), kinematic viscosity JME

  11. Changing the Rules on Fuel Export at Sellafield's First Fuel Storage Pond - 12065

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, Derek [Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pile Fuel Storage Pond (PFSP) was built in 1949/50 to receive, store and de-can fuel and isotopes from the Windscale Piles. Following closure of the Piles in 1957, plant operations were scaled down until fuel processing eventually ceased in 1962. The facility has held an inventory of metal fuel both from the Piles and from other programmes since that time. The pond is currently undergoing remediation and removal of the fuel is a key step in that process, unfortunately the fuel export infrastructure on the plant is no longer functional and due to the size and limited lifting capability, the plant is not compatible with today's large volume heavy export flasks. The baseline scheme for the plant is to package fuel into a small capacity flask and transfer it to another facility for treatment and repackaging into a flask compatible with other facilities on site. Due to programme priorities the repackaging facility is not available to do this work for several years causing a delay to the work. In an effort accelerate the programme the Metal Fuel Pilot Project (MFPP) was initiated to challenge the norms for fuel transfer and develop a new methodology for transferring the fuel. In developing a transfer scheme the team had to overcome challenges associated with unknown fuel condition, transfers outside of bulk containment, pyro-phoricity and oxidisation hazards as well as developing remote control and recovery systems for equipment not designed for this purpose. A combination of novel engineering and enhanced operational controls were developed which resulted in the successful export of the first fuel to leave the Pile Fuel Storage Pond in over 40 years. The learning from the pilot project is now being considered by the main project team to see how the new methodology can be applied to the full inventory of the pond. (author)

  12. International Workshop on Geomechanics and Energy The Ground as Energy Source and Storage Lausanne, Switzerland, 26-28 November 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candea, George

    International Workshop on Geomechanics and Energy The Ground as Energy Source and Storage of shales is becoming one of the most important issues in modern geomechanics, largely driven by petroleum region of Switzerland. #12;International Workshop on Geomechanics and Energy The Ground as Energy

  13. Addressing land-based discrimination in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    , feudalism was based on ownership of land, the dominant mode of production. Political power was dominated by absolute kings and feudal overlords. Wealth and position in society was derived from the land ownership

  14. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Product, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the Earths atmosphere have increased dramatically in the past 100 years due to deforestation, land use change, and fossil fuel combustion. These humancaused, higher levels of CO{sub 2} may enhance the atmospheric greenhouse effect and may contribute to climate change. Many reclaimed coal-surface mine areas in the eastern U.S. are not in productive use. Reforestation of these lands could provide societal benefits, including sequestration of atmospheric carbon. The goal of this project was to determine the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on the tens of thousands of hectares of mined land and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from large-scale application of forest restoration procedures. We developed a mine soil quality model that can be used to estimate the suitability of selected mined sites for carbon sequestration projects. Across the mine soil quality gradient, we tested survival and growth performance of three species assemblages under three levels of silvicultural. Hardwood species survived well in WV and VA, and survived better than the other species used in OH, while white pine had the poorest survival of all species at all sites. Survival was particularly good for the site-specific hardwoods planted at each site. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Grassland to forest conversion costs may be a major contributor to the lack of reforestation of previously reclaimed mine lands in the Appalachian coal-mining region. Otherwise profitable forestry opportunities may be precluded by these conversion costs, which for many combinations of factors (site class, forest type, timber prices, regeneration intensity, and interest rate) result in negative land expectation values. Improved technology and/or knowledge of reforestation practices in these situations may provide opportunities to reduce the costs of converting many of these sites as research continues into these practices. It also appears that in many cases substantial payments, non-revenue values, or carbon values are required to reach profitability under the present circumstances. It is unclear when, or in what form, markets will develop to support any of these add-on values to supplement commercial forestry revenues. However, as these markets do develop, they will only enhance the viability of forestry on reclaimed mined lands, although as we demonstrate in our analysis of carbon payments, the form of the revenue source may itself influence management, potentially mitigating some of the benefits of reforestation. For a representative mined-land resource base, reforestation of mined lands with mixed pine-hardwood species would result in an average estimated C accumulation in forms that can be harvested for use as wood products or are likely to remain in the soil C pool at ~250 Mg C ha{sup -1} over a 60 year period following reforestation. The additionality of this potential C sequestration was estimated considering data in scientific literature that defines C accumulation in mined-land grasslands over the long term. Given assumptions detailed in the text, these lands have the potential to sequester ~180 Mg C ha{sup -1}, a total of 53.5 x 10{sup 6} Mg C, over 60 years, an average of ~900,000 Mg C / yr, an amount equivalent to about 0.04% of projected US C emissions at the midpoint of a 60-year period (circa 2040) following assumed reforestation. Although potential sequestration quantities are not great relative to potential national needs should an energy-related C emissions offset requirement be developed at some future date, these lands are available and unused for other economically valued purposes and many possess soil and site properties that are well-suited to reforestation. Should such reforestation occur, it would also produce ancillary benefits by providing env

  15. Heilougjiang adopts measures to strengthen land management-each square millimeter of land is utterly cherished and rationally used

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan Peiquan; Liu, Y.

    1983-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reports on how a Chinese province with a large area of land and a small population has adopted a series of measures to strengthen land management, to stop the illegal occupying of land, and to protect land resources. Investigations of land resources and of the state of land use, as well as soil surveys, have been launched in order to determine the rights of land ownership and use. Many counties and cities have experimented with dividing farm areas into districts and comprehensive land planning, established land files, trained key personnel in land management skills, and have launched scientific land research. Illegal occupation, waste and destruction of land have risen with the increase in population and construction. Per capita cultivated acreage has declined to 4.1 mu. An effort has been made to reach the people in urban and rural areas with this message: ''Cherish every square millimeter of land utterly and use it rationally''.

  16. Accepted for publication in Energy and Buildings. 2014. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.enbuild.2014.03.056 Improvement of Borehole Thermal Energy Storage Design Based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .03.056 1 Improvement of Borehole Thermal Energy Storage Design Based on Experimental and Modelling Results Thermal Energy Storage appears to be an attractive solution for solar thermal energy storage. The SOLARGEOTHERM research project aimed to evaluate the energetic potential of borehole thermal energy storage

  17. The impact of land use change on migrant birds in the Sahel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, William M.; Small, Robert D. S.; Vickery, Juliet A.

    2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    -1967 but below it between 1968-1985. In fact, the early 1970s were a period of rainfall failure and famine in the Sahel, and coincided with population declines in many of the migrant bird populations wintering in these drought-affect d dryland habitats... and grazing reserves have been subject to more intensive use (both legal and illegal). The extent of Sahelian wetlands has been reduced by the construction of dams for hydro power and irrigation. The spatial patterns of land use change and the associated...

  18. Rainfall trends in India and their impact on soil erosion and land management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pal, Indrani

    2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    (Ich0.5,PPch at left), soil water deficit (SWDch at centre) and land cover (LCch at right) (Nunes et al., 2009) 170 Figure 4.3 Flow chart of a model of the processes of soil erosion by water (Meyer & Wischmeier, 1969) 173 Figure 4.4 Carbon loss... concentration in surface water d Number of storms in a day e Kinetic energy of rainfall E Total storm kinetic energy ENSO El-Nio Southern Oscillation gc Daily ground cover subfactor I Rainfall intensity i Index of the number of storms in each day...

  19. Plant Succession at the Edges of Two Abandoned Cultivated Fields on the Arid Lands Ecology Reserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Sally A. (OFFICE OF FELLOWSHIP PROG); Rickard, William H. (OFFICE OF FELLOWSHIP PROG)

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    How vegetation recovers from disturbances is an important question for land managers. We examined 500 m2 plots to determine the progress made by native herbaceous plant species in colonizing the edges of abandoned cultivated fields at different elevations and microclimates, but with similar soils in a big sagebrush/bluebunch wheatgrass steppe. Alien species, especially cheatgrass and cereal rye, were the major competitors to the natives. The native species with best potential for restoring steppe habitats were sulphur lupine, hawksbeard, bottlebrush squirreltail, needle-and-thread grass, Sandberg's bluegrass, and several lomatiums.

  20. Light storage in a room temperature atomic vapor based on coherent population oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. -A. Maynard; F. Bretenaker; F. Goldfarb

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the experimental observation of Coherent Population Oscillation (CPO) based light storage in an atomic vapor cell at room temperature. Using the ultranarrow CPO between the ground levels of a $\\Lambda$ system selected by polarization in metastable $^4$He, such a light storage is experimentally shown to be phase preserving. As it does not involve any atomic coherences it has the advantage of being robust to dephasing effects such as small magnetic field inhomogeneities. The storage time is limited by the population lifetime of the ground states of the $\\Lambda$ system.

  1. EIS-0442: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado, Nebraska, and Utah

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS is being prepared jointly by DOEs Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Forest Service. The EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of Westerns proposed changes to vegetation management along its transmission line rights-of-way on National Forest System lands in Colorado, Utah, and Nebraska.

  2. U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the Chesapeake Bay for 30 years and have, specific to the topic of this hearing, been engaged in several relevant of the Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee of the Chesapeake Bay Program which last year released the report (Exhibit 1). While annual Bay water temperatures have varied in relation to large-scale climate cycles

  3. Albedo estimates for land surface models and support for a new paradigm based on foliage nitrogen concentration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollinger, D. [USDA Forest Service; Ollinger, S. V. [University of Hew Hampshire; Richardson, A. D. [University of Hew Hampshire; Martin, M. E. [University of New Hampshire; Meyers, T. P. [NOAA ATDD; Dail, D. B. [University of Maine; Scott, N. A. [Queens University, Kingston, ON, Canada; Arkebauer, T. J. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Baldocchi, D. D. [University of California, Berkeley; Clark, K. L. [USDA Forest Service; Curtis, Peter [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Davis, K. J. [Pennsylvania State University; Desai, Desai Ankur R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Dragoni, Danilo [Indiana University; Goulden, M. L. [University of California, Irvine; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Katul, G. G. [Duke University; Pallardy, Stephen G. [University of Missouri; Pawu, K. T. [University of California, Davis; Schmid, H. P. [IFU, FZK IMK, Institute of Meteorology & Climate, Garmisch Partenkirchen, Germany; Stoy, P. C. [University of Edinburgh; Suyker, A. E. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Verma, Shashi [University of Nebraska

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetation albedo is a critical component of the Earth s climate system, yet efforts to evaluate and improve albedo parameterizations in climate models have lagged relative to other aspects of model development. Here, we calculated growing season albedos for deciduous and evergreen forests, crops, and grasslands based on over 40 site-years of data from the AmeriFlux network and compared them with estimates presently used in the land surface formulations of a variety of climate models. Generally, the albedo estimates used in land surface models agreed well with this data compilation. However, a variety of models using fixed seasonal estimates of albedo overestimated the growing season albedo of northerly evergreen trees. In contrast, climatemodels that rely on a common two-stream albedo submodel provided accurate predictions of boreal needle-leaf evergreen albedo but overestimated grassland albedos. Inverse analysis showed that parameters of the two-stream model were highly correlated. Consistent with recent observations based on remotely sensed albedo, the AmeriFlux dataset demonstrated a tight linear relationship between canopy albedo and foliage nitrogen concentration (for forest vegetation: albedo 50.0110.071%N, r250.91; forests, grassland, and maize: albedo50.0210.067%N, r250.80). However, this relationship saturated at the higher nitrogen concentrations displayed by soybean foliage. We developed similar relationships between a foliar parameter used in the two-stream albedo model and foliage nitrogen concentration. These nitrogen-based relationships can serve as the basis for a new approach to land surface albedo modeling that simplifies albedo estimation while providing a link to other important ecosystem processes.

  4. Sensitivity of Surface Flux Simulations to Hydrologic Parameters Based on an Uncertainty Quantification Framework Applied to the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Lin, Guang; Ricciuto, Daniel M.

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainties in hydrologic parameters could have significant impacts on the simulated water and energy fluxes and land surface states, which will in turn affect atmospheric processes and the carbon cycle. Quantifying such uncertainties is an important step toward better understanding and quantification of uncertainty of integrated earth system models. In this paper, we introduce an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework to analyze sensitivity of simulated surface fluxes to selected hydrologic parameters in the Community Land Model (CLM4) through forward modeling. Thirteen flux tower footprints spanning a wide range of climate and site conditions were selected to perform sensitivity analyses by perturbing the parameters identified. In the UQ framework, prior information about the parameters was used to quantify the input uncertainty using the Minimum-Relative-Entropy approach. The quasi-Monte Carlo approach was applied to generate samples of parameters on the basis of the prior pdfs. Simulations corresponding to sampled parameter sets were used to generate response curves and response surfaces and statistical tests were used to rank the significance of the parameters for output responses including latent (LH) and sensible heat (SH) fluxes. Overall, the CLM4 simulated LH and SH show the largest sensitivity to subsurface runoff generation parameters. However, study sites with deep root vegetation are also affected by surface runoff parameters, while sites with shallow root zones are also sensitive to the vadose zone soil water parameters. Generally, sites with finer soil texture and shallower rooting systems tend to have larger sensitivity of outputs to the parameters. Our results suggest the necessity of and possible ways for parameter inversion/calibration using available measurements of latent/sensible heat fluxes to obtain the optimal parameter set for CLM4. This study also provided guidance on reduction of parameter set dimensionality and parameter calibration framework design for CLM4 and other land surface models under different hydrologic and climatic regimes.

  5. Hydrogen Storage

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well a

  6. Stasis: Flexible Transactional Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Russell C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    He and Bowei Du implemented Oasys, and helped with my firstwas built on top of a C++ object persistence library, Oasys.Oasys uses plug-in storage modules that implement persistent

  7. Impact of land use change on the local climate over the Tibetan Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, J.; Lu, S.; Li, S.; Miller, N.L.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observational data show that the remotely sensed leaf area index (LAI) has a significant downward trend over the east Tibetan Plateau (TP), while a warming trend is found in the same area. Further analysis indicates that this warming trend mainly results from the nighttime warming. The Single-Column Atmosphere Model (SCAM) version 3.1 developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research is used to investigate the role of land use change in the TP local climate system and isolate the contribution of land use change to the warming. Two sets of SCAM simulations were performed at the Xinghai station that is located near the center of the TP Sanjiang (three rivers) Nature Reserve where the downward LAI trend is largest. These simulations were forced with the high and low LAIs. The modeling results indicate that, when the LAI changes from high to low, the daytime temperature has a slight decrease, while the nighttime temperature increases significantly, which is consistent with the observations. The modeling results further show that the lower surface roughness length plays a significant role in affecting the nighttime temperature increase.

  8. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. 44, NO. 1, JANUARY 2008 193 A New Read Channel Model for Patterned Media Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Paul H.

    domain "islands" may provide an alternative to conventional continuous media. For this new type of mediaIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. 44, NO. 1, JANUARY 2008 193 A New Read Channel Model for Patterned Media Storage Seyhan Karakulak, Paul H. Siegel, Fellow, IEEE, Jack K. Wolf, Life Fellow, IEEE

  9. Proceedings of the third international seminar on double layer capacitors and similar energy storage devices. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book contains the papers presented at the Third International Seminar on Double Layer Capacitors and Similar Energy Storage Devices in December, 1993. The topics of the papers include basic electrochemical principles, testing of ultracapacitors and systems for application in electric powered vehicles, performance of capacitors, materials used in supercapacitors, and reliability of supercapacitors.

  10. Recent experimental results on the beam-beam effects in storage rings and an attempt of their interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kheifets, S.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The latest available experimental results on the luminosity, the space charge parameters, and the beam blowup as functions of particle energy and beam current are reviewed. The comparison with the phenomenological diffusion theory is done and useful scaling laws are derived. Some implications for anti p p storage rings are discussed.

  11. Safety Issues Chemical Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Safety Issues Chemical Storage Store in compatible containers that are in good condition to store separately. #12;Safety Issues Flammable liquid storage -Store bulk quantities in flammable storage cabinets -UL approved Flammable Storage Refrigerators are required for cold storage Provide

  12. Impact of Fractures on CO2 Storage Monitoring: Keys for an Integrated Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    storage in fractured reservoirs (depleted hydrocarbon fields or brine aquifers) requires the study fluids, connected and/or non-connected fractures, the presence of Oil & Gas Science and Technology ­ Rev

  13. Light Effects on the Charge Storage in the A-SI:H Pin Diode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shu-Hsien

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    was verified with a pre-fabricated circuit which is a charge storage readout device. The diode under the long wavelength light illumination condition stored more charges than that under the short wavelength light illumination condition because the former could...

  14. Primitive Land Plants 37 PRIMITIVE LAND PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koptur, Suzanne

    Primitive Land Plants 37 PRIMITIVE LAND PLANTS These are the plants that were present soon after land was colonized, over 400 mil- lion years ago. A few plants living today are closely related to those ancient plants, and we often call them "living fossils". Two major lineages of plants evolved

  15. Soil Carbon Change and Net Energy Associated with Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: A Regional Modeling Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandaru, Varaprasad; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Link, Robert P.; Zhang, Xuesong; Post, W. M.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of marginal lands (MLs) for biofuel production has been contemplated as a promising solution for meeting biofuel demands. However, there have been concerns with spatial location of MLs, their inherent biofuel potential, and possible environmental consequences with the cultivation of energy crops. Here, we developed a new quantitative approach that integrates high-resolution land cover and land productivity maps and uses conditional probability density functions for analyzing land use patterns as a function of land productivity to classify the agricultural lands. We subsequently applied this method to determine available productive croplands (P-CLs) and non-crop marginal lands (NC-MLs) in a nine-county Southern Michigan. Furthermore, Spatially Explicit Integrated Modeling Framework (SEIMF) using EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) was used to understand the net energy (NE) and soil organic carbon (SOC) implications of cultivating different annual and perennial production systems.

  16. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we compiled and evaluated all soil properties measured on the study sites. Statistical analysis of the properties was conducted, and first year survival and growth of white pine, hybrid poplars, and native hardwoods was assessed. Hardwood species survived better at all sites than white pine or hybrid poplar. Hardwood survival across treatments was 80%, 85%, and 50% for sites in Virginia, West Virginia, and Ohio, respectively, while white pine survival was 27%, 41%, and 58%, and hybrid poplar survival was 37%, 41%, and 72% for the same sites, respectively. Hybrid poplar height and diameter growth were superior to those of the other species tested, with the height growth of this species reaching 126.6cm after one year in the most intensive treatment at the site in Virginia. To determine carbon in soils on these sites, we developed a cost-effective method for partitioning total soil carbon to pedogenic carbon and geogenic carbon in mine soils. We are in the process of evaluating the accuracy and precision of the proposed carbon partitioning technique for which we are designing an experiment with carefully constructed mine soil samples. In a second effort, as part of a mined land reforestation project for carbon sequestration in southwestern Virginia we implemented the first phase of the carbon monitoring protocol that was recently delivered to DOE.

  17. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2004-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Tree survival, height and diameter were measured after the first growing season. There were significant treatment and treatment x site interactions. A STELLA{reg_sign}-based model helped us develop insight as to whether it is possible to differentiate the permanent SOC from the C contained in the labile forms of SOM. The model can be used for predicting the amount of C sequestered on mine lands, and the amount of C that is expected to reside in the mine soil for more than 1,000 years. Based on our work, it appears that substantial carbon payments to landowners would be required to reach ''profitability'' under present circumstances. However, even though the payments that we examine could generate non-negative LEVs, there is no guarantee that the payments will actually cause landowners to reforest in practice. It is landowner utility associated with forestland profitability that will be the determining factor in actual conversion--utility that likely would include cash flow timing, amenities, and even the credit position of the landowner.

  18. Proceedings of a workshop on uses of depleted uranium in storage, transportation and repository facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A workshop on the potential uses of depleted uranium (DU) in the repository was organized to coordinate the planning of future activities. The attendees, the original workshop objective and the agenda are provided in Appendices A, B and C. After some opening remarks and discussions, the objectives of the workshop were revised to: (1) exchange information and views on the status of the Department of Energy (DOE) activities related to repository design and planning; (2) exchange information on DU management and planning; (3) identify potential uses of DU in the storage, transportation, and disposal of high-level waste and spent fuel; and (4) define the future activities that would be needed if potential uses were to be further evaluated and developed. This summary of the workshop is intended to be an integrated resource for planning of any future work related to DU use in the repository. The synopsis of the first day`s presentations is provided in Appendix D. Copies of slides from each presenter are presented in Appendix E.

  19. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

  20. Chapter 9, Land and Bioenergy in Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE), Bioenergy & Sustainability: bridging the gaps.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods J, Lynd LR [Imperial College London, UK; Laser, M [Dartmouth College; Batistella M, De Castro D [EMBRAPA Monitoramento por Satelite, Campinas, Brasil; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Faaij, Andre [Energy Academy Europe, Netherlands

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this chapter we address the questions of whether and how enough biomass could be produced to make a material contribution to global energy supply on a scale and timeline that is consistent with prominent low carbon energy scenarios. We assess whether bioenergy provision necessarily conflicts with priority ecosystem services including food security for the world s poor and vulnerable populations. In order to evaluate the potential land demand for bioenergy, we developed a set of three illustrative scenarios using specified growth rates for each bioenergy sub-sector. In these illustrative scenarios, bioenergy (traditional and modern) increases from 62 EJ/yr in 2010 to 100, 150 and 200 EJ/yr in 2050. Traditional bioenergy grows slowly, increasing by between 0.75% and 1% per year, from 40 EJ/yr in 2010 to 50 or 60 EJ/ yr in 2050, continuing as the dominant form of bioenergy until at least 2020. Across the three scenarios, total land demand is estimated to increase by between 52 and 200 Mha which can be compared with a range of potential land availability estimates from the literature of between 240 million hectares to over 1 billion hectares. Biomass feedstocks arise from combinations of residues and wastes, energy cropping and increased efficiency in supply chains for energy, food and materials. In addition, biomass has the unique capability of providing solid, liquid and gaseous forms of modern energy carriers that can be transformed into analogues to existing fuels. Because photosynthesis fixes carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, biomass supply chains can be configured to store at least some of the fixed carbon in forms or ways that it will not be reemitted to the atmosphere for considerable periods of time, so-called negative emissions pathways. These attributes provide opportunities for bioenergy policies to promote longterm and sustainable options for the supply of energy for the foreseeable future.

  1. Proposed rulemaking on the storage and disposal of nuclear waste. Cross-statement of the United States Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE cross-statement in the matter of proposed rulemaking in the storage and disposal of nuclear wastes is presented. It is concluded from evidence contained in the document that: (1) spent fuel can be disposed of in a manner that is safe and environmentally acceptable; (2) present plans for establishing geological repositories are an effective and reasonable means of disposal; (3) spent nuclear fuel from licensed facilities can be stored in a safe and environmentally acceptable manner on-site or off-site until disposal facilities are ready; (4) sufficient additional storage capacity for spent fuel will be established; and (5) the disposal and interim storage systems for spent nuclear fuel will be integrated into an acceptable operating system. It was recommended that the commission should promulgate a rule providing that the safety and environmental implications of spent nuclear fuel remaining on site after the anticipated expiration of the facility licenses involved need not be considered in individual facility licensing proceedings. A prompt finding of confidence in the nuclear waste disposal and storage area by the commission is also recommeded. (DMC)

  2. CHEMICAL STORAGE SEGREGATION GUIDELINES In order to store chemicals properly, they must be segregated based on the associated hazard. Never

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    CHEMICAL STORAGE SEGREGATION GUIDELINES In order to store chemicals properly, they must RECOMMENDED STORAGE METHOD CHEMICAL EXAMPLES INCOMPATIBLES SEE SAFETY DATA SHEETS IN ALL CASES Compressed a flammable gas cabinet for storage. Methane, Acetylene, Hydrogen Oxidizing and toxic compressed gases

  3. Coverage Dependent Charge Reduction of Cationic Gold Clusters on Surfaces Prepared Using Soft Landing of Mass-selected Ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Priest, Thomas A.; Laskin, Julia

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The ionic charge state of monodisperse cationic gold clusters on surfaces may be controlled by selecting the coverage of mass-selected ions soft landed onto a substrate. Polydisperse diphosphine-capped gold clusters were synthesized in solution by reduction of chloro(triphenylphosphine)gold(I) with borane tert-butylamine in the presence of 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane. The polydisperse gold clusters were introduced into the gas phase by electrospray ionization and mass selection was employed to select a multiply charged cationic cluster species (Au11L53+, m/z = 1409, L = 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) which was delivered to the surfaces of four different self-assembled monolayers on gold (SAMs) at coverages of 1011 and 1012 clusters/mm2. Employing the spatial profiling capabilities of in-situ time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) it is shown that, in addition to the chemical functionality of the monolayer (as demonstrated previously: ACS Nano, 2012, 6, 573) the coverage of cationic gold clusters on the surface may be used to control the distribution of ionic charge states of the soft-landed multiply charged clusters. In the case of a 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecanethiol SAM (FSAM) almost complete retention of charge by the deposited Au11L53+ clusters was observed at a lower coverage of 1011 clusters/mm2. In contrast, at a higher coverage of 1012 clusters/mm2, pronounced reduction of charge to Au11L52+ and Au11L5+ was observed on the FSAM. When soft landed onto 16- and 11-mercaptohexadecanoic acid surfaces on gold (16,11-COOH-SAMs), the mass-selected Au11L53+ clusters exhibited partial reduction of charge to Au11L52+ at lower coverage and additional reduction of charge to both Au11L52+ and Au11L5+ at higher coverage. The reduction of charge was found to be more pronounced on the surface of the shorter (thinner) C11 than the longer (thicker) C16-COOH-SAM. On the surface of the 1-dodecanethiol (HSAM) monolayer, the most abundant charge state was found to be Au11L52+ at lower coverage and Au11L5+ at higher coverage, respectively. A coverage-dependent electron tunneling mechanism is proposed to account for the observed reduction of charge of mass-selected multiply charged gold clusters soft landed on SAMs. The results demonstrate that one of the critical parameters that influence the chemical and physical properties of supported metal clusters, ionic charge state, may be controlled by selecting the coverage of charged species soft landed onto surfaces.

  4. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A

    2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we determined that by grinding the soil samples to a finer particle size of less than 250 ?m (sieve No. 60), the effect of mine soil coal particle size on the extent to which these particles will be oxidized during the thermal treatment of the carbon partitioning procedure will be eliminated, thus making the procedure more accurate and precise. In the second phase of the carbon sequestration project, we focused our attention on determining the sample size required for carbon accounting on grassland mined fields in order to achieve a desired accuracy and precision of the final soil organic carbon (SOC) estimate. A mine land site quality classification scheme was developed and some field-testing of the methods of implementation was completed. The classification model has been validated for softwoods (white pine) on several reclaimed mine sites in the southern Appalachian coal region. The classification model is a viable method for classifying post-SMCRA abandoned mined lands into productivity classes for white pine. A thinning study was established as a random complete block design to evaluate the response to thinning of a 26-year-old white pine stand growing on a reclaimed surface mine in southwest Virginia. Stand parameters were projected to age 30 using a stand table projection. Site index of the stand was found to be 32.3 m at base age 50 years. Thinning rapidly increased the diameter growth of the residual trees to 0.84 cm yr{sup -1} compared to 0.58 cm yr{sup -1} for the unthinned treatment; however, at age 26, there was no difference in volume or value per hectare. At age 30, the unthinned treatment had a volume of 457.1 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1} but was only worth $8807 ha{sup -1}, while the thinned treatment was projected to have 465.8 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1}, which was worth $11265 ha{sup -1} due to a larger percentage of the volume being in sawtimber size classes.

  5. ABSTRACT--Due to the sun's intermittent nature, there must be energy storage on a large scale in order for solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honsberg, Christiana

    ABSTRACT--Due to the sun's intermittent nature, there must be energy storage on a large scale electrode). Since this produces no carbon dioxide this is a very clean process. With the growing demand future. Hydrogen is a potential candidate to act as an energy storage medium in a sustainable energy

  6. Statement of position of the United States Department of Energy in the matter of proposed rulemaking on the storage and disposal of nuclear waste (waste confidence rulemaking)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose of this proceeding is to assess generically the degree of assurance that the radioactive waste can be safely disposed of, to determine when such disposal or off-site storage will be available, and to determine whether wastes can be safely stored on-site past license expiration until off-site disposal/storage is available. (DLC)

  7. Molecules as Segmented Storage Elements in Floating Gate Memories................................................................................................MAT.1 In-situ Deposition of High-k Dielectrics on a III-V Compound Semiconductor .............

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    that are on the order of 1nm in size, representing a uniform set of identical nanostructured charge-storage centers. WeMaterials Molecules as Segmented Storage Elements in Floating Gate Memories ....................................................................................MAT.2 A CMOS-compatible Substrate and Contact Technology for Monolithic Integration of III-V Devices

  8. Research project on CO2 geological storage and groundwater resources: Large-scale hydrological evaluation and modeling of impact on groundwater systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin; Rutqvist, Jonny; Jordan, Preston; Zhang, K.; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    confidence in carbon capture and storage technologies, thereIf carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies areIf carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies are

  9. Seismically induced loads on internal components submerged in waste storage tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rezvani, M.A.; Julyk, J.L.; Weiner, E.O.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As new equipment is designed and analyzed to be installed in the double-shell waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, the equipment and the tank integrity must be evaluated. These evaluations must consider the seismically induced loads, combined with other loadings. This paper addresses the hydrodynamic behavior and response of structural components submerged in the fluid waste. The hydrodynamic effects induced by the horizontal component of ground shaking is expressed as the sum of the impulsive and convective (sloshing) components. The impulsive component represents the effects of the fluid that may be considered to move in synchronism with the tank wall as a rigidly attached mass. The convective component represents the action of the fluid near the surface that experiences sloshing or rocking motion. The added-mass concept deals with the vibration of the structural component in a viscous fluid. The presence of the fluid gives rise to a fluid reaction force that can be interpreted as an added-mass effect and a damping contribution to the dynamic response of the submerged components. The distribution of the hydrodynamic forces on the internal components is not linear. To obtain the reactions and the stresses at the critical points, the force distribution is integrated along the length of the equipment submerged in the fluid.

  10. Risk perception on management of nuclear high-level and transuranic waste storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dees, L.A.

    1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy`s program for disposing of nuclear High-Level Waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste has been impeded by overwhelming political opposition fueled by public perceptions of actual risk. Analysis of these perceptions shows them to be deeply rooted in images of fear and dread that have been present since the discovery of radioactivity. The development and use of nuclear weapons linked these images to reality and the mishandling of radioactive waste from the nations military weapons facilities has contributed toward creating a state of distrust that cannot be erased quickly or easily. In addition, the analysis indicates that even the highly educated technical community is not well informed on the latest technology involved with nuclear HLW and TRU waste disposal. It is not surprising then, that the general public feels uncomfortable with DOE`s management plans for with nuclear HLW and TRU waste disposal. Postponing the permanent geologic repository and use of Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) would provide the time necessary for difficult social and political issues to be resolved. It would also allow time for the public to become better educated if DOE chooses to become proactive.

  11. Analysis on storage off-gas emissions from woody, herbaceous, and torrefied biomass

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Lim, C. Jim; Bi, Xiaotao T.; Kuang, Xingya; Melin, Staffan; Yazdanpanah, Fahimeh; Sokhansanj, Shahab

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wood chips, torrefied wood chips, ground switchgrass, and wood pellets were tested for off-gas emissions during storage. Storage canisters with gas-collection ports were used to conduct experiments at room temperature of 20 C and in a laboratory oven set at 40 C. Commercially-produced wood pellets yielded the highest carbon monoxide (CO) emissions at both 20 and 40 C (1600 and 13,000 ppmv), whereas torrefied wood chips emitted the lowest of about more20 and 40 C at the end of 11 days of storage. CO emission factors (milligrams per kilogram of biomass) calculated were lowest for ground switchgrass and torrefied wood chips (2.68 and 4.86 mg/kg) whereas wood pellets had the highest CO of about 10.60 mg/kg, respectively, at 40 C after 11 days of storage. In the case of CO?, wood pellets recorded the lowest value of 55.46 mg/kg, whereas switchgrass recorded the highest value of 318.72 mg/kg. This study concludes that CO emission factor is highest for wood pellets, CO? is highest for switchgrass and CH? is negligible for all feedstocks except for wood pellets, which is about 0.374 mg/kg at the end of 11-day storage at 40 C.less

  12. Land-Based Wind Turbine Transportation and Logistics Barriers and Their Effects on U.S. Wind Markets (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotrell, J.; Stehly, T.; Johnson, J.; Roberts, J.O.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Heimiller, D.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The average size of land based wind turbines installed in the United States has increased dramatically over time. As a result wind turbines are facing new transportation and logistics barriers that limit the size of utility scale land based wind turbines that can be deployed in the United States. Addressing these transportation and logistics barriers will allow for even further increases in U.S. turbine size using technologies under development for offshore markets. These barriers are important because larger taller turbines have been identified as a path to reducing the levelized cost of energy for electricity. Additionally, increases in turbine size enable the development of new low and moderate speed markets in the U.S. In turn, wind industry stakeholder support, market stability, and ultimately domestic content and manufacturing competitiveness are potentially affected. In general there is very little recent literature that characterizes transportation and logistics barriers and their effects on U.S. wind markets and opportunities. Accordingly, the objective of this paper is to report the results of a recent NREL study that identifies the barriers, assesses their impact and provides recommendations for strategies and specific actions.

  13. Land and Facility Use Planning

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Land and Facility Use Planning process provides a way to guide future site development and reuse based on the shared long-term goals and objectives of the Department, site and its stakeholders. Does not cancel other directives.

  14. Office of Inspector General report on audit of proposal to acquire land at the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (Department) obtained an appraisal and developed a cost estimate to acquire 78 to 100 acres of privately-held land adjoining the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) as an additional buffer for a waste disposal facility. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the proposed purchase of land was essential to support the site`s mission. The Department obtained an appraisal and developed a cost estimate to acquire the additional land without confirming that av lid need for the land existed. If the land is acquired, the Department could spend between $655,000 and $2.2 million unnecessarily. Additionally, the Department could incur unnecessary maintenance and security costs to maintain the land after acquisition. It was recommended that the Manager, Ohio Field Office, dismiss the proposal to acquire the additional land. Management agreed with the recommendation, stating that the acquisition could not be justified at this time. However, management did not agree with the finding that the Department obtained an appraisal and developed a cost estimate without confirming that a valid need for the land existed. Management stated that the appraisal and cost estimate were principal and necessary to determining whether a need for the land existed. It was concluded that the appraisal and cost estimate should not have been performed because a valid need for the land was never established. Also, it was concluded that it would be inappropriate to reconsider the proposal to acquire the land at a later date if additional funds become available, unless a valid need for the land is first established.

  15. The effects of gas-fluid-rock interactions on CO2 injection and storage: Insights from reactive transport modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Y.; Xu, T.; Pruess, K.

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Possible means of reducing atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions include injecting CO{sub 2} in petroleum reservoirs for Enhanced Oil Recovery or storing CO{sub 2} in deep saline aquifers. Large-scale injection of CO{sub 2} into subsurface reservoirs would induce a complex interplay of multiphase flow, capillary trapping, dissolution, diffusion, convection, and chemical reactions that may have significant impacts on both short-term injection performance and long-term fate of CO{sub 2} storage. Reactive Transport Modeling is a promising approach that can be used to predict the spatial and temporal evolution of injected CO{sub 2} and associated gas-fluid-rock interactions. This presentation will summarize recent advances in reactive transport modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and review key technical issues on (1) the short- and long-term behavior of injected CO{sub 2} in geological formations; (2) the role of reservoir mineral heterogeneity on injection performance and storage security; (3) the effect of gas mixtures (e.g., H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}) on CO{sub 2} storage; and (4) the physical and chemical processes during potential leakage of CO{sub 2} from the primary storage reservoir. Simulation results suggest that CO{sub 2} trapping capacity, rate, and impact on reservoir rocks depend on primary mineral composition and injecting gas mixtures. For example, models predict that the injection of CO{sub 2} alone or co-injection with H{sub 2}S in both sandstone and carbonate reservoirs lead to acidified zones and mineral dissolution adjacent to the injection well, and carbonate precipitation and mineral trapping away from the well. Co-injection of CO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S and in particular with SO{sub 2} causes greater formation alteration and complex sulfur mineral (alunite, anhydrite, and pyrite) trapping, sometimes at a much faster rate than previously thought. The results from Reactive Transport Modeling provide valuable insights for analyzing and assessing the dynamic behaviors of injected CO{sub 2}, identifying and characterizing potential storage sites, and managing injection performance and reducing costs.

  16. The effect of time and temperature on the storage of passive organic vapor dosimeters contaminated with 1,2-dichloroethane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Robert Vincent

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contaminated With '1, 2-Dichloroethane. (December 1980) Robert Vincent Williams, B. S. , Stetson University Chairman of Advisory Comnittee: Mr. Charles L. Gi imore The effect of time and temperature on the storage of 1, 2-dichloro- ethane (common name...--ethylene chloride) collected on passive organic vapor dosimeters was investigated. Passive organic vapor dosimeters manufactured by the 3M Company, the Walden Division of Abcor, Inc. , and the E. I. duPont de Nemours Company were statically exposed to ethylene...

  17. Allocation of inventory to a variable, time-phased, on-line storage system under known demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Charles Wesley

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the automotive industry are being phased into production and inventory control systems the procedures for supplying the assembly operation must be updated. An initial step in updating the precedures would be to base them on more quantitative techniques... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January, 1968 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering ALLOCATION OF INVENTORY TO A VARIABLE ~ T IME PHASED ~ ON L INE STORAGE SYSTEM UNDER KNOWN DEMAND A Thesis By CHARLES WESLEY WHITE Approved as to style...

  18. Grid regulation services for energy storage devices based on grid frequency

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pratt, Richard M; Hammerstrom, Donald J; Kintner-Meyer, Michael C.W.; Tuffner, Francis K

    2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein are representative embodiments of methods, apparatus, and systems for charging and discharging an energy storage device connected to an electrical power distribution system. In one exemplary embodiment, a controller monitors electrical characteristics of an electrical power distribution system and provides an output to a bi-directional charger causing the charger to charge or discharge an energy storage device (e.g., a battery in a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV)). The controller can help stabilize the electrical power distribution system by increasing the charging rate when there is excess power in the electrical power distribution system (e.g., when the frequency of an AC power grid exceeds an average value), or by discharging power from the energy storage device to stabilize the grid when there is a shortage of power in the electrical power distribution system (e.g., when the frequency of an AC power grid is below an average value).

  19. Grid regulation services for energy storage devices based on grid frequency

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pratt, Richard M; Hammerstrom, Donald J; Kintner-Meyer, Michael C.W.; Tuffner, Francis K

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein are representative embodiments of methods, apparatus, and systems for charging and discharging an energy storage device connected to an electrical power distribution system. In one exemplary embodiment, a controller monitors electrical characteristics of an electrical power distribution system and provides an output to a bi-directional charger causing the charger to charge or discharge an energy storage device (e.g., a battery in a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV)). The controller can help stabilize the electrical power distribution system by increasing the charging rate when there is excess power in the electrical power distribution system (e.g., when the frequency of an AC power grid exceeds an average value), or by discharging power from the energy storage device to stabilize the grid when there is a shortage of power in the electrical power distribution system (e.g., when the frequency of an AC power grid is below an average value).

  20. The impacts of climate, land use, and demography on fires during the 21st century simulated by CLM-CN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kloster, S.; Mahowald, N. M; Randerson, J. T; Lawrence, P. J

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    model of wetland extent and peat accumulation: results forof carbon released from peat and forest fires in Indonesialosses in Alaskan forests and peat- lands, Nature Geosci. ,

  1. Optimal Deployment of Thermal Energy Storage under Diverse Economic and Climate Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeForest, Nicolas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deployment of Thermal Energy Storage under Diverse Dincer I. On thermal energy storage systems and applicationsin research on cold thermal energy storage, International

  2. Optimal Deployment of Thermal Energy Storage under Diverse Economic and Climate Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeForest, Nicolas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2012. [8] Dincer I. On thermal energy storage systems andin research on cold thermal energy storage, InternationalLF. Overview of thermal energy storage (TES) potential

  3. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  4. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storage Coil", Proc. 19 80 ASC,Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEE Trans.SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", in Advances

  5. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined abovean Aquifer Used for Hot Water Storage: Digital Simulation ofof Aquifer Systems for Cyclic Storage of Water," of the Fall

  6. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  7. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

  8. Stasis: Flexible Transactional Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Russell C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stasis: Flexible Transactional Storage by Russell C. Sears AR. Larson Fall 2009 Stasis: Flexible Transactional StorageC. Sears Abstract Stasis: Flexible Transactional Storage by

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulations Reveal Ion Dynamics in Polymer Electrolyte On November 13, 2012, in Energy Storage, News, News & Events Improving battery electrolytes is highly desirable, particularly...

  10. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    optimal could be acquired. Battery storage costs are roughlylead/acid battery) and thermal storage, capabilities, withcell electric storage heat storage flow battery abs. chiller

  11. Report of the Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) refers to a set of technologies that can greatly reduce carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from new and existing coal- and gas-fired power plants, industrial processes, and other stationary sources of CO{sub 2}. In its application to electricity generation, CCS could play an important role in achieving national and global greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction goals. However, widespread cost-effective deployment of CCS will occur only if the technology is commercially available and a supportive national policy framework is in place. In keeping with that objective, on February 3, 2010, President Obama established an Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage composed of 14 Executive Departments and Federal Agencies. The Task Force, co-chaired by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), was charged with proposing a plan to overcome the barriers to the widespread, cost-effective deployment of CCS within ten years, with a goal of bringing five to ten commercial demonstration projects online by 2016. Composed of more than 100 Federal employees, the Task Force examined challenges facing early CCS projects as well as factors that could inhibit widespread commercial deployment of CCS. In developing the findings and recommendations outlined in this report, the Task Force relied on published literature and individual input from more than 100 experts and stakeholders, as well as public comments submitted to the Task Force. The Task Force also held a large public meeting and several targeted stakeholder briefings. While CCS can be applied to a variety of stationary sources of CO{sub 2}, its application to coal-fired power plant emissions offers the greatest potential for GHG reductions. Coal has served as an important domestic source of reliable, affordable energy for decades, and the coal industry has provided stable and quality high-paying jobs for American workers. At the same time, coal-fired power plants are the largest contributor to U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and coal combustion accounts for 40 percent of global carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from the consumption of energy. EPA and Energy Information Administration (EIA) assessments of recent climate and energy legislative proposals show that, if available on a cost-effective basis, CCS can over time play a large role in reducing the overall cost of meeting domestic emissions reduction targets. By playing a leadership role in efforts to develop and deploy CCS technologies to reduce GHG emissions, the United States can preserve the option of using an affordable, abundant, and domestic energy resource, help improve national security, help to maximize production from existing oil fields through enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and assist in the creation of new technologies for export. While there are no insurmountable technological, legal, institutional, regulatory or other barriers that prevent CCS from playing a role in reducing GHG emissions, early CCS projects face economic challenges related to climate policy uncertainty, first-of-a-kind technology risks, and the current high cost of CCS relative to other technologies. Administration analyses of proposed climate change legislation suggest that CCS technologies will not be widely deployed in the next two decades absent financial incentives that supplement projected carbon prices. In addition to the challenges associated with cost, these projects will need to meet regulatory requirements that are currently under development. Long-standing regulatory programs are being adapted to meet the circumstances of CCS, but limited experience and institutional capacity at the Federal and State level may hinder implementation of CCS-specific requirements. Key legal issues, such as long-term liability and property rights, also need resolution. A climate policy designed to reduce our Nation's GHG emissions is the most important step for commercial deployment of low-carbon technologies such as CCS, because it will create a stable, long-term framework for p

  12. On the Importance of Evaluating Storage Systems' $Costs Zhichao Li, Amanpreet Mukker, and Erez Zadok --Stony Brook University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zadok, Erez

    , combining different storage technologies with different behaviors. Performance alone is not enough to charac- terize storage systems: energy efficiency, durability, and more are becoming equally important. We posit of storage systems. 1 Introduction Storage systems are getting more complex with solid- state technologies

  13. Analyzing the Effects of Climate and Thermal Configuration on Community Energy Storage Systems (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.; Coleman, D.; Chen, D.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Community energy storage (CES) has been proposed to mitigate the high variation in output from renewable sources and reduce peak load on the electrical grid. Thousands of these systems may be distributed around the grid to provide benefits to local distribution circuits and to the grid as a whole when aggregated. CES must be low cost to purchase and install and also largely maintenance free through more than 10 years of service life to be acceptable to most utilities.Achieving the required system life time is a major uncertainty for lithium-ion batteries. The lifetime and immediate system performance of batteries can change drastically with battery temperature, which is a strong function of system packaging, local climate, electrical duty cycle, and other factors. In other Li-ion applications, this problem is solved via air or liquid heating and cooling systems that may need occasional maintenance throughout their service life. CES requires a maintenance-free thermal management system providing protection from environmental conditions while rejecting heat from a moderate electrical duty cycle. Thus, the development of an effective, low-cost, zero-maintenance thermal management system poses a challenge critical to the success of CES. NREL and Southern California Edison have collaborated to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of various CES thermal configurations in multiple climates by building a model of CES based on collected test data, integrating it with an NREL-developed Li-ion degradation model, and applying CES electrical duty cycles and historic location-specific meteorological data to forecast battery thermal response and degradation through a 10-year service life.

  14. Feasibility Study of Biopower in East Helena, Montana. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriarty, K.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to reuse contaminated sites for renewable energy generation when aligned with the community's vision for the site. The former American Smelting and Refining Company (Asarco) smelter in East Helena, Montana, was selected for a feasibility study under the initiative. Biomass was chosen as the renewable energy resource based on the wood products industry in the area. Biopower was selected as the technology based on Montana's renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requiring utilities to purchase renewable power.

  15. National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis of Biorefinery Siting Based on Cellulosic Feedstock Grown on Marginal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. ARRA support for this project and to the PNNL Joint Global Change Research Institute enabled us to create an advanced computing infrastructure to execute millions of simulations, conduct post-processing calculations, store input and output data, and visualize results. These computing resources included two components installed at the Research Data Center of the University of Maryland. The first resource was 'deltac': an 8-core Linux server, dedicated to county-level and state-level simulations and PostgreSQL database hosting. The second resource was the DOE-JGCRI 'Evergreen' cluster, capable of executing millions of simulations in relatively short periods. ARRA funding also supported a PhD student from UMD who worked on creating the geodatabases and executing some of the simulations in this study. Using a physically based classification of marginal lands, we simulated production of cellulosic feedstocks from perennial mixtures grown on these lands in the US Midwest. Marginal lands in the western states of the US Midwest appear to have significant potential to supply feedstocks to a cellulosic biofuel industry. Similar results were obtained with simulations of N-fertilized perennial mixtures. A detailed spatial analysis allowed for the identification of possible locations for the establishment of 34 cellulosic ethanol biorefineries with an annual production capacity of 5.6 billion gallons. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided simulation results on the potential of perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. The results of this study will be submitted to the USDOE Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework as a way to contribute to the development of a sustainable bioenergy industry. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

  16. Experimental Research on Solar Assisted Heat Pump Heating System with Latent Heat Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Z.; Zheng, M.; Liu, W.; Wang, F.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assisted Heat Pump Heating System with Latent Heat Storage. In this system, solar energy is the major heat source for a heat pump, and the supplementary heat source is soil. The disagreement in time between the space heat load and heat collected by solar...

  17. Sub-Seafloor Carbon Dioxide Storage Potential on the Juan de Fuca Plate, Western North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerry Fairley; Robert Podgorney

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Juan de Fuca plate, off the western coast of North America, has been suggested as a site for geological sequestration of waste carbon dioxide because of its many attractive characteristics (high permeability, large storage capacity, reactive rock types). Here we model CO2 injection into fractured basalts comprising the upper several hundred meters of the sub-seafloor basalt reservoir, overlain with low-permeability sediments and a large saline water column, to examine the feasibility of this reservoir for CO2 storage. Our simulations indicate that the sub-seafloor basalts of the Juan de Fuca plate may be an excellent CO2 storage candidate, as multiple trapping mechanisms (hydrodynamic, density inversions, and mineralization) act to keep the CO2 isolated from terrestrial environments. Questions remain about the lateral extent and connectivity of the high permeability basalts; however, the lack of wells or boreholes and thick sediment cover maximize storage potential while minimizing potential leakage pathways. Although promising, more study is needed to determine the economic viability of this option.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Direct Expansion Dynamic Ice-on-coil Storage System Used in Residential Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, M.; Kong, F.; Han, Z.; Liu, W.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    better heat exchanger ability caused by the larger surface of sheet ice, steady and low chilled water temperature was directly extracted from an ice storage tank. The longitudinal and axial fin-added coils improved the COP of the refrigerating unit...

  19. Finding of no significant impact: Changes in the sanitary sludge land application program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1042) that evaluates potential impacts of proposed changes in the sanitary sludge land application program on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Changes in lifetime sludge land application limits and radionuclide loading are proposed, and two new sources of sewage sludge from DOE facilities would be transported to the City of Oak Ridge Publicly Owned Treatment Works (COR POTW). Lifetime sludge land application limits would increase from 22 tons/acre to 50 tons/acre, which is the limit approved and permitted by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). With the approval of TDEC, the permissible radiological dose from sludge land application would change from the current limit of 2x background radionuclide concentrations in receiving soils to a risk-based dose limit of 4 millirem (mrem) per year for the maximally exposed individual. Sludge land application sites would not change from those that are currently part of the program. Based on the results of the analysis reported in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not necessary, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). 70 refs., 2 figs., 17 tabs.

  20. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

  1. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

  2. Systems analysis of thermal storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copeland, R.J.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During FY 1981, analyses were conducted on thermal storage concepts for solar thermal applications. These studies include estimates of both the obtainable costs of thermal storage concepts and their worth to a user (i.e., value). Based on obtainable costs and performance, an in-depth study evaluated thermal storage concepts for water/steam, organic fluid, and gas/Brayton solar thermal receivers. Promising and nonpromising concepts were identified. A study to evaluate thermal storage concepts for a liquid metal receiver was initiated. The value of thermal storage in a solar thermal industrial process heat application was analyzed. Several advanced concepts are being studied, including ground-mounted thermal storage for parabolic dishes with Stirling engines.

  3. Cool Storage Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppelheimer, D. M.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . This article covers three thermal storage topics. The first section catalogs various thermal storage systems and applications. Included are: load shifting and load leveling, chilled water storage systems, and ice storage systems using Refrigerant 22 or ethylene...

  4. The Petascale Data Storage Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, Garth [Carnegie Mellon University; Long, Darrell [The Regents of the University of California, Santa Cruz; Honeyman, Peter [University of Michigan at Ann Arbor; Grider, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kramer, William [National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center; Shalf, John [National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center; Roth, Philip [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Felix, Evan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Ward, Lee [Sandia National Laboratory

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petascale computing infrastructures for scientific discovery make petascale demands on information storage capacity, performance, concurrency, reliability, availability, and manageability. The Petascale Data Storage Institute focuses on the data storage problems found in petascale scientific computing environments, with special attention to community issues such as interoperability, community buy-in, and shared tools. The Petascale Data Storage Institute is a collaboration between researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, University of Michigan, and the University of California at Santa Cruz.

  5. Extracting Biological Meaning From Global Proteomic Data on Circulating-Blood Platelets: Effects of Diabetes and Storage Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, John H.; Suleiman, Atef; Daly, Don S.; Springer, David L.; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Blumberg, Neil; Phipps, Richard P.

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Transfusion of platelets into patients suffering from trauma and a variety of disease is a common medical practice that involves millions of units per year. Partial activation of platelets can result in the release of bioactive proteins and lipid mediators that increase the risk of adverse post-transfusion effects. Type-2 diabetes and storage are two factors known to cause partial activation of platelets. A global proteomic study was undertaken to investigate these effects. In this paper we discuss the methods used to interpret these data in terms of biological processes affected by diabetes and storage. The main emphasis is on the processing of proteomic data for gene ontology enrichment analysis by techniques originally designed for microarray data.

  6. Research project on CO2 geological storage and groundwaterresources: Large-scale hydrological evaluation and modeling of impact ongroundwater systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin; Rutqvist, Jonny; Jordan,Preston; Zhang,K.; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    If carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies areimplemented on a large scale, the amounts of CO2 injected and sequesteredunderground could be extremely large. The stored CO2 then replaces largevolumes of native brine, which can cause considerable pressureperturbation and brine migration in the deep saline formations. Ifhydraulically communicating, either directly via updipping formations orthrough interlayer pathways such as faults or imperfect seals, theseperturbations may impact shallow groundwater or even surface waterresources used for domestic or commercial water supply. Possibleenvironmental concerns include changes in pressure and water table,changes in discharge and recharge zones, as well as changes in waterquality. In compartmentalized formations, issues related to large-scalepressure buildup and brine displacement may also cause storage capacityproblems, because significant pressure buildup can be produced. Toaddress these issues, a three-year research project was initiated inOctober 2006, the first part of which is summarized in this annualreport.

  7. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Discharge Using Ground- Water Storage," Transactions1971. "Storage of Solar Energy in a Sandy-Gravel Ground,"

  8. Feasibility Study of Anaerobic Digestion of Food Waste in St. Bernard, Louisiana. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriarty, K.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to re-use contaminated sites for renewable energy generation when aligned with the community's vision for the site. The former Kaiser Aluminum Landfill in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana, was selected for a feasibility study under the program. Preliminary work focused on selecting a biomass feedstock. Discussions with area experts, universities, and the project team identified food wastes as the feedstock and anaerobic digestion (AD) as the technology.

  9. Energy Storage Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. At NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), research focuses on the integration of energy storage systems (both stationary and vehicle-mounted) and interconnection with the utility grid. Focusing on battery technologies, but also hosting ultra-capacitors and other electrical energy storage technologies, the laboratory will provide all resources necessary to develop, test, and prove energy storage system performance and compatibility with distributed energy systems. The laboratory will also provide robust vehicle testing capability, including a drive-in environmental chamber, which can accommodate commercial-sized hybrid, electric, biodiesel, ethanol, compressed natural gas, and hydrogen fueled vehicles. The Energy Storage Laboratory is designed to ensure personnel and equipment safety when testing hazardous battery systems or other energy storage technologies. Closely coupled with the research electrical distribution bus at ESIF, the Energy Storage Laboratory will offer megawatt-scale power testing capability as well as advanced hardware-in-the-loop and model-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. Some application scenarios are: The following types of tests - Performance, Efficiency, Safety, Model validation, and Long duration reliability. (2) Performed on the following equipment types - (a) Vehicle batteries (both charging and discharging V2G); (b) Stationary batteries; (c) power conversion equipment for energy storage; (d) ultra- and super-capacitor systems; and (e) DC systems, such as commercial microgrids.

  10. Neutrino signals in electron-capture storage-ring experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avraham Gal

    2015-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino signals in electron-capture storage-ring experiments at GSI are reconsidered, with special emphasis placed on the quasi-circular motion of the daughter ions in two-body decays. Whereas parent-ion decay rates cannot exhibit modulation with the several-second period reported in these experiments, the time evolution of the detected daughter ions is shown to produce oscillations that under certain conditions may provide resolution of the `GSI Oscillations' puzzle. New dedicated storage-ring or trap experiments could look up for these oscillations.

  11. On scale and magnitude of pressure build-up induced by large-scale geologic storage of CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scale and magnitude of pressure perturbation and brine migration induced by geologic carbon sequestration is discussed assuming a full-scale deployment scenario in which enough CO{sub 2} is captured and stored to make relevant contributions to global climate change mitigation. In this scenario, the volumetric rates and cumulative volumes of CO{sub 2} injection would be comparable to or higher than those related to existing deep-subsurface injection and extraction activities, such as oil production. Large-scale pressure build-up in response to the injection may limit the dynamic storage capacity of suitable formations, because over-pressurization may fracture the caprock, may drive CO{sub 2}/brine leakage through localized pathways, and may cause induced seismicity. On the other hand, laterally extensive sedimentary basins may be less affected by such limitations because (i) local pressure effects are moderated by pressure propagation and brine displacement into regions far away from the CO{sub 2} storage domain; and (ii) diffuse and/or localized brine migration into overlying and underlying formations allows for pressure bleed-off in the vertical direction. A quick analytical estimate of the extent of pressure build-up induced by industrial-scale CO{sub 2} storage projects is presented. Also discussed are pressure perturbation and attenuation effects simulated for two representative sedimentary basins in the USA: the laterally extensive Illinois Basin and the partially compartmentalized southern San Joaquin Basin in California. These studies show that the limiting effect of pressure build-up on dynamic storage capacity is not as significant as suggested by Ehlig-Economides and Economides, who considered closed systems without any attenuation effects.

  12. Effect of induced hypothalamic hyperphagia and forced-feeding on organ weight and tissular development in Landes geese

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . The daily food intake of the geese and their weekly liveweight gain were monitored. After VMH lesions intervenes in the mobilization, utilization and storage of fats in the organism. The ventromedian produces lipid accumulation in storage tissues (Labie and Tournut, 1970). Thus, hyperphagia induced

  13. Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the storage technology as well as PV and solar thermaltechnologies are necessary. Thus, to access the impact on storage, PV, as well as solar

  14. Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media given at the DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials on May 18, 2006. storagetheorysessionei...

  15. On the effects of the evolution of microbial mats and land plants on the Earth as a planet. Photometric and spectroscopic light curves of paleo-Earths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanrom, E; Garca-Muoz, A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the spectral and photometric variability of the Earth and the rest of the Solar System planets has become of the utmost importance for the future characterization of rocky exoplanets. As this is not only interesting at present times but also along the planetary evolution, we studied the effect that the evolution of microbial mats and plants over land has had on the way our planet looks from afar. As life evolved, continental surfaces changed gradually and non- uniformly from deserts through microbial mats to land plants, modifying the reflective properties of the ground and most probably the distribution of moisture and cloudiness. Here, we used a radiative transfer model of the Earth, together with geological paleo-records of the continental distribution and a reconstructed cloud distribution, to simulate the visible and near-IR radiation reflected by our planet as a function of the Earth's rotation. We found that the evolution from deserts to microbial mats and to land plants produce detectabl...

  16. On the Use of Energy Storage Technologies for Regulation Services in Electric Power Systems with Significant Penetration of Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Bo; Makarov, Yuri V.; DeSteese, John G.; Vishwanathan, Vilanyur V.; Nyeng, Preben; McManus, Bart; Pease, John

    2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy produced by intermittent renewable resources is sharply increasing in the United States. At high penetration levels, volatility of wind power production could cause additional problems for the power system balancing functions such as regulation. This paper reports some partial results of a project work, recently conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project proposes to mitigate additional intermittency with the help of Wide Area Energy Management System (WAEMS) that would provide a two-way simultaneous regulation service for the BPA and California ISO systems by using a large energy storage facility. The paper evaluates several utility-scale energy storage technology options for their usage as regulation resources. The regulation service requires a participating resource to quickly vary its power output following the rapidly and frequently changing regulation signal. Several energy storage options have been analyzed based on thirteen selection criteria. The evaluation process resulted in the selection of flywheels, pumped hydro electric power (or conventional hydro electric power) plant and sodium sulfur or nickel cadmium batteries as candidate technologies for the WAEMS project. A cost benefit analysis should be conducted to narrow the choice to one technology.

  17. Criticality Safety Evaluations on the Use of 200-gram Pu Mass Limit for RHWM Waste Storage Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, P

    2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This work establishes the criticality safety technical basis to increase the fissile mass limit from 120 grams to 200 grams for Type A 55-gallon drums and their equivalents. Current RHWM fissile mass limit is 120 grams Pu for Type A 55-gallon containers and their equivalent. In order to increase the Type A 55-gallon drum limit to 200 grams, a few additional criticality safety control requirements are needed on moderators, reflectors, and array controls to ensure that the 200-gram Pu drums remain criticality safe with inadvertent criticality remains incredible. The purpose of this work is to analyze the use of 200-gram Pu drum mass limit for waste storage operations in Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) Facilities. In this evaluation, the criticality safety controls associated with the 200-gram Pu drums are established for the RHWM waste storage operations. With the implementation of these criticality safety controls, the 200-gram Pu waste drum storage operations are demonstrated to be criticality safe and meet the double-contingency-principle requirement per DOE O 420.1.

  18. Regulatory Concerns on the In-Containment Water Storage System of the Korean Next Generation Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahn, Hyung-Joon; Lee, Jae-Hun; Bang, Young-Seok; Kim, Hho-Jung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The in-containment water storage system (IWSS) is a newly adopted system in the design of the Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR). It consists of the in-containment refueling water storage tank, holdup volume tank, and cavity flooding system (CFS). The IWSS has the function of steam condensation and heat sink for the steam release from the pressurizer and provides cooling water to the safety injection system and containment spray system in an accident condition and to the CFS in a severe accident condition. With the progress of the KNGR design, the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety has been developing Safety and Regulatory Requirements and Guidances for safety review of the KNGR. In this paper, regarding the IWSS of the KNGR, the major contents of the General Safety Criteria, Specific Safety Requirements, Safety Regulatory Guides, and Safety Review Procedures were introduced, and the safety review items that have to be reviewed in-depth from the regulatory viewpoint were also identified.

  19. Electrochemical energy storage device based on carbon dioxide as electroactive species

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nemeth, Karoly; van Veenendaal, Michel Antonius; Srajer, George

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical energy storage device comprising a primary positive electrode, a negative electrode, and one or more ionic conductors. The ionic conductors ionically connect the primary positive electrode with the negative electrode. The primary positive electrode comprises carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) and a means for electrochemically reducing the CO.sub.2. This means for electrochemically reducing the CO.sub.2 comprises a conductive primary current collector, contacting the CO.sub.2, whereby the CO.sub.2 is reduced upon the primary current collector during discharge. The primary current collector comprises a material to which CO.sub.2 and the ionic conductors are essentially non-corrosive. The electrochemical energy storage device uses CO.sub.2 as an electroactive species in that the CO.sub.2 is electrochemically reduced during discharge to enable the release of electrical energy from the device.

  20. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period July 1, 2004, through September 30, 2004. During this time period there were three main activities. First was the ongoing negotiations of the four sub-awards working toward signed contracts with the various organizations involved. Second, an Executive Council meeting was held at Penn State September 9, 2004. And third, the GSTC participated in the SPE Eastern Regional Meeting in Charleston, West Virginia, on September 16th and 17th. We hosted a display booth with the Stripper Well Consortium.