National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for on highway diesel

  1. Off-Highway Heavy Vehicle Diesel Efficiency Improvement and Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Off-Highway Heavy Vehicle Diesel Efficiency Improvement and Emissions Reduction Off-Highway Heavy Vehicle Diesel Efficiency Improvement and Emissions Reduction 2005 Diesel Engine...

  2. Diesel Fueled SOFC for Class 7/Class 8 On-Highway Truck Auxiliary Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vesely, Charles John-Paul; Fuchs, Benjamin S.; Booten, Chuck W.

    2010-03-31

    The following report documents the progress of the Cummins Power Generation (CPG) Diesel Fueled SOFC for Class 7/Class 8 On-Highway Truck Auxiliary Power (SOFC APU) development and final testing under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) contract DE-FC36-04GO14318. This report overviews and summarizes CPG and partner development leading to successful demonstration of the SOFC APU objectives and significant progress towards SOFC commercialization. Significant SOFC APU Milestones: Demonstrated: Operation meeting SOFC APU requirements on commercial Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) fuel. SOFC systems operating on dry CPOX reformate. Successful start-up and shut-down of SOFC APU system without inert gas purge. Developed: Low cost balance of plant concepts and compatible systems designs. Identified low cost, high volume components for balance of plant systems. Demonstrated efficient SOFC output power conditioning. Demonstrated SOFC control strategies and tuning methods.

  3. No. 2 Diesel Sales for On-Highway Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6Year JanperGas

  4. Retail Prices for Diesel (On-Highway) - All Types

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988 1.996 2.003 1990-2016 East Coast (PADD 1)May-15421

  5. ,"U.S. On-Highway Diesel Fuel Prices"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia:Illinois:WizardYatescloudDataAge Refining AirA1.

  6. The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices Global Crude Oil Prices Brent396,0138.62(96)The U.S.

  7. The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices Global Crude Oil Prices Brent396,0138.62(96)The

  8. Aftertreatment Technologies for Off-Highway Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kass, M.D.

    2008-07-15

    The objective of this program was to explore a combination of advanced injection control and urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) to reduce the emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) from a Tier 2 off-highway diesel engine to Tier 3 emission targets while maintaining fuel efficiency. The engine used in this investigation was a 2004 4.5L John Deere PowerTechTM; this engine was not equipped with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Under the original CRADA, the principal objective was to assess whether Tier 3 PM emission targets could be met solely by increasing the rail pressure. Although high rail pressure will lower the total PM emissions, it has a contrary effect to raise NOx emissions. To address this effect, a urea-SCR system was used to determine whether the enhanced NOx levels, associated with high rail pressure, could be reduced to Tier 3 levels. A key attraction for this approach is that it eliminates the need for a Diesel particulate filter (DPF) to remove PM emissions. The original CRADA effort was also performed using No.2 Diesel fuel having a maximum sulfur level of 500 ppm. After a few years, the CRADA scope was expanded to include exploration of advanced injection strategies to improve catalyst regeneration and to explore the influence of urea-SCR on PM formation. During this period the emission targets also shifted to meeting more stringent Tier 4 emissions for NOx and PM, and the fuel type was changed to ultra-low sulfur Diesel (ULSD) having a maximum sulfur concentration of 15 ppm. New discoveries were made regarding PM formation at high rail pressures and the influences of oxidation catalysts and urea-SCR catalysts. These results are expected to provide a pathway for lower PM and NOx emissions for both off- and on-highway applications. Industrial in-kind support was available throughout the project period. Review of the research results were carried out on a regular basis (annual reports and meetings) followed by suggestions for improvement in ongoing work and direction for future work. A significant portion of the industrial support was in the form of experimentation, data analysis, data exchange, and technical consultation.

  9. Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust Fluid, and Selective Catalytic Reduction Technologies on the AFDC Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel...

  10. Advanced Hybrid Propulsion and Energy Management System for High Efficiency, Off Highway, 240 Ton Class, Diesel Electric Haul Trucks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richter, Tim; Slezak, Lee; Johnson, Chris; Young, Henry; Funcannon, Dan

    2008-12-31

    The objective of this project is to reduce the fuel consumption of off-highway vehicles, specifically large tonnage mine haul trucks. A hybrid energy storage and management system will be added to a conventional diesel-electric truck that will allow capture of braking energy normally dissipated in grid resistors as heat. The captured energy will be used during acceleration and motoring, reducing the diesel engine load, thus conserving fuel. The project will work towards a system validation of the hybrid system by first selecting an energy storage subsystem and energy management subsystem. Laboratory testing at a subscale level will evaluate these selections and then a full-scale laboratory test will be performed. After the subsystems have been proven at the full-scale lab, equipment will be mounted on a mine haul truck and integrated with the vehicle systems. The integrated hybrid components will be exercised to show functionality, capability, and fuel economy impacts in a mine setting.

  11. Prescribed Fire is Cool on Florida Highway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caster, Jeff; McBurney, Willson; Farley, Patricia; Rodriguez, Rose; Green, Lane; McGorty, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    plans for a prescribed fire on US319/SR61, Kate Irelandwww.longleafalliance.org). Prescribed fire is a necessaryresource. Using prescribed fire along this highway is safe

  12. Predicting Highway Construction Impacts on a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Predicting Highway Construction Impacts on a Community #12;Making the Best Decisions in the Face 212 &TH 52 Construction Challenges TH 212 &TH 52 Construction Challenges Ü TH 212 Unsuitable Matls Construction Access Environmentally Sensitive Areas Payment Curve Illegal dump sites Noise Mitigation ­ Walls

  13. French perspective on diesel engines & emissions | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    French perspective on diesel engines & emissions French perspective on diesel engines & emissions 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Aaqius & Aaqius 2002deernino.pdf More...

  14. U.S. diesel fuel prices continue to decrease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    diesel fuel prices continue to decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 2.51 a gallon on Monday. That's down 4.7 cents from a week ago, based on...

  15. Lubricant Formulation and Consumption Effects on Diesel Exhaust...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lubricant Formulation and Consumption Effects on Diesel Exhaust Ash Emissions: Lubricant Formulation and Consumption Effects on Diesel Exhaust Ash Emissions: 2005 Diesel Engine...

  16. Update on 2007 Diesel Particulate Measurement Research | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2007 Diesel Particulate Measurement Research Update on 2007 Diesel Particulate Measurement Research 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and...

  17. Fine Particle (Nanoparticle) Emissions on Minnesota Highways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    of Minnesota 7th Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Workshop U.S Department of Energy (DOE) Office Aerosol - Particle Size Distribution Nanoparticle Formation - History Typical Engine Exhaust - Particulate Exposure Increasing Time Nanoparticle Formation History From the Start of Combustion to the Nose

  18. On-Board Diesel & Hybrid Diesel-Electric Transit Bus PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmén, Britt A.

    On-Board Diesel & Hybrid Diesel-Electric Transit Bus PM Mass and Size-Resolved Number Emissions AND cost-effective ­ 2003 -- Purchase 2 hybrid diesel-electric buses ­ Emissions Testing ­ gases Particulate Mass -- filter #12;Motivation · Ultrafine (UF) particle health effects · Diesel vehicle exhaust

  19. Energy Efficient Navigation Management for Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Highways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yongge

    Energy Efficient Navigation Management for Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Highways Mohammad Ashiqur the elec- tric power stored in the battery as energy, as an alternative to traditional gasoline Vehicles (PHEVs) are gaining pop- ularity due to their economical efficiency as well as their contribution

  20. Effects of Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF Regeneration Effects of Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF Regeneration DPF regeneration experiments verified the...

  1. Fuel Formulation Effects on Diesel Fuel Injection, Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Formulation Effects on Diesel Fuel Injection, Combustion, Emissions and Emission Control Fuel Formulation Effects on Diesel Fuel Injection, Combustion, Emissions and Emission...

  2. Progress on DOE Vehicle Technologies Light-Duty Diesel Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on DOE Vehicle Technologies Light-Duty Diesel Engine Efficiency and Emissions Milestones Progress on DOE Vehicle Technologies Light-Duty Diesel Engine Efficiency and Emissions...

  3. The Impact of Oil Consumption Mechanisms on Diesel Exhaust Particle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mechanisms on Diesel Exhaust Particle Size Distributions and Detailed Exhaust Chemical Composition The Impact of Oil Consumption Mechanisms on Diesel Exhaust Particle Size...

  4. Eaton Aftertreatment System (EAS) for On-Highway Diesel Engines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. 2006deerhu.pdf More Documents & Publications LNT + SCR...

  5. Update on Diesel Exhaust Emission Control Technology and Regulations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Control Technology and Regulations Update on Diesel Exhaust Emission Control Technology and Regulations 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation:...

  6. Update on Diesel Exhaust Emission Control | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Control Update on Diesel Exhaust Emission Control 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Corning, Inc. deer2003johnson.pdf More Documents & Publications Review of Diesel Emission...

  7. Impact of Fuel Metal Impurities on Diesel Exhaust Catalysts ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Exhaust Catalysts Investigates impact of metal impurities in biodiesel on full useful life durability of catalysts in diesel exhaust aftertreatment systems...

  8. Biodiesel Effects on Diesel Particle Filter Performance: Milestone Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, A.; McCormick, R. L.; Hayes, R.; Ireland, J.

    2006-03-01

    Research results on the performance of biodiesel and biodiesel blends with ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and a diesel particle filter (DPF).

  9. Update on Transition to Ultra-Low-Sulfur Diesel Fuel (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    On November 8, 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator signed a direct final rule that will shift the retail compliance date for offering ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) for highway use from September 1, 2006, to October 15, 2006. The change will allow more time for retail outlets and terminals to comply with the new 15 parts per million (ppm) sulfur standard, providing time for entities in the diesel fuel distribution system to flush higher sulfur fuel out of the system during the transition. Terminals will have until September 1, 2006, to complete their transitions to ULSD. The previous deadline was July 15, 2006.

  10. The effect of diesel injection timing on a turbocharged diesel engine fumigated with ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, A.R.; Savage, L.D.; White, R.A.; Sorenson, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    A study has been done to determine the effect of changes in diesel injection timing on engine performance using a multicylinder, turbocharged diesel engine fumigated with ethanol. Tests at half load with engine speeds of 2000 and 2400 rpm indicated that a 4% increase in thermal efficiency could be obtained by advancing the diesel injection timing from 18 to 29/sup 0/BTDC. The effect of changes in diesel timing was much more pronounced at 2400 rpm. Advancing the diesel timing decreased CO and unburned HC levels significantly. The increase in NO levels due to advances in diesel timing was offset by the decrease in NO due to ethanol addition.

  11. Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust Fluid, and Selective Catalytic Reduction Technologies on the AFDC (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodt-Giles, D.

    2008-08-05

    Presentation covers new content available on the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicle Data Center regarding diesel vehicles, diesel exhaust fluid, and selective catalytic reduction technologies.

  12. Safe Tractor Operation: Driving on Highways 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, David

    2004-09-16

    of the car first notices the tractor while still 400 feet behind it, the driver has less than 10 seconds to avoid a collision with the tractor. In this time, the driver of the car must recognize the danger, determine the speed the tractor is traveling... the brakes, clutch and steering mechanisms, and often cannot see everything around them while sitting in the tractor seat. Don?t put your child in this dangerous situation. Chil- dren should never drive tractors on public roads. Extra Riders Except...

  13. Safeguarding Truck-Shipped Wholesale and Retail Fuels Revenues from motor fuel and other highway use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to identify it as a fuel that has not had on-road taxes paid. Only dyed diesel fuel may be removed from bulk highway use taxes provide the primary source of funding for the United States' transportation system, and ensuring all of these taxes are collected, remitted, and credited to the Highway Trust Fund is a priority

  14. Effect of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on Diesel Engine Oil...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Effect of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on Diesel Engine Oil - Impact on Wear Effect of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on Diesel Engine Oil - Impact on Wear Results of completed...

  15. The Effect of Diesel Fuel Properties on Emissions-Restrained...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Effect of Diesel Fuel Properties on Emissions-Restrained Fuel Economy at Mid-Load Conditions The Effect of Diesel Fuel Properties on Emissions-Restrained Fuel Economy at...

  16. Perspective on the Future Development of Diesel Emission Standards...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Perspective on the Future Development of Diesel Emission Standards in Europe - Euro 5 for LDV, amendment of EURO 5 for HDV Perspective on the Future Development of Diesel Emission...

  17. ON CONDITION MONITORING OF EXHAUST VALVES IN MARINE DIESEL ENGINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    ON CONDITION MONITORING OF EXHAUST VALVES IN MARINE DIESEL ENGINES T. L. Fog x L. K. Hansen z , J : Research & Development, MAN B&W Diesel A/S Teglholmsgade 41, DK­2450, Copenhagen SV, Denmark. E­mail: tof­invasive characterisation of ex­ haust valve conditions in large marine diesel engines, were exper­ imentally investigated

  18. Wetlands mitigation issues related to reconstruction of U.S. Highway 93 on the Flathead Indian Reservation, Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Mary B.

    2003-01-01

    resulting from the Kerr Hydro Power project on Flatheadfor highway construction and hydro power projects. She has a

  19. Fact #650: November 22, 2010 Diesel Fuel Prices hit a Two-Year High

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    According to the Energy Information Administration's weekly fuel price data, the price of highway diesel fuel on the week of November 17, 2010, reached a 2-year high of $3.18 per gallon. Back in...

  20. Alternatives to conventional diesel fuel-some potential implications of California's TAC decision on diesel particulate.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberhardt, J. J.; Rote, D. M.; Saricks, C. L.; Stodolsky, F.

    1999-08-10

    Limitations on the use of petroleum-based diesel fuel in California could occur pursuant to the 1998 declaration by California's Air Resources Board (CARB) that the particulate matter component of diesel exhaust is a carcinogen, therefore a toxic air contaminant (TAC) subject to provisions of the state's Proposition 65. It is the declared intention of CARB not to ban or restrict diesel fuel, per se, at this time. Assuming no total ban, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) explored two feasible ''mid-course'' strategies. (1) Increased penetration of natural gas and greater gasoline use in the transportation fuels market, to the extent that some compression-ignition (CI) applications revert to spark-ignition (SI) engines. (2) New specifications requiring diesel fuel reformulation based on exhaust products of individual diesel fuel constituents. Each of these alternatives results in some degree of (conventional) diesel displacement. In the first case, diesel fuel is assumed admissible for ignition assistance as a pilot fuel in natural gas (NG)-powered heavy-duty vehicles, and gasoline demand in California increases by 32.2 million liters per day overall, about 21 percent above projected 2010 baseline demand. Natural gas demand increases by 13.6 million diesel liter equivalents per day, about 7 percent above projected (total) consumption level. In the second case, compression-ignition engines utilize substitutes for petroleum-based diesel having similar ignition and performance properties. For each case we estimated localized air emission plus generalized greenhouse gas and energy changes. Economic implications of vehicle and engine replacement were not evaluated.

  1. Evaluation of a wildlife underpass on Vermont State Highway 289 in Essex, Vermont

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin, John M.; Garland, Larry

    2001-01-01

    Scharf, technicians for the Vermont Department of Fish andEVALUATION OF A WILDLIFE UNDERPASS ON VERMONT STATE HIGHWAY289 IN ESSEX, VERMONT John M. Austin and Larry Garland,

  2. Diesel Reformers for On-board Hydrogen Applications | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reformers for On-board Hydrogen Applications Diesel Reformers for On-board Hydrogen Applications 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Hydrogen Source 2003deermauss.pdf More...

  3. Heavy-Duty Stoichiometric Compression Ignition Engine with Improved Fuel Economy over Alternative Technologies for Meeting 2010 On-Highway Emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby J. Baumgard; Richard E. Winsor

    2009-12-31

    The objectives of the reported work were: to apply the stoichiometric compression ignition (SCI) concept to a 9.0 liter diesel engine; to obtain engine-out NO{sub x} and PM exhaust emissions so that the engine can meet 2010 on-highway emission standards by applying a three-way catalyst for NO{sub x} control and a particulate filter for PM control; and to simulate an optimize the engine and air system to approach 50% thermal efficiency using variable valve actuation and electric turbo compounding. The work demonstrated that an advanced diesel engine can be operated at stoichiometric conditions with reasonable particulate and NOx emissions at full power and peak torque conditions; calculated that the SCI engine will operate at 42% brake thermal efficiency without advanced hardware, turbocompounding, or waste heat recovery; and determined that EGR is not necessary for this advanced concept engine, and this greatly simplifies the concept.

  4. Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion modeling & experimental testing Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Fuels Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels...

  5. Development of SCR on Diesel Particulate Filter System for Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Investigation on continuous soot oxidation and NOx reduction by SCR coated DPF SCR-DPF Integrations for Diesel ExhaustPerformance and...

  6. Reliability and Design Strength Limit Calculations on Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Corning 2004deerwebb.pdf More Documents & Publications Predicting Thermal Stress in Diesel Particulate Filters Environmental Effects on Power Electronic Devices Effect...

  7. Contract claims and disputes on Texas highway construction projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Michael Peter

    1991-01-01

    : Dr. Dorm E. Hancher This thesis documents the efforts to determine the major causes of the numerous construction contract claims and disputes against the Texas State Department of Highways and Public Transportation. Surveys of departmental... personnel and contractors who do construction for the State were used to locate these problem areas. These surveys, along with a study of 18 claims against the State, found design errors, delays by the State, and additional work to be the main sources...

  8. Size-Resolved Particle Number and Volume Emission Factors for On-Road Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ban-Weiss, George A.

    2009-01-01

    losses when sampling diesel aerosol: A quality assurancefrom on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles. AtmosphericSource apportionment of diesel and spark ignition exhaust

  9. Comparative Study on Exhaust Emissions from Diesel- and CNG-Powered...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Study on Exhaust Emissions from Diesel- and CNG-Powered Urban Buses Comparative Study on Exhaust Emissions from Diesel- and CNG-Powered Urban Buses 2003 DEER Conference...

  10. Effects of Retrofitting Emission Control Systems on In-Use Heavy Diesel Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millstein, Dev E.; Harley, Robert A

    2010-01-01

    use emissions from heavy-duty diesel vehicles. Environ. Sci.Sci. Technol. (7) Johnson, T. V. Diesel Emission Control inNO x control on heavy-duty diesel truck emissions. Environ.

  11. Modeling and interpreting the observed effects of ash on diesel particulate filter performance and regeneration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yujun, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    Diesel particulate filters (DPF) are devices that physically capture diesel particulates to prevent their release to the atmosphere. Diesel particulate filters have seen widespread use in on- and off-road applications as ...

  12. IMPACT OF DME-DIESEL FUEL BLEND PROPERTIES ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elana M. Chapman; Andre L. Boehman; Kimberly Wain; Wallis Lloyd; Joseph M. Perez; Donald Stiver; Joseph Conway

    2002-07-01

    The objectives of this research program are to develop information on lubricity and viscosity improvers and their impact on the wear mechanisms in fuel injectors operating on blends of dimethyl ether (DME) and diesel fuel. This project complements another ongoing project titled ''Development of a Dimethyl Ether (DME)-Fueled Shuttle Bus Demonstration Project''. The objectives of that research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as, field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In the shuttle bus project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. The strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. In this project, they have sought to develop methods for extending the permissible DME content in the DME-diesel blends without experiencing rapid injector failure due to wear. To date, the activities have covered two areas: development of a high-pressure lubricity test apparatus for studies of lubricity and viscosity improvers and development of an injector durability stand for evaluation of wear rates in fuel injectors. This report provides summaries of the progress toward completion of both experimental systems and a summary of the plan for completion of the project objectives.

  13. IMPACT OF DME-DIESEL FUEL BLEND PROPERTIES ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elana M. Chapman; Andre Boehman; Kimberly Wain; Wallis Lloyd; Joseph M. Perez; Donald Stiver; Joseph Conway

    2004-04-01

    The objectives of this research program are to develop information on lubricity and viscosity improvers and their impact on the wear mechanisms in fuel injectors operating on blends of dimethyl ether (DME) and diesel fuel. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In the shuttle bus project, we have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. Our strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. In this project, we have sought to develop methods for extending the permissible DME content in the DME-diesel blends without experiencing rapid injector failure due to wear. Our activities have covered three areas: examination of the impact of lubricity additives on the viscosity of DME, development of a high-pressure lubricity test apparatus for studies of lubricity and viscosity improvers and development of an injector durability stand for evaluation of wear rates in fuel injectors. The first two of these areas have resulted in valuable information about the limitations of lubricity and viscosity additives that are presently available in terms of their impact on the viscosity of DME and on wear rates on injector hardware. The third area, that of development of an injector durability test stand, has not resulted in a functioning experiment. Some information is provided in this report to identify the remaining tasks that need to be performed to make the injector stand operational. The key observations from the work are that when blended at 25 wt.% in either diesel fuel or Biodiesel fuel, DME requires more than 5 wt.% additive of all viscosity and lubricity additives tested here to even approach the lower limit of the ASTM diesel fuel viscosity requirement. To treat neat DME sufficiently to make DME comply with the ASTM diesel fuel viscosity requirement would require a viscosity additive with 10{sup 45} cSt viscosity, which is not possible with current additive technologies.

  14. IMPACT OF DME-DIESEL FUEL BLEND PROPERTIES ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elana M. Chapman; Andre Boehman; Kimberly Wain; Wallis Lloyd; Joseph M. Perez; Donald Stiver; Joseph Conway

    2003-06-01

    The objectives of this research program are to develop information on lubricity and viscosity improvers and their impact on the wear mechanisms in fuel injectors operating on blends of dimethyl ether (DME) and diesel fuel. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In the shuttle bus project, we have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. Our strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. In this project, we have sought to develop methods for extending the permissible DME content in the DME-diesel blends without experiencing rapid injector failure due to wear. To date, our activities have covered three areas: examination of the impact of lubricity additives on the viscosity of DME, development of a high-pressure lubricity test apparatus for studies of lubricity and viscosity improvers and development of an injector durability stand for evaluation of wear rates in fuel injectors. This report provides summaries of the progress toward evaluation of the viscosity impacts of lubricity additives, completion of both experimental systems and a summary of the plan for completion of the project objectives.

  15. Evaluation of the effects of a highway improvement project on Key deer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braden, Anthony Wayne

    2006-10-30

    Deer-vehicle collisions (DVCs) along a 5.6-km segment of United States Highway 1 (US 1) on Big Pine Key (BPK), Florida responsible for approximately 26% of endangered Florida Key deer (Odocoileus virginianus clavium) annual mortalities. The Florida...

  16. The effect of triethyl phosphate on the biodegradation of diesel fuel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lott, Heather Leianne

    1999-01-01

    on the biodegradation of diesel fuel. Three types of treatments (sterile soil with diesel and TEP, a pictorially active soil with diesel, and a pictorially active soil with diesel and TEP) were set up in microcosms and housed in a controlled temperature chamber for 48...

  17. A STUDY OF THE DISCREPANCY BETWEEN FEDERAL AND STATE MEASUREMENTS OF ON-HIGHWAY FUEL CONSUMPTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, HL

    2003-08-11

    Annual highway fuel taxes are collected by the Treasury Department and placed in the Highway Trust Fund (HTF). There is, however, no direct connection between the taxes collected by the Treasury Department and the gallons of on-highway fuel use, which can lead to a discrepancy between these totals. This study was conducted to determine how much of a discrepancy exists between the total fuel usages estimated based on highway revenue funds as reported by the Treasury Department and the total fuel usages used in the apportionment of the HTF to the States. The analysis was conducted using data from Highway Statistics Tables MF-27 and FE-9 for the years 1991-2001. It was found that the overall discrepancy is relatively small, mostly within 5% difference. The amount of the discrepancy varies from year to year and varies among the three fuel types (gasoline, gasohol, special fuels). Several potential explanations for these discrepancies were identified, including issues on data, tax measurement, gallon measurement, HTF receipts, and timing. Data anomalies caused by outside forces, such as deferment of tax payments from one fiscal year to the next, can skew fuel tax data. Fuel tax evasion can lead to differences between actual fuel use and fuel taxes collected. Furthermore, differences in data collection and reporting among States can impact fuel use data. Refunds, credits, and transfers from the HTF can impact the total fuel tax receipt data. Timing issues, such as calendar year vs. fiscal year, can also cause some discrepancy between the two data sources.

  18. Effect of carbon coating on scuffing performance in diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajayi, O. O.; Alzoubi, M. F.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

    2000-06-29

    Low-sulfur and low-aromatic diesel fuels are being introduced in order to reduce various types of emissions in diesel engines to levels in compliance with current and impending US federal regulations. The low lubricity of these fuels, however, poses major reliability and durability problems for fuel injection components that depend on diesel fuel for their lubrication. In the present study, the authors evaluated the scuff resistance of surfaces in regular diesel fuel containing 500 ppm sulfur and in Fischer-Tropsch synthetic diesel fuel containing no sulfur or aromatics. Tests were conducted with the high frequency reciprocating test rig (HFRR) using 52100 steel balls and H-13 tool-steel flats with and without Argonne's special carbon coatings. Test results showed that the sulfur-containing fuels provide about 20% higher scuffing resistance than does fuel without sulfur. Use of the carbon coating on the flat increased scuffing resistance in both regular and synthetic fuels by about ten times, as measured by the contact severity index at scuffing. Scuffing failure in tests conducted with coated surfaces did not occur until the coating had been removed by the two distinct mechanisms of spalling and wear.

  19. Effects of Catalysts on Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Retrofits...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalysts on Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Retrofits for PM and NOX Control Effects of Catalysts on Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Retrofits for PM and NOX Control The more...

  20. BioDiesel Content On-board monitoring | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BioDiesel Content On-board monitoring BioDiesel Content On-board monitoring onboard fuel monitoring of fuel and biofuel qualities using an optical sensor for engine...

  1. Testing an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine Engine Testing an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine Engine Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24,...

  2. Non-uniform Aging on Super Duty Diesel Truck Aged Urea Cu/Zeolite...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    uniform Aging on Super Duty Diesel Truck Aged Urea CuZeolite SCR Catalysts Non-uniform Aging on Super Duty Diesel Truck Aged Urea CuZeolite SCR Catalysts CuZeolite SCR catalysts...

  3. Application for Permit to Construct Access Driveway Facilities on Highway

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex A S Jump to:Angola onAperionCommissionEnergyROW | Open Energy

  4. Lubricant oil consumption effects on diesel exhaust ash emissions using a sulfur dioxide trace technique and thermogravimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plumley, Michael J

    2005-01-01

    A detailed experimental study was conducted targeting lubricant consumption effects on ,diesel exhaust ash levels using a model year 2002 5.9L diesel engine, high and low Sulfur commercial lubricants, and clean diesel ...

  5. New concept on lower exhaust emission of diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujimoto, Hajime; Senda, Jiro; Shibata, Ichiro; Matsui, Koji

    1995-12-31

    One of the countermeasures for exhaust emissions from a diesel engine, especially, DI diesel engine, is the use of a super high pressure injection system with a small hole diameter. However, the system needs greater driving force than that with normal injection pressure,and its demerit is an increase in NO{sub x}, although soot decreases. The authors propose a new concept, the simultaneous reduction of NO{sub x} and soot. The concept is that the utilization of flash boiling phenomenon in a diesel engine. The phenomenon can be realized by use of the injection of fuel oil with CO{sub 2} gas dissolved. Flash boiling facilities the distinguished atomization of fuel oil and CO{sub 2} gas contributes to the internal EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) during combustion. Fundamental information on the characteristics of a flash boiling spray of n-tridecane with CO{sub 2} gas dissolved is described in this paper, as a first step.

  6. Impacts of Biodiesel Fuel Blends Oil Dilution on Light-Duty Diesel Engine Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, M. J.; Alleman, T. L.; Luecke, J.; McCormick, R. L.

    2009-08-01

    Assesses oil dilution impacts on a diesel engine operating with a diesel particle filter, NOx storage, a selective catalytic reduction emission control system, and a soy-based 20% biodiesel fuel blend.

  7. Effect of engine operating parameters and fuel characteristics on diesel engine emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acar, Joseph, 1977-

    2005-01-01

    To examine the effects of using synthetic Fischer-Tropsch (FT) diesel fuel in a modern compression ignition engine, experiments were conducted on a MY 2002 Cummins 5.9 L diesel engine outfitted with high pressure, common ...

  8. Fuel Effects on Low Temperature Combustion in a Light-Duty Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Temperature Combustion in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine Fuel Effects on Low Temperature Combustion in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine Six different fuels were investigated to study the...

  9. IMPACT OF LOW-EMISSION DIESEL ENGINES ON UNDERGROUND MINE AIR QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    1 IMPACT OF LOW-EMISSION DIESEL ENGINES ON UNDERGROUND MINE AIR QUALITY Susan T. Bagley1, Winthrop-1295 2 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Center for Diesel Research, University of Minnesota, 111, however, is providing the report on its Website because it is important for parties interested in diesel

  10. Summary of Swedish Experiences on CNG and "Clean" Diesel Buses...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications A Comparison of Two Gasoline and Two Diesel Cars with Varying Emission Control Technologies Diesel Health Impacts & Recent Comparisons...

  11. Effect of Biodiesel Blends on Diesel Particulate Filter Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, A.; McCormick, R. L.; Hayes, R. R.; Ireland, J.; Fang, H. L.

    2006-11-01

    Presents results of tests of ultra-low sulfur diesel blended with soy-biodiesel at 5 percent using a Cummins ISB engine with a diesel particulate filter.

  12. The Effect of Metal Salts on Quantification of Elemental and Organic Carbon in Diesel Exhaust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    The Effect of Metal Salts on Quantification of Elemental and Organic Carbon in Diesel Exhaust-loaded diesel samples. Estimated TC was calculated from the BC concentration measured by optical transmissometer and linear relationship between TC and BC, TC (µg)= 1.78 ×BC(µg) - 21.97, derived from diesel reference

  13. Impacts of a Nanosized Ceria Additive on Diesel Engine Emissions of Particulate and Gaseous Pollutants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    Impacts of a Nanosized Ceria Additive on Diesel Engine Emissions of Particulate and Gaseous incorporating nanosized ceria have been increasingly used in diesel engines as combustion promoters. However- cylinder, four-cycle diesel engine using fuel mixes containing nanoceria of varying concentrations

  14. SAE Paper 04P-273 Modeling of Diesel Combustion and NO Emissions Based on a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, Hong G.

    SAE Paper 04P-273 Modeling of Diesel Combustion and NO Emissions Based on a Modified Eddy of Automotive Engineers, Inc. ABSTRACT This paper reports the development of a model of diesel combustion about global warming and hazardous emissions bring about a need for an improved understanding of diesel

  15. Modeling of Diesel Combustion, Soot and NO Emissions Based on a Modified Eddy Dissipation Concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, Hong G.

    1 Modeling of Diesel Combustion, Soot and NO Emissions Based on a Modified Eddy Dissipation Concept and soot emissions modeling, computational diesel engine simulations, eddy dissipation concept #12 ignition, combustion, NOx and soot emissions over a wide range of operating conditions in a diesel engine

  16. 2008-01-0333 Detailed Effects of a Diesel Particulate Filter on the Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Mingshen

    2008-01-0333 Detailed Effects of a Diesel Particulate Filter on the Reduction of Chemical Species of Wisconsin-Madison Copyright © 2008 SAE International ABSTRACT Diesel particulate filters are designed to reduce the mass emissions of diesel particulate matter and have been proven to be effective

  17. Emission Control Technology, Performance/Durability -POSTER Effect of Accelerated Ash Loading on Performance of Diesel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    on Performance of Diesel Particulate Filters and Morphology of Ash Layers Bruce G. Bunting and Todd J. Toops using a single-cylinder diesel engine has been developed for accelerated ash loading in catalyzed and non- catalyzed diesel particular filters (DPF) made of cordierite, SiC and mullite substrate

  18. Modeling Pollutant Emissions of Diesel Engine based on Kriging Models: a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modeling Pollutant Emissions of Diesel Engine based on Kriging Models: a Comparison between.denis-vidal@math.univ-lille1.fr, ghislaine.joly-blanchard@utc.fr) Abstract: In order to optimize the performance of a diesel problems, modelling errors, Automotive emissions, Diesel engines 1. INTRODUCTION The automotive industry

  19. On-Road Use of Fischer-Tropsch Diesel Blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nigel Clark; Mridul Gautam; Donald Lyons; Chris Atkinson; Wenwei Xie; Paul Norton; Keith Vertin; Stephen Goguen; James Eberhardt

    1999-04-26

    Alternative compression ignition engine fuels are of interest both to reduce emissions and to reduce U.S. petroleum fuel demand. A Malaysian Fischer-Tropsch gas-to-liquid fuel was compared with California No.2 diesel by characterizing emissions from over the road Class 8 tractors with Caterpillar 3176 engines, using a chassis dynamometer and full scale dilution tunnel. The 5-Mile route was employed as the test schedule, with a test weight of 42,000 lb. Levels of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) were reduced by an average of 12% and particulate matter (PM) by 25% for the Fischer-Tropsch fuel over the California diesel fuel. Another distillate fuel produced catalytically from Fischer-Tropsch products originally derived from natural gas by Mossgas was also compared with 49-state No.2 diesel by characterizing emissions from Detroit Diesel 6V-92 powered transit buses, three of them equipped with catalytic converters and rebuilt engines, and three without. The CBD cycle was employed as the test schedule, with a test weight of 33,050 lb. For those buses with catalytic converters and rebuilt engines, NO x was reduced by 8% and PM was reduced by 31% on average, while for those buses without, NO x was reduced by 5% and PM was reduced by 20% on average. It is concluded that advanced compression ignition fuels from non-petroleum sources can offer environmental advantages in typical line haul and city transit applications.

  20. Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust Fluid, and Selective Catalytic Reduction Technologies on the AFDC

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Showcases new content added to the AFDC including: Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust Fluid, Selective Catalytic Reduction Technologies, and an upcoming Deisel Exhaust Fluid Locator.

  1. Light Duty Diesels in the United States - Some Perspectives ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Update on Diesel Exhaust Emission Control Technology and Regulations Review of Diesel Emission Control Technology Diesel Emission Control Review...

  2. The economic impacts of highway widening projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Patricia Ann

    1997-01-01

    the after period represented market value on land parcels once construction was completed. A design matrix was developed from data available for two highway types, multilane highway and freeway, on pre-selected sites. Location selection was based on prior...

  3. Effect of GTL Diesel Fuels on Emissions and Engine Performance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: DaimlerChrysler Research and Technology

  4. Impact of Clean Diesel Technology on Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Brookhaven National Laboratory

  5. The Effects of Altitude on Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck On-Road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    The Effects of Altitude on Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck On-Road Emissions G A R Y A . B I S H O P , * J oxide from 5772 heavy-duty diesel trucks at five locations in the United States and Europe show slightly emissions has largely been focused on the regulation and control of exhaust emissions from light

  6. Comparative Analysis on the Effects of Diesel Particulate Filter and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Mingshen

    and NOx. Consequently, these two emissions are of the utmost concern in current diesel emission research Systems on a Wide Spectrum of Chemical Species Emissions Z . G E R A L D L I U , * , D E V I N R . B E R G , T H A D D E U S A . S W O R , A N D J A M E S J . S C H A U E R Cummins Emission Solutions

  7. Fuel effects on flame lift-off under diesel conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persson, Helena; Andersson, Oeivind; Egnell, Rolf

    2011-01-15

    An apparent relation between the lift-off length under diesel conditions and the ignition quality of a fuel has previously been reported. To cast light on the underlying mechanism, the current study aims to separate flame lift-off effects of the chemical ignition delay from those of other fuel properties under diesel conditions. Flame lift-off was measured in an optical diesel engine by high-speed video imaging of OH-chemiluminescence. Fuel and ambient-gas properties were varied during the experiment. Only a weak correlation was found between ignition delay and lift-off length. The data indicate that this correlation is due to a common, stronger correlation with the ambient oxygen concentration. The chemical ignition delay and the fuel type had similar, weak effects on the lift-off length. A recently proposed mechanism for lift-off stabilization was used to interpret the results. It assumes that reactants approaching the lift-off position of the jet are mixed with high-temperature products found along the edges of the flame, which trigger autoignition. In this picture, the fuel effect is most likely due to differences in the amount of mixing with high-temperature products that is required for autoignition. In the current experiment, all lift-off effects seem to arise from variations in the reactant and product temperatures, induced by fuel and ambient properties. (author)

  8. Overcoming Hydrocarbon Inhibition on Pd-based Diesel Oxidation Catalysts with Rational Catalyst Design Approach

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discusses results of a project focused on overcoming hydrocarbon inhibition on Pd-based diesel oxidation catalysts by using a rational catalyst design approach.

  9. Desulfurization Effects on a Light-Duty Diesel Vehicle NOx Adsorber Exhaust Emission Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatur, M.; Tomazic, D.; Tyrer, H.; Thornton, M.; Kubsh, J.

    2006-05-01

    Analyzes the effects on gaseous emissions, before and after desulfurization, on a light-duty diesel vehicle with a NOx adsorber catalyst.

  10. Radar/Lidar Sensor Fusion for Car-Following on Highways Daniel Gohring, Miao Wang, Michael Schnurmacher, Tinosch Ganjineh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rojas, Raúl

    Radar/Lidar Sensor Fusion for Car-Following on Highways Daniel G¨ohring, Miao Wang, Michael Schn-time algorithm which enables an autonomous car to comfortably follow other cars at various speeds while keeping that depends on the position as well as the velocity of the followed car. Radar sensors provide reliable

  11. The Impact of Lubricant on Emissions from a Medium-Duty Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents & Publications Lubricant Formulation and Consumption Effects on Diesel Exhaust Ash Emissions: Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells: 2000 Annual Progress Report...

  12. Diesel Truck Traffic in Low-Income and Minority Communities Adjacent to Ports: Environmental Justice Implications of Near-Roadway Land Use Conflicts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Douglas; Krudysz, Margaret; Winer, Arthur

    2008-01-01

    Particulate Emissions from Diesel Engines: A Review. JournalExposure of PM2.5 and EC from Diesel and Gasoline Vehiclesa Major Highway with Heavy-Duty Diesel Traffic. Atmospheric

  13. Nevada Strengthens Electric Vehicle Infrastructure on Major U.S. Highway

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In June, the Nevada Governor’s Office of Energy and the local utility NV Energy announced the Nevada Electric Highway joint initiative, an effort to facilitate electric vehicle (EV) transportation...

  14. Size-Resolved Particle Number and Volume Emission Factors for On-Road Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ban-Weiss, George A.

    2009-01-01

    matter from on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles.D.H. , Chase, R.E. , 1999b. Gasoline vehicle particle sizeFactors for On-Road Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles

  15. Influence of diesel engine combustion on the rupture strength of partially stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, C.R.; VonCook, K.; Foster, B.E.; Graves, R.L.; Kahl, W.K.; Liu, K.C.; Simpson, W.A. )

    1989-08-01

    This article is on a study conducted to determine whether long-term exposure of two types of partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) to the combustion environment of diesel engines would generate a change in mechanical properties. The author explains why PSZ was chosen for the study and goes on to discuss some reservations about the use of PSZ in diesel engines.

  16. Alcohol injection cuts diesel consumption on turbocharged tractors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edson, D.V.

    1980-07-21

    M and W Gear Co. of Gibson City, IL, are marketing a new alcohol- injection system that permits turbocharged diesel engines to burn alcohol and claims to cut diesel consumption by 30% and more. The alcohol fuel, a blend of alcohol and water, does not meet the diesel fuel until the alcohol has been atomized and sprayed through the intake manifold into the cylinders. It permits farmers to use home- still-produced ethanol without the added expense of refining to anhydrous composition.

  17. Highway Crash Cushions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Monroe Carlton

    1971-01-01

    . (August 1971) Monroe Carlton White, B. S. , Texas A&M University Directed by: Dr'. T. J. Hirsch Statistics indi. cate that approximately 20 to 35/ of motor vehicle accident fatalities on highways and freeways were the re- sult of colliding with fixed... roadside structures. A device which would cushion vehicles that collide with these rigid obstacles could thus save the lives of and decrease injuries to occupants, and minimize property damage to colliding vehicles. Four such devices are presently...

  18. INFLUENCE OF EGR COMPOUNDS ON THE OXIDATION OF AN HCCI-DIESEL SURROGATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ) and methanol (CH3OH), on the oxidation of a n-heptane/toluene blend was studied over a wide range reactions of NO, methanol (CH3OH) and ethylene (C2H4) and is used to explain the obtained experimental data a cetane number close to diesel and toluene representing the aromatic fraction of a diesel fuel

  19. The Effect of PV Array Size and Battery Size on the Economics of PV/Diesel/Battery Hybrid RAPS Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Effect of PV Array Size and Battery Size on the Economics of PV/Diesel/Battery Hybrid RAPS WA 6150 Abstract This paper focuses on pv/diesel/battery hybrid RAPS systems meeting loads above 50 kWh. INTRODUCTION A diesel hybrid system, incorporating a battery and inverter, can often provide power at a lower

  20. Epidemiological-environmental study of diesel bus garage workers: chronic effects of diesel exhaust on the respiratory system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamble, J.; Jones, W.; Minshall, S.

    1987-10-01

    Two hundred and eighty-three (283) male diesel bus garage workers from four garages in two cities were examined to determine if there was excess chronic respiratory morbidity related to diesel exposure. The dependent variables were respiratory symptoms, radiographic interpretation for pneumoconiosis, and pulmonary function (FVC, FEV1, and flow rates). Independent variables included race, age, smoking, drinking, height, and tenure (as surrogate measure of exposure). Exposure-effect relationships within the study population showed no detectable associations of symptoms with tenure. There was an apparent association of pulmonary function and tenure. Seven workers (2.5%) had category 1 pneumoconiosis (three rounded opacities, two irregular opacities, and one with both rounded and irregular). The study population was also compared to a nonexposed blue-collar population. After indirect adjustment for age, race, and smoking, the study population had elevated prevalences of cough, phlegm, and wheezing, but there was no association with tenure. Dyspnea showed a dose-response trend but no apparent increase in prevalence. Mean percent predicted pulmonary function of the study population was greater than 100%, i.e., elevated above the comparison population. These data show there is an apparent effect of diesel exhaust on pulmonary function but not chest radiographs. Respiratory symptoms are high compared to blue-collar workers, but there is no relationship with tenure.

  1. The effect of fumigation of different ethalnol proofs on a turbocharged diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, T.K.; Savage, L.D.; White, R.A.; Sorenson, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    Lower proof ethanol is shown to be a viable alternate fuel for diesel engines. This type of ethanol can be manufactured economically in small distillation plants from renewable grain supplies. The effect of fumigation of ethanol proofs with a multipoint injection system on a turbocharged direct injection diesel engine at 2,400 rpm and three loads was studied. The addition of the water in the lower proofs reduced the maximum rate of pressure rise and peak pressure from pure ethanol levels. Both of these values were significantly higher than those for diesel operation. HC and CO emissions increased several times over diesel levels at all loads and also with increased ethanol fumigation. NO emissions were reduced below diesel levels for lower proof ethanol at all loads. The tests at this rpm and load with a a multipoint ethanol injection system indicate that lower (100 or 125) proof provides optimum performance.

  2. Diesel Oxidation Catalyst Combined to Non-Thermal Plasma: Effect on Activation Catalyst Temperature and by-products formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Diesel Oxidation Catalyst Combined to Non-Thermal Plasma: Effect on Activation Catalyst Temperature efficiency together with the catalyst activation temperature when a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) is placed downstream to a multi-plans Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) reactor. In order to simulate Diesel engine

  3. Fact #634: August 2, 2010 Off-highway Transportation-related Fuel Consumption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Environmental Protection Agency's NONROAD2008a model estimates fuel use for off-highway equipment. Construction and mining equipment using diesel fuel account for the majority of this fuel use....

  4. Fact #634: August 2, 2010 Off-highway Transportation-related...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NONROAD2008a model estimates fuel use for off-highway equipment. Construction and mining equipment using diesel fuel account for the majority of this fuel use. Nearly all of...

  5. Diesel Aerosol Sampling in the Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Kittelson; Jason Johnson; Winthrop Watts; Qiang Wei; Marcus Drayton; Dwane Paulsen; Nicolas Bukowiecki

    2000-06-19

    The University of Minnesota Center for Diesel Research along with a research team including Caterpillar, Cummins, Carnegie Mellon University, West Virginia University (WVU), Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland, and Tampere University in Finland have performed measurements of Diesel exhaust particle size distributions under real-world dilution conditions. A mobile aerosol emission laboratory (MEL) equipped to measure particle size distributions, number concentrations, surface area concentrations, particle bound PAHs, as well as CO 2 and NO x concentrations in real time was built and will be described. The MEL was used to follow two different Cummins powered tractors, one with an older engine (L10) and one with a state-of-the-art engine (ISM), on rural highways and measure particles in their exhaust plumes. This paper will describe the goals and objectives of the study and will describe representative particle size distributions observed in roadway experiments with the truck powered by the ISM engine.

  6. Checklist for transition to new highway fuel(s).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Risch, C.; Santini, D.J.

    2011-12-15

    Transportation is vital to the U.S. economy and society. As such, U.S. Presidents have repeatedly stated that the nation needs to reduce dependence on petroleum, especially for the highway transportation sector. Throughout history, highway transportation fuel transitions have been completed successfully both in United States and abroad. Other attempts have failed, as described in Appendix A: Historical Highway Fuel Transitions. Planning for a transition is critical because the changes can affect our nation's ability to compete in the world market. A transition will take many years to complete. While it is tempting to make quick decisions about the new fuel(s) of choice, it is preferable and necessary to analyze all the pertinent criteria to ensure that correct decisions are made. Doing so will reduce the number of changes in highway fuel(s). Obviously, changes may become necessary because of occurrences such as significant technology breakthroughs or major world events. With any and all of the possible transitions to new fuel(s), the total replacement of gasoline and diesel fuels is not expected. These conventional fuels are envisioned to coexist with the new fuel(s) for decades, while the revised fuel and vehicle infrastructures are implemented. The transition process must analyze the needs of the primary 'players,' which consist of the customers, the government, the fuel industry, and the automotive industry. To maximize the probability of future successes, the prime considerations of these groups must be addressed. Section 2 presents a succinct outline of the Checklist. Section 3 provides a brief discussion about the groupings on the Checklist.

  7. Novel Application of Metering Pump on Diesel Aftertreatment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation from the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  8. On-Board Ammonia Generation Using Delphi Diesel Fuel Reformer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  9. Impact of Lube-oil Phosphorus on Diesel Oxidation Catalysts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  10. On-Board Engine Exhaust Particulate Matter Sensor for HCCI and Conventional Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Matt; Matthews, Ron

    2011-09-30

    The goal of the research was to refine and complete development of an on-board particulate matter (PM) sensor for diesel, DISI, and HCCI engines, bringing it to a point where it could be commercialized and marketed.

  11. On-Site Diesel Generation- How You Can Reduce Your Energy Costs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles, D.

    1996-01-01

    Interruptible power rates, Utility special rate negotiations, and the emergence of a spot electrical power market all can lead to lower industrial energy costs. The installation of low cost on-site diesel powered generation, or the proposed...

  12. Operating temperature effects on nozzle coking in a cottonseed oil fueled diesel engine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yarbrough, Charles Michael

    1984-01-01

    OPERATING TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON NOZZLE COKING IN A COTTONSEED OIL FUELED DIESEL ENGINE A Thesis CHARLES MICHAEL YARBROUGH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree cf... MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1984 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering OPERATING TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON NOZZLE CORING IN A COTTONSEED OIL FUELED DIESEL ENGINE A Thesis by CHARLES MICHAEL YARBROUGH Approved as to style and content by: ayne A. Le...

  13. THE DIESEL ENGINE'S CHALLENGE IN THE NEW MILLENIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairbanks, John W.

    2000-08-20

    Diesel engines are the dominant propulsion engine of choice for most of the commercial surface transportation applications in the world. Consider agricultural uses: Diesel engine power is used to prepare the soil, transport the bulk seed or seedlings, pump irrigation water, and spray fertilizers, mechanically harvest some crops and distribute the produce to market. Diesel engines power virtually all of the off-highway construction equipment. Deep water commercial freighters or containerships are almost all diesel engine powered. The passenger ships are primarily either diesel or a combination of diesel and gas turbine, referred to as CODAG or CODOG.

  14. Measurements of Diesel Truck Traffic Associated with Goods Movement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Douglas; Krudysz, Margaret; Winer, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    Concentrations of PM2.5 and Diesel Exhaust Particles onPatterns of Measured Port Diesel Traffic. (a) Intersectionof particulate emissions from diesel engines: a review’, J.

  15. Effects of an Accelerated Diesel Engine Replacement/Retrofit Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millstein, Dev E.; Harley, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    and Cackette, T. A. , (2001). Diesel engines: environmentalfrom On-Road Gasoline and Diesel Vehicles. Atmos. Environ.emissions from gasoline- and diesel-powered motor vehicles.

  16. An Improvement of Diesel PM and NOx Reduction System | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Development on simultaneous reduction system of NOx and PM from a diesel engine An Improvement of Diesel PM and NOx Reduction System New Diesel Emissions...

  17. An Improvement of Diesel PM and NOx Reduction System | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Diesel PM and NOx Reduction System Development on simultaneous reduction system of NOx and PM from a diesel engine Simplification of Diesel Emission Control System Packaging...

  18. Diesel prices increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDieselDieselDieselDieselDiesel

  19. Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, Scott; Hanson, Reed M; Wagner, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    Reactivity controlled compression ignition is a low-temperature combustion technique that has been shown, both in computational fluid dynamics modeling and single-cylinder experiments, to obtain diesel-like efficiency or better with ultra-low nitrogen oxide and soot emissions, while operating primarily on gasoline-like fuels. This paper investigates reactivity controlled compression ignition operation on a four-cylinder light-duty diesel engine with production-viable hardware using conventional gasoline and diesel fuel. Experimental results are presented over a wide speed and load range using a systematic approach for achieving successful steady-state reactivity controlled compression ignition combustion. The results demonstrated diesel-like efficiency or better over the operating range explored with low engine-out nitrogen oxide and soot emissions. A peak brake thermal efficiency of 39.0% was demonstrated for 2600 r/min and 6.9 bar brake mean effective pressure with nitrogen oxide emissions reduced by an order of magnitude compared to conventional diesel combustion operation. Reactivity controlled compression ignition emissions and efficiency results are compared to conventional diesel combustion operation on the same engine.

  20. On the concept of separate aftercooling for locomotive diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uzkan, T.; Lenz, M.A.

    1999-04-01

    This paper describes a patented cooling system concept for a turbocharged diesel engine. In particular, it defines a cooling system having the capability of transferring some of the cooling capacity of transferring some of the cooling capacity of engine jacket and engine oil cooling to cool the cylinder inlet air when more than the cooling capacity built into the system through the size of the radiators and fans is needed. This increased aftercooling will improve the engine performance and reduce emission levels. The cooling capacity of a locomotive is essentially determined by the radiator and fan size, among other factors, and is designed to cool the engine within acceptable metal temperatures at a specified maximum ambient temperature and at the maximum engine power. On the other hand, at lower ambient temperatures or engine power levels, the cooling needs of the engine will be less than this maximum cooling capacity of the cooling system. There remains some excess capacity. This paper describes the concept called the ``Separate Aftercooling System`` that uses some of this excess cooling capacity to cool the engine inlet air at the aftercoolers. It shows the feasibility of such a system, describes the order of magnitude of benefits that can be expected from such a system, and outlines the implementation of this concept to EMD built locomotives.

  1. Firm racial segregation and affirmative action in the highway construction industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marion, Justin

    2009-01-01

    on self- employment in the construction industry. Nationalaction in the highway construction industry Justin MarionI document that highway construction ?rms in California,

  2. Impact of Fuel Metal Impurities on the Durability of a Light-Duty Diesel Aftertreatment System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, A.; Burton, J.; McCormick, R. L.; Toops, T.; Wereszczak, A. A.; Fox, E. E.; Lance, M. J.; Cavataio, G.; Dobson, D.; Warner, J.; Brezny, R.; Nguyen, K.; Brookshear, D. W.

    2013-04-01

    Alkali and alkaline earth metal impurities found in diesel fuels are potential poisons for diesel exhaust catalysts. A set of diesel engine production exhaust systems was aged to 150,000 miles. These exhaust systems included a diesel oxidation catalyst, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst, and diesel particulate filter (DPF). Four separate exhaust systems were aged, each with a different fuel: ultralow sulfur diesel containing no measureable metals, B20 (a common biodiesel blend) containing sodium, B20 containing potassium, and B20 containing calcium, which were selected to simulate the maximum allowable levels in B100 according to ASTM D6751. Analysis included Federal Test Procedure emissions testing, bench-flow reactor testing of catalyst cores, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and measurement of thermo-mechanical properties of the DPFs. EPMA imaging found that the sodium and potassium penetrated into the washcoat, while calcium remained on the surface. Bench-flow reactor experiments were used to measure the standard nitrogen oxide (NOx) conversion, ammonia storage, and ammonia oxidation for each of the aged SCR catalysts. Vehicle emissions tests were conducted with each of the aged catalyst systems using a chassis dynamometer. The vehicle successfully passed the 0.2 gram/mile NOx emission standard with each of the four aged exhaust systems.

  3. Effects of diesel fuel combustion-modifier additives on In-cylinder soot formation in a heavy-duty Dl diesel engine.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musculus, Mark P. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Dietz, Jeff (The Lubrizol Corp.)

    2005-07-01

    Based on a phenomenological model of diesel combustion and pollutant-formation processes, a number of fuel additives that could potentially reduce in-cylinder soot formation by altering combustion chemistry have been identified. These fuel additives, or ''combustion modifiers'', included ethanol and ethylene glycol dimethyl ether, polyethylene glycol dinitrate (a cetane improver), succinimide (a dispersant), as well as nitromethane and another nitro-compound mixture. To better understand the chemical and physical mechanisms by which these combustion modifiers may affect soot formation in diesel engines, in-cylinder soot and diffusion flame lift-off were measured, using an optically-accessible, heavy-duty, direct-injection diesel engine. A line-of-sight laser extinction diagnostic was employed to measure the relative soot concentration within the diesel jets (''jetsoot'') as well as the rates of deposition of soot on the piston bowl-rim (''wall-soot''). An OH chemiluminescence imaging technique was utilized to measure the lift-off lengths of the diesel diffusion flames so that fresh oxygen entrainment rates could be compared among the fuels. Measurements were obtained at two operating conditions, using blends of a base commercial diesel fuel with various combinations of the fuel additives. The ethanol additive, at 10% by mass, reduced jet-soot by up to 15%, and reduced wall-soot by 30-40%. The other fuel additives also affected in-cylinder soot, but unlike the ethanol blends, changes in in-cylinder soot could be attributed solely to differences in the ignition delay. No statistically-significant differences in the diesel flame lift-off lengths were observed among any of the fuel additive formulations at the operating conditions examined in this study. Accordingly, the observed differences in in-cylinder soot among the fuel formulations cannot be attributed to differences in fresh oxygen entrainment upstream of the soot-formation zones after ignition.

  4. Beyond Diesel - Renewable Diesel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-07-01

    CTTS fact sheet describing NREL's new Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Research Laboratory, which will be used to facilitate increased renewable diesel use in heavy-duty vehicles.

  5. Center for Diesel Research Potential Efficiency Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Center for Diesel Research Potential Efficiency Improvement by Accessory Load Reduction on Hybrid University of Minnesota Center for Diesel Research #12;Center for Diesel Research Acknowledgements · Jeff;Center for Diesel Research Transit Energy Use and Cost · 633 M gallons diesel used for US transit in 2010

  6. Effect of EGR contamination of diesel engine oil on wear.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajayi, O. O.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.; Aldajah, S.; Goldblatt, I. L.; Energy Systems; United Arab Emirates Univ.; BP-Global Lubricants Technology

    2007-09-01

    Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is one of the effective means to reduce the NO{sub X} emission from diesel engines. Returning exhaust product to the diesel engine combustion chamber accelerated the degradation of the lubricant engine oil, primarily by increasing the total acid number (TAN) as well as the soot content and, consequently, the viscosity. These oil degradation mechanisms were observed in engine oil exposed to EGR during a standard Cummins M-l 1 diesel engine test. Four-ball wear tests with M-50 balls showed that, although the used oils slightly decrease the friction coefficients, they increased the ball wear by two orders of magnitude when compared to tests with clean oil. Wear occurred primarily by an abrasive mechanism, but in oil with the highest soot loading of 12%, scuffing and soot particle embedment were also observed. Laboratory wear tests showed a linear correlation with the TAN, while the crosshead wear during the engine test was proportional to the soot content.

  7. Investigation on Nitric Oxide and Soot of Biodiesel and Conventional Diesel using a Medium Duty Diesel Engine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Hoseok

    2012-07-16

    Biodiesel has been suggested as an alternative fuel to the petroleum diesel fuel. It beneficially reduces regulated emission gases, but increases NOx (nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide) Thus, the increase in NOx is the ...

  8. Optimizing Low Temperature Diesel Combustion | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Optimizing Low Temperature Diesel Combustion Optimizing Low Temperature Diesel Combustion Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on...

  9. Progress report Idaho on-road test with vegetable oil as a diesel fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reece, D.; Peterson, C.L.

    1993-12-31

    Biodiesel is among many biofuels being considered in the US for alternative fueled vehicles. The use of this fuel can reduce US dependence on imported oil and help improve air quality by reducing gaseous and particulate emissions. Researchers at the Department of Agricultural Engineering at the University of Idaho have pioneered rapeseed oil as a diesel fuel substitute. Although UI has conducted many laboratory and tractor tests using raw rapeseed oil and rape methyl ester (RME), these fuels have not been proven viable for on-road applications. A biodiesel demonstration project has been launched to show the use of biodiesel in on-road vehicles. Two diesel powered pickups are being tested on 20 percent biodiesel and 80 percent diesel. One is a Dodge 3/4-ton pickup powered by a Cummins 5.9 liter turbocharged and intercooled engine. This engine is direct injected and is being run on 20 percent RME and 80 percent diesel. The other pickup is a Ford, powered by a Navistar 7.3 liter, naturally aspirated engine. This engine has a precombustion chamber and is being operated on 20 percent raw rapeseed oil and 80 percent diesel. The engines themselves are unmodified, but modifications have been made to the vehicles for the convenience of the test. In order to give maximum vehicle range, fuel mixing is done on-board. Two tanks are provided, one for the diesel and one for the biodiesel. Electric fuel pumps supply fuel to a combining chamber for correct proportioning. The biodiesel fuel tanks are heated with a heat exchanger which utilizes engine coolant circulation.

  10. Diesel prices decrease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDiesel pricesDieselDieselDiesel

  11. Diesel prices flat nationally

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDieselDieselDieselDiesel prices

  12. Diesel prices increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDieselDieselDieselDiesel

  13. Diesel prices slightly increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas UsageDiesel prices increaseDieselDieselDiesel

  14. Evaluating the Interstate Highway Transportation System in West Africa: Recommendations for an Integrated Highway Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyang, Lamin Bumi

    2010-12-17

    of travel along West African highways. Research indicates that traveling on West Africa’s highways can be onerous. In 2003, the African Development Bank admitted that what should be a 3-day trip from Bangua, Central African Republic, to Douala, Cameroon...

  15. Vegetable oils as an on the farm diesel fuel substitute: the North Carolina situation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harwood, H.J.

    1981-06-01

    The state-of-the-art of using vegetable oil as a diesel fuel alternative is reviewed. Particular emphasis has been placed on using vegetable oil in farm vehicles as an emergency fuel which may be produced on-farm. The following are reviewed: the mechanical feasibility, on-farm fuel production, and economic analysis.

  16. Assessing effects of highway bridge deck runoff on near-by recieving waters in coastal margins using remote monitoring techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nwaneshiudu, Oke

    2005-02-17

    be found in transportaion infrastructure and are used as means of treating highway runoff. The Urban Polution research center at Middlesex University in London, UK recently concluded a study which investigated the environmental sensitivity analysis...

  17. Fuel Sulfur Effects on a Medium-Duty Diesel Pick-Up with a NOx Adsorber, Diesel Particle Filter Emissions Control System: 2000-Hour Aging Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, M.; Webb, C. C.; Weber, P. A.; Orban, J.; Slone, E.

    2006-05-01

    Discusses the emission results of a nitrogen oxide adsorber catalyst and a diesel particle filter in a medium-duty, diesel pick-up truck.

  18. IMPACT OF DME-DIESEL FUEL BLEND PROPERTIES ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street LightingFrom theHighI _ _ ORNL-6161Annual

  19. On-Road Remote Sensing of Heavy-duty Diesel Truck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    measure the concentrations of CO, HC, NO, and CO2 in automobile and truck emissions while in route, HC, and NO to CO2 and to get percent opacity readings for heavy-duty diesel trucks with elevated the source. The data show, on average, a correlation between high CO emissions and reported opacity

  20. Dynamic Positioning System as Dynamic Energy Storage on Diesel-Electric Ships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    1 Dynamic Positioning System as Dynamic Energy Storage on Diesel-Electric Ships Tor A. Johansen in order to implement energy storage in the kinetic and potential energy of the ship motion using the DP in order to relate the dynamic energy storage capacity to the maximum allowed ship position deviation

  1. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON EXHAUST EMISSIONS FROM DIESEL- AND CNG-POWERED URBAN BUSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    COROLLER, P; PLASSAT, G

    2003-08-24

    Couple years ago, ADEME engaged programs dedicated to the urban buses exhaust emissions studies. The measures associated with the reduction of atmospheric and noise pollution has particular importance in the sector of urban buses. In many cases, they illustrate the city's environmental image and contribute to reinforcing the attractiveness of public transport. France's fleet in service, presently put at about 14,000 units, consumes about 2 per cent of the total energy of city transport. It causes about 2 per cent of the HC emissions and from 4 to 6 per cent of the NOx emissions and particles. These vehicles typically have a long life span (about 15 years) and are relatively expensive to buy, about 150.000 euros per unit. Several technical solutions were evaluated to quantify, on a real condition cycle for buses, on one hand pollutants emissions, fuel consumption and on the other hand reliability, cost in real existing fleet. This paper presents main preliminary results on urban buses exhaust emission on two different cases: - existing Diesel buses, with fuel modifications (Diesel with low sulphur content), Diesel with water emulsion and bio-Diesel (30% oil ester in standard Diesel fuel); renovating CNG powered Euro II buses fleet, over representative driving cycles, set up by ADEME and partners. On these cycles, pollutants (regulated and unregulated) were measured as well as fuel consumption, at the beginning of a program and one year after to quantify reliability and increase/decrease of pollutants emissions. At the same time, some after-treatment technologies were tested under real conditions and several vehicles. Information such as fuel consumption, lubricant analysis, problem on the technology were following during a one year program. On the overall level, it is the combination of various action, pollution-reduction and renewal that will make it possible to meet the technological challenge of reducing emissions and fuel consumption by urban bus networks.

  2. Studies on catalytic and structural properties of BaRuO3 type perovskite1 material for diesel soot oxidation2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Studies on catalytic and structural properties of BaRuO3 type perovskite1 material for diesel by co-precipitation24 method and its catalytic activity has been tested for diesel soot oxidation processes and vehicle exhaust.33 Key words: BaRuO3, perovskite, diesel soot oxidation, vehicular exhaust

  3. Heavy Truck Clean Diesel Cooperative Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milam, David

    2006-12-31

    This report is the final report for the Department of Energy on the Heavy Truck Engine Program (Contract No. DE-FC05-00OR22806) also known as Heavy Truck Clean Diesel (HTCD) Program. Originally, this was scoped to be a $38M project over 5 years, to be 50/50 co-funded by DOE and Caterpillar. The program started in June 2000. During the program the timeline was extended to a sixth year. The program completed in December 2006. The program goal was to develop and demonstrate the technologies required to enable compliance with the 2007 and 2010 (0.2g/bhph NOx, 0.01g/bhph PM) on-highway emission standards for Heavy Duty Trucks in the US with improvements in fuel efficiency compared to today's engines. Thermal efficiency improvement from a baseline of 43% to 50% was targeted.

  4. Mount Everest Highway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2007-08-08

    Broadcast Transcript: If China has a national sport, well, it's got to be Extreme Engineering. The Great Wall. The Grand Canal. The Three Gorges Dam. The railroad at the top of the world. And now the Mt. Everest Highway, a 3.2 mile paved road...

  5. In-Cylinder Fuel Blending of Gasoline/Diesel for Improved Efficiency and Lowest Possible Emissions on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, Scott; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Wagner, Robert M; Parks, II, James E; Cho, Kukwon; Sluder, Scott; Kokjohn, Sage; Reitz, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    In-cylinder fuel blending of gasoline/diesel fuel is investigated on a multi-cylinder light-duty diesel engine as a potential strategy to control in-cylinder fuel reactivity for improved efficiency and lowest possible emissions. This approach was developed and demonstrated at the University of Wisconsin through modeling and single-cylinder engine experiments. The objective of this study is to better understand the potential and challenges of this method on a multi-cylinder engine. More specifically, the effect of cylinder-to-cylinder imbalances, heat rejection, and in-cylinder charge motion as well as the potential limitations imposed by real-world turbo-machinery were investigated on a 1.9-liter four-cylinder engine. This investigation focused on one engine condition, 2300 rpm, 4.2 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). Gasoline was introduced with a port-fuel-injection system. Parameter sweeps included gasoline-to-diesel fuel ratio, intake air mixture temperature, in-cylinder swirl number, and diesel start-of-injection phasing. In addition, engine parameters were trimmed for each cylinder to balance the combustion process for maximum efficiency and lowest emissions. An important observation was the strong influence of intake charge temperature on cylinder pressure rise rate. Experiments were able to show increased thermal efficiency along with dramatic decreases in oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and particulate matter (PM). However, indicated thermal efficiency for the multi-cylinder experiments were less than expected based on modeling and single-cylinder results. The lower indicated thermal efficiency is believed to be due increased heat transfer as compared to the model predictions and suggest a need for improved cylinder-to-cylinder control and increased heat transfer control.

  6. Fact #645: October 18, 2010 Price of Diesel Fuel versus Gasoline in Europe

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A comparison between the average annual price of a gallon of gasoline and a gallon of highway diesel fuel in several European countries shows that a large change took place in 2008. In most of the...

  7. Synergistic effects of lubricant additive chemistry on ash properties impacting diesel particulate filter flow resistance and catalyst performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munnis, Sean (Sean Andrew)

    2011-01-01

    Diesel particulate filters (DPF) have seen widespread use in recent years in both on- and offroad applications as an effective means for meeting the increasingly stringent particulate emission regulations. Overtime, ...

  8. The nature of lubricant-derived ash-related emissions and their impact on diesel aftertreatment system performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sappok, Alexander G. (Alexander Georg)

    2009-01-01

    Diesel particulate filters (DPF) have seen widespread use in on- and off-road applications as an effective means for meeting increasingly stringent particle emissions regulations. Over time, incombustible material or ash, ...

  9. On-Road Particle Matter Emissions from a MY 2010 Compliant HD Diesel Vehicle Driving Across the U.S.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Measuring particle emissions from a 2010 compliant HD Diesel tractor while traveling on-road for 2300 miles found average gravimetric TPM over the entire route to be well below EPA's 2010 PM standard.

  10. Swedish tests on rape-seed oil as an alternative to diesel fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johansson, E.; Nordstroem, O.

    1982-01-01

    The cheapest version of Swedish rape-seed oil was chosen. First the rape-seed oil was mixed in different proportions with regular diesel fuel. A mixture of 1/3 rape-seed oil and 2/3 regular diesel fuel (R 33) was then selected for a long-term test. A Perkins 4.248 diesel engine was used for laboratory tests. Four regular farm tractors, owned and operated by farmers, and two tractors belonging to the Institute have been running on R 33. Each tractor was calibrated on a dynamometer according to Swedish and ISO-standards before they were operated on R 33. Since then the tractors have been regularly recalibrated. The test tractors have been operated on R 33 for more than 3400 h. An additional 1200 h have been covered by the laboratory test engine. None of the test tractors have hitherto required repairs due to the use of R 33, but some fuel filters have been replaced. Some fuel injectors have been cleaned due to deposits on the nozzles. 4 figures, 1 table.

  11. ULEV potential of a DI/TCI diesel passenger car engine operated on dimethyl ether

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kapus, P.E.; Cartellieri, W.P.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a feasibility test program on a 2 liter, 4 cylinder DI/TCI passenger car engine operated on the new alternative fuel Dimethyl Ether (DME) with the aim of demonstrating its potential of meeting ULEV (ultra low emission vehicle) emissions (0.2 g/mi NOx in the FTP 75 test cycle) when installed in a full size passenger car. Special attention is drawn to the fuel injection equipment (FIE) as well as combustion system requirements towards the reduction of NOx and combustion noise while keeping energetic fuel consumption at the level of he baseline DI/TCI diesel engine. FIE and combustion system parameters were optimized on the steady state dynamometer by variation of a number of parameters, such as rate of injection, number of nozzle holes, compression ratio, piston bowl shape and exhaust gas recirculation. The paper presents engine test results achieved with DME under various operating conditions and compares these results to those achieved with the diesel version of the same engine.The FTP 75 cycle results were projected from steady state engine maps using a vehicle simulation program taking into account vehicle data and road resistance data of a given vehicle.The cycle results are also compared to actual chassis dynamometer results achieved with the diesel version of the same engine installed in the same vehicle.the passenger car DI/TCI engine adapted for and operated on DME shows very promising results with respect to meeting ULEV NOx emissions without any soot emissions and without the need for a DENOX catalyst. DME fuel consumption on energy basis can be kept very close to the DI diesel value. An oxidation catalyst will be necessary to meet the stringent CO and HC ULEV emission limits.

  12. Diesel prices decrease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDiesel pricesDiesel pricesDiesel

  13. Diesel prices decrease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDiesel pricesDieselDiesel prices

  14. Diesel prices decrease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDiesel pricesDieselDiesel

  15. Diesel prices decrease slightly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDieselDieselDiesel prices

  16. Diesel prices flat

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDieselDieselDiesel

  17. Impact of Biodiesel on the Oxidation Kinetics and Morphology of Diesel Particulate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL] [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    We compare the oxidation characteristics of four different diesel particulates generated with a modern light-duty engine. The four particulates represent engine fueling with conventional ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD), biodiesel, and two intermediate blends of these fuels. The comparisons discussed here are based on complementary measurements implemented in a laboratory micro-reactor, including temperature programmed desorption and oxidation, pulsed isothermal oxidation, and BET surface area. From these measurements we have derived models that are consistent with the observed oxidation reactivity differences. When accessible surface area effects are properly accounted for, the oxidation kinetics of the fixed carbon components were found to consistently exhibit an Arrhenius activation energy of 113 6 kJ/mol. Release of volatile carbon from the as-collected particulate appears to follow a temperaturedependent rate law.

  18. Intercooling effects of methanol on turbocharged diesel engine performance and exhaust emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, T.; Daisho, Y.; Aoki, Y.; Kawase, N.

    1984-01-01

    From the viewpoint of utilizing methanol fuel in an automotive turbocharged direct-injection diesel engine, an intercooling system supplying liquid methanol has been devised and its effects on engine performance and exhaust gas emissions have been investigated. With an electronically controlled injector in this system, methanol as a supplementary fuel to diesel fuel can be injected into the intake pipe in order to intercool a hot air charge compressed by the turbocharger. It has been confirmed that especially at heavy load conditions, methanol-intercooling can yield a higher thermal efficiency, and lower nox and smoke emissions simultaneously, compared with three other cases without using methanol: natural aspiration and the cases with and without an ordinary intercooler. However, methanol fueling must be avoided at lower loads since sacrifices in efficiency and hydrocarbon emissions are involved.

  19. Idaho - IDAPA 39.03.42 - Encroachment on State Highway Rights-of-Way | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas:HydrothermallyIFB Agro| Open Energy

  20. 23 V.S.A. Section 1392 Gross Weight Limits on Highways | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton Jump to:Wylie,Information Skord, Et Al.,2050

  1. ADOT Policy for Accommodating Utilities on Highway Rights-Of-Way | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram |RecentSulfonate as401 WaterADNR Water FormsEnergy

  2. FUEL FORMULATION EFFECTS ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION, COMBUSTION, EMISSIONS AND EMISSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehman, A; Alam, M; Song, J; Acharya, R; Szybist, J; Zello, V; Miller, K

    2003-08-24

    This paper describes work under a U.S. DOE sponsored Ultra Clean Fuels project entitled ''Ultra Clean Fuels from Natural Gas,'' Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41098. In this study we have examined the incremental benefits of moving from low sulfur diesel fuel and ultra low sulfur diesel fuel to an ultra clean fuel, Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel produced from natural gas. Blending with biodiesel, B100, was also considered. The impact of fuel formulation on fuel injection timing, bulk modulus of compressibility, in-cylinder combustion processes, gaseous and particulate emissions, DPF regeneration temperature and urea-SCR NOx control has been examined. The primary test engine is a 5.9L Cummins ISB, which has been instrumented for in-cylinder combustion analysis and in-cylinder visualization with an engine videoscope. A single-cylinder engine has also been used to examine in detail the impacts of fuel formulation on injection timing in a pump-line-nozzle fueling system, to assist in the interpretation of results from the ISB engine.

  3. Emergency response to a highway accident in Springfield, Massachusetts, on December 16, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    On December 16, 1991, a truck carrying unirradiated (fresh) nuclear fuel was involved in an accident on US Interstate 91, in Springfield, Massachusetts. This report describes the emergency response measures undertaken by local, State, Federal, and private parties. The report also discusses ``lessons learned`` from the response to the accident and suggests areas where improvements might be made.

  4. Emergency response to a highway accident in Springfield, Massachusetts, on December 16, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    On December 16, 1991, a truck carrying unirradiated (fresh) nuclear fuel was involved in an accident on US Interstate 91, in Springfield, Massachusetts. This report describes the emergency response measures undertaken by local, State, Federal, and private parties. The report also discusses lessons learned'' from the response to the accident and suggests areas where improvements might be made.

  5. Soybean and Coconut Biodiesel Fuel Effects on Combustion Characteristics in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Manbae [ORNL; Cho, Kukwon [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of soybean- and coconut-derived biodiesel fuels on combustion characteristics in a 1.7-liter direct injection, common rail diesel engine. Five sets of fuels were studied: 2007 ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD), 5% and 20% volumetric blends of soybean biodiesel with ULSD (soybean B5 and B20), and 5% and 20% volumetric blends of coconut biodiesel with ULSD (coconut B5 and B20). In conventional diesel combustion mode, particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NO/dx) emissions were similar for all fuels studied except soybean B20. Soybean B20 produced the lowest PM but the highest NO/dx emissions. Compared with conventional diesel combustion mode, high efficiency clean combustion (HECC) mode, achieved by increased EGR and combustion phasing, significantly reduced both PM and NO/dx emissions for all fuels studied at the expense of higher hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions and an increase in fuel consumption (less than 4%). ULSD, soybean B5, and coconut B5 showed no difference in exhaust emissions. However, PM emissions increased slightly for soybean B20 and coconut B20. NO/dx emissions increased significantly for soybean B20, while those for coconut B20 were comparable to ULSD. Differences in the chemical and physical properties of soybean and coconut biodiesel fuels compared with ULSD, such as higher fuel-borne oxygen, greater viscosity, and higher boiling temperatures, play a key role in combustion processes and, therefore, exhaust emissions. Furthermore, the highly unsaturated ester composition in soybean biodiesel can be another factor in the increase of NO/dx emissions.

  6. Transportation impacts on the Tennessee highway system proposed monitored retrievable storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobble, C.

    1985-12-12

    The issue of the transport of spent fuels to the proposed monitored retrievable storage facility in Tennessee is discussed. Relevant issues include the ability of the roads and bridges on the transport routes to handle the weight of the trucks. (CBS)

  7. Transportation impacts on the Tennessee highway system proposed monitored retrievable storage. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobble, C.

    1985-12-12

    The issue of the transport of spent fuels to the proposed monitored retrievable storage facility in Tennessee is discussed. Relevant issues include the ability of the roads and bridges on the transport routes to handle the weight of the trucks. (CBS)

  8. ANTICIPATING INJURY & DEATH: CONTROLLING FOR NEW VARIABLES ON SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA HIGHWAYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    to non-recurring events, such as crashes, costing on the order of $1000 per capita per year, particularly more critical in many ways, particularly in societies that continue to motorize. The present cost of U.S. crashes per year is estimated to be $230.6 billion; per capita this figure is $820 in 2000 (2

  9. Effects of Vehicle-vehicle/ roadside-vehicle Communication on Adaptive Cruise Controlled Highway Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengupta, Raja

    /vehicle-roadside communication on the performance of adaptive cruise control (ACC) systems. Two simulation works are presented benefits such communication system could bring, FCC proposed the allocation of 5.9GHz band spectrum millimeter wave radar or infrared laser). When V-V/R-V communication is conjoined with ACC, the system

  10. Relating geometric design consistency and accident experience on two-lane rural highways 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glascock, Stephen Wade

    1991-01-01

    to provide more efficient transportation on the one hand, and this same compulsion pushes man to work and devise methods of reducing the probability and severity of accidents. For so long as we have humans at the control of the transport vehicle..., the driver, and the vehicle contribute to the occurrence and severity of accidents. Seldom is information included in accident analyses that addresses all of these factors. Even with more complete accident data bases, however, researchers often are unable...

  11. DIESEL/HEAVY The diesel/heavy equipment certificate offers training in maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    DIESEL/HEAVY EQUIPMENT The diesel/heavy equipment certificate offers training in maintenance and repair of heavy equipment and trucks. Students will learn to work on electrical and air systems, diesel · Small Engines · Automotive Maintenance · Welding · Training for entry level heavy diesel equipment

  12. Measurement of earth pressures on concrete box culverts under highway embankments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, M.Z.; Drumm, E.C.; Bennett, R.M.; Mauldon, M.

    1999-07-01

    To obtain a better understanding of the stresses acting on cast-in-place concrete box culverts, and to investigate the conditions which resulted in a culvert failure under about 12 meters of backfill, two sections of a new culvert were instrumented. The measured earth pressure distribution was found to depend upon the height of the embankment over the culvert. For low embankment heights (less than one-half the culvert width), the average measured vertical earth pressures, weighted by tributary length, were about 30% greater than the recommended AASHTO pressures. The measured lateral pressures were slightly greater than the AASHTO pressures. As the embankment height increased, the measured weighted average vertical stress exceeded the AASHTO pressures by about 20%. Lateral pressures which exceeded the vertical pressures were recorded at the bottom of the culvert walls, and small lateral pressures were recorded on the upper locations of the wall. The high lateral pressures at the base of the wall are consistent with the results from finite element analyses with high density (modulus) backfill material placed around the culvert.

  13. Simulating Study of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition on Light-Duty Diesel Fuel Economy and Emissions Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    We utilize the Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) combined with transient engine and aftertreatment component models to simulate the impact of premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) on the fuel economy and emissions of light-duty (LD) diesel-powered conventional and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Our simulated aftertreatment train consists of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), lean NOx trap (LNT), and catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). The results indicate that utilizing PCCI combustion significantly reduces fuel consumption and tailpipe emissions for the conventional diesel-powered vehicle with NOx and particulate emissions controls. These benefits result from a favorable engine speed-load distribution over the cycle combined with a corresponding reduction in the need to regenerate the LNT and DPF. However, the current PCCI technology appears to offer less potential benefit for diesel HEVs equipped with similar emissions controls. This is because PCCI can only be activated over a relatively small part of the drive cycle. Thus we conclude that future utilization of PCCI in diesel HEVs will require significant extension of the available speed-load range for PCCI and revision of current HEV engine management strategies before significant benefits can be realized.

  14. The effect of lubricant derived ash on the catalytic activity of diesel particulate filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Timothy Quinn

    2014-01-01

    A diesel particulate filter (DPF) is an aftertreatment device used to remove hazardous particulate matter (PM) from diesel engine exhaust. Modem emission restrictions have limited the acceptable amount of PM output by ...

  15. Fact #555: January 26, 2009 Transit Buses are Relying Less on Diesel Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 1995, over 95% of the fuel used in transit buses was diesel. In 2006, diesel fuel constituted just under 75% of the fuel used by transit buses while other fuel types such as compressed natural...

  16. Simplification of Diesel Emission Control System Packaging Using...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Simplification of Diesel Emission Control System Packaging Using SCR Coated on DPF Simplification of Diesel Emission Control System Packaging Using SCR Coated on DPF Study...

  17. American Road: Clean Diesels for the Real World | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    American Road: Clean Diesels for the Real World American Road: Clean Diesels for the Real World Perspectives on clean diesels and public policy as it is developing in the US, as...

  18. A Conceptual Model for Partially PremixedLow-Temperature Diesel Combustion Based onIn-Cylinder Laser Diagnostics and Chemical Kinetics Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Conceptual models for low temperature combustion diesel engines are offered based on recent research within optically accessible engines and combustion chambers.

  19. Off-Highway Transportation-Related Fuel Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.

    2004-05-08

    The transportation sector includes many subcategories--for example, on-highway, off-highway, and non-highway. Use of fuel for off-highway purposes is not well documented, nor is the number of off-highway vehicles. The number of and fuel usage for on-highway and aviation, marine, and rail categories are much better documented than for off-highway land-based use. Several sources document off-highway fuel use under specific conditions--such as use by application (e.g., recreation) or by fuel type (e.g., gasoline). There is, however, no single source that documents the total fuel used off-highway and the number of vehicles that use the fuel. This report estimates the fuel usage and number of vehicles/equipment for the off-highway category. No new data have been collected nor new models developed to estimate the off-highway data--this study is limited in scope to using data that already exist. In this report, unless they are being quoted from a source that uses different terminology, the terms are used as listed below. (1) ''On-highway/on-road'' includes land-based transport used on the highway system or other paved roadways. (2) ''Off-highway/off-road'' includes land-based transport not using the highway system or other paved roadways. (3) ''Non-highway/non-road'' includes other modes not traveling on highways such as aviation, marine, and rail. It should be noted that the term ''transportation'' as used in this study is not typical. Generally, ''transportation'' is understood to mean the movement of people or goods from one point to another. Some of the off-highway equipment included in this study doesn't transport either people or goods, but it has utility in movement (e.g., a forklift or a lawn mower). Along these lines, a chain saw also has utility in movement, but it cannot transport itself (i.e., it must be carried) because it does not have wheels. Therefore, to estimate the transportation-related fuel used off-highway, transportation equipment is defined to include all devices that have wheels, can move or be moved from one point to another, and use fuel. An attempt has been made to exclude off-highway engines that do not meet all three of these criteria (e.g., chain saws and generators). The following approach was used to determine the current off-highway fuel use. First, a literature review was conducted to ensure that all sources with appropriate information would be considered. Secondly, the fuel use data available from each source were compiled and compared in so far as possible. Comparable data sets (i.e., same fuel type; same application) were evaluated. Finally, appropriate data sets were combined to provide a final tally.

  20. Fact #698: October 24, 2011 Changes in the Federal Highway Administration Vehicle Travel Data

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the April release of Table VM-1 from Highway Statistics 2009 came several changes to the availability of data on vehicle miles of travel (VMT). From 1966 to 2008, the Federal Highway...

  1. Highway 280 North or South Take the Sand Hill Road exit, head east

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    Highway 280 North or South · Take the Sand Hill Road exit, head east · Turn right on Stock Farm for "all" below From Bayshore US Highway 101 NorthFrom Bayshore US Highway 101 North or South · Take · Turn left on Stock Farm Road LKSC ParkingTurn left on Stock Farm Road · Make the next lefthand turn

  2. Fabrication of Small Diesel Fuel Injector Orifices | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Small Diesel Fuel Injector Orifices Fabrication of Small Diesel Fuel Injector Orifices Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on...

  3. Light Duty Diesels in the United States - Some Perspectives ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emission Control Technology Review Update on Diesel Exhaust Emission Control Technology and Regulations Light Duty Diesels in the United States - Some Perspectives...

  4. Review of Emerging Diesel Emissions and Control | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emerging Diesel Emissions and Control Review of Emerging Diesel Emissions and Control Criteria pollutant regulatory efforts are focused on Euro VI HD PN limits, and California LEV3...

  5. Emissions and Durability of Underground Mining Diesel Particulate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine Engine Ceramic Particulate Filters Development of an Accelerated Ash-Loading Protocol for Diesel Particulate Filters...

  6. Chassis Dynamometer Testing of Parallel and Series Diesel Hybrid Buses

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Emissions and fuel economy data were studied from tests on four diesel and diesel hybrid transit buses using the Houston Metro Bus Cycle.

  7. A Conceptual Model for Partially PremixedLow-Temperature Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PremixedLow-Temperature Diesel Combustion Based onIn-Cylinder Laser Diagnostics and Chemical Kinetics Modeling A Conceptual Model for Partially PremixedLow-Temperature Diesel...

  8. Heavy-duty diesel vehicle Nox? aftertreatment in 2010 : the infrastructure and compliance challenges of urea-SCR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodek, Kristian M

    2008-01-01

    Increasingly stringent heavy-duty vehicle emission regulations are prompting the use of PM and NOx aftertreatment systems in the US, the EU and Japan. In the US, the EPA Highway Diesel Rule, which will be fully implemented ...

  9. NOVEL DATA ANALYSIS TECHNIQUE TO EVALUATE FIELD NOx AND CO2 CONTINUOUS EMISSION DATA, BASED ON THE EVALUATION OF: (1) AN OFF-ROAD DIESEL COMPACTOR RUNNING ON THREE FUEL TYPES AND (2) TWO COMPACTORS RUNNING ON DIESEL FUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerra, Sergio

    2012-12-31

    profiles; (4) evaluate the emission variability between two pieces of equipment of the same model; and (5) develop a standard, systematic analysis for handling large emission data sets. The study is based on the tailpipe emission sampling of a diesel fueled...

  10. Impact of Biodiesel on Modern Diesel Engine Emissions | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingREnergy Tools forEnergyof Energy Metals

  11. Jet-wall interaction effects on diesel combustion and soot formation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickett, Lyle M.; Lopez, J. Javier

    2004-09-01

    The effects of wall interaction on combustion and soot formation processes of a diesel fuel jet were investigated in an optically-accessible constant-volume combustion vessel at experimental conditions typical of a diesel engine. At identical ambient and injector conditions, soot processes were studied in free jets, plane wall jets, and 'confined' wall jets (a box-shaped geometry simulating secondary interaction with adjacent walls and jets in an engine). The investigation showed that soot levels are significantly lower in a plane wall jet compared to a free jet. At some operating conditions, sooting free jets become soot-free as plane wall jets. Possible mechanisms to explain the reduced or delayed soot formation upon wall interaction include an increased fuel-air mixing rate and a wall-jet-cooling effect. However, in a confined-jet configuration, there is an opposite trend in soot formation. Jet confinement causes combustion gases to be redirected towards the incoming jet, causing the lift-off length to shorten and soot to increase. This effect can be avoided by ending fuel injection prior to the time of significant interaction with redirected combustion gases. For a fixed confined-wall geometry, an increase in ambient gas density delays jet interaction, allowing longer injection durations with no increase in soot. Jet interaction with redirected combustion products may also be avoided using reduced ambient oxygen concentration because of an increased ignition delay. Although simplified geometries were employed, the identification of important mechanisms affecting soot formation after the time of wall interaction is expected to be useful for understanding these processes in more complex and realistic diesel engine geometries.

  12. Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCaribElectricSouthApplying caulkChapter 9DesertVersionCPLaboratory

  13. Effect of translucence of engineering ceramics on heat transfer in diesel engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahiduzzaman, S.; Morel, T.

    1992-04-01

    This report describes the experimental portion of a broader study undertaken to assess the effects of translucence of ceramic materials used as thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines. In an earlier analytical work a parametric study was performed, varying several radiative properties over ranges typical of engineering ceramics, thereby identifying the most important radiative properties and their impact on in-cylinder heat transfer. In the current study these properties were experimentally determined for several specific zirconia coatings considered for thermal barrier applications in diesel engines. The methodology of this study involved formulation of a model capable of describing radiative transfer through a semitransparent medium as a function of three independent model parameters, ie, absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and refractive index. For the zirconia-based ceramics investigated in this study, it was concluded that for usual coating thicknesses (1.5--2.5 mm) these ceramics are optically thick and hence, are effective as radiative heat transfer barriers. These ceramics possess high scattering coefficients and low absorption coefficients causing them to be highly reflective (60-80%) in the spectral region where thermal radiation is important. The performance of the investigated ceramics and the mechanism of heat transfer were found to depend on surface condition, specifically on soot deposition. Thus, to insure the optimum thermal barrier operation for either clean or heavily sooted surfaces, a ceramic material with high scattering coefficient provides the best choice.

  14. Effect of translucence of engineering ceramics on heat transfer in diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahiduzzaman, S.; Morel, T. )

    1992-04-01

    This report describes the experimental portion of a broader study undertaken to assess the effects of translucence of ceramic materials used as thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines. In an earlier analytical work a parametric study was performed, varying several radiative properties over ranges typical of engineering ceramics, thereby identifying the most important radiative properties and their impact on in-cylinder heat transfer. In the current study these properties were experimentally determined for several specific zirconia coatings considered for thermal barrier applications in diesel engines. The methodology of this study involved formulation of a model capable of describing radiative transfer through a semitransparent medium as a function of three independent model parameters, ie, absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and refractive index. For the zirconia-based ceramics investigated in this study, it was concluded that for usual coating thicknesses (1.5--2.5 mm) these ceramics are optically thick and hence, are effective as radiative heat transfer barriers. These ceramics possess high scattering coefficients and low absorption coefficients causing them to be highly reflective (60-80%) in the spectral region where thermal radiation is important. The performance of the investigated ceramics and the mechanism of heat transfer were found to depend on surface condition, specifically on soot deposition. Thus, to insure the optimum thermal barrier operation for either clean or heavily sooted surfaces, a ceramic material with high scattering coefficient provides the best choice.

  15. A study of the organic emission from a turbocharged diesel engine running on 12 percent hexyl nitrate dissolved in ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walde, N.; Westerholm, R.; Persson, K.-A.

    1984-01-01

    A highly rated turbocharged diesel engine adapted for an alternative fuel based on ethanol and hexyl nitrate has been investigated with respect to the emission of organic compounds in the exhausts. The adaption involves: ignition nozzles with larger holes, a change of injection timing and more fuel injected per stroke. Emissions were measured at four different driving modes ie, 1, 8, 10 and 12 respectively, in the California Cycle. The exhaust composition are different compared to conventional diesel emissions. The main part of the organic pollutants consists of unburned ethanol and hexyl nitrate, acetaldehyde being the most abundant aldehyde.

  16. Risk Assessment of Diesel-Fired

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mlllet, Dylan B.

    Risk Assessment of Diesel-Fired Back-up Electric Generators Operating in California Prepared of the toxicity of various hazardous air pollutants in diesel emissions. Wayne Miller, the Director discussions on diesel back-up generators and, more broadly, the environmental health impacts of electricity

  17. Cold starting capabilities of petroleum and syntehetic lubricants in heavy-duty diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margeson, M.A.; Belmesch, B.J. )

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the work described in this paper was to compare the cold weather starting ability of diesel engines lubricated with SAE 15W-40 petroleum and SAE 5W-30 synthetic motor oil. Laboratory bench tests were used to compare rhelogical features such as borderline pumping temperature and cold cranking simulator profiles. A cold box provided a well controlled environment in which cranking and starting studies were carried out on the two oils in a turbocharged diesel engine. The SAE 5W-30 synthetic exhibited higher cranking speeds, lower starter amperage draw and immediate oil pressure readings when compared to the SAE l5W-40 petroleum. The SAE 5W-30 synthetic oil was safely started at {minus} l0 {sup 0}F oil temperature without auxiliary heaters. The comparative cylinder turbocharged diesel engines representing conditions commonly found in the commercial and off-highway sectors, These studies indicate that combining high capacity cold cranking amperage batteries, high pressure ether aid injection, and SAE 5W-30 synthetic oil resulted in a system that safely starts diesel engines down to actual oil temperatures of at least {minus} 10 {sup 0}F.

  18. Diesel hybridization and emissions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasquier, M.; Monnet, G.

    2004-04-21

    The CTR Vehicle Systems and Fuels team a diesel hybrid powertrain. The goal of this experiment was to investigate and demonstrate the potential of diesel engines for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) in a fuel economy and emissions. The test set-up consisted of a diesel engine coupled to an electric motor driving a Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT). This hybrid drive is connected to a dynamometer and a DC electrical power source creating a vehicle context by combining advanced computer models and emulation techniques. The experiment focuses on the impact of the hybrid control strategy on fuel economy and emissions-in particular, nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM). The same hardware and test procedure were used throughout the entire experiment to assess the impact of different control approaches.

  19. Diesel prices decrease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDiesel pricesDiesel

  20. Diesel prices rise slightly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas UsageDiesel prices increase nationallyDiesel

  1. Diesel prices slightly decrease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas UsageDiesel prices increaseDiesel prices

  2. Diesel prices slightly decrease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas UsageDiesel prices increaseDiesel

  3. Urban driving cycle results of retrofitted diesel oxidation catalysts on heavy duty vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, K.F. [Engine Control Systems Ltd., Aurora, Ontario (Canada); Rideout, G.

    1996-09-01

    This paper presents the emissions testing results of various heavy duty engines and vehicles with and without retrofitted diesel oxidation catalyst technology. 1987 Cummins L10 and 1991 DDC 6V92TA DDECII engine results over the US Heavy Duty Transient Test are presented for comparison to chassis test results. The vehicles in this study include two urban buses, two school buses and three heavy duty trucks. The Central Business District, New York Bus and New York Composite urban driving cycles have been used to evaluate baseline emissions and the catalyst performance on a heavy duty chassis dynamometer. The results demonstrate that 25--45% particulate reduction is readily achievable on a wide variety of heavy duty vehicles. Significant carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon reductions were also observed.

  4. Diesel Locomotive Fueling Problem (LFP) in Railroad Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murty, Katta G.

    Chapter 2 Diesel Locomotive Fueling Problem (LFP) in Railroad Operations Bodhibrata Nag Katta G their operating costs low. About 75% of transport by railroads in the world is based on diesel locomotives by diesel locomotives. One of the major compo- nents in the operating cost of diesel powered rail transport

  5. CE 466/ 566 Highway Geometric Design Fall 2010 Course Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Officials (AASHTO), A Policy on Geometric Design of Highways and Streets, 5th Edition, 2004. Other materials Student Code of Conduct, in accordance with the Code of Academic Integrity. This code is published at http

  6. Effects of natural gas composition on ignition delay under diesel conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naber, J.D.; Siebers, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Di Julio, S.S. [California State Univ., Northridge, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Westbrook, C.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-12-03

    Effects of variations in natural gas composition on autoignition of natural gas under direct-injection (DI) diesel engine conditions were studied experimentally in a constant-volume combustion vessel and computationally using a chemical kinetic model. Four fuel blends were investigated: pure methane, a capacity weighted mean natural gas, a high ethane content natural gas, and a natural gas with added propane typical of peak shaving conditions. Experimentally measured ignition delays were longest for pure methane and became progressively shorter as ethane and propane concentrations increased. At conditions characteristic of a DI compression ignition natural gas engine at Top Dead Center (CR=23:1, p = 6.8 MPa, T = 1150K), measured ignition delays for the four fuels varied from 1.8 ms for the peak shaving and high ethane gases to 2.7 ms for pure methane. Numerically predicted variations in ignition delay as a function of natural gas composition agreed with these measurements.

  7. The effect of fuel and engine design on diesel exhaust particle size distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumgard, K.J.; Johnson, J.H. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The objective of this research was to obtain diesel particle size distributions from a 1988 and a 1991 diesel engine using three different fuels and two exhaust control technologies (a ceramic particle trap and an oxidation catalytic converter). The particle size distributions from both engines were used to develop models to estimate the composition of the individual size particles. Nucleation theory of the H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} vapor is used to predict when nuclei-mode particles will form in the dilution tunnel. Combining the theory with the experimental data, the conditions necessary in the dilution tunnel for particle formation are predicted. The paper also contains a discussion on the differences between the 1988 and 1991 engine`s particle size distributions. The results indicated that nuclei mode particles (0.0075--0.046 {micro}m) are formed in the dilution tunnel and consist of more than 80% H{sub 2}O-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} particles when using the 1988 engine and 0.29 wt% sulfur fuel. Nucleation theory indicated that H{sub 2}O-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} particles may form during dilution at 0.03 wt% fuel sulfur levels and above. The 1991 engine was designed for lower particulate emissions than the 1988 engine and the 1991 engine`s accumulation mode particles (0.046-1.0 {micro}m) were reduced more than 80% by volume compared to the 1988 engine using the same low sulfur fuel. The particle size composition model indicated that using low sulfur fuel and the 1991 engine, the nuclei mode contained more than 45% of the total solid particles and over 85% of the soluble organic fraction.

  8. Driving Down Diesel Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harley, Robert

    2013-01-01

    is adapted from “Effects of Diesel Particle Filter Retro?tst’s official: exposure to diesel exhaust harms human health.its rankings, shifting diesel exhaust from a probable to a

  9. Reformulated diesel fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McAdams, Hiramie T [Carrollton, IL; Crawford, Robert W [Tucson, AZ; Hadder, Gerald R [Oak Ridge, TN; McNutt, Barry D [Arlington, VA

    2006-03-28

    Reformulated diesel fuels for automotive diesel engines which meet the requirements of ASTM 975-02 and provide significantly reduced emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) and particulate matter (PM) relative to commercially available diesel fuels.

  10. Kalman Filtering for Real-Time Individual Cylinder Air Fuel Ratio Observer on a Diesel Engine Test Bench

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    propose an estimator of the individual cylinder air fuel ratios in a turbocharged Diesel Engine using

  11. Effect of Ambient Pressure on Diesel Spray Axial Velocity and Internal Structure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  12. Transition to Ultra-Low-Sulfur Diesel Fuel: Effects on Prices and Supply, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    This report discusses the implications of the new regulations for vehicle fuel efficiency and examines the technology, production, distribution, and cost implications of supplying diesel fuel to meet the new standards.

  13. Passive regeneration : long-term effects on ash characteristics and diesel particulate filter performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahr, Michael J., Nav. E. (Michael James). Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    Diesel particulate filters (DPF) have seen widespread growth as an effective means for meeting increasingly rigorous particle emissions regulations. There is growing interest to exploit passive regeneration of DPFs to ...

  14. Effect of Machining Procedures on the Strength of Ceramics for Advanced Diesel Engine Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  15. Recent Progress on Steam Hydrogasification of Carbonaceous Matter to Clean Synthetic Diesel Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  16. Diesel prices continue to fall

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage Form 2003(EIA)DieselDieselDiesel

  17. Diesel prices continue to increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDiesel prices continueDieselDiesel

  18. Diesel prices slightly decrease nationally

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas UsageDiesel prices increaseDieselDiesel

  19. Effect of E85 on RCCI Performance and Emissions on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine - SAE World Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, Scott; Hanson, Reed M; Wagner, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of E85 on load expansion and FTP modal point emissions indices under reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) operation on a light-duty multi-cylinder diesel engine. A General Motors (GM) 1.9L four-cylinder diesel engine with the stock compression ratio of 17.5:1, common rail diesel injection system, high-pressure exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system and variable geometry turbocharger was modified to allow for port fuel injection with gasoline or E85. Controlling the fuel reactivity in-cylinder by the adjustment of the ratio of premixed low-reactivity fuel (gasoline or E85) to direct injected high reactivity fuel (diesel fuel) has been shown to extend the operating range of high-efficiency clean combustion (HECC) compared to the use of a single fuel alone as in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) or premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI). The effect of E85 on the Ad-hoc federal test procedure (FTP) modal points is explored along with the effect of load expansion through the light-duty diesel speed operating range. The Ad-hoc FTP modal points of 1500 rpm, 1.0bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP); 1500rpm, 2.6bar BMEP; 2000rpm, 2.0bar BMEP; 2300rpm, 4.2bar BMEP; and 2600rpm, 8.8bar BMEP were explored. Previous results with 96 RON unleaded test gasoline (UTG-96) and ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) showed that with stock hardware, the 2600rpm, 8.8bar BMEP modal point was not obtainable due to excessive cylinder pressure rise rate and unstable combustion both with and without the use of EGR. Brake thermal efficiency and emissions performance of RCCI operation with E85 and ULSD is explored and compared against conventional diesel combustion (CDC) and RCCI operation with UTG 96 and ULSD.

  20. DIESEL FUEL LUBRICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, Jun [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The diesel fuel injector and pump systems contain many sliding interfaces that rely for lubrication upon the fuels. The combination of the poor fuel lubricity and extremely tight geometric clearance between the plunger and bore makes the diesel fuel injector vulnerable to scuffing damage that severely limits the engine life. In order to meet the upcoming stricter diesel emission regulations and higher engine efficiency requirements, further fuel refinements that will result in even lower fuel lubricity due to the removal of essential lubricating compounds, more stringent operation conditions, and tighter geometric clearances are needed. These are expected to increase the scuffing and wear vulnerability of the diesel fuel injection and pump systems. In this chapter, two approaches are discussed to address this issue: (1) increasing fuel lubricity by introducing effective lubricity additives or alternative fuels, such as biodiesel, and (2) improving the fuel injector scuffing-resistance by using advanced materials and/or surface engineering processes. The developing status of the fuel modification approach is reviewed to cover topics including fuel lubricity origins, lubricity improvers, alternative fuels, and standard fuel lubricity tests. The discussion of the materials approach is focused on the methodology development for detection of the onset of scuffing and evaluation of the material scuffing characteristics.

  1. Application of positive matrix factorization to on-road measurements for source apportionment of diesel- and gasoline-powered vehicle emissions in Mexico City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornhill, D. A.

    The goal of this research is to quantify diesel- and gasoline-powered motor vehicle emissions within the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) using on-road measurements captured by a mobile laboratory combined with positive ...

  2. Insights on postinjection-associated soot emissions in direct injection diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arregle, Jean; Pastor, Jose V.; Lopez, J. Javier; Garcia, Antonio [CMT-Motores Termicos, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera, s/n 46022, Valencia (Spain)

    2008-08-15

    A comprehensive study was carried out in order to better understand combustion behavior in a direct injection diesel engine when using postinjections. More specifically, the aim of the study is twofold: (1) to better understand the mechanism of a postinjection to reduce soot and (2) to improve the understanding of the contribution of the postinjection combustion on the total soot emissions by looking at the effect of the postinjection timing variation and the postinjection mass variation on the soot emissions associated with the postinjection. The study is focused only on far postinjections, and the explored operating conditions include the use of EGR. The first objective was fulfilled analyzing some results from a previous work adding only a few complementary results. Concerning the second objective, the basic idea behind the analysis performed is the search of appropriate parameters physically linked to the processes under analysis. These parameters are found based on the state-of-the-art of diesel combustion. For the effect of the postinjection timing, the physical parameter found was the temperature of the unburned gases at the end of injection, T{sub ug{sub E}}{sub oI}. It was checked that a threshold level of T{sub ug{sub E}}{sub oI} ({proportional_to}700 K for the cases explored here) exists below which soot is unable to be formed, independently of the postinjection size, and the amount of soot increases as the temperature increases beyond this threshold. For the effect of the postinjection size, the physical parameter that was found was DoI/ACT (the ratio between the actual duration of injection and the time necessary for mixing - the apparent combustion time). This parameter can quantify when the postinjection is able to produce soot (the threshold value is {proportional_to}0.37 for the cases explored here), and the amount of soot produced increases as this parameter increases beyond this threshold value. A function containing these two parameters has been fitted to the experimental soot emissions associated with the postinjection obtained in many engine operating conditions, and the appropriate quality of the fit demonstrates that these two parameters explain the main behaviors of the soot emissions associated with a postinjection. (author)

  3. Diesel Emission Control Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reviews regulatory requirements and technology approaches for diesel emission control for heavy and light duty applications

  4. Performance-Based Decision-Making in Post-Earthquake Highway Bridge Repair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordin, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    Reinforced Concrete Bridge Columns by Steel Jacketing. SanDatabase for Concrete Bridge Components and Systems underMotion Level on Highway Bridge Costs. Program of Applied

  5. Off-Highway Gasoline Consuption Estimation Models Used in the Federal Highway Administration Attribution Process: 2008 Updates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, Ho-Ling; Davis, Stacy Cagle

    2009-12-01

    This report is designed to document the analysis process and estimation models currently used by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) to estimate the off-highway gasoline consumption and public sector fuel consumption. An overview of the entire FHWA attribution process is provided along with specifics related to the latest update (2008) on the Off-Highway Gasoline Use Model and the Public Use of Gasoline Model. The Off-Highway Gasoline Use Model is made up of five individual modules, one for each of the off-highway categories: agricultural, industrial and commercial, construction, aviation, and marine. This 2008 update of the off-highway models was the second major update (the first model update was conducted during 2002-2003) after they were originally developed in mid-1990. The agricultural model methodology, specifically, underwent a significant revision because of changes in data availability since 2003. Some revision to the model was necessary due to removal of certain data elements used in the original estimation method. The revised agricultural model also made use of some newly available information, published by the data source agency in recent years. The other model methodologies were not drastically changed, though many data elements were updated to improve the accuracy of these models. Note that components in the Public Use of Gasoline Model were not updated in 2008. A major challenge in updating estimation methods applied by the public-use model is that they would have to rely on significant new data collection efforts. In addition, due to resource limitation, several components of the models (both off-highway and public-us models) that utilized regression modeling approaches were not recalibrated under the 2008 study. An investigation of the Environmental Protection Agency's NONROAD2005 model was also carried out under the 2008 model update. Results generated from the NONROAD2005 model were analyzed, examined, and compared, to the extent that is possible on the overall totals, to the current FHWA estimates. Because NONROAD2005 model was designed for emission estimation purposes (i.e., not for measuring fuel consumption), it covers different equipment populations from those the FHWA models were based on. Thus, a direct comparison generally was not possible in most sectors. As a result, NONROAD2005 data were not used in the 2008 update of the FHWA off-highway models. The quality of fuel use estimates directly affect the data quality in many tables published in the Highway Statistics. Although updates have been made to the Off-Highway Gasoline Use Model and the Public Use Gasoline Model, some challenges remain due to aging model equations and discontinuation of data sources.

  6. Effect of pilot injection on combustion in a turbocharged D.I. diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishida, Masahiro; Chen, Z.L.; Luo, G.F.; Ueki, Hironobu

    1994-09-01

    For reducing the exhaust emissions and improving the ignition characteristics, the effect of pilot injection was investigated experimentally in a turbocharged direct injection diesel engine. The pilot injection quantity was varied by changing the seat diameter of the Doge plunger installed in the newly developed pilot injector while the separation period between the beginning of pilot injection and that of main injection was fixed at a short interval in the present experiment. The pilot injection effect on combustion was compared with the case of normal injection in two fuel oils with the cetane indexes of 53 and 40-respectively. The pilot injection showed some significant effects on improving the ignition characteristics and fuel consumption as follows: (1) The pilot ignition delay and the main ignition delay were about half of the ignition delay of the normal injection respectively. (2) The lower fuel consumption and NOx could be attained by the pilot injection at the retarded injection timing, especially under the lower load condition. (3) The trade-off relationship between the specific fuel consumption and NOx was significantly improved by the pilot injection. (4) In the present short pilot-main interval, a small amount of pilot quantity was recommended to reduce NOx and fuel consumption without deteriorating smoke density. 12 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Clean Diesel: Overcoming Noxious Fumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodrick, Christie-Joy; Sperling, Daniel; Dwyer, Harry A.

    2001-01-01

    emissions and by low diesel-fuel prices, relatively gentleand the absence of diesel fuel price terize and measureattraction where diesel fuel prices are lower than gasoline

  8. Update on Modeling for Effective Diesel Engine Aftertreatment Implementation- Master Plan, Status and Critical Needs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    An integrated diesel engine-aftertreatment-vehicle system is extremely complex with numerous interacting variables and an unlimited number of control options. An experimental approach to develop an optimized viable system is tedious, if at all possible. Sophisticated component, subsystem and integrated simulation tools offer an excellent option of a virtual lab approach to the development of such a complex system. A viable and robust diesel engine aftertreatment system can thus be developed within optimum time and resources when this virtual simulation is integrated with selective hardware-based testing.

  9. Comparing the Performance of SunDiesel and Conventional Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Performance of SunDiesel and Conventional Diesel in a Light-Duty Vehicle and Engines Comparing the Performance of SunDiesel and Conventional Diesel in a Light-Duty Vehicle and...

  10. The influence of molecular structure of fatty acid monoalkyl esters on diesel combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenborn, Alessandro; Ladommatos, Nicos [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Williams, John; Allan, Robert; Rogerson, John [BP Oil UK Limited, Technology Centre, Whitchurch Hill, Pangbourne, Reading, RG8 7QR (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-15

    The subject of this paper is a series of experiments conducted on a single-cylinder research engine investigating the influence of molecular structure on the combustion behaviour of fatty acid alcohol ester (biodiesel) molecules under diesel engine conditions. The fuels employed in these experiments comprised various samples of pure individual fatty acid alcohol ester molecules of different structure, as well as several mixtures of such molecules. The latter consisted in biodiesel fuels produced by the transesterification of naturally occurring plant oils or animal fat with a monohydric alcohol. It was observed that the molecular structure of the fuel significantly influenced the formation of NO{sub x} and particulate matter and their respective concentration in the exhaust gas. The influence on the formation of NO{sub x} in particular, appeared to be exerted first through the effect which the molecular structure had on the auto-ignition delay occurring after the fuel was injected into the combustion chamber, and second through the flame temperature at which the various molecules burned. The emission of particulates on the other hand showed correlation with the number of double bonds in the fuel molecules for the case of larger accumulation mode particles, and with the boiling point of the fuel samples for the case of the smaller, nucleation mode particles. The effect of ignition delay on the exhaust emissions of these pollutants was isolated by adding the ignition promoting molecule 2-ethylhexyl nitrate to some of the fuel samples in closely specified concentrations, so as to equalise the ignition delay for the relevant fuel samples. The removal of the ignition delay as a main influence on the combustion process enabled the observation of the lesser effects of adiabatic flame temperature. (author)

  11. 2009-01-0366 In-cylinder Burned Gas Rate Estimation and Control on VVA Diesel Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the combustion cham- bers of turbocharged Diesel engines equipped with low pressure EGR loop and VVA actuator. We

  12. Diesel exhaust aftertreatment 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The papers in this volume deal in the main with the two most common forms of aftertreatment technology. The first is the trap oxidizer, which is a system for trapping and filtering the particulate matter from the exhaust gas and periodically removing it by thermal oxidation. This process is commonly known as regeneration. The second is the diesel oxidation catalyst. Similar in many ways to the flow through a converter in passenger cars, it oxidizes the soluble organic fraction of the diesel exhaust as well as gaseous hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. This catalyst is being used in production volumes in heavy duty trucks in the US beginning in 1994. Several papers in this volume deal with the development experience of this converter application. There also is included a series of papers by trap and filter manufacturers dealing with improved materials, making their devices more durable. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  13. Biodiesel's Enabling Characteristics in Attaining Low Temperature Diesel Combustion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discusses reasons and physical significance of cool-flame behavior of biodiesel on improving low temperature diesel combustion

  14. Hydrogen Assisted Diesel Combustion in a Common Rail Turbodiesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This study measured the effects of hydrogen substitution on engine performance and reducing NOx emissions in a diesel engine

  15. An optimization study on the control of NOx and particulate emissions from diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, C.; Oey, F.; Levendis, Y.A. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    This is an optimization study on the use of filtered exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) to reduce the NO emissions of diesel engines. Control of the particulate emissions and provisions for filtered EGR were achieved by an Aerodynamically Regenerated Trap (ART) with collection efficiencies in the order of 99%. The amount of EGR was regulated to provide for substantial NO reduction, without unacceptably decreasing the thermal efficiency of the engine or increasing the CO emissions. EGR regulation was accomplished by monitoring the injection pump setting which was correlated to the fuel flow rate, the speed of the engine, the amount of EGR flow, and the ambient air temperature. Through these parameters, the mixture strength expressed as the equivalence ratio {phi} was calculated and related to the power output of the engine. Thus, a map of engine performance parameters was generated and related to measured NO and CO emissions. A series of road tests showed that EGR most effectively reduces NO emissions at high {phi}`s (by a factor of two at 20% EGR) which, however, is accompanied by an increase in CO emissions by a factor of two, and a penalty in fuel economy by 8%. Benefits and losses can be optimized by automatically varying the level of EGR, using feedback from the aforementioned engine parameters. An algorithm was developed to govern the electrically controlled EGR valve and tests showed that the NO levels decreased by 30%, while the CO increased by 30%, showing no penalty in fuel economy. The resulting specific NO and CO emissions were well within the current US EPA standards.

  16. Low-Temperature Diesel Combustion Cross-Cut Research | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Density and Temperature on Soot Formation under High-EGR Conditions Low-Temperature Diesel Combustion Cross-Cut Research LES Applied to Low-Temperature, Diesel and Hydrogen...

  17. REAL-WORLD EFFICACY OF HEAVY DUTY DIESEL TRUCK NOX AND PM EMISSIONS CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    REAL-WORLD EFFICACY OF HEAVY DUTY DIESEL TRUCK NOX AND PM EMISSIONS CONTROLS Gurdas Sandhu H 0121 NOx(g/gal) Truck Number Highway Arterial Comparison of Trucks: Fuel-Based NO Emission Rates NOx emissions are substantially lower than Truck 5715. 1999 2005 2007 2009 2010 Fuel-Based Emission

  18. Federal Highway Admininstration - Law Enforcement Escort - Best...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Federal Highway Admininstration - Law Enforcement Escort - Best Practices Guidelines Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory...

  19. Artificial Neural Nets and Cylinder Pressures in Diesel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharkey, Amanda

    Artificial Neural Nets and Cylinder Pressures in Diesel Engine Fault Diagnosis * Gopi O diagnosis system for a diesel engine, which uses artificial neural nets to identify faults on the basis cylinder Ruston AP 230, medium speed Diesel engine was simulated. When tested on new data previously unseen

  20. Control Engineering Practice 16 (2008) 10811091 Motion planning for experimental airpath control of a diesel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    A strategy based on motion planning is proposed for airpath control of turbocharged diesel engines equipped

  1. Diesel: Applying Privilege Separation to Database Access Adrienne Porter Felt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, David

    Diesel: Applying Privilege Separation to Database Access Adrienne Porter Felt UC Berkeley apf reviewers. We construct a system called Diesel, which implements data sep- aration by intercepting database queries and applying mod- ules' restrictions to the queries. We evaluate Diesel on three widely

  2. MODELING AND CONTROL OF A DIESEL HCCI ENGINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    MODELING AND CONTROL OF A DIESEL HCCI ENGINE J. Chauvin A. Albrecht G. Corde N. Petit Institut Abstract: This article focuses on the control of a Diesel engine airpath. We propose a detailed description of the airpath of a Diesel HCCI engine supported by experimental results. Moreover, we propose a simple, yet

  3. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition: Formulation Effect of a Diesel Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition: Formulation Effect of a Diesel Fuel on the Initiation and the Combustion Potential of Olefin Impact in a Diesel Base Fuel D. Alseda1,2, X. Montagne1 and P. Dagaut2 1 -- Combustion en mode HCCI : impact de la formulation d'un carburant Diesel sur l'initiation et la combustion

  4. Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development. Final report, September 28, 1990--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kakwani, R.M.; Winsor, R.E.; Ryan, T.W. III; Schwalb, J.A.; Wahiduzzaman, S.; Wilson, R.P. Jr.

    1993-09-01

    The goal of this program was to study the feasibility of operating a Detroit Diesel Series 149 engine at high speeds using a Coal-Water-Slurry (CWS) fuel. The CWS-fueled 149 engine is proposed for the mine-haul off-highway truck and work boat marine markets. Economic analysis studies indicate that, for these markets, the use of CWS fuel could have sufficient operating cost savings, depending upon the future diesel fuel price, emission control system capital and operating costs, and maintenance and overhaul costs. A major portion of the maintenance costs is expected to be due to lower life and higher cost of the CWS injectors. Injection and combustion systems were specially designed for CWS, and were installed in one cylinder of a Detroit Diesel 8V-149TI engine for testing. The objective was to achieve engine operation for sustained periods at speeds up to 1,900 rpm with reasonable fuel economy and coal burnout rate. A computer simulation predicted autoignition of coal fuel at 1,900 rpm would require an average droplet size of 18 microns and 19:1 compression ratio, so the injection system, and pistons were designed accordingly. The injection system was capable of supplying the required volume of CWS/injection with a duration of approximately 25 crank angle degrees and peak pressures on the order of 100 mpa. In addition to the high compression ratio, the combustion system also utilized hot residual gases in the cylinder, warm inlet air admission and ceramic insulated engine components to enhance combustion. Autoignition of CWS fuel was achieved at 1900 rpm, at loads ranging from 20--80 percent of the rated load of diesel-fuel powered cylinders. Limited emissions data indicates coal burnout rates in excess of 99 percent. NO{sub x} levels were significantly lower, while unburned hydrocarbon levels were higher for the CWS fueled cylinder than for corresponding diesel-fuel powered cylinders.

  5. Regulated and Unregulated Exhaust Emissions Comparison for Three Tier II Non-Road Diesel Engines Operating on Ethanol-Diesel Blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merritt, P. M.; Ulmet, V.; McCormick, R. L.; Mitchell, W. E.; Baumgard, K. J.

    2005-11-01

    Regulated and unregulated emissions (individual hydrocarbons, ethanol, aldehydes and ketones, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), nitro-PAH, and soluble organic fraction of particulate matter) were characterized in engines utilizing duplicate ISO 8178-C1 eight-mode tests and FTP smoke tests. Certification No. 2 diesel (400 ppm sulfur) and three ethanol/diesel blends, containing 7.7 percent, 10 percent, and 15 percent ethanol, respectively, were used. The three, Tier II, off-road engines were 6.8-L, 8.1-L, and 12.5-L in displacement and each had differing fuel injection system designs. It was found that smoke and particulate matter emissions decreased with increasing ethanol content. Changes to the emissions of carbon monoxide and oxides of nitrogen varied with engine design, with some increases and some decreases. As expected, increasing ethanol concentration led to higher emissions of acetaldehyde (increases ranging from 27 to 139 percent). Benzene emissions were reduced by up to 50 percent with the ethanol-blended fuels. Emissions of 1,3-butadiene were also substantially decreased, with reductions ranging from 24 to 82 percent. Isolated trends were noted for certain PAHs. There was a decrease in 1-nitropyrene with use of ethanol in all cases. Particulate phase 1-nitropyrene was reduced from 18 to 62 percent. There was also a general increase in the proportion of heavy PAHs in the particulate phase with ethanol use, and although less pronounced, a general decrease in light PAHs in the particulate phase.

  6. Join Diesel: Concurrency Primitives for Diesel Peter-Michael Osera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Join Diesel: Concurrency Primitives for Diesel Peter-Michael Osera psosera to the Diesel programming language, entitled Join Diesel. We describe the design decisions and trade-offs made in integrating these concurrency primitives into the Diesel language. We also give a typechecking algorithm

  7. Diesel prices decrease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDiesel

  8. Diesel prices increase nationally

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas UsageDiesel prices increase nationally The

  9. Diesel prices continue to decrease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage Form 2003(EIA) TheDieselDiesel

  10. Diesel prices continue to decrease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage Form 2003(EIA)Diesel pricesDiesel

  11. Diesel prices continue to decrease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage Form 2003(EIA)DieselDiesel prices

  12. Diesel prices continue to increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDiesel prices continue toDiesel

  13. Diesel prices continue to increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDiesel prices continueDiesel prices

  14. Diesel prices continue to increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDiesel prices continueDiesel

  15. Diesel prices continue to rise

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDiesel pricesDiesel prices

  16. Diesel prices up this week

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas UsageDiesel pricesDiesel prices top $4

  17. Impact of Real Field Diesel Quality Variability on Engine Emissions and Fuel Consumption Solutions for Onboard Optimisation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A matrix of 10 diesel fuels was prepared and tested to establish an optimized ECU setting and a compensating algorithm for the engine.

  18. Texas Hydrogen Highway - Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus and Fueling Infrastructu...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Highway - Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus and Fueling Infrastructure Technology Showcase Texas Hydrogen Highway - Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus and Fueling Infrastructure Technology Showcase...

  19. Control considerations for an on-line, active regeneration system for diesel particulate traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stiglic, P.; Hardy, J.; Gabelman, B. (Garrett Automotive Group, Allied-Singal, Torrance, CA (US))

    1989-07-01

    The authors are developing an exhaust aftertreatment system aimed at particulate emissions reduction from commercial diesel engines. The system uses a ceramic wall flow filter to trap the particulates, and regeneration is effected by raising gas temperature by throttling the exhaust downstream of the turbocharger. Lab testing at steady conditions demonstrated good performance with both catalyzed and uncatalyzed traps. Road testing shows the regeneration must be accomplished under severe transient conditions created by the normal vehicle operating modes. Primary efforts are to accommodate those transients using advanced control and digital computational techniques. Some of those techniques are described and are shown to yield improved control performance.

  20. An application of a combined charging system on a turbocharged diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, D.I.; Her, K.; Chang, N.

    1984-01-01

    To improve the low-speed torque characteristics and the fuel economy and to reduce the exhaust gaseous emissions from a 10-liter, turbocharged diesel engines, charge air cooling with a resonant intake system has been introduced. The use of an air-to-air inter-cooler mounted in front of the radiator results in increasing the charge air density and the resonant intake system offers a high volumetric charging efficiencies at low-speed region. Actual engine data show an increase in power of 14 percent, the improvement of specific fuel consumption by 3-7 percent and a decrease in NOx emissions by 33 percent.

  1. Clean Coal Diesel Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Wilson

    2006-10-31

    A Clean Coal Diesel project was undertaken to demonstrate a new Clean Coal Technology that offers technical, economic and environmental advantages over conventional power generating methods. This innovative technology (developed to the prototype stage in an earlier DOE project completed in 1992) enables utilization of pre-processed clean coal fuel in large-bore, medium-speed, diesel engines. The diesel engines are conventional modern engines in many respects, except they are specially fitted with hardened parts to be compatible with the traces of abrasive ash in the coal-slurry fuel. Industrial and Municipal power generating applications in the 10 to 100 megawatt size range are the target applications. There are hundreds of such reciprocating engine power-plants operating throughout the world today on natural gas and/or heavy fuel oil.

  2. Effects of Turbulence on the Combustion Properties of Partially Premixed Flames of Canola Methyl Ester and Diesel Blends

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dhamale, N.; Parthasarathy, R. N.; Gollahalli, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    Canola methyl ester (CME) is a biofuel that is a renewable alternative energy resource and is produced by the transesterification of canola oil. The objective of this study was to document the effects of turbulence on the combustion characteristics of blends of CME and No 2 diesel fuel in a partially-premixed flame environment. The experiments were conducted with mixtures of pre-vaporized fuel and air at an initial equivalence ratio of 7 and three burner exit Reynolds numbers, 2700, 3600, and 4500. Three blends with 25, 50, and 75% volume concentration of CME were studied. The soot volume fraction was highestmore »for the pure diesel flames and did not change significantly with Reynolds number due to the mutually compensating effects of increased carbon input rate and increased air entrainment as the Reynolds number was increased. The global NOx emission index was highest and the CO emission index was the lowest for the pure CME flame, and varied non-monotonically with biofuel content in the blend The mean temperature and the NOx concentration at three-quarter flame height were generally correlated, indicating that the thermal mechanism of NOx formation was dominant in the turbulent biofuel flames also.« less

  3. Alternative energy sources for non-highway transportation. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    A planning study was made for DOE on alternate fuels for non-highway transportation (aircraft, rail, marine, and pipeline). The study provides DOE with a recommendation of what alternate fuels may be of interest to non-highway transportation users from now through 2025 and recommends R and D needed to allow non-petroleum derived fuels to be used in non-highway transportation. Volume III contains all of the references for the data used in the preliminary screening and is presented in 4 subvolumes. Volume IIIA covers the background information on the various prime movers used in the non-highway transportation area, the physical property data, the fuel-prime mover interaction and a review of some alternate energy forms. Volume IIIB covers the economics of producing, tranporting, and distributing the various fuels. Volume IIIC is concerned with the environment issues in production and use of the fuels, the energy efficiency in use and production, the fuel logistics considerations, and the overall ratings and selection of the fuels and prime movers for the detailed evaluation. Volume IIID covers the demand-related issues.

  4. Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2005-05-27

    Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a five-year Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction (LEADER) program under a DOE project entitled: ''Research and Development for Compression-Ignition Direct-Injection Engines (CIDI) and Aftertreatment Sub-Systems''. The objectives of the LEADER Program were to: Demonstrate technologies that will achieve future federal Tier 2 emissions targets; and Demonstrate production-viable technical targets for engine out emissions, efficiency, power density, noise, durability, production cost, aftertreatment volume and weight. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the LEADER program The most noteworthy achievements in this program are listed below: (1) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a PNGV-mule Neon passenger car, utilizing a CSF + SCR system These aggressive emissions were obtained with no ammonia (NH{sub 3}) slip and a combined fuel economy of 63 miles per gallon, integrating FTP75 and highway fuel economy transient cycle test results. Demonstrated feasibility to achieve Tier 2 Bin 8 emissions levels without active NOx aftertreatment. (2) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a light-duty truck utilizing a CSF + SCR system, synergizing efforts with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. This aggressive reduction in tailpipe out emissions was achieved with no ammonia slip and a 41% fuel economy improvement, compared to the equivalent gasoline engine-equipped vehicle. (3) Demonstrated Tier 2 near-Bin 9 emissions compliance on a light-duty truck, without active NOx aftertreatment devices, in synergy with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. (4) Developed and applied advanced combustion technologies such as ''CLEAN Combustion{copyright}'', which yields simultaneous reduction in engine out NOx and PM emissions while also improving engine and aftertreatment integration by providing favorable exhaust species and temperature characteristics. These favorable emissions characteristics were obtained while maintaining performance and fuel economy. These aggressive emissions and performance results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. This systems approach benefits substantially from an integrated experimental and analytical approach to technology development, which is one of DDCs core competencies Also, DDC is uniquely positioned to undertake such a systems technology development approach, given its vertically integrated commercial structure within the DaimlerChrysler organization. State-of-the-art analytical tools were developed targeting specific LEADER program objectives and were applied to guide system enhancements and to provide testing directions, resulting in a shortened and efficient development cycle. Application examples include ammonia/NO{sub x} distribution improvement and urea injection controls development, and were key contributors to significantly reduce engine out as well as tailpipe out emissions. Successful cooperation between DDC and Engelhard Corporation, the major subcontractor for the LEADER program and provider of state-of-the-art technologies on various catalysts, was another contributing factor to ensure that both passenger car and LD truck applications achieved Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions levels. Significant technical challenges, which highlight barriers of commercialization of diesel technology for passenger cars and LD truck applications, are presented at the end of this report.

  5. Clean Diesel: Overcoming Noxious Fumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodrick, Christie-Joy; Sperling, Daniel; Dwyer, Harry A.

    2001-01-01

    Clean Diesel: Overcoming NoxiousFumes Are diesel engines part of the problem or part of theS T H E T R U T H about diesel engines? Are they inherently

  6. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compere, Alicia L. (Knoxville, TN); Griffith, William L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Farragut, TN); West, Brian H. (Kingston, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO.sub.x emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO.sub.x produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  7. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Dorsey, G.F.; West, B.H.

    1998-05-05

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO{sub x} emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO{sub x} produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  8. Diesel fuel from biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuester, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    A project to convert various biomass materials to diesel type transportation fuel compatible with current engine designs and the existing distribution system is described. A continuous thermochemical indirect liquefaction approach is used. The system consists of a circulating solid fluidized bed gasification system to produce a synthesis gas containing olefins, hydrogen and carbon monoxide followed by a catalytic liquefaction step to convert the synthesis gas to liquid hydrocarbon fuel. The major emphasis on the project at the present time is to maximize product yield. A level of 60 gals of diesel type fuel per ton of feedstock (dry, ash free basis) is expected. Numerous materials have been processed through the conversion system without any significant change in product quality (essentially C/sub 7/-C/sub 17/ paraffinic hydrocarbons with cetane indicies of 50+). Other tasks in progress include factor studies, process simplification, process control and scale-up to a 10 ton/day Engineering Test Facility. 18 references, 4 figures, 9 tables.

  9. Simulating the Impact of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition on Light-Duty Diesel Fuel Economy and Emissions of Particulates and NOx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    We utilize the Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) combined with transient engine and aftertreatment component models implemented in Matlab/Simulink to simulate the effect of premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) on the fuel economy and emissions of light-duty diesel-powered conventional and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Our simulated engine is capable of both conventional diesel combustion (CDC) and premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) over real transient driving cycles. Our simulated aftertreatment train consists of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), lean NOx trap (LNT), and catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). The results demonstrate that, in the simulated conventional vehicle, PCCI can significantly reduce fuel consumption and emissions by reducing the need for LNT and DPF regeneration. However, the opportunity for PCCI operation in the simulated HEV is limited because the engine typically experiences higher loads and multiple stop-start transients that are outside the allowable PCCI operating range. Thus developing ways of extending the PCCI operating range combined with improved control strategies for engine and emissions control management will be especially important for realizing the potential benefits of PCCI in HEVs.

  10. Review of SCR Technologies for Diesel Emission Control: Euruopean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicles French perspective on diesel engines & emissions Potential Effect of Pollutantn Emissions on Global Warming: First Comparisong Using External Costs on Urban Buses...

  11. Diesel particles -a health hazard 1 Diesel particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diesel particles - a health hazard 1 Diesel particles - a health hazard #12;The Danish Ecological Council - August 20042 Diesel particles - a health hazard ISBN: 87-89843-61-4 Text by: Christian Ege 33150777 Fax no.: +45 33150971 E-mail: info@ecocouncil.dk www.ecocouncil.dk #12;Diesel particles - a health

  12. Drive cycle analysis of butanol/diesel blends in a light-duty vehicle.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miers, S. A.; Carlson, R. W.; McConnell, S. S.; Ng, H. K.; Wallner, T.; LeFeber, J.; Energy Systems; Esper Images Video & Multimedia

    2008-10-01

    The potential exists to displace a portion of the petroleum diesel demand with butanol and positively impact engine-out particulate matter. As a preliminary investigation, 20% and 40% by volume blends of butanol with ultra low sulfur diesel fuel were operated in a 1999 Mercedes Benz C220 turbo diesel vehicle (Euro III compliant). Cold and hot start urban as well as highway drive cycle tests were performed for the two blends of butanol and compared to diesel fuel. In addition, 35 MPH and 55 MPH steady-state tests were conducted under varying road loads for the two fuel blends. Exhaust gas emissions, fuel consumption, and intake and exhaust temperatures were acquired for each test condition. Filter smoke numbers were also acquired during the steady-state tests.

  13. Evaluation of sight distance as a criterion for prioritizing rail-highway intersections in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pecheux, Kelley Klaver

    1993-01-01

    been effective over the years in identifying particularly hazardous rail-highway intersections based on high vehicle volumes, train volumes, and accident histories, and these crossings have been treated or improved. Many of the remaining crossings...

  14. A hotel economic feasibility study : Monsignor O'Brien Highway, Cambridge, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, Mark P. (Mark Paul)

    2007-01-01

    A hotel economic feasibility study was carried out for an assemblage of four (4) parcels located on Monsignor O'Brien Highway in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The primary objective of this economic feasibility study was to ...

  15. Newfound land : urban highway removal and planning the land it uncovers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masenten, David J. (David Joel), 1974-

    2004-01-01

    When the interstate highway system was routed through urban centers during the 1950's and 1960's, few thought these elevated expressways would have a serious detrimental impact on the cities they served. These interstates ...

  16. An investigation of driver behavior at highway-railroad grade crossings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Lee Anne

    1996-01-01

    Highway-railroad grade crossings are classified as either "active" or "passive" depending on the ability of the warning system to indicate the presence of an approaching train. Active crossings are characterized by warning systems such as flashing...

  17. Characterizing the In-Use Emissions Performance of Novel PM and NOx Control Technologies on Diesel Construction Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  18. Effects of a Zeolite-Selective Catalytic Reduction System on Comprehensive Emissions from a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Mingshen

    lean-combustion diesel engines, including exhaust gas recirculation, lean NOx catalysis, selective by several engine manufacturers for use in mobile emis- sion sources to meet stringent NOx regulations.2

  19. Long-Term Changes in Gas- and Particle-Phase Emissions from On-Road Diesel and Gasoline Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  20. An investigation into the use of highway traffic signals at highway-railroad grade crossings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frieslaar, Andre Henry

    1997-01-01

    Rail-highway grade crossings are amongst the most dangerous of intersections a driver will encounter. One out of every nine accidents at rail-highway crossings produces a fatality. In half of these cases, the crossing is an active crossing, meaning...

  1. DIESEL et CANCER Dominique Lafon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1/5 DIESEL et CANCER Dominique Lafon INERIS (*) De nombreuses questions se posent sur la toxicité des émissions des moteurs diesel. C'est un sujet qui a beaucoup préoccupé les scientifiques ces EMISSIONS DU DIESEL. Avant d'aborder la toxicité des émissions du diesel, un rappel de leur composition est

  2. ELECTRONIC FUEL INJECTION DIESEL LOCOMOTIVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagannatham, Aditya K.

    ELECTRONIC FUEL INJECTION FOR DIESEL LOCOMOTIVES 13 August, 2011 Diesel Loco Modernisation Works, Patiala #12;ELECTRONIC FUEL INJECTION FOR DIESEL LOCOMOTIVES A Milestone in Green Initiatives by Indian the first major milestone in this direction for its fleet of Diesel Locomotives. Introduction The first

  3. Effect of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on Diesel Engine Oil - Impact on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementofApril 25,EVthe next generation

  4. Cleaning Up Diesel Engines | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Engines Cleaning Up Diesel Engines 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005deerwitherspoon.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  5. Catalytic Filter for Diesel Exhaust Purification | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalytic Filter for Diesel Exhaust Purification Catalytic Filter for Diesel Exhaust Purification This project is developing a precious metal-free passive diesel particulate...

  6. DIesel Emission Control Technology Developments | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DIesel Emission Control Technology Developments DIesel Emission Control Technology Developments 2005deerandreoni.pdf More Documents & Publications Cleaning Up Diesel Engines...

  7. Particle Sensor for Diesel Combustion Monitoring | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sensor for Diesel Combustion Monitoring Particle Sensor for Diesel Combustion Monitoring 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: University of...

  8. Pleated Ceramic Fiber Diesel Particulate Filter | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pleated Ceramic Fiber Diesel Particulate Filter Pleated Ceramic Fiber Diesel Particulate Filter 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters...

  9. (Surveying isolated diesel power stations in Guatemala)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waddle, D.B.

    1990-02-26

    I travelled to Guatemala City, Guatemala, to lead a team of specialists to study the operating, administrative, and management efficiency of isolated diesel power plants, operated by Instituto Nacional de Electrificacion (INDE). The study is part of a global initiative managed jointly by the Agency for International Development and the World Bank. The power plants were audited, including INDE's largest isolated diesel station, and two, much smaller municipal and privately owned stations. I returned to Oak Ridge on February 22, 1990.

  10. Performance of the Low-Efficiency Diesel Particulate Filter for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents & Publications On-Road PM Mass Emission Measured with OBS-TRPM Investigation of Direct Injection Vehicle Particulate Matter Emissions Simplification of Diesel Emission...

  11. Supplemental Information : Secondary Organic Aerosol Production from Modern Diesel Engine Emissions, Shar Samy and1 Barbara Zielinska2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    Supplemental Information : Secondary Organic Aerosol Production from Modern Diesel Engine Emissions emissions. For more detail on compositional and toxicity changes produced from further29 diesel engine use of Final Mass 05/16/05 D-3, Diesel in Dark with ozone 9:15 11.5 15:30 11 -0.5 0.0 05/17/05 D-3, Diesel

  12. Comparison of Real-World Fuel Use and Emissions for Dump Trucks Fueled with B20 Biodiesel Versus Petroleum Diesel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    Versus Petroleum Diesel By H. Christopher Frey, Ph.D. Professor Department of Civil, Construction 2006 Annual Meeting CD-ROM Paper revised from original submittal. #12;Frey and Kim 1 ABSTRACT Diesel-world in-use on-road emissions of selected diesel vehicles, fueled with B20 biodiesel and petroleum diesel

  13. Proceedings of the 1998 diesel engine emissions reduction workshop [DEER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-31

    This workshop was held July 6--9, 1998 in Castine, Maine. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on reduction of diesel engine emissions. Attention was focused on the following: agency/organization concerns on engine emissions; diesel engine issues and challenges; health risks from diesel engines emissions; fuels and lubrication technologies; non-thermal plasma and urea after-treatment technologies; and diesel engine technologies for emission reduction 1 and 2.

  14. Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets 9,WhyConsumption6FuelCountiesOn-Highway

  15. Effect of B20 and Low Aromatic Diesel on Transit Bus NOx Emissions Over Driving Cycles with a Range of Kinetic Intensity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lammert, M. P.; McCormick, R. L.; Sindler, P.; Williams, A.

    2012-10-01

    Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions for transit buses for up to five different fuels and three standard transit duty cycles were compared to establish whether there is a real-world biodiesel NOx increase for transit bus duty cycles and engine calibrations. Six buses representing the majority of the current national transit fleet and including hybrid and selective catalyst reduction systems were tested on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer with certification diesel, certification B20 blend, low aromatic (California Air Resources Board) diesel, low aromatic B20 blend, and B100 fuels over the Manhattan, Orange County and UDDS test cycles. Engine emissions certification level had the dominant effect on NOx; kinetic intensity was the secondary driving factor. The biodiesel effect on NOx emissions was not statistically significant for most buses and duty cycles for blends with certification diesel, except for a 2008 model year bus. CARB fuel had many more instances of a statistically significant effect of reducing NOx. SCR systems proved effective at reducing NOx to near the detection limit on all duty cycles and fuels, including B100. While offering a fuel economy benefit, a hybrid system significantly increased NOx emissions over a same year bus with a conventional drivetrain and the same engine.

  16. Diesel prices dip below the 4 dollar mark

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDieselDieselDiesel pricesDiesel

  17. Stochastic Modeling of Future Highway Maintenance Costs for Flexible Type Highway Pavement Construction Projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yoo Hyun

    2012-07-16

    OF TABLES Page Table 1. Categorized climate region used in California (Caltrans 2007) ................. 6 Table 2. Total lane-mile of Texas highways in 2005 (Mikhail et al. 2006) ............ 15 Table 3. Maintenance categories defined in Maintenance... are as shown in Table 2. Table 2. Total lane-mile of Texas highways in 2005 (Mikhail et al. 2006) Highway type Asphalt Concrete Pavement(ACP) Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavement (CRCP) Jointed Concrete Pavement(JCP) Total IH 4,745 1,346 244 6...

  18. From marginalized to optimized : re-envisioning urban highway corridors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spicer, Sarah J

    2011-01-01

    The past century of highway construction has assumed relentless growth of vehicular traffic capacity. Yet today is an era of highway rationalization, aging facilities, strained finances, peak oil concerns, climate change, ...

  19. Effect of Biodiesel Blending on the Speciation of Soluble Organic Fraction from a Light Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL] [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL] [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; Foster, Prof. Dave [University of Wisconsin] [University of Wisconsin; Rutland, Prof. Christopher J. [University of Wisconsin] [University of Wisconsin

    2010-01-01

    Soy methyl ester (SME) biodiesel was volumetrically blended with 2007 certification ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel and run in a 1.7L direct-injection common rail diesel engine at one speed-load point (1500rpm, 2.6bar BMEP). Engine fueling rate and injection timing were adjusted to maintain a constant load, while particulate samples were collected in a diesel particulate filter (DPF) and with a dilution tunnel sampling train. The samples collected at these two locations were found to contain different levels of soluble organic fraction (SOF) and the different hydrocarbon species in the SOF. This observation indicates that traditional SOF measurements, in light of the specific sampling procedure used, may not be appropriate to DPF applications.

  20. Electrically-Assisted Diesel Particulate Filter Regeneration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Substrate Studies of an Electrically-Assisted Diesel Particulate Filter Electrically-Assisted Diesel Particulate Filter Regeneration...

  1. CLEERS Activities: Diesel Soot Filter Characterization & NOx...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activities: Diesel Soot Filter Characterization & NOx Control Fundamentals CLEERS Activities: Diesel Soot Filter Characterization & NOx Control Fundamentals 2009 DOE Hydrogen...

  2. Efficiency Considerations of Diesel Premixed Charge Compression...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Considerations of Diesel Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Combustion Efficiency Considerations of Diesel Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Combustion Poster...

  3. Recent Developments in BMW's Diesel Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinparzer, F

    2003-08-24

    The image of BMW is very strongly associated to high power, sports biased, luxury cars in the premium car segment, however, particularly in the United States and some parts of Asia, the combination of a car in this segment with a diesel engine was up until now almost unthinkable. I feel sure that many people in the USA are not even aware that BMW produces diesel-powered cars. In Europe there is a completely contrary situation which, driven by the relative high fuel price, and the noticeable difference between gasoline and diesel prices, there has been a continuous growth in the diesel market since the early eighties. During this time BMW has accumulated more then 20 years experience in developing and producing powerful diesel engines for sports and luxury cars. BMW started the production of its 1st generation diesel engine in 1983 with a 2,4 l, turbocharged IDI engine in the 5 series model range. With a specific power of 35 kW/l, this was the most powerful diesel engine on the market at this time. In 1991 BMW introduced the 2nd generation diesel engine, beginning with a 2,5 l inline six, followed in 1994 by a 1,7 l inline four. All engines of this 2nd BMW diesel engine family were turbocharged and utilized an indirect injection combustion system. With the availability of high-pressure injection systems such as the common rail system, BMW developed its 3rd diesel engine family which consists of four different engines. The first was the 4-cylinder for the 3 series car in the spring of 1998, followed by the 6-cylinder in the fall of 1998 and then in mid 1999 by the worlds first V8 passenger car diesel with direct injection. Beginning in the fall of 2001 with the 4-cylinder, BMW reworked this DI engine family fundamentally. Key elements are an improved core engine design, the use of the common rail system of the 2nd generation and a new engine control unit with even better performance. Step by step, these technological improvements were introduce d to production for all members of this engine family and in all the different vehicle applications. In the next slide you can see the production volume of diesel engines by BMW. From the 1st family we produced {approx} 260,000 units over eight years and from the 2nd family {approx} 630,000 units were produced also during an eight year period. How successful the actual engine family with direct injection is can be seen in the increase of the production volume to 330,000 units for the year 2002 alone. The reason for this is that, in addition to the very low fuel consumption, this new engines provide excellent driving characteristics and a significant improvement in the level of noise and vibration. Page 2 of 5 In 2002, 26% of all BMW cars worldwide, and nearly 40% in Europe, were produced with a diesel engine under the hood. In the X5 we can see the biggest diesel success rate. Of all the X5 vehicles produced, 35% Worldwide and 68% in Europe are powered by a diesel engine.

  4. Development of Diesel Exhaust Aftertreatment System for Tier II Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, R. C.; Cole, A. S., Stroia, B. J.; Huang, S. C. (Cummins, Inc.); Howden, Kenneth C.; Chalk, Steven (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

    2002-06-01

    Due to their excellent fuel efficiency, reliability, and durability, compression ignition direct injection (CIDI) engines have been used extensively to power almost all highway trucks, urban buses, off-road vehicles, marine carriers, and industrial equipment. CIDI engines burn 35 to 50% less fuel than gasoline engines of comparable size, and they emit far less greenhouse gases (Carbon Dioxides), which have been implicated in global warming. Although the emissions of CIDI engines have been reduced significantly over the last decade, there remains concern with the Nitrogen Oxides (NOX) and Particulate Matter (PM) emission levels. In 2000, the US EPA proposed very stringent emissions standards to be introduced in 2007 along with low sulfur (< 15ppm) diesel fuel. The California Air Resource Board (CARB) has also established the principle that future diesel fueled vehicles should meet the same emissions standards as gasoline fueled vehicles and the EPA followed suit with its Tier II emissions regulations. Meeting the Tier II standards requires NOX and PM emissions to be reduced dramatically. Achieving such low emissions while minimizing fuel economy penalty cannot be done through engine development and fuel reformulation alone, and requires application of NOX and PM aftertreatment control devices. A joint effort was made between Cummins Inc. and the Department of Energy to develop the generic aftertreatment subsystem technologies applicable for Light-Duty Vehicle (LDV) and Light-Duty Truck (LDT) engines. This paper provides an update on the progress of this joint development program. Three NOX reduction technologies including plasmaassisted catalytic NOX reduction (PACR), active lean NOX catalyst (LNC), and adsorber catalyst (AC) technology using intermittent rich conditions for NOX reduction were investigated in parallel in an attempt to select the best NOX control approach for light-duty aftertreatment subsystem integration and development. Investigations included system design and analysis, critical lab/engine experiments, and ranking then selection of NOX control technologies against reliability, up-front cost, fuel economy, service interval/serviceability, and size/weight. The results of the investigations indicate that the best NOX control approach for LDV and LDT applications is a NOX adsorber system. A greater than 83% NOX reduction efficiency is required to achieve 0.07g/mile NOX Tier II vehicle-out emissions. Both active lean NOX and PACR technology are currently not capable of achieving the high conversion efficiency required for Tier II, Bin 5 emissions standards. In this paper, the NOX technology assessment and selection is first reviewed and discussed. Development of the selected NOX technology (NOX adsorber) and PM control are then discussed in more detail. Discussion includes exhaust sulfur management, further adsorber formulation development, reductant screening, diesel particulate filter development & active regeneration, and preliminary test results on the selected integrated SOX trap, NOX adsorber, and diesel particulate filter system over an FTP-75 emissions cycle, and its impact on fuel economy. Finally, the direction of future work for continued advanced aftertreatment technology development is discussed. (SAE Paper SAE-2002-01-1867 © 2002 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

  5. Status of Wind-Diesel Applications in Arctic Climates: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.; Corbus, D.

    2007-12-01

    The rising cost of diesel fuel and the environmental regulation for its transportation, use, and storage, combined with the clear impacts of increased arctic temperatures, is driving remote communities to examine alternative methods of providing power. Over the past few years, wind energy has been increasingly used to reduce diesel fuel consumption, providing economic, environmental, and security benefits to the energy supply of communities from Alaska to Antarctica. This summary paper describes the current state of wind-diesel systems, reviews the operation of wind-diesel plants in cold climates, discusses current research activities pertaining to these systems, and addresses their technical and commercial challenges. System architectures, dispatch strategies, and operating experience from a variety of wind-diesel systems in Alaska will be reviewed. Specific focus will also be given to the control of power systems with large amounts of wind generation and the complexities of replacing diesel engine waste heat with excess wind energy, a key factor in assessing power plants for retrofit. A brief overview of steps for assessing the viability of retrofitting diesel power systems with wind technologies will also be provided. Because of the large number of isolated diesel minigrids, the market for adding wind to these systems is substantial, specifically in arctic climates and on islands that rely on diesel-only power generation.

  6. Tradeoffs among Free-flow Speed, Capacity, Cost, and Environmental Footprint in Highway Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chen Feng; Small, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    National Highway Construction Cost Index, Washing D.C. :National Highway Construction Cost Index (FHWA 2010). The

  7. Tradeoffs among Free-flow Speed, Capacity, Cost, and Environmental Footprint in Highway Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chen Feng; Small, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Highway Construction Cost Index, Washing D.C. : FederalHighway Construction Cost Index (FHWA 2010). The average

  8. SEISMIC DESIGN PROVISIONS -THE CANADIAN HIGHWAY BRIDGE DESIGN CODE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Michel

    in the 1994 American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials Load and Resistance Factor Code in the 1994 American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials Load and Resistance Factor CodeSEISMIC DESIGN PROVISIONS - THE CANADIAN HIGHWAY BRIDGE DESIGN CODE Denis MITCHELL Mc

  9. Light-Duty Drive Cycle Simulations of Diesel Engine-Out Exhaust Properties for an RCCI-Enabled Vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhiming; Curran, Scott; Daw, C Stuart; Wagner, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel fuels to achieve low-temperature reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) can reduce NOx and PM emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency compared to conventional diesel combustion (CDC). Moreover, the dual-fueling RCCI is able to achieve these benefits by tailoring combustion reactivity over a wider range of engine operation than is possible with a single fuel. However, the currently demonstrated range of stable RCCI combustion just covers a portion of the engine speed-load range required in several light-duty drive cycles. This means that engines must switch from RCCI to CDC when speed and load fall outside of the stable RCCI range. In this study we investigated the impact of RCCI as it has recently been demonstrated on practical engine-out exhaust temperature and emissions by simulating a multi-mode RCCI-enabled vehicle operating over two urban and two highway driving cycles. To implement our simulations, we employed experimental engine maps for a multi-mode RCCI/CDC engine combined with a standard mid-size, automatic transmission, passenger vehicle in the Autonomie vehicle simulation platform. Our results include both detailed transient and cycle-averaged engine exhaust temperature and emissions for each case, and we note the potential implications of the modified exhaust properties on catalytic emissions control and utilization of waste heat recovery on future RCCI-enabled vehicles.

  10. Cleaning Up Non-Road Diesel Vehicles: A Public Health Imperative...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Concerned Scientists 2002deermonahan.pdf More Documents & Publications EPA Diesel Update A View From The Bridge Commonalities between Non-road and On-road Diesel Emissions...

  11. Fact #831: July 28, 2014 Top Ten States with Diesel Light Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In Wyoming, more than 10% of registered light vehicles are fueled by diesel making their State number one in terms of diesel share. All other States on the top ten list are also western States. The...

  12. Control of Charge Dilution in Turbocharged Diesel Engines via Exhaust Valve Timing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    on the full order model. 1. Introduction Diesel or Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) engine, non-linear, dynamic model of a direct-injection, turbocharged diesel engine [6], we examine

  13. Experimental and computational study of soot formation under diesel engine conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitsopanidis, Ioannis, 1975-

    2004-01-01

    Past research has shown that during diesel combustion, soot is formed in local premixed fuel-rich regions. This project focuses on the fundamentals soot formation under fuel-rich conditions similar to those in diesel engine ...

  14. Development of a Simple Field Test for Vehicle Exhaust to Detect Illicit Use of Dyed Diesel Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, Scott D.; Wright, Bob W.

    2011-10-30

    The use of tax-free dyed fuel on public highways in the United States provides a convenient way of evading taxes. Current enforcement involves visual inspection for the red azo dye added to the fuel to designate its tax-free status. This approach has shortcomings such as the invasive nature of the tests and/or various deceptive tactics applied by tax evaders. A test designed to detect dyed fuel use by analyzing the exhaust would circumvent these shortcomings. This paper describes the development of a simple color spot test designed to detect the use of tax-free (dyed) diesel fuel by analyzing the engine exhaust. Development first investigated the combustion products of C.I. Solvent Red 164 (the azo dye formulation used in the United States to tag tax-free fuel). A variety of aryl amines were identified as characteristic molecular remnants that appear to survive combustion. A number of microanalytical color tests specific for aryl amines were then investigated. One test based on the use of 4-(dimethylamino)benzaldehyde seemed particularly applicable and was used in a proof-of-principle experiment. The 4-(dimethylamino)benzaldehyde color spot test was able to clearly distinguish between engines burning regular and dyed diesel fuel. Further development will refine this color spot test to provide an easy-to-use field test for Internal Revenue Service Field Compliance specialists.

  15. Impact of demand-enhancing farm policy on the agricultural sector: a firm level simulation of ethanol production subsidies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wasson, Leta Susanne

    1990-01-01

    to a 60 cent per gallon subsidy on each gallon of ethanol blended with gasoline. Other federal incentives include the Crude Oil Windfall Profit Tax of 1980 which gave blenders of ethanol an income tax credit and extended the gasoline tax exemption... subsidies providing for all off- highway uses of diesel fuel and gasoline to be exempt from Federal Excise taxes. Also, the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation has provided insurance against production losses due to weather and other perils at subsidized...

  16. Active Diesel Emission Control Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems Active Diesel Emission Control Systems 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conferencen Presentation: RYPOS Active Diesel Emission Control Systems...

  17. Application of positive matrix factorization to on-road measurements for source apportionment of diesel-and gasoline-powered vehicle emissions in Mexico City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    of diesel- and gasoline-powered vehicle emissions in Mexico City D. A. Thornhill, A. E. Williams, T. B be low. The second figure shows the background versus diesel factors. There may be a slight horizontal factors. In this case, even when the diesel factor's contributions are very high, the background factor

  18. Diesel lubrication and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The film describes the parts of diesel lubricating and cooling systems and how they work in relation to each other.

  19. Diesel lubrication and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The film describes the parts of diesel lubricating and cooling systems and how they work in relation to each other.

  20. CDOT State Highway Access Permit Application | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine:Kansas: Energy Resources Jump to:Energy IncTool JumpState Highway

  1. Perspectives Regarding Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction in the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2004deerblock.pdf More Documents & Publications Dumping Dirty Diesels: The View From the Bridge EPA Diesel Update Ultra-Low Sulfur diesel Update & Future Light Duty Diesel...

  2. Title 19 Chapter 11 Protection of Highways | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)Open EnergyTinox Jump to:,11 Protection of Highways Jump to:

  3. Title 19 Chapter 3 Town Highways | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)Open EnergyTinox Jump to:,11 Protection of Highways Jump to:3

  4. Diesel Brewing | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsArea (DOE GTP) Jump to:SouthBar,eólicoDidion EthanolDiesel

  5. APPLIED ISSUES Spatial and temporal impacts of a diesel fuel spill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntosh, Angus

    APPLIED ISSUES Spatial and temporal impacts of a diesel fuel spill on stream invertebrates DAVID A, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, U.S.A. SUMMARY 1. We assessed the effects of a 26 500 L diesel fuel, but the degree of dominance was twice as large at the impact site. 5. We concluded that the diesel fuel spill

  6. Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels -- Diesel Emissions Control Project (APBF-DEC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-03-01

    Annual progress report of the Advanced Petroleum-based fuels-Diesel Emissions Control Project. Contains information on 5 test projects to determine the best combinations of low-sulfur diesel fuels, lubricants, diesel engines, and emission control systems to meet projected emissions standards.

  7. DIESEL AEROSOL SAMPLING IN THE David Kittelson, Jason Johnson, and Winthrop Watts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    chemical composition of diesel particulate matter collected in laboratory and in wind tunnel #12;In OrderDIESEL AEROSOL SAMPLING IN THE ATMOSPHERE David Kittelson, Jason Johnson, and Winthrop Watts Center for Diesel Research University of Minnesota 10th CRC ON-ROAD VEHICLE EMISSIONS WORKSHOP San Diego, California

  8. Mass Flow Estimation with Model Bias Correction for a Turbocharged Diesel Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    Mass Flow Estimation with Model Bias Correction for a Turbocharged Diesel Engine Tomás Polóni. Based on an augmented observable Mean Value En- gine Model (MVEM) of a turbocharged Diesel engine in the intake duct. Keywords: Diesel engine, Mass flow estimation, Bias estimation, Kalman filtering, Mean value

  9. The process of soot formation in a DI Diesel engine is very challenging to understand and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandoghdar, Vahid

    Background The process of soot formation in a DI Diesel engine is very challenging to understand and describe. But with respect to the demand for much lower particulate emissions (Tab.1) of Diesel engines emissi- ons of a medium duty DI Diesel engine which is certified for the TIER 3 norm should be evaluated

  10. DIESEL ENGINES FOR FIREDAMP MINES Institut National de 1'Environnement Industricl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    93-41 DIESEL ENGINES FOR FIREDAMP MINES A.CZYZ Institut National de 1'Environnement Industricl et REGULATIONS The introducüon of foreign diesel engines (mainly German engines with 12.5 mm flameproof joints any Problems in the case of dassical diesel engines i.e. with natural aspiration. On the otherhand

  11. Nitrogen oxidizing in modeling of diesel engine operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulakov, V.; Merker, G.

    1995-12-31

    A computer model of diesel engine operation based on the interconnected calculation of diesel fuel spray and the processes in the combustion chamber is extended for the calculation of Nitrogen oxidizing. A number of chemical reactions with O{sub 2}, O, N{sub 2}, N, NO, OH, H, H{sub 2} are included in the model.

  12. Diesel injector carbonization by three alternative fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodrum, J.W.; Patel, V.C.; McClendon, R.W. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Three alternative diesel fuels were screened by analysis of fuel injector tip deposits. The test engines were operated on the Peterson (torque) test cycle; the average carbon deposit volume on an injector tip was measured by a computer vision method. Relative coke deposit quantity was obtained by area analysis of injector tip images. Repetitive image areas varied less than 1%. Coke deposit areas for repetitive fuel tests also varied less than 1%. Injector coking tendencies of tested fuels decreased in the following order: peanut oil, no. 2 diesel, tricaprylin, and tributyrin/no. 2 diesel blend. The observed dependence of the relative coke quantity on fuel type was consistent with the results from a photographic technique used previously for fuel screening. 10 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. A Chemical Kinetic Modeling Study of the Effects of Oxygenated Hydrocarbons on Soot Emissions from Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J

    2005-11-14

    A detailed chemical kinetic modeling approach is used to examine the phenomenon of suppression of sooting in diesel engines by addition of oxygenated hydrocarbon species to the fuel. This suppression, which has been observed experimentally for a few years, is explained kinetically as a reduction in concentrations of soot precursors present in the hot products of a fuel-rich diesel ignition zone when oxygenates are included. Oxygenates decrease the overall equivalence ratio of the igniting mixture, producing higher ignition temperatures and more radical species to consume more soot precursor species, leading to lower soot production. The kinetic model is also used to show how different oxygenates, ester structures in particular, can have different soot-suppression efficiencies due to differences in molecular structure of the oxygenated species.

  14. Diesel prices continue to decrease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage Form 2003(EIA) The followingDiesel

  15. Diesel prices continue to decrease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage Form 2003(EIA) TheDiesel prices

  16. Diesel prices continue to decrease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage Form 2003(EIA) TheDiesel

  17. Diesel prices continue to decrease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage Form 2003(EIA)Diesel prices

  18. Diesel prices continue to decrease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage Form 2003(EIA)Diesel

  19. Diesel prices continue to increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDiesel prices continue to increase

  20. Diesel prices continue to increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDiesel prices continue to

  1. Diesel prices continue to increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDiesel prices continue

  2. Diesel prices continue to increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDiesel prices

  3. Diesel prices remain fairly stable

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas UsageDiesel prices increase nationally

  4. Diesel prices see slight drop

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas UsageDiesel prices increase

  5. Diesel prices slightly increase nationally

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas UsageDiesel prices

  6. Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural GasEIA lowers 2015ValuesEFuel OilDiesel Fuel Pump

  7. Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural GasEIA lowers 2015ValuesEFuel OilDiesel Fuel

  8. Diesel engine fuel systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The film shows the basic structure of diesel systems, including the parts and operation of injectors and fuel pumps. It discusses Bosch, General Motors, and Excello Equipment. This title has been declared obsolete for use within the sponsoring agency, but may have content value for educational use.

  9. Diesel engine fuel systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The film shows the basic structure of diesel systems, including the parts and operation of injectors and fuel pumps. It discusses Bosch, General Motors, and Excello Equipment. This title has been declared obsolete for use within the sponsoring agency, but may have content value for educational use.

  10. Diesel Engine Idling Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Zirker; James Francfort; Jordon Fielding

    2006-02-01

    In support of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technology Program Office goal to minimize diesel engine idling and reduce the consumption of millions of gallons of diesel fuel consumed during heavy vehicle idling periods, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducted tests to characterize diesel engine wear rates caused by extended periods of idling. INL idled two fleet buses equipped with Detroit Diesel Series 50 engines, each for 1,000 hours. Engine wear metals were characterized from weekly oil analysis samples and destructive filter analyses. Full-flow and the bypass filter cartridges were removed at four stages of the testing and sent to an oil analysis laboratory for destructive analysis to ascertain the metals captured in the filters and to establish wear rate trends. Weekly samples were sent to two independent oil analysis laboratories. Concurrent with the filter analysis, a comprehensive array of other laboratory tests ascertained the condition of the oil, wear particle types, and ferrous particles. Extensive ferrogram testing physically showed the concentration of iron particles and associated debris in the oil. The tests results did not show the dramatic results anticipated but did show wear trends. New West Technologies, LLC, a DOE support company, supplied technical support and data analysis throughout the idle test.

  11. Fuel Effects on Combustion and Emissions of a Direct-Inection Diesel Engine Operating at Moderate to High Engine Speed and Load

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szybist, James P [ORNL; Szymkowicz, Patrick G. [General Motors Corporation; Northrop, William F [General Motors Corporation

    2012-01-01

    It is advantageous to increase the specific power output of diesel engines and to operate them at higher load for a greater portion of a driving cycle to achieve better thermal efficiency and thus reduce vehicle fuel consumption. Such operation is limited by excessive smoke formation at retarded injection timing and high rates of cylinder pressure rise at more advanced timing. Given this window of operation, it is desired to understand the influence of fuel properties such that optimum combustion performance and emissions can be retained over the range of fuels commonly available in the marketplace. It has been shown in previous studies that varying cetane number (CN) of diesel fuel has little effect on ignition delay at high engine load due to the domination of high cylinder temperature on ignition kinetics. The work here experimentally confirms that finding but also shows that emissions and combustion performance vary according to fuel reactivity. Data are examined from a direct-injection single cylinder research engine for eight common diesel fuels including soy-based biodiesel blends at two high load operating points with no exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and at a moderate load with four levels of EGR. It is shown in the work that at high engine load where combustion is controlled by mixing processes, CN and other fuel properties have little effect on engine performance, although lower CN fuels produce a small increase in noise, smoke and CO emissions. Biodiesel blends increase NOX emissions and decreases CO and smoke emissions at high load, but otherwise have little effect on performance. At moderate load, higher CN fuels are more tolerant to EGR due to their better chemical reactivity at retarded injection timing, but all fuels produce comparable thermal efficiency at advanced combustion phasing regardless of EGR. In contrast to the high load conditions, there was no increase in NOX emissions for biodiesel at the moderate load condition. It is concluded that although higher CN does not significantly alter ignition delay at moderate to high loads it has a dominant influence on the acceptable injection timing range. Apart from CN effects, fuel oxygen content plays an independent role in reducing some emissions. It is therefore recommended that compensation for fuel ignitability and oxygen content be included in combustion control strategies to optimize emissions and performance of future diesel engines.

  12. Emission control options for mine diesels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waytulonis, R.W. (Bureau of Mines, Twin Cities, MN (USA). Twin Cities Research Center)

    1991-03-01

    New exhaust control techniques and devices may be necessary to meet future diesel particulate matter emission standards in underground coal mines. This paper reviews conventional work practices and devices used to control diesel exhaust emissions, and new techniques being tested by the US Bureau of Mines. Discussions center on important work practices and on the function and efficiency of exhaust aftertreatment devices. An industry-government cooperative research project to develop and test an exhaust aftertreatment system for part 36 equipment is also discussed.

  13. Diesel prices continue to decrease nationally

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage Form 2003(EIA)DieselDiesel

  14. Diesel prices top $4 per gallon

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas UsageDiesel pricesDiesel prices top $4 per

  15. Studies on the practical application of producer gas from agricultural residues as supplementary fuel for diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruz, I.E.

    1980-01-01

    Gasification of various agricultural residues in down-draft, fixed bed gas producers and the utilization of the gas in small diesel engines converted for dual-fuel operation were studied at the College of Engineering, University of the Philippines. Such agricultural residues as coconut shells, wood waste, rice hulls and corn cobs were readily gasified in gas producers of simple design. Cleaning of the gas before its use in diesel engines presented some problems. Use of charcoal in the gas producers to provide gas to a 5-brake horsepower single cylinder engine and a 65-brake horsepower six cylinder engine proved satisfactory. With charcoal as fuel, the percentage of the total energy from diesel oil replaced by producer gas and utilized in the single cylinder engine was higher (79%) compared to that in the six cylinder engine (73%). The thermal efficiency of the bigger gas producer, however was significantly better (85%) compared to the smaller gas producer (70%). The total gasification rate of the bigger reactor (20 kg/h) was 8 times that (2.5 kg/h) of the smaller reactor.

  16. Dual-fueling turbocharged diesels with ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruz, J.M.; Rotz, C.A.; Watson, D.H.

    1982-09-01

    Spray addition and carburetion methods were tested for dual-fueling a turbocharged, 65 kW diesel tractor. Approximately 30 percent of the fuel energy for the tractor was supplied by spraying ethanol into the intake air and about 46 percent by carburetion with little affect on the engine thermal efficiency. Further substitution of diesel fuel with ethanol was limited by knock. As the amount of ethanol fed into the engine was increased, ignition apparently changed from the steady burning process which normally occurs in a diesel engine to a rapid explosion which caused knock. The best fuel for the spray approach was a 50 percent ethanol/water solution and with the carburetor it was an 80 percent ethanol/water solution.

  17. Dual-fueling turbocharged diesels with ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruz, J.M.; Rotz, C.A.; Watson, D.H.

    1982-09-01

    Spray addition and carburetion methods were tested for dual-fueling a turbocharged, 65 kW diesel tractor. Approximately 30 percent of the fuel energy for the tractor was supplied by spraying ethanol into the intake air and about 46 percent by carburetion with little affect on the engine thermal efficiency. Further substitution of diesel fuel with ethanol was limited by knock. As the amount of ethanol fed into the engine was increased, ignition apparently changed from the steady burning process which normally occurs in a diesel engine to a rapid explosion which caused knock. The best fuel for the spray approach was a 50 percent ethanol/water solution and with the carburetor it was an 80 percent ethanol/water solution. (Refs. 6).

  18. New 11 liter Komatsu diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizusawa, M.; Tanosaki, T.; Kawase, M.; Oguchi, T.

    1984-01-01

    New 6 cylinder direct injection 11 liter diesel engines which have naturally aspirated, turbocharged, and turbocharged-aftercooled versions have been developed and moved in production at the end of 1983. The highest output of the turbocharged-aftercooled version is 276 kW (375 ps) at 2200 RPM. Based on Komatsu new technologies 125 mm bore diesel has been designed to meet the users' demands, such as compact in size, light in weight, extremely high performance, high reliability and durability. The turbocharged and turbocharged-aftercooled engines are characterized by the adoption of the ductile cast iron piston which is the first application into the high speed, four cycle diesels in production in the world, and which was enabled by Komatsu design and precision casting technologies. This paper also covers the other design aspects and performance characteristics.

  19. Simplification of Diesel Emission Control System Packaging Using SCR Coated on DPF

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Study demonstrates high NOx conversion with SCR coated on DPF. Optimization of catalyst washcoat and coating process minimizes back-pressure while maintaining good performance.

  20. Development of SCR on Diesel Particulate Filter System for Heavy Duty Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluation of a system consisting of SCRDPF in comparison to a commercial 2010 CDPF system on an engine under high and low engine-out NOx conditions

  1. On-Board Engine Exhaust Particulate Matter Sensor for HCCI and Conventional Diesel Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland.

  2. Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels|Programs |Chart of breakout of funds by majorEnergy 12 DOE

  3. Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels|Programs |Chart of breakout of funds by majorEnergy 12 DOE1 DOE

  4. Pollutant Emissions from Biodiesels in Diesel Engine Tests and On-road Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Yue

    2012-08-31

    and HC emissions. The H: C ratio, ratio of saturated fatty acids and degree of unsaturation of biodiesels all had a substantial effect on NO emissions. Density measurement was an easy way to predict total NOx from biodiesels. Methods of running on...

  5. Fuel Effects on Low Temperature Combustion in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Six different fuels were investigated to study the influence of fuel properties on engine out emissions and performance of low temperature premixed compression ignition combustion light-duty HSDI engines

  6. Influence of EGR compounds on the oxidation of an HCCI-diesel surrogate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderlohr, Jörg; Da Cruz, A Pires; Bounaceur, Roda; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Dagaut, Philippe; Montagne, X; 10.1016/j.proci.2008.06.019

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental and numerical study of the impact of various additives on the oxidation of a typical automotive surrogate fuel blend, i.e. n-heptane and toluene. It examines the impact of engine re-cycled exhaust has compounds on the control of an Homogeneous Charge Compression-Ignition (HCCI) engine. Series of experiments were performed in a hihly diluted Jet-Stirred Reactor (JDR) at pressures of 1 and 10 atm (1 atm = 101,325 Pa). The chosen thermo-chemical conditions were close to those characteristices of the pre-ignition period in an HCCI engine. The influence of various additives, namely nitric oxide (NO), ethylene (C2H4) and methanol (CH3OH), on the oxidation of a n-heptane/toluene blend was studied over a wide range of temperatures (550-1100 K), including the zone of the Negative Temperature Coefficient (NTC).

  7. Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCaribElectricSouthApplying caulkChapter

  8. Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCaribElectricSouthApplying caulkChapterace013_pitz_2013_o.pdf More

  9. Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging station in Rhode Island. |Moreit

  10. Modeling Species Inhibition of NO Oxidation in Urea-SCR Catalysts for Diesel Engine NOx Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.; Herling, Darrell R.

    2011-04-20

    Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are regarded as the leading NOx aftertreatment technology to meet the 2010 NOx emission standards for on-highway vehicles running on heavy-duty diesel engines. However, issues such as low NOx conversion at low temperature conditions still exist due to various factors, including incomplete urea thermolysis, inhibition of SCR reactions by hydrocarbons and H2O. We have observed a noticeable reduction in the standard SCR reaction efficiency at low temperature with increasing water content. We observed a similar effect when hydrocarbons are present in the stream. This effect is absent under fast SCR conditions where NO ~ NO2 in the feed gas. As a first step in understanding the effects of such inhibition on SCR reaction steps, kinetic models that predict the inhibition behavior of H2O and hydrocarbons on NO oxidation are presented in the paper. A one-dimensional SCR model was developed based on conservation of species equations and was coded as a C-language S-function and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. NO oxidation and NO2 dissociation kinetics were defined as a function of the respective adsorbate’s storage in the Fe-zeolite SCR catalyst. The corresponding kinetic models were then validated on temperature ramp tests that showed good match with the test data. Such inhibition models will improve the accuracy of model based control design for integrated DPF-SCR aftertreatment systems.

  11. Modeling Species Inhibition of NO oxidation in Urea-SCR Catalysts for Diesel Engine NOx Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.; Herling, Darrell R.

    2010-09-15

    Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are regarded as the leading NOx aftertreatment technology to meet the 2010 NOx emission standards for on-highway vehicles running on heavy-duty diesel engines. However, issues such as low NOx conversion at low temperature conditions still exist due to various factors, including incomplete urea thermolysis, inhibition of SCR reactions by hydrocarbons and H2O. We have observed a noticeable reduction in the standard SCR reaction efficiency at low temperature with increasing water content. We observed a similar effect when hydrocarbons are present in the stream. This effect is absent under fast SCR conditions where NO ~ NO2 in the feed gas. As a first step in understanding the effects of such inhibition on SCR reaction steps, kinetic models that predict the inhibition behavior of H2O and hydrocarbons on NO oxidation are presented in the paper. A one-dimensional SCR model was developed based on conservation of species equations and was coded as a C-language S-function and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. NO oxidation and NO2 dissociation kinetics were defined as a function of the respective adsorbate’s storage in the SCR catalyst. The corresponding kinetic models were then validated on temperature ramp tests that showed good match with the test data.

  12. Structural and safety characteristics and warrants for highway traffic barriers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohutek, Terry Lee

    1975-01-01

    Ross Highway traffic barriers are highway appurtenances that provide vehicle occupants with a relative degree of protection from roadside hazards and from errant vehicles encroaching across a median. The six basic types of traffic barr1ers are roads... are decision criteria that 1dentify sites along highways that need traff1c barrier installations. Structural and safety character- istics of the barr1ers refer to the impact performance, the structural integrity, and the safety of the vehicle occupants upon...

  13. Peanut oil as an emergency diesel fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodrum, J.W.

    1983-06-01

    Two elements of an emergency fuel system are discussed. A CeCoCo mechanical oil expeller's efficiency is related to temperature, moisture, and pressure conditions. Durability test on 20:80 and 80:20 peanut oil: diesel blends show injector coking and effects on exhaust temperature, specific fuel, and crankcase oil.

  14. Feebates, Footprints and Highway Safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a market-based policy aimed at encouraging manufacturers to develop more fuel efficient vehicles without affecting the car buyer s choice of vehicle size. A vehicle s size is measured by its footprint , the product of track width and wheelbase. Traditional market-based policies to promote higher fuel economy, such as higher gasoline taxes or gas guzzler taxes, also induce motorists to purchase smaller vehicles. Whether or not such policies affect overall road safety remains controversial, however. Feebates, a continuous schedule of new vehicle taxes and rebates as a function of vehicle fuel consumption, can also be made a function of vehicle size, thus removing the incentive to buy a smaller vehicle. A feebate system based on a vehicle s footprint creates the same incentive to adopt technology to improve fuel economy as simple feebate systems while removing any incentive for manufacturers or consumers to downsize vehicles.

  15. The test result of diesel truck on road with use of soot removal equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshikawa, Hideo; Kowada, Minoru [Chiba Inst. of Tech. (Japan); Yamaguchi, Tateo [Chiba Truck Corp. (Japan); Ikeda, Takashi

    1996-09-01

    In this study, the test results of commercialized 2 ton cargo truck on road for 6 months, are reported using the soot removal equipment at low voltage and with a short regeneration time. The equipment consists of using commercial truck battery, changing electrically neutral soot to negative charged soot. It adsorbs charged soot electrically with the metal mesh connected to positive pole and washes the soot with liquid detergent, during the cutting off of electric source. The removal of the accumulated soot was completed within two minutes, with 100% regeneration.

  16. Hawaii Clean Energy Iniative - Construction Upon a State Highway...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hawaii Clean Energy Iniative - Construction Upon a State Highway Permit Packet Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance -...

  17. Federal Highway Administration - Pilot Car Escort - Best Practices...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Federal Highway Administration - Pilot Car Escort - Best Practices...

  18. Idaho - Access Management: Standards and Procedures for Highway...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Access Management: Standards and Procedures for Highway Right-of-Way Encroachments Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory...

  19. Pressure modulated injection and its effect on combustion and emissions of a HD diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erlach, H.; Chmela, F.; Cartellieri, W.; Herzog, P.

    1995-12-31

    The paper describes the concept selection, design and performance of a fuel injection equipment (FIE) which provides high flexibility in shaping the injection rate. With this injection system standard and boot shaped injection rates as well as pilot injections and post injections can be achieved throughout the hole speed and load range. Special emphasis was drawn to realize boot rate shaping by pressure modulation rather than by throttling the fuel flow (i.e.: the system is operated with fully opened needle during the whole injection period and no throttling device limits the fuel flow in front of the nozzle to reduce the injection rate). Initial engine tests on a single cylinder research engine with 2 liter displacement were carried out at one operating point (1,000 rpm, 200 mm{sup 3}/str = 75% of full load fueling). Boot and pilot (split) injection rate shaping strategies are compared to a standard injection without rate shaping. At constant smoke and BSFC the boot injection shows a considerable improvement potential in NOx emissions of up to {minus}14%, or NOx and BSFC can be reduced simultaneously by {minus}9% and {minus}7%, respectively. The results with pilot injection are less promising than the results with boot injection. Furthermore, they are sensitive to pilot timing and to injection pressure as well as fueling during pilot injection.

  20. Experimental Investigation of the Effects of Fuel Characteristics on High Efficiency Clean Combustion (HECC) in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Kukwon; Han, Manbae; Wagner, Robert M; Sluder, Scott

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to understand fuel property effects on low temperature combustion (LTC) processes in a light-duty diesel engine. These types of combustion modes are often collectively referred to as high efficiency clean combustion (HECC). A statistically designed set of research fuels, the Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE), were used for this study. Engine conditions consistent with low speed cruise (1500 rpm, 2.6 bar BMEP) were chosen for investigating fuel property effects on HECC operation in a GM 1.9-L common rail diesel engine. The FACE fuel matrix includes nine combinations of fuel properties including cetane number (30 to 55), aromatic contents (20 to 45 %), and 90 % distillation temperature (270 to 340 C). HECC operation was achieved with high levels of EGR and adjusting injection parameters, e.g. higher fuel rail pressure and single injection event, which is also known as Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI) combustion. Engine performance, pollutant emissions, and details of the combustion process are discussed in this paper. Cetane number was found to significantly affect the combustion process with variations in the start of injection (SOI) timing, which revealed that the ranges of SOI timing for HECC operation and the PM emission levels were distinctively different between high cetane number (55) and low cetane number fuels (30). Low cetane number fuels showed comparable levels of regulated gas emissions with high cetane number fuels and had an advantage in PM emissions.

  1. Impact of rail pressure and biodiesel fueling on the particulate morphology and soot nanostructures from a common-rail turbocharged direct injection diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Peng; Vander Wal, Randy; Boehman, Andre L.; Toops, Todd J.; Daw, C. Stuart; Sun, Chenxi; Lapuerta, Magin; Agudelo, John

    2014-12-26

    The effect of rail pressure and biodiesel fueling on the morphology of exhaust particulate agglomerates and the nanostructure of primary particles (soot) was investigated with a common-rail turbocharged direct injection diesel engine. The engine was operated at steady state on a dynamometer running at moderate speed with both low (30%) and medium–high (60%) fixed loads, and exhaust particulate was sampled for analysis. Ultra-low sulfur diesel and its 20% v/v blends with soybean methyl ester biodiesel were used. Fuel injection occurred in a single event around top dead center at three different injection pressures. Exhaust particulate samples were characterized with TEM imaging, scanning mobility particle sizing, thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and XRD analysis. Particulate morphology and oxidative reactivity were found to vary significantly with rail pressure and with biodiesel blend level. Higher biodiesel content led to increases in the primary particle size and oxidative reactivity but did not affect nanoscale disorder in the as-received samples. For particulates generated with higher injection pressures, the initial oxidative reactivity increased, but there was no detectable correlation with primary particle size or nanoscale disorder.

  2. Impact of rail pressure and biodiesel fueling on the particulate morphology and soot nanostructures from a common-rail turbocharged direct injection diesel engine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ye, Peng; Vander Wal, Randy; Boehman, Andre L.; Toops, Todd J.; Daw, C. Stuart; Sun, Chenxi; Lapuerta, Magin; Agudelo, John

    2014-12-26

    The effect of rail pressure and biodiesel fueling on the morphology of exhaust particulate agglomerates and the nanostructure of primary particles (soot) was investigated with a common-rail turbocharged direct injection diesel engine. The engine was operated at steady state on a dynamometer running at moderate speed with both low (30%) and medium–high (60%) fixed loads, and exhaust particulate was sampled for analysis. Ultra-low sulfur diesel and its 20% v/v blends with soybean methyl ester biodiesel were used. Fuel injection occurred in a single event around top dead center at three different injection pressures. Exhaust particulate samples were characterized with TEMmore »imaging, scanning mobility particle sizing, thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and XRD analysis. Particulate morphology and oxidative reactivity were found to vary significantly with rail pressure and with biodiesel blend level. Higher biodiesel content led to increases in the primary particle size and oxidative reactivity but did not affect nanoscale disorder in the as-received samples. For particulates generated with higher injection pressures, the initial oxidative reactivity increased, but there was no detectable correlation with primary particle size or nanoscale disorder.« less

  3. Epidemiological-environmental study of diesel bus garage workers: acute effects of NO/sub 2/ and respirable particulate on the respiratory system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamble, J.; Jones, W.; Minshall, S.

    1987-02-01

    Personal samples of nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) and respirable particulate (RP) were collected over the shift on 232 workers in four diesel bus garages. Response was assessed by an acute respiratory questionnaire and before and after shift spirometry. Measures of exposure to NO/sub 2/ and RP were associated with work-related symptoms of cough; itching, burning, or watering eyes; difficult or labored breathing; chest tightness; and wheeze. The prevalence of burning eyes, headaches, difficult or labored breathing, nausea, and wheeze experienced at work were higher in the diesel bus garage workers than in a comparison population of battery workers, while the prevalence of headaches was reduced. Mean reductions in forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), peak flow, and flows at 50 and 75% of FVC were not obviously different from zero. There was no detectable association of exposure to NO/sub 2/ or respirable particulate and acute reductions in pulmonary function. Workers who often had respiratory work-related symptoms generally had a slightly greater mean acute reduction in FEV1 and FEF50 than did those who did not have these symptoms, but these differences were not statistically significant.

  4. Materials-Enabled High-Efficiency (MEHE) Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kass, M.; Veliz, M.

    2011-09-30

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UTBattelle, Inc. and Caterpillar, Inc. was to improve diesel engine efficiency by incorporating advanced materials to enable higher combustion pressures and temperatures necessary for improved combustion. The project scope also included novel materials for use in advanced components and designs associated with waste-heat recovery and other concepts for improved thermal efficiency. Caterpillar initially provided ORNL with a 2004 Tier 2 C15 ACERT diesel engine (designed for on-highway use) and two 600 hp motoring dynamometers. The first year of the CRADA effort was focused on establishing a heavy-duty experimental engine research cell. First year activities included procuring, installing and commissioning the cell infrastructure. Infrastructure components consisted of intake air handling system, water tower, exhaust handling system, and cell air conditioning. Other necessary infrastructure items included the fuel delivery system and bottled gas handling to support the analytical instrumentation. The second year of the CRADA focused on commissioning the dynamometer system to enable engine experimentation. In addition to the requirements associated with the dynamometer controller, the electrical system needed a power factor correction system to maintain continuity with the electrical grid. During the second year the engine was instrumented and baseline operated to confirm performance and commission the dynamometer. The engine performance was mapped and modeled according to requirements provided by Caterpillar. This activity was further supported by a Work-for-Others project from Caterpillar to evaluate a proprietary modeling system. A second Work-for-Others activity was performed to evaluate a novel turbocharger design. This project was highly successful and may lead to new turbocharger designs for Caterpillar heavy-duty diesel engines. During the third (and final) year of the CRADA, a novel valve material was evaluated to assess high temperature performance and durability. A series of prototype valves, composed of a unique nickel-alloy was placed in the engine head. The engine was aggressively operated using a transient test cycle for 200 hours. The valve recession was periodically measured to determine valve performance. Upon completion of the test the valves were removed and returned to Caterpillar for additional assessment. Industrial in-kind support was available throughout the project period. Review of the status and research results were carried out on a regular basis (meetings and telecons) which included direction for future work activities. A significant portion of the industrial support was in the form of information exchange and technical consultation.

  5. Clean Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program Clean Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program 2005deermay.pdf More Documents & Publications Noxtechs PAC System Development and...

  6. Electrically-Assisted Diesel Particulate Filter Regeneration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation pm041lance2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications Electrically-Assisted Diesel Particulate Filter Regeneration Substrate Studies of an Electrically-Assisted Diesel...

  7. Diesel Particulate Filters: Market Introducution in Europe |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Filters: Market Introducution in Europe Diesel Particulate Filters: Market Introducution in Europe 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Aaqius and...

  8. Diesel Engine Emission Reduction (DEER) Experiment | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas in the U.S. Diesel Injection Shear-Stress Advanced Nozzle (DISSAN) Emissions and Durability of Underground Mining Diesel...

  9. Diesel vs Gasoline Production | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    vs Gasoline Production Diesel vs Gasoline Production A look at refinery decisions that decide "swing" between diesel and gasoline production deer08leister.pdf More Documents &...

  10. Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review...

  11. Potential Thermoelectric Applications in Diesel Vehicles | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectric Applications in Diesel Vehicles Potential Thermoelectric Applications in Diesel Vehicles 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: BSST, LLC 2003deercrane.pdf More...

  12. Diesel prices decrease for first time in four weeks

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDieselDiesel prices decreaseDiesel

  13. Diesel prices decrease for first time in four weeks

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDieselDiesel pricesU.S. Diesel

  14. Diesel prices decrease for first time in four weeks

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDieselDiesel pricesU.S. DieselU.S.

  15. Diesel prices decrease for first time in four weeks

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDieselDiesel pricesU.S.diesel

  16. Diesel prices decrease for the ninth consecutive week

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDieselDieselDiesel prices decrease

  17. Caterpillar Light Truck Clean Diesel Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert L. Miller; Kevin P. Duffy; Michael A. Flinn; Steve A. Faulkner; Mike A. Graham

    1999-04-26

    In 1998, light trucks accounted for over 48% of new vehicle sales in the U.S. and well over half the new Light Duty vehicle fuel consumption. The Light Truck Clean Diesel (LTCD) program seeks to introduce large numbers of advanced technology diesel engines in light-duty trucks that would improve their fuel economy (mpg) by at least 50% and reduce our nation's dependence on foreign oil. Incorporating diesel engines in this application represents a high-risk technical and economic challenge. To meet the challenge, a government-industry partnership (Department of Energy, diesel engine manufacturers, and the automotive original equipment manufacturers) is applying joint resources to meet specific goals that will provide benefits to the nation. [1] Caterpillar initially teamed with Ford Motor Company on a 5 year program (1997-2002) to develop prototype vehicles that demonstrate a 50% fuel economy improvement over the current 1997 gasoline powered light truck vehicle in this class while complying with EPA's Tier II emissions regulations. The light truck vehicle selected for the demonstration is a 1999 Ford F150 SuperCab. To meet the goals of the program, the 4.6 L V-8 gasoline engine in this vehicle will be replaced by an advanced compression ignition direct injection (CIDI) engine. Key elements of the Caterpillar LTCD program plan to develop the advanced CIDI engine are presented in this paper.

  18. Analyzing Drivers' Responses to Portable Changeable Message Signs in Rural Highway Work Zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yue

    2011-04-21

    The number of work zones has been increasing in the highway system of the United States because of rising needs in highway construction and maintenance. Highway work zones disrupt normal traffic flow and create safety ...

  19. Development of design guidelines for two-lane, two-way rural highways in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghupathy, Selvam

    2001-01-01

    the risk of crashes due to potential dangerous overtaking maneuvers attempted by some motorists. This research focused on obtaining the optimal design length and spacing of passing lanes on two-lane, two-way rural highways, for various two-way volumes...

  20. Tier 2 Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Results for a NOx Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Light-Duty Diesel Vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatur, M.; Tomazic, D.; Thornton, M.; Orban, J.; Slone, E.

    2006-05-01

    Investigates the emission control system performance and system desulfurization effects on regulated and unregulated emissions in a light-duty diesel engine.

  1. Philippine refiner completes diesel desulfurization project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Candido, S.S.; Crisostomo, E.V.

    1997-01-27

    In anticipation of tightening sulfur specifications on diesel fuel, Petron Corp. built a new 18,000 b/sd gas oil desulfurization unit (GODU) at its refinery in Bataan, Philippines. The GODU gives Petron sufficient diesel oil desulfurization capacity to meet demand for lower-sulfur diesel in the country. The project places the refinery in a pacesetter position to comply with the Philippine government`s moves to reduce air pollution, especially in urban centers, by reducing the sulfur specification for diesel to 0.5 wt% in 1996 from 0.7 wt% at the start of the project. Performance tests and initial operations of the unit have revealed a desulfurization efficiency of 91% vs. a guaranteed efficiency of 90%. A feed sulfur content of 1.33 wt% is reduced to 0.12 wt% at normal operating conditions. Operating difficulties during start-up were minimized through use of a detailed prestartup check conducted during the early stages of construction work.

  2. DEEP DESULFURIZATION OF DIESEL FUELS BY A NOVEL INTEGRATED APPROACH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaoliang Ma; Michael Sprague; Lu Sun; Chunshan Song

    2002-10-01

    In order to reduce the sulfur level in liquid hydrocarbon fuels for environmental protection and fuel cell applications, deep desulfurization of a model diesel fuel and a real diesel fuel was conducted by our SARS (selective adsorption for removing sulfur) process using the adsorbent A-2. Effect of temperature on the desulfurization process was examined. Adsorption desulfurization at ambient temperature, 24 h{sup -1} of LHSV over A-2 is efficient to remove dibenzothiophene (DBT) in the model diesel fuel, but difficult to remove 4-methyldibenzothiophene (4-MDBT) and 4,6-dimethyl-dibenzothiophene (4,6-DMDBT). Adsorption desulfurization at 150 C over A-2 can efficiently remove DBT, 4-MDBT and 4,6-DMDBT in the model diesel fuel. The sulfur content in the model diesel fuel can be reduced to less than 1 ppmw at 150 C without using hydrogen gas. The adsorption capacity corresponding to the break-through point is 6.9 milligram of sulfur per gram of A-2 (mg-S/g-A-2), and the saturate capacity is 13.7 mg-S/g-A-2. Adsorption desulfurization of a commercial diesel fuel with a total sulfur level of 47 ppmw was also performed at ambient temperature and 24 h{sup -1} of LHSV over the adsorbent A-2. The results show that only part of the sulfur compounds existing in the low sulfur diesel can be removed by adsorption over A-2 at such operating conditions, because (1) the all sulfur compounds in the low sulfur diesel are the refractory sulfur compounds that have one or two alkyl groups at the 4- and/or 6-positions of DBT, which inhibit the approach of the sulfur atom to the adsorption site; (2) some compounds coexisting in the commercial low sulfur diesel probably inhibit the interaction between the sulfur compounds and the adsorbent. Further work in determining the optimum operating conditions and screening better adsorbent is desired.

  3. Reformulated diesel fuel and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McAdams, Hiramie T [Carrollton, IL; Crawford, Robert W [Tucson, AZ; Hadder, Gerald R [Oak Ridge, TN; McNutt, Barry D [Arlington, VA

    2006-08-22

    A method for mathematically identifying at least one diesel fuel suitable for combustion in an automotive diesel engine with significantly reduced emissions and producible from known petroleum blendstocks using known refining processes, including the use of cetane additives (ignition improvers) and oxygenated compounds.

  4. Influence of fuel variables on the operation of automotive open and pre-chamber diesel and spark ignited stratified charge engines: a literature study covering petroleum and syncrude derived fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Needham, J.R.

    1980-09-01

    A literature study has been carried out to ascertain the influence of fuels and fuel variables on the operation of automotive diesel and spark ignited stratified charge engines with a view to understanding the impact of future fuels derived from Syncrude. The findings from the search are presented and discussed in detail, conclusions reached and recommendations made.

  5. Emissions from Buses with DDC 6V92 Engines Using Synthetic Diesel Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Norton; Keith Vertin; Nigel N. Clark; Donald W. Lyons; Mridul Gautam; Stephen Goguen; James Eberhardt

    1999-05-03

    Synthetic diesel fuel can be made from a variety of feedstocks, including coal, natural gas and biomass. Synthetic diesel fuels can have very low sulfur and aromatic content, and excellent autoignition characteristics. Moreover, synthetic diesel fuels may also economically competitive with California diesel fuel if .roduced in large volumes. Previous engine laboratory and field tests using a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer indicate that synthetic diesel fuel made using the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalytic conversion process is a promising alternative fuel, because it can be used in unmodified diesel engines, and can reduce exhaust emissions substantially. The objective of this study was a preliminary assessment of the emissions from older model transit operated on Mossgas synthetic diesel fuel. The study compared emissions from transit buses operating on Federal no. 2 Diesel fuel, Mossgas synthetic diesel (MGSD), and a 50/50 blend of the two fuels. The buses were equipped with unmodified Detroit Diesel 6V92 2-stroke diesel engines. Six 40-foot buses were tested. Three of the buses had recently rebuilt engines and were equipped with an oxidation catalytic converter. Vehicle emissions measurements were performed using West Virginia University's unique transportable chassis dynamometer. The emissions were measured over the Central Business District (CBD) driving cycle. The buses performed well on both neat and blended MGSD fuel. Three buses without catalytic converters were tested. Compared to their emissions when operating on Federal no. 2 diesel fuel, these buses emitted an average of 5% lower oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and 20% lower particulate matter (PM) when operating on neat MGSD fuel. Catalyst equipped buses emitted an average of 8% lower NOx and 31% lower PM when operating on MGSD than when operating on Federal no. 2 diesel fuel.

  6. Performance-Based Decision-Making in Post-Earthquake Highway Bridge Repair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordin, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    the Northridge Earthquake. Post Earthquake Highway ResponseLoma Prieta Quake. Post Earthquake Highway Response andand ShakeMap for Lifeline Post-Earthquake Response and

  7. Linseed Oil-Based Concrete Surface Treatment -for Building and Highway Structures in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Linseed Oil-Based Concrete Surface Treatment -for Building and Highway Structures in Hong Kong Y using jour Canadian linseed oil- based sealants on concrete specimens madejrom G30120 and G45120 Keywords: Unseed Oil, Concrete Surface Treatment, Salt Spray Resistance, Carbonation, Bond Strength, Ultra

  8. EPA Diesel Rule and the Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-05-08

    The VT program collaborated with industry stakeholders and the EPA (in an effort initiated in 1998 called Diesel Emission Control – Sulfur Effects study, otherwise known as DECSE) to quantify the effects of fuel sulfur on emission control technologies.

  9. Analysis of parasitic losses in heavy duty diesel engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, Christopher Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Fuel economy of large, on-road diesel engines has become even more critical in recent years for engine manufactures, vehicle OEMs, and truck operators, in view of pending CO2 emission regulations. Demands for increased ...

  10. Emission Control Strategy for Downsized Light-Duty Diesels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This poster discusses the combustion aspects and control challenges of a high EGR combustion calibration that was conducted on a moderately downsized diesel engine with a compression ratio of 15:1.

  11. Idling - cruising the fuel inefficiency highway.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, L.; Levinson, T.

    2011-06-30

    What is the purpose of idling? The scale of idling can be small, as when parents idle their vehicles while waiting for their children outside of school, or it can be large, as when ocean liners are in port. In many cases, the primary purpose for idling is to control the temperature of a passenger or freight compartment. Large line-haul trucks idle overnight to keep fuel and the engine warm, for the resting driver's comfort, to mask out noises and smells, and for safety. In addition, all classes of trucks idle during the workday at ports and terminals, busy delivery sites, border crossings, and other work sites. They may be idling to enable slow movement in a queue (creep idling) or to provide other services. Bus drivers also idle their vehicles while they wait for passengers and to warm up in the morning. Even locomotive engines are idled so they start, for hotel load, to keep the battery charged, to keep the toilet water from freezing, and for air brakes, or because the operator idles out of habit. Although this document focuses on long-haul trucks, much of the information applies to other vehicles as well. The impacts of idling are substantial, with as much as 6 billion gallons of fuel burned unnecessarily each year in the United States at a cost of over $20 billion. The extra hours of engine operation also cost the owners money for more frequent maintenance and overhauls. In addition, idling vehicles emit particulates (PM{sub 10}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). These emissions, along with noise from idling vehicles, have led to many local and state restrictions on idling. Two main factors have combined to create a surge of interest in idling reduction (IR): (1) Increasing restrictions on idling for heavy vehicles and (2) The price of diesel fuel. Because stakeholders focus their efforts on improving different factors (air quality, fuel economy, noise level), they do not necessarily agree on the most advantageous technological alternatives to implement. In addition, although many equipment manufacturers have tried to educate customers and government agencies, they often provide conflicting claims about the comparative merits of different devices. This makes it difficult for truck owners to choose the right equipment for their needs. In this study, we present the first comparison of IR technologies with each other and with idling on the basis of both costs and full fuel-cycle emissions, for different locations, fuel prices, and idling patterns. The preferences described are for the technologies that reduce total emissions the most and cost truck owners the least. We also discuss how regulatory issues and legislation affect IR, what financial incentives help to promote IR, and how outreach and education approaches can be adopted to reduce the need to idle. Finally, we offer a prediction of how future research and development (R&D), regulations, and citizen involvement can help to improve fuel economy and clean the air.

  12. "Performance, Emission and Particle distribution of Diesel Engines Fueled with Diesel-Dimethoxymethane (DMM) Blends"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xibin Wang "Performance, Emission and Particle distribution of Diesel Engines Fueled with Diesel-Dimethoxymethane (DMM) Blends" Abstract : Combustion, performance and emission were studied for DI diesel engine fuelled with DMM/diesel fuel blends for DMM content from 0 to 50%. Results showed that, for diesel engine with fuel

  13. Status of Heavy Vehicle Diesel Emission Control Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Test Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Sverdrup

    1999-06-07

    DECSE test program is well under way to providing data on effects of sulfur levels in diesel fuel on performance of emission control technologies.

  14. Neural Modelling and Control of a Diesel Engine with Pollution Constraints Mustapha Ouladsine*, Grard Bloch**, Xavier Dovifaaz**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Neural Modelling and Control of a Diesel Engine with Pollution Constraints Mustapha Ouladsine a neural approach for modelling and control of a turbocharged Diesel engine. A neural model, whose dynamics and outperform during transients the control schemes based on static mappings. Keywords: Diesel

  15. KINETIC MODELING OF A SURROGATE DIESEL FUEL APPLIED TO 3D AUTO-IGNITION IN HCCI ENGINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    KINETIC MODELING OF A SURROGATE DIESEL FUEL APPLIED TO 3D AUTO-IGNITION IN HCCI ENGINES R OF A SURROGATE DIESEL FUEL APPLIED TO 3D AUTO-IGNITION IN HCCI ENGINES INTRODUCTION Engines running on HCCI combustion mode (Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition) have the potential to provide both diesel

  16. Heavy Duty Diesels- The Road Ahead

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation gives a landscape picture of diesel engine technologies from the Daimler point of view.

  17. EPA Clean Diesel Funding Assistance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is accepting applications for the Clean Diesel Funding Assistance Program for projects to achieve significant reductions in diesel emissions in terms of tons of pollution produced by diesel engines and diesel emissions exposure, particularly from fleets operating at or servicing goods movement facilities located in areas designated as having poor air quality.

  18. EPA Tribal Clean Diesel Funding Assistance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is accepting applications for the Tribal Clean Diesel Funding Assistance Program for tribal projects to achieve significant reductions in diesel emissions in terms of tons of pollution produced by diesel engines and diesel emissions exposure. Eligible entities include tribal governments.

  19. Cummins Light Truck Clean Diesel | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light Truck Clean Diesel Cummins Light Truck Clean Diesel 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation 2004deerstang2.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  20. Technology Development for Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines Technology Development for Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines Improve the efficiency of diesel engines for light duty applications...

  1. MobiCleanTM Soot Filter for Diesel Locomotiive Applications ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MobiCleanTM Soot Filter for Diesel Locomotiive Applications MobiCleanTM Soot Filter for Diesel Locomotiive Applications 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

  2. The 60% Efficient Diesel Engine: Probably, Possible, Or Just...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The 60% Efficient Diesel Engine: Probably, Possible, Or Just a Fantasy? The 60% Efficient Diesel Engine: Probably, Possible, Or Just a Fantasy? 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions...

  3. Heavy-Truck Clean Diesel (HTCD) Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heavy-Truck Clean Diesel (HTCD) Program Heavy-Truck Clean Diesel (HTCD) Program 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Caterpillar...

  4. Real-Time Measurement of Diesel Trap Efficiency | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Measurement of Diesel Trap Efficiency Real-Time Measurement of Diesel Trap Efficiency 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters...

  5. 2007 Diesel Particulate Measurement Research (E-66 Project) ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Particulate Measurement Research (E-66 Project) 2007 Diesel Particulate Measurement Research (E-66 Project) 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference:...

  6. Carbonyl Emissions from Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jakober, Chris A.

    2008-01-01

    emissions from gasoline and diesel motor vehicles. Environ.of four dilutions of diesel engine exhaust for a subchronicautomobiles and heavy-duty diesel trucks. Environ. Sci.

  7. Value Analysis of Alternative Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Value Analysis of Alternative Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Substrates for Future Diesel Aftertreatment Systems Value Analysis of Alternative Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF)...

  8. North American Market Challenges for Diesel Engines | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    American Market Challenges for Diesel Engines North American Market Challenges for Diesel Engines 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Gale Banks...

  9. Hydrogen as a Supplemental Fuel in Diesel Engines | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    as a Supplemental Fuel in Diesel Engines Hydrogen as a Supplemental Fuel in Diesel Engines Poster presentation from the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research...

  10. Technical Challenges and Opportunities Light-Duty Diesel Engines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges and Opportunities Light-Duty Diesel Engines in North America Technical Challenges and Opportunities Light-Duty Diesel Engines in North America 2005 Diesel Engine...

  11. Design Challenges of Locomotive Diesel Engines | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges of Locomotive Diesel Engines Design Challenges of Locomotive Diesel Engines 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters...

  12. Adaptive Injection Strategies (AIS) for Ultra-low Emissions Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Injection Strategies (AIS) for Ultra-low Emissions Diesel Engines Adaptive Injection Strategies (AIS) for Ultra-low Emissions Diesel Engines Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel...

  13. Unique Catalyst System for NOx Reduction in Diesel Exhaust |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalyst System for NOx Reduction in Diesel Exhaust Unique Catalyst System for NOx Reduction in Diesel Exhaust Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions...

  14. Fuels and Lubricants to Support Advanced Diesel Engine Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lubricants to Support Advanced Diesel Engine Technology Fuels and Lubricants to Support Advanced Diesel Engine Technology 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

  15. Regulated Emissions from Diesel and Compressed Natural Gas Transit...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emissions from Diesel and Compressed Natural Gas Transit Buses Regulated Emissions from Diesel and Compressed Natural Gas Transit Buses Poster presentaiton at the 2007 Diesel...

  16. How Exhaust Emissions Drive Diesel Engine Fuel Efficiency | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    How Exhaust Emissions Drive Diesel Engine Fuel Efficiency How Exhaust Emissions Drive Diesel Engine Fuel Efficiency 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

  17. Retrofit Diesel Emissions Control System Providing 50% NOxControl...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Emissions Control System Providing 50% NOxControl Retrofit Diesel Emissions Control System Providing 50% NOxControl 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

  18. Next Generation Diesel Engine Control | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Engine Control Next Generation Diesel Engine Control Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007,...

  19. Advanced Ceramic Filter For Diesel Emission Control | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ceramic Filter For Diesel Emission Control Advanced Ceramic Filter For Diesel Emission Control 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Dow Automotive...

  20. Dumping Dirty Diesels: The View From the Bridge | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dumping Dirty Diesels: The View From the Bridge Dumping Dirty Diesels: The View From the Bridge 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters...

  1. Business Case for Light-Duty Diesels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesels Business Case for Light-Duty Diesels 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005deergodwin.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  2. Future Breathing System Requirements for Clean Diesel Engines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Breathing System Requirements for Clean Diesel Engines Future Breathing System Requirements for Clean Diesel Engines Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency &...

  3. Future Diesel Engine Thermal Efficiency Improvement andn Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Engine Thermal Efficiency Improvement andn Emissions Control Technology Future Diesel Engine Thermal Efficiency Improvement andn Emissions Control Technology 2005 Diesel...

  4. A Standard Soot Generator for Diesel Particulate Filter Testing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Standard Soot Generator for Diesel Particulate Filter Testing A Standard Soot Generator for Diesel Particulate Filter Testing Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel...

  5. Exhaust Heat Recovery for Rural Alaskan Diesel Generators | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery for Rural Alaskan Diesel Generators Exhaust Heat Recovery for Rural Alaskan Diesel Generators Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research...

  6. Advanced Modeling of Direct-Injection Diesel Engines | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modeling of Direct-Injection Diesel Engines Advanced Modeling of Direct-Injection Diesel Engines 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters...

  7. Glow Plug Integrated Piezo-Ceramic Combustion Sensor for Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Glow Plug Integrated Piezo-Ceramic Combustion Sensor for Diesel Engines Glow Plug Integrated Piezo-Ceramic Combustion Sensor for Diesel Engines 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions...

  8. (Survey of three isolated diesel power stations in Guatemala)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chronowski, R.A.

    1990-03-15

    I traveled to Guatemala City, Guatemala to participate with a team of specialists to study the operating, administrative, and management efficiency of isolated diesel power plants, operated by Instituto Nacional de Electrificacion (INDE). The study is part of a global initiative managed jointly by the Agency for International Development and the World Bank. The power plants were audited, including INDE's largest isolated diesel station, and two much smaller municipal and privately owned stations. I returned to the USA on February 20, 1990.

  9. Southeast BioDiesel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity forSiliciumEnergyHouston,Windsor,Southchase, Florida:BioDiesel Jump

  10. Prescribed Fire is Cool on Florida Highway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caster, Jeff; McBurney, Willson; Farley, Patricia; Rodriguez, Rose; Green, Lane; McGorty, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    Only you can prevent forest fires! For all our lives we’veYou can’t prevent forest fires. We can, however, preventcan prevent wildfires. ” Forest fires will occur naturally,

  11. Retrofit and Testing of a Pre-Turbo, Diesel Oxidation Catalyst on a Tier 0, SD60M Freight Locomotive Achieving Over 50% PM Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  12. Design of oil consumption measuring system to determine the effects of evolving oil sump composition over time on diesel engine performance and emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz-Soto, Elliott (Elliott A.)

    2006-01-01

    The automotive industry is currently struggling because of the increasingly stricter emissions standards that will take effect in the near future. Diesel engine emissions are of particular interest because they are still ...

  13. Radial-Basis-Function-Network-Based Prediction of Performance and Emission Characteristics in a Bio Diesel Engine Run on WCO Ester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Shiva

    2012-01-01

    Radial basis function neural networks (RBFNNs), which is a relatively new class of neural networks, have been investigated for their applicability for prediction of performance and emission characteristics of a diesel ...

  14. Vermont Permit and License Information, Work in a State Highway...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vermont Permit and License Information, Work in a State Highway Right of Way Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance -...

  15. Automatic recognition codes for Intelligent Vehicle-Highway Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardi, Pierre Charles Louis

    1994-01-01

    This thesis describes an automatic recognition code system designed for non-stop toll collection (part of Intelligent Vehicle-Highway Systems). The system uses Bose, Chaudhuri, and Hocquenghem (BCH) codes to encode the information. Each code...

  16. High carbon fly ash finds uses in highway construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, H.; Patton, R.

    2008-07-01

    The beneficial use of high carbon fly ash in a highway construction project is discussed. The fly ash also had a relatively high content of mercury and some other heavy metals. 1 fig., 4 photos.

  17. Diesel Emission Control in Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  18. The John Deere E diesel Test & Research Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, Nathan; Mitchell, William E.

    2008-09-23

    Three non-road Tier II emissions compliant diesel engines manufactured by John Deere were placed on a durability test plan of 2000 hours each at full load, rated speed (FLRS). The fuel was a blend of 10% fuel ethanol and 90% low sulfur #2 diesel fuel. Seven operational failures involving twenty seven fuel system components occurred prior to completion of the intended test plan. Regulated emissions measured prior to component failure indicated compliance to Tier II certification goals for the observed test experience. The program plan included operating three non-road Tier II diesel engines for 2000 hours each monitoring the regulated emissions at 500 hour intervals for changes/deterioration. The program was stopped prematurely due to number and frequency of injection system failures. The failures and weaknesses observed involved injector seat and valve wear, control solenoid material incompatibility, injector valve deposits and injector high pressure seal cavitation erosion. Future work should target an E diesel fuel standard that emphasizes minimum water content, stability, lubricity, cetane neutrality and oxidation resistance. Standards for fuel ethanol need to require water content no greater than the base diesel fuel standard. Lubricity bench test standards may need new development for E diesel.

  19. Technology, Performance, and Market Report of Wind-Diesel Applications for Remote and Island Communities: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.; Dabo, M.

    2009-02-01

    This paper describes the current status of wind-diesel technology and its applications, the current research activities, and the remaining system technical and commercial challenges. System architectures, dispatch strategies, and operating experience from a variety of wind-diesel systems will be discussed, as well as how recent development to explore distributed energy generation solutions for wind generation can benefit from the performance experience of operating systems. The paper also includes a detailed discussion of the performance of wind-diesel applications in Alaska, where 10 wind-diesel stations are operating and additional systems are currently being implemented. Additionally, because this application represents an international opportunity, a community of interest committed to sharing technical and operating developments is being formed. The authors hope to encourage this expansion while allowing communities and nations to investigate the wind-diesel option for reducing their dependence on diesel-driven energy sources.

  20. Technology, Performance, and Market Report of Wind-Diesel Applications for Remote and Island Communities: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.; Dabo, M.

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the current status of wind-diesel technology and its applications, the current research activities, and the remaining system technical and commercial challenges. System architectures, dispatch strategies, and operating experience from a variety of wind-diesel systems will be discussed, as well as how recent development to explore distributed energy generation solutions for wind generation can benefit from the performance experience of operating systems. The paper also includes a detailed discussion of the performance of wind-diesel applications in Alaska, where 10 wind-diesel stations are operating and additional systems are currently being implemented. Additionally, because this application represents an international opportunity, a community of interest committed to sharing technical and operating developments is being formed. The authors hope to encourage this expansion while allowing communities and nations to investigate the wind-diesel option for reducing their dependence on diesel-driven energy sources.

  1. Regulation of Emissions from Stationary Diesel Engines (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    On July 11, 2006, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued regulations covering emissions from stationary diesel engines New Source Performance Standards that limit emissions of NOx, particulate matter, SO2, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons to the same levels required for nonroad diesel engines. The regulation affects new, modified, and reconstructed diesel engines. Beginning with model year 2007, engine manufacturers must specify that new engines less than 3,000 horsepower meet the same emissions standard as nonroad diesel engines. For engines greater than 3,000 horsepower, the standard will be fully effective in 2011. Stationary diesel engine fuel will also be subject to the same standard as nonroad diesel engine fuel, which reduces the sulfur content of the fuel to 500 parts per million by mid-2007 and 15 parts per million by mid-2010.

  2. Capture of Heat Energy from Diesel Engine Exhaust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuen-Sen Lin

    2008-12-31

    Diesel generators produce waste heat as well as electrical power. About one-third of the fuel energy is released from the exhaust manifolds of the diesel engines and normally is not captured for useful applications. This project studied different waste heat applications that may effectively use the heat released from exhaust of Alaskan village diesel generators, selected the most desirable application, designed and fabricated a prototype for performance measurements, and evaluated the feasibility and economic impact of the selected application. Exhaust flow rate, composition, and temperature may affect the heat recovery system design and the amount of heat that is recoverable. In comparison with the other two parameters, the effect of exhaust composition may be less important due to the large air/fuel ratio for diesel engines. This project also compared heat content and qualities (i.e., temperatures) of exhaust for three types of fuel: conventional diesel, a synthetic diesel, and conventional diesel with a small amount of hydrogen. Another task of this project was the development of a computer-aided design tool for the economic analysis of selected exhaust heat recovery applications to any Alaskan village diesel generator set. The exhaust heat recovery application selected from this study was for heating. An exhaust heat recovery system was fabricated, and 350 hours of testing was conducted. Based on testing data, the exhaust heat recovery heating system showed insignificant effects on engine performance and maintenance requirements. From measurements, it was determined that the amount of heat recovered from the system was about 50% of the heat energy contained in the exhaust (heat contained in exhaust was evaluated based on environment temperature). The estimated payback time for 100% use of recovered heat would be less than 3 years at a fuel price of $3.50 per gallon, an interest rate of 10%, and an engine operation of 8 hours per day. Based on experimental data, the synthetic fuel contained slightly less heat energy and fewer emissions. Test results obtained from adding different levels of a small amount of hydrogen into the intake manifold of a diesel-operated engine showed no effect on exhaust heat content. In other words, both synthetic fuel and conventional diesel with a small amount of hydrogen may not have a significant enough effect on the amount of recoverable heat and its feasibility. An economic analysis computer program was developed on Visual Basic for Application in Microsoft Excel. The program was developed to be user friendly, to accept different levels of input data, and to expand for other heat recovery applications (i.e., power, desalination, etc.) by adding into the program the simulation subroutines of the desired applications. The developed program has been validated using experimental data.

  3. REVIEW OF DIESEL PARTICULATE MATTER SAMPLING METHODS Supplemental Report # 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    REVIEW OF DIESEL PARTICULATE MATTER SAMPLING METHODS Supplemental Report # 1 DIESEL EXHAUST.D. and Megan Arnold University of Minnesota Department of Mechanical Engineering Center for Diesel Research....................................................................................... 3 Diesel aerosol size instrumentation............................................................ 4

  4. Hydraulic Hybrid and Conventional Parcel Delivery Vehicles' Measured Laboratory Fuel Economy on Targeted Drive Cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lammert, M. P.; Burton, J.; Sindler, P.; Duran, A.

    2014-10-01

    This research project compares laboratory-measured fuel economy of a medium-duty diesel powered hydraulic hybrid vehicle drivetrain to both a conventional diesel drivetrain and a conventional gasoline drivetrain in a typical commercial parcel delivery application. Vehicles in this study included a model year 2012 Freightliner P100H hybrid compared to a 2012 conventional gasoline P100 and a 2012 conventional diesel parcel delivery van of similar specifications. Drive cycle analysis of 484 days of hybrid parcel delivery van commercial operation from multiple vehicles was used to select three standard laboratory drive cycles as well as to create a custom representative cycle. These four cycles encompass and bracket the range of real world in-use data observed in Baltimore United Parcel Service operations. The NY Composite cycle, the City Suburban Heavy Vehicle Cycle cycle, and the California Air Resources Board Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck (HHDDT) cycle as well as a custom Baltimore parcel delivery cycle were tested at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Renewable Fuels and Lubricants Laboratory. Fuel consumption was measured and analyzed for all three vehicles. Vehicle laboratory results are compared on the basis of fuel economy. The hydraulic hybrid parcel delivery van demonstrated 19%-52% better fuel economy than the conventional diesel parcel delivery van and 30%-56% better fuel economy than the conventional gasoline parcel delivery van on cycles other than the highway-oriented HHDDT cycle.

  5. An evaluation of alternative horizontal curve design approaches for rural two-lane highways 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voigt, Anthony Paul

    1995-01-01

    STATEMENT It has been recognized that accidents are more likely to occur on horizontal curves than on tangent sections of rural two-lane highways. Previous studies have found that accident &equency and severity are greater on the curve sections of rural... Distance L v a Case 2 Distance r- c a' C Case 3 Distance FIGURE 2. Speed Profile Model Cases (4). 16 Superelevation Deficiency Thete have been several ellbrts to determine relationships among accident rates on horizontal curves and independent...

  6. Plasma Catalysis for NOx Reduction from Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-12-15

    On behalf of the Department of Energy's Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies, we are pleased to introduce the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program. The mission of the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program is to develop more energy efficient and environmentally friendly highway transportation technologies that enable Americans to use less petroleum for their vehicles. The Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program supports this mission by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines for light-, medium-, and heavy-duty highway vehicles that meet future Federal and state emissions regulations. The primary objective of the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program is to improve the brake thermal efficiency of internal combustion engines from 30 to 45 percent for light-duty applications by 2010; and 40 to 55 percent for heavy-duty applications by 2012; while meeting cost, durability, and emissions constraints. R&D activities include work on combustion technologies that increase efficiency and minimize in-cylinder formation of emissions, as well as aftertreatment technologies that further reduce exhaust emissions. Work is also being conducted on ways to reduce parasitic and heat transfer losses through the development and application of thermoelectrics and turbochargers that include electricity generating capability, and conversion of mechanically driven engine components to be driven via electric motors. This introduction serves to outline the nature, current progress, and future directions of the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program. The research activities of this Sub-Program are planned in conjunction with the FreedomCAR Partnership and the 21st Century Truck Partnership and are carried out in collaboration with industry, national laboratories, and universities. Because of the importance of clean fuels in achieving low emissions, R&D activities are closely coordinated with the relevant activities of the Fuel Technologies Sub-Program, also within the Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies. Research is also being undertaken on hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines to provide an interim hydrogen-based powertrain technology that promotes the longer-range FreedomCAR Partnership goal of transitioning to a hydrogen-fueled transportation system. Hydrogen engine technologies being developed have the potential to provide diesel-like engine efficiencies with near-zero emissions.

  7. Advanced Diesel Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission Legislation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Robert Bosch GMBH Common Rail System Engineering for PC Diesel Systems

  8. Chemical and Physical Characteristics of Diesel Aerosol | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Physical Characteristics of Diesel Aerosol Chemical and Physical Characteristics of Diesel Aerosol 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: University of Minnesota...

  9. Simultaneous Efficiency, NOx, and Smoke Improvements through Diesel/Gasoline Dual-Fuel Operation in a Diesel Engine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Jiafeng

    2014-08-05

    Diesel/gasoline dual-fuel combustion uses both gasoline and diesel fuel in diesel engines to exploit their different reactivities. This operation combines the advantages of diesel fuel and gasoline while avoiding their disadvantages, attains...

  10. Rapid engine test to measure injector fouling in diesel engines using vegetable oil fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korus, R.A.; Jaiduk, J.; Peterson, C.L.

    1985-11-01

    Short engine tests were used to determine the rate of carbon deposition on direct injection diesel nozzles. Winter rape, high-oleic and high-linoleic safflower blends with 50% diesel were tested for carbon deposit and compared to that with D-2 Diesel Control Fuel. Deposits were greatest with the most unsaturated fuel, high-linoleic safflower, and least with winter rape. All vegetable oil blends developed power similar to diesel fueled engines with a 6 to 8% greater fuel consumption. 8 references.

  11. Emission Characteristics of a Diesel Engine Operating with In-Cylinder Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Blending

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Curran, Scott; Barone, Teresa L; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Storey, John Morse; Cho, Kukwon; Wagner, Robert M; Parks, II, James E

    2010-01-01

    Advanced combustion regimes such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) and premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) offer benefits of reduced nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions. However, these combustion strategies often generate higher carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions. In addition, aldehydes and ketone emissions can increase in these modes. In this study, the engine-out emissions of a compression-ignition engine operating in a fuel reactivity- controlled PCCI combustion mode using in-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel fuel have been characterized. The work was performed on a 1.9-liter, 4-cylinder diesel engine outfitted with a port fuel injection system to deliver gasoline to the engine. The engine was operated at 2300 rpm and 4.2 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) with the ratio of gasoline to diesel fuel that gave the highest engine efficiency and lowest emissions. Engine-out emissions for aldehydes, ketones and PM were compared with emissions from conventional diesel combustion. Sampling and analysis was carried out following micro-tunnel dilution of the exhaust. Particle geometric mean diameter, number-size distribution, and total number concentration were measured by a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). For the particle mass measurements, samples were collected on Teflon-coated quartz-fiber filters and analyzed gravimetrically. Gaseous aldehydes and ketones were sampled using dinitrophenylhydrazine-coated solid phase extraction cartridges and the extracts were analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). In addition, emissions after a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) were also measured to investigate the destruction of CO, HC and formaldehydes by the catalyst.

  12. Exhaust Aftertreatment and Low Pressure Loop EGR Applied to an Off-Highway Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumgard, Kirby; Triana, Antonio; Johnson, John; Yang, Song; Premchand, Kiran

    2006-01-30

    The goal of the project was to demonstrate that low pressure loop EGR incorporating a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a diesel particulate filter (DPF) can be applied to an off-highway engine to meet Tier 3 (Task I) and Interim Tier 4 (Task II) off-road emissions standards. Task I data was collected using a John Deere 8.1 liter engine modified with a low pressure loop EGR system. The engine and EGR system was optimized and final data over the ISO 8178 eight mode test indicated the NOx emissions were less than 4 g/kWh and the PM was less than 0.02 g/kWh which means the engine met the Tier 3 off-road standard. Considerable experimental data was collected and used by Michigan Tech University to develop and calibrate the MTU-Filter 1D DPF model. The MTU-Filter 1D DPF code predicts the particulate mass evolution (deposition and oxidation) in the diesel particulate filter (DPF) during simultaneous loading and during thermal and NO{sub 2}-assisted regeneration conditions. It also predicts the pressure drop across the DPF, the flow and temperature fields, the solid filtration efficiency and the particle number distribution downstream of the DPF. A DOC model was also used to predict the NO{sub 2} upstream of the DPF. The DPF model was calibrated to the experimental data at temperatures from 230 C to 550 C, and volumetric flow rates from 9 to 39 actual m{sup 3}/min. Model predictions of the solid particulate mass deposited in the DPF after each loading and regeneration case were in agreement within +/-10g (or +/-10%) of experimental measurements at the majority of the engine operating conditions. The activation temperatures obtained from the model calibration are in good agreement with values reported in the literature and gave good results in the model calibration by using constant pre-exponential factors throughout the entire range of conditions evaluated. The average clean filter permeability was 2.372 x 10{sup -13} m{sup 2}. Estimates of the solid particulate mass packing density inside the porous wall were 1 to 5 kg/m{sup 3}; and percolation factors were 0.81 to 0.97. Average particulate layer permeability was 1.95 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}. Solid particulate layer packing density values were between 11 and 128 kg/m{sup 3}. These values were in good agreement with the Peclet number correlation theory reported in the literature. NO{sub 2}-assisted oxidation of PM in the DPF showed experimentally that a significant reduction of the pressure drop can be achieved (<8 kPa) when sufficient NO{sub 2} (>120 ppm) is available and high exhaust gas temperatures ({approx}360-460 C) can be maintained, even at high PM loadings (low NO{sub 2}/solid PM ratios). The CRT{trademark} (DOC-DPF system) showed limited advantages when used with high PM rates (low NOx/PM ratios) in combination with a low pressure loop EGR strategy for a continuous operation of an engine-exhaust aftertreatment system. The 8.1-liter engine was not designed for low-pressure loop EGR and when the EGR was added the NOx emissions were reduced but the PM emissions increased. This corresponds to the well known NOx to PM relationship in which if the NOx is reduced the PM emissions increase. In order for this technology to be successful on this engine family, the engine out PM emissions must be reduced. These results led to Task II. Task II objective was to meet the interim Tier 4 standards using the CCRT{trademark} technology applied to an advanced 6.8 liter John Deere engine. The advanced engine incorporated a 4 valve head, required additional EGR, an advanced high pressure common rail fuel system and a better matched turbocharger. The EGR system was optimized and the goal of less than 2 g/kWh NOx and less than 0.02 g/kWh PM were achieved over the 8 mode test. Again, experimental data was provided to Michigan Tech to study the passive regeneration of the CCRT{trademark} technology. Two computer models, i.e., the MTU 1-D DOC model and the MTU 1-D 2-layer CPF model were developed as part of this research and calibrated using the data obtained from experiments. The 1-D D

  13. Progress in diesel engine emissions control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khair, M.K. (Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States))

    1992-07-01

    A considerable amount of work was carried out in the mid-1980s to develop heavy-duty diesel engines that could meet limits on particulate emissions. These limits, although high by today's standards, were considered very restrictive. Some manufacturers struggled to achieve the 0.6 g/bhp-h particulate matter limit with enough margin for production variabilities and to account for the deterioration factor. Significant progress was achieved in diesel emissions control through engine and fuel system design changes. This eventually made it possible to meet a particulate level of 0.25 g/bhp-h for 1991. The next target level for particulate emissions is 0.1 g/bhp-h for the 1994 heavy-duty engine. To meet the challenge, engine developers are not only considering engine and injection system design changes but also fuel improvements and exhaust aftertreatment. This paper includes a review of past and current strategies used to control emissions in the modern diesel engine.

  14. Influence of fuel variables on the operation of automotive open and pre-chamber diesel and spark ignited stratified charge engines: a literature study covering petroleum and syncrude derived fuels, executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Needham, J.R.

    1980-09-01

    A literature study was carried out to ascertain the influence of fuels and fuel variables on the operation of automotive diesel and spark ignited stratified charge engines with a view to understanding the impact of future fuels derived from syncrude. The findings from the search were presented and discussed in detail in the main report (Ricardo DP.81/539). In this executive summary, the conclusions and recommendations from the main report are presented.

  15. Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. ace020reitz2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies Optimization of Advanced Diesel...

  16. Diesel Cycle: Since we use a Closed System, the work and heat transfers are calculated from changes in internal energy u

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diesel Cycle: Since we use a Closed System, the work and heat transfers are calculated from changes of Diesels (and therefore potential th) are likely to be much higher, because rather than worrying about pre-ignition, we are counting on self-ignition! 1 #12;On top of that, Diesel cycles have no throttling losses, so

  17. Preserving Diesel Exhaust Ultrafine (Nano-) Particulate Structure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Particulate Structure in Genotoxicity Studies to Support Engineering Development of Emission Controls Preserving Diesel Exhaust Ultrafine (Nano-) Particulate Structure in...

  18. Elastomer Compatibility Testing of Renewable Diesel Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frame, E.; McCormick, R. L.

    2005-11-01

    In this study, the integrity and performance of six elastomers were tested with ethanol-diesel and biodiesel fuel blends.

  19. Recent Progress in the Development of Diesel Surrogate Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Mueller, C J

    2009-12-09

    There has been much recent progress in the area of surrogate fuels for diesel. In the last few years, experiments and modeling have been performed on higher molecular weight components of relevance to diesel fuel such as n-hexadecane (n-cetane) and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (iso-cetane). Chemical kinetic models have been developed for all the n-alkanes up to 16 carbon atoms. Also, there has been much experimental and modeling work on lower molecular weight surrogate components such as n-decane and n-dodecane that are most relevant to jet fuel surrogates, but are also relevant to diesel surrogates where simulation of the full boiling point range is desired. For two-ring compounds, experimental work on decalin and tetralin recently has been published. For multi-component surrogate fuel mixtures, recent work on modeling of these mixtures and comparisons to real diesel fuel is reviewed. Detailed chemical kinetic models for surrogate fuels are very large in size. Significant progress also has been made in improving the mechanism reduction tools that are needed to make these large models practicable in multi-dimensional reacting flow simulations of diesel combustion. Nevertheless, major research gaps remain. In the case of iso-alkanes, there are experiments and modeling work on only one of relevance to diesel: iso-cetane. Also, the iso-alkanes in diesel are lightly branched and no detailed chemical kinetic models or experimental investigations are available for such compounds. More components are needed to fill out the iso-alkane boiling point range. For the aromatic class of compounds, there has been no new work for compounds in the boiling point range of diesel. Most of the new work has been on alkyl aromatics that are of the range C7 to C8, below the C10 to C20 range that is needed. For the chemical class of cycloalkanes, experiments and modeling on higher molecular weight components are warranted. Finally for multi-component surrogates needed to treat real diesel, the inclusion of higher molecular weight components is needed in models and experimental investigations.

  20. Recent Progress in the Development of Diesel Surrogate Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J

    2009-09-04

    There has been much recent progress in the area of surrogate fuels for diesel. In the last few years, experiments and modeling have been performed on higher molecular weight components of relevance to diesel fuel such as n-hexadecane (n-cetane) and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (iso-cetane). Chemical kinetic models have been developed for all the n-alkanes up to 16 carbon atoms. Also, there has been much experimental and modeling work on lower molecular weight surrogate components such as n-decane and do-decane which are most relevant to jet fuel surrogates, but are also relevant to diesel surrogates where simulation of the full boiling point range is desired. For the cycloalkanes, experimental work on decalin and tetralin recently has been published. For multi-component surrogate fuel mixtures, recent work on modeling of these mixtures and comparisons to real diesel fuel is reviewed. Detailed chemical kinetic models for surrogate fuels are very large in size. Significant progress also has been made in improving the mechanism reduction tools that are needed to make these large models practicable in multidimensional reacting flow simulations of diesel combustion. Nevertheless, major research gaps remain. In the case of iso-alkanes, there are experiments and modeling work on only one of relevance to diesel: iso-cetane. Also, the iso-alkanes in diesel are lightly branched and no detailed chemical kinetic models or experimental investigations are available for such compounds. More components are needed to fill out the iso-alkane boiling point range. For the aromatic class of compounds, there has been no new work for compounds in the boiling point range of diesel. Most of the new work has been on alkyl aromatics that are of the range C7 to C8, below the C10 to C20 range that is needed. For the chemical class of cycloalkanes, experiments and modeling on higher molecular weight components are warranted. Finally for multi-component surrogates needed to treat real diesel, the inclusion of higher molecular weight components is needed in models and experimental investigations.

  1. JatroDiesel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:onItron (California) Jump to:Jaffrey,JatroDiesel Jump to:

  2. Systems Performance Analyses of Alaska Wind-Diesel Projects; Selawik, Alaska (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2009-04-01

    This fact sheet summarizes a systems performance analysis of the wind-diesel project in Selawik, Alaska. Data provided for this project include community load data, wind turbine output, diesel plant output, thermal load data, average wind speed, average net capacity factor, optimal net capacity factor based on Alaska Energy Authority wind data, average net wind penetration, and estimated fuel savings.

  3. Increased Hot-Plate Ignition Probability for Nanoparticle-Laden Diesel Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacheco, Jose Rafael

    droplets of the fuel were allowed to fall in a controlled environment on a heated metallic plateIncreased Hot-Plate Ignition Probability for Nanoparticle-Laden Diesel Fuel Himanshu Tyagi, Patrick April 2, 2008 ABSTRACT The present study attempts to improve the ignition properties of diesel fuel

  4. Systems Performance Analyses of Alaska Wind-Diesel Projects; Toksook Bay, Alaska (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2009-04-01

    This fact sheet summarizes a systems performance analysis of the wind-diesel project in Toksook Bay, Alaska. Data provided for this project include community load data, average wind turbine output, average diesel plant output, thermal load data, average net capacity factor, optimal net capacity factor based on Alaska Energy Authority wind data, average net wind penetration, estimated fuel savings, and wind system availability.

  5. JET BREAKUP and SPRAY FORMATION in a DIESEL ENGINE James Glimm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

    JET BREAKUP and SPRAY FORMATION in a DIESEL ENGINE James Glimm Department of Applied Mathematics 11973-5000, USA Constantine Tzanos Reactor Analysis and Engineering, Argonne National Laboratory of a fuel eÆcient, nonpollut- ing diesel engine. We report preliminary progress on the numerical simulation

  6. Clean Diesel Component Improvement Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-06-30

    The research conducted in this program significantly increased the knowledge and understanding in the fields of plasma physics and chemistry in diesel exhaust, the performance and characteristics of multifunctional catalysts in diesel exhaust, and the complexities of controlling a combination of such systems to remove NOx. Initially this program was designed to use an in-line plasma system (know as a plasma assisted catalyst system or PAC) to convert NO {yields} NO{sub 2}, a more catalytically active form of nitrogen oxides, and to crack hydrocarbons (diesel fuel in particular) into active species. The NO{sub 2} and the cracked hydrocarbons were then flowed over an in-line ceramic NOx catalyst that removed NO{sub 2} from the diesel exhaust. Even though the PAC system performed well technically and was able to remove over 95% of NOx from diesel exhaust the plasma component proved not to be practical or commercially feasible. The lack of practical and commercial viability was due to high unit costs and lack of robustness. The plasma system and its function was replaced in the NOx removal process by a cracking reforming catalyst that converted diesel fuel to a highly active reductant for NOx over a downstream ceramic NOx catalyst. This system was designated the ceramic catalyst system (CCS). It was also determined that NO conversion to NO{sub 2} was not required to achieve high levels of NOx reduction over ceramic NOx catalyst if that catalyst was properly formulated and the cracking reforming produced a reductant optimized for that NOx catalyst formulation. This system has demonstrated 92% NOx reduction in a diesel exhaust slipstream and 65% NOx reduction from the full exhaust of a 165 hp diesel engine using the FTP cycle. Although this system needs additional development to be commercial, it is simple, cost effective (does not use precious metals), sulfur tolerant, operates at high space velocities, does not require a second fluid be supplied as a reductant, has low parasitic loss of 2-3% and achieves high levels of NOx reduction. This project benefits the public by providing a simple low-cost technology to remove NOx pollutants from the exhaust of almost any combustion source. The reduction of NOx emissions emitted into the troposphere provides well documented improvement in health for the majority of United States citizens. The emissions reduction produced by this technology helps remove the environmental constraints to economic growth.

  7. Development of Technologies for a High Efficiency, Very Low Emission, Diesel Engine for Light Trucks and Sport Utility Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stang, John H.

    1997-12-01

    Cummins Inc., in partnership with the Department of Energy, has developed technology for a new highly efficient, very low emission, diesel engine for light trucks and sport utility vehicles. This work began in April 1997, and started with very aggressive goals for vehicles in the 5751 to 8500 pound GCW weight class. The primary program goals were as follows: (1) EMISSIONS NOx = 0.50 g/mi PM = 0.05 g/mi CO = 2.8 g/mi NMHC = 0.07 g/mi California decided to issue new and even tougher LEV II light truck regulations late in 1999. EPA also issued its lower Tier 2 regulations late in 2000. The net result was that the targets for this diesel engine project were lowered, and these goals were eventually modified by the publication of Federal Tier 2 emission standards early in 2000 to the following: NOx = 0.07 g/mi PM = 0.01 g/mi (2) FUEL ECONOMY The fuel economy goal was 50 percent MPG improvement (combined city/highway) over the 1997 gasoline powered light truck or sport utility vehicle in the vehicle class for which this diesel engine is being designed to replace. The goal for fuel economy remained at 50 percent MPG improvement, even with the emissions goal revisions. (3) COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT Regular design reviews of the engine program will be conducted with a vehicle manufacturer to insure that the concepts and design specifics are commercially feasible. (DaimlerChrysler has provided Cummins with this design review input.) Cummins has essentially completed a demonstration of proof-of-principle for a diesel engine platform using advanced combustion and fuel system technologies. Cummins reported very early progress in this project, evidence that new diesel engine technology had been developed that demonstrated the feasibility of the above emissions goals. Emissions levels of NOx = 0.4 g/mi and PM = 0.06 g/mi were demonstrated for a 5250 lb. test weight vehicle with passive aftertreatment only. These results were achieved using the full chassis dynamometer FTP-75 test procedure that allowed compliance with the Tier 2 Interim Bin 10 Standards and would apply to vehicles in MY2004 through MY2007 timeframe. In further technology development with active aftertreatment management, Cummins has been able to report that the emissions goals for the Tier 2 Bin 5 standards were met on an engine running the full FTP-75 test procedure. The fuel economy on the chassis tests was measured at over 59 percent MPG improvement over the gasoline engines that are offered in typical SUVs and light trucks. The above demonstration used only in-cylinder fueling for management of the aftertreatment system.

  8. Development of Technologies for a High Efficiency, Very Low Emission, Diesel Engine for Light Trucks and Sport Utility Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John H. Stang

    2005-12-31

    Cummins Inc., in partnership with the Department of Energy, has developed technology for a new highly efficient, very low emission, diesel engine for light trucks and sport utility vehicles. This work began in April 1997, and started with very aggressive goals for vehicles in the 5751 to 8500 pound GCW weight class. The primary program goals were as follows: (1) EMISSIONS--NO{sub x} = 0.50 g/mi; PM = 0.05 g/mi; CO = 2.8 g/mi; and NMHC = 0.07 g/mi. California decided to issue new and even tougher LEV II light truck regulations late in 1999. EPA also issued its lower Tier 2 regulations late in 2000. The net result was that the targets for this diesel engine project were lowered, and these goals were eventually modified by the publication of Federal Tier 2 emission standards early in 2000 to the following: NO{sub x} = 0.07 g/mi; and PM = 0.01 g/mi. (2) FUEL ECONOMY--The fuel economy goal was 50 percent MPG improvement (combined city/highway) over the 1997 gasoline powered light truck or sport utility vehicle in the vehicle class for which this diesel engine is being designed to replace. The goal for fuel economy remained at 50 percent MPG improvement, even with the emissions goal revisions. (3) COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT--Regular design reviews of the engine program will be conducted with a vehicle manufacturer to insure that the concepts and design specifics are commercially feasible. (DaimlerChrysler has provided Cummins with this design review input.) Cummins has essentially completed a demonstration of proof-of-principle for a diesel engine platform using advanced combustion and fuel system technologies. Cummins reported very early progress in this project, evidence that new diesel engine technology had been developed that demonstrated the feasibility of the above emissions goals. Emissions levels of NOx = 0.4 g/mi and PM = 0.06 g/mi were demonstrated for a 5250 lb. test weight vehicle with passive aftertreatment only. These results were achieved using the full chassis dynamometer FTP-75 test procedure that allowed compliance with the Tier 2 Interim Bin 10 Standards and would apply to vehicles in MY2004 through MY2007 timeframe. In further technology development with active aftertreatment management, Cummins has been able to report that the emissions goals for the Tier 2 Bin 5 standards were met on an engine running the full FTP-75 test procedure. The fuel economy on the chassis tests was measured at over 59 percent MPG improvement over the gasoline engines that are offered in typical SUVs and light trucks. The above demonstration used only in-cylinder fueling for management of the aftertreatment system.

  9. Development of Technologies for a High Efficiency, Very Low Emission, Diesel Engine for Light Trucks and Sport Utility Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stang, John H.

    2005-12-19

    Cummins Inc., in partnership with the Department of Energy, has developed technology for a new highly efficient, very low emission, diesel engine for light trucks and sport utility vehicles. This work began in April 1997, and started with very aggressive goals for vehicles in the 5751 to 8500 pound GCW weight class. The primary program goals were as follows: (1) EMISSIONS -- NOx = 0.50 g/mi; PM = 0.05 g/mi; CO = 2.8 g/mi; and NMHC = 0.07 g/mi. California decided to issue new and even tougher LEV II light truck regulations late in 1999. EPA also issued its lower Tier 2 regulations late in 2000. The net result was that the targets for this diesel engine project were lowered, and these goals were eventually modified by the publication of Federal Tier 2 emission standards early in 2000 to the following: NOx = 0.07 g/mi; and PM = 0.01 g/mi. (2) FUEL ECONOMY -- The fuel economy goal was 50 percent MPG improvement (combined city/highway) over the 1997 gasoline powered light truck or sport utility vehicle in the vehicle class for which this diesel engine is being designed to replace. The goal for fuel economy remained at 50 percent MPG improvement, even with the emissions goal revisions. (3) COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT -- Regular design reviews of the engine program will be conducted with a vehicle manufacturer to insure that the concepts and design specifics are commercially feasible. (DaimlerChrysler has provided Cummins with this design review input.) Cummins has essentially completed a demonstration of proof-of-principle for a diesel engine platform using advanced combustion and fuel system technologies. Cummins reported very early progress in this project, evidence that new diesel engine technology had been developed that demonstrated the feasibility of the above emissions goals. Emissions levels of NOx = 0.4 g/mi and PM = 0.06 g/mi were demonstrated for a 5250 lb. test weight vehicle with passive aftertreatment only. These results were achieved using the full chassis dynamometer FTP-75 test procedure that allowed compliance with the Tier 2 Interim Bin 10 Standards and would apply to vehicles in MY2004 through MY2007 timeframe. In further technology development with active aftertreatment management, Cummins has been able to report that the emissions goals for the Tier 2 Bin 5 standards were met on an engine running the full FTP-75 test procedure. The fuel economy on the chassis tests was measured at over 59 percent MPG improvement over the gasoline engines that are offered in typical SUVs and light trucks. The above demonstration used only in-cylinder fueling for management of the aftertreatment system.

  10. Biodiesel and Other Renewable Diesel Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-11-01

    Present federal tax incentives apply to certain types of biomass-derived diesel fuels, which in energy policy and tax laws are described either as renewable diesel or biodiesel. To understand the distinctions between these diesel types it is necessary to understand the technologies used to produce them and the properties of the resulting products. This fact sheet contains definitions of renewable and biodiesel and discusses the processes used to convert biomass to diesel fuel and the properties of biodiesel and renewable diesel fuels.

  11. Physical properties of bio-diesel & Implications for use of bio-diesel in diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakravarthy, Veerathu K [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Ra, Youngchul [ORNL; Griffin, Jelani K [ORNL; Reitz, Rolf [University of Wisconsin

    2008-01-01

    In this study we identify components of a typical biodiesel fuel and estimate both their individual and mixed thermo-physical and transport properties. We then use the estimated mixture properties in computational simulations to gauge the extent to which combustion is modified when biodiesel is substituted for conventional diesel fuel. Our simulation studies included both regular diesel combustion (DI) and premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI). Preliminary results indicate that biodiesel ignition is significantly delayed due to slower liquid evaporation, with the effects being more pronounced for DI than PCCI. The lower vapor pressure and higher liquid heat capacity of biodiesel are two key contributors to this slower rate of evaporation. Other physical properties are more similar between the two fuels, and their impacts are not clearly evident in the present study. Future studies of diesel combustion sensitivity to both physical and chemical properties of biodiesel are suggested.

  12. U.S. diesel fuel prices decrease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices Globaldiesel fuel prices7, 2014diesel

  13. Sandia Energy - Low-Temperature Diesel Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy &Water Power ProgramLargeLow-Temperature Diesel

  14. COMPARISON OF CLEAN DIESEL BUSES TO CNG BUSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowell, D.; Parsley, W.; Bush,C; Zupo, D.

    2003-08-24

    Using previously published data on regulated and unregulated emissions, this paper will compare the environmental performance of current generation transit buses operated on compressed natural gas (CNG) to current generation transit buses operated on ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (ULSD) and incorporating diesel particulate filters (DPF). Unregulated emissions evaluated include toxic compounds associated with adverse health effects (carbonyl, PAH, NPAH, benzene) as well as PM particle count and size distribution. For all regulated and unregulated emissions, both technologies are shown to be comparable. DPF equipped diesel buses and CNG buses have virtually identical levels of PM mass emissions and particle number emissions. DPF-equipped diesel buses have lower HC and CO emissions and lower emissions of toxic substances such as benzene, carbonyls and PAHs than CNG buses. CNG buses have lower NOx emissions than DPF-equipped buses, though CNG bus NOx emissions are shown to be much more variable. In addition, this paper will compare the capital and operating costs of CNG and DPF-equipped buses. The cost comparison is primarily based on the experience of MTA New York City Transit in operating CNG buses since 1995 and DPF-equipped buses fueled with ULSD since 2001. Published data on the experience of other large transit agencies in operating CNG buses is used to validate the NYCT experience. The incremental cost (compared to ''baseline'' diesel) of operating a typical 200-bus depot is shown to be six times higher for CNG buses than for ''clean diesel'' buses. The contributors to this increased cost for CNG buses are almost equally split between increased capital costs for purchase of buses and installation of fueling infrastructure, and increased operating costs for purchase of fuel, bus maintenance, and fuel station maintenance.

  15. Diesel prices decrease for first time in four weeks

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDieselDiesel prices decrease for

  16. Diesel prices decrease for first time in four weeks

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDieselDiesel prices decrease

  17. Diesel prices decrease for first time in four weeks

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDieselDiesel prices

  18. Diesel prices decrease for first time in four weeks

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDieselDiesel pricesU.S.

  19. Diesel prices decrease for first time in four weeks

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDieselDiesel pricesU.S.dieseldiesel

  20. Diesel prices decrease for first time in seven weeks

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural Gas Usage FormDieselDiesel