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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

General overview of the Nigerian construction industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study is to investigate and provide a general overview of the Nigerian construction industry, its role in the national economy, the main participants in the industry, the problems that they face, and ...

Dantata, Sanusi (Sanusi A.)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Preliminary studies on the recovery of bitumen from Nigerian tar sands: I. Beneficiation and solvent extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solvent extraction of bitumen from Nigerian tar sands using toluene has been investigated. Pulverization of the tar sands followed by agglomeration in a mechanical shaker resulted in spherical agglomerates having higher bitumen contents than the mined tar sand. The extent of beneficiation was 4% and 19% for the high grade and low grade sands, respectively. Temperature, agitation, and tar sand/solvent (S/L) ratios were found to be significant variables affecting the dissolution of bitumen from the sand. S/L ratio has the greatest effect on extraction efficiency. The rate of bitumen extraction, expressed as extractability eta* showed great dependence on agitation. About 16- and 15-fold increases in extractability were obtained for S/L ratios of 1/20 and 1/5 respectively for a 2.8 fold increase in agitation. At the initial stages of extraction, asphaltene content of the bitumen extracted at 50/sup 0/C was less than that in the bitumen extracted at 25/sup 0/C. This finding could have significant implications for the overall economics of upgrading processes. A high extraction efficiency of about 99% was obtained with stagewise extraction at high tar sand/solvent ratios.

Ademodi, B.; Oshinowo, T.; Sanni, S.A.; Dawodu, O.F.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

ALKALI – CATALYSED PRODUCTION OF BIODIESEL FUEL FROM NIGERIAN CITRUS SEEDS OIL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The potential of oil extracted from the seeds of three different Nigerian citrus fruits for biodiesel production was investigated. Fatty acid alkyl esters were produced from orange seed oil, grape seed oil and tangerine seed oil by transesterification of the oils with ethanol using potassium hydroxide as a catalyst. In the conversion of the citrus seed oils to alkyl esters (biodiesel), the grape seed oil gave the highest yield of 90.6%, while the tangerine seed oil and orange seed oil gave a yield of 83.1 % and 78.5%, respectively. Fuel properties of the seed oil and its biodiesel were determined. The results showed that orange seed oil had a density of 730 Kg/m 3, a viscosity of 36.5 mm 2 /s, and a pour point of- 14 o C; while its biodiesel fuel had a density of 892 Kg/m 3, a viscosity of 5.60 mm 2 /s, and a pour point of- 25 o C. Grape seed oil had a density of 675 Kg/m 3, a viscosity of 39.5 mm 2 /s, and a pour point of- 12 o C, while its biodiesel fuel had a density of 890 Kg/m 3, a viscosity of 4.80 mm 2 /s, and a pour point of- 22 o C. Tangerine seed oil had an acid value of 1.40 mg/g, a density of 568 Kg/m 3, a viscosity of 37.3 mm 2 /s, and a pour point of- 15 o C, while its biodiesel fuel had an acid value of 0.22 mg/g, a density of 895 Kg/m 3, a viscosity of 5.30 mm 2 /s, and a pour point of- 24 o C.

unknown authors

4

©Wilolud Online Journals, 2008. THE NIGERIAN FUEL ENERGY SUPPLY CRISIS AND THE PROPOSED PRIVATE REFINERIES – PROSPECTS AND PROBLEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamism of the world economy has compelled Nigerians to accept the liberalization of its economy to encourage private sector participation and induce managerial efficiency. This has become very imperative most especially, in the downstream sub-sector of the Nigerian oil and gas industry by the establishment and management of private refineries in view of the persistent fuel energy crisis. An attempt is made here at analyzing the prospects and problems of such refineries that are expected to end the fuel energy crisis which started in the 1970s due to increased demand for petroleum products for rehabilitation and reconstruction after the civil war but later metamorphosed into a hydraheaded monster in the 1980s to date. Efforts towards arresting this crisis by the government through the establishment of more refineries, storage depots and network of distribution pipelines etc achieved a short-term solution due to the abysmal low performance of the refineries and facilities in contrast to increasing demand for petroleum products. It is deduced that the low performance resulted from bad and corrupt management by indigenous technocrats and political leaders as well as vandalization of facilities. Prospects for such investments were identified, as well as some of the problems to content with. This is in order to understand the pros and cons of such investments in view of their capital intensiveness and the need to achieve economic goals that must incorporate environmental and social objectives.

Agwom Sani Z

5

Strengthening the Nigerian Sovereign Investment Authority: A Policy Analysis of the Nigerian Excess Crude Account and the Nigerian Sovereign Investment Authority Act  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since international oil prices fluctuate erratically, oilexcess oil revenues when oil prices skyrocket, and tap intoif the current rise in oil prices persists, the manner in

Ugwuibe, Cynthia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Strengthening the Nigerian Sovereign Investment Authority: A Policy Analysis of the Nigerian Excess Crude Account and the Nigerian Sovereign Investment Authority Act  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Global Pension Reserve Oil Saudi Arabia SAMA Foreign n/aWelfare Pension Fund Reserve Oil Qatar Qatar Investmentand the General Reserve Fund) Oil & Gas Russia National

Ugwuibe, Cynthia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Strengthening the Nigerian Sovereign Investment Authority: A Policy Analysis of the Nigerian Excess Crude Account and the Nigerian Sovereign Investment Authority Act  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Savings Authority Oil Investment Corporation of ReserveBrunei Iran Oil Oil Libyan Investment Authority Reserve Fundcurrent and future investments of oil windfalls. Since

Ugwuibe, Cynthia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Strengthening the Nigerian Sovereign Investment Authority: A Policy Analysis of the Nigerian Excess Crude Account and the Nigerian Sovereign Investment Authority Act  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Botswana East Timor Mexico Saudi Arabia Oil Oil State OilFund of Mexico Public Investment Fund Oil Oil Trinidad &New Land Grant Mexico Permanent Fund) Savings* Oil and other

Ugwuibe, Cynthia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Strengthening the Nigerian Sovereign Investment Authority: A Policy Analysis of the Nigerian Excess Crude Account and the Nigerian Sovereign Investment Authority Act  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Land Grant Mexico Permanent Fund) Savings* Oil and otherBotswana East Timor Mexico Saudi Arabia Oil Oil State OilSavings Oil and other non-commodity sources New Mexico State

Ugwuibe, Cynthia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Observations and Interpretations: 2000 Years of Nigerian Art  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Afro-American Arts of the Suriname Rain Forest, at UCLA lastthe creation of the first Suriname art objects just beforeshootdown of African and Suriname "lookalikes," they admit

Selected Editors

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

adult nigerian subjects: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the idea of creating a subjectivity classifier that uses lists of subjective nouns learned by bootstrapping algorithms. The goal of our research is to develop a system that can...

12

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult nigerian population Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sun Jung Kang2... University, Cleveland, OH 3 Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute of MIT ... Source: Tong, Liping - Department of Mathematics and...

13

"Hideous architecture" : mimicry, feint and resistance in turn of the century southeastern Nigerian building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation reconstructs the histories of some exceptional, hitherto unstudied buildings, erected in southeastern Nigeria between 1889 and 1939; they are part of a larger group, dispersed over the African Atlantic ...

Okoye, Ikemefuna Stanley Ifejika

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Effects of drilling fluids on marine bacteria from a Nigerian offshore oilfield  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two marine bacterial isolates from drill mud cuttings obtained from Agbara oilfield, Staphylococcus sp. and Bacillus sp., were cultured aerobically in the presence of varying concentrations (0, 25, 50, and 75 {mu}g/ml) of drilling fluids to determine the effects of concentration of toxicants on their growth. With the exception of Clairsol, Enviromul, and Bariod mineral oil, which had little or no effect, the exponential growth of Bacillus sp. was depressed by all other test chemicals. Additionally, all test chemicals except Clairsol had no effect on lag phase of growth of Bacillus sp. With Staphylococcus sp. the depressive effect on the exponential phase of growth was shown by almost all test chemicals. There was enhancement of both growth rate and generation times of Staphylococcus sp. and decrease of those of Bacillus sp. with increasing concentrations of drilling fluids. These results show that while some drilling fluids may be stimulatory or depressive to bacterial growth, others may be without effect. 23 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Okpokwasil, G.C.; Nnubia, C. [Univ. of Prot Harcourt (Nigeria)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

ALKALI – CATALYSED PRODUCTION OF BIODIESEL FUEL FROM NIGERIAN CITRUS SEEDS OIL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biodiesel production was investigated. Fatty acid alkyl esters were produced from orange seed oil, grape

unknown authors

16

Characterization of selected sorghums for the preparation of ogi, a Nigerian fermented food  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a Strong-Scott barley pearler containing a carborundum wheel 6 inches in diameter. Then the stocks were sifted on a Tyler Rotap through a number 12 mesh screen for 3 minutes. The "overs" of the number 12 screen were taken as an index of grain...

Akingbala, John Olusola

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Convex Approaches to Text Summarization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

obama, reported violence, president, state, new, said, military, mr nigerian, nigerias, africa, kenya, angola, muslim,

Gawalt, Brian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Pulmonary function and symptoms of Nigerian workers exposed to carbon black in dry cell battery and tire factories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pulmonary function and symptoms of 125 workers exposed to carbon black in dry cell battery and tire manufacturing plants were investigated. There was no significant difference in the pulmonary function of the subjects in the two plants. There was good agreement in the symptoms reported in the two different factories: cough with phlegm production, tiredness, chest pain, catarrh, headache, and skin irritation. The symptoms also corroborate those reported in the few studies on the pulmonary effects of carbon black. The suspended particulate levels in the dry cell battery plant ranged from 25 to 34 mg/m/sup 3/ and the subjects with the highest probable exposure level had the most impaired pulmonary function. The pulmonary function of the exposed subjects was significantly lower than that of a control, nonindustrially exposed population. The drop in the lung function from the expected value per year of age was relatively constant for all the study subgroups but the drop per year of duration of employment was more severe in the earlier years of employment. This study has underscored the need for occupational health regulations in the industries of developing countries.

Oleru, U.G.; Elegbeleye, O.O.; Enu, C.C.; Olumide, Y.M.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Current Knowledge of Leishmania Vectors in Mexico: How Geographic Distributions of Species Relate to Transmission Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Lu. shannoni, Lu. panamensis , and Lu. ylephiletor , have recently been found infected with Leishmania mexicana in Campeche. 16, 17 Previous studies in Campeche documented Lu. o. olmeca as infected with Leishmania ; Lu. cruciata was also found... in Campeche (n = 86), Oaxaca (n = 47), and Quintana Roo (n = 40). In contrast, only single sampling localities were available for the states of Coahuila, Chihuahua, and Tamaulipas. The species most commonly obtained were Lu. cruciata (n = 102) and Lu...

Gonzá lez, Camila; Rebollar-Té llez, Eduardo A.; Ibá ñ ez-Bernal, Sergio; Becker-Fauser, Ingeborg; Martí nez-Meyer, Enrique; Peterson, A. Townsend; Sá nchez-Cordero, Ví ctor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Crossing the Divide: A Case Study of Cross-Cultural Organizational Culture and Leadership Perceptions in a Faith-Based Non-Profit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and efficiency. The Nigerian board members and employees, however, expressed a desire for a supportive culture that focused on love and harmony uncovering a discrepancy between American and Nigerian preferences in organizational culture typology. The results from...

Muenich, Joelle 1987-

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "olmeca nigerian forcados" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Possible republics : tracing the 'entanglements' of race and nation in Afro-Latina/o Caribbean thought and activism, 1870-1930  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Massaquoi of Liberia and a paper by Samuel Johnson theNigerian historian, Samuel Johnson. The St. Thomasian

Fusté, José I.; Fusté, José I.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Foreign Fishery Developments Nigeria Plans Large  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by State- owned companies. The Nigerian private sector, however. has also participated in the f Government announced that it planned to donate a $4.7 million re- search vessel to the Nigerian Institute as the Nigerian company was consistently late with wage pay- ments. Poland: Poland's Navimor company delivered two

23

Optica Precolombina Del Peru  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Archaeological American mirrors are common findings and the images obtained with them are often described by archaeologists as possessing high quality. However, photographs attesting this fact are rare, if any. To the best of my knowledge, only two papers show that quality concerning the Olmeca culture, and only one of them mentions the pre-Inca cultures case. Certainly more images are needed to increase awareness of the importance of the existence of sophisticated imaging elements, particularly when evaluating the cultural degree of the pre-Columbian civilizations. In this paper we show images made in two museums in Lima, Peru, by means of mirrors and the lens action on a necklace element.

Lunazzi, J J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Materials science and engineering mse.mcmaster.ca graduate studies at the department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· The Steel Research Centre · The Centre for Automotive Materials and Corrosion. With its reputation Inc., NY Nigerian Oil Co. Nors

Thompson, Michael

25

The Poet and His Inner World: Subjective Experience in the Poetry of Christopher Okigbo and Wole Soyinka  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TiiE POET AND HIS INNER ~LD: SLBJECTIVE EXPERIENCE IN TiiEpublished in 1965, the Nigerian poet Christopher Okigbo madenevertheless, the labour of the poets who write it. Still ,

Muduakor, Obi

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Essays on the Economics of Environmental Issues: The Environmental Kuznets Curve to Optimal Energy Portfolios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

role in the Nigerian energy mix, with coal limited to a veryin any particular energy mix will then be a function of therisk pro?le of the state energy mix is due, in part, to a

Meininger, Aaron G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Waiting for an Angel: Refashioning the African Writing Self  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Helon Habila's Waiting for an Angel, the author argues that third generation Nigerian writers, compared to their post-independence literary forbears, articulate a more refined representation of the artist as a social ...

Edoro, Ainehi

2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

28

asteraceae leaf extract: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

known as the Crofton weed; other common names are eupatory, sticky snakeroot, cat weed, hemp agrimony, sticky agrimony, Mexican Reddy, Gadi VP 17 THE EFFECTS OF A NIGERIAN SPECIE...

29

acai palm fruit: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tree to the Nigerian Economy CiteSeer Summary: Abstract: Date palm tree is an economic crop which is grown in the arid region of Northern Nigeria from latitude 10 N in the...

30

Africa: It's good news, bad news - again  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article presents the outlook for African petroleum. Observations include: Nigerian oil revenues will be $6-7 billion this year, down 50% from '84; Egyptian drillers are still going strong in the Western Desert and Gulf of Suez; Algeria is looking for natural gas buyers, and they have plenty of gas to sell-cheap; Even with new petroleum legislation, Tunisian production and reserves are falling; Libya's bozo leader is feeling the effects of falling oil revenues and falling bombs; Angola continues as a hot spot of activity with 42 successful oil strikes last year; Crude production jumped 29% in Cameroun last year with three new fields onstream; Congo is another West African winner due to major commitments by Elf and Agip.

Not Available

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Biodiesel as an Alternative Energy Resource in Southwest Nigeria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Nigerian state faces unique issues that may provide an opportunity for rural economic growth. One of such is that major urban areas in the southwest of the country are beginning to have population increase and hence air quality problems that will require actions to reduce sources of pollution. One major pollution source is from exhaust emissions from cars and trucks. The use of alternative fuel sources such as biodiesel can make a significant reduction in certain exhaust emissions thus reducing pollution and improving air quality. The opportunity for economic growth in a single product economy like ours could lie in the processing of soybean oil and other suitable feedstocks produced within the country into biodiesel. The new fuel can be used by vehicles traversing the country thus reduce air pollution and providing another market for agricultural feedstocks while creating a value added market for animal fats and spent oils from industrial facilities. The benefits of biodiesel go far beyond the clean burning nature of the product. Bio diesel is a renewable resource helping to reduce the dependence of the economy on limited resources and imports, create a market for farmers and reduce the amount of waste oil, fat and grease being dumped into landfills and sewers.

Ajide O. O

32

Oil and gas developments in central and southern Africa in 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant rightholding changes took place in central and southern Africa during 1987. Angola, Benin, Congo, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Mauritania, Seychelles, Somali Republic, Tanzania, Zaire, and Zambia announced awards or acreage open for bidding. Decreases in exploratory rightholdings occurred in Cameroon, Congo, Cote d'Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Kenya, Namibia, South Africa, and Tanzania. More wells and greater footage were drilled in 1987 than in 1986. Total wells increased by 18% as 254 wells were completed compared to 217 in 1986. Footage drilled during the year increased by 46% as about 1.9 million ft were drilled compared to about 1.3 million ft in 1986. The success rate for exploration wells in 1987 improved slightly to 36% compared to 34% in 1986. Significant discoveries were made in Nigeria, Angola, Congo, and Gabon. Seismic acquisition in 1987 was the major geophysical activity during the year. Total oil production in 1987 was 773 million bbl (about 2.1 million b/d), a decrease of 7%. The decrease is mostly due to a 14% drop in Nigerian production, which comprises 60% of total regional production. The production share of OPEC countries (Nigeria and Gabon) versus non-OPEC countries of 67% remained unchanged from 1986. 24 figs., 5 tabs.

Hartman, J.B.; Walker, T.L.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Material flows of mobile phones and accessories in Nigeria: Environmental implications and sound end-of-life management options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presently, Nigeria is one of the fastest growing Telecom markets in the world. The country's teledensity increased from a mere 0.4 in 1999 to 10 in 2005 following the liberalization of the Telecom sector in 2001. More than 25 million new digital mobile lines have been connected by June 2006. Large quantities of mobile phones and accessories including secondhand and remanufactured products are being imported to meet the pent-up demand. This improvement in mobile telecom services resulted in the preference of mobile telecom services to fixed lines. Consequently, the contribution of fixed lines decreased from about 95% in year 2000 to less than 10% in March 2005. This phenomenal progress in information technology has resulted in the generation of large quantities of electronic waste (e-waste) in the country. Abandoned fixed line telephone sets estimated at 120,000 units are either disposed or stockpiled. Increasing quantities of waste mobile phones estimated at 8 million units by 2007, and accessories will be generated. With no material recovery facility for e-waste and/or appropriate solid waste management infrastructure in place, these waste materials end up in open dumps and unlined landfills. These practices create the potential for the release of toxic metals and halocarbons from batteries, printed wiring boards, liquid crystal display and plastic housing units. This paper presents an overview of the developments in the Nigerian Telecom sector, the material in-flow of mobile phones, and the implications of the management practices for wastes from the Telecom sector in the country.

Osibanjo, Oladele [Department of Chemistry, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State (Nigeria)], E-mail: osibanjo@baselnigeria.org; Nnorom, Innocent Chidi [Department of Industrial Chemistry, Abia State University Uturu (Nigeria)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z