Sample records for oled solid state

  1. Quantum Dot Light Enhancement Substrate for OLED Solid-State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Perkins; Matthew Stevenson; Gagan Mahan; Seth Coe-Sullivan; Peter Kazlas

    2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    With DOE Award No. DE-EE00000628, QD Vision developed and demonstrated a cost-competitive solution for increasing the light extraction efficiency of OLEDs with efficient and stable color rendering index (CRI) for solid state lighting (SSL). Solution processable quantum dot (QD) films were integrated into OLED ITO-glass substrates to generate tunable white emission from blue emitting OLED) devices as well as outcouple light from the ITO film. This QD light-enhancement substrate (QD-LED) technology demonstrated a 60% increase in OLED forward light out-coupling, a value which increases to 76% when considering total increase in multi-directional light output. The objective for the first year was an 80% increase in light output. This project seeks to develop and demonstrate a cost-competitive solution for realizing increased extraction efficiency organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) with efficient and stable color rendering index (CRI) for SSL. Solution processible quantum dot (QD) films will be utilized to generate tunable white emission from blue emitting phosphorescent OLED (Ph-OLED) devices.

  2. Multi-Faceted Scientific Strategies Toward Better Solid-State Lighting of Phosphorescent OLEDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohammad Omary; Bruce Gnade; Qi Wang; Oussama Elbjeirami; Chi Yang; Nigel Shepherd; Huiping Jia; Manuel Quevedo; Husam Alshareef; Minghang Li; Ming-Te Lin; Wei-Hsuan Chen; Iain Oswald; Pankaj Sinha; Ravi Arvapally; Usha Kaipa; John Determan; Sreekar Marpu; Roy McDougald; Gustavo Garza; Jason Halbert; Unnat Bhansali; Michael Perez

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has advanced solid-state lighting (SSL) by utilizing new phosphorescent systems for use in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The technical approach was two-fold: a) Targeted synthesis and screening of emitters designed to exhibit phosphorescence with maximized brightness in the solid state; and b) Construction and optimizing the performance of monochromatic and white OLEDs from the best new emitters to improve performance metrics versus the state of the art. The phosphorescent systems were screened candidates among a large variety of recentlysynthesized and newly-designed molecular and macromolecular metal-organic phosphors. The emitters and devices have been optimized to maximize light emission and color metrics, improve the long-term durability of emitters and devices, and reduce the manufacturing cost both by simplifying the process flow and by seeking less expensive device components than common ones. The project succeeded in all these goals upon comparison of the best materials and devices investigated vs. the state of the art of the technology.

  3. Apply: Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D - 2014(DE...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Through research and development of solid-state lighting (SSL),including both light-emitting diode (LED) and organic light emitting diode (OLED) technologies, the objectives of...

  4. Solid-state lighting technology perspective.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Coltrin, Michael Elliott

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-State Lighting (SSL) uses inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) to convert electricity into light for illumination. SSL has the potential for enormous energy savings and accompanying environmental benefits if its promise of 50% (or greater) energy efficiencies can be achieved. This report provides a broad summary of the technologies that underlie SSL. The applications for SSL and potential impact on U.S. and world-wide energy consumption, and impact on the human visual experience are discussed. The properties of visible light and different technical metrics to characterize its properties are summarized. The many factors contributing to the capital and operating costs for SSL and traditional lighting sources (incandescent, fluorescent, and high-intensity discharge lamps) are discussed, with extrapolations for future SSL goals. The technologies underlying LEDs and OLEDs are also described, including current and possible alternative future technologies and some of the present limitations.

  5. Molecular Orbital Study of the First Excited State of the OLED Material Tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum(III)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Molecular Orbital Study of the First Excited State of the OLED Material Tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum, Michigan 48202 Received February 6, 2001. Revised Manuscript Received May 16, 2001 Tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum

  6. Solid State Division

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M. (eds.)

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces. (LSP)

  7. Solid-State Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    research and design. Quality LED luminaires require program designed to successfully move solid-state lighting precise design of several components -LED arrays, electronic into the...

  8. The solid state lighting initiative: An industry/DOE collaborativeeffort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Steve

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new era of technology is emerging in lighting. It is being propelled by the dramatic improvements in performance of solid state light sources. These sources offer an entirely new array of design aspects not achievable with current light sources. At the same time, their performance characteristics continue to improve and are expected to eclipse those of the most common light sources within the near future. High efficiency is one of these performance attributes motivating the Department of Energy (DOE) to work with the manufacturers of this new technology to create a program plan sufficiently comprehensive to support an industry-driven Solid State Lighting Initiative before Congress. The purpose of the initiative is to educate Congress about the potential of this technology to reduce the electric lighting load within the United States and, consequently, to realize the associated environmental benefits. The initiative will solicit congressional support to accelerate the development of solid state technology through investment in the research and development necessary to overcome the technical barriers that currently limit the products to niche markets. While there are multiple technologies being developed as solid state light sources, the two technologies which hold the most promise for application to general illumination are Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) and Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLEDs). The form of these sources can be quite different from current sources, allowing exciting new design uses for the products. Being diffuse sources, OLEDs are much lower in intensity per unit area than LEDs. The manufacturing process for OLEDs lends itself to shapes that can be formed to different geometries, making possible luminous panels or flexible luminous materials. Conversely, LEDs are very intense point sources which can be integrated into a small space to create an intense source or used separately for less focused applications. Both OLED and LED sources are expected to be thinner than other comparable sources; this thinness offers additional design opportunities.

  9. Solid state switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merritt, Bernard T. (Livermore, CA); Dreifuerst, Gary R. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1500 A peak, 1.0 .mu.s pulsewidth, and 4500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry.

  10. Solid state switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merritt, B.T.; Dreifuerst, G.R.

    1994-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1,500 A peak, 1.0 [mu]s pulsewidth, and 4,500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry. 6 figs.

  11. Packaging of solid state devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glidden, Steven C.; Sanders, Howard D.

    2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A package for one or more solid state devices in a single module that allows for operation at high voltage, high current, or both high voltage and high current. Low thermal resistance between the solid state devices and an exterior of the package and matched coefficient of thermal expansion between the solid state devices and the materials used in packaging enables high power operation. The solid state devices are soldered between two layers of ceramic with metal traces that interconnect the devices and external contacts. This approach provides a simple method for assembling and encapsulating high power solid state devices.

  12. Solid state optical microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, I.T.

    1983-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal. 2 figs.

  13. Solid state optical microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, Ian T. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

  14. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garzon, Fernando H. (Sante Fe, NM); Chung, Brandon W. (Los Alamos, NM); Raistrick, Ian D. (Los Alamos, NM); Brosha, Eric L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer.

  15. Solid state rapid thermocycling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Spadaccini, Christopher

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid thermal cycling of a material is targeted. A solid state heat exchanger with a first well and second well is coupled to a power module. A thermoelectric element is coupled to the first well, the second well, and the power module, is configured to transfer thermal energy from the first well to the second well when current from the power module flows through the thermoelectric element in a first direction, and is configured to transfer thermal energy from the second well to the first well when current from the power module flows through the thermoelectric element in a second direction. A controller may be coupled to the thermoelectric elements, and may switch the direction of current flowing through the thermoelectric element in response to a determination by sensors coupled to the wells that the amount of thermal energy in the wells falls below or exceeds a pre-determined threshold.

  16. OLED area illumination source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foust, Donald Franklin (Scotia, NY); Duggal, Anil Raj (Niskayuna, NY); Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Nealon, William Francis (Gloversville, NY); Bortscheller, Jacob Charles (Clifton Park, NY)

    2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

  17. OLED devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapochak, Linda Susan [Arlington, VA; Burrows, Paul Edward [Kennewick, WA; Bimalchandra, Asanga [Richland, WA

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An OLED device having an emission layer formed of an ambipolar phosphine oxide host material and a dopant, a hole transport layer in electrical communication with an anode, an electron transport layer in communication with a cathode, wherein the HOMO energy of the hole transport layer is substantially the same as the HOMO energy of the ambipolar host in the emission layer, and the LUMO energy of the electron transport layer is substantially the same as the LUMO energy of the ambipolar host in the emission layer.

  18. Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs) and Optically-Detected Magnetic Resonance (ODMR) studies on organic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Min

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic semiconductors have evolved rapidly over the last decades and currently are considered as the next-generation technology for many applications, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) in flat-panel displays (FPDs) and solid state lighting (SSL), and organic solar cells (OSCs) in clean renewable energy. This dissertation focuses mainly on OLEDs. Although the commercialization of the OLED technology in FPDs is growing and appears to be just around the corner for SSL, there are still several key issues that need to be addressed: (1) the cost of OLEDs is very high, largely due to the costly current manufacturing process; (2) the efficiency of OLEDs needs to be improved. This is vital to the success of OLEDs in the FPD and SSL industries; (3) the lifetime of OLEDs, especially blue OLEDs, is the biggest technical challenge. All these issues raise the demand for new organic materials, new device structures, and continued lower-cost fabrication methods. In an attempt to address these issues, we used solution-processing methods to fabricate highly efficient small molecule OLEDs (SMOLEDs); this approach is costeffective in comparison to the more common thermal vacuum evaporation. We also successfully made efficient indium tin oxide (ITO)-free SMOLEDs to further improve the efficiency of the OLEDs. We employed the spin-dependent optically-detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) technique to study the luminescence quenching processes in OLEDs and organic materials in order to understand the intrinsic degradation mechanisms. We also fabricated polymer LEDs (PLEDs) based on a new electron-accepting blue-emitting polymer and studied the effect of molecular weight on the efficiency of PLEDs. All these studies helped us to better understand the underlying relationship between the organic semiconductor materials and the OLEDs’ performance, and will subsequently assist in further enhancing the efficiency of OLEDs. With strongly improved device performance (in addition to other OLEDs' attributes such as mechanical flexibility and potential low cost), the OLED technology is promising to successfully compete with current technologies, such as LCDs and inorganic LEDs.

  19. Solid-state lithium battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ihlefeld, Jon; Clem, Paul G; Edney, Cynthia; Ingersoll, David; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Fenton, Kyle Ross

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a higher power, thin film lithium-ion electrolyte on a metallic substrate, enabling mass-produced solid-state lithium batteries. High-temperature thermodynamic equilibrium processing enables co-firing of oxides and base metals, providing a means to integrate the crystalline, lithium-stable, fast lithium-ion conductor lanthanum lithium tantalate (La.sub.1/3-xLi.sub.3xTaO.sub.3) directly with a thin metal foil current collector appropriate for a lithium-free solid-state battery.

  20. Municipal Solid Waste in The United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barlaz, Morton A.

    2011 Facts and Figures Municipal Solid Waste in The United States #12;United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste (5306P) EPA530-R-13-001 May 2013 www.epa.gov #12;MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE IN THE UNITED STATES: 2011 FACTS AND FIGURES Table of Contents Chapter Page MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE

  1. Solid-state radioluminescent compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, Roger L. (Albuquerque, NM); Gill, John T. (Miamisburg, OH); Hawkins, Daniel B. (Fairbanks, AK); Renschler, Clifford L. (Tijeras, NM); Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA); Smith, Henry M. (Overland Park, KS)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid state radioluminescent composition for light source comprises an optically clear polymer organic matrix containing tritiated organic materials and dyes capable of "red" shifting primary scintillation emissions from the polymer matrix. The tritiated organic materials are made by reducing, with tritium, an unsaturated organic compound that prior to reduction contains olefinic or alkynylic bonds.

  2. Solid-state membrane module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, John Howard (Salt Lake City, UT); Taylor, Dale M. (Murray, UT)

    2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-state membrane modules comprising at least one membrane unit, where the membrane unit has a dense mixed conducting oxide layer, and at least one conduit or manifold wherein the conduit or manifold comprises a dense layer and at least one of a porous layer and a slotted layer contiguous with the dense layer. The solid-state membrane modules may be used to carry out a variety of processes including the separating of any ionizable component from a feedstream wherein such ionizable component is capable of being transported through a dense mixed conducting oxide layer of the membrane units making up the membrane modules. For ease of construction, the membrane units may be planar.

  3. Creation of a U.S. Phosphorescent OLED Lighting Panel Manufacturing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hack, Michael

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Universal Display Corporation (UDC) has pioneered high efficacy phosphorescent OLED (PHOLED™) technology to enable the realization of an exciting new form of high quality, energy saving solid-date lighting. In laboratory test devices, we have demonstrated greater than 100 lm/W conversion efficacy. In this program, Universal Display will demonstrate the scalability of its proprietary UniversalPHOLED technology and materials for the manufacture of white OLED lighting panels that meet commercial lighting targets. Moser Baer Technologies will design and build a U.S.- based pilot facility. The objective of this project is to establish a pilot phosphorescent OLED (PHOLED) manufacturing line in the U.S. Our goal is that at the end of the project, prototype lighting panels could be provided to U.S. luminaire manufacturers for incorporation into products to facilitate the testing of design concepts and to gauge customer acceptance, so as to facilitate the growth of the embryonic U.S. OLED lighting industry. In addition, the team will provide a cost of ownership analysis to quantify production costs including OLED performance metrics which relate to OLED cost such as yield, materials usage, cycle time, substrate area, and capital depreciation. This project was part of a new DOE initiative designed to help establish and maintain U.S. leadership in this program will support key DOE objectives by showing a path to meet Department of Energy Solid-State Lighting Manufacturing Roadmap cost targets, as well as meeting its efficiency targets by demonstrating the energy saving potential of our technology through the realization of greater than 76 lm/W OLED lighting panels by 2012.

  4. Development of High Efficacy, Low Cost Phosphorescent Oled Lightning Luminaire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Hack

    2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this two year program, UDC together with Armstrong World Industries, Professor Stephen Forrest (University of Michigan) and Professor Mark Thompson (University of Southern California) planned to develop and deliver high efficiency OLED lighting luminaires as part of an integrated ceiling illumination system that exceed the Department of Energy (DOE) 2010 performance projections. Specifically the UDC team in 2010 delivered two prototype OLED ceiling illumination systems, each consisting of four individual OLED lighting panels on glass integrated into Armstrong's novel TechZone open architecture ceiling systems, at an overall system efficacy of 51 lm/W, a CRI = 85 and a projected lifetime to 70% of initial luminance to exceed 10,000 hours. This accomplishment represents a 50% increase in luminaire efficacy and a factor of two in lifetime over that outlined in the solicitation. In addition, the team has also delivered one 15cm x 15cm lighting panel fabricated on a flexible metal foil substrate, demonstrating the possibility using OLEDs in a range of form factors. During this program, our Team has pursued the commercialization of these OLED based ceiling luminaires, with a goal to launch commercial products within the next three years. We have proven that our team is ideally suited to develop these highly novel and efficient solid state lighting luminaires, having both the technical experience and commercial strategy to leverage work performed under this contract. Our calculations show that the success of our program could lead to energy savings of more than 0.5 quads or 8 MMTC (million metric tons of carbon) per year by 2016.

  5. High Efficancy Integrated Under-Cabinet Phosphorescent OLED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Hack

    2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this two year program Universal Display Corporation (UDC) together with the University of Michigan, Teknokon, developed and delivered an energy efficient phosphorescent OLED under cabinet illumination system. Specifically the UDC team goal was in 2011 to deliver five (5) Beta level OLED under cabinet lighting fixtures each consisting of five 6-inch x 6-inch OLED lighting panels, delivering over 420 lumens, at an overall system efficacy of >60 lm/W, a CRI of >85, and a projected lifetime to 70% of initial luminance to exceed 20,000 hours. During the course of this program, the Team pursued the commercialization of these OLED based under cabinet lighting fixtures, to enable the launch of commercial OLED lighting products. The UDC team was ideally suited to develop these novel and efficient solid state lighting fixtures, having both the technical experience and commercial distribution mechanisms to leverage work performed under this contract. UDC's business strategy is to non-exclusively license its PHOLED technology to lighting manufacturers, and also supply them with our proprietary PHOLED materials. UDC is currently working with several licensees who are manufacturing OLED lighting panels using our technology. During this 2 year program, we further developed our high efficiency white Phosphorescent OLEDs from the first milestone, achieving a 80 lm/W single pixel to the final milestone, achieving an under-cabinet PHOLED lighting system that operates at 56 lm/W at 420 lumens. Each luminaire was comprised of ten 15cm x 7.5cm lighting modules mounted in outcoupling enhancement lenses and a control module. The lamps modules are connected together using either plugs or wires with plugs on each end, allowing for unlimited configurations. The lamps are driven by an OLED driver mounted in an enclosure which includes the AC plug. As a result of advancements gained under this program, the path to move OLED lighting panels from development into manufacturing has been further realized. We have found that under-cabinet lighting is an ideal first entry product opportunity to launch OLED lighting for residential applications. From the studies that we have performed, our PHOLED under-cabinet lighting system performance is very similar to many of the current commercially available LED under-cabinet luminaires. We also found that the projected cost of PHOLED luminaire should be comparable to the LED luminaire by 2015. With the additional benefits of PHOLED lighting, no glare, better uniformity and low operating temperature, it can be easily seen how the PHOLED under-cabinet luminaire could be preferred over the LED competition. Although the metrics we set for this program were extremely aggressive, the performance we achieved and reported, represents a very significant advancement in the OLED lighting industry.

  6. Solid-state optical microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, I.T.

    1981-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid state optical microscope is described wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. Means for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions are provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

  7. Solid state electrochromic light modulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cogan, Stuart F. (111 Downey St., Norwood, MA 02062); Rauh, R. David (111 Downey St., Norwood, MA 02062)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An all solid-state variable transmission electrochromic device has a source of charge compensating ions. An inorganic oxide counterelectrode film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions increases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength is separated from a primary electrochromic film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions decreases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength by an insulating electrolyte film that transports the charge compensating ions. First and second electrodes are contiguous with the inorganic oxide counter electrode film and the primary electrochromic film, respectively, and separated by the three films.

  8. Solid state electrochromic light modulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cogan, Stuart F. (Sudbury, MA); Rauh, R. David (Newton, MA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An all solid-state variable transmission electrochromic device has a source of charge compensating ions. An inorganic oxide counterelectrode film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions increases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength is separated from a primary electrochromic film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions decreases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength by an insulating electrolyte film that transports the charge compensating ions. First and second electrodes are contiguous with the inorganic oxide counter electrode film and the primary electrochromic film, respectively, and separated by the three films.

  9. Solid state electrochromic light modulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cogan, S.F.; Rauh, R.D.

    1990-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An all solid-state variable transmission electrochromic device has a source of charge compensating ions. An inorganic oxide counter electrode film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions increases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength is separated from a primary electrochromic film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions decreases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength by an insulating electrolyte film that transports the charge compensating ions. First and second electrodes are contiguous with the inorganic oxide counter electrode film and the primary electrochromic film, respectively, and separated by the three films. 4 figs.

  10. Materials for solid state lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, S.G.; Simmons, J.A.

    2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Dramatic improvement in the efficiency of inorganic and organic light emitting diodes (LEDs and OLEDs) within the last decade has made these devices viable future energy efficient replacements for current light sources. However, both technologies must overcome major technical barriers, requiring significant advances in material science, before this goal can be achieved. Attention will be given to each technology associated with the following major areas of material research: (1) material synthesis, (2) process development, (3) device and defect physics, and (4) packaging. The discussion on material synthesis will emphasize the need for further development of component materials, including substrates and electrodes, necessary for improving device performance. The process technology associated with the LEDs and OLEDs is very different, but in both cases it is one factor limiting device performance. Improvements in process control and methodology are expected to lead to additional benefits of higher yield, greater reliability and lower costs. Since reliability and performance are critical to these devices, an understanding of the basic physics of the devices and device failure mechanisms is necessary to effectively improve the product. The discussion will highlight some of the more basic material science problems remaining to be solved. In addition, consideration will be given to packaging technology and the need for the development of novel materials and geometries to increase the efficiencies and reliability of the devices. The discussion will emphasize the performance criteria necessary to meet lighting applications, in order to illustrate the gap between current status and market expectations for future product.

  11. Solid State Lighting Program (Falcon)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meeks, Steven

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past two years, KLA-Tencor and partners successfully developed and deployed software and hardware tools that increase product yield for High Brightness LED (HBLED) manufacturing and reduce product development and factory ramp times. This report summarizes our development effort and details of how the results of the Solid State Light Program (Falcon) have started to help HBLED manufacturers optimize process control by enabling them to flag and correct identified killer defect conditions at any point of origin in the process manufacturing flow. This constitutes a quantum leap in yield management over current practice. Current practice consists of die dispositioning which is just rejection of bad die at end of process based upon probe tests, loosely assisted by optical in-line monitoring for gross process deficiencies. For the first time, and as a result of our Solid State Lighting Program, our LED manufacturing partners have obtained the software and hardware tools that optimize individual process steps to control killer defects at the point in the processes where they originate. Products developed during our two year program enable optimized inspection strategies for many product lines to minimize cost and maximize yield. The Solid State Lighting Program was structured in three phases: i) the development of advanced imaging modes that achieve clear separation between LED defect types, improves signal to noise and scan rates, and minimizes nuisance defects for both front end and back end inspection tools, ii) the creation of defect source analysis (DSA) software that connect the defect maps from back-end and front-end HBLED manufacturing tools to permit the automatic overlay and traceability of defects between tools and process steps, suppress nuisance defects, and identify the origin of killer defects with process step and conditions, and iii) working with partners (Philips Lumileds) on product wafers, obtain a detailed statistical correlation of automated defect and DSA map overlay to failed die identified using end product probe test results. Results from our two year effort have led to “automated end-to-end defect detection” with full defect traceability and the ability to unambiguously correlate device killer defects to optically detected features and their point of origin within the process. Success of the program can be measured by yield improvements at our partner’s facilities and new product orders.

  12. My Favorite OLED Panel

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    My Favorite OLED Panel Basar Erdener Sun and Snow Photo Courtesy 2009-2015 Kvikken 2 Sizable 3 Sizable Photo Courtesy Printmeneer on Etsy 4 5 Shapeable Photo Courtesy Dia...

  13. Solid state radiative heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid state radiative heat pump operable at room temperature (300 K) utilizes a semiconductor having a gap energy in the range of 0.03-0.25 eV and operated reversibly to produce an excess or deficit of change carriers as compared equilibrium. In one form of the invention an infrared semiconductor photodiode is used, with forward or reverse bias, to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. In another form of the invention, a homogenous semiconductor is subjected to orthogonal magnetic and electric fields to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. Three methods of enhancing transmission of radiation the active surface of the semiconductor are disclosed. In one method, an anti-refection layer is coated into the active surface of the semiconductor, the anti-reflection layer having an index of refraction equal to the square root of that of the semiconductor. In the second method, a passive layer is speaced trom the active surface of the semiconductor by a submicron vacuum gap, the passive layer having an index of refractive equal to that of the semiconductor. In the third method, a coupler with a paraboloid reflecting surface surface is in contact with the active surface of the semiconductor, the coupler having an index of refraction about the same as that of the semiconductor.

  14. Solid state safety jumper cables

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid state jumper cables for connecting two batteries in parallel, having two bridge rectifiers for developing a reference voltage, a four-input decoder for determining which terminals are to be connected based on a comparison of the voltage at each of the four terminals to the reference voltage, and a pair of relays for effecting the correct connection depending on the determination of the decoder. No connection will be made unless only one terminal of each battery has a higher voltage than the reference voltage, indicating positive'' terminals, and one has a lower voltage than the reference voltage, indicating negative'' terminals, and that, therefore, the two high voltage terminals may be connected and the two lower voltage terminals may be connected. Current flows once the appropriate relay device is closed. The relay device is preferably a MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor) combined with a series array of photodiodes that develop MOSFET gate-closing potential when the decoder output causes an LED to light.

  15. Solid state safety jumper cables

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (353 Church Rd., Beech Island, SC 29841)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid state jumper cables for connecting two batteries in parallel, having two bridge rectifiers for developing a reference voltage, a four-input decoder for determining which terminals are to be connected based on a comparison of the voltage at each of the four terminals to the reference voltage, and a pair of relays for effecting the correct connection depending on the determination of the decoder. No connection will be made unless only one terminal of each battery has a higher voltage than the reference voltage, indicating "positive" terminals, and one has a lower voltage than the reference voltage, indicating "negative" terminals, and that, therefore, the two high voltage terminals may be connected and the two lower voltage terminals may be connected. Current flows once the appropriate relay device is closed. The relay device is preferably a MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor) combined with a series array of photodiodes that develop MOSFET gate-closing potential when the decoder output causes an LED to light.

  16. Solid state radiative heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berdahl, Paul H. (Oakland, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid state radiative heat pump (10, 50, 70) operable at room temperature (300.degree. K.) utilizes a semiconductor having a gap energy in the range of 0.03-0.25 eV and operated reversibly to produce an excess or deficit of charge carriers as compared to thermal equilibrium. In one form of the invention (10, 70) an infrared semiconductor photodiode (21, 71) is used, with forward or reverse bias, to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. In another form of the invention (50), a homogeneous semiconductor (51) is subjected to orthogonal magnetic and electric fields to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. Three methods of enhancing transmission of radiation through the active surface of the semiconductor are disclosed. In one method, an anti-reflection layer (19) is coated into the active surface (13) of the semiconductor (11), the anti-reflection layer (19) having an index of refraction equal to the square root of that of the semiconductor (11). In the second method, a passive layer (75) is spaced from the active surface (73) of the semiconductor (71) by a submicron vacuum gap, the passive layer having an index of refractive equal to that of the semiconductor. In the third method, a coupler (91) with a paraboloid reflecting surface (92) is in contact with the active surface (13, 53) of the semiconductor (11, 51), the coupler having an index of refraction about the same as that of the semiconductor.

  17. Roll-To-Roll Process for Transparent Metal Electrodes in OLED Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slafer, W. Dennis

    2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This program will develop and demonstrate a new manufacturing technology that can help to improve the efficiency and reduce the cost of producing the next generation solid-state lighting (OLEDs)for a broad range of commercial applications. This will not only improve US competitiveness in the manufacturing sector but will also result in a positive impact in meeting the Department of Energy’s goal of developing high efficiency lighting while reducing the environmental impact.

  18. Polymer OLED White Light Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homer Antoniadis; Vi-En Choong; Stelios Choulis; Brian Cumpston; Rahul Gupta; Mathew Mathai; Michael Moyer; Franky So

    2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    OSRAM Opto Semiconductors (OSRAM) successfully completed development, fabrication and characterization of the large area, polymer based white light OLED prototype at their OLED Research and Development (R&D) facility in San Jose, CA. The program, funded by the Department of Energy (DOE), consisted of three key objectives: (1) Develop new polymer materials and device architectures--in order to improve the performance of organic light emitters. (2) Develop processing techniques--in order to demonstrate and enable the manufacturing of large area, white light and color tunable, solid state light sources. (3) Develop new electronics and driving schemes for organic light sources, including color-tunable light sources. The key performance goals are listed. A world record efficiency of 25 lm/W was established for the solution processed white organic device from the significant improvements made during the project. However, the challenges to transfer this technology from an R&D level to a large tile format such as, the robustness of the device and the coating uniformity of large area panels, remain. In this regard, the purity and the blend nature of the materials are two factors that need to be addressed in future work. During the first year, OSRAM's Materials and Device group (M&D) worked closely with the major polymer material suppliers to develop the polymer emissive technology. M&D was successful in demonstrating a 7-8 lm/W white light source which was based on fluorescent materials. However, it became apparent that the major gains in efficiency could only be made if phosphorescent materials were utilized. Thus, in order to improve the performance of the resulting devices, the focus of the project shifted towards development of solution-processable phosphorescent light emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) and device architectures. The result is a higher efficiency than the outlined project milestone.

  19. OLEDS FOR GENERAL LIGHTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anil Duggal; Don Foust; Chris Heller; Bill Nealon; Larry Turner; Joe Shiang; Nick Baynes; Tim Butler; Nalin Patel

    2004-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this program was to reduce the long term technical risks that were keeping the lighting industry from embracing and developing organic light-emitting diode (OLED) technology for general illumination. The specific goal was to develop OLEDs for lighting to the point where it was possible to demonstrate a large area white light panel with brightness and light quality comparable to a fluorescence source and with an efficacy comparable to that of an incandescent source. it was recognized that achieving this would require significant advances in three area: (1) the improvement of white light quality for illumination, (2) the improvement of OLED energy efficiency at high brightness, and (3) the development of cost-effective large area fabrication techniques. The program was organized such that, each year, a ''deliverable'' device would be fabricated which demonstrated progress in one or more of the three critical research areas. In the first year (2001), effort concentrated on developing an OLED capable of generating high illumination-quality white light. Ultimately, a down-conversion method where a blue OLED was coupled with various down-conversion layers was chosen. Various color and scattering models were developed to aid in material development and device optimization. The first year utilized this approach to deliver a 1 inch x 1 inch OLED with higher illumination-quality than available fluorescent sources. A picture of this device is shown and performance metrics are listed. To their knowledge, this was the first demonstration of true illumination-quality light from an OLED. During the second year, effort concentrated on developing a scalable approach to large area devices. A novel device architecture consisting of dividing the device area into smaller elements that are monolithically connected in series was developed. In the course of this development, it was realized that, in addition to being scalable, this approach made the device tolerant to the most common OLED defect--electrical shorts. This architecture enabled the fabrication of a 6 inch x 6 inch OLED deliverable for 2002. A picture of this deliverable is shown and the performance metrics are listed. At the time, this was the highest efficiency, highest lumen output illumination-quality OLED in existence. The third year effort concentrated on improving the fabrication yield of the 6 inch x 6 inch devices and improving the underlying blue device efficiency. An efficiency breakthrough was achieved through the invention of a new device structure such that now 15 lumen per watt devices could be fabricated. A 2 feet x 2 feet OLED panel consisting of sixteen 6 inch x 6 inch high efficiency devices tiled together was then fabricated. Pictures of this panel are shown with performance metrics listed. This panel met all project objectives and was the final deliverable for the project. It is now the highest efficiency, highest lumen output, illumination-quality OLED in existence.

  20. Solid-State Lighting Videos | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Information Resources Solid-State Lighting Videos Solid-State Lighting Videos On this page you can access DOE Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Program videos. photo of a university...

  1. Solid State Thin Film Lithium Microbatteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Z.

    Solid state thin film lithium microbatteries fabricated by pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) are suggested. During deposition the following process parameters must be considered, which are laser energy and fluence, laser pulse ...

  2. Novel phosphors for solid state lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furman, Joshua D

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid state white light emitting diode lighting devices outperform conventional light sources in terms of lifetime, durability, and lumens per watt. However, the capital contribution is still to high to encourage widespread adoption. Furthermore...

  3. Grating enhanced solid-state laser amplifiers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erlandson, Alvin C. (Livermore, CA); Britten, Jerald A. (Clayton, CA)

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel method and apparatus for suppressing ASE and parasitic oscillation modes in a high average power laser is introduced. Such an invention, as disclosed herein, uses diffraction gratings to increase gain, stored energy density, and pumping efficiency of solid-state laser gain media, such as, but not limited to rods, disks and slabs. By coupling predetermined gratings to solid-state gain media, such as crystal or ceramic laser gain media, ASE and parasitic oscillation modes can be effectively suppressed.

  4. Scalar operators in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Boqin

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selectivity and resolution of solid-state NMR spectra are determined by dispersion of local magnetic fields originating from relaxation effects and orientation-dependent resonant frequencies of spin nuclei. Theoretically, the orientation-dependent resonant frequencies can be represented by a set of irreducible tensors. Among these tensors, only zero rank tensors (scalar operators) are capable of providing high resolution NMR spectra. This thesis presents a series of new developments in high resolution solid-state NMR concerning the reconstruction of various scalar operators motion in solid C{sub 60} is analyzed.

  5. ELSEVIER Solid State Ionics 94 (1997) 17-25 Ceramic solid electrolytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Stacy

    ELSEVIER Solid State Ionics 94 (1997) 17-25 SOLID STATE IoMcs Ceramic solid electrolytes John B electrolytes are best suited for solid reactants, as are found in most battery systems. Ceramic solid 78712-106.3. USA Abstract Strategies for the design of ceramic solid electrolytes are reviewed. Problems

  6. Ionic Liquid-Enhanced Solid State Electrolyte Interface (SEI...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liquid-Enhanced Solid State Electrolyte Interface (SEI) for Lithium Sulfur Batteries. Ionic Liquid-Enhanced Solid State Electrolyte Interface (SEI) for Lithium Sulfur Batteries....

  7. Solid-State Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics and Kinetics. Solid-State Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics and Kinetics. Abstract: Solid-state reversible...

  8. The Kanatzidis - Chang Cell: dye sensitized all solid state solar...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Kanatzidis - Chang Cell: dye sensitized all solid state solar cell Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > The Kanatzidis - Chang Cell: dye sensitized all solid state...

  9. Federal Technology Deployment Pilot: Exterior Solid State Lighting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal Technology Deployment Pilot: Exterior Solid State Lighting Federal Technology Deployment Pilot: Exterior Solid State Lighting Presentation-given at the Fall 2011 Federal...

  10. Solid state division progress report, period ending February 29, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research is reported concerning theoretical solid state physics; surface and near-surface properties of solids; defects in solids; transport properties of solids; neutron scattering; crystal growth and characterization; and isotope research materials.

  11. ?B-Crystallin: A Hybrid Solid-State/Solution-State NMR...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ?B-Crystallin: A Hybrid Solid-StateSolution-State NMR Investigation Reveals Structural Aspects of the Heterogeneous ?B-Crystallin: A Hybrid Solid-StateSolution-State...

  12. Passivation-free solid state battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abraham, K.M.; Peramunage, D.

    1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to passivation-free solid-state rechargeable batteries composed of Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} anode, a solid polymer electrolyte and a high voltage cathode. The solid polymer electrolyte comprises a polymer host, such as polyacrylonitrile, poly(vinyl chloride), poly(vinyl sulfone), and poly(vinylidene fluoride), plasticized by a solution of a Li salt in an organic solvent. The high voltage cathode includes LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, LiCoO{sub 2}, LiNiO{sub 2} and LiV{sub 2}O{sub 5} and their derivatives. 5 figs.

  13. Passivation-free solid state battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abraham, Kuzhikalail M. (Needham, MA); Peramunage, Dharmasena (Norwood, MA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to passivation-free solid-state rechargeable batteries composed of Li.sub.4 Ti.sub.5 O.sub.12 anode, a solid polymer electrolyte and a high voltage cathode. The solid polymer electrolyte comprises a polymer host, such as polyacrylonitrile, poly(vinyl chloride), poly(vinyl sulfone), and poly(vinylidene fluoride), plasticized by a solution of a Li salt in an organic solvent. The high voltage cathode includes LiMn.sub.2 O.sub.4, LiCoO.sub.2, LiNiO.sub.2 and LiV.sub.2 O.sub.5 and their derivatives.

  14. Coordinated garbage collection for raid array of solid state disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillow, David A; Ki, Youngjae; Oral, Hakki S; Shipman, Galen M; Wang, Feiyi

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An optimized redundant array of solid state devices may include an array of one or more optimized solid-state devices and a controller coupled to the solid-state devices for managing the solid-state devices. The controller may be configured to globally coordinate the garbage collection activities of each of said optimized solid-state devices, for instance, to minimize the degraded performance time and increase the optimal performance time of the entire array of devices.

  15. Technology assessment and market analysis of solid state ultracapacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Zibo

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides quantitative analysis of Solid State Ultracapacitors (SSUs) from technological and financial perspectives. SSUs are Ultracapacitors with solid electrolytes predicted to have huge application potential ...

  16. Solid-state NMR imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gopalsami, Nachappa (Naperville, IL); Dieckman, Stephen L. (Elmhurst, IL); Ellingson, William A. (Naperville, IL)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for use with a solid-state NMR spectrometer includes a special imaging probe with linear, high-field strength gradient fields and high-power broadband RF coils using a back projection method for data acquisition and image reconstruction, and a real-time pulse programmer adaptable for use by a conventional computer for complex high speed pulse sequences.

  17. Energy Conversion: Solid-State Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    8 Energy Conversion: Solid-State Lighting E. Kioupakis1,2 , P. Rinke1,3 , A. Janotti1 , Q. Yan1 fraction of the world's energy resources [1]. Lighting has been one of the earliest applications. The inefficiency of existing light sources that waste most of the power they consume is the reason for this large

  18. Abstract--The FREEDM grid utilizes solid state transformers (SST) and solid state fault interruption devices (FID) which may

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimball, Jonathan W.

    bidirectional power flow between the system and the renewable energy sources. The system also includes solid of a Distribution Grid with Solid State Power Devices Karl Stefanski, Hengsi Qin, Badrul H. Chowdhury, Senior Member1 Abstract-- The FREEDM grid utilizes solid state transformers (SST) and solid state fault

  19. Solid state synthesis of poly(dichlorophosphazene)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Christopher W. (Essex Junction, VT); Hneihen, Azzam S. (Burlington, VT); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for making poly(dichlorophosphazene) using solid state reactants is disclosed and described. The present invention improves upon previous methods by removing the need for chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents, eliminating complicated equipment and simplifying the overall process by providing a "single pot" two step reaction sequence. This may be accomplished by the condensation reaction of raw materials in the melt phase of the reactants and in the absence of an environmentally damaging solvent.

  20. Heat Pump Water Heater using Solid-State Energy Converters |...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Heat Pump Water Heater using Solid-State Energy Converters Heat Pump Water Heater using Solid-State Energy Converters Sheetak will work on developing a full scale prototype of its...

  1. Doing Business with DOE's Solid-State Lighting Program | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Quality Solid-State Lighting Program Overview Brochure Home About the Solid-State Lighting Program R&D Program Market-Based Programs SSL Basics Using LEDs Information Resources...

  2. Friction Stir and Ultrasonic Solid State Joining of Magnesium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Ultrasonic Solid State Joining of Magnesium to Steel Friction Stir and Ultrasonic Solid State Joining of Magnesium to Steel 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  3. The Institute for Solid State Physics The University of Tokyo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    research works on advanced solid state spectroscopy. In 2005, the operation of the PF ring was quitted fromThe Institute for Solid State Physics The University of Tokyo Activity ReportActivity Report Laboratory (SRL) was estab- lished in 1975 as a research group dedicating to study solid state physics using

  4. Ris National Laboratory Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø National Laboratory Postprint Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Department Year 2007 Paper Højgaard Jensen1, Jørgen B. Bilde-Sørensen3, Mogens Mogensen1 1Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry-Sørensen3 , Mogens Mogensen1 1 Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Department, Risø National Laboratory

  5. Blue Solid-State Photoluminescence and Electroluminescence from Novel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myrick, Michael Lenn

    Blue Solid-State Photoluminescence and Electroluminescence from Novel Poly copolymers give rise to efficient ( ) 0.16-0.76) blue solid-state emission (max ) 422-443 nm) which can-PPE (max 500-520 nm). The effective and blue-shifted solid-state emission is a result of disrupting

  6. HIGH INTENSITY DISCHARGE (HID) SOLID STATE BALLAST PROGRAM PHASE I FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ailing, W.R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    change in the output power for the solid state ballast asof the solid state ballast's constant output power withswitching power supplies such as the solid state ballast.

  7. Pulsed Power for Solid-State Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gagnon, W; Albrecht, G; Trenholme, J; Newton, M

    2007-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Beginning in the early 1970s, a number of research and development efforts were undertaken at U.S. National Laboratories with a goal of developing high power lasers whose characteristics were suitable for investigating the feasibility of laser-driven fusion. A number of different laser systems were developed and tested at ever larger scale in pursuit of the optimum driver for laser fusion experiments. Each of these systems had associated with it a unique pulsed power option. A considerable amount of original and innovative engineering was carried out in support of these options. Ultimately, the Solid-state Laser approach was selected as the optimum driver for the application. Following this, the Laser Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the University of Rochester undertook aggressive efforts directed at developing the technology. In particular, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a series of laser systems beginning with the Cyclops laser and culminating in the present with the National Ignition Facility were developed and tested. As a result, a large amount of design information for solid-state laser pulsed power systems has been documented. Some of it is in the form of published papers, but most of it is buried in internal memoranda, engineering reports and LLNL annual reports. One of the goals of this book is to gather this information into a single useable format, such that it is easily accessed and understood by other engineers and physicists for use with future designs. It can also serve as a primer, which when seriously studied, makes the subsequent reading of original work and follow-up references considerably easier. While this book deals only with the solid-state laser pulsed power systems, in the bibliography we have included a representative cross section of papers and references from much of the very fine work carried out at other institutions in support of different laser approaches. Finally, in recent years, there has been a renewed interest in high-average-power solid-state glass lasers. Much of the prime power technology developed in support of this has definite applications in the long term for fusion power plant scenarios.

  8. Solid State Marx Modulators for Emerging Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemp, M.A.; /SLAC

    2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Emerging linear accelerator applications increasingly push the boundaries of RF system performance and economics. The power modulator is an integral part of RF systems whose characteristics play a key role in the determining parameters such as efficiency, footprint, cost, stability, and availability. Particularly within the past decade, solid-state switch based modulators have become the standard in high-performance, high power modulators. One topology, the Marx modulator, has characteristics which make it particularly attractive for several emerging applications. This paper is an overview of the Marx topology, some recent developments, and a case study of how this architecture can be applied to a few proposed linear accelerators.

  9. Nanoengineering for solid-state lighting.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, E. Fred (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute,Troy, NY); Koleske, Daniel David; Wetzel, Christian (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute,Troy, NY); Lee, Stephen Roger; Missert, Nancy A.; Lin, Shawn-Yu (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute,Troy, NY); Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Fischer, Arthur Joseph

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes results from a 3-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project performed in collaboration with researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Our collaborative effort was supported by Sandia's National Institute for Nanoengineering and focused on the study and application of nanoscience and nanoengineering concepts to improve the efficiency of semiconductor light-emitting diodes for solid-state lighting applications. The project explored LED efficiency advances with two primary thrusts: (1) the study of nanoscale InGaN materials properties, particularly nanoscale crystalline defects, and their impact on internal quantum efficiency, and (2) nanoscale engineering of dielectric and metal materials and integration with LED heterostructures for enhanced light extraction efficiency.

  10. Solid-State Lighting Program Strategy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage » SearchEnergyDepartmentScoping Study |4Solid-State EnergyLighting ProgramJames

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Solid-State Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted for US PatentOperationalfor DownloadSolarUseratSolid-State

  12. UDC Demonstrates Phosphorescent OLED Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Universal Display Corporation (UDC), along with project partners Armstrong World Industries and the universities of Michigan and Southern California, have successfully demonstrated two phosphorescent OLED (PHOLED™) luminaire systems, the first of their kind in the U.S. This achievement marks a critical step in the development of practical OLED lighting in a complete luminaire system, including decorative housing, power supply, mounting, and maintenance provisions. Each luminaire has overall dimensions of approximately 15x60 cm and is comprised of four 15x15 cm phosphorescent OLED panels. With a combined power supply and lamp efficacy of 51 lm/W, the prototype luminaire is about twice as efficient as the market-leading halogen-based systems. In addition, the prototype OLED lighting system snaps into Armstrong's TechZone™ Ceiling System, which is commercially available in the U.S.x

  13. PHYSICS "636, SOLID STATE II: BOOKS Christopher Henley, spring 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henley, Christopher L.

    transport, and density- functional theory. This covers many of our topics, at the level of the advanced Theory (1970). QC 176.H32 ­ The first half of this book corresponds to Solid State I, the second to SolidPHYSICS "636, SOLID STATE II: BOOKS Christopher Henley, spring 2012 My basic "text" will be set

  14. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balmer, D.K.; Haverty, T.W.; Nordin, C.W.; Tyree, W.H.

    1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite. 1 fig.

  15. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balmer, David K. (155 Coral Way, Broomfield, CO 80020); Haverty, Thomas W. (1173 Logan, Northglenn, CO 80233); Nordin, Carl W. (7203 W. 32nd Ave., Wheatridge, CO 80033); Tyree, William H. (1977 Senda Rocosa, Boulder, CO 80303)

    1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite.

  16. Compact high voltage solid state switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glidden, Steven C.

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact, solid state, high voltage switch capable of high conduction current with a high rate of current risetime (high di/dt) that can be used to replace thyratrons in existing and new applications. The switch has multiple thyristors packaged in a single enclosure. Each thyristor has its own gate drive circuit that circuit obtains its energy from the energy that is being switched in the main circuit. The gate drives are triggered with a low voltage, low current pulse isolated by a small inexpensive transformer. The gate circuits can also be triggered with an optical signal, eliminating the trigger transformer altogether. This approach makes it easier to connect many thyristors in series to obtain the hold off voltages of greater than 80 kV.

  17. ON-SITE DEMONSTRATION PROCEDURE FOR SOLID-STATE FLUORESCENT BALLAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verderber, Rudy

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the solid-state ballast supplies electrical power to theof switching power transistors that are essential for solid-solid-state ballast can transform the input electrical power

  18. International trends in solid-state lighting : analyses of the article and patent literature.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Huey, Mark C. (Strategic Perspectives, Incorporated, McLean, VA); Boyack, Kevin W.; Miksovic, Ann E. (Strategic Perspectives, Incorporated, McLean, VA)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of the literature of solid-state lighting, based on a comprehensive dataset of 35,851 English-language articles and 12,420 U.S. patents published or issued during the years 1977-2004 in the foundational knowledge domain of electroluminescent materials and phenomena. The dataset was created using a complex, iteratively developed search string. The records in the dataset were then partitioned according to: whether they are articles or patents, their publication or issue date, their national or continental origin, whether the active electroluminescent material was inorganic or organic, and which of a number of emergent knowledge sub-domains they aggregate into on the basis of bibliographic coupling. From these partitionings, we performed a number of analyses, including: identification of knowledge sub-domains of historical and recent importance, and trends over time of the contributions of various nations and continents to the knowledge domain and its sub-domains. Among the key results: (1) The knowledge domain as a whole has been growing quickly: the average growth rates of the inorganic and organic knowledge sub-domains have been 8%/yr and 25%/yr, respectively, compared to average growth rates less than 5%/yr for English-language articles and U.S. patents in other knowledge domains. The growth rate of the organic knowledge sub-domain is so high that its historical dominance by the inorganic knowledge sub-domain will, at current trajectories, be reversed in the coming decade. (2) Amongst nations, the U.S. is the largest contributor to the overall knowledge domain, but Japan is on a trajectory to become the largest contributor within the coming half-decade. Amongst continents, Asia became the largest contributor during the past half-decade, overwhelmingly so for the organic knowledge sub-domain. (3) The relative contributions to the article and patent datasets differ for the major continents: North America contributing relatively more patents, Europe contributing relatively more articles, and Asia contributing in a more balanced fashion. (4) For the article dataset, the nations that contribute most in quantity also contribute most in breadth, while the nations that contribute less in quantity concentrate their contributions in particular knowledge sub-domains. For the patent dataset, North America and Europe tend to contribute improvements in end-use applications (e.g., in sensing, phototherapy and communications), while Asia tends to contribute improvements at the materials and chip levels. (5) The knowledge sub-domains that emerge from aggregations based on bibliographic coupling are roughly organized, for articles, by the degree of localization of electrons and holes in the material or phenomenon of interest, and for patents, according to both their emphasis on chips, systems or applications, and their emphasis on organic or inorganic materials. (6) The six 'hottest' topics in the article dataset are: spintronics, AlGaN UV LEDs, nanowires, nanophosphors, polyfluorenes and electrophosphorescence. The nine 'hottest' topics in the patent dataset are: OLED encapsulation, active-matrix displays, multicolor OLEDs, thermal transfer for OLED fabrication, ink-jet printed OLEDs, phosphor-converted LEDs, ornamental LED packages, photocuring and phototherapy, and LED retrofitting lamps. A significant caution in interpreting these results is that they are based on English-language articles and U.S. patents, and hence will tend to over-represent the strength of English-speaking nations (particularly the U.S.), and under-represent the strength of non-English-speaking nations (particularly China).

  19. Solid-State Lighting Program Strategy Overview - 2014 BTO Peer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lighting Program Strategy Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Solid-State Lighting Program Strategy Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: James Broderick, U.S. Department of...

  20. Testimonials - Partnerships in Solid-State Lighting - Cree, Inc...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cree, Inc. Testimonials - Partnerships in Solid-State Lighting - Cree, Inc. Addthis Text Version The words "Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of...

  1. Solid-State Lighting Manufacturing Research and Development ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to achieve cost reduction of solid-state lighting (SSL) for general illumination through improvements in manufacturing equipment, processes, or techniques. It is anticipated that...

  2. FEMP Outdoor Solid-State Lighting Intiative: Resources for Outdoor...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    sheet describes the Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) solid-state lighting (SSL) initiatives that provide information and resources for the application of SSL lighting...

  3. LED Watch: The Outlook for OLEDs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    December 2014 LED Watch: The Outlook for OLEDs James Brodrick, U.S. Department of Energy LD+A Magazine

  4. Bichromatic Driving of a Solid State Cavity QED System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Papageorge; Arka Majumdar; Erik D. Kim; Jelena Vuckovic

    2011-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The bichromatic driving of a solid state cavity quantum electrodynamics system is used to probe cavity dressed state transitions and observe coherent interaction between the system and the light field. We theoretically demonstrate the higher order cavity-dressed states, supersplitting, and AC stark shift in a solid state system comprised of a quantum dot strongly coupled to a photonic crystal cavity for on- and far off-resonant cases. For the off-resonant case, phonons mediate off-resonant coupling between the quantum dot and the photonic resonator, a phenomenon unique to solid state cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  5. Testimonials - Partnerships in Solid-State Lighting - Soraa,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Mike Krames: The Department of Energy has done a great job in supporting solid-state lighting in the United States. We have funding programs, EERE does funding, research and...

  6. A New I/O Scheduler for Solid State Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, Marcus P.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    parameters of solid state drives. Using the information from the parameter extraction, we present a new I/O scheduler design which utilizes the structure of solid state devices to efficiently schedule writes. The new scheduler, implemented on a 2.6 Linux...

  7. Modulated optical solid-state spectrometer applications in plasma diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, John

    Modulated optical solid-state spectrometer applications in plasma diagnostics John Howard Plasma A new electro-optically modulated optical solid-state MOSS interferometer has been constructed for the measurement of the low order spectral moments of line emission from optically thin radiant media

  8. Nikolaos Bonanos Fuel Cells & Solid State Chemistry Dept.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolaos Bonanos Fuel Cells & Solid State Chemistry Dept. Risø, Technical University of Denmark, P Oxide Fuel Cells, Genova, Italy, 22-24 October 2007 nikolaos.bonanos@risoe.dk Materials for SPFCs conductors I: Danish-French workshop on solid state materials for low to medium temperature fuel cells

  9. Solid State Replacement of Rotating Mirror Cameras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, A M; Bartolick, J M

    2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Rotating mirror cameras have been the mainstay of mega-frame per second imaging for decades. There is still no electronic camera that can match a film based rotary mirror camera for the combination of frame count, speed, resolution and dynamic range. The rotary mirror cameras are predominantly used in the range of 0.1 to 100 micro-seconds per frame, for 25 to more than a hundred frames. Electron tube gated cameras dominate the sub microsecond regime but are frame count limited. Video cameras are pushing into the microsecond regime but are resolution limited by the high data rates. An all solid state architecture, dubbed ''In-situ Storage Image Sensor'' or ''ISIS'', by Prof. Goji Etoh, has made its first appearance into the market and its evaluation is discussed. Recent work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has concentrated both on evaluation of the presently available technologies and exploring the capabilities of the ISIS architecture. It is clear though there is presently no single chip camera that can simultaneously match the rotary mirror cameras, the ISIS architecture has the potential to approach their performance.

  10. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE DELPHI SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Shaffer; Sean Kelly; Subhasish Mukerjee; David Schumann; Gail Geiger; Kevin Keegan; John Noetzel; Larry Chick

    2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of Phase I under this project is to develop a 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell power system for a range of fuels and applications. During Phase I, the following will be accomplished: Develop and demonstrate technology transfer efforts on a 5 kW stationary distributed power generation system that incorporates steam reforming of natural gas with the option of piped-in water (Demonstration System A). Initiate development of a 5 kW system for later mass-market automotive auxiliary power unit application, which will incorporate Catalytic Partial Oxidation (CPO) reforming of gasoline, with anode exhaust gas injected into an ultra-lean burn internal combustion engine. This technical progress report covers work performed by Delphi from January 1, 2003 to June 30, 2003, under Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC-02NT41246. This report highlights technical results of the work performed under the following tasks: Task 1 System Design and Integration; Task 2 Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack Developments; Task 3 Reformer Developments; Task 4 Development of Balance of Plant (BOP) Components; Task 5 Manufacturing Development (Privately Funded); Task 6 System Fabrication; Task 7 System Testing; Task 8 Program Management; and Task 9 Stack Testing with Coal-Based Reformate.

  11. Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance Delphi SOFC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Shaffer; Gary Blake; Sean Kelly; Subhasish Mukerjee; Karl Haltiner; Larry Chick; David Schumann; Jeff Weissman; Gail Geiger; Ralphi Dellarocco

    2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The following report details the results under the DOE SECA program for the period July 2006 through December 2006. Developments pertain to the development of a 3 to 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell power system for a range of fuels and applications. This report details technical results of the work performed under the following tasks for the SOFC Power System: Task 1 SOFC System Development; Task 2 Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack Developments; Task 3 Reformer Developments; Task 4 Development of Balance of Plant Components; Task 5 Project Management; and Task 6 System Modeling & Cell Evaluation for High Efficiency Coal-Based Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Gas Turbine Hybrid System.

  12. Solid-State Lighting Patents Resulting from DOE-Funded Projects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solid-State Lighting Patents Resulting from DOE-Funded Projects Solid-State Lighting Patents Resulting from DOE-Funded Projects 2013 DOE Solid-State Lighting Program Fact Sheet...

  13. 150-kV, 80-A SOLID STATE POWER SUPPLY FOR NEUTRAL BEAM INJECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owren, H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    owned rig 150-kV, 80-A SOLID STATE POWER SUPPLY FOR NEUTRALpaper describes an all solid state power supply designed forment and arc power supplies are also solid state. With the

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - average power solid-state Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solid-state Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: average power solid-state Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Badrul H. Chowdhury Solid State...

  15. COMMENTS ON ""EFFICIENCY OF THE SOLID-STATE ENGINE MADE WITH NITINOL MEMORY MATERIAL""

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed, H.A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Solid- State Engine Made with Nitinol Memoryof the Solid-State Engine Made'with Nitinol Memory Material"efficiency of a solid-state engine made with a Ni-Ti alloy (

  16. Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff Webcast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This May 6, 2010 webcast served as the first official meeting of the new DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium. Ed Smalley of Seattle City Light and Bruce Kinzey of Pacific Northwest...

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: "Solid-state Lighting: 'The case...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    illumination. Since then, investments in the now-renamed field of solid-state lighting (SSL) have accelerated and considerable progress has been made, not always in the directions...

  18. Phase Behavior and Solid State Chemistry of Olivines

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Annual Merit Review FY 2008 TJRichardson BATT Task 1.2 Phase Behavior and Solid State Chemistry of Olivines BATT Task 1.2 Thomas J. Richardson Environmental Energy Technologies...

  19. MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    must be an Iowa electric governmental customer of MidAmerican Energy Company. Light-emitting diode and induction types of solid state lighting (SSL) qualify under this program....

  20. State Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Plan (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The State supports the "good management of solid waste and the conservation of natural resources through the promotion or development of systems to collect, separate, reclaim, recycle, and dispose...

  1. Solid state power bus controllers for aerospace applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villarreal, Terry Joseph

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SOLID STATE POWER BUS CONTROLLERS FOR AEROSPACE APPLICATIONS A Thesis by TERRY JOSEPH VILLARREAL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Electrical Eny'neering SOLID STATE POWER BUS CONTROLLERS FOR AEROSPACE APPLICATIONS A Thesis TERRY JOSEPH VILLARREAL Approved as to style and content by: Mehrdad Ehsani (Chairman of Committee) Robert D. Nevels...

  2. Synergies Connecting the Photovoltaics and Solid-State Lighting Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent increases in the efficiencies of phosphide, nitride, and organic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) inspire a vision of a revolution in lighting. If high efficiencies, long lifetimes, and low cost can be achieved, solid-state lighting could save our country many quads of electricity in the coming years. The solid-state lighting (SSL) and photovoltaic (PV) industries share many of the same challenges. This paper explores the similarities between the two industries and how they might benefit by sharing information.

  3. Solid State Division progress report, September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress made during the 19 months from March 1, 1980, through September 30, 1981, is reported in the following areas: theoretical solid state physics (surfaces, electronic and magnetic properties, particle-solid interactions, and laser annealing); surface and near-surface properties of solids (plasma materials interactions, ion-solid interactions, pulsed laser annealing, and semiconductor physics and photovoltaic conversion); defects in solids (radiation effects, fracture, and defects and impurities in insulating crystals); transport properties of solids (fast-ion conductors, superconductivity, and physical properties of insulating materials); neutron scattering (small-angle scattering, lattice dynamics, and magnetic properties); crystal growth and characterization (nuclear waste forms, ferroelectric mateirals, high-temperature materials, and special materials); and isotope research materials. Publications and papers are listed. (WHK)

  4. High Extraction Phosphors for Solid State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Summers; Hisham Menkara; Brent Wagner

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed high-index, high efficiency bulk luminescent materials and novel nano-sized phosphors for improved solid-state white LED lamps. These advances can potentially contribute to reducing the loss in luminous efficiencies due to scattering, re-absorption, and thermal quenching. The bulk and nanostructured luminescent materials investigated are index matched to GaN and have broad and size-tunable absorption bands, size and impurity tuned emission bands, size-driven elimination of scattering effects, and a separation between absorption and emission bands. These innovations were accomplished through the use of novel synthesis techniques suitable for high volume production for LED lamp applications. The program produced a full-color set of high quantum yield phosphors with high chemical stability. In the bulk phosphor study, the ZnSeS:Cu,Ag phosphor was optimized to achieve >91% efficiency using erbium (Er) and other activators as sensitizers. Detailed analysis of temperature quenching effects on a large number of ZnSeS:Cu,Ag,X and strontium- and calcium-thiogallate phosphors lead to a breakthrough in the understanding of the â??anti-quenchingâ?ť behavior and a physical bandgap model was developed of this phenomena. In a follow up to this study, optimized phosphor blends for high efficiency and color performance were developed and demonstrated a 2-component phosphor system with good white chromaticity, color temperature, and high color rendering. By extending the protocols of quantum dot synthesis, â??largeâ?ť nanocrystals, greater than 20 nm in diameter were synthesized and exhibited bulk-like behavior and blue light absorption. The optimization of ZnSe:Mn nanophosphors achieved ~85% QE The limitations of core-shell nanocrystal systems were addressed by investigating alternative deltadoped structures. To address the manufacturability of these systems, a one-pot manufacturing protocol was developed for ZnSe:Mn nanophosphors. To enhance the stability of these material systems, the encapsulation of ZnSeS particle phosphors and ZnSeS screens with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} using ALD was shown to improve the stability by >8X and also increased the luminescence efficiency due to improved surface passivation and optical coupling. A large-volume fluidized bed ALD system was designed that can be adapted to a commercial ALD or vapor deposition system. Throughout the program, optical simulations were developed to evaluate and optimize various phosphor mixtures and device configurations. For example, to define the scattering properties of nanophosphors in an LED device or in a stand-off screen geometry. Also this work significantly promoted and assisted in the implementation of realistic phosphor material models into commercial modeling programs.

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted solid state Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solid state Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: assisted solid state Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Information Management Software...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced solid state Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Function of Supramolecular Materials CHEM 710T15 Advanced Solid State Chemistry... Optoelectronic Devices ECE 730T10 Topics in Solid State Devices: Adv. Technology for...

  7. advanced solid-state array: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sudesh; Michael Kavaya; Upendra Singh 6 PHYSICS 6555 --ADVANCED SOLID STATE PHYSICS 1 Syllabus --Fall 2013, CRN 95603 Physics Websites Summary: PHYSICS 6555 -- ADVANCED SOLID STATE...

  8. Energy Savings Potential of Solid-State Lighting in General Illuminati...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PROGRAM Energy Savings Potential of Solid-State Lighting in General Illumination Applications January 2012 Prepared for: Solid-State Lighting Program Building Technologies Program...

  9. Solid-State Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment,Institutes and ResponseStaffServicesFutureU.S.Solar CellSolidDepartment

  10. Series connected OLED structure and fabrication method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foust, Donald Franklin; Balch, Ernest Wayne; Duggal, Anil Raj; Heller, Christian Maria; Guida, Renato; Nealon, William Francis; Faircloth, Tami Janene

    2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A light emitting device comprises a plurality of organic light emitting diode (OLED) modules. The OLED modules are arranged into a series group where the individual OLED modules are electrically connected in series. The device is configured to be coupled to a power supply. A display is also provided. The display includes a plurality of OLED modules arranged to depict a shape selected from the group consisting of at least one letter, at least one number, at least one image, and a combination thereof.

  11. Challenges in OLED Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View the video about OLED technology’s advantages and what is needed to move it fully into the lighting market.

  12. Solid State Division Progress Report for period ending March 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M. (eds.)

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is divided into: theoretical solid-state physics, surface and near-surface properties of solids, defects in solids, transport properties of solids, neutron scattering, and synthesis and properties of novel materials. (DLC)

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Solid State Lighting EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch WelcomeScienceProgramsSAND 2011-5054W CopySocietySolarSolid

  14. Electrochemical properties of all solid state Li/S battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Ji-Hyun; Park, Jin-Woo; Wang, Qing; Ryu, Ho-Suk; Kim, Ki-Won [School of Materials Science and Engineering, WCUNGB, RIGET, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, WCUNGB, RIGET, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jou-Hyeon [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Yongku [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Guoxiu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, WCUNGB, RIGET, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of) [School of Materials Science and Engineering, WCUNGB, RIGET, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); School of Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Technology Sydney, Broadway, Sydney, NSW 2007 (Australia); Ahn, Hyo-Jun, E-mail: ahj@gnu.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, WCUNGB, RIGET, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, WCUNGB, RIGET, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    All-solid-state lithium/sulfur (Li/S) battery is prepared using siloxane cross-linked network solid electrolyte at room temperature. The solid electrolytes show high ionic conductivity and good electrochemical stability with lithium and sulfur. In the first discharge curve, all-solid-state Li/S battery shows three plateau potential regions of 2.4 V, 2.12 V and 2.00 V, respectively. The battery shows the first discharge capacity of 1044 mAh g{sup ?1}-sulfur at room temperature. This first discharge capacity rapidly decreases in 4th cycle and remains at 512 mAh g{sup ?1}-sulfur after 10 cycles.

  15. Solid-state dewetting of continuous and patterned single crystal Ni thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ye, Jongpil

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-state dewetting of thin films is a process through which continuous solid films agglomerate to form islands. This process is driven by capillary forces, often occurring via surface self-diffusion. Solid-state dewetting ...

  16. Structures and fabrication techniques for solid state electrochemical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Visco, Steven J.; Jacobson, Craig P.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous substrates and associated structures for solid-state electrochemical devices, such as solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), are low-cost, mechanically strong and highly electronically conductive. Some preferred structures have a thin layer of an electrocatalytically active material (e.g., Ni--YSZ) coating a porous high-strength alloy support (e.g., SS-430) to form a porous SOFC fuel electrode. Electrode/electrolyte structures can be formed by co-firing or constrained sintering processes.

  17. Structures and fabrication techniques for solid state electrochemical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA); Jacobson, Craig P. (El Cerrito, CA); DeJonghe, Lutgard C. (Lafayette, CA)

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous substrates and associated structures for solid-state electrochemical devices, such as solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), are low-cost, mechanically strong and highly electronically conductive. Some preferred structures have a thin layer of an electrocatalytically active material (e.g., Ni--YSZ) coating a porous high-strength alloy support (e.g., SS-430) to form a porous SOFC fuel electrode. Electrode/electrolyte structures can be formed by co-firing or constrained sintering processes.

  18. Novel Low Cost Organic Vapor Jet Printing of Striped High Efficiency Phosphorescent OLEDs for White Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Hack

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this program, Universal Display Corporation and University of Michigan proposed to integrate three innovative concepts to meet the DOE's Solid State Lighting (SSL) goals: (1) high-efficiency phosphorescent organic light emitting device (PHOLED{trademark}) technology, (2) a white lighting design that is based on a series of red, green and blue OLED stripes, and (3) the use of a novel cost-effective, high rate, mask-less deposition process called organic vapor jet printing (OVJP). Our PHOLED technology offers up to four-times higher power efficiency than other OLED approaches for general lighting. We believe that one of the most promising approaches to maximizing the efficiency of OLED lighting sources is to produce stripes of the three primary colors at such a pitch (200-500 {mu}m) that they appear as a uniform white light to an observer greater than 1 meter (m) away from the illumination source. Earlier work from a SBIR Phase 1 entitled 'White Illumination Sources Using Striped Phosphorescent OLEDs' suggests that stripe widths of less than 500 {mu}m appear uniform from a distance of 1m without the need for an external diffuser. In this program, we intend to combine continued advances in this PHOLED technology with the striped RGB lighting design to demonstrate a high-efficiency, white lighting source. Using this background technology, the team has focused on developing and demonstrating the novel cost-effective OVJP process to fabricate these high-efficiency white PHOLED light sources. Because this groundbreaking OVJP process is a direct printing approach that enables the OLED stripes to be printed without a shadow mask, OVJP offers very high material utilization and high throughput without the costs and wastage associated with a shadow mask (i.e. the waste of material that deposits on the shadow mask itself). As a direct printing technique, OVJP also has the potential to offer ultra-high deposition rates (> 1,000 Angstroms/second) for any size or shaped features. As a result, we believe that this work will lead to the development of a cost-effective manufacturing solution to produce very-high efficiency OLEDs. By comparison to more common ink-jet printing (IJP), OVJP can also produce well-defined patterns without the need to pattern the substrate with ink wells or to dry/anneal the ink. In addition, the material set is not limited by viscosity and solvent solubility. During the program we successfully demonstrated a 6-inch x 6-inch PHOLED lighting panel consisting of fine-featured red, green and blue (R-G-B) stripes (1mm width) using an OVJP deposition system that was designed, procured and installed into UDC's cleanroom as part of this program. This project will significantly accelerate the DOE's ability to meet its 2015 DOE SSL targets of 70-150 lumens/Watt and less than $10 per 1,000 lumens for high CRI lighting index (76-90). Coupled with a low cost manufacturing path through OVJP, we expect that this achievement will enable the DOE to achieve its 2015 performance goals by the year 2013, two years ahead of schedule. As shown by the technical work performed under this program, we believe that OVJP is a very promising technology to produce low cost, high efficacy, color tunable light sources. While we have made significant progress to develop OVJP technology and build a pilot line tool to study basic aspects of the technology and demonstrate a lighting panel prototype, further work needs to be performed before its full potential and commercial viability can be fully assessed.

  19. All solid-state SBS phase conjugate mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.

    1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugate laser mirror uses a solid-state nonlinear gain medium instead of the conventional liquid or high pressure gas medium. The concept has been effectively demonstrated using common optical-grade fused silica. An energy threshold of 2.5 mJ and a slope efficiency of over 90% were achieved, resulting in an overall energy reflectivity of >80% for 15 ns, 1 um laser pulses. The use of solid-state materials is enabled by a multi-pass resonant architecture which suppresses transient fluctuations that would otherwise result in damage to the SBS medium. This all solid state phase conjugator is safer, more reliable, and more easily manufactured than prior art designs. It allows nonlinear wavefront correction to be implemented in industrial and defense laser systems whose operating environments would preclude the introduction of potentially hazardous liquids or high pressure gases. 8 figs.

  20. Wideband Waveform Design principles for Solid-state Weather Radars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharadwaj, Nitin; Chandrasekar, V.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of solid-state transmitter is becoming a key part of the strategy to realize a network of low cost electronically steered radars. However, solid-state transmitters have low peak powers and this necessitates the use of pulse compression waveforms. In this paper a frequency diversity wideband waveforms design is proposed to mitigate low sensitivity of solid-state transmitters. In addition, the waveforms mitigate the range eclipsing problem associated with long pulse compression. An analysis of the performance of pulse compression using mismatched compression filters designed to minimize side lobe levels is presented. The impact of range side lobe level on the retrieval of Doppler moments are presented. Realistic simulations are performed based on CSU-CHILL radar data and Center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) Integrated Project I (IP1) radar data.

  1. All solid-state SBS phase conjugate mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, Clifford B. (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugate laser mirror uses a solid-state nonlinear gain medium instead of the conventional liquid or high pressure gas medium. The concept has been effectively demonstrated using common optical-grade fused silica. An energy threshold of 2.5 mJ and a slope efficiency of over 90% were achieved, resulting in an overall energy reflectivity of >80% for 15 ns, 1 um laser pulses. The use of solid-state materials is enabled by a multi-pass resonant architecture which suppresses transient fluctuations that would otherwise result in damage to the SBS medium. This all solid state phase conjugator is safer, more reliable, and more easily manufactured than prior art designs. It allows nonlinear wavefront correction to be implemented in industrial and defense laser systems whose operating environments would preclude the introduction of potentially hazardous liquids or high pressure gases.

  2. Solid-State Lighting Consortia | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from the GridwiseSite ManagementSolid-State Lighting Calendar Solid-State

  3. Solid-State Lighting-Lighting Facts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from the GridwiseSite ManagementSolid-State LightingWebcasts Solid-State

  4. Density Functional Theory applied to the solid state...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Joan

    Density Functional Theory applied to the solid state... An introduction to VASP Jeremie Zaffran 2nd Marom (PhD) #12;Contents I- DFT and its functionals A. On the density functional theory... B #12;I- DFT and its functionals #12;I-DFT and its functionals A- On the density functional theory Why

  5. Ris National Laboratory Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø National Laboratory Postprint Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Department Year 2006 Paper 5883 A model describing the performance of a fuel cell based on 10 mole% gadolinia doped ceria, Ce0 of the measurements are compared with predictions of the formulated model. Furthermore, the response of a fuel cell

  6. Controls for Solid-State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis

    2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This study predicts new hybrid lighting applications for LEDs. In hybrid lighting, LEDs provide a low-energy 'standby' light level while another, more powerful, efficient light source provides light for occupied periods. Lighting controls will allow the two light sources to work together through an appropriate control strategy, typically motion-sensing. There are no technical barriers preventing the use of low through high CRI LEDs for standby lighting in many interior and exterior applications today. The total luminous efficacy of LED systems could be raised by increasing the electrical efficiency of LED drivers to the maximum practically achievable level (94%). This would increase system luminous efficacy by 20-25%. The expected market volumes for many types of LEDs should justify the evolution of new LED drivers that use highly efficient ICs and reduce parts count by means of ASICs. Reducing their electronics parts count by offloading discrete components onto integrated circuits (IC) will allow manufacturers to reduce the cost of LED driver electronics. LED luminaire manufacturers will increasingly integrate the LED driver and thermal management directly in the LED fixture. LED luminaires of the future will likely have no need for separable lamp and ballast because the equipment life of all the LED luminaire components will all be about the same (50,000 hours). The controls and communications techniques used for communicating with conventional light sources, such as dimmable fluorescent lighting, are appropriate for LED illumination for energy management purposes. DALI has been used to control LED systems in new applications and the emerging ZigBee protocol could be used for LEDs as well. Major lighting companies are already moving in this direction. The most significant finding is that there is a significant opportunity to use LEDs today for standby lighting purposes. Conventional lighting systems can be made more efficient still by using LEDs to provide a low-energy standby state when lower light levels are acceptable.

  7. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE (SECA) SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress made during the September 2001-March 2002 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41245 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program''. The program focuses on the development of a low-cost, high-performance 3-to-10-kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system suitable for a broad spectrum of power-generation applications. The overall objective of the program is to demonstrate a modular SOFC system that can be configured to create highly efficient, cost-competitive, and environmentally benign power plants tailored to specific markets. When fully developed, the system will meet the efficiency, performance, life, and cost goals for future commercial power plants.

  8. Use of Alternative Fuels in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Department, Ris National Laboratory, Technical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Use of Alternative Fuels in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Anke Hagen Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry on a variety of environmentally benign energy production technologies. Fuel cells can be a key element in this scenario. One of the fuel cells types ­ the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) ­ has a number of advantages

  9. MATERIALS DEGRADATION ANALYSIS AND DEVELOPMENT TO ENABLE ULTRA LOW COST, WEB-PROCESSED WHITE P-OLED FOR SSL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DR. DEVIN MACKENZIE

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress over Phase II of DE-FG02-07ER86293 'Materials Degradation Analysis and Development to Enable Ultra Low Cost, Web-Processed White P-OLED for SSL' was initially rapid in terms of device performance improvements. We exceeded our device luminance lifetime goals for printed flexible white OLEDs as laid out in our project proposal. Our Phase II performance target was to demonstrate >1500 hours luminance lifetime at 100 Cd/m2 from a printed flexible device. We now have R&D devices well in excess of 8000 hrs lifetime at 100 Cd/m2, tested in air. We also were able to produce devices which met the voltage target of >1500 hours below 15V operation. After completing the initial performance milestones, we went on to focus on color-related degradation issues which were cited as important to commercialization of the technology by our manufacturing partners. We also put additional focus on cathode work as the active material development that occurred over the STTR time period required an adaptation of the cathode from the original cathode formulations which were developed based on previous generation active layer materials. We were able to improve compatibility of the cathode with some of the newer generation active layer materials and improve device yield and voltage behavior. An additional objective of the initial Phase II was to further develop the underlying manufacturing technology and real-life product specifications. This is a key requirement that must be met to ensure eventual commercialization of this DOE-funded technology. The link between commercial investment for full commercialization and R&D efforts in OLED solid State Lighting is often a large one. Add-Vision's lower cost, printed OLED manufacturing approach is an attraction, but close engagement with manufacturing partners and addressing customer specifications is a very important link. Manufacturing technology encompasses development of moisture reduction encapsulation technology, improved cost performance, and reductions in operating voltage through thinner and higher uniformity active device layers. We have now installed a pilot encapsulation system at AVI for controlled, high throughput lamination encapsulation of flexible OLEDs in a novel process. Along with this, we have developed, with our materials supply partners, adhesives, barrier films and other encapsulation materials and we are showing total air product lifetimes in the 2-4 years range from a process consistent with our throughput goals of {approx}1M device per month ({approx}30,000 sq. ft. of processed OLEDs). Within the last year of the project, we have been working to introduce the manufacturing improvements made in our LEP deposition and annealing process to our commercial partners. Based on the success of this, a pilot scale-up program was begun. During this process, Add-Vision was acquired by a strategic partner, in no small part, because of the promise of future success of the technology as evidenced by our commercial partners pilot scale-up plans. Overall, the performance, manufacturing and product work in this project has been successful. Additional analysis and device work at LBL has also shown a unique adhesion change with device bias stressing which may result from active layer polymer cross-linking during bias stressing of device. It was shown that even small bias stresses, as a fraction of a full device lifetime stress period, result in measurable chemical change in the device. Further work needs to be conducted to fully understand the chemical nature of this interaction. Elucidation of this effect would enable doped OLED formulation to be engineered to suppress this effect and further extend lifetimes and reduce voltage climb.

  10. Solid state optical interconnect between distant superconducting quantum chips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keyu Xia; Jason Twamley

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a design for a quantum interface exploiting the electron spins in crystals to swap the quantum states between the optical and microwave. Using sideband driving of a superconducting flux qubit and a combined cavity/solid-state spin ensemble Raman transition, we demonstrate how a stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP)-type operation can swap the quantum state between a superconducting flux qubit and an optical cavity mode with a fidelity higher than $90\\%$. We further consider two distant superconducting qubits with their respective interfaces joined by an optical fiber and show a quantum transfer fidelity exceeding $90\\%$ between the two distant qubits.

  11. Compact Solid State Cooling Systems: Compact MEMS Electrocaloric Module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BEETIT Project: UCLA is developing a novel solid-state cooling technology to translate a recent scientific discovery of the so-called giant electrocaloric effect into commercially viable compact cooling systems. Traditional air conditioners use noisy, vapor compression systems that include a polluting liquid refrigerant to circulate within the air conditioner, absorb heat, and pump the heat out into the environment. Electrocaloric materials achieve the same result by heating up when placed within an electric field and cooling down when removed—effectively pumping heat out from a cooler to warmer environment. This electrocaloric-based solid state cooling system is quiet and does not use liquid refrigerants. The innovation includes developing nano-structured materials and reliable interfaces for heat exchange. With these innovations and advances in micro/nano-scale manufacturing technologies pioneered by semiconductor companies, UCLA is aiming to extend the performance/reliability of the cooling module.

  12. Hybrid solid state qubits: the powerful role of electron spins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John J. L. Morton; Brendon W. Lovett

    2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We review progress on the use of electron spins to store and process quantum information, with particular focus on the ability of the electron spin to interact with multiple quantum degrees of freedom. We examine the benefits of hybrid quantum bits (qubits) in the solid state that are based on coupling electron spins to nuclear spin, electron charge, optical photons, and superconducting qubits. These benefits include the coherent storage of qubits for times exceeding seconds, fast qubit manipulation, single qubit measurement, and scalable methods for entangling spatially separated matter-based qubits. In this way, the key strengths of different physical qubit implementations are brought together, laying the foundation for practical solid-state quantum technologies.

  13. Scaling of solid state lasers for satellite power beaming applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, H.W.; Albrecht, G.F.; Beach, R.J.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The power requirements for a satellite power beaming laser system depend upon the diameter of the beam director, the performance of the adaptive optics system, and the mission requirements. For an 8 meter beam director and overall Strehl ratio of 50%, a 30 kW laser at 850 nm can deliver an equivalent solar flux to a satellite at geostationary orbit. Advances in Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers (DPSSL) have brought these small, efficient and reliable devices to high average power and they should be considered for satellite power beaming applications. Two solid state systems are described: a diode pumped Alexandrite and diode pumped Thulium doped YAG. Both can deliver high average power at 850 nm in a single aperture.

  14. Performance of a 229 Thorium solid-state nuclear clock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazakov, G A; Romanenko, V I; Yatsenko, L P; Romanenko, A V; Schreitl, M; Winkler, G; Schumm, T

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 7.8 eV nuclear isomer transition in 229 Thorium has been suggested as an etalon transition in a new type of optical frequency standard. Here we discuss the construction of a "solid-state nuclear clock" from Thorium nuclei implanted into single crystals transparent in the vacuum ultraviolet range. We investigate crystal-induced line shifts and broadening effects for the specific system of Calcium fluoride. At liquid Nitrogen temperatures, the clock performance will be limited by decoherence due to magnetic coupling of the Thorium nucleus to neighboring nuclear moments, ruling out the commonly used Rabi or Ramsey interrogation schemes. We propose a clock stabilization based on counting of flourescence photons and present optimized operation parameters. Taking advantage of the high number of quantum oscillators under continuous interrogation, a fractional instability level of 10^{-19} might be reached within the solid-state approach.

  15. Performance of a 229 Thorium solid-state nuclear clock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. A. Kazakov; A. N. Litvinov; V. I. Romanenko; L. P. Yatsenko; A. V. Romanenko; M. Schreitl; G. Winkler; T. Schumm

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The 7.8 eV nuclear isomer transition in 229 Thorium has been suggested as an etalon transition in a new type of optical frequency standard. Here we discuss the construction of a "solid-state nuclear clock" from Thorium nuclei implanted into single crystals transparent in the vacuum ultraviolet range. We investigate crystal-induced line shifts and broadening effects for the specific system of Calcium fluoride. At liquid Nitrogen temperatures, the clock performance will be limited by decoherence due to magnetic coupling of the Thorium nucleus to neighboring nuclear moments, ruling out the commonly used Rabi or Ramsey interrogation schemes. We propose a clock stabilization based on counting of flourescence photons and present optimized operation parameters. Taking advantage of the high number of quantum oscillators under continuous interrogation, a fractional instability level of 10^{-19} might be reached within the solid-state approach.

  16. Solid state laser media driven by remote nuclear powered fluorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prelas, Mark A. (Columbia, MO)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is provided for driving a solid state laser by a nuclear powered fluorescence source which is located remote from the fluorescence source. A nuclear reaction produced in a reaction chamber generates fluorescence or photons. The photons are collected from the chamber into a waveguide, such as a fiber optic waveguide. The waveguide transports the photons to the remote laser for exciting the laser.

  17. Low voltage solid-state lateral coloration electrochromic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Ruth, Marta R. (Boulder, CO)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid-state transition metal oxide device comprising a plurality of lay having a predisposed orientation including an electrochromic oxide layer. Conductive material including anode and cathode contacts is secured to the device. Coloration is actuated within the electrochromic oxide layer after the application of a predetermined potential between the contacts. The coloration action is adapted to sweep or dynamically extend across the length of the electrochromic oxide layer.

  18. Low voltage solid-state lateral coloration electrochromic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.K.; Ruth, M.R.

    1984-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid-state transition metal oxide device comprising a plurality of layers having a predisposed orientation including an electrochromic oxide layer. Conductive material including anode and cathode contacts is secured to the device. Coloration is actuated within the electrochromic oxide layer after the application of a predetermined potential between the contacts. The coloration action is adapted to sweep or dynamically extend across the length of the electrochromic oxide layer.

  19. Solid-State Energy Conversion Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage » SearchEnergyDepartmentScoping Study |4Solid-State Energy Conversion Overview

  20. Position sensitive solid-state photomultipliers, systems and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shah, Kanai S; Christian, James; Stapels, Christopher; Dokhale, Purushottam; McClish, Mickel

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated silicon solid state photomultiplier (SSPM) device includes a pixel unit including an array of more than 2.times.2 p-n photodiodes on a common substrate, a signal division network electrically connected to each photodiode, where the signal division network includes four output connections, a signal output measurement unit, a processing unit configured to identify the photodiode generating a signal or a center of mass of photodiodes generating a signal, and a global receiving unit.

  1. Solid state photosensitive devices which employ isolated photosynthetic complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peumans, Peter; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid state photosensitive devices including photovoltaic devices are provided which comprise a first electrode and a second electrode in superposed relation; and at least one isolated Light Harvesting Complex (LHC) between the electrodes. Preferred photosensitive devices comprise an electron transport layer formed of a first photoconductive organic semiconductor material, adjacent to the LHC, disposed between the first electrode and the LHC; and a hole transport layer formed of a second photoconductive organic semiconductor material, adjacent to the LHC, disposed between the second electrode and the LHC. Solid state photosensitive devices of the present invention may comprise at least one additional layer of photoconductive organic semiconductor material disposed between the first electrode and the electron transport layer; and at least one additional layer of photoconductive organic semiconductor material, disposed between the second electrode and the hole transport layer. Methods of generating photocurrent are provided which comprise exposing a photovoltaic device of the present invention to light. Electronic devices are provided which comprise a solid state photosensitive device of the present invention.

  2. Prediction of solid-aqueous equilibria: Scheme to combine first-principles calculations of solids with experimental aqueous states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persson, Kristin A.

    We present an efficient scheme for combining ab initio calculated solid states with experimental aqueous states through a framework of consistent reference energies. Our work enables accurate prediction of phase stability ...

  3. High-power single mode solid state laser with short wide unstable cavity: Misprints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouznetsov, Dmitrii

    1 High-power single mode solid state laser with short wide unstable cavity: Misprints D. Kouznetsov. Kouznetsov, J.-F. Bisson, K. Takaichi K. Ueda. High-power single mode solid state laser with short wide

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - abundance solid-state 33s Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: abundance solid-state 33s Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Methodological developments of solid-state NMR and...

  5. LiMnPO4 Nanoplate Grown via Solid-State Reaction in Molten Hydrocarbon...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LiMnPO4 Nanoplate Grown via Solid-State Reaction in Molten Hydrocarbon for Li-ion Battery Cathode. LiMnPO4 Nanoplate Grown via Solid-State Reaction in Molten Hydrocarbon for Li-ion...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - angle spinning solid-state Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spinning solid-state Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: angle spinning solid-state Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Book Review Melinda J....

  7. Funding Opportunity for Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D – 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On December 6, 2013, DOE announced solid-state lighting funding opportunity DE-FOA-0000973, "Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D - 2014." A total of up to $10 million in funding is...

  8. Energy Savings Potential of Solid-State Lighting in General Illuminati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Solid-State Lighting in General Illumination Applications - Report A U.S. DOE SSL report on Energy Savings Potential of Solid-State Lighting in General Illumination...

  9. Energy Savings Potential of Solid-State Lighting in General Illuminati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Solid-State Lighting in General Illumination Applications - Factsheet A U.S. DOE SSL fact sheet on Energy Savings Potential of Solid-State Lighting in General Illumination...

  10. Progress from DOE EF RC: Solid-State Solar-Thermal Energy Conversion...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Frontier Research Center of the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences SOLID-STATE SOLAR-THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION CENTER Progress from DOE EFRC: Solid-State Solar-Thermal...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - all-solid-state ultraviolet laser Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ultraviolet laser Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: all-solid-state ultraviolet laser Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 All-solid-state...

  12. Progress from DOE EF RC: Solid-State Solar-Thermal Energy Conversion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from DOE EF RC: Solid-State Solar-Thermal Energy Conversion Center (S3TEC ) Progress from DOE EF RC: Solid-State Solar-Thermal Energy Conversion Center (S3TEC ) Introduction to the...

  13. Electrolyte Stability Determines Scaling Limits for Solid-State 3D Li Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Electrolyte Stability Determines Scaling Limits for Solid-State 3D Li Ion Batteries Dmitry Ruzmetov, all-solid-state Li ion batteries (LIBs) with high specific capacity and small footprint are highly to their high-energy density, Li ion batteries (LIBs) are attractive for these applications, and all-solid-state

  14. Polymeric Nanoscale All-Solid State Battery Steven E. Bullock1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kofinas, Peter

    Polymeric Nanoscale All-Solid State Battery Steven E. Bullock1 , and Peter Kofinas2 1 Department to an all solid- state polymer battery. Such a battery would have greater safety, without potential, the search for an all solid-state battery has continued. Research on polymeric materials for batteries has

  15. Block Copolymer Electrolytes Synthesized by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization for Solid-State, Thin-Film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoway, Donald Robert

    - cessing advantages as it is easily scalable and almost solvent-free. Solid-state, thin-film batteries, 2002. The ideal electrolyte material for a solid-state battery would have the ionic conductivity in solid-state lithium batteries, the purpose of this study was to inves- tigate the feasibility

  16. Self-doped block copolymer electrolytes for solid-state, rechargeable lithium batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoway, Donald Robert

    Self-doped block copolymer electrolytes for solid-state, rechargeable lithium batteries Donald R. Introduction The ideal electrolyte material for a solid-state battery would have the ionic conductivity and cathode binder thin-®lm, solid-state, rechargeable lithium batteries of the type Li/ BCE/LiMnO2 have been

  17. Theoretical feasibility study on neutron spectrometry with the polyallyldiglycol carbonate (PADC) solid-state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    It has been shown that detection and dosimetry of fast neutrons are possible with solid-state nuclear) solid-state nuclear track detector D. Nikezic a,b , K.N. Yu b,n a Faculty of Science, University November 2014 Keywords: Neutron spectrometry Polyallyldiglycol carbonate PADC CR-39 Solid-state nuclear

  18. Solid-State NMR Analysis of Excipients and Drug-Excipient Interactions in the Amorphous State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperger, Diana

    2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    of two major components: the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and other ingredients known as excipients. The API typicaly does not posses the proper material characteristics such as flow and compresibility required for manufacturing tablets... present in crystaline solids does not exist. 1.3.1 The crystalline state In a crystaline solid, the molecules are aranged into a thre-dimensional latice having long-range order. The smalest building block of a crystal structure is the unit cel, which...

  19. Text-Alternative Version: Challenges in OLED Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Narrator: Organic light-emitting diodes, OLEDs, are made using organic carbon-based materials. Unlike LEDs, which are small point light sources, OLEDs are made in sheets that create diffuse area...

  20. High Efficiency, Illumination Quality OLEDs for Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Shiang; James Cella; Kelly Chichak; Anil Duggal; Kevin Janora; Chris Heller; Gautam Parthasarathy; Jeffery Youmans; Joseph Shiang

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the program was to demonstrate a 45 lumen per watt white light device based upon the use of multiple emission colors through the use of solution processing. This performance level is a dramatic extension of the team's previous 15 LPW large area illumination device. The fundamental material system was based upon commercial polymer materials. The team was largely able to achieve these goals, and was able to deliver to DOE a 90 lumen illumination source that had an average performance of 34 LPW a 1000 cd/m{sup 2} with peak performances near 40LPW. The average color temperature is 3200K and the calculated CRI 85. The device operated at a brightness of approximately 1000cd/m{sup 2}. The use of multiple emission colors particularly red and blue, provided additional degrees of design flexibility in achieving white light, but also required the use of a multilayered structure to separate the different recombination zones and prevent interconversion of blue emission to red emission. The use of commercial materials had the advantage that improvements by the chemical manufacturers in charge transport efficiency, operating life and material purity could be rapidly incorporated without the expenditure of additional effort. The program was designed to take maximum advantage of the known characteristics of these material and proceeded in seven steps. (1) Identify the most promising materials, (2) assemble them into multi-layer structures to control excitation and transport within the OLED, (3) identify materials development needs that would optimize performance within multilayer structures, (4) build a prototype that demonstrates the potential entitlement of the novel multilayer OLED architecture (5) integrate all of the developments to find the single best materials set to implement the novel multilayer architecture, (6) further optimize the best materials set, (7) make a large area high illumination quality white OLED. A photo of the final deliverable is shown. In 2003, a large area, OLED based illumination source was demonstrated that could provide light with a quality, quantity, and efficiency on par with what can be achieved with traditional light sources. The demonstration source was made by tiling together 16 separate 6-inch x 6-inch blue-emitting OLEDs. The efficiency, total lumen output, and lifetime of the OLED based illumination source were the same as what would be achieved with an 80 watt incandescent bulb. The devices had an average efficacy of 15 LPW and used solution-processed OLEDs. The individual 6-inch x 6-inch devices incorporated three technology strategies developed specifically for OLED lighting -- downconversion for white light generation, scattering for outcoupling efficiency enhancement, and a scalable monolithic series architecture to enable large area devices. The downconversion approach consists of optically coupling a blue-emitting OLED to a set of luminescent layers. The layers are chosen to absorb the blue OLED emission and then luminescence with high efficiency at longer wavelengths. The composition and number of layers are chosen so that the unabsorbed blue emission and the longer wavelength re-emission combine to make white light. A downconversion approach has the advantage of allowing a wide variety of colors to be made from a limited set of blue emitters. In addition, one does not have to carefully tune the emission wavelength of the individual electro-luminescent species within the OLED device in order to achieve white light. The downconversion architecture used to develop the 15LPW large area light source consisted of a polymer-based blue-emitting OLED and three downconversion layers. Two of the layers utilized perylene based dyes from BASF AG of Germany with high quantum efficiency (>98%) and one of the layers consisted of inorganic phosphor particles (Y(Gd)AG:Ce) with a quantum efficiency of {approx}85%. By independently varying the optical density of the downconversion layers, the overall emission spectrum could be adjusted to maximize performance for lighting (e.g. blackbody temp

  1. Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen Minh

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work performed for Phase I (October 2001 - August 2006) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41245 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled 'Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program'. The program focuses on the development of a low-cost, high-performance 3-to-10-kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system suitable for a broad spectrum of power-generation applications. During Phase I of the program significant progress has been made in the area of SOFC technology. A high-efficiency low-cost system was designed and supporting technology developed such as fuel processing, controls, thermal management, and power electronics. Phase I culminated in the successful demonstration of a prototype system that achieved a peak efficiency of 41%, a high-volume cost of $724/kW, a peak power of 5.4 kW, and a degradation rate of 1.8% per 500 hours. . An improved prototype system was designed, assembled, and delivered to DOE/NETL at the end of the program. This prototype achieved an extraordinary peak efficiency of 49.6%.

  2. Recent advances in solid-state organic lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chenais, Sébastien; 10.1002/pi.3173

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic solid-state lasers are reviewed, with a special emphasis on works published during the last decade. Referring originally to dyes in solid-state polymeric matrices, organic lasers also include the rich family of organic semiconductors, paced by the rapid development of organic light emitting diodes. Organic lasers are broadly tunable coherent sources are potentially compact, convenient and manufactured at low-costs. In this review, we describe the basic photophysics of the materials used as gain media in organic lasers with a specific look at the distinctive feature of dyes and semiconductors. We also outline the laser architectures used in state-of-the-art organic lasers and the performances of these devices with regard to output power, lifetime, and beam quality. A survey of the recent trends in the field is given, highlighting the latest developments in terms of wavelength coverage, wavelength agility, efficiency and compactness, or towards integrated low-cost sources, with a special focus on the gr...

  3. On the role of twinning in solid-state reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akchurin, M. Sh., E-mail: akchurin@ns.crys.ras.ru; Zakalyukin, R. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new concept of the role of twinning in processes of plastic deformation is proposed which suggests mechanical twinning to be the main mechanism of solid-state reactions under the deformation mixing of components, in particular, the grinding of aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and yttrium oxide (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) powders, as a result of which yttrium-aluminum garnet (Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}) particles are formed.

  4. A Rising Star: Solid-State Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment(October-DecemberBasedToward a MoreA Rising Star: Solid-State

  5. Solid-State Lighting Calendar | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage » SearchEnergyDepartmentScoping Study |4Solid-State Energy ConversionMay 2015

  6. Application of Developed APCVD Transparent Conducting Oxides and Undercoat Technologies for Economical OLED Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin Bluhm; James Coffey; Roman Korotkov; Craig Polsz; Alexandre Salemi; Robert Smith; Ryan Smith; Jeff Stricker; Chen Xu; Jasmine Shirazi; George Papakonstantopulous; Steve Carson; Claudia Goldman; Soren Hartmann; Frank Jessen; Bianca Krogmann; Christoph Rickers; Manfred Ruske; Holger Schwab; Dietrich Bertram

    2011-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Economics is a key factor for application of organic light emitting diodes (OLED) in general lighting relative to OLED flat panel displays that can handle high cost materials such as indium tin oxide (ITO) or Indium zinc oxide (IZO) as the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) on display glass. However, for OLED lighting to penetrate into general illumination, economics and sustainable materials are critical. The issues with ITO have been documented at the DOE SSL R&D and Manufacturing workshops for the last 5 years and the issue is being exacerbated by export controls from China (one of the major sources of elemental indium). Therefore, ITO is not sustainable because of the fluctuating costs and the United States (US) dependency on other nations such as China. Numerous alternatives to ITO/IZO are being evaluated such as Ag nanoparticles/nanowires, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and other metal oxides. Of these other metal oxides, doped zinc oxide has attracted a lot of attention over the last 10 years. The volume of zinc mined is a factor of 80,000 greater than indium and the US has significant volumes of zinc mined domestically, resulting in the ability for the US to be self-sufficient for this element that can be used in optoelectronic applications. The costs of elemental zinc is over 2 orders of magnitude less than indium, reflecting the relative abundance and availability of the elements. Arkema Inc. and an international primary glass manufacturing company, which is located in the United States, have developed doped zinc oxide technology for solar control windows. The genesis of this DOE SSL project was to determine if doped zinc oxide technology can be taken from the commodity based window market and translate the technology to OLED lighting. Thus, Arkema Inc. sought out experts, Philips Lighting, Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) and National Renewable Research Laboratories (NREL), in OLED devices and brought them into the project. This project had a clear focus on economics and the work plan focused both on doped ZnO process and OLED device structure that would be consistent with the new TCO. The team successfully made 6 inch OLEDs with a serial construction. More process development is required to optimize commercial OLED structures. Feasibility was demonstrated on two different light extraction technologies: 1/4 lambda refractive index matching and high-low-high band pass filter. Process development was also completed on the key precursors for the TCO, which are ready for pilot-plant scale-up. Subsequently, Arkema has developed a cost of ownership model that is consistent with DOE SSL R&D Manufacturing targets as outlined in the DOE SSL R&D Manufacturing 2010 report. The overall outcome of this project was the demonstration that doped zinc oxide can be used for OLED devices without a drop-off in performance while gaining the economic and sustainable benefits of a more readily available TCO. The broad impact of this project, is the facilitation of OLED lighting market penetration into general illumination, resulting in significant energy savings, decreased greenhouse emissions, with no environmental impact issues such as mercury found in Fluorescent technology. The primary objective of this project was to develop a commercially viable process for 'Substrates' (Substrate/ undercoat/ TCO topcoat) to be used in production of OLED devices (lamps/luminaries/modules). This project focused on using Arkema's recently developed doped ZnO technology for the Fenestration industry and applying the technology to the OLED lighting industry. The secondary objective was the use of undercoat technology to improve light extraction from the OLED device. In optical fields and window applications, technology has been developed to mitigate reflection losses by selecting appropriate thicknesses and refractive indices of coatings applied either below or above the functional layer of interest. This technology has been proven and implemented in the fenestration industry for more than 15 years. Successful completion of

  7. Standardized Testing Program for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Michael A. [Southwest Research Institute; Page, Richard A. [Southwest Research Institute

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In the US and abroad, major research and development initiatives toward establishing a hydrogen-based transportation infrastructure have been undertaken, encompassing key technological challenges in hydrogen production and delivery, fuel cells, and hydrogen storage. However, the principal obstacle to the implementation of a safe, low-pressure hydrogen fueling system for fuel-cell powered vehicles remains storage under conditions of near-ambient temperature and moderate pressure. The choices for viable hydrogen storage systems at the present time are limited to compressed gas storage tanks, cryogenic liquid hydrogen storage tanks, chemical hydrogen storage, and hydrogen absorbed or adsorbed in a solid-state material (a.k.a. solid-state storage). Solid-state hydrogen storage may offer overriding benefits in terms of storage capacity, kinetics and, most importantly, safety.The fervor among the research community to develop novel storage materials had, in many instances, the unfortunate consequence of making erroneous, if not wild, claims on the reported storage capacities achievable in such materials, to the extent that the potential viability of emerging materials was difficult to assess. This problem led to a widespread need to establish a capability to accurately and independently assess the storage behavior of a wide array of different classes of solid-state storage materials, employing qualified methods, thus allowing development efforts to focus on those materials that showed the most promise. However, standard guidelines, dedicated facilities, or certification programs specifically aimed at testing and assessing the performance, safety, and life cycle of these emergent materials had not been established. To address the stated need, the Testing Laboratory for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies was commissioned as a national-level focal point for evaluating new materials emerging from the designated Materials Centers of Excellence (MCoE) according to established and qualified standards. Working with industry, academia, and the U.S. government, SwRI set out to develop an accepted set of evaluation standards and analytical methodologies. Critical measurements of hydrogen sorption properties in the Laboratory have been based on three analytical capabilities: 1) a high-pressure Sievert-type volumetric analyzer, modified to improve low-temperature isothermal analyses of physisorption materials and permit in situ mass spectroscopic analysis of the sample’s gas space; 2) a static, high-pressure thermogravimetric analyzer employing an advanced magnetic suspension electro-balance, glove-box containment, and capillary interface for in situ mass spectroscopic analysis of the sample’s gas space; and 3) a Laser-induced Thermal Desorption Mass Spectrometer (LTDMS) system for high thermal-resolution desorption and mechanistic analyses. The Laboratory has played an important role in down-selecting materials and systems that have emerged from the MCoEs.

  8. SPINEVOLUTION: A powerful tool for the simulation of solid and liquid state NMR experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Robert G.

    SPINEVOLUTION: A powerful tool for the simulation of solid and liquid state NMR experiments Mikhail. Simulations of solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) experiments can be particularly demanding both with complex pulse sequences and multi-spin systems in solids, SPINEVO- LUTION is a versatile and easy to use

  9. SPINEVOLUTION: A powerful tool for the simulation of solid and liquid state NMR experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Robert G.

    SPINEVOLUTION: A powerful tool for the simulation of solid and liquid state NMR experiments Mikhail and dynamic information from the spectra. Simulations of solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) experiments for the simulation of experiments with complex pulse sequences and multi-spin systems in solids, SPINEVO- LUTION

  10. Rubbery Graft Copolymer Electrolytes for Solid-State, Thin-Film Lithium Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoway, Donald Robert

    Rubbery Graft Copolymer Electrolytes for Solid-State, Thin-Film Lithium Batteries Patrick E. Trapa to be stable over a wide temperature range and voltage window. Solid-state, thin-film batteries comprised triflate-doped POEM-g-PDMS, which exhibited solid-like mechanical behavior, were nearly identical to those

  11. Solid State Division: Progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M. (eds.)

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper contains a collection of articles on research done at the Solid State Division of ORNL. General topics covered are: theoretical solid state physics; neutron scattering; physical properties of superconductors and ceramics; synthesis and characterization of solids; ion beam and laser processing; and surface and defect studies. (LSP)

  12. Solid-State Calculation of Crystalline Color Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Gaoqing; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is generally believed that the inhomogeneous Larkin-Ovchinnikov-Fulde-Ferrell (LOFF) phase appears in a color superconductor when the pairing between different quark flavors is under the circumstances of mismatched Fermi surfaces. However, the real crystal structure of the LOFF phase is still unclear because an exact treatment of 3D crystal structures is rather difficult. In this work we calculate the ground-state energy of the body-centered cubic (BCC) structure for two-flavor pairing by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian matrix in the Bloch space, in analogy to the \\emph{ab initio} calculations in solid-state physics. We develop a computational scheme to overcome the difficulties in diagonalizing huge matrices. Our results show that the BCC structure is energetically more favorable than the 1D modulation in a narrow window around the conventional LOFF-normal phase transition point, which indicates the significance of the higher-order terms in the Ginzburg-Landau approach.

  13. Solid-State Calculation of Crystalline Color Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaoqing Cao; Lianyi He; Pengfei Zhuang

    2015-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    It is generally believed that the inhomogeneous Larkin-Ovchinnikov-Fulde-Ferrell (LOFF) phase appears in a color superconductor when the pairing between different quark flavors is under the circumstances of mismatched Fermi surfaces. However, the real crystal structure of the LOFF phase is still unclear because an exact treatment of 3D crystal structures is rather difficult. In this work we calculate the ground-state energy of the body-centered cubic (BCC) structure for two-flavor pairing by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian matrix in the Bloch space, in analogy to the \\emph{ab initio} calculations in solid-state physics. We develop a computational scheme to overcome the difficulties in diagonalizing huge matrices. Our results show that the BCC structure is energetically more favorable than the 1D modulation in a narrow window around the conventional LOFF-normal phase transition point, which indicates the significance of the higher-order terms in the Ginzburg-Landau approach.

  14. Chemical phenomena in solid-state voltammetry in polymer solvents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geng, L.; Reed, R.A.; Kim, M.H.; Wooster, T.T.; Oliver, B.N.; Egekeze, J.; Kennedy, R.T.; Jorgenson, J.W.; Parcher, J.F.; Murray, R.W.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper, aimed at delineating significant chemical effects in solid-state voltammetry, describes electrochemical oxidations and reductions of electroactive monomer solutes dissolved in and diffusing through rigid and semirigid polymer electrolyte solvents. Sorption of organic monomer vapors into poly(ethylene oxide) films yields polymer solvents whose chemistry is dominated by that of the sorbed monomer as shown by coordination and precipitation effects. The dynamics of plasticization-induced changes in transport rates are quite rapid. Physical diffusion in the polymer solvent in slow enough that electron hopping reactions measurably enhance charge transport rates; the effect was used to estimate a lower limit for the (Co(bpy)/sub 3/)/sup 2+/+/ self-exchange rate constant of 2 /times/ 10/sup 9/ M/sup /minus/1/ s/sup /minus/1/. It is possible to erect polymeric film transport barriers at the electrode/polymer solvent interface and to measure the rate of permeation of monomer complexes from the polymer solvent into the polymer transport barrier film. Polymeric films of Os and Ru polypyridine complexes can be electropolymerized from polymer solutions of the corresponding monomers. Solid-state voltammetry can be extended to other polymer solvents including sulfonated polystyrene, poly(vinyl chloride), Nafion, and poly(acrylamide) gel.

  15. HIGH-EFFICIENCY NITRIDE-BASED SOLID-STATE LIGHTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Paul T. Fini; Prof. Shuji Nakamura

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this semiannual report we summarize the progress obtained in the first six months with the support of DoE contract No.DE-FC26-01NT41203, entitled ''High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting''. The two teams, from the University of California at Santa Barbara (Principle Investigator: Dr. Shuji Nakamura) and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (led by Dr. N. Narendran), are pursuing the goals of this contract from thin film growth, characterization, and packaging standpoints. The UCSB team has made significant progress in the development of GaN vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) as well as light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with AlGaN active regions emitting in the ultraviolet (UV). The Rensselaer team has developed target specifications for some of the key parameters for the proposed solid-state lighting system, including a luminous flux requirement matrix for various lighting applications, optimal spectral power distributions, and the performance characteristics of currently available commercial LEDs for eventual comparisons to the devices developed in the scope of this project.

  16. HIGH-EFFICIENCY NITRIDE-BASED SOLID-STATE LIGHTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Paul T. Fini; Prof. Shuji Nakamura

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this annual report we summarize the progress obtained in the first year with the support of DoE contract No.DE-FC26-01NT41203, entitled ''High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting''. The two teams, from the University of California at Santa Barbara (Principle Investigator: Dr. Shuji Nakamura) and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (led by Dr. N. Narendran), are pursuing the goals of this contract from thin film growth, characterization, and packaging standpoints. The UCSB team has made significant progress in the development of GaN vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) as well as light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with AlGaN active regions emitting in the ultraviolet (UV). The Rensselaer team has developed target specifications for some of the key parameters for the proposed solid-state lighting system, including a luminous flux requirement matrix for various lighting applications, optimal spectral power distributions, and the performance characteristics of currently available commercial LEDs for eventual comparisons to the devices developed in the scope of this project.

  17. Structure and dynamics studies by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itin, Boris

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major goal of this work is the development of high resolution solid state 205T1 NMR techniques and their application to the elucidation of the mechanism and dynamics of ion exchange in biological solids. The thesis ...

  18. A 58.4mW Solid-State Power Amplifier at 220 GHz using InP HBTs Abstract --A 220 GHz solid state power amplifier MMIC is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    A 58.4mW Solid-State Power Amplifier at 220 GHz using InP HBTs Abstract -- A 220 GHz solid state, Solid State Power Amplifier (SSPA). I. INTRODUCTION Future high resolution imaging systems and high bandwidth communications systems will benefit from the continued development of solid-state power amplifiers

  19. 2014 Solid-State Lighting Manufacturing R&D Workshop Presentations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Moderator U.S. OLED Lighting Manufacturing Status and Trends John Hamer, OLEDWorks DOE-SSL Manufacturing Workshop Eric Armour, Veeco Instruments Perspectives on Domestic...

  20. High brightness diode-pumped organic solid-state laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Zhuang; Nafa, Malik; Chénais, Sébastien; Forget, Sébastien

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-power, diffraction-limited organic solid-state laser operation has been achieved in a vertical external cavity surface-emitting organic laser (VECSOL), pumped by a low-cost compact blue laser diode. The diode-pumped VECSOLs were demonstrated with various dyes in a polymer matrix, leading to laser emissions from 540 nm to 660 nm. Optimization of both the pump pulse duration and output coupling leads to a pump slope efficiency of 11% for a DCM based VECSOLs. We report output pulse energy up to 280 nJ with 100 ns long pump pulses, leading to a peak power of 3.5 W in a circularly symmetric, diffraction-limited beam.

  1. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Solid-State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Sunil; Edmond, John; Krames, Michael; Raman, Sudhakar

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of U.S. manufacturing for clean energy technologies, such as solid-state lighting (SSL), is paramount to increasing competitiveness in a global marketplace. SSLs are poised to drive the lighting market, worldwide. In order to continue that competitiveness and support further innovation, the time to invest in U.S. manufacturing of clean energy technologies is now. Across the country, companies developing innovative clean energy technologies find competitive advantages to manufacturing in the U.S. The Department of Energy's Building Technology Office SSL Manufacturing Roadmap is just one example of how we support manufacturing through convening industry perspectives on opportunities to significantly reduce risk, improve quality, increase yields, and lower costs.

  2. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Solid-State Lighting

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Thomas, Sunil; Edmond, John; Krames, Michael; Raman, Sudhakar

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of U.S. manufacturing for clean energy technologies, such as solid-state lighting (SSL), is paramount to increasing competitiveness in a global marketplace. SSLs are poised to drive the lighting market, worldwide. In order to continue that competitiveness and support further innovation, the time to invest in U.S. manufacturing of clean energy technologies is now. Across the country, companies developing innovative clean energy technologies find competitive advantages to manufacturing in the U.S. The Department of Energy's Building Technology Office SSL Manufacturing Roadmap is just one example of how we support manufacturing through convening industry perspectives on opportunities to significantly reduce risk, improve quality, increase yields, and lower costs.

  3. Solid-state energy storage module employing integrated interconnect board

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rouillard, Jean; Comte, Christophe; Daigle, Dominik; Hagen, Ronald A.; Knudson, Orlin B.; Morin, Andre; Ranger, Michel; Ross, Guy; Rouillard, Roger; St-Germain, Philippe; Sudano, Anthony; Turgeon, Thomas A.

    2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical energy storage device includes a number of solid-state thin-film electrochemical cells which are selectively interconnected in series or parallel through use of an integrated interconnect board. The interconnect board is typically disposed within a sealed housing which also houses the electrochemical cells, and includes a first contact and a second contact respectively coupled to first and second power terminals of the energy storage device. The interconnect board advantageously provides for selective series or parallel connectivity with the electrochemical cells, irrespective of electrochemical cell position within the housing. Fuses and various electrical and electro-mechanical devices, such as bypass, equalization, and communication devices for example, may also be mounted to the interconnect board and selectively connected to the electrochemical cells.

  4. Solid-state energy storage module employing integrated interconnect board

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rouillard, Jean; Comte, Christophe; Daigle, Dominik; Hagen, Ronald A.; Knudson, Orlin B.; Morin, Andre; Ranger, Michel; Ross, Guy; Rouillard, Roger; St-Germain, Philippe; Sudano, Anthony; Turgeon, Thomas A.

    2003-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to an improved electrochemical energy storage device. The electrochemical energy storage device includes a number of solid-state, thin-film electrochemical cells which are selectively interconnected in series or parallel through use of an integrated interconnect board. The interconnect board is typically disposed within a sealed housing which also houses the electrochemical cells, and includes a first contact and a second contact respectively coupled to first and second power terminals of the energy storage device. The interconnect board advantageously provides for selective series or parallel connectivity with the electrochemical cells, irrespective of electrochemical cell position within the housing. Fuses and various electrical and electromechanical devices, such as bypass, equalization, and communication devices for example, may also be mounted to the interconnect board and selectively connected to the electrochemical cells.

  5. New diode wavelengths for pumping solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skidmore, J.A.; Emanuel, M.A.; Beach, R.J. [and others

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-power laser-diode arrays have been demonstrated to be viable pump sources for solid-state lasers. The diode bars (fill factor of 0.7) were bonded to silicon microchannel heatsinks for high-average-power operation. Over 12 W of CW output power was achieved from a one cm AlGaInP tensile-strained single-quantum-well laser diode bar. At 690 nm, a compressively-strained single-quantum-well laser-diode array produced 360 W/cm{sup 2} per emitting aperture under CW operation, and 2.85 kW of pulsed power from a 3.8 cm{sup 2} emitting-aperture array. InGaAs strained single-quantum-well laser diodes emitting at 900 nm produced 2.8 kW pulsed power from a 4.4 cm{sup 2} emitting-aperture array.

  6. DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium shares technical information and experiences related to LED street and area lighting demonstrations and serves as an objective resource for evaluating new products on the market intended for those applications. Cities, power providers, and others who invest in street and area lighting are invited to join the Consortium and share their experiences. The goal is to build a repository of valuable field experience and data that will significantly accelerate the learning curve for buying and implementing high-quality, energy-efficient LED lighting. Consortium members are part of an international knowledge base and peer group, receive updates on Consortium tools and resources, receive the Consortium E-Newsletter, and help steer the work of the Consortium by participating on a committee. Learn more about the Consortium.

  7. Solid-state sintering of tungsten heavy alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gurwell, W.E.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-state sintering is a technologically important step in the fabrication of tungsten heavy alloys. This work addresses practical variables affecting the sinterability: powder particle size, powder mixing, and sintering temperature and time. Compositions containing 1 to 10 micrometer ({mu}M) tungsten (W) powders can be fully densified at temperatures near the matrix solidus. Blending with an intensifier bar provided good dispersion of elemental powders and good as-sintered mechanical properties under adequate sintering conditions. Additional ball milling increases powder bulk density which primarily benefits mold and die filling. Although fine, 1 {mu}m W powder blends have high sinterability, higher as-sintered ductilities are reached in shorter sintering times with coarser, 5 {mu}m W powder blends; 10{mu}m W powder blends promise the highest as-sintered ductilities due to their coarse microstructural W.

  8. Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance 2nd Annual Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are pleased to provide the proceedings of the second annual Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Workshop held on March 29-30, 2001 in Arlington. The package includes the presentations made during the workshop, a list of participants, and the results of the breakout sessions. Those sessions covered stack materials and processes, power electronics, balance of plant and thermal integration, fuel processing technologies, and stack and system performance modeling. The breakout sessions have been reported as accurately as possible; however, due to the recording and transcription process errors may have occurred. If you note any significant omissions or wish to provide additional information, we welcome your comments and hope that all stakeholder groups will use the enclosed information in their planning endeavors.

  9. Solid state voltammetry of an anthraquinone molten salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M.E.; Murray, R.W.

    1999-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The solid-state voltammetries of the two reduction steps of a novel redox polyether hybrid--an anthraquinone molten salt (triethyl(MePEG350)ammonium anthraquinone sulfonate, (Et{sub 3}NMePEG350{sup +})(AQSO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}))--and its disulfonated analogue, are reported. Multiple effects on charge transport rates are encountered. Currents for the first reduction wave are greater than 10-fold smaller. The relative charge transport rates of the two reductions are examined as a function of temperature and of incrementally replacing the AQSO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} anion in the melt with the electro-inactive BF{sub 4}{sup {minus}} anion. An analysis that includes ionic conductivity measurements shows that the apparent charge transport rate of the second anthraquinone reduction is attenuated primarily as a result of ionic migration of the products of comproportionation reactions occurring in the diffusion layer.

  10. Direct Solid-State Conversion of Recyclable Metals and Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiran Manchiraju

    2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Friction Stir Extrusion (FSE) is a novel energy-efficient solid-state material synthesis and recycling technology capable of producing large quantity of bulk nano-engineered materials with tailored, mechanical, and physical properties. The novelty of FSE is that it utilizes the frictional heating and extensive plastic deformation inherent to the process to stir, consolidate, mechanically alloy, and convert the powders, chips, and other recyclable feedstock materials directly into useable product forms of highly engineered materials in a single step (see Figure 1). Fundamentally, FSE shares the same deformation and metallurgical bonding principles as in the revolutionary friction stir welding process. Being a solid-state process, FSE eliminates the energy intensive melting and solidification steps, which are necessary in the conventional metal synthesis processes. Therefore, FSE is highly energy-efficient, practically zero emissions, and economically competitive. It represents a potentially transformational and pervasive sustainable manufacturing technology for metal recycling and synthesis. The goal of this project was to develop the technological basis and demonstrate the commercial viability of FSE technology to produce the next generation highly functional electric cables for electricity delivery infrastructure (a multi-billion dollar market). Specific focus of this project was to (1) establish the process and material parameters to synthesize novel alloys such as nano-engineered materials with enhanced mechanical, physical, and/or functional properties through the unique mechanical alloying capability of FSE, (2) verifying the expected major energy, environmental, and economic benefits of FSE technology for both the early stage 'showcase' electric cable market and the anticipated pervasive future multi-market applications across several industry sectors and material systems for metal recycling and sustainable manufacturing.

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - activated solid-state synthesis Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is published by the American Chemical Summary: Article High-Contrast Solid-State Electrochromic Devices of Viologen-Bridged Polysilsesquioxane... this article 12;High-Contrast...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - applied solid state Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OF ARPAD A. BERGH, PRESIDENT OF THE Summary: lighting based on solid state optoelectronics. In particular, OIDA en- dorses legislation recently... -industry initiative to...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - active solid state Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    generally. Four members would be appointed... lighting based on solid state optoelectronics. In particular, OIDA en- dorses legislation recently... -industry initiative to...

  14. Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool Webcast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the "Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool" webcast, held April 3, 2012.

  15. Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff webcast, held May 6, 2010.

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced solid-state lasers Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sbastien Chnais and Sbastien Forget Laboratoire de... Villetaneuse, France Organic solid-state lasers are reviewed, with a special emphasis on works published during... the...

  17. Low Voltage White Phosphorescent OLED Achievements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Universal Display Corporation (UDC) and its research partners at Princeton University and the University of Southern California have succeeded in developing a white phosphorescent OLED (PHOLED™) that achieved a record efficiency of 20 lumens per watt. This achievement is the result of the team's collaborative efforts to increase the efficiency of PHOLED lighting by focusing on two critical factors: lowering the drive voltages and increasing the amount of light extracted.

  18. Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M. (eds.)

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the reporting period, relatively minor changes have occurred in the research areas of interest to the Division. Nearly all the research of the Division can be classified broadly as mission-oriented basic research. Topics covered include: theoretical solid state physics; surface and near-surface properties of solids; defects in solids; transport properties of solids; neutron scattering; and preparation and characterization of research materials. (GHT)

  19. Record External Quantum Efficiency in Blue OLED Device

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have created a blue organic light emitting diode (OLED) with an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 11% at 800 cd/m2, exceeding their previous record EQE of 8%. The EQE of blue OLEDs is a major challenge in OLED technology development. This achievement is particularly notable since it was accomplished at a much lower operating voltage (6.2V) than previous demonstrations using similar structures, revealing the potential for much higher power efficiencies.

  20. A novel solid-state self powered neutron detector Nicholas LiCausi*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    A novel solid-state self powered neutron detector Nicholas LiCausi*a , Justin Dingleyb , Yaron procedures. Keywords: Neutron detector, thermal neutrons, solid-state detector, DRIE, computer simulations 1 source and could be entirely self-powered. With no moving parts it would be robust and work in a variety

  1. Millisecond switching in solid state electrochromic polymer devices fabricated from ionic self-assembled multilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heflin, Randy

    Millisecond switching in solid state electrochromic polymer devices fabricated from ionic self The electrochromic switching times of solid state conducting polymer devices fabricated by the ionic self shown to decrease with the active area of the electrochromic device suggesting that even faster

  2. p s sbasic solid state physics www.pss-b.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakes, Roderic

    from nuclear fusion, however that is not the essen- tial stabilizing element. The essential physicsp s sbasic solid state physics b status solidi www.pss-b.com physica REPRINT Negative 10.1002/pssb.200777708 p s sbasic solid state physics b status solidi www.pss-b.com physica Negative

  3. Methods for measuring work surface illuminance in adaptive solid state lighting networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Methods for measuring work surface illuminance in adaptive solid state lighting networks Byungkun, MA 02139, USA ABSTRACT The inherent control flexibility implied by solid-state lighting ­ united propose several techniques for measuring work surface illuminance and ambient light using a sensor network

  4. JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE 34 (1999) 637 644 Cell nucleation in solid-state polymeric foams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vipin

    JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE 34 (1999) 637­ 644 Cell nucleation in solid-state polymeric foams-mail: holl@u.washington.edu The mechanism for nucleation phenomenon in solid-state microcellular foams. The nucleation phenomenon is thermally activated at the effective glass transition temperature of the gas

  5. Local solid-state modification of nanopore surface charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kox, Ronald; Chen, Chang; Arjmandi, Nima; Lagae, Liesbet; Borghs, Gustaaf; 10.1088/0957-4484/21/33/335703

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The last decade, nanopores have emerged as a new and interesting tool for the study of biological macromolecules like proteins and DNA. While biological pores, especially alpha-hemolysin, have been promising for the detection of DNA, their poor chemical stability limits their use. For this reason, researchers are trying to mimic their behaviour using more stable, solid-state nanopores. The most successful tools to fabricate such nanopores use high energy electron or ions beams to drill or reshape holes in very thin membranes. While the resolution of these methods can be very good, they require tools that are not commonly available and tend to damage and charge the nanopore surface. In this work, we show nanopores that have been fabricated using standard micromachning techniques together with EBID, and present a simple model that is used to estimate the surface charge. The results show that EBID with a silicon oxide precursor can be used to tune the nanopore surface and that the surface charge is stable over a...

  6. Storage of hyperentanglement in a solid-state quantum memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexey Tiranov; Jonathan Lavoie; Alban Ferrier; Philippe Goldner; Varun B. Verma; Sae Woo Nam; Richard P. Mirin; Adriana E. Lita; Francesco Marsili; Harald Herrmann; Christine Silberhorn; Nicolas Gisin; Mikael Afzelius; Felix Bussieres

    2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Two photons can simultaneously share entanglement between several degrees of freedom such as polarization, energy-time, spatial mode and orbital angular momentum. This resource is known as hyperentanglement, and it has been shown to be an important tool for optical quantum information processing. Here we demonstrate the quantum storage and retrieval of photonic hyperentanglement in a solid-state quantum memory. A pair of photons entangled in polarization and energy-time is generated such that one photon is stored in the quantum memory, while the other photon has a telecommunication wavelength suitable for transmission in optical fibre. We measured violations of a Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) Bell inequality for each degree of freedom, independently of the other one, which proves the successful storage and retrieval of the two bits of entanglement shared by the photons. Our scheme is compatible with long-distance quantum communication in optical fibre, and is in particular suitable for linear-optical entanglement purification for quantum repeaters.

  7. 2010 Ceramics, Solid State Studies in Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Halloran

    2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2010 Gordon Conference on Solid State Studies in Ceramics will present forefront research on ceramic materials in energy conversion, storage, and environmental sustainability. Oxide materials in advanced Li-ion batteries will be featured, including first principles computational methods, new experimental methods, novel synthesis, and the design of batteries that exploit nanoscale cathode materials. Several speakers address advances in oxides for solar applications, including photo-catalysts for solar hydrogen production and dye sensitized solar cells, along with thin film photovoltaics. Fast ionic conducting ceramics in electrochemical energy conversion and storage will be addressed for fuel cells and electrochemical storage. New concepts for electrochemical capacitor materials will be addressed, as will thermoelectric, geopolymers, and ceramics in nuclear energy. The Conference will bring together investigators at the forefront of their field as well as junior scientists in a collegial atmosphere, with programmed discussion sessions and informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings. Poster presentations provide opportunities for junior scientists and graduate students to present their work and exchange ideas with leaders in the field. This Conference provides an avenue for scientists from different disciplines to explore new ideas and promotes cross-disciplinary collaborations in the various research areas represented.

  8. Nitride and Oxynitride Based Phosphors for Solid State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Yongchi

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project is to advance the technology of the Lightscape Materials Inc. (Lightscape) proprietary nitride and oxynitride phosphors for solid state lighting (SSL) from the current level of maturity of applied research to advanced engineering development. This objective will be accomplished by optimizing the novel nitride and oxynitride phosphors, whose formulations are listed in Table 1, and establishing cost-effective preparation processes for the phosphors. The target performances of the phosphors are: • High luminescence efficiency: Quantum Yield = 90%. • Superior thermal stability of luminescence: Thermal Quenching Loss <10% at 150 °C. • Superior environmental stability: Luminescence Maintenance >90% after 5,000 hours at 85 °C and 85% relative humidity. • Scattering loss <10%. • Cost-effective preparation processes. The resulting phosphor materials and their preparation processes are anticipated to be a drop-in component for product development paths undertaken by LED lamp makers in the SSL industry. Upon program completion, Lightscape will target market insertion that enables high efficacy, high color rendering index (CRI), high thermal stability and long lifetime LED-based lighting products for general illumination that realizes substantial energy savings.

  9. Solid-State Lighting: An Energy Economics Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Saunders, Harry D.; Creighton, J. Randall; Coltrin, Michael E.; Simmons, Jerry A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Artificial light has long been a significant factor contributing to the quality and productivity of human life. As a consequence, we are willing to use huge amounts of energy to produce it. Solid-state lighting (SSL) is an emerging technology that promises performance features and efficiencies well beyond those of traditional artificial lighting, accompanied by potentially massive shifts in (a) the consumption of light, (b) the human productivity and energy use associated with that consumption and (c) the semiconductor chip area inventory and turnover required to support that consumption. In this paper, we provide estimates of the baseline magnitudes of these shifts using simple extrapolations of past behaviour into the future. For past behaviour, we use recent studies of historical and contemporary consumption patterns analysed within a simple energy-economics framework (a Cobb–Douglas production function and profit maximization). For extrapolations into the future, we use recent reviews of believed-achievable long-term performance targets for SSL. We also discuss ways in which the actual magnitudes could differ from the baseline magnitudes of these shifts. These include: changes in human societal demand for light; possible demand for features beyond lumens; and guidelines and regulations aimed at economizing on consumption of light and associated energy.

  10. Solid-state energy storage module employing integrated interconnect board

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rouillard, Jean (Saint-Luc, CA); Comte, Christophe (Montreal, CA); Daigle, Dominik (St-Hyacinthe, CA); Hagen, Ronald A. (Stillwater, MN); Knudson, Orlin B. (Vadnais Heights, MN); Morin, Andre (Longueuil, CA); Ranger, Michel (Lachine, CA); Ross, Guy (Beloeil, CA); Rouillard, Roger (Beloeil, CA); St-Germain, Philippe (Outremont, CA); Sudano, Anthony (Laval, CA); Turgeon, Thomas A. (Fridley, MN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to an improved electrochemical energy storage device. The electrochemical energy storage device includes a number of solid-state, thin-film electrochemical cells which are selectively interconnected in series or parallel through use of an integrated interconnect board. The interconnect board is typically disposed within a sealed housing which also houses the electrochemical cells, and includes a first contact and a second contact respectively coupled to first and second power terminals of the energy storage device. The interconnect board advantageously provides for selective series or parallel connectivity with the electrochemical cells, irrespective of electrochemical cell position within the housing. In one embodiment, a sheet of conductive material is processed by employing a known milling, stamping, or chemical etching technique to include a connection pattern which provides for flexible and selective interconnecting of individual electrochemical cells within the housing, which may be a hermetically sealed housing. Fuses and various electrical and electro-mechanical devices, such as bypass, equalization, and communication devices for example, may also be mounted to the interconnect board and selectively connected to the electrochemical cells.

  11. Solidification and solid state transformations of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, J A; Williams, J C; Thompson, A W

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The microstructure of austenitic stainless steel welds can contain a large variety of ferrite morphologies. It was originally thought that many of these morphologies were direct products of solidification. Subsequently, detailed work on castings suggested the structures can solidify either as ferrite or austenite. However, when solidification occurs by ferrite, a large fraction of the ferrite transforms to austenite during cooling via a diffusion controlled transformation. It was also shown by Arata et al that welds in a 304L alloy solidified 70-80% as primary ferrite, a large fraction of which also transformed to austenite upon cooling. More recently it was suggested that the cooling rates in welds were sufficiently high that diffusionless transformations were responsible for several commonly observed ferrite morphologies. However, other workers have suggested that even in welds, delta ..-->.. ..gamma.. transformations are diffusion controlled. A variety of ferrite morphologies have more recently been characterized by Moisio and coworkers and by David. The purpose of this paper is to provide further understanding of the evaluation of the various weld microstructures which are related to both the solidification behavior and the subsequent solid state transformations. To accomplish this, both TEM and STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy) techniques were employed.

  12. High Efficiency LED Lamp for Solid-State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Ibbetson

    2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a summary of technical achievements during a three-year project to demonstrate high efficiency, solid-state lamps based on gallium nitride/silicon carbide light-emitting diodes. Novel chip designs and fabrication processes are described for a new type of nitride light-emitting diode with the potential for very high efficiency. This work resulted in the demonstration of blue light-emitting diodes in the one watt class that achieved up to 495 mW of light output at 350 mA drive current, corresponding to quantum and wall plug efficiencies of 51% and 45%, respectively. When combined with a phosphor in Cree's 7090 XLamp package, these advanced blue-emitting devices resulted in white light-emitting diodes whose efficacy exceeded 85 lumens per watt. In addition, up to 1040 lumens at greater than 85 lumens per watt was achieved by combining multiple devices to make a compact white lamp module with high optical efficiency.

  13. OLED Display with Single Grain Si TFT. (SG-TFT):.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naeimi, A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??OLED is a current based device, which emitted amount of light depends on the current supplied to the device so steady current flow is needed.… (more)

  14. OLED Manufacture Challenge: Strategy for Cost Reduction and Yield...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    activity in China will help to leverage the fund for potential market of OLED lighting: Eye-shielding Lamps for Children Shadowless Surgical Operating Lamp New Construction Design...

  15. Solid-State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M. (eds.)

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress and activities are reported on: theoretical solid-state physics (surfaces; electronic, vibrational, and magnetic properties; particle-solid interactions; laser annealing), surface and near-surface properties of solids (surface, plasma-material interactions, ion implantation and ion-beam mixing, pulsed-laser and thermal processing), defects in solids (radiation effects, fracture, impurities and defects, semiconductor physics and photovoltaic conversion), transport properties of solids (fast-ion conductors, superconductivity, mass and charge transport in materials), neutron scattering (small-angle scattering, lattice dynamics, magnetic properties, structure and instrumentation), and preparation and characterization of research materials (growth and preparative methods, nuclear waste forms, special materials). (DLC)

  16. Application of Developed APCVD Transparent Conducting Oxides and Undercoat Technologies for Economical OLED Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Silverman; Bluhm, Martin; Coffey, James; Korotkov, Roman; Polsz, Craig; Salemi, Alexandre; Smith, Robert; Smith, Ryan; Stricker, Jeff; Xu,Chen; Shirazi, Jasmine; Papakonstantopulous, George; Carson, Steve Philips Lighting GmbH Goldman, Claudia; Hartmann, Sören; Jessen, Frank; Krogmann, Bianca; Rickers, Christoph; Ruske, Manfred, Schwab, Holger; Bertram, Dietrich

    2011-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Economics is a key factor for application of organic light emitting diodes (OLED) in general lighting relative to OLED flat panel displays that can handle high cost materials such as indium tin oxide (ITO) or Indium zinc oxide (IZO) as the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) on display glass. However, for OLED lighting to penetrate into general illumination, economics and sustainable materials are critical. The issues with ITO have been documented at the DOE SSL R&D and Manufacturing workshops for the last 5 years and the issue is being exaserbated by export controls from China (one of the major sources of elemental indium). Therefore, ITO is not sustainable because of the fluctuating costs and the United States (US) dependency on other nations such as China. Numerous alternatives to ITO/IZO are being evaluated such as Ag nanoparticles/nanowires, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and other metal oxides. Of these other metal oxides, doped zinc oxide has attracted a lot of attention over the last 10 years. The volume of zinc mined is a factor of 80,000 greater than indium and the US has significant volumes of zinc mined domestically, resulting in the ability for the US to be self-sufficient for this element that can be used in optoelectonic applications. The costs of elemental zinc is over 2 orders of magnitude less than indium, reflecting the relative abundance and availablility of the elements. Arkema Inc. and an international primary glass manufacturing company, which is located in the United States, have developed doped zinc oxide technology for solar control windows. The genesis of this DOE SSL project was to determine if doped zinc oxide technology can be taken from the commodity based window market and translate the technology to OLED lighting. Thus, Arkema Inc. sought out experts, Philips Lighting, Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) and National Renewable Research Laboratories (NREL), in OLED devices and brought them into the project. This project had a clear focus on economics and the work plan focused both on doped ZnO process and OLED device structure that would be consistent with the new TCO. The team successfully made 6 inch OLEDs with a serial construction. More process development is required to optimize commercial OLED structures. Feasibility was demonstrated on two different light extraction technologies: 1/4 lambda refractive index matching and high-low-high band pass filter. Process development was also completed on the key precursors for the TCO, which are ready for pilot-plant scale-up. Subsequently, Arkema has developed a cost of ownership model that is consistent with DOE SSL R&D Manufacturing targets as outlined in the DOE SSL R&D Manufacturing 2010 report. The overall outcome of this project was the demonstration that doped zinc oxide can be used for OLED devices without a drop-off in performance while gaining the economic and sustainable benefits of a more readily available TCO. The broad impact of this project, is the facilitation of OLED lighting market penetration into general illumination, resulting in significant energy savings, decreased greenhouse emissions, with no environmental impact issues such as mercury found in Fluorescent technology.

  17. Arabidopsis thalianafrom Polarization Transfer Solid-State NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Paul B [Ames Laboratory; Wang, Tuo [Ames Laboratory; Park, Yong Bum [Pennsylvania State University; Cosgrove, Daniel J [Pennsylvania State University; Hong, Mei [Ames Laboratory

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are hydrated under functional conditions, but the molecular interactions between water and polysaccharides in the wall have not been investigated. In this work, we employ polarization transfer solid-state NMR techniques to study the hydration of primary-wall polysaccharides of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. By transferring water 1H polarization to polysaccharides through distance- and mobility-dependent 1H–1H dipolar couplings and detecting it through polysaccharide 13C signals, we obtain information about water proximity to cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins as well as water mobility. Both intact and partially extracted cell wall samples are studied. Our results show that water–pectin polarization transfer is much faster than water–cellulose polarization transfer in all samples, but the extent of extraction has a profound impact on the water–polysaccharide spin diffusion. Removal of calcium ions and the consequent extraction of homogalacturonan (HG) significantly slowed down spin diffusion, while further extraction of matrix polysaccharides restored the spin diffusion rate. These trends are observed in cell walls with similar water content, thus they reflect inherent differences in the mobility and spatial distribution of water. Combined with quantitative analysis of the polysaccharide contents, our results indicate that calcium ions and HG gelation increase the amount of bound water, which facilitates spin diffusion, while calcium removal disrupts the gel and gives rise to highly dynamic water, which slows down spin diffusion. The recovery of spin diffusion rates after more extensive extraction is attributed to increased water-exposed surface areas of the polysaccharides. Water–pectin spin diffusion precedes water–cellulose spin diffusion, lending support to the single-network model of plant primary walls in which a substantial fraction of the cellulose surface is surrounded by pectins.

  18. OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy Second Quarter4,(National Renewable2014)OLED Stakeholder

  19. On-site demonstration procedure for solid-state fluorescent ballast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verderber, R.; Morse, O.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report was presented to plant engineers and managers who were involved in an on-site demonstration of EETech solid-state ballasts for two 40-watt T12 fluorescent lamps. The report includes a brief review of the operating principles of solid-state fluorescent ballasts and the status of development achieved during the LBL program. The remainder of the test describes the techniques of managing and instrumenting a test area for assessing the performance of solid-state fluorescent ballasts at an occupied site.

  20. Spontaneous fluctuations of transition dipole moment orientation in OLED triplet emitters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steiner, Florian; Vogelsang, Jan; Lupton, John M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficiency of an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) depends on the microscopic orientation of transition dipole moments of the molecular emitters. The most effective materials used for light generation have threefold symmetry, which prohibit a priori determination of dipole orientation due to the degeneracy of the fundamental transition. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals that the model triplet emitter tris(2-phenylisoquinoline)iridium(III) (Ir(piq)3) does not behave as a linear dipole, radiating with lower polarization anisotropy than expected. Spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs in the excited state, leading to a random selection of one of the three ligands to form a charge transfer state with the metal. This non-deterministic localization is revealed in switching of the degree of linear polarization of phosphorescence. Polarization scrambling likely raises out-coupling efficiency and should be taken into account when deriving molecular orientation of the guest emitter within the OLED host from ense...

  1. The Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and Gas Turbine (GT) Systems Steady State Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and Gas Turbine (GT) Systems Steady State Modeling Penyarat Fuel Cells (SOFCs) are of great interest nowadays. The feature of SOFCs makes them suitable for hybrid plants offer high cycle efficiencies. In this work a hybrid solid oxide fuel cell and gas turbine power

  2. Solid State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W. [eds.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program with emphasis on theoretical solid state physics, superconductivity, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. The High Flux Isotope Reactor was returned to full operation.

  3. Solid State Blending of Poly(ethylene terephthalate) with Polystyrene: Extent of PET Amorphization and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Brian S.

    Solid State Blending of Poly(ethylene terephthalate) with Polystyrene: Extent of PET Amorphization.interscience.wiley.com). ABSTRACT: Polystyrene (PS) and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) were blended to- gether in the solid. CMA PS/PET blend morphologies were characterized both qualitatively and quantitatively through

  4. Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Department Paper: www.risoe.dtu.dk/rispubl/art/2008_65.pdf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risř DTU Postprint Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Department Year 2008 Paper: www neutron diffraction F. Brćstrup a, , B. C. Hauback b, K. K. Hansen a a Fuel Cells and Solid State.1016/j.jssc.2008.05.028 #12;Risř DTU Postprint Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Department Year 2008

  5. Pore-Filling of Spiro-OMeTAD in Solid-State Dye Sensitized Solar Cells: Quantification, Mechanism, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGehee, Michael

    Pore-Filling of Spiro-OMeTAD in Solid-State Dye Sensitized Solar Cells: Quantification, Mechanism. Introduction Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) are one of the most promising photovoltaic technologies. Liquid in solid- state dye-sensitized solar cells (ss-DSCs), which have solid-state holetransportmaterials (HTMs

  6. Thin Film Packaging Solutions for High Efficiency OLED Lighting Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the 'Thin Film Packaging Solutions for High Efficiency OLED Lighting Products' project is to demonstrate thin film packaging solutions based on SiC hermetic coatings that, when applied to glass and plastic substrates, support OLED lighting devices by providing longer life with greater efficiency at lower cost than is currently available. Phase I Objective: Demonstrate thin film encapsulated working phosphorescent OLED devices on optical glass with lifetime of 1,000 hour life, CRI greater than 75, and 15 lm/W. Phase II Objective: Demonstrate thin film encapsulated working phosphorescent OLED devices on plastic or glass composite with 25 lm/W, 5,000 hours life, and CRI greater than 80. Phase III Objective: Demonstrate 2 x 2 ft{sup 2} thin film encapsulated working phosphorescent OLED with 40 lm/W, 10,000 hour life, and CRI greater than 85. This report details the efforts of Phase III (Budget Period Three), a fourteen month collaborative effort that focused on optimization of high-efficiency phosphorescent OLED devices and thin-film encapsulation of said devices. The report further details the conclusions and recommendations of the project team that have foundation in all three budget periods for the program. During the conduct of the Thin Film Packaging Solutions for High Efficiency OLED Lighting Products program, including budget period three, the project team completed and delivered the following achievements: (1) a three-year marketing effort that characterized the near-term and longer-term OLED market, identified customer and consumer lighting needs, and suggested prototype product concepts and niche OLED applications lighting that will give rise to broader market acceptance as a source for wide area illumination and energy conservation; (2) a thin film encapsulation technology with a lifetime of nearly 15,000 hours, tested by calcium coupons, while stored at 16 C and 40% relative humidity ('RH'). This encapsulation technology was characterized as having less than 10% change in transmission during the 15,000 hour test period; (3) demonstrated thin film encapsulation of a phosphorescent OLED device with 1,500 hours of lifetime at 60 C and 80% RH; (4) demonstrated that a thin film laminate encapsulation, in addition to the direct thin film deposition process, of a polymer OLED device was another feasible packaging strategy for OLED lighting. The thin film laminate strategy was developed to mitigate defects, demonstrate roll-to-roll process capability for high volume throughput (reduce costs) and to support a potential commercial pathway that is less dependent upon integrated manufacturing since the laminate could be sold as a rolled good; (5) demonstrated that low cost 'blue' glass substrates could be coated with a siloxane barrier layer for planarization and ion-protection and used in the fabrication of a polymer OLED lighting device. This study further demonstrated that the substrate cost has potential for huge cost reductions from the white borosilicate glass substrate currently used by the OLED lighting industry; (6) delivered four-square feet of white phosphorescent OLED technology, including novel high efficiency devices with 82 CRI, greater than 50 lm/W efficiency, and more than 1,000 hours lifetime in a product concept model shelf; (7) presented and or published more than twenty internal studies (for private use), three external presentations (OLED workshop-for public use), and five technology-related external presentations (industry conferences-for public use); and (8) issued five patent applications, which are in various maturity stages at time of publication. Delivery of thin film encapsulated white phosphorescent OLED lighting technology remains a challenging technical achievement, and it seems that commercial availability of thin, bright, white OLED light that meets market requirements will continue to require research and development effort. However, there will be glass encapsulated white OLED lighting products commercialized in niche markets during the 2008 calendar year. This commercializ

  7. Methods for measuring work surface illuminance in adaptive solid state lighting networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Byungkun

    The inherent control flexibility implied by solid-state lighting - united with the rich details offered by sensor networks - prompts us to rethink lighting control. In this research, we propose several techniques for ...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - all-solid-state lithium secondary Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: all-solid-state lithium secondary Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Preface to bLithium isotope...

  9. Solid-State Lighting: Early Lessons Learned on the Way to Market

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This February 20, 2014 webinar presented information from a new DOE report, Solid-State Lighting: Early Lessons Learned on the Way to Market. The SSL market continues to evolve rapidly and LED...

  10. Solid state growth mechanisms for carbon nanotubes Peter J.F. Harris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Peter J F

    Review Solid state growth mechanisms for carbon nanotubes Peter J.F. Harris Centre for Advanced.09.023 E-mail address: p.j.f.harris@rdg.ac.uk www.elsevier.com/locate/carbon Carbon 4

  11. MidAmerican Energy (Electric) – Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    MidAmerican Energy offers grants to munipalities which implement solid-state roadway street lighting upgrades. Grants of up to $5,000 are available to participating entities who install eligible...

  12. Apply: Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D - 2015 Funding...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    is closed. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced a solid-state lighting (SSL) R&D funding opportunity on October 14, 2014. Under this funding opportunity...

  13. Dynamic nuclear polarization in biomolecular solid state NMR : methods and applications in peptides and membrane proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bajaj, Vikram Singh

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid state NMR can probe structure and dynamics on length scales from the atomic to the supramolecular. However, low sensitivity limits its application in macromolecules. NMR sensitivity can be improved by dynamic nuclear ...

  14. Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This April 3, 2012 webcast presented information about the Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool developed by DOE"s Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium. Doug Elliott of Pacific Northwest...

  15. Energy efficient control of polychromatic solid state lighting using a sensor network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paradiso, Joseph A.

    Motivated by opportunities in smart lighting, energy efficiency, and ubiquitous sensing, we present the design of polychromatic solid-state lighting controlled using a sensor network. We developed both a spectrally tunable ...

  16. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopic Study of Phosphate Sorption Mechanisms on Aluminum (Hydr)oxides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Solid-State NMR Spectroscopic Study of Phosphate Sorption Mechanisms on Aluminum (Hydr)oxides Wei the mechanism of phosphate sorption on aluminum hydroxides under different environ- mental conditions, including

  17. Text-Alternative Version: Solid-State Lighting Early Lessons Learned Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Linda Sandahl: Welcome, ladies and gentlemen. I'm Linda Sandahl with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and I'd like to welcome you to today's webcast, Solid-State Lighting: Early Lessons...

  18. Commercialization of gallium nitride nanorod arrays on silicon for solid-state lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wee, Qixun

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One important component in energy usage is lighting, which is currently dominated by incandescent and fluorescent lamps. However, due to potentially higher efficiencies and thus higher energy savings, solid-state lighting ...

  19. High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul T. Fini; Shuji Nakamura

    2005-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this final technical progress report we summarize research accomplished during Department of Energy contract DE-FC26-01NT41203, entitled ''High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting''. Two teams, from the University of California at Santa Barbara (Principle Investigator: Dr. Shuji Nakamura) and the Lighting Research Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (led by Dr. N. Narendran), pursued the goals of this contract from thin film growth, characterization, and packaging/luminaire design standpoints. The UCSB team initially pursued the development of blue gallium nitride (GaN)-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, as well as ultraviolet GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). In Year 2, the emphasis shifted to resonant-cavity light emitting diodes, also known as micro-cavity LEDs when extremely thin device cavities are fabricated. These devices have very directional emission and higher light extraction efficiency than conventional LEDs. Via the optimization of thin-film growth and refinement of device processing, we decreased the total cavity thickness to less than 1 {micro}m, such that micro-cavity effects were clearly observed and a light extraction efficiency of over 10% was reached. We also began the development of photonic crystals for increased light extraction, in particular for so-called ''guided modes'' which would otherwise propagate laterally in the device and be re-absorbed. Finally, we pursued the growth of smooth, high-quality nonpolar a-plane and m-plane GaN films, as well as blue light emitting diodes on these novel films. Initial nonpolar LEDs showed the expected behavior of negligible peak wavelength shift with increasing drive current. M-plane LEDs in particular show promise, as unpackaged devices had unsaturated optical output power of {approx} 3 mW at 200 mA drive current. The LRC's tasks were aimed at developing the subcomponents necessary for packaging UCSB's light emitting diodes, and packaging them to produce a white light fixture. During the third and final year of the project, the LRC team investigated alternate packaging methods for the white LED device to achieve at least 25 percent more luminous efficacy than traditional white LEDs; conducted optical ray-tracing analyses and human factors studies to determine the best form factor for the white light source under development, in terms of high luminous efficacy and greater acceptance by subjects; and developed a new die encapsulant using silicone-epoxy resins that showed less yellowing and slower degradation. At the conclusion of this project, the LRC demonstrated a new packaging method, called scattered photon extraction (SPE), that produced an average luminous flux and corresponding average efficacy of 90.7 lm and 36.3 lm/W, respectively, compared with 56.5 lm and 22.6 lm/W for a similar commercial white LED package. At low currents, the SPE package emitted white light with an efficacy of over 80 lm/W and had chromaticity values very close to the blackbody locus. The SPE package showed an overall improvement of 61% for this particular comparison, exceeding the LRC's third-year goal of 25% improvement.

  20. Solid-State Lighting Manufacturing Research and Development - Round 3

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment,Institutes and ResponseStaffServicesFutureU.S.Solar CellSolid Oxide

  1. Solid-State Lighting Manufacturing Research and Development - Round 4

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment,Institutes and ResponseStaffServicesFutureU.S.Solar CellSolid

  2. World Record White OLED Performance Exceeds 100 lm/W

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Universal Display Corporation (UDC) has successfully demonstrated a record-breaking white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) with a power efficacy of 102 lm/W at 1000 cd/m2 using its proprietary, high-efficiency phosphorescent OLED technology. This achievement represents a significant milestone for OLED technology, demonstrating performance that surpasses the power efficacy of incandescent bulbs with less than 15 lm/W and fluorescent lamps at 60-90 lm/W. Funded in part by DOE, UDC's achievement is a major step toward DOE's roadmap goal of a 150 lm/W commercial OLED light source by 2015.

  3. Solution-Processable Transparent Conductive Hole Injection Electrode for OLED SSL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An interconnected network of silver nanowires has been used as transparent anode in OLED devices. This layer was deposited by spin-coating and slot-die coating from an aqueous nanowire suspension. The sheet resistance of the film was 10ohms/sq with a transmission (including the glass substrate) of higher than 85%. The first phase of the project focused on the implementation of this nanowire layer with a hole-injection-layer (HIL) which has been developed at Plextronics and has been shown to provide good stability and efficiency in conventional OLED devices. We modified the HIL solution such that it coated reasonably well with suitable surface morphology so that actual devices can be manufactured. During the second phase we investigated the hole-injection and stability of hole-onlydevices. We determined that the use of the nanowire network as anode does not introduce an additional degradation mechanism since the observed device characteristics did not differ from those made with ITO anode. We then proceeded to make actual OLED devices with this nanowire / HIL stack and achieved device characteristics similar state-of-the-art OLED devices with a single junction. In order to gain traction with potential OLED manufacturers, we decided to contract Novaled to prepare large-area demonstrators for us. For these devices, we used an allevaporated stack, i.e. we did use Novaledâ??s HIL material instead of Plextronicsâ??. We successfully fabricated demonstrators with an area of 25cm2 with a double or triple junction stack. Minor stack optimizations were necessary to achieve efficacies and lifetime equivalent with ITO devices made with the same devices stack. Due to the reduced microcavity effect, the color of the emitted light is significantly more stable with respect to the viewing angle compared to ITO devices. This fact in conjunction with the promise of lower production cost due to the elimination of the ITO sputtering process and the direct patterning of the anode layer are the obvious advantages of this technology. The project has shown that this nanowire technology is a viable option to achieve OLED devices with good lifetime and efficiency and we are currently working with manufacturers to utilize this technology in a production setting.

  4. Solid state 13C NMR in conducting polymers F. Devreux (*), G. Bidan (**), A. A. Syed(**,+) and C. Tsintavis (**)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1595 Solid state 13C NMR in conducting polymers F. Devreux (*), G. Bidan (**), A. A. Syed al. [1], the so-called solid-state high-resolution 13C NMR (CMR) could be a promis- ing way material for battery appli- cations. 2. Experimental High resolution CMR is achieved in solids by averag

  5. Thermodynamic $R$-diagrams reveal solid-like fluid states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George Ruppeiner; Peter Mausbach; Helge-Otmar May

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the thermodynamic curvature $R$ for fluid argon, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and water. For these fluids, $R$ is mostly negative, but we also find significant regimes of positive $R$, which we interpret as indicating solid-like fluid properties. Regimes of positive $R$ are present in all four fluids at very high pressure. Water has, in addition, a narrow slab of positive $R$ in the stable liquid phase near its triple point. Also, water is the only fluid we found having $R$ decrease on cooling into the metastable liquid phase, consistent with a possible second critical point.

  6. New Efficiency Record Achieved for White OLED Device

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Osram Opto-Semiconductors, Inc. has successfully demonstrated a white organic light emitting diode (OLED) with a record efficiency of 25 lumens per watt, the highest known efficiency achieved to date for a polymer-based white OLED. The 25 LPW cool-white-emitting device was produced by applying a standard external inorganic phosphor to Osram's record-breaking blue-emitting phosphorescent polymer device with a peak luminous efficacy of 14 LPW.

  7. Solid-State Circuit for Spin Entanglement Generation and Purification J. M. Taylor,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yacoby, Amir

    computers by connecting small- scale processors in a quantum network. EPR pair genera- tion and purificationSolid-State Circuit for Spin Entanglement Generation and Purification J. M. Taylor,1 W. Du¨r,2,3 P for the robust generation and purification of four-particle spin entangled states in elec- trically controlled

  8. Determination of interfacial states in solid heterostructures using a variable-energy positron beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Asokakumar, P.P.V.; Lynn, K.G.

    1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and means is provided for characterizing interfacial electron states in solid heterostructures using a variable energy positron beam to probe the solid heterostructure. The method includes the steps of directing a positron beam having a selected energy level at a point on the solid heterostructure so that the positron beam penetrates into the solid heterostructure and causes positrons to collide with the electrons at an interface of the solid heterostructure. The number and energy of gamma rays emitted from the solid heterostructure as a result of the annihilation of positrons with electrons at the interface are detected. The data is quantified as a function of the Doppler broadening of the photopeak about the 511 keV line created by the annihilation of the positrons and electrons at the interface, preferably, as an S-parameter function; and a normalized S-parameter function of the data is obtained. The function of data obtained is compared with a corresponding function of the Doppler broadening of the annihilation photopeak about 511 keV for a positron beam having a second energy level directed at the same material making up a portion of the solid heterostructure. The comparison of these functions facilitates characterization of the interfacial states of electrons in the solid heterostructure at points corresponding to the penetration of positrons having the particular energy levels into the interface of the solid heterostructure. Accordingly, the invention provides a variable-energy non-destructive probe of solid heterostructures, such as SiO[sub 2]/Si, MOS or other semiconductor devices.

  9. Solid State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W. [eds.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1995, through March 31, 1997. During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program in support of Department of Energy science and technology missions. The report includes brief summaries of research activities in condensed matter theory, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. An addendum includes listings of division publications and professional activities.

  10. Controls for Solid-State Lighting Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Energy Technology Laboratory and James Brodrick Building Technologies Program Office of Energy-State Lighting Final Report Prepared for: Joel Chaddock National Energy Technology Laboratory and James Brodrick

  11. Methods for Increasing Sensitivity and Throughput of Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Pharmaceutical Solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schieber, Loren

    2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    nucleus must change its spin state by the absorption of quantized energy specific to the Larmor precesion frequency. The appropriate energy can be determined from Equation 2.3. ! "E=h#= h$B 0 2% (2.3) The Larmor frequency...

  12. Solid-state lighting : lamp targets and implications for the semiconductor chip.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quiet revolution is underway. Over the next 5-10 years inorganic-semiconductor-based solid-state lighting technology is expected to outperform first incandescent, and then fluorescent and high-intensity-discharge, lighting. Along the way, many decision points and technical challenges will be faced. To help understand these challenges, the U.S. Department of Energy, the Optoelectronics Industry Development Association and the National Electrical Manufacturers Association recently updated the U.S. Solid-State Lighting Roadmap. In the first half of this paper, we present an overview of the high-level targets of the inorganic-semiconductor part of that update. In the second half of this paper, we discuss some implications of those high-level targets on the GaN-based semiconductor chips that will be the 'engine' for solid-state lighting.

  13. Energy savings with solid-state ballasted high-pressure sodium lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of three types of solid-state ballasts used to operate high-pressure sodium lamps is discussed. Each type of solid-state ballast has been designed to operate an HPS lamp of a different wattage (150, 200, and 400 watts). The performance of these ballasts compared to standard core-coil ballasts operating the same HPS lamps shows that system efficiency improves as much as 17%. The solid-state ballasted HPS system also demonstrates excellent regulation with respect to input voltage and output power. These new ballasts can dim the HPS lamps and reduce flicker from more than 60% to less than 3%. Refitting street lighting with these new HPS systims provides an attractive return on initial capital investment.

  14. Solid State Communications 122 (2002) 507?510

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    phase separation on charge ordering state in La 12x Ca x MnO 3 (x 12, 23, and 34) H.-D. Zhou, G. Li, S.-J. Feng, Y. Liu, T. Qian, X.-J. Fan, X.-G. Li * Structure Research...

  15. Conformational Changes of an Ion Channel Detected Through Water-Protein Interactions Using Solid-State NMR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Mei

    Conformational Changes of an Ion Channel Detected Through Water-Protein Interactions Using Solid-State is scarce. Using 1 H spin diffusion solid-state NMR, we have now determined the water accessibility of the M NMR Spectroscopy Wenbin Luo and Mei Hong* Department of Chemistry, Iowa State UniVersity, Ames, Iowa

  16. Solid-state NMR studies of the adsorption of acetylene on platinum/alumina catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambregts, Marsha Jo Lupher

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SOLID-STATE NMR STUDIES OF THE ADSORPTION OF ACETYLENE ON PLATINUM/ALUMINA CATALYSTS A Thesis by MARSHA JO LUPHER LAMBREGTS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Chemistry SOLID-STATE NMR STUDIES OF THE ADSORPTION OF ACETYLENE ON PLATINUM/ALUMINA CATALYSTS A Thesis by MARSHA JO LUPHER LAMBREGTS Approved as to style and content by: ames F. Haw...

  17. Parasitic oscillation suppression in solid state lasers using absorbing thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zapata, L.E.

    1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin absorbing film is bonded onto at least certain surfaces of a solid state laser gain medium. An absorbing metal-dielectric multilayer film is optimized for a broad range of incidence angles, and is resistant to the corrosive/erosive effects of a coolant such as water, used in the forced convection cooling of the film. Parasitic oscillations hamper the operation of solid state lasers by causing the decay of stored energy to amplified rays trapped within the gain medium by total and partial internal reflections off the gain medium facets. Zigzag lasers intended for high average power operation require the ASE absorber. 16 figs.

  18. Solid state RF power: The route to 1W per euro cent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heid, Oliver [Siemens AG, Mozartstrasse 57, Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In most particle accelerators RF power is a decisive design constraint due to high costs and relative inflexibility of current electron beam based RF sources, i.e. Klystrons, Magnetrons, Tetrodes etc. At VHF/UHF frequencies the transition to solid state devices promises to fundamentally change the situation. Recent progress brings 1 Watt per Euro cent installed cost within reach. We present a Silicon Carbide semiconductor solution utilising the Solid State Direct Drive technology at unprecedented efficiency, power levels and power densities. The proposed solution allows retrofitting of existing RF accelerators and opens the route to novel particle accelerator concepts.

  19. Parasitic oscillation suppression in solid state lasers using absorbing thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zapata, Luis E. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin absorbing film is bonded onto at least certain surfaces of a solid state laser gain medium. An absorbing metal-dielectric multilayer film is optimized for a broad range of incidence angles, and is resistant to the corrosive/erosive effects of a coolant such as water, used in the forced convection cooling of the film. Parasitic oscillations hamper the operation of solid state lasers by causing the decay of stored energy to amplified rays trapped within the gain medium by total and partial internal reflections off the gain medium facets. Zigzag lasers intended for high average power operation require the ASE absorber.

  20. The Ninth Annual DOE Solid-State Lighting Market Development Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nearly 200 lighting leaders from across North America gathered in Detroit from November 12–13, 2014, for the ninth annual Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Market Development Workshop, hosted by DOE. The diverse audience spanned the spectrum of SSL stakeholders, representing industry, government, efficiency organizations, utilities, municipalities, designers, specifiers, retailers, and distributors. The workshop’s purpose was to create a forum for airing issues and questions regarding today’s solid-state lighting products, and identifying strategies that will speed market adoption.

  1. Solid-State Lighting-L Prize Competition | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from the GridwiseSite ManagementSolid-State LightingWebcasts Solid-State LightingL

  2. Electric Field Modulation of the Membrane Potential in Solid-State Ion Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Mark

    channel. KEYWORDS: Nanochannel, membrane potential, electrofluidic gating, ion transport, salinityElectric Field Modulation of the Membrane Potential in Solid-State Ion Channels Weihua Guan a rapid flow of ions across the cell membrane. Normal physiological functions, such as generating action

  3. SOLID STATE NMR STUDY SUPPORTING THE LITHIUM VACANCY DEFECT MODEL IN CONGRUENT LITHIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bluemel, Janet

    @ Pergamon SOLID STATE NMR STUDY SUPPORTING THE LITHIUM VACANCY DEFECT MODEL IN CONGRUENT LITHIUM performed on powdered and single crystal lithium niobate of defectivecongruent composition (48.4%LirO;51.6% NbrOr) using a magnetic field strength of 7.05 Tesla with the aim to distinguish between a lithium

  4. Determination of Peptide Amide Configuration in a Model Amyloid Fibril by Solid-State NMR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Robert G.

    -42, with sequence LMVGGVVIA) forms a structured aggregate which is classified as an amyloid fibril based primarilyDetermination of Peptide Amide Configuration in a Model Amyloid Fibril by Solid-State NMR P. R these aggregates form. The primary constituent of the amyloid plaques characteristic of AD are a family of 39

  5. Homogeneous, dual layer, solid state, thin film deposition for structural and/or electrochemical characteristics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pitts, J. Roland; Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Li, Wenming

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid state, thin film, electrochemical devices (10) and methods of making the same are disclosed. An exemplary device 10 includes at least one electrode (14) and an electrolyte (16) deposited on the electrode (14). The electrolyte (16) includes at least two homogenous layers of discrete physical properties. The two homogenous layers comprise a first dense layer (15) and a second porous layer (16).

  6. Studies of solid state hydrogen storage materials by SAXS and QENS Qing Shi a, b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Studies of solid state hydrogen storage materials by SAXS and QENS Qing Shi a, b , Hjalte S than that of other chemical fuels1 . However, hydrogen storage is still a key problem remaining on reversible hydrogen storage in complex metal hydrides, these materials have dominated the research field due

  7. Solid-State Electrochromic Devices via Ionic Self-Assembled Multilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heflin, Randy

    Solid-State Electrochromic Devices via Ionic Self-Assembled Multilayers (ISAM) of a Polyviologena-Galva´n, Harry W. Gibson, James R. Heflin* Introduction Electrochromic (EC) devices undergo reversible absorbance/ transmittance change on application of external voltage.[1] Since the first major report on electrochromism

  8. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of HIV Fusion Peptide 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weliky, David

    Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of HIV Fusion Peptide 13 CO to Lipid 31 P ABSTRACT: Fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) membrane and the host cell membrane is an initial step of infection of the host cell. Fusion is catalyzed by gp41, which is an integral membrane

  9. Stable doped hybrid sol-gel materials for solid-state dye laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Stable doped hybrid sol-gel materials for solid-state dye laser Tran H. Nhung, Michael Canva have been obtained with dye-doped hybrid xerogel samples prepared several years ago and stored dye into a hybrid xerogel matrix and obtained good laser performances similar to the rest

  10. Solid State Research CenterDOE Fuel Cell Portable Power Workshop End User Perspective Industrial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usage :KU 19901980 :KU 2000 :KU 2010 :KU On Body Energy Solid State Research CenterDOE Fuel Cell · Notebook - ~20.0W ·High unit growth of Mobile phones driving energy demand ·Laptop computer power demands) Power(W) Energy & Power of Portable Devices Cellular Phone Laptop Computer Palm III Palm VII 2-way Radio

  11. A Hybrid Solid-State Storage Architecture for the Performance, Energy Consumption, and Lifetime Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giles, C. Lee

    A Hybrid Solid-State Storage Architecture for the Performance, Energy Consumption, and Lifetime-place updating so that it significantly im- proves the usage efficiency of log pages by eliminating out- of results show that our proposed methods can substantially improve the perfor- mance, energy consumption

  12. Mechanism and Kinetics of Solid-State Transformation in High-Temperature Processed Linepipe Steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Mechanism and Kinetics of Solid-State Transformation in High-Temperature Processed Linepipe Steel P, Cambridge CB2 3QZ, U.K. Abstract: A relatively new class of linepipe steels with yield strength above 500 systems. The design concept for the steels takes advantage of the enhanced role which higher levels

  13. THE INSTITUTE FOR SOLID STATE PHYSICS 2013 Laser and Synchrotron Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    coherent light sources based on laser and synchrotron technology over a wide spectrum range from X-ray67 THE INSTITUTE FOR SOLID STATE PHYSICS 2013 Laser and Synchrotron Research Center LASOR X X LASOR D X E SPring-8 BL07 X Laser and Synchrotron Research (LASOR) Center

  14. Industrial Solid-State Energy Harvesting: Mechanisms and Examples Matthew Kocoloski, Carnegie Mellon University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kissock, Kelly

    harvested energy from streams and wind for manufacturing and transportation. In the early 1700's, ThomasIndustrial Solid-State Energy Harvesting: Mechanisms and Examples Matthew Kocoloski, Carnegie Mellon University Carl Eger, City of Cleveland Robin McCarty, Kevin Hallinan, and Kelly Kissock

  15. Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Department August 2008 Ris National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Department August 2008 Risø National Laboratory 2008 2 Summary This project aimed at development and optimization of Danish SOFC stack technology and by optimization of the spacer components. Decoupling between end plates and the outermost interconnects has been

  16. Quantum interfaces between atomic and solid state systems Nikos Daniilidis and Hartmut Haffner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haeffner, Hartmut

    such as superconducting Josephson-junction devices or nanomechanical oscillators. Such hybrid quantum systems could ease, while the actual processing would be carried out with an array of Josephson-junction devices. So, from of solid-state devices such as Josephson-junction devices and nanomechanical oscillators. We focus

  17. Solid-State 25Mg NMR of a Magnesium(II) Adensosine 5-Triphosphate Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frydman, Lucio

    Solid-State 25Mg NMR of a Magnesium(II) Adensosine 5-Triphosphate Complex Christopher V. Grant interacting with RNA, such as magnesium- (II) binding sites within ribozymes, has become a topic of intense such as magnesium(II). X-ray crystallography has been most useful at providing structural information about

  18. Innovative Development of Next Generation and Energy Efficient Solid State Light Sources for General Illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Ferguson

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This two year program resulted in a novel broadband spectrally dynamic solid state illumination source (BSDLED) that uses a dual wavelength light emitting diode (LED) and combinations of phosphors to create a broadband emission that is real-time controllable. Four major focuses of this work were as follows: (1) creation of a two terminal dual wavelength LED with control of the relative intensities of the two emission peaks, (2) bandgap modeling of the two terminal dual LED to explain operation based on the doping profile, (3) novel use of phosphor combinations with dual LEDs to create a broadband spectral power distribution that can be varied to mimic a blackbody radiator over a certain range and (4) investigation of novel doping schemes to create tunnel junctions or equivalent buried current spreading layers in the III-nitrides. Advances were achieved in each of these four areas which could lead to more efficient solid state light sources with greater functionality over existing devices. The two-terminal BSDLED is an important innovation for the solid-state lighting industry as a variable spectrum source. A three-terminal dual emitter was also investigated and appears to be the most viable approach for future spectrally dynamic solid state lighting sources. However, at this time reabsorption of emission between the two active regions limits the usefulness of this device for illumination applications.

  19. Energy efficient control of polychromatic solid-state lighting using a sensor network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    used in the US and most developed economies tends to be consumed in homes and buildings,1 energy and environments using sensors and actuators to mitigate energy usage. Lighting, in particular, accounts for 22Energy efficient control of polychromatic solid-state lighting using a sensor network Matthew

  20. Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W. (eds.)

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1989, to September 30, 1990. During this period, division research programs were significantly enhanced by the restart of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and by new initiatives in processing and characterization of materials.

  1. System efficiency analysis for high power solid state radio frequency transmitter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, Akhilesh, E-mail: ajain@rrcat.gov.in; Sharma, D. K.; Gupta, A. K.; Lad, M. R.; Hannurkar, P. R. [RF Systems Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India)] [RF Systems Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Pathak, S. K. [Electromagnetics and Microwave Engineering, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)] [Electromagnetics and Microwave Engineering, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines some important relationships, related with the system efficiency, for very high power, radio frequency solid-state transmitter; incorporating multiple solid-state power amplifier modules, power combiners, dividers, couplers, and control/interlock hardware. In particular, the characterization of such transmitters, at the component as well as the system level, is discussed. The analysis for studying the influence of the amplitude and phase imbalance, on useful performance parameters like system efficiency and power distribution is performed. This analysis is based on a scattering parameter model. This model serves as a template for fine-tuning the results, with the help of a system level simulator. For experimental study, this approach is applied to a recently designed modular and scalable solid-state transmitter, operating at the centre frequency of 505.8?MHz and capable of delivering a continuous power of 75 kW. Such first time presented, system level study and experimental characterization for the real time operation will be useful for the high power solid-state amplifier designs, deployed in particle accelerators.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF MULTIPLE SAMPLE SOLID-STATE NMR PROBES FOR ANALYSIS OF PHARMACEUTICAL COMPOUNDS AND FORMULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Benjamin Nels

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy (ssNMR) is an extremely powerful technique for the analysis of pharmaceutical dosage forms. A major limitation of ssNMR is the number of samples that can be analyzed in a given period of time. ...

  3. Solid-State Speciation of Natural and Alum-Amended Poultry Litter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Solid-State Speciation of Natural and Alum-Amended Poultry Litter Using XANES Spectroscopy D . P E in lowering water-soluble phosphate levels in poultry litter, the mechanism by which this occurs is not fully variable and depends on the type of animal manure and soil properties. For example, poultry, cattle

  4. GreenVis: Energy-Saving Color Schemes for Sequential Data Visualization on OLED Displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Virginia Tech Blacksburg, VA north@cs.vt.edu ABSTRACT The organic light emitting diode (OLED, Color Scheme, Visualization 1. INTRODUCTION The organic light-emitting diode (OLED) display is an emerg

  5. A silicon current sensing amplifier and organic imager for an optical feedback OLED display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Albert, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic LEDs (OLEDs) have the potential to be used to build thin, flexible cost effective displays. Currently, the primary drawback to their usage lies in the difficulty of producing OLEDs that emit light at a constant and ...

  6. Numerical analysis of nanostructures for enhanced light extraction from OLEDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zschiedrich, L; Burger, S; Schmidt, F; 10.1117/12.2001132

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructures, like periodic arrays of scatters or low-index gratings, are used to improve the light outcoupling from organic light-emitting diodes (OLED). In order to optimize geometrical and material properties of such structures, simulations of the outcoupling process are very helpful. The finite element method is best suited for an accurate discretization of the geometry and the singular-like field profile within the structured layer and the emitting layer. However, a finite element simulation of the overall OLED stack is often beyond available computer resources. The main focus of this paper is the simulation of a single dipole source embedded into a twofold infinitely periodic OLED structure. To overcome the numerical burden we apply the Floquet transform, so that the computational domain reduces to the unit cell. The relevant outcoupling data are then gained by inverse Flouqet transforming. This step requires a careful numerical treatment as reported in this paper.

  7. Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Department Paper: www.risoe.dk/rispubl/art/2007_316.pdf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risř DTU Postprint Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Department 2007 Paper: www.risoe.dk/rispubl/art/2007_316.pdf Electrochemical Reduction of O2 and NO on Ni, Pt and Au K. Kammer Hansen Fuel Cells Electrochemical Reduction of O2 and NO on Ni, Pt and Au K. Kammer Hansen Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry

  8. Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Department Paper: www.risoe.dk/rispubl/art/2007_343.pdf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risř DTU Postprint Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Department 2007 Paper: www, Linda Nřrskov and Kent Kammer Hansen Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Department, National of NO and O2 on La2-xSrxCuO4 Based Electrodes Vibe L.E. Simonsen, Linda Nřrskov and Kent Kammer Hansen Fuel

  9. TO APPEAR IN IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS 2011 1 Design and Implementation of a Parallel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TO APPEAR IN IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS 2011 1 Design and Implementation of a Parallel and This paper was presented in part at the IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC), San data-rate or provides desirable power consumption for battery-powered devices of less than 100 m

  10. This image presents a scanning electron microscopy image of solid state dye-sensitized solar cell with a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGehee, Michael

    This image presents a scanning electron microscopy image of solid state dye-sensitized solar cell­57 Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) have received wide-spread research attention due to their high power incorporated into solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (ss-DSCs) by nanoimprint lithography. The reflectors

  11. Deposition of hole-transport materials in solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells by doctor-blading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGehee, Michael

    Deposition of hole-transport materials in solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells by doctor Accepted 19 April 2010 Available online xxxx Keywords: Dye-sensitized solar cells Organic semiconductors)-9,90 -spirobifluorene) in solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells. Doctor-blading is a roll

  12. Sixth International Conference on Solid State Lighting, edited by Ian T. Ferguson, Nadarajah Narendran, Tsunemasa Taguchi, Ian E. Ashdown,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Sharon

    commercial white light emitting diodes (LEDs) rely on complicated fabrication methods to produce white light: Cadmium Selenide, Nanocrystal, Photoluminescence, Phosphor, White Light, Light Emitting Diode, LED 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Solid state lighting Solid state lighting, in the form of white light emitting diodes (LEDs

  13. Self-powered micro-structured solid state neutron detector with very low leakage current and high efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Self-powered micro-structured solid state neutron detector with very low leakage current and high helps to reduce the gammas sensitivity. The neutron detec- tion efficiency of such detectors mainly, fabrication, and performance of solid-state neutron detector based on three-dimensional honeycomb-like silicon

  14. COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES & MATHEMATICS HTTP://NSM.UH.EDU COURSE TITLE/SECTION: Solid State Physics II (Physics 7338)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Haibing

    . Course Catalog Description 7338: Solid-State Physics II: Cr. 3. (3-0). Prerequisite: PHYS 7337. Transport Physics II (Physics 7338) TIME: 1 ­ 2:30 PM, Tuesday and Thursday (Spring Semester, 2011) Instructor of Phys 7337 and 7338, students will be able to have a comprehensive understanding of modern solid state

  15. Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochem. Eng. Aspects 263 (2005) 336340 Phenomenology of bubble nucleation in the solid-state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vipin

    nucleation in the solid-state nitrogen­polystyrene microcellular foams Vipin Kumar Department of Mechanical that the classical theory may not be applicable to nucleation in thermoplastic polymers near the glass transition. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Microcellular foams; Solid-state foams; Bubble

  16. High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albrecht, G.; George, E.V.; Krupke, W.F.; Sooy, W.; Sutton, S.B.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes. 5 figs.

  17. High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albrecht, Georg (Livermore, CA); George, E. Victor (Livermore, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA); Sooy, Walter (Pleasanton, CA); Sutton, Steven B. (Manteca, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes.

  18. Readout of solid-state charge qubits using a single-electron pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Hines; K. Jacobs; J. B. Wang

    2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A major difficulty in realizing a solid-state quantum computer is the reliable measurement of the states of the quantum registers. In this paper, we propose an efficient readout scheme making use of the resonant tunneling of a ballistic electron produced by a single electron pump. We treat the measurement interaction in detail by modeling the full spatial configuration, and show that for pumped electrons with suitably chosen energy the transmission coefficient is very sensitive to the qubit state. We further show that by using a short sequence of pumping events, coupled with a simple feedback control procedure, the qubit can be measured with high accuracy.

  19. Enhanced performance of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and OLED-based photoluminescent sensing platforms by novel microstructures and device architectures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Rui [Ames Laboratory

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After a general introduction to OLEDs and OLED-based PL sensors, the transient emission mechanism of guest-host OLEDs is described both experimentally and theoretically. A monolithic and easy-to-apply process is demonstrated for fabricating multicolor microcavity OLEDs (that improve the sensor platform). The outcoupling issues of OLEDs at the substrate/air interface are addressed by using a microstructured polymer film resulting from a PS and polyethylene glycol (PEG) mixture. Based on the understanding of OLEDs and their improvement, research was done in order to realize integrated all organic-based O{sub 2} and pH sensors with improved signal intensity and sensitivity. The sensor design modification and optimization are summarized

  20. Efficient one-step generation of large cluster states with solid-state circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    You, J. Q. [Department of Physics and Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key Laboratory), Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Frontier Research System, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako-shi 351-0198 (Japan); Wang, Xiang-bin [Frontier Research System, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako-shi 351-0198 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tanamoto, Tetsufumi [Corporate R and D Center, Toshiba Corporation, Saiwai-ku, Kawasaki 212-8582 (Japan); Nori, Franco [Frontier Research System, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako-shi 351-0198 (Japan); Center for Theoretical Physics, Physics Department, Center for the Study of Complex Systems, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040 (United States)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly entangled states called cluster states are a universal resource for measurement-based quantum computing (QC). Here we propose an efficient method for producing large cluster states using superconducting quantum circuits. We show that a large cluster state can be efficiently generated in just one step by turning on the interqubit coupling for a short time. Because the interqubit coupling is only switched on during the time interval for generating the cluster state, our approach is also convenient for preparing the initial state for each qubit and for implementing one-way QC via single-qubit measurements. Moreover, the cluster state is robust against parameter variations.

  1. Glass-like slow dynamics in a colloidal solid with multiple ground states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandana Mondal; Smarajit Karmakar; Surajit Sengupta

    2014-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the phase ordering dynamics of a two dimensional model colloidal solid using molecular dynamics simulations. The colloid particles interact with each other with a Hamaker potential modified by the presence of equatorial "patches" of attractive and negative regions. The total interaction potential between two such colloids is, therefore, strongly directional and has three-fold symmetry. Working in the canonical ensemble, we determine the tentative phase diagram in the density-temperature plane which features three distinct crystalline ground states viz, a low density honeycomb solid followed by a rectangular solid at higher density, which eventually transforms to a close packed triangular structure as the density is increased further. We show that when cooled rapidly from the liquid phase along isochores, the system undergoes a transition to a "strong glass" while slow cooling gives rise to crystalline phases. We claim that geometrical frustration arising from the presence of many crystalline ground states causes glassy ordering and dynamics in this solid. Our results may be easily confirmed by suitable experiments on patchy colloids.

  2. UDC Develops Prototype High-Efficiency OLED Undercabinet Luminaire

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Universal Display Corporation (UDC) has demonstrated the real-world application of a novel lighting technology by developing two pre-prototype OLED undercabinet lighting systems that exceed 420 total lumens at an efficacy of more than 55 lm/W, with an estimated lifetime (LT70) in excess of 10,000 hours, and a color rendering index (CRI) greater than 85.

  3. Late Quaternary history of Washington Land, North Greenland OLE BENNIKE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingólfsson, Ólafur

    Late Quaternary history of Washington Land, North Greenland OLE BENNIKE Bennike, O. 2002 (September): Late Quaternary history of Washington Land, North Greenland. Boreas, Vol. 31, 260­272. Oslo. ISSN 0300-9483. During the last glacial stage, Washington Land in western North Greenland was probably completely inun

  4. Quantum Simulation of Helium Hydride in a Solid-State Spin Register

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ya Wang; Florian Dolde; Jacob Biamonte; Ryan Babbush; Ville Bergholm; Sen Yang; Ingmar Jakobi; Philipp Neumann; Alán Aspuru-Guzik; James D. Whitfield; Jörg Wrachtrup

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    \\emph{Ab initio} computation of molecular properties is one of the most promising applications of quantum computing. While this problem is widely believed to be intractable for classical computers, efficient quantum algorithms exist which have the potential to vastly accelerate research throughput in fields ranging from material science to drug discovery. Using a solid-state quantum register realized in a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect in diamond, we compute the bond dissociation curve of the minimal basis helium hydride cation, HeH$^+$. Moreover, we report an energy uncertainty (given our model basis) of the order of $10^{-14}$ Hartree, which is ten orders of magnitude below desired chemical precision. As NV centers in diamond provide a robust and straightforward platform for quantum information processing, our work provides several important steps towards a fully scalable solid state implementation of a quantum chemistry simulator.

  5. High-Efficiency Solid State Cooling Technologies: Non-Equilibrium Asymmetic Thermoelectrics (NEAT) Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BEETIT Project: Sheetak is developing a thermoelectric-based solid state cooling system to replace typical air conditioners that use vapor compression to cool air. With noisy mechanical components, vapor compression systems use a liquid refrigerant to circulate within the air conditioner, absorb heat, and pump the heat out into the external environment. With no noisy moving parts or polluting refrigerants, thermoelectric systems rely on an electrical current being passed through the junction of the two different conducting materials to change temperature. Using advanced semiconductor technology, Sheetak is improving solid state cooling systems by using proprietary thermoelectric materials along with other innovations to achieve significant energy efficiency. Sheetak’s new design displaces compressor-based technology; improves reliability; and decreases energy usage. Sheetak’s use of semiconductor manufacturing methods leads to less material use—facilitating cheaper production.

  6. Roll-to-Roll Solution-Processible Small-Molecule OLEDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jie Jerry

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to develop key knowledge and make critical connections between technologies needed to enable low-cost manufacturing of OLED lighting products. In particular, the program was intended to demonstrate the feasibility of making high performance Small-Molecule OLEDs (SM-OLED) using a roll-to-roll (R2R) wet-coating technique by addressing the following technical risks (1) Whether the wet-coating technique can provide high performance OLEDs, (2) Whether SM-OLED can be made in a R2R manner, (3) What are the requirements for coating equipment, and (4) Whether R2R OLEDs can have the same performance as the lab controls. The program has been managed and executed according to the Program Management Plan (PMP) that was first developed at the beginning of the program and further revised accordingly as the program progressed. Significant progress and risk reductions have been accomplished by the end of the program. Specific achievements include: (1) Demonstrated that wet-coating can provide OLEDs with high LPW and long lifetime; (2) Demonstrated R2R OLEDs can be as efficient as batch controls (Figure 1) (3) Developed & validated basic designs for key equipment necessary for R2R SM-OLEDs; (4) Developed know-hows & specifications on materials & ink formulations critical to wetcoating; (5) Developed key R2R processes for each OLED layer (6) Identified key materials and components such as flexible barrier substrates necessary for R2R OLEDs.

  7. Perfect mode locking of solid-state lasers by a double passive modulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, O.E.; Marconi, M.C.; Dicdati, F.P.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new configuration, which incorporates a second passive modulation, has permitted complete selectivity in passive mode locking of solid-state lasers. A theoretical study is presented showing the existence of qualitatively different types of emission depending on the parameters of the system. Computed simulations are made to show the dependence of the emission on such parameters, and are used to determine their optimum range. Experimental results are presented confirming computed predictions.

  8. Development of A Self Biased High Efficiency Solid-State Neutron Detector for MPACT Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danon, Yaron; Bhat, Ishwara; Jian-Qiang Lu, James

    2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron detection is an important aspect of materials protection, accounting, and control for transmutation (MPACT). Currently He-3 filled thermal neutron detectors are utilized in many applications; these detectors require high-voltage bias for operation, which complicates the system when multiple detectors are used. In addition, due to recent increase in homeland security activity and the nuclear renaissance, there is a shortage of He-3, and these detectors become more expensive. Instead, cheap solid-state detectors that can be mass produced like any other computer chips will be developed. The new detector does not require a bias for operation, has low gamma sensitivity, and a fast response. The detection system is based on a honeycomb-like silicon device, which is filled with B-10 as the neutron converter; while a silicon p-n diode (i.e., solar cell type device) formed on the thin silicon wall of the honeycomb structure detects the energetic charged particles emitted from the B-10 conversion layer. Such a detector has ~40% calculated thermal neutron detection efficiency with an overall detector thickness of about 200 ?m. Stacking of these devices allows over 90% thermal neutron detection efficiency. The goal of the proposed research is to develop a high-efficiency, low-noise, self-powered solid-state neutron detector system based on the promising results of the existing research program. A prototype of this solid-state neutron detector system with sufficient detector size (up to 8-inch diam., but still portable and inexpensive) and integrated with interface electronics (e.g., preamplifier) will be designed, fabricated, and tested as a coincidence counter for MPACT applications. All fabrications proposed are based on silicon-compatible processing; thus, an extremely cheap detector system could be massively produced like any other silicon chips. Such detectors will revolutionize current neutron detection systems by providing a solid-state alternative to traditional gas-based neutron detectors.

  9. MEDIUM POWER 352 MHZ SOLID STATE PULSED RF AMPLIFIERS FOR THE CERN LINAC4 PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    MEDIUM POWER 352 MHZ SOLID STATE PULSED RF AMPLIFIERS FOR THE CERN LINAC4 PROJECT J. Broere, J in the CERN Linac4. The amplifiers are water-cooled and can provide up to 33 kW pulsed RF Power, 1.5 ms pulse RF Power for the debuncher cavity. The concept is based on 1.2 kW RF power modules using the latest 6

  10. Long-term measurements of unattached radon progeny concentrations using solid-state nuclear track detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    Long-term measurements of unattached radon progeny concentrations using solid-state nuclear track of radon progeny from a set of measured (f1, f2, f3) values, where fiÂĽCi/C0 (iÂĽ1, 2, 3), and C0, C1, C2 is mainly due to short-lived radon progeny, i.e., 218 Po, 214 Pb, 214 Bi and 214 Po, but not to the radon

  11. Light-Emitting Diodes in the Solid-State Lighting Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Red and green light-emitting diodes (LEDs) had been produced for several decades before blue emitting diodes, suitable for lighting applications, were widely available. Today, we have the possibility of combining the three fundamental colours to have a bright white light. And therefore, a new form of lighting, the solid-state lighting, has now become a reality. Here we discuss LEDs and some of their applications in displays and lamps.

  12. Solid-State Lighting Patents Resulting from DOE-Funded Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage » SearchEnergyDepartmentScoping Study |4Solid-State Energy Optoelectronic

  13. Quantum coherence in an all-solid-state dye-sentizied solar cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benedek, C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reported new type of all-solid-state, inorganic solar cell will be discussed by a semiclassical light-matter interaction method. The molecular compound will be treated by a three times two-level coupled quantum system. The equation of motion of the density matrix of this system will be analytical solved, in linear approximation and due to the coherent superposition of certain states, time-independent off-diagonal elements will be obtained. These elements represent an important components for the overal optical performane of this cell.

  14. Quantum coherence in an all-solid-state dye-sentizied solar cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Benedek

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The reported new type of all-solid-state, inorganic solar cell will be discussed by a semiclassical light-matter interaction method. The molecular compound will be treated by a three times two-level coupled quantum system. The equation of motion of the density matrix of this system will be analytical solved, in linear approximation and due to the coherent superposition of certain states, time-independent off-diagonal elements will be obtained. These elements represent an important components for the overal optical performane of this cell.

  15. Superconducting qubits coupled to nanoelectromechanical resonators: An architecture for solid-state quantum-information processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geller, M.R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2451 (United States); Cleland, A.N. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the design for a scalable, solid-state quantum-information-processing architecture based on the integration of GHz-frequency nanomechanical resonators with Josephson tunnel junctions, which has the potential for demonstrating a variety of single- and multiqubit operations critical to quantum computation. The computational qubits are eigenstates of large-area, current-biased Josephson junctions, manipulated and measured using strobed external circuitry. Two or more of these phase qubits are capacitively coupled to a high-quality-factor piezoelectric nanoelectromechanical disk resonator, which forms the backbone of our architecture, and which enables coherent coupling of the qubits. The integrated system is analogous to one or more few-level atoms (the Josephson junction qubits) in an electromagnetic cavity (the nanomechanical resonator). However, unlike existing approaches using atoms in electromagnetic cavities, here we can individually tune the level spacing of the 'atoms' and control their 'electromagnetic' interaction strength. We show theoretically that quantum states prepared in a Josephson junction can be passed to the nanomechanical resonator and stored there, and then can be passed back to the original junction or transferred to another with high fidelity. The resonator can also be used to produce maximally entangled Bell states between a pair of Josephson junctions. Many such junction-resonator complexes can be assembled in a hub-and-spoke layout, resulting in a large-scale quantum circuit. Our proposed architecture combines desirable features of both solid-state and cavity quantum electrodynamics approaches, and could make quantum-information processing possible in a scalable, solid-state environment.

  16. High-resolution solid-state NMR of anisotropically mobile molecules under very low-power 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Mei

    High-resolution solid-state NMR of anisotropically mobile molecules under very low-power 1 H Revised 13 May 2009 Available online 21 May 2009 Keywords: Low-power decoupling Lipid membranes Solid such as WALTZ-16. We demonstrate this moderate MAS low-power decoupling technique on hydrated POPC lipid

  17. A 220GHz InP HBT Solid-State Power Amplifier MMIC with at 8.2dB Compressed Gain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    A 220GHz InP HBT Solid-State Power Amplifier MMIC with 90mW POUT at 8.2dB Compressed Gain Thomas B, CA, USA 91360 zgriffith@teledyne-si.com Abstract -- A 220 GHz Solid State Power Amplifer MMIC, Solid State Power Amplifier (SSPA). I. INTRODUCTION Future synthetic aperture radars and high resolution

  18. Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W. [eds.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program with emphasis on theoretical solid state physics, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. This research effort was enhanced by new capabilities in atomic-scale materials characterization, new emphasis on the synthesis and processing of materials, and increased partnering with industry and universities. The theoretical effort included a broad range of analytical studies, as well as a new emphasis on numerical simulation stimulated by advances in high-performance computing and by strong interest in related division experimental programs. Superconductivity research continued to advance on a broad front from fundamental mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity to the development of new materials and processing techniques. The Neutron Scattering Program was characterized by a strong scientific user program and growing diversity represented by new initiatives in complex fluids and residual stress. The national emphasis on materials synthesis and processing was mirrored in division research programs in thin-film processing, surface modification, and crystal growth. Research on advanced processing techniques such as laser ablation, ion implantation, and plasma processing was complemented by strong programs in the characterization of materials and surfaces including ultrahigh resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, atomic-resolution chemical analysis, synchrotron x-ray research, and scanning tunneling microscopy.

  19. The tetrafluoroaluminate anion -- a new species for the synthesis of new, solid-state, fluoroaluminate materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herron, N.; Thorn, D.L.; Harlow, R.L.; Davidson, F.; Parise, J.B. [The Du Pont Company, Wilmington, DE (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    All previous solid-state structures of fluoroaluminate species have as their basic building-block the octahedral AlF{sub 6} unit - either as a discreet trianion or fused via corner-sharing. The long suspected, but controversial and elusive, tetrafluoroaluminate ion has now been produced via anhyrdous organoaluminum chemistry, crystallized as a series of organic cations salts and proven to have the anticipated tetrahedral geometry. The authors have obtained three x-ray structures cataloging the structural properties of this ion and revealing much about its chemical nature. The salts themselves can be extremely soluble in organic media where nmr techniques confirm the tetrahedral natural of the ion. Fusion of such ions into more complex solid-state structures proceeds to reveal octahedral AlF{sub 6} units having a novel edge-sharing, and then the more typical corner-sharing, motif. Upon thermolysis, certain of the protic tetrafluoroaluminate salts lead to a new solid acid HAlF/4 and eventually to new crystalline structural phases of AlF{sub 3} at temperature below 250{degrees}C.

  20. Synthesis of nanostructured AlN by solid state reaction of Al and diaminomaleonitrile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rounaghi, S.A., E-mail: s.a.rounaghi@gmail.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. P.O. Box no. 91775-1111, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); IFW Dresden, Institut fuer Komplexe Materialien, Postfach 27 01 16, Dresden D-01171 (Germany); Eshghi, H., E-mail: heshghi@ferdowsi.um.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. P.O. Box no. 91775-1436, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kiani Rashid, A.R.; Vahdati Khaki, J. [Department of Materials Engineering, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. P.O. Box no. 91775-1111, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Materials Engineering, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. P.O. Box no. 91775-1111, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Samadi Khoshkhoo, M.; Scudino, S. [IFW Dresden, Institut fuer Komplexe Materialien, Postfach 27 01 16, Dresden D-01171 (Germany)] [IFW Dresden, Institut fuer Komplexe Materialien, Postfach 27 01 16, Dresden D-01171 (Germany); Eckert, J. [IFW Dresden, Institut fuer Komplexe Materialien, Postfach 27 01 16, Dresden D-01171 (Germany) [IFW Dresden, Institut fuer Komplexe Materialien, Postfach 27 01 16, Dresden D-01171 (Germany); TU Dresden, Institut fuer Werkstoffwissenschaft, Dresden D-01062 (Germany)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The solid state reaction of diaminomaleonitrile (DAMN) with aluminum via both mechanochemical and thermal treatment routes was studied by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. During the milling process, the reaction starts with the deammoniation of the DAMN molecules, followed by the formation of nanostructured AlN powder as the main solid product after milling for 7 h. The reactivity of the mixed powder was also investigated during the conventional thermal treatment process using differential scanning calorimetry, derivative thermogravimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. The results reveal that DAMN starts to polymerize at 192 Degree-Sign C by the elimination of the amine groups. Furthermore, increasing the annealing temperature leads to the formation of a nitrogen-containing carbonaceous material with the structure similar to non-crystalline carbon. However, no evidence for the formation of AlN was observed in the annealed samples even at temperatures as high as the Al melting point. - Graphical abstract: AlN nanoparticles obtained after milling of Al and diaminomaleonitrile (DAMN) for 12 h. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid state reaction of diaminomaleonitrile (DAMN) with Al was studied via mechanochemical and thermal treatment routs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanocrystalline AlN was successfully synthesized by the mechanochemical process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The C/N material was formed by polymerization of DAMN during the thermal treatment process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No reaction between DAMN and Al was detected during the thermal treatment method.

  1. SESAME 96170, a solid-liquid equation of state for CeO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisolm, Eric D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory] [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe an equation of state (EOS) for the low-pressure solid phase and liquid phase of cerium (IV) oxide, CeO{sub 2}. The models and parameters used to calculate the EOS are presented in detail, and I compare with data for the full-density crystal. Hugoniot data are available only for high-porosity powders, and I discuss difficulties in comparing with such data. I have constructed SESAME 96170, an EOS for cerium (IV) oxide that includes the ambient solid and liquid phases. The EOS extends over the full standard SESAME range, but should not be used at low temperatures and high densities because of the lack of a high-pressure solid phase. I have described the models used to compute the three terms of the EOS (cold curve, nuclear, and thermal electronic), and I have given the parameters used in the models. They were determined by comparison with experimental data at P = 1 atm, including the constant-pressure specific heat, coefficient of thermal expansion, and melting and boiling points. The EOS compares well with data in its intended range of validity, but the presence of high-frequency optical modes in its phonon spectrum limits the agreement of our models with thermal data. The next step is to construct a multiphase EOS that includes the low- and high-pressure solid phases and the liquid. The DAC data from Duclos will most strongly constrain the parameters of the high-pressure solid. A remaining issue is the comparison of the crystal-density EOS with experimental Hugoniot data, which are taken at much lower initial data because the samples are porous powders. A satisfactory means of modeling porosity, allowing comparison of theory and experiment, has not yet been produced.

  2. Charged particle assisted nuclear reactions in solid state environment: renaissance of low energy nuclear physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kálmán, Péter

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The features of electron assisted neutron exchange processes in crystalline solids are survayed. It is stated that, contrary to expectations, the cross section of these processes may reach an observable magnitude even in the very low energy case because of the extremely huge increment caused by the Coulomb factor of the electron assisted processes and by the effect of the crystal-lattice. The features of electron assisted heavy charged particle exchange processes, electron assisted nuclear capure processes and heavy charged particle assisted nuclear processes are also overviewed. Experimental observations, which may be related to our theoretical findings, are dealt with. The anomalous screening phenomenon is related to electron assisted neutron and proton exchange processes in crystalline solids. A possible explanation of observations by Fleischmann and Pons is presented. The possibility of the phenomenon of nuclear transmutation is qualitatively explained with the aid of usual and charged particle assisted r...

  3. Solid-State Lighting on a Shoestring Budget: The Economics of Off-Grid Lighting for Small Businesses in Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radecsky, Kristen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report #3 Solid-State Lighting on a Shoestring Budget:The Economics of Off-Grid Lighting for Small Businesses inProject includes an Off-Grid Lighting Technology Assessment

  4. 558 2006 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference ISSCC 2006 / SESSION 30 / SILICON FOR BIOLOGY / 30.4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, Hoi-Jun

    558 · 2006 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference ISSCC 2006 / SESSION 30 / SILICON of the human body channel are investigated with the DCI. As shown in Fig. 30.4.2, a battery-powered crystal

  5. 922 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 42, NO. 4, APRIL 2007 Power and Area Minimization for Multidimensional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolic, Borivoje

    922 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 42, NO. 4, APRIL 2007 Power and Area Minimization of California, Berkeley, CA 94704 USA. Digital Object Identifier 10.1109/JSSC.2007.892191 battery life

  6. IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 43, NO. 4, APRIL 2008 881 Exploring Variability and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin, Todd M.

    IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 43, NO. 4, APRIL 2008 881 Exploring Variability consumption of these systems ultimately limits form factor, battery life, and complexity. It is therefore

  7. [superscript 2]H-DNP-enhanced [superscript 2]H-[superscript 13]C solid-state NMR correlation spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maly, Thorsten

    Perdeuteration of biological macromolecules for magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy can yield high-resolution [superscript 2]H–[superscript 13]C correlation spectra and the method is therefore of great interest ...

  8. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance methodology and applications to structure determination of peptides, proteins and amyloid fibrils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several methodological developments and applications of multidimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance to biomolecular structure determination are presented. Studies are performed in uniformly 3C, 15N isotope ...

  9. Journal of Nondestructive Evaluation, Vol. 7, ?Cos.3/4, 1988 Ultrasonic NDE of Solid-State Bonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, Peter B.

    Journal of Nondestructive Evaluation, Vol. 7, ?Cos.3/4, 1988 Ultrasonic NDE of Solid-State Bonds, 1988 This paper discusses a number of special ultrasonic NDE problems of particular interest to inertia

  10. Lochon Catalyzed D-D Fusion in Deuterated Palladium in the Solid State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. P. Sinha; A. Meulenberg

    2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Lochons (local charged bosons or local electron pairs) can form on D+ to give D- (bosonic ions) in Palladium Deuteride in the solid state. Such entities will occur at special sites or in linear channel owing to strong electron-phonon interaction or due to potential inversion on metallic electrodes. These lochons can catalyze D- - D+ fusion as a consequence of internal conversion leading to the formation of He-4 plus production of energy (Q=23.8 MeV) which is carried by the alpha particle and the ejected electron-pair. The reaction rate for this fusion process is calculated.

  11. Solid-State Lighting: Early Lessons Learned on the Way to Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandahl, Linda J.; Cort, Katherine A.; Gordon, Kelly L.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document early challenges and lessons learned in the solid-state lighting (SSL) market development as part of the DOE’s SSL Program efforts to continually evaluate market progress in this area. This report summarizes early actions taken by DOE and others to avoid potential problems anticipated based on lessons learned from the market introduction of compact fluorescent lamps and identifies issues, challenges, and new lessons that have been learned in the early stages of the SSL market introduction. This study identifies and characterizes12 key lessons that have been distilled from DOE SSL program results.

  12. The Use of a Solid State Analog Television Transmitter as a Superconducting Electron Gun Power Amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.G. Kulpin, K.J. Kleman, R.A. Legg

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid state analog television transmitter designed for 200 MHz operation is being commissioned as a radio frequency power amplifier on the Wisconsin superconducting electron gun cavity. The amplifier consists of three separate radio frequency power combiner cabinets and one monitor and control cabinet. The transmitter employs rugged field effect transistors built into one kilowatt drawers that are individually hot swappable at maximum continuous power output. The total combined power of the transmitter system is 33 kW at 200 MHz, output through a standard coaxial transmission line. A low level radio frequency system is employed to digitally synthesize the 200 MHz signal and precisely control amplitude and phase.

  13. Robust control pulses design for electron shuttling in solid state devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Zhang; Loren Greenman; Xiaotian Deng; K. Birgitta Whaley

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study robust pulse design for electron shuttling in solid state devices. This is crucial for many practical applications of coherent quantum mechanical systems. Our objective is to design control pulses that can transport an electron along a chain of donors, and also make this process robust to parameter uncertainties. We formulate it as a set of optimal control problems on the special unitary group SU(n), and derive explicit expressions for the gradients of the aggregate transfer fidelity. Numerical results for a donor chain of ionized phosphorus atoms in bulk silicon demonstrate the efficacy of our algorithm.

  14. Solid-state lighting : the III-V Epi Killer App.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout its history, lighting technology has made tremendous progress: the efficiency with which power is converted into usable light has increased 2.8 orders of magnitude over three centuries. This progress has, in turn, fueled large increases in the consumption of light and productivity of human society. In this talk, we review an emerging new technology, solid-state lighting: its frontier performance potential; the underlying advances in physics and materials that might enable this performance potential; the resulting energy consumption and human productivity benefits; and the impact on worldwide III-V epi manufacture.

  15. Low-Temperature Synthesis of Actinide Tetraborides by Solid-State Metathesis Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lupinetti, Anthony J.; Garcia, Eduardo; Abney, Kent D.

    2004-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The synthesis of actinide tetraborides including uranium tetraboride (UB,), plutonium tetraboride (PUB,) and thorium tetraboride (ThB{sub 4}) by a solid-state metathesis reaction are demonstrated. The present method significantly lowers the temperature required to {approx_equal}850 C. As an example, when UCl{sub 4}, is reacted with an excess of MgB{sub 2}, at 850 C, crystalline UB, is formed. Powder X-ray diffraction and ICP-AES data support the reduction of UCl{sub 3}, as the initial step in the reaction. The UB, product is purified by washing water and drying.

  16. Solid-state ultracapacitors for electric vehicles and consumer electronics. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Brian G. Dixon

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced ultracapacitors are described that are based upon conducting polymer technology. Both Type I and Type II capacitors were constructed in single cell and stacked arrays that had superior electrochemical properties. More specifically nanophase clay electrode supports were fabricated and the conducting polymers solvent deposited upon them. Both liquid phase and solid polymer electrolytes were evaluated as well. Both single cell and multiple cell capacitors were prepared that exceeded the 15Wh/kg, 1500W/kg goals set by the United States Department of Energy. In addition, it was shown that different conducting polymer electrode configurations could be constructed that showed promise.

  17. Assessment of municipal solid waste for energy production in the western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodman, B.J.; Texeira, R.H.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) represents both a significant problem and an abundant resource for the production of energy. The residential, institutional, and industrial sectors of this country generate about 250 million tons of MSW each year. In this report, the authors have compiled data on the status of MSW in the 13-state western region, including economic and environmental issues. The report is designed to assist the members of the Western Regional Biomass Energy Program Ad Hoc Resource Committee in determining the potential for using MSW to produce energy in the region. 51 refs., 7 figs., 18 tabs.

  18. The transported entropies of ions in solid state fluorides and beta-alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharivker, V.S.; Ratkje, S.K. [Univ. of Trondheim (Norway)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical relevance of reversible heat effects is discussed with reference to high temperature batteries and electrolysis systems. The transported entropies of Na{sup +} in solid state mixtures of NaF and Na{sub 3}AlF{sub 6} are presented. The transported entropies are S{sup *cry}{sub Na{sup +}} = 140 {+-} 7 J K{sup {minus}1} mol{sup {minus}1} for cryolite, S{sup *NaF}{sub Na{sup +}} = 81 {+-} 8 J K{sup {minus}1} mol{sup {minus}1} for sodium fluoride and S{sup *{beta}}{sub Na{sup +}} = 60 {+-} 5 J K{sup {minus}1} mol{sup {minus}1} for sodium {beta}{double_prime}-alumina at the temperature range 380--500 C. The value obtained for sodium in the solid cryolite is higher than transported entropy of Na{sup +} in other solid sodium conductors and makes the authors predict that the transported entropy for Na{sup +} in the molten electrolyte mixture for aluminum production is substantial, and that so are the reversible heat effects in the aluminum electrolysis cell.

  19. Vacuum space charge effect in laser-based solid-state photoemission spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graf, Jeff

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    markers. The solid lines are ?ts to a power law. The datadeviations. The solid lines are ?ts to a power law. We ?tdeviations. The solid lines are ?ts to a power law. V.

  20. Environment-assisted quantum control of a solid-state spin via coherent dark states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jack Hansom; Carsten H. H. Schulte; Claire Le Gall; Clemens Matthiesen; Edmund Clarke; Maxime Hugues; Jacob M. Taylor; Mete Atatüre

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the interplay between a quantum system and its environment lies at the heart of quantum science and its applications. To-date most efforts have focused on circumventing decoherence induced by the environment by either protecting the system from the associated noise or by manipulating the environment directly. Recently, parallel efforts using the environment as a resource have emerged, which could enable dissipation-driven quantum computation and coupling of distant quantum bits. Here, we realize the optical control of a semiconductor quantum-dot spin by relying on its interaction with an adiabatically evolving spin environment. The emergence of hyperfine-induced, quasi-static optical selection rules enables the optical generation of coherent spin dark states without an external magnetic field. We show that the phase and amplitude of the lasers implement multi-axis manipulation of the basis spanned by the dark and bright states, enabling control via projection into a spin-superposition state. Our approach can be extended, within the scope of quantum control and feedback, to other systems interacting with an adiabatically evolving environment.

  1. GEA Refrigeration Technologies / GEA Refrigeration Germany GmbH Wolfgang Dietrich / Dr. Ole Fredrich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    GEA Refrigeration Technologies / GEA Refrigeration Germany GmbH Wolfgang Dietrich / Dr. Ole Technologies3 Achema 2012 // heat pumps using ammonia Industrial demand on heat in Germany Heatdemandin

  2. GPU-based acceleration of free energy calculations in solid state physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Januszewski, Micha?; Crivelli, Dawid; Gardas, Bart?omiej

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Obtaining a thermodynamically accurate phase diagram through numerical calculations is a computationally expensive problem that is crucially important to understanding the complex phenomena of solid state physics, such as superconductivity. In this work we show how this type of analysis can be significantly accelerated through the use of modern GPUs. We illustrate this with a concrete example of free energy calculation in multi-band iron-based superconductors, known to exhibit a superconducting state with oscillating order parameter. Our approach can also be used for classical BCS-type superconductors. With a customized algorithm and compiler tuning we are able to achieve a 19x speedup compared to the CPU (119x compared to a single CPU core), reducing calculation time from minutes to mere seconds, enabling the analysis of larger systems and the elimination of finite size effects.

  3. Quantum process tomography and Linblad estimation of a solid state qubit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Howard; J. Twamley; C. Wittmann; T. Gaebel; F. Jelezko; J. Wrachtrup

    2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an example of quantum process tomography (QPT) performed on a single solid state qubit. The qubit used is two energy levels of the triplet state in the Nitrogen-Vacancy defect in Diamond. Quantum process tomography is applied to a qubit which has been allowed to decohere for three different time periods. In each case the process is found in terms of the chi matrix representation and the affine map representation. The discrepancy between experimentally estimated process and the closest physically valid process is noted. The results of QPT performed after three different decoherence times are used to find the error generators, or Lindblad operators, for the system, using the technique introduced by Boulant et al. [N. Boulant, T.F. Havel, M.A. Pravia and D.G. Cory, Phys. Rev. A 67, 042322 (2003)].

  4. Nanostructured High Performance Ultraviolet and Blue Light Emitting Diodes for Solid State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arto V. Nurmikko; Jung Han

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on research results in this project which synergize advanced material science approaches with fundamental optical physics concepts pertaining to light-matter interaction, with the goal of solving seminal problems for the development of very high performance light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the blue and near ultraviolet for Solid State Lighting applications. Accomplishments in the second 12 month contract period include (i) new means of synthesizing AlGaN and InN quantum dots by droplet heteroepitaxy, (ii) synthesis of AlGaInN nanowires as building blocks for GaN-based microcavity devices, (iii) progress towards direct epitaxial alignment of the dense arrays of nanowires, (iv) observation and measurements of stimulated emission in dense InGaN nanopost arrays, (v) design and fabrication of InGaN photonic crystal emitters, and (vi) observation and measurements of enhanced fluorescence from coupled quantum dot and plasmonic nanostructures. The body of results is presented in this report shows how a solid foundation has been laid, with several noticeable accomplishments, for innovative research, consistent with the stated milestones.

  5. Characterization of proton exchange membrane materials for fuel cells by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, Zueqian

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used to explore the nanometer-scale structure of Nafion, the widely used fuel cell membrane, and its composites. We have shown that solid-state NMR can characterize chemical structure and composition, domain size and morphology, internuclear distances, molecular dynamics, etc. The newly-developed water channel model of Nafion has been confirmed, and important characteristic length-scales established. Nafion-based organic and inorganic composites with special properties have also been characterized and their structures elucidated. The morphology of Nafion varies with hydration level, and is reflected in the changes in surface-to-volume (S/V) ratio of the polymer obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The S/V ratios of different Nafion models have been evaluated numerically. It has been found that only the water channel model gives the measured S/V ratios in the normal hydration range of a working fuel cell, while dispersed water molecules and polymer ribbons account for the structures at low and high hydration levels, respectively.

  6. NANOSTRUCTURED HIGH PERFORMANCE ULTRAVIOLET AND BLUE LIGHT EMITTING DIODES FOR SOLID STATE LIGHTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arto V. Nurmikko; Jung Han

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on research results in this project which synergize advanced material science approaches with fundamental optical physics concepts pertaining to light-matter interaction, with the goal of solving seminal problems for the development of very high performance light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the blue and near ultraviolet for Solid State Lighting applications. Accomplishments in the first 12 month contract period include (1) new means of synthesizing zero- and one-dimensional GaN nanostructures, (2) establishment of the building blocks for making GaN-based microcavity devices, and (3) demonstration of top-down approach to nano-scale photonic devices for enhanced spontaneous emission and light extraction. These include a demonstration of eight-fold enhancement of the external emission efficiency in new InGaN QW photonic crystal structures. The body of results is presented in this report shows how a solid foundation has been laid, with several noticeable accomplishments, for innovative research, consistent with the stated milestones.

  7. Solid State Solar Cells Based On Tio2 Sensitized With Natural Pigment Extracted From the Anthurium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. R. A. Kumara

    Abstract: The purpose of this experiment was to create functional dye-sensitized solid state solar cells using natural pigments extracted from the blood red Anthurium as the electron donating species. Natural dye was extracted and adsorbed onto a nano-porous titania substrate. Platinum coated glass was used as the counter electrode. The cells were prepared using drop coating method to get a thickness around 10?m using 25 nm size TiO2 particles. Using the extracted natural dye we have been able to obtain high efficiencies with CuSCN over CuI hole conductor. The prepared cells show open circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.46 V and 0.43 of fill factor (FF) with an overall efficiency (?) of 0.34 % for CuSCN over the CuI hole conductor. Nevertheless short circuit current density (Jsc) was 2.37 mA cm-2 for CuI, it was 1.73 mA cm-2 for CuSCN. Key words: Dye Sensitized Solid State Solar Cells, Cyanidin, Anthurium, hole conductor. 1.

  8. Thin Film Solid-State Reactions Forming Carbides as Contact Materials for Carbon-Containing Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leroy,W.; Detavernier, C.; Van Meirhaeghe, R.; Lavoie, C.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal carbides are good candidates to contact carbon-based semiconductors (SiC, diamond, and carbon nanotubes). Here, we report on an in situ study of carbide formation during the solid-state reaction between thin films. The solid-state reaction was examined between 11 transition metals (W, Mo, Fe, Cr, V, Nb, Mn, Ti, Ta, Zr, and Hf) and an amorphous carbon layer. Capping layers (C or TiN) of different thicknesses were applied to prevent oxidation. Carbide formation is evidenced for nine metals and the phases formed have been identified (for a temperature ranging from 100 to 1100 C). W first forms W{sub 2}C and then WC; Mo forms Mo{sub 2}C; Fe forms Fe{sub 3}C; Cr first forms metastable phases Cr{sub 2}C and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2-x}, and finally forms Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}; V forms VC{sub x}; Nb transforms into Nb{sub 2}C followed by NbC; Ti forms TiC; Ta first forms Ta{sub 2}C and then TaC; and Hf transforms into HfC. The activation energy for the formation of the various carbide phases has been obtained by in situ x-ray diffraction.

  9. Structure and properties of composites synthesized in situ using solid state displacement reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henager, C.H. Jr.; Brimhall, J.L.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid state displacement reactions can produce in situ intermetallic and ceramic matrix composites in a process where an intermetallic or ceramic phase(s) and a potential reinforcing phase(s) are grown together during a solid state reaction. Interpenetrating and dispersed microstructures, important for desirable composite properties, have been produced by means of displacement reaction processing techniques. Two such composites have been synthesized which exhibit two distinct microstructures: MoSi{sub 2} reinforced with SiC particles, which exhibits a dispersed-phase structure, and NiAl/Ni{sub 3}Al reinforced with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which exhibits an interpenetrating-phase structure. Strength in bending and chevron-notch fracture toughness have been determined as a function of temperature, and measured properties compare favorably with composites produced by other means. The measured properties are discussed with regard to the observed microstructures. The potential for displacement reaction processing is assessed, and it appears to be a cost-effective synthesis method compared to others.

  10. 1504 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 39, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2004 Standby Power Reduction Using Dynamic Voltage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calhoun, Benton H.

    1504 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 39, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2004 Standby Power Reduction. Chandrakasan, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--Lowering during standby mode reduces power by decreasing both voltage where state is lost gives the best power savings. We show that "canary" flip-flops provide a mechanism

  11. IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 34, NO. 3, MARCH 1999 405 Reducing Switching Activity on Datapath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 34, NO. 3, MARCH 1999 405 Reducing Switching Activity with minimal overhead. When a bus is not going to be used in a datapath, it is held in a quiescent state of high-performance systems, and battery life of portable devices. Achieving low average power dissipation

  12. Solid-state electrochromic devices based on poly ,,phenylene vinylene... A. L. Holt, J. M. Leger, and S. A. Cartera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Sue

    Solid-state electrochromic devices based on poly ,,phenylene vinylene... polymers A. L. Holt, J. M state electrochromic device based on poly phenylene vinylene light-emitting polymers and explore device-of-the-art conducting polymer electrochromic devices. © 2005 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10

  13. Colloquium: Majorana Fermions in nuclear, particle and solid-state physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. Elliott; M. Franz

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ettore Majorana (1906-1938) disappeared while traveling by ship from Palermo to Naples in 1938. His fate has never been fully resolved and several articles have been written that explore the mystery itself. His demise intrigues us still today because of his seminal work, published the previous year, that established symmetric solutions to the Dirac equation that describe a fermionic particle that is its own anti-particle. This work has long had a significant impact in neutrino physics, where this fundamental question regarding the particle remains unanswered. But the formalism he developed has found many uses as there are now a number of candidate spin-1/2 neutral particles that may be truly neutral with no quantum number to distinguish them from their anti-particles. If such particles exist, they will influence many areas of nuclear and particle physics. Most notably the process of neutrinoless double beta decay can only exist if neutrinos are massive Majorana particles. Hence, many efforts to search for this process are underway. Majorana's influence doesn't stop with particle physics, however, even though that was his original consideration. The equations he derived also arise in solid state physics where they describe electronic states in materials with superconducting order. Of special interest here is the class of solutions of the Majorana equation in one and two spatial dimensions at exactly zero energy. These Majorana zero modes are endowed with some remarkable physical properties that may lead to advances in quantum computing and, in fact, there is evidence that they have been experimentally observed. This review first summarizes the basics of Majorana's theory and its implications. It then provides an overview of the rich experimental programs trying to find a fermion that is its own anti-particle in nuclear, particle, and solid state physics.

  14. Diode-pumped solid-state laser driver experiments for inertial fusion energy applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, C.D.; Payne, S.A.; Emanuel, M.E.; Smith, L.K.; Powell, H.T.; Krupke, W.F.

    1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Although solid-state lasers have been the primary means by which the physics of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) have been investigated, it was previously thought that solid-state laser technology could not offer adequate efficiencies for an inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. Orth and co-workers have recently designed a conceptual IFE power plant, however, with a high efficiency diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL) driver that utilized several recent innovations in laser technology. It was concluded that DPSSLs could offer adequate performance for IFE with reasonable assumptions. This system was based on a novel diode pumped Yb-doped Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F (Yb:S-FAP) amplifier. Because this is a relatively new gain medium, a project was established to experimentally validate the diode-pumping and extraction dynamics of this system at the smallest reasonable scale. This paper reports on the initial experimental results of this study. We found the pumping dynamics and extraction cross-sections of Yb:S-FAP crystals to be similar to those previously inferred by purely spectroscopic techniques. The saturation fluence for pumping was measured to be 2.2 J/cm{sup 2} using three different methods based on either the spatial, temporal, or energy transmission properties of a Yb:S-FAP rod. The small signal gain implies an emission cross section of 6.0{times}10{sup {minus}20} cm{sup 2}. Up to 1.7 J/cm{sup 3} of stored energy density was achieved in a 6{times}6{times}44 mm{sup 3} Yb:S-FAP amplifier rod. In a free running configuration diode-pumped slope efficiencies up to 43% were observed with output energies up to {approximately}0.5 J per 1 ms pulse from a 3{times}3{times}30 mm{sup 3} rod. When the rod was mounted in a copper block for cooling, 13 W of average power was produced with power supply limited operation at 70 Hz with 500 {mu}s pulses.

  15. Charged particle assisted nuclear reactions in solid state environment: renaissance of low energy nuclear physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Péter Kálmán; Tamás Keszthelyi

    2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The features of electron assisted neutron exchange processes in crystalline solids are survayed. It is stated that, contrary to expectations, the cross section of these processes may reach an observable magnitude even in the very low energy case because of the extremely huge increment caused by the Coulomb factor of the electron assisted processes and by the effect of the crystal-lattice. The features of electron assisted heavy charged particle exchange processes, electron assisted nuclear capure processes and heavy charged particle assisted nuclear processes are also overviewed. Experimental observations, which may be related to our theoretical findings, are dealt with. The anomalous screening phenomenon is related to electron assisted neutron and proton exchange processes in crystalline solids. A possible explanation of observations by Fleischmann and Pons is presented. The possibility of the phenomenon of nuclear transmutation is qualitatively explained with the aid of usual and charged particle assisted reactions. The electron assisted neutron exchange processes in pure $Ni$ and $Li-Ni$ composite systems (in the Rossi-type E-Cat) are analyzed and it is concluded that these reactions may be responsible for recent experimental observations.

  16. Design of interferometer system for Keda Torus eXperiment using terahertz solid-state diode sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Jinlin, E-mail: jlxie@ustc.edu.cn; Wang, Haibo; Li, Hong; Lan, Tao; Liu, Adi; Liu, Wandong; Yu, Changxuan [School of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Ding, Weixing [School of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); University of California-Los Angeles, P. O. Box 957099, Los Angeles, California 90095-7099 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid-state source based terahertz (THz) interferometer diagnostic system has been designed and characterized for the Keda Torus eXperiment (KTX). The THz interferometer utilizes the planar diodes based frequency multiplier (X48) to provide the probing beam at fixed frequency 0.650 THz, and local oscillator is provided by an independent solid-state diode source with tunable frequency (0.650 THz +/? 10 MHz). Both solid-state sources have approximately 1 mW power. The planar-diode mixers optimized for high sensitivity, ?750 mV/mW, are used in the heterodyne detection system, which permits multichannel interferometer on KTX with a low phase noise. A sensitivity of {sub min} = 4.5 × 10{sup 16} m{sup ?2} and a temporal resolution of 0.2 ?s have been achieved during the initial bench test.

  17. Multiple intrinsically identical single photon emitters in the solid-state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lachlan J. Rogers; Kay D. Jahnke; T. Teraji; Luca Marseglia; Christoph. Müller; Boris Naydenov; Hardy Schauffert; C. Kranz; Junichi Isoya; Liam P. McGuinness; Fedor Jelezko

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Emitters of indistinguishable single photons are crucial for the growing field of quantum technologies. To realize scalability and increase the complexity of quantum optics technologies, multiple independent yet identical single photon emitters are also required. However typical solid-state single photon sources are inherently dissimilar, necessitating the use of electrical feedback or optical cavities to improve spectral overlap between distinct emitters. Here, we demonstrate bright silicon-vacancy (SiV-) centres in low-strain bulk diamond which intrinsically show spectral overlap of up to 91% and near transform-limited excitation linewidths. Our results have impact upon the application of single photon sources for quantum optics and cryptography, and the production of next generation fluorophores for bio-imaging.

  18. Development of all-solid-state flash x-ray generator with photoconductive semiconductor switches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xun, Ma; Jianjun, Deng; Hongwei, Liu; Jianqiang, Yuan; Jinfeng, Liu; Bing, Wei; Yanling, Qing; Wenhui, Han; Lingyun, Wang; Pin, Jiang; Hongtao, Li [Key Laboratory of Pulsed Power, Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, P.O. Box 919-108, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact, low-jitter, and high repetitive rate all-solid-state flash x-ray generator making use of photo conductive semiconductor switches was developed recently for the diagnostic purpose of some hydrokinetical experiments. The generator consisted of twelve stages of Blumlein pulse forming networks, and an industrial cold cathode diode was used to generate intense x-ray radiations with photon energy up to 220 keV. Test experiments showed that the generator could produce >1 kA electron beam currents and x-ray pulses with ?40 ns duration under 100 Hz repetitive rates at least (limited by the triggering laser on hand), also found was that the delay time of the cathode explosive emission is crucial to the energy transfer efficiency of the whole system. In addition, factors affecting the diode impedance, how the switching synchronization and diode impedance determining the allowable operation voltage were discussed.

  19. Electrochemical and Solid-State Lithiation of Graphitic C3N4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Baggetto, Loic [ORNL; Adamczyk, Leslie A [ORNL; Guo, Bingkun [ORNL; Brown, Suree [ORNL; Sun, Xiao-Guang [ORNL; Albert, Austin A [ORNL; Humble, James R [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Barnes, Craig E. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Bojdys, Michael J [University of Liverpool; Dai, Sheng [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Lithiated graphitic carbon n.itride {C3N4 ) was fabricated by electrochemical and solid-state reactions. The addition of Li to C3N4 results in a reaction between the Li and the graphite-like C3N species in C3N4. This irreversible reaction leads to the formation of Li-CH=NR and Li-N=CR2 species, which are detrimental to anode properties. Suitable nitrogen-doped carbon structures for anode applications are predicted to need high concentrations of pyridinic C-N-C terminal bonds and low concentrations of w quaternary C3N species to boost electronic conductivity and reversibly cycle Li ions. 3.5r-- - - -------, Li 25 + 1 5 0.5 KEYWORDS: mrbo11 uilride, lit!Jiatiou, auode, battery Copaoty tmAIVol

  20. Harsh-Environment Solid-State Gamma Detector for Down-hole Gas and Oil Exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Sandvik; Stanislav Soloviev; Emad Andarawis; Ho-Young Cha; Jim Rose; Kevin Durocher; Robert Lyons; Bob Pieciuk; Jim Williams; David O'Connor

    2007-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this program was to develop a revolutionary solid-state gamma-ray detector suitable for use in down-hole gas and oil exploration. This advanced detector would employ wide-bandgap semiconductor technology to extend the gamma sensor's temperature capability up to 200 C as well as extended reliability, which significantly exceeds current designs based on photomultiplier tubes. In Phase II, project tasks were focused on optimization of the final APD design, growing and characterizing the full scintillator crystals of the selected composition, arranging the APD device packaging, developing the needed optical coupling between scintillator and APD, and characterizing the combined elements as a full detector system preparing for commercialization. What follows is a summary report from the second 18-month phase of this program.

  1. Low-temperature synthesis of actinide tetraborides by solid-state metathesis reactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lupinetti, Anthony J. (Los Alamos, NM); Garcia, Eduardo (Los Alamos, NM); Abney, Kent D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2004-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The synthesis of actinide tetraborides including uranium tetraboride (UB.sub.4), plutonium tetraboride (PuB.sub.4) and thorium tetraboride (ThB.sub.4) by a solid-state metathesis reaction are demonstrated. The present method significantly lowers the temperature required to .ltoreq.850.degree. C. As an example, when UCl.sub.4 is reacted with an excess of MgB.sub.2, at 850.degree. C., crystalline UB.sub.4 is formed. Powder X-ray diffraction and ICP-AES data support the reduction of UCl.sub.3 as the initial step in the reaction. The UB.sub.4 product is purified by washing water and drying.

  2. III-nitride nanowires : novel materials for solid-state lighting.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, George T.; Upadhya, Prashanth C. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Prasankumar, Rohit P. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Armstrong, Andrew M.; Huang, Jian Yu; Li, Qiming; Talin, Albert Alec (NIST, Gaithersburg, MD)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although planar heterostructures dominate current solid-state lighting architectures (SSL), 1D nanowires have distinct and advantageous properties that may eventually enable higher efficiency, longer wavelength, and cheaper devices. However, in order to fully realize the potential of nanowire-based SSL, several challenges exist in the areas of controlled nanowire synthesis, nanowire device integration, and understanding and controlling the nanowire electrical, optical, and thermal properties. Here recent results are reported regarding the aligned growth of GaN and III-nitride core-shell nanowires, along with extensive results providing insights into the nanowire properties obtained using cutting-edge structural, electrical, thermal, and optical nanocharacterization techniques. A new top-down fabrication method for fabricating periodic arrays of GaN nanorods and subsequent nanorod LED fabrication is also presented.

  3. Reversible Dehydrogenation of Magnesium Borohydride to Magnesium Triborane in the Solid State Under Moderate Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chong, Marina; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Jalisatgi, Satish; Jensen, Craig M.

    2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal decomposition of magnesium borohydride, Mg(BH4)2, in the solid state was studied by a combination of PCT, TGA/MS and NMR spectroscopy. Dehydrogenation of Mg(BH4)2 at 200 °C, results in the highly selective formation of magnesium triborane, Mg(B3H8)2. This process is reversible at 250 °C under 120 atm H2. Dehydrogenation at higher temperature, > 300 °C, produces a complex mixture of polyborane species. Solution phase 11B NMR spectra of the hydrolyzed decomposition products reveals the formation of the B3H8 anion, boric acid from hydrolysis of the unstable polyboranes (BnHx) (n = 3-11, x >8), and the closoborane B12H12 dianion as a minor product. A BH condensation mechanism involving metal hydride formation is proposed to explain the limited reversible hydrogen storage in magnesium borohydride.

  4. Phase-locked indistinguishable photons with synthesized waveforms from a solid-state source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemens Matthiesen; Martin Geller; Carsten H. H. Schulte; Claire Le Gall; Jack Hansom; Zhengyong Li; Maxime Hugues; Edmund Clarke; Mete Atatüre

    2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Resonance fluorescence in the Heitler regime provides access to single photons with coherence well beyond the Fourier transform limit of the transition, and holds the promise to circumvent environment-induced dephasing common to all solid-state systems. Here we demonstrate that the coherently generated single photons from a single self-assembled InAs quantum dot display mutual coherence with the excitation laser on a timescale exceeding 3 seconds. Exploiting this degree of mutual coherence we synthesize near-arbitrary coherent photon waveforms by shaping the excitation laser field. In contrast to post-emission filtering, our technique avoids both photon loss and degradation of the single photon nature for all synthesized waveforms. By engineering pulsed waveforms of single photons, we further demonstrate that separate photons generated coherently by the same laser field are fundamentally indistinguishable, lending themselves to creation of distant entanglement through quantum interference.

  5. Nonequilibrium fluctuations in quantum heat engines: Theory, example, and possible solid state experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michele Campisi; Jukka Pekola; Rosario Fazio

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the stochastic energetic exchanges in quantum heat engines. Due to microreversibility, these obey a fluctuation relation, called the heat engine fluctuation relation, which implies the Carnot bound: no machine can have an efficiency larger than Carnot's efficiency. The stochastic thermodynamics of a quantum heat engine (including the joint statistics of heat and work and the statistics of efficiency) is illustrated by means of an optimal two-qubit heat engine, where each qubit is coupled to a thermal bath and a two-qubit gate determines energy exchanges between the two qubits. We discuss possible solid state implementations with Cooper pair boxes and flux qubits, quantum gate operations, and fast calorimetric on-chip measurements of single stochastic events.

  6. Science and the Energy Security Challenge: The Example of Solid-State Lighting

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Julia Phillips

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Securing a viable, carbon neutral energy future for humankind will require an effort of gargantuan proportions. As outlined clearly in a series of workshops sponsored by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences (http://www.sc.doe.gov/bes/reports/list.html), fundamental advances in scientific understanding are needed to broadly implement many of the technologies that are held out as promising options to meet future energy needs, ranging from solar energy, to nuclear energy, to approaches to clean combustion. Using solid state lighting based on inorganic materials as an example, I will discuss some recent results and new directions, emphasizing the multidisciplinary, team nature of the endeavor. I will also offer some thoughts about how to encourage translation of the science into attractive, widely available products ? a significant challenge that cannot be ignored. This case study offers insight into approaches that are likely to be beneficial for addressing other aspects of the energy security challenge.

  7. Technical Report (Final): Development of Solid State Reagents for Preparing Radiolabeled Imaging Agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kabalka, George W

    2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research was on the development of new, rapid, and efficient synthetic methods for incorporating short-lived radionuclides into agents of use in measuring dynamic processes. The initial project period (Year 1) was focused on the preparation of stable, solid state precursors that could be used to efficiently incorporate short-lived radioisotopes into small molecules of use in biological applications (environmental, plant, and animal). The investigation included development and evaluation of new methods for preparing carbon-carbon and carbon-halogen bonds for use in constructing the substrates to be radiolabeled. The second phase (Year 2) was focused on developing isotope incorporation techniques using the stable, boronated polymeric precursors. The final phase (Year 3), was focused on the preparation of specific radiolabeled agents and evaluation of their biodistribution using micro-PET and micro-SPECT. In addition, we began the development of a new series of polymeric borane reagents based on polyethylene glycol backbones.

  8. Multi-Year Program Plan FY'09-FY'15 Solid-State Lighting Research and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    President Obama's energy and environment agenda calls for deployment of 'the Cheapest, Cleanest, Fastest Energy Source - Energy Efficiency.' The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) plays a critical role in advancing the President's agenda by helping the United States advance toward an energy-efficient future. Lighting in the United States is projected to consume nearly 10 quads of primary energy by 2012.3 A nation-wide move toward solid-state lighting (SSL) for general illumination could save a total of 32.5 quads of primary energy between 2012 and 2027. No other lighting technology offers the DOE and our nation so much potential to save energy and enhance the quality of our built environment. The DOE has set forth the following mission statement for the SSL R&D Portfolio: Guided by a Government-industry partnership, the mission is to create a new, U.S.-led market for high-efficiency, general illumination products through the advancement of semiconductor technologies, to save energy, reduce costs and enhance the quality of the lighted environment.

  9. P solid-state NMR studies of the dependence of inter-bilayer water dynamics on lipid headgroup structure and membrane peptides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Mei

    2D 1 H­31 P solid-state NMR studies of the dependence of inter-bilayer water dynamics on lipid Revised 29 September 2008 Available online 5 October 2008 Keywords: Water Lipid membranes Solid-state NMR headgroup structure and membrane peptides Tim Doherty, Mei Hong * Department of Chemistry, Iowa State

  10. Variable-temperature solid-state NMR studies of iron(II) and iron(III) complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepard, Patricia Arlene

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the first communication reporting the use of C CP/MAS NMR to observe paramagnetic solids directly. Zust as shift reagents had been used in solution-state NMR, selected paramagnetic lanthanide acetates exhibited paramagnetic shifts in the solid state... of the Fe(III) chloride salt yields the w-oxo-bis[porphine- iron(III)] dimer where the two iron centers are bridged via an oxygen. The synthesis, characterization and crystal structure of the metallo-porphyrin dimer w-oxo-bis[tetra- phenylporphineiron...

  11. Solid-State Lighting Research and Development: Multi-Year Program Plan April 2014 (Updated May 2014)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage » SearchEnergyDepartmentScoping Study |4Solid-State EnergyLightingSolid-State

  12. A15 SUPERCONDUCTORS THROUGH DIRECT ""SOLID-STATE"" PRECIPITATION: V3Ga AND N63AI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Minghwei

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Metallurgy of Superconductors, pp. 147-153. J . H. N.Research Division A15 SUPERCONDUCTORS THROUGH DIRECT "SOLID-0 5 - E N G - 4 8 Al5 SUPERCONDUCTORS THROUGH DIRECT "SOLID-

  13. Space Technology and Applications International Forum Proceedings, Albuquerque, New Mexico, January 2000 Miniaturized Radioisotope Solid State Power Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    thermoelectric generators (RTGs) have been successfully used for a number of deep space missions RTGs. However 2000 Miniaturized Radioisotope Solid State Power Sources J.-P. Fleurial, G.J. Snyder, J. Patel, J-pierre.fleurial@jpl.nasa.gov Abstract. Electrical power requirements for the next generation of deep space missions cover a wide range

  14. Tetraphosphine Linker Scaffolds with a Tetraphenyltin Core for Superior Immobilized Catalysts: A Solid-State NMR Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perera, Melanie Ingrid

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    the mechanism of the phosphonium formation in more detail by utilizing solid-state NMR spectroscopy. It has also been a point of interest to study the linkers and catalysts under realistic conditions, in the presence of solvents. Therefore, HRMAS (high...

  15. IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 37, NO. 3, MARCH 2002 371 Fully Integrated CMOS Power Amplifier Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 37, NO. 3, MARCH 2002 371 Fully Integrated CMOS Power-chip impedance matching and power- combining method, the distributed active transformer is presented. It combines output power while maintaining a 50- match. It also uses virtual ac grounds and magnetic couplings

  16. 422 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 40, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2005 Noise-Shaping Techniques Applied to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Un-Ku

    422 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 40, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2005 Noise-Shaping Techniques to be portable. However, as battery use continues, the battery voltage drops, sometimes gradually and sometimes suddenly, depending on the type of battery and type of electronic device. Such variations in the battery

  17. IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 45, NO. 1, JANUARY 2010 189 An Efficient Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandrakasan, Anantha

    IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 45, NO. 1, JANUARY 2010 189 An Efficient Piezoelectric. The dependence on the battery as the only power source is putting an enormous burden in applications where either due to size, weight, safety or lifetime constraints, doing away with the battery is the only choice

  18. Solid-State, Flexible, High Strength Paper-Based Supercapacitors Xiaodan Zhang, Ziyin Lin, Bo Chen, Yulin Deng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    Solid-State, Flexible, High Strength Paper-Based Supercapacitors Xiaodan Zhang, Ziyin Lin, Bo Chen Supercapacitors are one of the main energy storage devices and are key technological enablers ranging from transportation to customer electronics. Compared to their competitors--batteries, supercapacitors have superior

  19. High contrast solid state electrochromic devices based on Ruthenium Purple nanocomposites fabricated by layer-by-layer assemblyw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heflin, Randy

    High contrast solid state electrochromic devices based on Ruthenium Purple nanocomposites: 10.1039/b803915a Electrochromic Ruthenium Purple­polymer nanocomposite films, fabricated by multilayer assembly, were found to exhibit sub-second switching speed and the highest electrochromic con

  20. Laminating solution-processed silver nanowire mesh electrodes onto solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGehee, Michael

    Accepted 6 March 2011 Available online 21 March 2011 Keywords: Dye-sensitized solar cells Nanomaterials meshes (Ag NWs) were laminated on top of solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (ss-DSCs) as a reflective. Introduction Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) [1­3] are an emerging photovoltaic technology on the verge

  1. Development of the Solid State X-band Radar and the Phased Array Radar System in Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    Development of the Solid State X-band Radar and the Phased Array Radar System in Japan By DR. TOMOO array radar system have been developed. Toshiba has developed the latest model of weather radar of precipitation and to achieve drastic reduction of its size and life cycle cost. It is now well known

  2. Control of the Pump Cycle in Bacteriorhodopsin: Mechanisms Elucidated by Solid-State NMR of the D85N Mutant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Robert G.

    Control of the Pump Cycle in Bacteriorhodopsin: Mechanisms Elucidated by Solid-State NMR of the D85 as an inward-driven hydroxyl pump (analogous to halorhodopsin) rather than an outward-driven proton pump. Third. INTRODUCTION Proton pumps create transmembrane electrochemical poten- tials that provide energy for cellular

  3. 1220 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 45, NO. 6, JUNE 2010 Energy-Efficient Design Methodologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    1220 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 45, NO. 6, JUNE 2010 Energy-Efficient Design and system constraints. In this paper, methodology for energy-efficient design applied to 64-bit adders Terms--Arithmetic and logic structures, computer arith- metic, energy-efficient design, high

  4. Seventh International Conference on Solid State Lighting, Edited by Ian T. Ferguson, Nadarajah Narendran, Tsunemasa Taguchi, Ian E. Ashdown,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Sharon

    Selenide, Nanocrystal, Photoluminescence, Phosphor, White Light, Light Emitting Diode, LED 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Solid state lighting and white-light LEDs The use of white light emitting diodes (LEDs emitting diodes[11] , though they are a less mature technology as compared to inorganic semiconductor

  5. 744 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 40, NO. 3, MARCH 2005 Nonlinear Transmission Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afshari, Ehsan

    744 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 40, NO. 3, MARCH 2005 Nonlinear Transmission Lines--Nonlinear transmission lines (NLTL) are used for pulse shaping. We developed the theory of pulse propagation through sharpening, nonlinear effects, nonlinear transmission lines, pulse shaping, soli- tons, transmission lines. I

  6. &p.1:Abstract Numerous observations have been reported in the literature of enhanced mass transport and solid-state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Reid F.

    in the development of materials technologies employing microwave radiation. For exam- ple, heat processing it was discovered that microwave energy from radar could dry large ceram- ic bodies. However, serious efforts and solid-state reaction rates during microwave heating or processing of a variety of ceramic, glass

  7. Long-term determination of airborne radon progeny concentrations using LR 115 solid-state nuclear track detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    Long-term determination of airborne radon progeny concentrations using LR 115 solid-state nuclear. Introduction The radon-related absorbed dose in the lung is mainly due to short-lived radon progeny, i.e., 218-term measurements of the concentrations of radon progeny or the equilibrium factor F, among other information

  8. REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 82, 083301 (2011) Increasing the energy dynamic range of solid-state nuclear track detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This allows simultaneous imaging of both high and low energy particles from the fusion reactions D + 3 He 4REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 82, 083301 (2011) Increasing the energy dynamic range of solid-state nuclear track detectors using multiple surfaces A. B. Zylstra,a) H. G. Rinderknecht, N. Sinenian, M. J

  9. Structural characterization of water-bearing silicate and aluminosilicate glasses by high-resolution solid-state NMR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Structural characterization of water-bearing silicate and aluminosilicate glasses by high-resolution solid-state NMR techniques have been applied to hydrous silicate and aluminosilicate glasses: simple as to completely exclude any of the different previously proposed models for water incorporation in silicate

  10. Correlation of solid-state NMR relaxation times to functional properties such as chemical stability and particle size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dempah, Kassibla Elodie

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the work presented in this dissertation was to investigate the correlation between the particle size of crystalline active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and their solid-state NMR (SSNMR) proton spin-lattice relaxation times (1H T1...

  11. Impact Strength of High Relative Density Solid State CO, Blown CPET Microcellular Foams Impact Strength of High Relative Density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vipin

    is an increased glass transition temperature (T,), thus requiring higher foaming temperatures. Baldwin and SuhImpact Strength of High Relative Density Solid State CO, Blown CPET Microcellular Foams ImpactTerephthalate) Microcellular Foams Vipin KurnaW, Richard P Juntunena, and Chris Barlowb University of Washington, Seattle

  12. Solid state NMR method development and studies of biological and biomimetic nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Yanyan

    2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes application and development of advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for complex materials, in particular organic-inorganic nanocomposites and thermoelectric tellurides. The apatite-collagen interface, essential for understanding the biomineralization process in bone and engineering the interface for controlled bio-mimetic synthesis and optimized mechanical properties, is buried within the nanocomposite of bone. We used multinuclear solid-state NMR to study the composition and structure of the interface. Citrate has been identified as the main organic molecule strongly bound to the apatite surface with a density of 1/(2 nm){sup 2}, covering 1/6 of the total surface area in bovine bone. Citrate provides more carboxylate groups, one of the key functional groups found to affect apatite nucleation and growth, than all the non-collagenous proteins all together in bone; thus we propose that citrate stabilizes apatite crystals at a very small thickness of {approx}3 nm (4 unit cells) to increase bone fracture tolerance. The hypothesis has been confirmed in vitro by adding citrate in the bio-mimetic synthesis of polymerhydroxyapatite nanocomposites. The results have shown that the size of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals decreases as increasing citrate concentration. With citrate concentrations comparable to that in body fluids, similar-sized nanocrystals as in bone have been produced. Besides the dimensions of the apatite crystals, the composition of bone also affects its biofunctional and macroscopic mechanical properties; therefore, our team also extended its effort to enhance the inorganic portion in our bio-mimetic synthesis from originally 15 wt% to current 50 wt% compared to 65 wt% in bovine bone, by using Lysine-Leucine hydroxyapatite nucleating diblock co-polypeptide, which forms a gel at very low concentration. In this thesis, various advanced solid state NMR techniques have been employed to characterize nanocomposites. Meanwhile, we have developed new methods to achieve broadband high resolution NMR and improve the accuracy of inter-nuclear distance measurements involving quadrupolar spins. Broadband high resolution NMR of spin-1/2 nuclei has been accomplished by the adaptation of the magic angle turning (MAT) method to fast magic angle spinning, termed fast MAT, by solving technical problems such as off resonance effects. Fast MAT separates chemical shift anisotropy and isotropic chemical shifts over a spectral range of {approx}1.8 {gamma}B{sub 1} without significant distortions. Fast MAT {sup 125}Te NMR has been applied to study technologically important telluride materials with spectra spreading up to 190 kHz. The signal-to-noise ratio of the spectra is significantly improved by using echo-matched Gaussian filtering in offline data processing. The accuracy of the measured distances between spin-1/2 and quadrupolar nuclei with methods such as SPIDER and REAPDOR has been improved by compensating for the fast longitudinal quadrupolar relaxation on the sub-millisecond with a modified S{sub 0} pulse sequence. Also, the T1Q effect on the spin coherence and its spinning speed dependency has been explored and documented with analytical and numerical simulations as well as experimental measurements.

  13. Solid state phase equilibria and intermetallic compounds of the Al-Cr-Ho system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pang, Mingjun [Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials and New Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China) [Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials and New Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); SAIC-GM-Wuling Automobile Co., Ltd., Liuzhou, Guangxi 545007 (China); Zhan, Yongzhong, E-mail: zyzmatres@yahoo.com.cn [Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials and New Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China)] [Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials and New Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); Du, Yong [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The solid state phase equilibria of the Al-Cr-Ho ternary system at 500 Degree-Sign C were experimentally investigated. The phase relations at 500 Degree-Sign C are governed by 14 three-phase regions, 29 two-phase regions and 15 single-phase regions. The existences of 10 binary compounds and 2 ternary phases have been confirmed. Al{sub 11}Cr{sub 2}, Al{sub 11}Cr{sub 4} and Al{sub 17}Ho{sub 2} were not found at 500 Degree-Sign C. Crystal structures of Al{sub 9}Cr{sub 4} and Al{sub 8}Cr{sub 4}Ho were determined by the Rietveld X-ray powder data refinement. Al{sub 9}Cr{sub 4} was found to exhibit cubic structure with space group I4-bar 3m (no. 217) and lattice parameters a=0.9107(5) nm. Al{sub 8}Cr{sub 4}Ho crystallizes in ThMn{sub 12} structure type with space group I4/mmm (no. 139) and lattice parameters a=0.8909(4) nm, c=0.5120(5) nm. It is concluded that the obtained Al{sub 4}Cr phase in this work should be {mu}-Al{sub 4}Cr by comparing with XRD pattern of the hexagonal {mu}-Al{sub 4}Mn compound. - Graphical abstract: The solid state phase equilibria of the Al-Cr-Ho ternary system at 500 Degree-Sign C. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al-Cr-Ho system has been investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 9}Cr{sub 4} has cubic structure with space group I4-bar 3m. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 8}Cr{sub 4}Ho crystallizes in ThMn{sub 12} type with space group I4/mmm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 4}Cr phase is {mu}-type at 500 Degree-Sign C.

  14. A Solid-State Nanosecond Beam Kicker Modulator Based on the DSRD Switch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akre, R.; Benwell, A.; Burkhart, C.; Krasnykh, A.; Tang, T.; /SLAC; Kardo-Sysoev, A.; /Ioffe Phys. Tech. Inst.

    2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast solid-state beam kicker modulator is under development at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The program goal is to develop a modulator that will deliver 4 ns, {+-}5 kV pulses to the ATF2 damping ring beam extraction kicker. The kicker is a 50 {Omega}, bipolar strip line, 60 cm long, fed at the downstream end and terminated at the upstream end. The bunch spacing in the ring is 5.6 ns, bunches are removed from the back end of the train, and there is a gap of 103.6 ns before the next train. The modulator design is based on an opening switch topology that uses Drift Step Recovery Diodes as the opening switches. The design and results of the modulator development are discussed. There are many applications that benefit from very fast high power switching. However, at MW power levels and nanosecond time scales, solid state options are limited. One option, the Drift Step Recovery Diode (DSRD) has been demonstrated as capable of blocking thousands of volts and switching in nanosecond to sub-nanosecond ranges. When used as an opening switch, the DSRD exhibits a very fast turn off transient. The process is described in detail by its pioneers in [5,6]. In essence, charge is pumped into and then extracted from the DSRD under pulsed conditions. The turn off transient occurs precisely when the pumped charge is equal to the extracted charge and the DSRD is switched off. At the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, a DSRD is being used as an opening switch in the development of a fast kicker modulator. The modulator is designed to create {+-}5kV pulses with <1ns rise and fall time on a 50{Omega} strip line kicker. As is common in beam optics, the absence of power in the kicker before and after the pulse is very important. The entire {+-}5kV kicker modulator is composed of two identical 5kV pulsing circuits, each with its own DSRD component. This paper describes the modulator topology and the status of tests on one of the two 5kV pulse circuits.

  15. Recovery Act: Low Cost Integrated Substrate for OLED Lighting Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Benton; Abhinav Bhandari

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    PPG pursued the development of an integrated substrate, including the anode, external, and internal extraction layers. The objective of PPGâ??s program was to achieve cost reductions by displacing the existing expensive borosilicate or double-side polished float glass substrates and developing alternative electrodes and scalable light extraction layer technologies through focused and short-term applied research. One of the key highlights of the project was proving the feasibility of using PPGâ??s high transmission Solarphire® float glass as a substrate to consistently achieve organic lightemitting diode (OLED) devices with good performance and high yields. Under this program, four low-cost alternatives to the Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) anode were investigated using pilot-scale magnetron sputtered vacuum deposition (MSVD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technologies. The anodes were evaluated by fabricating small and large phosphorescent organic lightemitting diode (PHOLED) devices at Universal Display Corporation (UDC). The device performance and life-times comparable to commercially available ITO anodes were demonstrated. A cost-benefit analysis was performed to down-select two anodes for further low-cost process development. Additionally, PPG developed and evaluated a number of scalable and compatible internal and external extraction layer concepts such as scattering layers on the outside of the glass substrate or between the transparent anode and the glass interface. In one external extraction layer (EEL) approach, sol-gel sprayed pyrolytic coatings were deposited using lab scale equipment by hand or automated spraying of sol-gel solutions on hot glass, followed by optimizing of scattering with minimal absorption. In another EEL approach, PPG tested large-area glass texturing by scratching a glass surface with an abrasive roller and acid etching. Efficacy enhancements of 1.27x were demonstrated using white PHOLED devices for 2.0mm substrates which are at par with the standard diffuser sheets used by OLED manufacturers. For an internal extraction layer (IEL), PPG tested two concepts combining nanoparticles either in a solgel coating inserted between the anode and OLED or anode and glass interface, or incorporated into the internal surface of the glass. Efficacy enhancements of 1.31x were demonstrated using white PHOLED devices for the IEL by itself and factors of 1.73x were attained for an IEL in combination of thick acrylic block as an EEL. Recent offline measurements indicate that, with further optimization, factors over 2.0x could be achieved through an IEL alone.

  16. Solid Waste (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New Mexico Environment Department's Solid Waste Bureau manages solid waste in the state. The Bureau implements and enforces the rules established by the Environmental Improvement Board.

  17. Electroluminescence property of organic light emitting diode (OLED)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Özdemir, Orhan; Kavak, Pelin; Saatci, A. Evrim; Gökdemir, F. P?nar; Menda, U. Deneb; Can, Nursel; Kutlu, Kubilay [Y?ld?z Technical University, Department of Physics, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Tekin, Emine; Pravadal?, Selin [National Metrology Inst?tute of Turkey (TUB?TAK-UME), Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Transport properties of electrons and holes were investigated not only in a anthracene-containing poly(p-phenylene-ethynylene)- alt - poly(p-phenylene-vinylene) (PPE-PPV) polymer (AnE-PVstat) light emitting diodes (OLED) but also in an ITO/Ag/polymer/Ag electron and ITO/PEDOT:PSS/polymer/Au hole only devices. Mobility of injected carriers followed the Poole-Frenkel type conduction mechanism and distinguished in the frequency range due to the difference of transit times in admittance measurement. Beginning of light output took place at the turn-on voltage (or flat band voltage), 1.8 V, which was the difference of energy band gap of polymer and two barrier offsets between metals and polymer.

  18. Tridentate Phosphine Linkers for Immobilized Catalysts: Development and Characterization of Immobilized Rhodium Complexes and Solid-State NMR Studies of Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Johannes 1983-

    2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of performance polymers with solid2state NMR techniques. First a brief overview of solid2state NMR and its relevance to the various areas of chemistry covered in this thesis is given. Following the synthesis, immobilization, and characterization of tridentate...

  19. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Evidence for an Extended Strand Conformation of the Membrane-Bound HIV-1 Fusion Peptide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weliky, David

    Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Evidence for an Extended Strand Conformation of the Membrane-Bound HIV-1 Fusion Peptide Jun Yang, Charles M. Gabrys, and David P. Weliky* Department of ChemistryVed May 4, 2001 ABSTRACT: Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was applied

  20. 0-7803-8363-X/04/$20.00 2004 IEEE 20th IEEE SEMI-THERM Symposium Nanoscale Devices for Solid State Refrigeration and Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on superlattice and quantum dot thermoelectrics and solid- state and vacuum thermionic thin film devices are reviewed. We also present an overview of the research activities at the multi university Thermionic Energy Conversion Center on the design of solid-state and vacuum devices that could convert heat into electricity

  1. 26. L. Y. Chen and N. C. MacDonald, Digest IEEE Int. Cont Solid-State Sensors Actuators (June 1991), p. 739.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, William

    -- - 118 26. L. Y. Chen and N. C. MacDonald, Digest IEEE Int. Cont Solid-State Sensors Actuators. Najali, Digest IEEE Int. Electron Devices Meeting (Decem- ber 1991), in press. 29. K. Suzuki, ibid., p. 625. 30. W. Ehrfeld, F. Gotz, D. Munchmeyer, W. Schelb, D. Schmidt, Digest IEEE Solid-State Sensor

  2. Multinuclear and multidimensional solid-state NMR investigations of combustion chamber deposits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, J.C. [Texaco Research Center, Beacon, NY (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multinuclear solid-state NMR has been used to study the carbonaceous backbone of combustion chamber deposits (CCDs) generated in both gasoline and diesel engines. The combination of {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C cross-polarization, and dipolar dephasing techniques have been used to {open_quotes}average molecule{close_quotes} parameters for a large number of CCDs. These parameters were correlated with gasoline composition and cylinder cleanliness. Discussion will be presented on deposits from different areas of the chamber - piston top, cylinder head, squish, non-squish, end-gas, non-end gas regions. Deposits from various cylinders in a number of dynamometer engines, fleet car engines will be compared. The use of NMR to observe the effects of bench-test engine modifications on CCD structure will be demonstrated. The macromolecular structure of the deposits was studied by {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C spin-exchange experiments which allow one to observe internuclear dipolar interactions between the various carbon functionalities in the deposit. The spatial information on fuel additive - CCD interactions that these experiments provide will be discussed.

  3. Anisotropy of the solid-state epitaxy of silicon carbide in silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kukushkin, S. A., E-mail: kukushkin_s@yahoo.com; Osipov, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Problems of Machine Science (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method for the solid-state synthesis of epitaxial layers is developed, in which a substrate participates in the chemical reaction and the reaction product grows not on the substrate surface, as in traditional epitaxial methods, but inside the substrate. This method offers new opportunities for elastic-energy relaxation due to a mechanism operating only in anisotropic media, specifically, the attraction of point defects formed during the chemical reaction. The attracting point centers of dilatation form relatively stable objects, dilatation dipoles, which significantly reduce the total elastic energy. It is shown that, in crystals with cubic symmetry, the most favorable arrangement of dipoles is the ?111? direction. The theory is tested by growing silicon carbide (SiC) films on Si (111) substrates by chemical reaction with carbon monoxide CO. High-quality single-crystal SiC-4H films with thicknesses of up to 100 nm are grown on Si (111). Ellipsometric analysis showed that the optical constants of the SiC-4H films are significantly anisotropic. This is caused not only by the lattice hexagonality but also by a small amount (about 2–6%) of carbon atoms remaining in the film due to dilatation dipoles. It is shown that the optical constants of the carbon impurity correspond to strongly anisotropic highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  4. The Effect of Cellulose Crystal Structure and Solid-State Morphology on the Activity of Cellulases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stipanovic, Arthur J [SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Consistent with the US-DOE and USDA “Roadmap” objective of producing ethanol and chemicals from cellulosic feedstocks more efficiently, a three year research project entitled “The Effect of Cellulose Crystal Structure and Solid-State Morphology on the Activity of Cellulases” was initiated in early 2003 under DOE sponsorship (Project Number DE-FG02-02ER15356). A three year continuation was awarded in June 2005 for the period September 15, 2005 through September 14, 2008. The original goal of this project was to determine the effect of cellulose crystal structure, including allomorphic crystalline form (Cellulose I, II, III, IV and sub-allomorphs), relative degree of crystallinity and crystallite size, on the activity of different types of genetically engineered cellulase enzymes to provide insight into the mechanism and kinetics of cellulose digestion by “pure” enzymes rather than complex mixtures. We expected that such information would ultimately help enhance the accessibility of cellulose to enzymatic conversion processes thereby creating a more cost-effective commercial process yielding sugars for fermentation into ethanol and other chemical products. Perhaps the most significant finding of the initial project phase was that conversion of native bacterial cellulose (Cellulose I; BC-I) to the Cellulose II (BC-II) crystal form by aqueous NaOH “pretreatment” provided an increase in cellulase conversion rate approaching 2-4 fold depending on enzyme concentration and temperature, even when initial % crystallinity values were similar for both allomorphs.

  5. MOCVD synthesis of group III-nitride heterostructure nanowires for solid-state lighting.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, George T.; Creighton, James Randall; Talin, Albert Alec

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-state lighting (SSL) technologies, based on semiconductor light emitting devices, have the potential to reduce worldwide electricity consumption by more than 10%, which could significantly reduce U.S. dependence on imported energy and improve energy security. The III-nitride (AlGaInN) materials system forms the foundation for white SSL and could cover a wide spectral range from the deep UV to the infrared. For this LDRD program, we have investigated the synthesis of single-crystalline III-nitride nanowires and heterostructure nanowires, which may possess unique optoelectronic properties. These novel structures could ultimately lead to the development of novel and highly efficient SSL nanodevice applications. GaN and III-nitride core-shell heterostructure nanowires were successfully synthesized by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on two-inch wafer substrates. The effect of process conditions on nanowire growth was investigated, and characterization of the structural, optical, and electrical properties of the nanowires was also performed.

  6. Multifunctional (NOx/CO/O2) Solid-State Sensors For Coal Combustion Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric D. Wachsman

    2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-state sensors were developed for coal combustion control and the understanding of sensing mechanisms was advanced. Several semiconducting metal oxides (p-type and n-type) were used to fabricate sensor electrodes. The adsorption/desorption characteristics and catalytic activities of these materials were measured with Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) and Temperature Programmed Reaction (TPR) experiments. The sensitivity, selectivity, and response time of these sensors were measured for steps of NO, NO{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O vapor in simple N{sub 2}-balanced and multi-component, simulated combustion-exhaust streams. The role of electrode microstructure and fabrication parameters on sensing performance was investigated. Proof for the proposed sensing mechanism, Differential Electrode Equilibria, was demonstrated by relating the sensing behavior (sensitivities and cross-sensitivities) of the various electrode materials to their gas adsorption/desorption behaviors and catalytic activities. A multifunctional sensor array consisting of three sensing electrodes and an integrated heater and temperature sensors was fabricated with tape-casting and screen-printing and its NO{sub x} sensing performance was measured. The multifunctional sensor demonstrated it was possible to measure NO{sub 2} independent of NO by locally heating one of the sensing electrodes. The sensor technology was licensed to Fuel FX International, Inc. Fuel FX has obtained investor funding and is developing prototype sensors as a first step in their commercialization strategy for this technology.

  7. Compact and efficient method of RGB to RGBW data conversion for OLED microdisplays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Can, Chi

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Colour Electronic Information Displays (EIDs) typically consist of pixels that are made up of red, green and blue (RGB) subpixels. A recent technology, Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED), offers the potential to create ...

  8. Development of Advanced LED Phosphors by Spray-based Processes for Solid State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabot Corporation

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overarching goal of the project was to develop luminescent materials using aerosol processes for making improved LED devices for solid state lighting. In essence this means improving white light emitting phosphor based LEDs by improvement of the phosphor and phosphor layer. The structure of these types of light sources, displayed in Figure 1, comprises of a blue or UV LED under a phosphor layer that converts the blue or UV light to a broad visible (white) light. Traditionally, this is done with a blue emitting diode combined with a blue absorbing, broadly yellow emitting phosphor such as Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce (YAG). A similar result may be achieved by combining a UV emitting diode and at least three different UV absorbing phosphors: red, green, and blue emitting. These emitted colors mix to make white light. The efficiency of these LEDs is based on the combined efficiency of the LED, phosphor, and the interaction between the two. The Cabot SSL project attempted to improve the over all efficiency of the LED light source be improving the efficiency of the phosphor and the interaction between the LED light and the phosphor. Cabot's spray based process for producing phosphor powders is able to improve the brightness of the powder itself by increasing the activator (the species that emits the light) concentration without adverse quenching effects compared to conventional synthesis. This will allow less phosphor powder to be used, and will decrease the cost of the light source; thus lowering the barrier of entry to the lighting market. Cabot's process also allows for chemical flexibility of the phosphor particles, which may result in tunable emission spectra and so light sources with improved color rendering. Another benefit of Cabot's process is the resulting spherical morphology of the particles. Less light scattering results when spherical particles are used in the phosphor layer (Figure 1) compared to when conventional, irregular shaped phosphor particles are used. This spherical morphology will result in better light extraction and so an improvement of efficiency in the overall device. Cabot is a 2.5 billion dollar company that makes specialized materials using propriety spray based technologies. It is a core competency of Cabot's to exploit the spray based technology and resulting material/morphology advantages. Once a business opportunity is clearly identified, Cabot is positioned to increase the scale of the production to meet opportunity's need. Cabot has demonstrated the capability to make spherical morphology micron-sized phosphor powders by spray based routes for PDP and CRT applications, but the value proposition is still unproven for LED applications. Cabot believes that the improvements in phosphor powders yielded by their process will result in a commercial advantage over existing technologies. Through the SSL project, Cabot has produced a number of different compositions in a spherical morphology that may be useful for solid state lights, as well as demonstrated processes that are able to produce particles from 10 nanometers to 3 micrometers. Towards the end of the project we demonstrated that our process produces YAG:Ce powder that has both higher internal quantum efficiency (0.6 compared to 0.45) and external quantum efficiency (0.85 compared to 0.6) than the commercial standard (see section 3.4.4.3). We, however, only produced these highly bright materials in research and development quantities, and were never able to produce high quantum efficiency materials in a reproducible manner at a commercial scale.

  9. Achieving Record Efficiency for Blue OLEDs by Controlling the Charge Balance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Researchers at the University of Florida (UF) have demonstrated a blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diode (OLED) with a peak power efficiency of 50 lm/W and an external quantum efficiency exceeding 20 percent at a luminance of 1,000 cd/m2, using no external light extraction techniques. This accomplishment is believed to be the world record in blue OLED efficiency.

  10. Solid-state Structural Characterization of a Rigid Framework of Lacunary Heteropolyniobates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyman,M.; Celestian, A.; Holland, G.; Alam, T.; Parise, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In our ongoing investigations of heteropolyniobate chemistry, a phase featuring decorated, A-type trivacant {alpha}-Keggin ions linked by their charge-balancing sodium cations has been isolated and structurally characterized. This is the first heteropolyniobate reported that has a true lacunary structure type. Na{sub 15}[(PO{sub 2}){sub 3}PNb{sub 9}O{sub 34}]{center_dot}22H{sub 2}O (1) [triclinic space group P{bar 1} (No. 2); a = 12.242 (2) Angstroms, b = 12.291 (3) Angstroms, c = 22.056 (4) Angstroms; {alpha}= 93.12 (3), {beta}= 99.78 (3), {gamma}= 119.84 (3); Z = 4, V = 2799.2 (10) Angstroms{sup 3}] is composed of bilayers of the heteropolyanions alternating with layers of hydrated Na{sup +} cations. Sodium cations also bridge the clusters within their layers through Na-Ot-Nb, Na-Ob-Nb2, and Na-Ot-P bonds (t = terminal and b = bridging). This phase is poorly soluble in water, suggesting that it is more characteristic of a framework of linked heteropolyanions rather than a water-soluble heteropolyanion salt. Two-dimensional solid-state {sup 23}Na multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR of 1 reveals five distinctive chemical and structural environments for sodium, which agrees with the crystallographic data. The {sup 23}Na and {sup 1}H MAS NMR studies further illustrate the rigid and immobile nature of this framework of cations and anions.

  11. High-Resolution NMR of Quadrupolar Nuclei in the Solid State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gann, Sheryl Lee

    1995-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes recent developments in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), for the most part involving the use of dynamic-angle spinning (DAS) NMR to study quadrupolar nuclei. Chapter 1 introduces some of the basic concepts and theory that will be referred to in later chapters, such as the density operator, product operators, rotations, coherence transfer pathways, phase cycling, and the various nuclear spin interactions, including the quadrupolar interaction. Chapter 2 describes the theory behind motional averaging experiments, including DAS, which is a technique where a sample is spun sequentially about two axis oriented at different angles with respect to the external magnetic field such that the chemical shift and quadrupolar anisotropy are averaged to zero. Work done on various rubidium-87 salts is presented as a demonstration of DAS. Chapter 3 explains how to remove sidebands from DAS and magic-angle spinning (MAS) experiments, which result from the time-dependence of the Hamiltonian under sample spinning conditions, using rotor-synchronized {pi}-pulses. Data from these experiments, known as DAH-180 and MAH-180, respectively, are presented for both rubidium and lead salts. In addition, the applicability of this technique to double rotation (DOR) experiments is discussed. Chapter 4 concerns the addition of cross-polarization to DAS (CPDAS). The theory behind spin locking and cross polarizing quadrupolar nuclei is explained and a method of avoiding the resulting problems by performing cross polarization at 0{sup o} (parallel) with respect to the magnetic field is presented. Experimental results are shown for a sodium-23 compound, sodium pyruvate, and for oxygen-17 labeled L-akmine. In Chapter 5, a method for broadening the Hartmann-Hahn matching condition under MAS, called variable effective field cross-polarization (VEFCI?), is presented, along with experimental work on adamantane and polycarbonate.

  12. Development of bulk-type all-solid-state lithium-sulfur battery using LiBH{sub 4} electrolyte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unemoto, Atsushi, E-mail: unemoto@imr.tohoku.ac.jp; Ikeshoji, Tamio [WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Yasaku, Syun; Matsuo, Motoaki [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Nogami, Genki; Tazawa, Masaru; Taniguchi, Mitsugu [Mitsubishi Gas Chemicals Co., Ltd., 182 Tayuhama Shinwari, Kita-ku, Niigata 950-3112 (Japan); Orimo, Shin-ichi [WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Stable battery operation of a bulk-type all-solid-state lithium-sulfur battery was demonstrated by using a LiBH{sub 4} electrolyte. The electrochemical activity of insulating elemental sulfur as the positive electrode was enhanced by the mutual dispersion of elemental sulfur and carbon in the composite powders. Subsequently, a tight interface between the sulfur-carbon composite and the LiBH{sub 4} powders was manifested only by cold-pressing owing to the highly deformable nature of the LiBH{sub 4} electrolyte. The high reducing ability of LiBH{sub 4} allows using the use of a Li negative electrode that enhances the energy density. The results demonstrate the interface modification of insulating sulfur and the architecture of an all-solid-state Li-S battery configuration with high energy density.

  13. Solid-State Physical Form Detection and Quantitation of Pharmaceuticals in Formulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorman, Eric

    2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The majority of pharmaceutical dosage forms are marketed as solids, and the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) can exist in various physical forms. These physical forms can be either crystalline or amorphous, and will ...

  14. Solid State Electrochemical Sensors for Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Detection in Lean Exhaust Gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rheaume, Jonathan Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    = Au, Pd, and TiO 2 ) with varying counter electrode", Solid= Au, Pd, and TiO 2 ) with varying counter electrode", Solidelectrodes (dense gold wires) Conductive paste (Au-Pd)

  15. A green synthesis of a layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate; lower temperature solid-state reaction and improved materials performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogawa, Makoto, E-mail: waseda.ogawa@gmail.com [Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan); Department of Earth Sciences, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan); Morita, Masashi, E-mail: m-masashi@y.akane.waseda.jp [Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan); Igarashi, Shota, E-mail: uxei_yoshi_yoshi@yahoo.co.jp [Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan); Sato, Soh, E-mail: rookie_so_sleepy@yahoo.co.jp [Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate, with the size range from 0.1 to 30 µm was prepared to show the effects of the particle size on the materials performance. The potassium lithium titanate was prepared by solid-state reaction as reported previously, where the reaction temperature was varied. The reported temperature for the titanate preparation was higher than 800 °C, though 600 °C is good enough to obtain single-phase potassium lithium titanate. The lower temperature synthesis is cost effective and the product exhibit better performance as photocatalysts due to surface reactivity. - Graphical abstract: Finite particle of a layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate, was prepared by solid-state reaction at lower temperature to show modified materials performance. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Potassium lithium titanate was prepared by solid-state reaction. • Lower temperature reaction resulted in smaller sized particles of titanate. • 600 °C was good enough to obtain single phased potassium lithium titanate. • The product exhibited better performance as photocatalyst.

  16. Solid State Joining of High Temperature Alloy Tubes for USC and Heat-Exchanger Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bimal Kad

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective of this project was to develop materials enabling joining technologies for use in forward looking heat-exchanger fabrication in Brayton cycle HIPPS, IGCC, FutureGen concepts capable of operating at temperatures in excess of 1000{degree}C as well as conventional technology upgrades via Ultra Super-Critical (USC) Rankine-cycle boilers capable of operating at 760{degree}C (1400F)/38.5MPa (5500psi) steam, while still using coal as the principal fossil fuel. The underlying mission in Rankine, Brayton or Brayton-Rankine, or IGCC combined cycle heat engine is a steady quest to improving operating efficiency while mitigating global environmental concerns. There has been a progressive move to higher overall cycle efficiencies, and in the case of fossil fuels this has accelerated recently in part because of concerns about greenhouse gas emissions, notably CO{sub 2}. For a heat engine, the overall efficiency is closely related to the difference between the highest temperature in the cycle and the lowest temperature. In most cases, efficiency gains are prompted by an increase in the high temperature, and this in turn has led to increasing demands on the materials of construction used in the high temperature end of the systems. Our migration to new advanced Ni-base and Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys poses significant fabrication challenges, as these materials are not readily weldable or the weld performs poorly in the high temperature creep regime. Thus the joining challenge is two-fold to a) devise appropriate joining methodologies for similar/dissimilar Ni-base and ODS alloys while b) preserving the near baseline creep performance in the welded region. Our program focus is on solid state joining of similar and dissimilar metals/alloys for heat exchanger components currently under consideration for the USC, HIPPS and IGCC power systems. The emphasis is to manipulate the joining methods and variables available to optimize joint creep performance compared to the base material creep performance. Similar and dissimilar butt joints were fabricated of MA956, IN740 alloys and using inertia welding techniques. We evaluated joining process details and heat treatments and its overall effect on creep response. Fixed and incrementally accelerated temperature creep tests were performed for similar and dissimilar joints and such incremental creep life data is compiled and reported. Long term MA956-MA556 joint tests indicate a firm 2Ksi creep stress threshold performance at 850{degree}C with a maximum exposure of over 9725 hours recorded in the current program. A Larsen Miller Parameter (LMP) of 48.50 for a 2Ksi test at 850{degree}C was further corroborated with tests at 2Ksi stress at 900{degree}C yielding a LMP=48.80. Despite this threshold the joints exhibit immense temperature sensitivity and fail promptly when test temperature raised above 900{degree}C. In comparison the performance of dissimilar joints was inferior, perhaps dictated by the creep characteristics of the mating nickel-base alloys. We describe a parametric window of joint development, and post weld heat treatment (PWHT) in dissimilar joints with solid solution (IN601, IN617) and precipitate strengthened (IN740) materials. Some concerns are evident regarding the diffusion of aluminum in dissimilar joints during high temperature recrystallization treatments. It is noted that aggressive treatments rapidly deplete the corrosion protecting aluminum reservoir in the vicinity of the joint interface. Subsequently, the impact of varying PWHT has been evaluated in the context on ensuing creep performance.

  17. United States Office of Office of Solid EPA/540/S-96/500 Environmental Protection Research and Waste and December 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Office Monitoring and Site Characterization, Office of Solid Waste and Emergency ResponseUnited States Office of Office of Solid EPA/540/S-96/500 Environmental Protection Research and Waste and December 1995 Agency Development Emergency Response Engineering Forum Issue DETERMINATION

  18. It all began in 2001, when three NREL researchers took their thin-film expertise from window technology research and applied it to a solid-state, thin-film lithium battery. The researchers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    window technology research and applied it to a solid-state, thin-film lithium battery. The researchers developed the concept of building the battery in reverse order, depositing first the solid-state electrolyte's"buried-anode" technology and put it to work in solid-state lithium batteries. The company claims its large-format batteries

  19. Composition and method of preparation of solid state dye laser rods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, Robert E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention includes solid polymeric-host laser rods prepared using bulk polymerization of acrylic acid ester comonomers which, when admixed with dye(s) capable of supporting laser oscillation and polymerized with a free radical initiator under mild thermal conditions, produce a solid product having the preferred properties for efficient lasing. Unsaturated polymerizable laser dyes can also be employed as one of the comonomers. Additionally, a method is disclosed which alleviates induced optical stress without having to anneal the polymers at elevated temperatures (>85.degree. C.).

  20. 622 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 49, NO. 3, MARCH 2014 Co-Design of a CMOS Rectifier and Small Loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serdijn, Wouter A.

    622 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 49, NO. 3, MARCH 2014 Co-Design of a CMOS Rectifier (EM) en- ergy into electrical DC power. This DC power is locally stored in a capacitor or battery

  1. 494 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 39, NO. 3, MARCH 2004 A Shared-Well Dual-Supply-Voltage 64-bit ALU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolic, Borivoje

    494 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 39, NO. 3, MARCH 2004 A Shared-Well Dual delivery. On the other end of the spectrum, reducing the energy consumption is essential for battery

  2. 1352 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 37, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2002 A 120-mW 3-D Rendering Engine With 6-Mb Embedded DRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, Hoi-Jun

    1352 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 37, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2002 A 120-mW 3-D Rendering digital assistant (PDA) in which the power has to be supplied by batteries. Since the lithium battery

  3. 310 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 40, NO. 1, JANUARY 2005 A 180-mV Subthreshold FFT Processor Using a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandrakasan, Anantha

    310 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 40, NO. 1, JANUARY 2005 A 180-mV Subthreshold FFT THERE is significant research activity to minimize energy dissipation at the system level to lengthen battery life

  4. IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 47, NO. 8, AUGUST 2012 1935 A Switched-Inductor Integrated Voltage Regulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carloni, Luca

    IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 47, NO. 8, AUGUST 2012 1935 A Switched on computational performance in modern microprocessors and systems-on-chip is power consumption. Battery life

  5. IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 42, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2007 2573 480-GMACS/mW Resonant Adiabatic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cauwenberghs, Gert

    IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 42, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2007 2573 480-GMACS/mW Resonant in the de- sign of portable and implantable microsystems supporting the use of a miniature battery power

  6. 1 2004 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference 0-000-000-0/00/$10.00 2004 IEEE ISSCC 2004 / SESSION 12 / BIOMICROSYSTEMS / 12.6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Shawn K.

    1 · 2004 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference 0-000-000-0/00/$10.00 ©2004 IEEE ISSCC battery life and exposing tissue to potentially damaging temperatures. This is especially true for retinal

  7. 170 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 41, NO. 1, JANUARY 2006 PVT-Aware Leakage Reduction for On-Die Caches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Chris H.

    170 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 41, NO. 1, JANUARY 2006 PVT-Aware Leakage Reduction power requirements for extended battery life. Manuscript received April 2, 2005; revised May 27, 2005

  8. IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 38, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2003 1739 A Dual-Path Bandwidth Extension Amplifier Topology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hoi

    IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 38, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2003 1739 A Dual-Path Bandwidth amplifiers. I. INTRODUCTION DRIVEN by the proliferation of battery-powered portable electronic equipment

  9. 1210 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 41, NO. 5, MAY 2006 A SiGe PA With Dual Dynamic Bias Control and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asbeck, Peter M.

    1210 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 41, NO. 5, MAY 2006 A SiGe PA With Dual Dynamic from the battery, is the key factor determining the talk time and battery life for portable wireless

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Solid State NMR Studies of Li-Rich NMC Cathodes: Investigating Structure Change and Its Effect on Voltage Fade Phenomenon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about solid state NMR...

  11. Efficiency Improvement of Nitride-Based Solid State Light Emitting Materials -- CRADA Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisielowski, Christian; Weber, Eicke

    2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x} N/GaN thin film growth by Molecular Beam Epitaxy has opened a new route towards energy efficient solid-state lighting. Blue and green LED's became available that can be used to match the whole color spectrum of visible light with the potential to match the eye response curve. Moreover, the efficiency of such devices largely exceeds that of incandescent light sources (tungsten filaments) and even competes favorably with lighting by fluorescent lamps. It is, however, also seen in Figure 1 that it is essential to improve on the luminous performance of green LED's in order to mimic the eye response curve. This lack of sufficiently efficient green LED's relates to particularities of the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N materials system. This ternary alloy system is polar and large strain is generated during a lattice mismatched thin film growth because of the significantly different lattice parameters between GaN and InN and common substrates such as sapphire. Moreover, it is challenging to incorporate indium into GaN at typical growth temperatures because a miscibility gap exists that can be modified by strain effects. As a result a large parameter space needs exploration to optimize the growth of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N and to date it is unclear what the detailed physical processes are that affect device efficiencies. In particular, an inhomogeneous distribution indium in GaN modifies the device performance in an unpredictable manner. As a result technology is pushed forward on a trial and error basis in particular in Asian countries such as Japan and Korea, which dominate the market and it is desirable to strengthen the competitiveness of the US industry. This CRADA was initiated to help Lumileds Lighting/USA boosting the performance of their green LED's. The tasks address the distribution of the indium atoms in the active area of their blue and green LED's and its relation to internal and external quantum efficiencies. Procedures to measure the indium distribution with near atomic resolution were developed and applied to test samples and devices that were provided by Lumilids. Further, the optical performance of the device materials was probed by photoluminescence, electroluminescence and time resolved optical measurements. Overall, the programs objective is to provide a physical basis for the development of a simulation program that helps making predictions to improve the growth processes such that the device efficiency can be increased to about 20%. Our study addresses all proposed aspects successfully. Carrier localization, lifetime and recombination as well as the strain-induced generation of electric fields were characterized and modeled. Band gap parameters and their relation to the indium distribution were characterized and modeled. Electron microscopy was developed as a unique tool to measure the formation of indium clusters on a nanometer length scale and it was demonstrated that strain induced atom column displacements can reliably be determined in any materials system with a precision that approaches 2 pm. The relation between the local indium composition x and the strain induced lattice constant c(x) in fully strained In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N quantum wells was found to be: c(x) = 0.5185 + {alpha}x with {alpha} = 0.111 nm. It was concluded that the local indium concentration in the final product can be modulated by growth procedures in a predictable manner to favorably affect external quantum efficiencies that approached target values and that internal quantum efficiencies exceeded them.

  12. A self-injected, diode-pumped, solid-state ring laser for laser cooling of Li atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miake, Yudai; O'Hara, Kenneth M; Gensemer, Stephen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have constructed a solid-state light source for experiments with laser cooled lithium atoms based on a Nd:YVO$_4$ ring laser with second-harmonic generation. Unidirectional lasing, an improved mode selection, and a high output power of the ring laser was achieved by weak coupling to an external cavity which contained the lossy elements required for single frequency operation. Continuous frequency tuning is accomplished by controlling two PZTs in the internal and the external cavities simultaneously. The light source has been utilized to trap and cool fermionic lithium atoms into the quantum degenerate regime.

  13. Reconstituted polymeric materials derived from post-consumer waste, industrial scrap and virgin resins made by solid state shear pulverization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khait, Klementina (Skokie, IL)

    2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making polymeric particulates wherein polymeric scrap material, virgin polymeric material and mixtures thereof are supplied to intermeshing extruder screws which are rotated to transport the polymeric material along their length and subject the polymeric material to solid state shear pulverization and in-situ polymer compatibilization, if two or more incompatible polymers are present. Uniform pulverized particulates are produced without addition of a compatibilizing agent. The pulverized particulates are directly melt processable (as powder feedstock) and surprisingly yield a substantially homogeneous light color product.

  14. Reconstituted Polymeric Materials Derived From Post-Consumer Waste, Industrial Scrap And Virgin Resins Made By Solid State Shear Pulverizat

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khait, Klementina (Skokie, IL)

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making polymeric particulates wherein polymeric scrap material, virgin polymeric material and mixtures thereof are supplied to intermeshing extruder screws which are rotated to transport the polymeric material along their length and subject the polymeric material to solid state shear pulverization and in-situ polymer compatibilization, if two or more incompatible polymers are present. Uniform pulverized particulates are produced without addition of a compatibilizing agent. The pulverized particulates are directly melt processable (as powder feedstock) and surprisingly yield a substantially homogeneous light color product.

  15. Reconstituted polymeric materials derived from post-consumer waste, industrial scrap and virgin resins made by solid state pulverization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khait, Klementina (Skokie, IL)

    1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making polymeric particulates wherein polymeric scrap material, virgin polymeric material and mixtures thereof are supplied to intermeshing extruder screws which are rotated to transport the polymeric material along their length and subject the polymeric material to solid state shear pulverization and in-situ polymer compatibilization, if two or more incompatible polymers are present. Uniform pulverized particulates are produced without addition of a compatibilizing agent. The pulverized particulates are directly melt processable (as powder feedstock) and surprisingly yield a substantially homogeneous light color product.

  16. Reconstituted polymeric materials derived from post-consumer waste, industrial scrap and virgin resins made by solid state pulverization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khait, K.

    1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making polymeric particulates is described wherein polymeric scrap material, virgin polymeric material and mixtures thereof are supplied to intermeshing extruder screws which are rotated to transport the polymeric material along their length and subject the polymeric material to solid state shear pulverization and in-situ polymer compatibilization, if two or more incompatible polymers are present. Uniform pulverized particulates are produced without addition of a compatible agent. The pulverized particulates are directly melt processable (as powder feedstock) and surprisingly yield a substantially homogeneous light color product. 29 figs.

  17. Direct observation of intermediates in a thermodynamically controlled solid state dynamic covalent reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belenguer, Ana M.; Lampronti, Giulio Isacco; Wales, David J.; Sanders, Jeremy Keith Morris

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    the meta- stable polymorph under ball mill neat grinding condi- tions. Similarly, polymorph (1-2)A is metastable under ball mill LAG conditions and rapidly transforms to (1-2)B (Figure 1b). Polymorph transformations are crucial in the pharmaceutical... industry and generally in any field where the final product is used and commercialized as a solid phase.37 2 EXPERIMENTAL DETAILS We present here 14 kinetic studies, which were de- signed to explore the different kinetic and thermodynam- ic features...

  18. Role of solid-state interactions in the acid-catalyzed thermolysis of surface-attached diphenylalkanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.; Biggs, C.A.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cross-linked, network structure of coal may impose constraints on conventional reaction mechanisms as a consequence of restricted mass transport. We have examined this phenomenon for thermal reactions through the study of model compounds that are covalently anchored to an inert silica surface (1). We have now initiated studies that employ these immobilized model compounds as solid-state probes in modeling fundamental aspects of catalyzed, heterogeneous reactions of coal. There have been numerous recent reports on the development of unsupported, highly dispersed catalysts for improving the conversion and product selectivity in coal liquefaction (2,3) and hydropyrolysis (4). A potential advantage of such dispersed catalysts is the improved contact between the coal, solvent vehicle if present, hydrogen gas, and the catalyst surface, particularly when catalysts with very small particle sizes can be generated. In this paper, we report initial results from a model system that begins to address the mechanistic question of if, in the early stages of coal dissolution, significant activation of solid coal particles by solid catalyst can occur. For this study, surface-immobilized 1,3-diphenylpropane ({approx}DPP) has been employed as a model for related trimethylene (and longer) aliphatic linking groups between aromatic clusters in coal, and its reactivity in the presence of a dispersed aluminosilicate at 310--375{degree}C has been investigated. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Scaling Up: Kilolumen Solid-State Lighting Exceeding 100 LPW via Remote Phosphor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waqidi Falicoff

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This thirty-month project was successful in attaining its ambitious objectives of demonstrating a radically novel 'remote-phosphor' LED light source that can out-perform conventional conformal coated phosphor LED sources. Numerous technical challenges were met with innovative techniques and optical configurations. This product development program for a new generation of solid-state light sources has attained unprecedented luminosity (over 1 kilo-lumen) and efficacy (based on the criterion lumens per 100mw radiant blue). LPI has successfully demonstrated its proprietary technology for optical synthesis of large uniform sources out of the light output of an array of separated LEDs. Numerous multiple blue LEDs illuminate single a phosphor patch. By separating the LEDs from the phosphor, the phosphor and LEDs operate cooler and with higher efficiency over a wide range of operating conditions (from startup to steady state). Other benefits of the system include: better source uniformity, more types of phosphor can be used (chemical interaction and high temperatures are no longer an issue), and the phosphor can be made up from a pre-manufactured sheet (thereby lowering cost and complexity of phosphor deposition). Several laboratory prototypes were built and operated at the expected high performance level. The project fully explored two types of remote phosphor system: transmissive and reflective. The first was found to be well suited for a replacement for A19 type incandescent bulbs, as it was able to replicate the beam pattern of a traditional filament bulb. The second type has the advantages that it is pre-collimate source that has an adjustable color temperature. The project was divided in two phases: Phase I explored a transmissive design and Phase II of the project developed reflective architectures. Additionally, in Phase II the design of a spherical emitting transmissive remote phosphor bulb was developed that is suitable for replacement of A19 and similar light bulbs. In Phase II several new reflective remote phosphor systems were developed and patents applied for. This research included the development of reflective systems in which the short-pass filter operated at a nominal incidence angle of 15{sup o}, a major advancement of this technology. Another goal of the project was to show that it is possible to align multiple optics to multiple LEDs (spaced apart for better thermal management) to within an accuracy in the z-direction of 10 microns or less. This goal was achieved. A further goal was to show it is possible to combine and homogenize the output from multiple LEDs without any flux loss or significant increase in etendue. This goal also was achieved. The following color-coded computer drawing of the Phase 2 reflective remote phosphor prototype gives an idea of the accuracy challenges encountered in such an assembly. The actual setup has less functional clarity due to the numerous items of auxiliary equipment involved. Not only did 10 degrees of freedoms alignment have to be supplied to the LEDs and component prisms as well, but there were also micro-titrating glue dispensers and vacuum hoses. The project also utilized a recently introduced high-index glass, available in small customized prisms. This prototype also embodies a significant advance in thin-film design, by which an unprecedented 98% single-pass efficiency was attained over a 30 degree range of incidence angle (Patents Pending). Such high efficiency is especially important since it applies to the blue light going to the phosphor and then again to the phosphor's light, so that the 'system' efficiency associated with short-pass filter was 95.5%. Other losses have to be kept equally small, towards which a new type of ultra-clear injection-moldable acrylic was discovered and used to make ultra-transparent CPC optics. Several transmissive remote phosphor prototypes were manufactured that could replace screw-in type incandescent bulbs. The CRI of the white light from these prototypes varied from 55 to 93. The system efficiency achieved was between 27 to 29.5

  20. “Zero-length” Cross-linking in Solid State as an Approach for Analysis of Protein -Protein Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elshafey, Ahmed; Tolic, Nikola; Young, Malin M.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Smith, Richard D.; Kery, Vladimir

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyzing the architecture of protein complexes is a difficult task. Chemical cross-linking is often used in combination with mass spectrometric analysis to elucidate the interaction interfaces between proteins. We have developed a new approach for the analysis of interacting interfaces in protein complexes based on cross-linking in the solid state. Protein complexes are freeze-dried under vacuum and cross-links are introduced in the solid phase by dehydrating the protein in a non-water solvent, thus, creating peptide bonds between amino and carboxyl groups of the interacting peptides. Cross-linked proteins are digested into peptides with trypsin in both H216O and H218O and then readily distinguished in mass spectra by characteristic 8 atomic mass unit (amu) shifts reflecting incorporation of two 18O atoms into each C-terminus of proteolytic peptides. Computer analysis of mass spectrometry (MS) and MS/MS data is used to identify the cross-linked peptides.We demonstrated our method by cross-linking homooligomeric protein complexes alone or in a mixture of many other proteins. Cross-linking in the solid state was shown to be specific and reproducible. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) from Schistosoma japonicum was studied in more detail. Twenty-seven unique intra-molecular and two inter-molecular cross-linked peptides were identified using tryptic mapping followed by LTQ-MS analysis. Identified cross-links were predominantly of amide origin, but six esters and thioesters were also found. Identified cross-linked peptides were validated by computational (visualization of cross-links in the three-dimensional [3D] structure of GST) and experimental (MS/MS) analyses. Most of the identified cross-links matched interacting peptides in the native 3D structure of GST indicating that the structure of GST and its oligomeric complex remained primarily intact after freeze drying. The pattern of oligomeric GST obtained in solid state was the same as that obtained in solution by Ru(II)Bpy32+ catalyzed, oxidative ?zero-length? cross-linking, confirming that it is feasible to use our strategy for analyzing the molecular interfaces of interacting proteins or peptides.

  1. Functional and shunt states of bacteriorhodopsin resolved by 250 GHz dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced solid-state NMR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bajaj, Vikram S.

    Observation and structural studies of reaction intermediates of proteins are challenging because of the mixtures of states usually present at low concentrations. Here, we use a 250 GHz gyrotron (cyclotron resonance maser) ...

  2. Solid-State Lighting Patents Resulting from DOE-Funded Projects |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment,Institutes and ResponseStaffServicesFutureU.S.Solar CellSolidDepartment of

  3. The Solid State Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory A Brief History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAboutManusScienceThe Life ofSciencethe New FundingSolid

  4. Diffusion-governed-asymmetric growth of amorphous layer under solid-state reaction in Ni-Zr multilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, B.X.; Lai, W.S. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A molecular-dynamics simulation with an n-body potential was performed to study solid-state amorphization in the Ni-Zr system upon annealing at medium temperatures ranging from 300 to 600 C. The models for simulation were a Zr-Ni-Zr sandwich consisting of both hcp Zr and fcc Ni (001) atomic planes and a bilayer with a thin preset disordered interfacial layer, respectively, for revealing the detailed amorphization process and the growing kinetics of an amorphous layer upon solid-state reaction. The simulation results demonstrated, for the first time, that the atomic process proceeded through first diffusion, then alloying and eventually amorphization. In other words, amorphization was controlled by a diffusion-limited reaction and the growth kinetics of the amorphous layer followed exactly a t{sup 1/2} law. Another interesting finding was that the growing speeds of the amorphous layer exhibited an asymmetric behavior, i.e, the amorphous layer extended faster towards Ni lattice than that directed to Zr side. Besides, it was also found that an initiation of amorphization upon annealing was dependent to the interfacial textures, i.e., amorphization could take place when the interfaces were composed of the more open atomic planes, whereas it was suppressed if the interfaces were constructed with the close-packed planes of both lattices.

  5. Solid-state NMR analysis of the {beta}-strand orientation of the protofibrils of amyloid {beta}-protein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doi, Takashi [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Masuda, Yuichi, E-mail: masuda@mail.pharm.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan) [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Irie, Kazuhiro [Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Akagi, Ken-ichi; Monobe, Youko; Imazawa, Takayoshi [Section of Laboratory Equipment, Division of Biomedical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan)] [Section of Laboratory Equipment, Division of Biomedical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan); Takegoshi, K. [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The supramolecular structure of A{beta}42 protofibrils was analyzed by solid-state NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ala-21 residue in the A{beta}42 protofibrils is included in a slightly disordered {beta}-strand. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The A{beta}42 protofibrils do not form intermolecular in-register parallel {beta}-sheets. -- Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is caused by abnormal deposition (fibrillation) of a 42-residue amyloid {beta}-protein (A{beta}42) in the brain. During the process of fibrillation, the A{beta}42 takes the form of protofibrils with strong neurotoxicity, and is thus believed to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of AD. To elucidate the supramolecular structure of the A{beta}42 protofibrils, the intermolecular proximity of the Ala-21 residues in the A{beta}42 protofibrils was analyzed by {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C rotational resonance experiments in the solid state. Unlike the A{beta}42 fibrils, an intermolecular {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C correlation was not found in the A{beta}42 protofibrils. This result suggests that the {beta}-strands of the A{beta}42 protofibrils are not in an in-register parallel orientation. A{beta}42 monomers would assemble to form protofibrils with the {beta}-strand conformation, then transform into fibrils by forming intermolecular parallel {beta}-sheets.

  6. Raman and absorption spectrophotometric studies of selected lanthanide, californium-doped lanthanide, and actinide trihalides in the solid state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilmarth, W.R.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solid-state absorption spectra of Cf(III) ions as a dopant in lanthanide trihalide hosts (LnCl/sub 3/: Ln = Ce, Sm, and Y; LnBr/sub 3/: Ln = Ce, Sm, Tb, and Y; LnI/sub 3/: Ln = Ce and Y) have been recorded. The spectra of Cf(III) have been correlated with the various crystal structures. The phonon Raman spectra and solid-state absorption spectra of PmF/sub 3/, PmCl/sub 3/, PmBr/sub 3/, and two crystal modifications of PmI/sub 3/ have been recorded. Symmetry assignments have been made for the Raman-active bands for these trihalides and also the sesquioxide. The room-temperature absorption spectra have been correlated to crystal field effects. The symmetry assignments of the Raman-active phonon modes have been made based on polarized Raman spectra from single crystals of YF/sub 3/-type orthorhombic TbF/sub 3/ and PuBr/sub 3/-type orthorhombic NdBr/sub 3/. Raman spectra of other isostructural lanthanide compounds have been recorded and compared. Symmetry assignments for these compounds have been made by analogy to the single-crystal assignments. Raman spectra have been obtained and catalogued for a number of actinide compounds. Symmetry assignments have been made for the observed Raman-active phonon bands in this work based on the assignments made for isostructural lanthanide compounds. 29 figs., 22 tabs.

  7. Large angle solid state position sensitive x-ray detector system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurtz, D.S.; Ruud, C.O.

    1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for x-ray measurement of certain properties of a solid material. In distinction to known methods and apparatus, this invention employs a specific fiber-optic bundle configuration, termed a reorganizer, itself known for other uses, for coherently transmitting visible light originating from the scintillation of diffracted x-radiation from the solid material gathered along a substantially one dimensional linear arc, to a two-dimensional photo-sensor array. The two-dimensional photodetector array, with its many closely packed light sensitive pixels, is employed to process the information contained in the diffracted radiation and present the information in the form of a conventional x-ray diffraction spectrum. By this arrangement, the angular range of the combined detector faces may be increased without loss of angular resolution. Further, the prohibitively expensive coupling together of a large number of individual linear diode photodetectors, which would be required to process signals generated by the diffracted radiation, is avoided. 7 figs.

  8. Large angle solid state position sensitive x-ray detector system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurtz, David S. (State College, PA); Ruud, Clay O. (State College, PA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for x-ray measurement of certain properties of a solid material. In distinction to known methods and apparatus, this invention employs a specific fiber-optic bundle configuration, termed a reorganizer, itself known for other uses, for coherently transmitting visible light originating from the scintillation of diffracted x-radiation from the solid material gathered along a substantially one dimensional linear arc, to a two-dimensional photo-sensor array. The two-dimensional photodetector array, with its many closely packed light sensitive pixels, is employed to process the information contained in the diffracted radiation and present the information in the form of a conventional x-ray diffraction spectrum. By this arrangement, the angular range of the combined detector faces may be increased without loss of angular resolution. Further, the prohibitively expensive coupling together of a large number of individual linear diode photodetectors, which would be required to process signals generated by the diffracted radiation, is avoided.

  9. Large angle solid state position sensitive x-ray detector system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurtz, D.S.; Ruud, C.O.

    1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for x-ray measurement of certain properties of a solid material are disclosed. In distinction to known methods and apparatus, this invention employs a specific fiber-optic bundle configuration, termed a reorganizer, itself known for other uses, for coherently transmitting visible light originating from the scintillation of diffracted x-radiation from the solid material gathered along a substantially one dimensional linear arc, to a two-dimensional photo-sensor array. The two-dimensional photodetector array, with its many closely packed light sensitive pixels, is employed to process the information contained in the diffracted radiation and present the information in the form of a conventional x-ray diffraction spectrum. By this arrangement, the angular range of the combined detector faces may be increased without loss of angular resolution. Further, the prohibitively expensive coupling together of a large number of individual linear diode photodetectors, which would be required to process signals generated by the diffracted radiation, is avoided. 7 figs.

  10. Solid-State Gadolinium-Magnesium Hydride Optical Switch R. Armitage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -state electrochromic device. With positive polarization of the hydride electrode, the visible reflectance approaches 35 and reflecting states. Keywords: gadolinium-magnesium; electrochromic hydride; optical switching device. 2 #12;A conventional electrochromics5 . Optical switching has also been demonstrated by varying the H content

  11. Solid-State Water Electrolysis with an Alkaline Membrane Yongjun Leng,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -3 The advantages of hydrogen as an energy carrier include (1) highly efficient reversible conversion between hydrogen from renewable energy such as solar, wind, and hydropower for grid-scale energy storage.4, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, United States Center for Energy Storage

  12. 2004 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference 0-7803-8267-6/04 2004 IEEE ISSCC 2004 / SESSION 15 / WIRELESS CONSUMER ICs / 15.7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Seth

    · 2004 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference 0-7803-8267-6/04 ©2004 IEEE ISSCC 2004 the standby time a cellular phone can sustain with each full charge of the battery, pulse frequency modulation mode, compared to 15µA in state-of-the-art ICs [4]. As a result, the cellular phone standby time may

  13. IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 47, NO. 1, JANUARY 2012 23 A Super-Pipelined Energy Efficient Subthreshold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kambhampati, Subbarao

    IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 47, NO. 1, JANUARY 2012 23 A Super-Pipelined Energy efficiency than current state-of-art and 10 higher throughput than typical ULV designs. Measurements of 60 scaling has been widely applied to highly energy-constrained systems such as battery-pow- ered sensor

  14. IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 38, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2003 2269 Automatic Phase Alignment for a Fully Integrated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Thomas H.

    IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 38, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2003 2269 Automatic Phase Alignment, battery lifetime is largely determined by the power efficiency of the PA. On the other hand, it may. The current state of the art is to design a moderately linear PA and employ some linearization technique

  15. 252 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 39, NO. 1, JANUARY 2004 A CMOS Subbandgap Reference Circuit With 1-V Power Supply Voltage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayers, Joseph

    252 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 39, NO. 1, JANUARY 2004 A CMOS Subbandgap Reference management circuits [1]. As process technologies go into the deep-submicron eras and the demand for battery) as well as design margin. To keep pace with supply voltage requirements of a state-of-the-art CMOS process

  16. 2001 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference 0-7803-6608-5 2001 IEEE ISSCC 2001 / SESSION 20 / MULTI GIGAHERTZ MICROPROCESSOR TECHNOLOGIES / 20.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    · 2001 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference 0-7803-6608-5 ©2001 IEEE ISSCC 2001 exponentially with decreasing Vth, resulting in battery-draining quiescent power con- sumption with Vth less charge stored at the output node is dumped to ground when the output state changes. A charge recycling

  17. 446 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 43, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2008 A Low-Power SRAM Using Bit-Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahmoodi, Hamid

    propose a new low-power SRAM using bit-line Charge Recycling (CR-SRAM) for the write operation to invert the state of the internal nodes of the SRAM cell in write operation. A low-power SRAM using446 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 43, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2008 A Low-Power SRAM Using Bit

  18. Permanent polarization and charge distribution in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs): Insights from near-infrared charge-modulation spectroscopy of an operating OLED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchetti, Alfred P.; Haskins, Terri L.; Young, Ralph H.; Rothberg, Lewis J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor-deposited Alq{sub 3} layers typically possess a strong permanent electrical polarization, whereas NPB layers do not. (Alq{sub 3} is tris(8-quinolinolato)aluminum(III); NPB is 4,4?-bis[N-(1-naphthyl)-N-phenylamino]biphenyl.) The cause is a net orientation of the Alq{sub 3} molecules with their large dipole moments. Here we report on consequences for an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) with an NPB hole-transport layer and Alq{sub 3} electron-transport layer. The discontinuous polarization at the NPB|Alq{sub 3} interface has the same effect as a sheet of immobile negative charge there. It is more than compensated by a large concentration of injected holes (NPB{sup +}) when the OLED is running. We discuss the implications and consequences for the quantum efficiency and the drive voltage of this OLED and others. We also speculate on possible consequences of permanent polarization in organic photovoltaic devices. The concentration of NPB{sup +} was measured by charge-modulation spectroscopy (CMS) in the near infrared, where the NPB{sup +} has a strong absorption band, supplemented by differential-capacitance and current-voltage measurements. Unlike CMS in the visible, this method avoids complications from modulation of the electroluminescence and electroabsorption.

  19. The State-of-the-Art in Sealing Technology for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weil, K. Scott

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the keys to developing viable solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems is to first develop reliable and inexpensive stack sealing technology. Three general approaches are currently being pursued, including: rigid bonded sealing, compressive sealing, and compliant bonded sealing. This review highlights the advantages and limitations of each option, discusses some of the leading concepts, and outlines the future steps that need to be taken in their development. Given the number of different SOFC stack designs under development, the variety of potential applications/conditions in which these systems can be used, and the complexities of stack manufacture, it is likely that no one sealing technique will be suitable for all uses. Therefore continued progress in each general area, as well as the development of new concepts, is critical to the eventual success of SOFC technology.

  20. High-temperature steam-treatment of PBI, PEEK, and PEKK polymers with H2O and D2O: A solid-state NMR study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bluemel, Janet

    High-temperature steam-treatment of PBI, PEEK, and PEKK polymers with H2O and D2O: A solid 2014 Keywords: Steam-treatment of PBI, PEEK, PEKK Solid-state NMR Water and D2O uptake polymers a b with D2O steam at temperatures of 150 and 315 C. All samples are studied by TGA, IR, 13 C CP/MAS, 1 H

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - all-solid-state four-color laser Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    noise of a laser... -diode-pumped single-frequency ring Nd:YVO4-KTP green laser by optoelectronic feedback Jing Zhang, ... Source: Zhang, Jing - State Key Laboratory of Quantum...

  2. Resonance et contr^ole en cavite ouverte Jer^ome Hoepffner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoepffner, Jérôme

    R´esonance et contr^ole en cavit´e ouverte J´er^ome Hoepffner KTH, Sweden Avec Espen °Akervik, Uwe) From Rowley et al, JFM 2002 Self sustained cycle: perturbation growth pressure wave new perturbation localised and where are they sensitive ? #12;Optimal transient energy growth from initial conditions System

  3. Chameleon: A Color-Adaptive Web Browser for Mobile OLED Displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Lin

    transformation, low power 1. Introduction Displays are known to be among the largest power-consuming components devices. Unlike liquid crystal displays (LCD), OLED displays consume dramatically different power browser that renders web pages with power-optimized color schemes under user-supplied constraints. Driven

  4. Spectrally narrowed leaky waveguide edge emission and transient electrluminescent dynamics of OLEDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhengqing, Gan

    2010-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In summary, there are two major research works presented in this dissertation. The first research project (Chapter 4) is spectrally narrowed edge emission from Organic Light Emitting Diodes. The second project (Chapter 5) is about transient electroluminescent dynamics in OLEDs. Chapter 1 is a general introduction of OLEDs. Chapter 2 is a general introduction of organic semiconductor lasers. Chapter 3 is a description of the thermal evaporation method for OLED fabrication. The detail of the first project was presented in Chapter 4. Extremely narrowed spectrum was observed from the edge of OLED devices. A threshold thickness exists, above which the spectrum is narrow, and below which the spectrum is broad. The FWHM of spectrum depends on the material of the organic thin films, the thickness of the organic layers, and length of the OLED device. A superlinear relationship between the output intensity of the edge emission and the length of the device was observed, which is probably due to the misalignment of the device edge and the optical fiber detector. The original motivation of this research is for organic semiconductor laser that hasn't been realized due to the extremely high photon absorption in OLED devices. Although we didn't succeed in fabricating an electrically pumped organic laser diode, we made a comprehensive research in edge emission of OLEDs which provides valuable results in understanding light distribution and propagation in OLED devices. Chapter 5 focuses on the second project. A strong spike was observed at the falling edge of a pulse, and a long tail followed. The spike was due to the recombination of correlated charge pair (CCP) created by trapped carriers in guest molecules of the recombination zone. When the bias was turned off, along with the decreasing of electric field in the device, the electric field induced quenching decreases and the recombination rate of the CCP increases which result in the spike. This research project provides a profound understanding of the EL dynamics of OLED, and the theoretical model can fit and explain the experiment data quite well. For the edge emission, we focused on the spectrum and the relative intensity of the edge emission. In the future, more research can be done on the comparison of the intensity between the total edge emission and the surface emission which will give us a sense what fraction of light was trapped in the device. Micro structures can be integrated into the OLED such as DFB and DBR, the character of edge emission should be very interesting. For the transient spike, the CCP model can give a good explanation. But in the model, the effect of the electric field change is not included, because from the start point (t=0), we assume the mobility of carriers is a constant. If we consider the details of the change of the electric field, then when turning of the bias, the decrease of the electric field results in decrease of the carrier mobility and the dissociation rate. If we can add the electric field effect into the model, the whole theory will be more convincing.

  5. Laser cooling of solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, Richard I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor [UNM

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

  6. Structural Evolution and Li Dynamics in Nanophase Li3PS4 by Solid-State and Pulsed Field Gradient NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gobet, Mallory [Hunter College of the City University of New York] [Hunter College of the City University of New York; Greenbaum, Steve [Hunter College of the City University of New York] [Hunter College of the City University of New York; Sahu, Gayatri [ORNL] [ORNL; Liang, Chengdu [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ceramic lithium ion conductor -Li3PS4 has a disordered and nanoporous structure that leads to an enhancement in ionic conductivity by some three orders of magnitude compared to the crystalline phase. The phase is prepared by thermal treatment of an inorganic-organic complex based on Li3PS4 and THF. Multinuclear (1H, 6,7Li, 31P) solid state NMR spectroscopy is used to characterize the structural phase evolution of the starting material at various steps in the thermal treatment. The phase formed after high temperature treatment is recognized as spectroscopically distinct from the bulk -Li3PS4 compound. Also formed is an amorphous lithium thiophosphate phase that is metastable as verified by annealing over an extended period. Lithium ion self-diffusion coefficients are measurable by standard pulsed gradient NMR methods at 100oC and with values consistent with the high ionic conductivity previously reported for this material.

  7. An original method to evaluate the transport parameters and reconstruct the electric field in solid-state photodetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santi, A.; Piacentini, G. [DiFeST, Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 7/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Zanichelli, M.; Pavesi, M., E-mail: maura.pavesi@unipr.it [DiFeST, Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 7/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); IMEM-CNR, Institute of Materials for Electronics and Magnetism, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Cola, A.; Farella, I. [IMM-CNR, Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for reconstructing the spatial profile of the electric field along the thickness of a generic bulk solid-state photodetector is proposed. Furthermore, the mobility and lifetime of both electrons and holes can be evaluated contextually. The method is based on a procedure of minimization built up from current transient profiles induced by laser pulses in a planar detector at different applied voltages. The procedure was tested in CdTe planar detectors for X- and Gamma rays. The devices were measured in a single-carrier transport configuration by impinging laser light on the sample cathode. This method could be suitable for many other devices provided that they are made of materials with sufficiently high resistivity, i.e., with a sufficiently low density of intrinsic carriers.

  8. Stimuli-Tailored Dispersion State of Aqueous Carbon Nanotube Suspensions and Solid Polymer Nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Etika, Krishna

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoparticles (such as, carbon nanotubes, carbon black, clay etc.) have one or more dimensions of the order of 100 nm or less. Owing to very high van der Waals force of attraction, these nanoparticles exist in a highly aggregated state. It is often...

  9. Report from the third workshop on future directions of solid-state chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    . It is clear with hindsight that those individuals, companies, regions and nations that have embraced the new of stopping. In this the second half of the century, we have chips with 10 million transistors, solar photovoltaics and alldsolid-state light- ing, cell phones, displays, data storage, the insulated gate bipolar

  10. Novel Reduced Density !Materialsby Solid-State Extrusion: Proof-of-ConceptExperiments*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vipin

    must reside between the soil particles. This, in effect, lubricates each of the particles causing them attempted to walk on this pseudo-liquid. the end result was at least muddy shoes or in extreme cases much-state. Different approaches to achieving mud-like conditions inside the extruder are presented. In the first system

  11. Solid-State Formation of Titanium Carbide and Molybdenum Carbide as Contcts for Carbon-Containing Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leroy,W.; Detavernier, C.; van Meirhaeghe, R.; Kellock, A.; Lavoie, C.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal carbides are good candidates to contact carbon-based semiconductors (SiC, diamond, and carbon nanotubes). Here, we report on an in situ study of carbide formation during the solid-state reaction between thin Ti or Mo films and C substrates. Titanium carbide (TiC) was previously reported as a contact material to diamond and carbon nanotubes. However, the present study shows two disadvantages for the solid-state reaction of Ti and C. First, because Ti reacts readily with oxygen, a capping layer should be included to enable carbide formation. Second, the TiC phase can exist over a wide range of composition (about 10%, i.e., from Ti{sub 0.5}C{sub 0.5} to Ti{sub 0.6}C{sub 0.4}), leading to significant variations in the properties of the material formed. The study of the Mo-C system suggests that molybdenum carbide (Mo{sub 2}C) is a promising alternative, since the phase shows a lower resistivity (about 45% lower than for TiC), the carbide forms below 900 {sup o}C, and its formation is less sensitive to oxidation as compared with the Ti-C system. The measured resistivity for Mo{sub 2}C is p=59 {mu}{Omega} cm, and from kinetic studies an activation energy for Mo{sub 2}C formation of E{sub a}=3.15+/-0.15 eV was obtained.

  12. Ultrafast control of nuclear spins using only microwave pulses: towards switchable solid-state quantum gates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George Mitrikas; Yiannis Sanakis; Georgios Papavassiliou

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the control of the alpha-proton nuclear spin, I=1/2, coupled to the stable radical CH(COOH)2, S=1/2, in a gamma-irradiated malonic acid single crystal using only microwave pulses. We show that, depending on the state of the electron spin mS=+/-1/2, the nuclear spin can be locked in a desired state or oscillate between mI=+1/2 and mI=-1/2 on the nanosecond time scale. This approach provides a fast and efficient way of controlling nuclear spin qubits and also enables the design of switchable spin-based quantum gates by addressing only the electron spin.

  13. Solid State Lighting: GATEWAY and CALiPER | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energyof the Americas |DOEEnergy SmoothSolar IndustrySBSolid State

  14. Photodegradation of oligomeric polyesters containing anthraquinone and 1,2-diamine units. Single electron transfer induced cation radical bond cleavage in the solid state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leon, J.W.; Whitten, D.G. (Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States))

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oligomeric polyesters containing light-absorbing anthraquinone electron acceptor chromophores and fragmentable 1,2-diamine donors have been synthesized. Irradiation with [lambda] [ge] 340 nm in solution or as solid films results in photooxidative C-C bond cleavage of the 1,2-diamine units yielding essentially the same products in either case. The solid state photodegradation reaction was monitored using size exclusion chromatography and was found to be substantially less efficient than the corresponding solution reaction. This is attributed to an inefficient forward electron transfer step and the possibility of an induced reversibility of the fragmentation. The efficiency of photodegradation is suggested to be dependent on the donor/acceptor orientations in the solid state. 49 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Microscopic models for charge-noise-induced dephasing of solid-state qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Félix Beaudoin; W. A. Coish

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Several experiments have shown qubit coherence decay of the form $\\mathrm{exp}[-(t/T_2)^\\alpha]$ due to environmental charge-noise fluctuations. We present a microscopic description for temperature dependences of the parameters $T_2$ and $\\alpha$. Our description is appropriate to qubits in semiconductors interacting with spurious two-level charge fluctuators coupled to a thermal bath. We find distinct power-law dependences of $T_2$ and $\\alpha$ on temperature depending on the nature of the interaction of the fluctuators with the associated bath. We consider fluctuator dynamics induced by first- and second-order tunneling with a continuum of delocalized electron states. We also study one- and two-phonon processes for fluctuators in either GaAs or Si. These results can be used to identify dominant charge-dephasing mechanisms and suppress them.

  16. Solid Waste Management (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Indiana Department of...

  17. A Solid-State NMR Study of Tungsten Methyl Group Dynamics in [W(5-C5Me5)Me4][PF6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Robert G.

    A Solid-State NMR Study of Tungsten Methyl Group Dynamics in [W(5-C5Me5)Me4][PF6] Douglas C. Maus Spinning (MAS) 13C and static 2H NMR studies of the dynamics of the methyl groups coordinated to tungsten

  18. 1204 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 34, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 1999 Breakdown in Millimeter-Wave Power InP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jesús A.

    1204 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 34, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 1999 Breakdown in Millimeter-Wave Power InP HEMT's: A Comparison with GaAs PHEMT's J. A. del Alamo and M. H. Somerville Abstract's) deliver lower output power than GaAs pseudomorphic HEMT's (PHEMT's) throughout most of the millimeter

  19. 1512 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 39, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2004 A Low-Power Content-Addressable Memory (CAM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheikholeslami, Ali

    1512 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 39, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2004 A Low-Power Content Sheikholeslami, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--This paper presents two techniques to reduce power consumption, the search operation is discontinued for subsequent segments, hence reducing power. The second tech- nique

  20. 1732 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 42, NO. 8, AUGUST 2007 A Transient-Enhanced Low-Quiescent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hoi

    1732 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 42, NO. 8, AUGUST 2007 A Transient-Enhanced Low. INTRODUCTION POWER management is essential in all battery-powered portable devices such as cellular phones and PDAs in order to reduce the standby power and prolong the battery runtime. Low-dropout regulators (LDOs

  1. IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 47, NO. 4, APRIL 2012 1043 HermesE: A 96-Channel Full Data Rate Direct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shenoy, Krishna V.

    IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 47, NO. 4, APRIL 2012 1043 HermesE: A 96-Channel Full with an intracranial 96-channel Utah Electrode Array (UEA). Physical size and battery-life con- straints have thus far

  2. 2342 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 39, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2004 A 4-A Quiescent-Current Dual-Mode Digitally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Seth

    2342 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 39, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2004 A 4-A Quiescent voltage compatibility between a single-cell lithium-ion battery voltage and a low-voltage integrated with each full charge of the battery, pulse frequency modulation (PFM) mode is preferred for light load

  3. 1302 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 48, NO. 5, MAY 2013 A Logic-Compatible Embedded Flash Memory for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Chris H.

    1302 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 48, NO. 5, MAY 2013 A Logic-Compatible Embedded. Two approaches exist for this purpose as illustrated in Fig. 1. First option is to use a battery mode. This approach is based on readily available technology (e.g., SRAM and battery); however, the on

  4. 1248 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 44, NO. 4, APRIL 2009 A 350 W CMOS MSK Transmitter and 400 W

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Joel

    1248 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 44, NO. 4, APRIL 2009 A 350 W CMOS MSK Transmitter, is that batteries must last over a decade without the possibility of recharging. As a result, Manuscript received to preserve battery life, the corresponding base-station is free to consume much more power. This observation

  5. IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 48, NO. 1, JANUARY 2013 229 A Modular 1 mm Die-Stacked Sensing Platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, Prabal

    IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 48, NO. 1, JANUARY 2013 229 A Modular 1 mm Die with compatibility to commercial C protocols. A self-adapting power management unit is proposed for efficient battery voltage down conversion for wide range of battery voltages and load current. The power man- agement unit

  6. IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 32, NO. 12, DEC 1997 1 A 12mW Wide Dynamic Range CMOS Front-End

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Thomas H.

    IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 32, NO. 12, DEC 1997 1 A 12mW Wide Dynamic Range CMOS into their products. For many of these hand-held devices, one of the primary concerns is battery life. Thus

  7. 816 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 36, NO. 5, MAY 2001 A Mixed-Signal Approach to High-Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diorio, Chris

    816 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 36, NO. 5, MAY 2001 A Mixed-Signal Approach to High. At the same time, these devices require low-power compact circuits to max- imize battery life and minimize off

  8. 1216 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 42, NO. 6, JUNE 2007 An SC Voltage Doubler with Pseudo-Continuous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hoi

    1216 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 42, NO. 6, JUNE 2007 An SC Voltage Doubler by the growing demand of battery-operated portable electronic devices like PDAs, cellular phones, MP3 players-load conditions for prolonging the battery lifetime; 2) to be low cost in terms of using small-value off

  9. 2514 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 43, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2008 Techniques to Extend Canary-Based Standby VDD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calhoun, Benton H.

    2514 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 43, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2008 Techniques to Extend in both active and standby mode. For battery-constrained devices, the reduc- tion of standby leakage power is especially important for longer battery life. Since SRAM/Cache is the largest component in many digital

  10. 1016 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 45, NO. 5, MAY 2010 A Low-Power Capacitive Charge Pump Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johns, David A.

    1016 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 45, NO. 5, MAY 2010 A Low-Power Capacitive Charge@eecg.toronto.edu). Digital Object Identifier 10.1109/JSSC.2010.2042524 In the interest of prolonging battery life in mobile

  11. 570 2008 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference ISSCC 2008 / SESSION 31 / RF & mm-WAVE POWER AMPLIFIERS / 31.7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajimiri, Ali

    570 · 2008 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference ISSCC 2008 / SESSION 31 / RF & mm supply voltages that is very useful for a low-battery-voltage solution. However, it is not compatible with the higher voltages presented by the Li-ion batteries which under charging situations can present supply

  12. motion of crystalline domains in an otherwise rigid solid-state Received 7 January; accepted 10 June 2002; doi:10.1038/nature00901.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    non- aqueous cells. J. Power Sources 14, 153­166 (1985). 3. Ohzuku, T. & Hirai, T. An electrochromic., Morzilli, S. & Scrosati, B. The electrochromic characteristics of titanium oxide thin film electrodes. Solid State Ionics 20, 197­202 (1986). 5. Cantao, M. P., Cisneros, J. I. & Torresi, R. M. Electrochromic

  13. 1999 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference 0-7803-5129-0/99 IEEE 1999 MP 4.7 Tunable, Switchable, High-Q VHF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Clark T.-C.

    · 1999 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference 0-7803-5129-0/99 © IEEE 1999 MP 4 high-Q passive components, at- tempts to maximize their role with the intention of harnessing the above for the transmit local oscillator and power amplifier, as well. Due to Q limitations, conventional IC technologies

  14. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of HIV Fusion Peptide to Lipid Distances Reveal the Intimate Contact of Strand Peptide with Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weliky, David

    Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of HIV Fusion Peptide to Lipid Distances Reveal 23, 2007 ABSTRACT: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection begins with fusion between viral and host cell membranes and is catalyzed by the HIV gp41 fusion protein. The 20 N-terminal apolar residues

  15. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Evidence for Parallel and Antiparallel Strand Arrangements in the Membrane-Associated HIV-1 Fusion Peptide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weliky, David

    Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Evidence for Parallel and Antiparallel Strand Arrangements in the Membrane-Associated HIV-1 Fusion Peptide Jun Yang and David P. Weliky* Department of Chemistry, Michigan 7, 2003 ABSTRACT: The HIV-1 fusion peptide serves as a useful model system for understanding viral

  16. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 562 (2006) 380388 Modeling solid-state boron carbide low energy neutron detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    carbide low energy neutron detectors C. Lundstedta,b , A. Harkena,c , E. Daya,c , B.W. Robertsona,c , S types of solid-state boron carbide detector. These results provide the basis for distinguishing between-section. At the University of Nebraska, Lincoln (UNL), a semiconducting form of boron carbide has been developed over

  17. Physics 489 Solid State Bibliography: Aside from the course text here are some other general texts, and more focused books for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, Joseph

    ). In-depth description of density functional and related modern theories and methods for computational texts, and more focused books for specific reference on this subject. These extend into some grad recommended books, arranged very roughly by order of increasing sophistication: Rosenberg, The Solid State

  18. 1266 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 38, NO. 7, JULY 2003 A Multichannel Pipeline Analog-to-Digital Converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T. "Pierre"

    1266 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 38, NO. 7, JULY 2003 A Multichannel Pipeline Analog-channel 10-bit pipeline analog-to-digital con- verter, designed for use in an integrated three-interleaved pipeline paths, each operating at 80 MHz. The two parallel pipelines are subsequently multiplexed

  19. Thermal management system and method for a solid-state energy storing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rouillard, Roger (Beloeil, CA); Domroese, Michael K. (South St. Paul, MN); Gauthier, Michel (La Prairie, CA); Hoffman, Joseph A. (Minneapolis, MN); Lindeman, David D. (Hudson, WI); Noel, Joseph-Robert-Gaetan (St-Hubert, CA); Radewald, Vern E. (Austin, TX); Ranger, Michel (Lachine, CA); Rouillard, Jean (Saint-Luc, CA); Shiota, Toshimi (St. Bruno, CA); St-Germain, Philippe (Outremont, CA); Sudano, Anthony (Laval, CA); Trice, Jennifer L. (Eagan, MN); Turgeon, Thomas A. (Fridley, MN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved electrochemical energy storing device includes a number of thin-film electrochemical cells which are maintained in a state of compression through use of an internal or an external pressure apparatus. A thermal conductor, which is connected to at least one of the positive or negative contacts of each electrochemical cell, conducts current into and out of the electrochemical cells and also conducts thermal energy between the electrochemical cells and thermally conductive material disposed on a wall structure adjacent the conductors. The wall structure includes electrically resistive material, such as an anodized coating or a thin film of plastic. The thermal conductors are fabricated to include a spring mechanism which expands and contacts to maintain mechanical contact between the electrochemical cells and the thermally conductive material in the presence of relative movement between the electrochemical cells and the wall structure. An active cooling apparatus may be employed external to a hermetically sealed housing containing the electrochemical cells to enhance the transfer of thermal energy into and out of the electrochemical cells. An integrated interconnect board may be disposed within the housing onto which a number of electrical and electro-mechanical components are mounted. Heat generated by the components is conducted from the interconnect board to the housing using the thermal conductors.

  20. Solution-Procesed Small-Molecule OLED Luminaire for Interior Illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Ian

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Prototype lighting panels and luminaires were fabricated using DuPont Displaysâ?? solution-processed small-molecule OLED technology. These lighting panels were based on a spatially-patterned, 3-color design, similar in concept to an OLED display panel, with materials chosen to maximize device efficacy. The majority of the processing steps take place in air (rather than high vacuum). Optimization of device architecture, processing and construction was undertaken, with a final prototype design of 50 cm{sup 2} being fabricated and tested. Performance of these panels reached 35 lm/W at illuminant-A. A unique feature of this technology is the ability to color tune the emission, and color temperatures ranging from 2700 to > 6,500K were attained in the final build. Significant attention was paid to low-cost fabrication techniques.