National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ole potential customers

  1. OLED area illumination source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foust, Donald Franklin; Duggal, Anil Raj; Shiang, Joseph John; Nealon, William Francis; Bortscheller, Jacob Charles

    2008-03-25

    The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

  2. OLED devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapochak, Linda Susan [Arlington, VA; Burrows, Paul Edward [Kennewick, WA; Bimalchandra, Asanga [Richland, WA

    2011-02-22

    An OLED device having an emission layer formed of an ambipolar phosphine oxide host material and a dopant, a hole transport layer in electrical communication with an anode, an electron transport layer in communication with a cathode, wherein the HOMO energy of the hole transport layer is substantially the same as the HOMO energy of the ambipolar host in the emission layer, and the LUMO energy of the electron transport layer is substantially the same as the LUMO energy of the ambipolar host in the emission layer.

  3. OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report PDF icon OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report.pdf More Documents & Publications OLED Stakeholder Report 2015 Project...

  4. OLED Stakeholder Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    OLED Stakeholder Report OLED Stakeholder Report PDF icon 2015 OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report.pdf More Documents & Publications OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report 2015 Project...

  5. Creation of a U.S. Phosphorescent OLED Lighting Panel Manufacturing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hack, Michael

    2013-09-30

    Universal Display Corporation (UDC) has pioneered high efficacy phosphorescent OLED (PHOLED) technology to enable the realization of an exciting new form of high quality, energy saving solid-date lighting. In laboratory test devices, we have demonstrated greater than 100 lm/W conversion efficacy. In this program, Universal Display will demonstrate the scalability of its proprietary UniversalPHOLED technology and materials for the manufacture of white OLED lighting panels that meet commercial lighting targets. Moser Baer Technologies will design and build a U.S.- based pilot facility. The objective of this project is to establish a pilot phosphorescent OLED (PHOLED) manufacturing line in the U.S. Our goal is that at the end of the project, prototype lighting panels could be provided to U.S. luminaire manufacturers for incorporation into products to facilitate the testing of design concepts and to gauge customer acceptance, so as to facilitate the growth of the embryonic U.S. OLED lighting industry. In addition, the team will provide a cost of ownership analysis to quantify production costs including OLED performance metrics which relate to OLED cost such as yield, materials usage, cycle time, substrate area, and capital depreciation. This project was part of a new DOE initiative designed to help establish and maintain U.S. leadership in this program will support key DOE objectives by showing a path to meet Department of Energy Solid-State Lighting Manufacturing Roadmap cost targets, as well as meeting its efficiency targets by demonstrating the energy saving potential of our technology through the realization of greater than 76 lm/W OLED lighting panels by 2012.

  6. OLED panel with fuses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Levermore, Levermore; Pang, Huiqing; Rajan, Kamala

    2014-09-16

    Embodiments may provide a first device that may comprise a substrate, a plurality of conductive bus lines disposed over the substrate, and a plurality of OLED circuit elements disposed on the substrate, where each of the OLED circuit elements comprises one and only one pixel electrically connected in series with a fuse. Each pixel may further comprise a first electrode, a second electrode, and an organic electroluminescent (EL) material disposed between the first and the second electrodes. The fuse of each of the plurality of OLED circuit elements may electrically connect each of the OLED circuit elements to at least one of the plurality of bus lines. Each of the plurality of bus lines may be electrically connected to a plurality of OLED circuit elements that are commonly addressable and at least two of the bus lines may be separately addressable.

  7. Record External Quantum Efficiency in Blue OLED Device

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have created a blue organic light emitting diode (OLED) with an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 11% at 800 cd/m2, exceeding their previous record EQE of 8%. The EQE of blue OLEDs is a major challenge in OLED technology development. This achievement is particularly notable since it was accomplished at a much lower operating voltage (6.2V) than previous demonstrations using similar structures, revealing the potential for much higher power efficiencies.

  8. OLED Stakeholder Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report OLED Stakeholder Report PDF icon 2015 OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report.pdf More Documents & Publications OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report 2016 Project Portfolio 2015

  9. OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Meeting Report OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report PDF icon OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report.pdf More Documents & Publications OLED Stakeholder Report 2016 SSL R&D WORKSHOP ...

  10. OLED Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SSL Basics » OLED Basics OLED Basics OLEDs are organic LEDs, which means that their key building blocks are organic (i.e., carbon-based) materials. Unlike LEDs, which are small-point light sources, OLEDs are made in sheets that are diffuse-area light sources. OLED technology is developing rapidly, and there are a handful of product offerings with efficacy, lifetime, and color quality specs that are comparable to their LED counterparts. However, OLEDs are still some years away from widespread

  11. Where Do OLEDs Fit In?

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Where Do OLEDs Fit In? DOE SSL Workshop Portland, OR Giana M. Phelan Where do OLEDs fit in? A solid-state lighting solution that complements LED With the SSL advantages...

  12. OLED T Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OLED T Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: OLED-T Ltd. Place: Enfield, United Kingdom Zip: EN3 7XH Product: OLED-T is a VCPE backed R&D company focused on the development and...

  13. High Efficiency, Illumination Quality OLEDs for Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Shiang; James Cella; Kelly Chichak; Anil Duggal; Kevin Janora; Chris Heller; Gautam Parthasarathy; Jeffery Youmans; Joseph Shiang

    2008-03-31

    The goal of the program was to demonstrate a 45 lumen per watt white light device based upon the use of multiple emission colors through the use of solution processing. This performance level is a dramatic extension of the team's previous 15 LPW large area illumination device. The fundamental material system was based upon commercial polymer materials. The team was largely able to achieve these goals, and was able to deliver to DOE a 90 lumen illumination source that had an average performance of 34 LPW a 1000 cd/m{sup 2} with peak performances near 40LPW. The average color temperature is 3200K and the calculated CRI 85. The device operated at a brightness of approximately 1000cd/m{sup 2}. The use of multiple emission colors particularly red and blue, provided additional degrees of design flexibility in achieving white light, but also required the use of a multilayered structure to separate the different recombination zones and prevent interconversion of blue emission to red emission. The use of commercial materials had the advantage that improvements by the chemical manufacturers in charge transport efficiency, operating life and material purity could be rapidly incorporated without the expenditure of additional effort. The program was designed to take maximum advantage of the known characteristics of these material and proceeded in seven steps. (1) Identify the most promising materials, (2) assemble them into multi-layer structures to control excitation and transport within the OLED, (3) identify materials development needs that would optimize performance within multilayer structures, (4) build a prototype that demonstrates the potential entitlement of the novel multilayer OLED architecture (5) integrate all of the developments to find the single best materials set to implement the novel multilayer architecture, (6) further optimize the best materials set, (7) make a large area high illumination quality white OLED. A photo of the final deliverable is shown. In 2003, a large area, OLED based illumination source was demonstrated that could provide light with a quality, quantity, and efficiency on par with what can be achieved with traditional light sources. The demonstration source was made by tiling together 16 separate 6-inch x 6-inch blue-emitting OLEDs. The efficiency, total lumen output, and lifetime of the OLED based illumination source were the same as what would be achieved with an 80 watt incandescent bulb. The devices had an average efficacy of 15 LPW and used solution-processed OLEDs. The individual 6-inch x 6-inch devices incorporated three technology strategies developed specifically for OLED lighting -- downconversion for white light generation, scattering for outcoupling efficiency enhancement, and a scalable monolithic series architecture to enable large area devices. The downconversion approach consists of optically coupling a blue-emitting OLED to a set of luminescent layers. The layers are chosen to absorb the blue OLED emission and then luminescence with high efficiency at longer wavelengths. The composition and number of layers are chosen so that the unabsorbed blue emission and the longer wavelength re-emission combine to make white light. A downconversion approach has the advantage of allowing a wide variety of colors to be made from a limited set of blue emitters. In addition, one does not have to carefully tune the emission wavelength of the individual electro-luminescent species within the OLED device in order to achieve white light. The downconversion architecture used to develop the 15LPW large area light source consisted of a polymer-based blue-emitting OLED and three downconversion layers. Two of the layers utilized perylene based dyes from BASF AG of Germany with high quantum efficiency (>98%) and one of the layers consisted of inorganic phosphor particles (Y(Gd)AG:Ce) with a quantum efficiency of {approx}85%. By independently varying the optical density of the downconversion layers, the overall emission spectrum could be adjusted to maximize performance for lighting (e.g. blackbody temperature, color rendering and luminous efficacy) while keeping the properties of the underlying blue OLED constant. The success of the downconversion approach is ultimately based upon the ability to produce efficient emission in the blue. Table 1 presents a comparison of the current performance of the conjugated polymer, dye-doped polymer, and dendrimer approaches to making a solution-processed blue OLED as 2006. Also given is the published state of the art performance of a vapor-deposited blue OLED. One can see that all the approaches to a blue OLED give approximately the same external quantum efficiency at 500 cd/m{sup 2}. However, due to its low operating voltage, the fluorescent conjugated polymer approach yields a superior power efficiency at the same brightness.

  14. UDC Demonstrates Phosphorescent OLED Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Universal Display Corporation (UDC), along with project partners Armstrong World Industries and the universities of Michigan and Southern California, have successfully demonstrated two phosphorescent OLED (PHOLED™) luminaire systems, the first of their kind in the U.S. This achievement marks a critical step in the development of practical OLED lighting in a complete luminaire system, including decorative housing, power supply, mounting, and maintenance provisions. Each luminaire has overall dimensions of approximately 15x60 cm and is comprised of four 15x15 cm phosphorescent OLED panels. With a combined power supply and lamp efficacy of 51 lm/W, the prototype luminaire is about twice as efficient as the market-leading halogen-based systems. In addition, the prototype OLED lighting system snaps into Armstrong's TechZone™ Ceiling System, which is commercially available in the U.S.x

  15. 2015 OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... fixture market is hot, and most fixture designers and fabricators are focused on LED right now. Additionally, current OLED designs use high-price panels in high-price luminaires. ...

  16. OLED Testing Call for Sources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    OLED Testing Call for Sources OLED Testing Call for Sources PDF icon OLED Testing Call for Sources - November 2015 More Documents & Publications CX-010821: Categorical Exclusion ...

  17. OLED Testing Opportunity | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Testing Opportunity OLED Testing Opportunity Ongoing discussions with the OLED lighting community have identified the need for a collaborative R&D framework to accelerate developments in OLED lighting technology and manufacturing. DOE has implemented a new testing opportunity to enable component makers to incorporate various R&D-stage components into a baseline state-of-the art (SOTA) OLED device. The results of the testing will lead to the identification of high-performing components

  18. Economic Potential of CHP in Detroit Edison Service Area: the Customer Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, J.

    2003-10-10

    DOE's mission under the Distributed Energy and Electricity Reliability (DEER) Program is to strengthen America's electric energy infrastructure and provide utilities and consumers with a greater array of energy-efficient technology choices for generating, transmitting, distributing, storing, and managing demand for electric power and thermal energy. DOE recognizes that distributed energy technologies can help accomplish this mission. Distributed energy (DE) technologies have received much attention for the potential energy savings and electric power reliability assurances that may be achieved by their widespread adoption. Fueling the attention has been the desire to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and concern about easing power transmission and distribution system capacity limitations and congestion. However, these benefits may come at a cost to the electric utility companies in terms of lost revenue and other potential impacts on the distribution system. It is important to assess the costs and benefits of DE to consumers and distribution system companies. DOE commissioned this study to assess the costs and benefits of DE technologies to consumers and to better understand the effect of DE on the grid. Current central power generation units vent more waste heat (energy) than the entire transportation sector consumes and this wasted thermal energy is projected to grow by 45% within the next 20 years. Consumer investment in technologies that increase power generation efficiency is a key element of the DOE Energy Efficiency program. The program aims to increase overall cycle efficiency from 30% to 70% within 20 years as well. DOE wants to determine the impact of DE in several small areas within cities across the U.S. Ann Arbor, Michigan, was chosen as the city for this case study. Ann Arbor has electric and gas rates that can substantially affect the market penetration of DE. This case study analysis was intended to: (1) Determine what DE market penetration can realistically be expected, based on consumer investment in combined heat and power systems (CHP) and the effect of utility applied demand response (DR). (2) Evaluate and quantify the impact on the distribution utility feeder from the perspective of customer ownership of the DE equipment. (3) Determine the distribution feeder limits and the impact DE may have on future growth. For the case study, the Gas Technology Institute analyzed a single 16-megawatt grid feeder circuit in Ann Arbor, Michigan to determine whether there are economic incentives to use small distributed power generation systems that would offset the need to increase grid circuit capacity. Increasing circuit capacity would enable the circuit to meet consumer's energy demands at all times, but it would not improve the circuit's utilization factor. The analysis spans 12 years, to a planning horizon of 2015. By 2015, the demand for power is expected to exceed the grid circuit capacity for a significant portion of the year. The analysis was to determine whether economically acceptable implementation of customer-owned DE systems would reduce the peak power demands enough to forestall the need to upgrade the capacity of the grid circuit. The analysis was based on economics and gave no financial credit for improved power reliability or mitigation of environmental impacts. Before this study was completed, the utility expanded the capacity of the circuit to 22 MW. Although this expansion will enable the circuit to meet foreseeable increases in peak demand, it also will significantly decrease the circuit's overall utilization factor. The study revealed that DE penetration on the selected feeder is not expected to forestall the need to upgrade the grid circuit capacity unless interconnection barriers are removed. Currently, a variety of technical, business practice, and regulatory barriers discourage DE interconnection in the US market.

  19. Series connected OLED structure and fabrication method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foust, Donald Franklin; Balch, Ernest Wayne; Duggal, Anil Raj; Heller, Christian Maria; Guida, Renato; Nealon, William Francis; Faircloth, Tami Janene

    2006-05-23

    A light emitting device comprises a plurality of organic light emitting diode (OLED) modules. The OLED modules are arranged into a series group where the individual OLED modules are electrically connected in series. The device is configured to be coupled to a power supply. A display is also provided. The display includes a plurality of OLED modules arranged to depict a shape selected from the group consisting of at least one letter, at least one number, at least one image, and a combination thereof.

  20. LED Watch: The Outlook for OLEDs | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Watch: The Outlook for OLEDs LED Watch: The Outlook for OLEDs PDF icon LED Watch: December 2014 More Documents & Publications 2015 ARTICLES What's Next for Solid-State Lighting - February 2015 OLED Stakeholder Report

  1. Challenges in OLED Research and Development | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    OLED Research and Development Challenges in OLED Research and Development View the video about OLED technology's advantages and what is needed to move it fully into the lighting market

  2. Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs) and Optically-Detected Magnetic Resonance (ODMR) studies on organic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Min

    2011-11-30

    Organic semiconductors have evolved rapidly over the last decades and currently are considered as the next-generation technology for many applications, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) in flat-panel displays (FPDs) and solid state lighting (SSL), and organic solar cells (OSCs) in clean renewable energy. This dissertation focuses mainly on OLEDs. Although the commercialization of the OLED technology in FPDs is growing and appears to be just around the corner for SSL, there are still several key issues that need to be addressed: (1) the cost of OLEDs is very high, largely due to the costly current manufacturing process; (2) the efficiency of OLEDs needs to be improved. This is vital to the success of OLEDs in the FPD and SSL industries; (3) the lifetime of OLEDs, especially blue OLEDs, is the biggest technical challenge. All these issues raise the demand for new organic materials, new device structures, and continued lower-cost fabrication methods. In an attempt to address these issues, we used solution-processing methods to fabricate highly efficient small molecule OLEDs (SMOLEDs); this approach is costeffective in comparison to the more common thermal vacuum evaporation. We also successfully made efficient indium tin oxide (ITO)-free SMOLEDs to further improve the efficiency of the OLEDs. We employed the spin-dependent optically-detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) technique to study the luminescence quenching processes in OLEDs and organic materials in order to understand the intrinsic degradation mechanisms. We also fabricated polymer LEDs (PLEDs) based on a new electron-accepting blue-emitting polymer and studied the effect of molecular weight on the efficiency of PLEDs. All these studies helped us to better understand the underlying relationship between the organic semiconductor materials and the OLEDs performance, and will subsequently assist in further enhancing the efficiency of OLEDs. With strongly improved device performance (in addition to other OLEDs' attributes such as mechanical flexibility and potential low cost), the OLED technology is promising to successfully compete with current technologies, such as LCDs and inorganic LEDs.

  3. Using prismatic microstructured films for image blending in OLEDS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haenichen, Lukas; Pschenitzka, Florian

    2009-09-08

    An apparatus such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a microstructured film disposed on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The microstructured film contains features which diffuse light emitted by said OLED device and increase the luminance of the device.

  4. Text-Alternative Version: Challenges in OLED Research and Development |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy OLED Research and Development Text-Alternative Version: Challenges in OLED Research and Development Narrator: Organic light-emitting diodes, OLEDs, are made using organic carbon-based materials. Unlike LEDs, which are small point light sources, OLEDs are made in sheets that create diffuse area lighting. As a result, the OLED offers a range of qualities beyond the scope of the LED - qualities that could revolutionize both commercial and residential lighting. James

  5. Host compounds for red phosphorescent OLEDs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xia, Chuanjun; Cheon, Kwang -Ohk

    2015-08-25

    Novel compounds containing a triphenylene moiety linked to an .alpha..beta. connected binaphthyl ring system are provided. These compounds have surprisingly good solubility in organic solvents and are useful as host compounds in red phosphorescent OLEDs.

  6. Customers & Partners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Areva Solar and Sandia Labs Join Forces for CLFR Molten-Salt Storage Concentrating Solar Power, Customers & ... and Innovation in Vermont's Electricity Sector Climate, Customers & ...

  7. Custom Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Management Small Industrial Lighting Compressed Air ESUE Motors Federal Agriculture Custom Projects No two industrial customers are alike; each has its own unique...

  8. Customer Comments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acscustomercomments Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search Doing Business Expand Doing Business Customer Involvement Expand Customer Involvement Reports &...

  9. Customer Comments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Service Customer Comments Customer Response to July 24August 8 Forums N.Wasco County PUD (08262013) Portland General Electric (08262013) Renewable Northwest Project (0826...

  10. Customer Comments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search Doing Business Expand Doing Business Customer Involvement Expand Customer Involvement Reports & Tools Expand Reports & Tools Operations &...

  11. Outdoor OLED Luminaire Using Solar Energy for Lighting Pedestrian Areas |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Outdoor OLED Luminaire Using Solar Energy for Lighting Pedestrian Areas Outdoor OLED Luminaire Using Solar Energy for Lighting Pedestrian Areas Lead Performer: OLEDWorks LLC - Rochester, NY DOE Total Funding: $148,368 Project Term: June 8, 2015 - March 8, 2016 Funding Opportunity: FY2015 Phase I Release 2 SBIR Awards PROJECT OBJECTIVE The recipient, currently the only commercial OLED lighting panel manufacturer in the U.S., will develop a concept for an outdoor OLED

  12. Customer Comments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Improvement (CBPI) Customer Forum Energy Imbalance Market Generator Interconnection Reform Implementation Network Integration Transmission Service (NT Service) Network Open...

  13. Customer Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joint Operating Committee Transmission Issues Policy Steering Committee Customer Training Interconnection Small Generator Interconnection Procedures (SGIP) Balancing Authority...

  14. High Quantum Efficiency OLED Lighting Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiang, Joseph [General Electric (GE) Global Research, Fairfield, CT (United States)

    2011-09-30

    The overall goal of the program was to apply improvements in light outcoupling technology to a practical large area plastic luminaire, and thus enable the product vision of an extremely thin form factor high efficiency large area light source. The target substrate was plastic and the baseline device was operating at 35 LPW at the start of the program. The target LPW of the program was a >2x improvement in the LPW efficacy and the overall amount of light to be delivered was relatively high 900 lumens. Despite the extremely difficult challenges associated with scaling up a wet solution process on plastic substrates, the program was able to make substantial progress. A small molecule wet solution process was successfully implemented on plastic substrates with almost no loss in efficiency in transitioning from the laboratory scale glass to large area plastic substrates. By transitioning to a small molecule based process, the LPW entitlement increased from 35 LPW to 60 LPW. A further 10% improvement in outcoupling efficiency was demonstrated via the use of a highly reflecting cathode, which reduced absorptive loss in the OLED device. The calculated potential improvement in some cases is even larger, ~30%, and thus there is considerable room for optimism in improving the net light coupling efficacy, provided absorptive loss mechanisms are eliminated. Further improvements are possible if scattering schemes such as the silver nanowire based hard coat structure are fully developed. The wet coating processes were successfully scaled to large area plastic substrate and resulted in the construction of a 900 lumens luminaire device.

  15. Customer Comments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Customer Comments BPA Power (452012) Clark PUD (452012) Cowlitz PUD (452012) Emerald PUD (452012) Franklin PUD (452012) Grant PUD (452012) Iberdrola (452012)...

  16. Customer Comments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Projects Expand Projects Skip navigation links Ancillary and Control Area Services (ACS) Practices Forum Attachment K Commercial Business Process Improvement (CBPI) Customer...

  17. Customer Involvement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Projects Expand Projects Skip navigation links Ancillary and Control Area Services (ACS) Practices Forum Meetings Customer Comments Attachment K 2015 Planning Cycle 2014...

  18. Customer Forum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Projects Expand Projects Skip navigation links Ancillary and Control Area Services (ACS) Practices Forum Meetings Customer Comments Attachment K 2015 Planning Cycle 2014...

  19. Customer Comments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2009) Customer Comments on 2009 PTSA Avista Utilities BPA Power Services Grant County PUD Horizon Wind Energy Iberdrola Renewables Northwest Requirements Utilities Powerex...

  20. Low Voltage White Phosphorescent OLED Achievements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Universal Display Corporation (UDC) and its research partners at Princeton University and the University of Southern California have succeeded in developing a white phosphorescent OLED (PHOLED™) that achieved a record efficiency of 20 lumens per watt. This achievement is the result of the team's collaborative efforts to increase the efficiency of PHOLED lighting by focusing on two critical factors: lowering the drive voltages and increasing the amount of light extracted.

  1. OLED Luminaire with Panel Integrated Drivers and Advanced Controls |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy OLED Luminaire with Panel Integrated Drivers and Advanced Controls OLED Luminaire with Panel Integrated Drivers and Advanced Controls Lead Performer: Acuity Brands Lighting - Berkeley, CA Partners: OLEDWorks - Rochester, NY DOE Total Funding: $337,505 Cost Share: $112,502 Project Term: 7/1/15 - 6/30/16 Funding Opportunity: SSL R&D Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) (DE-FOA-0001171) Project Objective This project plans to develop an OLED luminaire that features DC

  2. Advanced Light Extraction Material for OLED Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light Extraction Material for OLED Lighting Advanced Light Extraction Material for OLED Lighting Lead Performer: Pixelligent Technologies LLC - Baltimore, MD Partners: OLEDWorks LLC DOE Total Funding: $1,000,000 Project Term: April 6, 2015 - April 5, 2017 Funding Opportunity: FY2015 Phase II Release 1 SBIR Awards PROJECT OBJECTIVE The primary goal of this Phase II project is to develop a viable commercial process to manufacture an internal light extraction (ILE) layer to be supplied to OLED

  3. Princeton University Improves Outcoupling Efficiency Of Thin-film Oleds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the desire to shift OLED lighting to flexible substrates come additional challenges that are associated with scattering trapped light, because flexible substrates have higher refractive...

  4. OLED Luminaire with Panel Integrated Drivers and Advanced Controls...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DC current drivers integrated with each panel, and a base station that interfaces with ... More Documents & Publications High-Performance OLED Panel and Luminaire Luminaires for ...

  5. Our Customers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Our Customers Our Customers The Lab's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Los Alamos National Laboratory is one of three laboratories owned by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). As of 2012, about 65% of our work is done for NNSA programs to care for America's nuclear weapons stockpile and

  6. Stable and Efficient White OLEDs Based on a Single Emissive Material...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Stable and Efficient White OLEDs Based on a Single Emissive Material Stable and Efficient White OLEDs Based on a Single Emissive Material Lead Performer: Arizona State University - ...

  7. ITO-free white OLEDs on Flexible Substrates with Enhanced Light...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ITO-free white OLEDs on Flexible Substrates with Enhanced Light Outcoupling ITO-free white OLEDs on Flexible Substrates with Enhanced Light Outcoupling Lead Performer: Princeton ...

  8. World Record White OLED Performance Exceeds 100 lm/W

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Universal Display Corporation (UDC) has successfully demonstrated a record-breaking white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) with a power efficacy of 102 lm/W at 1000 cd/m2 using its proprietary, high-efficiency phosphorescent OLED technology. This achievement represents a significant milestone for OLED technology, demonstrating performance that surpasses the power efficacy of incandescent bulbs with less than 15 lm/W and fluorescent lamps at 60-90 lm/W. Funded in part by DOE, UDC's achievement is a major step toward DOE's roadmap goal of a 150 lm/W commercial OLED light source by 2015.

  9. High Performance OLEDs with Air-stable Nanostructured Electrodes - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Building Energy Efficiency Building Energy Efficiency Find More Like This Return to Search High Performance OLEDs with Air-stable Nanostructured Electrodes Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryScientists at Berkeley Lab have modified the cathode-organic layer of an OLED device to significantly enhance electron injection efficiency and reduce the sensitivity of the cathode to environmental degradation by water

  10. Advanced Light Extraction Structure for OLED Lighting | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Light Extraction Structure for OLED Lighting Advanced Light Extraction Structure for OLED Lighting Lead Performer: Pixelligent Technologies, LLC - Baltimore, MD Partners: OLEDWorks, LLC - Rochester, NY DOE Total Funding: $1,000,000 Cost Share: $250,000 Project Term: 9/10/2014 - 8/31/2016 Funding Opportunity: SSL R&D Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) (DE-FOA-0000973) Project Objective This project will develop a novel internal light extraction (ILE) design to improve the light

  11. High-Performance OLED Panel and Luminaire | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    OLED Panel and Luminaire High-Performance OLED Panel and Luminaire Lead Performer: OLEDWorks, LLC - Rochester, NY Partners: Acuity Brands Lighting - Berkeley, CA DOE Total Funding: $1,376,999 Cost Share: $458,999 Project Term: 10/1/2014 - 3/31/2016 Funding Opportunity: SSL R&D Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) (DE-FOA-0000973) Project Objective This project seeks to develop and integrate the cost effective manufacturing technologies necessary to achieve the DOE performance and cost

  12. Integrated Plastic Substrates for OLED Lighting | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Plastic Substrates for OLED Lighting Integrated Plastic Substrates for OLED Lighting Lead Performer: Sinovia Technologies - Foster City, CA Partners: - Eastman Kodak Company - Rochester, NY - Vitriflex - San Jose, CA - Solvay, USA Inc. - Houston, TX DOE Total Funding: $1,211,240 Cost Share: $1,249,430 Project Term: 8/1/15 - 3/1/17 Funding Opportunity: SSL R&D Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) (DE-FOA-0001171) Project Objective This project will combine a barrier film technology with a

  13. New Efficiency Record Achieved for White OLED Device

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Osram Opto-Semiconductors, Inc. has successfully demonstrated a white organic light emitting diode (OLED) with a record efficiency of 25 lumens per watt, the highest known efficiency achieved to date for a polymer-based white OLED. The 25 LPW cool-white-emitting device was produced by applying a standard external inorganic phosphor to Osram's record-breaking blue-emitting phosphorescent polymer device with a peak luminous efficacy of 14 LPW.

  14. Modifying the organic/electrode interface in Organic Solar Cells (OSCs) and improving the efficiency of solution-processed phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Teng

    2012-04-27

    Organic semiconductors devices, such as, organic solar cells (OSCs), organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) have drawn increasing interest in recent decades. As organic materials are flexible, light weight, and potentially low-cost, organic semiconductor devices are considered to be an alternative to their inorganic counterparts. This dissertation will focus mainly on OSCs and OLEDs. As a clean and renewable energy source, the development of OSCs is very promising. Cells with 9.2% power conversion efficiency (PCE) were reported this year, compared to < 8% two years ago. OSCs belong to the so-called third generation solar cells and are still under development. While OLEDs are a more mature and better studied field, with commercial products already launched in the market, there are still several key issues: (1) the cost of OSCs/OLEDs is still high, largely due to the costly manufacturing processes; (2) the efficiency of OSCs/OLEDs needs to be improved; (3) the lifetime of OSCs/OLEDs is not sufficient compared to their inorganic counterparts; (4) the physics models of the behavior of the devices are not satisfactory. All these limitations invoke the demand for new organic materials, improved device architectures, low-cost fabrication methods, and better understanding of device physics. For OSCs, we attempted to improve the PCE by modifying the interlayer between active layer/metal. We found that ethylene glycol (EG) treated poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT: PSS) improves hole collection at the metal/polymer interface, furthermore it also affects the growth of the poly(3- hexylthiophene) (P3HT):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blends, making the phase segregation more favorable for charge collection. We then studied organic/inorganic tandem cells. We also investigated the effect of a thin LiF layer on the hole-collection of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/C70-based small molecular OSCs. A thin LiF layer serves typically as the electron injection layer in OLEDs and electron collection interlayer in the OSCs. However, several reports showed that it can also assist in holeinjection in OLEDs. Here we first demonstrate that it assists hole-collection in OSCs, which is more obvious after air-plasma treatment, and explore this intriguing dual role. For OLEDs, we focus on solution processing methods to fabricate highly efficient phosphorescent OLEDs. First, we investigated OLEDs with a polymer host matrix, and enhanced charge injection by adding hole- and electron-transport materials into the system. We also applied a hole-blocking and electron-transport material to prevent luminescence quenching by the cathode. Finally, we substituted the polymer host by a small molecule, to achieve more efficient solution processed small molecular OLEDs (SMOLEDs); this approach is cost-effective in comparison to the more common vacuum thermal evaporation. All these studies help us to better understand the underlying relationship between the organic semiconductor materials and the OSCs and OLEDs performance and will subsequently assist in further enhancing the efficiencies of OSCs and OLEDs. With better efficiency and longer lifetime, the OSCs and OLEDs will be competitive with their inorganic counterparts.

  15. R2R Production of Low-Cost Integrated OLED Substrate with Improved...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    R2R Production of Low-Cost Integrated OLED Substrate with Improved Transparent Conductor and Enhanced Light Outcoupling R2R Production of Low-Cost Integrated OLED Substrate with ...

  16. OLEDWORKS DEVELOPS INNOVATIVE HIGH-PERFORMANCE DEPOSITION TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE MANUFACTURING COST OF OLED LIGHTING

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The high manufacturing cost of OLED lighting is a major barrier to the growth of the emerging OLED lighting industry. OLEDWorks is developing high-performance deposition technology that addresses...

  17. Materials and architectures for efficient harvesting of singlet and triplet excitons for white light emitting OLEDs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mark E; Forrest, Stephen

    2015-02-03

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  18. DOE Publishes GATEWAY Report on OLED Lighting in an Office Setting |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy GATEWAY Report on OLED Lighting in an Office Setting DOE Publishes GATEWAY Report on OLED Lighting in an Office Setting April 26, 2016 - 11:50am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy has released a report on the first GATEWAY demonstration involving OLED lighting. Aurora Lighting Design, Inc., in Grayslake, IL, installed Acuity Brands' Trilia(tm) OLED lighting system in September 2014. The new report recounts the experiences of this pioneering project and provides

  19. High Efficancy Integrated Under-Cabinet Phosphorescent OLED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Hack

    2001-10-31

    In this two year program Universal Display Corporation (UDC) together with the University of Michigan, Teknokon, developed and delivered an energy efficient phosphorescent OLED under cabinet illumination system. Specifically the UDC team goal was in 2011 to deliver five (5) Beta level OLED under cabinet lighting fixtures each consisting of five 6-inch x 6-inch OLED lighting panels, delivering over 420 lumens, at an overall system efficacy of >60 lm/W, a CRI of >85, and a projected lifetime to 70% of initial luminance to exceed 20,000 hours. During the course of this program, the Team pursued the commercialization of these OLED based under cabinet lighting fixtures, to enable the launch of commercial OLED lighting products. The UDC team was ideally suited to develop these novel and efficient solid state lighting fixtures, having both the technical experience and commercial distribution mechanisms to leverage work performed under this contract. UDC's business strategy is to non-exclusively license its PHOLED technology to lighting manufacturers, and also supply them with our proprietary PHOLED materials. UDC is currently working with several licensees who are manufacturing OLED lighting panels using our technology. During this 2 year program, we further developed our high efficiency white Phosphorescent OLEDs from the first milestone, achieving a 80 lm/W single pixel to the final milestone, achieving an under-cabinet PHOLED lighting system that operates at 56 lm/W at 420 lumens. Each luminaire was comprised of ten 15cm x 7.5cm lighting modules mounted in outcoupling enhancement lenses and a control module. The lamps modules are connected together using either plugs or wires with plugs on each end, allowing for unlimited configurations. The lamps are driven by an OLED driver mounted in an enclosure which includes the AC plug. As a result of advancements gained under this program, the path to move OLED lighting panels from development into manufacturing has been further realized. We have found that under-cabinet lighting is an ideal first entry product opportunity to launch OLED lighting for residential applications. From the studies that we have performed, our PHOLED under-cabinet lighting system performance is very similar to many of the current commercially available LED under-cabinet luminaires. We also found that the projected cost of PHOLED luminaire should be comparable to the LED luminaire by 2015. With the additional benefits of PHOLED lighting, no glare, better uniformity and low operating temperature, it can be easily seen how the PHOLED under-cabinet luminaire could be preferred over the LED competition. Although the metrics we set for this program were extremely aggressive, the performance we achieved and reported, represents a very significant advancement in the OLED lighting industry.

  20. Enhanced performance of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and OLED-based photoluminescent sensing platforms by novel microstructures and device architectures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Rui

    2012-08-01

    After a general introduction to OLEDs and OLED-based PL sensors, the transient emission mechanism of guest-host OLEDs is described both experimentally and theoretically. A monolithic and easy-to-apply process is demonstrated for fabricating multicolor microcavity OLEDs (that improve the sensor platform). The outcoupling issues of OLEDs at the substrate/air interface are addressed by using a microstructured polymer film resulting from a PS and polyethylene glycol (PEG) mixture. Based on the understanding of OLEDs and their improvement, research was done in order to realize integrated all organic-based O{sub 2} and pH sensors with improved signal intensity and sensitivity. The sensor design modification and optimization are summarized

  1. High Performance OLEDs with Air-stable Nanostructured Electrodes

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    2010-07-28

    Scientists at Berkeley Lab have modified the cathode-organic layer of an OLED device to significantly enhance electron injection efficiency and reduce the sensitivity of the cathode to environmental degradation by water and oxygen. Two approaches are used:1. An ordered arrangement of nanostructures (top-down processing) or2. A nanomaterial interfacial layer (bottom-up processing)....

  2. UDC Develops Prototype High-Efficiency OLED Undercabinet Luminaire

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Universal Display Corporation (UDC) has demonstrated the real-world application of a novel lighting technology by developing two pre-prototype OLED undercabinet lighting systems that exceed 420 total lumens at an efficacy of more than 55 lm/W, with an estimated lifetime (LT70) in excess of 10,000 hours, and a color rendering index (CRI) greater than 85.

  3. Novel Low Cost Organic Vapor Jet Printing of Striped High Efficiency Phosphorescent OLEDs for White Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Hack

    2008-12-31

    In this program, Universal Display Corporation and University of Michigan proposed to integrate three innovative concepts to meet the DOE's Solid State Lighting (SSL) goals: (1) high-efficiency phosphorescent organic light emitting device (PHOLED{trademark}) technology, (2) a white lighting design that is based on a series of red, green and blue OLED stripes, and (3) the use of a novel cost-effective, high rate, mask-less deposition process called organic vapor jet printing (OVJP). Our PHOLED technology offers up to four-times higher power efficiency than other OLED approaches for general lighting. We believe that one of the most promising approaches to maximizing the efficiency of OLED lighting sources is to produce stripes of the three primary colors at such a pitch (200-500 {mu}m) that they appear as a uniform white light to an observer greater than 1 meter (m) away from the illumination source. Earlier work from a SBIR Phase 1 entitled 'White Illumination Sources Using Striped Phosphorescent OLEDs' suggests that stripe widths of less than 500 {mu}m appear uniform from a distance of 1m without the need for an external diffuser. In this program, we intend to combine continued advances in this PHOLED technology with the striped RGB lighting design to demonstrate a high-efficiency, white lighting source. Using this background technology, the team has focused on developing and demonstrating the novel cost-effective OVJP process to fabricate these high-efficiency white PHOLED light sources. Because this groundbreaking OVJP process is a direct printing approach that enables the OLED stripes to be printed without a shadow mask, OVJP offers very high material utilization and high throughput without the costs and wastage associated with a shadow mask (i.e. the waste of material that deposits on the shadow mask itself). As a direct printing technique, OVJP also has the potential to offer ultra-high deposition rates (> 1,000 Angstroms/second) for any size or shaped features. As a result, we believe that this work will lead to the development of a cost-effective manufacturing solution to produce very-high efficiency OLEDs. By comparison to more common ink-jet printing (IJP), OVJP can also produce well-defined patterns without the need to pattern the substrate with ink wells or to dry/anneal the ink. In addition, the material set is not limited by viscosity and solvent solubility. During the program we successfully demonstrated a 6-inch x 6-inch PHOLED lighting panel consisting of fine-featured red, green and blue (R-G-B) stripes (1mm width) using an OVJP deposition system that was designed, procured and installed into UDC's cleanroom as part of this program. This project will significantly accelerate the DOE's ability to meet its 2015 DOE SSL targets of 70-150 lumens/Watt and less than $10 per 1,000 lumens for high CRI lighting index (76-90). Coupled with a low cost manufacturing path through OVJP, we expect that this achievement will enable the DOE to achieve its 2015 performance goals by the year 2013, two years ahead of schedule. As shown by the technical work performed under this program, we believe that OVJP is a very promising technology to produce low cost, high efficacy, color tunable light sources. While we have made significant progress to develop OVJP technology and build a pilot line tool to study basic aspects of the technology and demonstrate a lighting panel prototype, further work needs to be performed before its full potential and commercial viability can be fully assessed.

  4. CERTS customer adoption model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubio, F. Javier; Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi,Kristina S.

    2000-03-01

    This effort represents a contribution to the wider distributed energy resources (DER) research of the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS, http://certs.lbl.gov) that is intended to attack and, hopefully, resolve the technical barriers to DER adoption, particularly those that are unlikely to be of high priority to individual equipment vendors. The longer term goal of the Berkeley Lab effort is to guide the wider technical research towards the key technical problems by forecasting some likely patterns of DER adoption. In sharp contrast to traditional electricity utility planning, this work takes a customer-centric approach and focuses on DER adoption decision making at, what we currently think of as, the customer level. This study reports on Berkeley Lab's second year effort (completed in Federal fiscal year 2000, FY00) of a project aimed to anticipate patterns of customer adoption of distributed energy resources (DER). Marnay, et al., 2000 describes the earlier FY99 Berkeley Lab work. The results presented herein are not intended to represent definitive economic analyses of possible DER projects by any means. The paucity of data available and the importance of excluded factors, such as environmental implications, are simply too important to make such an analysis possible at this time. Rather, the work presented represents a demonstration of the current model and an indicator of the potential to conduct more relevant studies in the future.

  5. APPA Customer Connections Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Customer Connections Conference is APPA's annual meeting for utility professionals in the areas of:

  6. Organic Light-Emitting Devices (OLEDS) and Their Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance (ODMR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gang Li

    2003-12-12

    Organic Light-Emitting Devices (OLEDs), both small molecular and polymeric have been studied extensively since the first efficient small molecule OLED was reported by Tang and VanSlyke in 1987. Burroughes' report on conjugated polymer-based OLEDs led to another track in OLED development. These developments have resulted in full color, highly efficient (up to {approx} 20% external efficiency 60 lm/W power efficiency for green emitters), and highly bright (> 140,000 Cd/m{sup 2} DC, {approx}2,000,000 Cd/m{sup 2} AC), stable (>40,000 hr at 5 mA/cm{sup 2}) devices. OLEDs are Lambertian emitters, which intrinsically eliminates the view angle problem of liquid crystal displays (LCDs). Thus OLEDs are beginning to compete with the current dominant LCDs in information display. Numerous companies are now active in this field, including large companies such as Pioneer, Toyota, Estman Kodak, Philipps, DuPont, Samsung, Sony, Toshiba, and Osram, and small companies like Cambridge Display Technology (CDT), Universal Display Corporation (UDC), and eMagin. The first small molecular display for vehicular stereos was introduced in 1998, and polymer OLED displays have begun to appear in commercial products. Although displays are the major application for OLEDs at present, they are also candidates for nest generation solid-state lighting. In this case the light source needs to be white in most cases. Organic transistors, organic solar cells, etc. are also being developed vigorously.

  7. Stacked white OLED having separate red, green and blue sub-elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen; Qi, Xiangfei; Slootsky, Michael

    2015-06-23

    The present invention relates to efficient organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). More specifically, the present invention relates to white-emitting OLEDs, or WOLEDs. The devices of the present invention employ three emissive sub-elements, typically emitting red, green and blue, to sufficiently cover the visible spectrum. The sub-elements are separated by charge generating layers.

  8. Timeline for Customer Choices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Revised September 28, 2015 TIMELINE FOR CUSTOMER CHOICES 2011 AND BEYOND - RECURRING CHOICES 1) Recurring Choices by Notice Deadlines: The choices below are made according to the...

  9. Low Power, Red, Green and Blue Carbon Nanotube Enabled Vertical Organic Light Emitting Transistors for Active Matrix OLED Displays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, M. A. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Liu, B. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Donoghue, E. P. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL; Kim, D. Y. [University of Florida, Gainesville; So, Franky [University of Florida, Gainesville; Rinzler, A. G. [University of Florida, Gainesville

    2011-01-01

    Organic semiconductors are potential alternatives to polycrystalline silicon as the semiconductor used in the backplane of active matrix organic light emitting diode displays. Demonstrated here is a light-emitting transistor with an organic channel, operating with low power dissipation at low voltage, and high aperture ratio, in three colors: red, green and blue. The single-wall carbon nanotube network source electrode is responsible for the high level of performance demonstrated. A major benefit enabled by this architecture is the integration of the drive transistor, storage capacitor and light emitter into a single device. Performance comparable to commercialized polycrystalline-silicon TFT driven OLEDs is demonstrated.

  10. Recovery Act: Low Cost Integrated Substrate for OLED Lighting Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Benton; Abhinav Bhandari

    2012-09-30

    PPG pursued the development of an integrated substrate, including the anode, external, and internal extraction layers. The objective of PPG??s program was to achieve cost reductions by displacing the existing expensive borosilicate or double-side polished float glass substrates and developing alternative electrodes and scalable light extraction layer technologies through focused and short-term applied research. One of the key highlights of the project was proving the feasibility of using PPG??s high transmission Solarphire® float glass as a substrate to consistently achieve organic lightemitting diode (OLED) devices with good performance and high yields. Under this program, four low-cost alternatives to the Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) anode were investigated using pilot-scale magnetron sputtered vacuum deposition (MSVD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technologies. The anodes were evaluated by fabricating small and large phosphorescent organic lightemitting diode (PHOLED) devices at Universal Display Corporation (UDC). The device performance and life-times comparable to commercially available ITO anodes were demonstrated. A cost-benefit analysis was performed to down-select two anodes for further low-cost process development. Additionally, PPG developed and evaluated a number of scalable and compatible internal and external extraction layer concepts such as scattering layers on the outside of the glass substrate or between the transparent anode and the glass interface. In one external extraction layer (EEL) approach, sol-gel sprayed pyrolytic coatings were deposited using lab scale equipment by hand or automated spraying of sol-gel solutions on hot glass, followed by optimizing of scattering with minimal absorption. In another EEL approach, PPG tested large-area glass texturing by scratching a glass surface with an abrasive roller and acid etching. Efficacy enhancements of 1.27x were demonstrated using white PHOLED devices for 2.0mm substrates which are at par with the standard diffuser sheets used by OLED manufacturers. For an internal extraction layer (IEL), PPG tested two concepts combining nanoparticles either in a solgel coating inserted between the anode and OLED or anode and glass interface, or incorporated into the internal surface of the glass. Efficacy enhancements of 1.31x were demonstrated using white PHOLED devices for the IEL by itself and factors of 1.73x were attained for an IEL in combination of thick acrylic block as an EEL. Recent offline measurements indicate that, with further optimization, factors over 2.0x could be achieved through an IEL alone.

  11. Electroluminescence property of organic light emitting diode (OLED)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    zdemir, Orhan; Kavak, Pelin; Saatci, A. Evrim; Gkdemir, F. P?nar; Menda, U. Deneb; Can, Nursel; Kutlu, Kubilay; Tekin, Emine; Pravadal?, Selin

    2013-12-16

    Transport properties of electrons and holes were investigated not only in a anthracene-containing poly(p-phenylene-ethynylene)- alt - poly(p-phenylene-vinylene) (PPE-PPV) polymer (AnE-PVstat) light emitting diodes (OLED) but also in an ITO/Ag/polymer/Ag electron and ITO/PEDOT:PSS/polymer/Au hole only devices. Mobility of injected carriers followed the Poole-Frenkel type conduction mechanism and distinguished in the frequency range due to the difference of transit times in admittance measurement. Beginning of light output took place at the turn-on voltage (or flat band voltage), 1.8 V, which was the difference of energy band gap of polymer and two barrier offsets between metals and polymer.

  12. Next Generation Hole Injection/Transport Nano-Composites for High Efficiency OLED Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King Wang

    2009-07-31

    The objective of this program is to use a novel nano-composite material system for the OLED anode coating/hole transport layer. The novel anode coating is intended to significantly increase not only hole injection/transport efficiency, but the device energy efficiency as well. Another goal of the Core Technologies Program is the optimization and scale-up of air-stable and cross-linkable novel HTL nano-composite materials synthesis and the development of low-cost, large-scale mist deposition processes for polymer OLED fabrication. This proposed technology holds the promise to substantially improve OLED energy efficiency and lifetime.

  13. PPG Industries Develops a Low-Cost Integrated OLED Substrate | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Research & Development » R&D Highlights » PPG Industries Develops a Low-Cost Integrated OLED Substrate PPG Industries Develops a Low-Cost Integrated OLED Substrate With the help of DOE funding, PPG Industries, Inc., has developed a low-cost OLED substrate, using inexpensive soda-lime "float" glass that the company manufactures at high volume for the architectural industry. Float glass is thin sheet glass and is much less expensive than the borosilicate or

  14. Large Customers (DR Sellers)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiliccot, Sila

    2011-10-25

    State of the large customers for demand response integration of solar and wind into electric grid; openADR; CAISO; DR as a pseudo generation; commercial and industrial DR strategies; California regulations

  15. Customer Acquisition | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Soft Costs Customer Acquisition Customer Acquisition Photo of a woman, man, and child looking at a silver box on the outside of a home. Customer acquisition costs in the solar ...

  16. Customer Service Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Customer Service Plan Department of Energy Customer Service Plan - 2011 1 A Message from the Secretary Over the past two and a half years, the Obama Administration and the Department of Energy have worked to make the federal government more open for the American public and its own employees. Through these efforts, we have significantly expanded the amount and breadth of information available online about our programs and services. We have also transformed the way we communicate with the public

  17. Crystal Structures of Xanthomonas campestris OleA Reveal Features That Promote Head-to-Head Condensation of Two Long-Chain Fatty Acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goblirsch, BR; Frias, JA; Wackett, LP; Wilmot, CM

    2012-05-22

    OleA is a thiolase superfamily enzyme that has been shown to catalyze the condensation of two long-chain fatty acylcoenzyme A (CoA) substrates. The enzyme is part of a larger gene cluster responsible for generating long-chain olefin products, a potential biofuel precursor. In thiolase superfamily enzymes, catalysis is achieved via a ping-pong mechanism. The first substrate forms a covalent intermediate with an active site cysteine that is followed by reaction with the second substrate. For OleA, this conjugation proceeds by a nondecarboxylative Claisen condensation. The OleA from Xanthomonas campestris has been crystallized and its structure determined, along with inhibitor-bound and xenon-derivatized structures, to improve our understanding of substrate positioning in the context of enzyme turnover. OleA is the first characterized thiolase superfamily member that has two long-chain alkyl substrates that need to be bound simultaneously and therefore uniquely requires an additional alkyl binding channel. The location of the fatty acid biosynthesis inhibitor, cerulenin, that possesses an alkyl chain length in the range of known OleA substrates, in conjunction with a single xenon binding site, leads to the putative assignment of this novel alkyl binding channel. Structural overlays between the OleA homologues, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) synthase and the fatty acid biosynthesis enzyme FabH, allow assignment of the two remaining channels: one for the thioester-containing pantetheinate arm and the second for the alkyl group of one substrate. A short beta-hairpin region is ordered in only one of the crystal forms, and that may suggest open and closed states relevant for substrate binding. Cys143 is the conserved catalytic cysteine within the superfamily, and the site of alkylation by cerulenin. The alkylated structure suggests that a glutamic acid residue (Glu117 beta) likely promotes Claisen condensation by acting as the catalytic base. Unexpectedly, Glu117 beta comes from the other monomer of the physiological dimer.

  18. Crystal Structures of Xanthomonas campestris OleA Reveal Features That Promote Head-to-Head Condensation of Two Long-Chain Fatty Acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goblirsch, Brandon R.; Frias, Janice A.; Wackett, Lawrence P.; Wilmot, Carrie M.

    2012-10-25

    OleA is a thiolase superfamily enzyme that has been shown to catalyze the condensation of two long-chain fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) substrates. The enzyme is part of a larger gene cluster responsible for generating long-chain olefin products, a potential biofuel precursor. In thiolase superfamily enzymes, catalysis is achieved via a ping-pong mechanism. The first substrate forms a covalent intermediate with an active site cysteine that is followed by reaction with the second substrate. For OleA, this conjugation proceeds by a nondecarboxylative Claisen condensation. The OleA from Xanthomonas campestris has been crystallized and its structure determined, along with inhibitor-bound and xenon-derivatized structures, to improve our understanding of substrate positioning in the context of enzyme turnover. OleA is the first characterized thiolase superfamily member that has two long-chain alkyl substrates that need to be bound simultaneously and therefore uniquely requires an additional alkyl binding channel. The location of the fatty acid biosynthesis inhibitor, cerulenin, that possesses an alkyl chain length in the range of known OleA substrates, in conjunction with a single xenon binding site, leads to the putative assignment of this novel alkyl binding channel. Structural overlays between the OleA homologues, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) synthase and the fatty acid biosynthesis enzyme FabH, allow assignment of the two remaining channels: one for the thioester-containing pantetheinate arm and the second for the alkyl group of one substrate. A short {beta}-hairpin region is ordered in only one of the crystal forms, and that may suggest open and closed states relevant for substrate binding. Cys143 is the conserved catalytic cysteine within the superfamily, and the site of alkylation by cerulenin. The alkylated structure suggests that a glutamic acid residue (Glu117{beta}) likely promotes Claisen condensation by acting as the catalytic base. Unexpectedly, Glu117{beta} comes from the other monomer of the physiological dimer.

  19. Customer Aggregation: An Opportunity for Green Power?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, E.; Bird, L.

    2001-02-26

    We undertook research into the experience of aggregation groups to determine whether customer aggregation offers an opportunity to bring green power choices to more customers. The objectives of this report, therefore, are to (1) identify the different types of aggregation that are occurring today, (2) learn whether aggregation offers an opportunity to advance sales of green power, and (3) share these concepts and approaches with potential aggregators and green power advocates.

  20. The Approach to Low-Cost High-Efficiency OLED Lighting | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy The Approach to Low-Cost High-Efficiency OLED Lighting The Approach to Low-Cost High-Efficiency OLED Lighting Lead Performer: University of California - Los Angeles - Los Angeles, CA Partners: Polyradiant Corp. - Calabasas, CA DOE Total Funding: $612,733 Cost Share: $153,183 Project Term: September 4, 2014 - August 31, 2016 Funding Opportunity: SSL R&D Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) (DE-FOA-0000973) Project Objective This project will develop an integrated plastic

  1. ITO-free white OLEDs on Flexible Substrates with Enhanced Light Outcoupling

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy ITO-free white OLEDs on Flexible Substrates with Enhanced Light Outcoupling ITO-free white OLEDs on Flexible Substrates with Enhanced Light Outcoupling Lead Performer: Princeton University - Princeton, NJ DOE Total Funding: $1,021,241 Cost Share: $255,661 Project Term: 9/10/2014 - 9/9/2016 Funding Opportunity: SSL R&D Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) (DE-FOA-0000973) Project Objective This project will integrate multiple aspects of outcoupling enhancement

  2. R2R Production of Low-Cost Integrated OLED Substrate with Improved

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transparent Conductor and Enhanced Light Outcoupling | Department of Energy R2R Production of Low-Cost Integrated OLED Substrate with Improved Transparent Conductor and Enhanced Light Outcoupling R2R Production of Low-Cost Integrated OLED Substrate with Improved Transparent Conductor and Enhanced Light Outcoupling Lead Performer: MicroContinuum, Inc. - Cambridge, MA DOE Total Funding: $1,149,037 Project Term: April 6, 2015 - April 5, 2017 Funding Opportunity: FY2015 Phase II Release 1 SBIR

  3. Achieving Record Efficiency for Blue OLEDs by Controlling the Charge Balance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Researchers at the University of Florida (UF) have demonstrated a blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diode (OLED) with a peak power efficiency of 50 lm/W and an external quantum efficiency exceeding 20 percent at a luminance of 1,000 cd/m2, using no external light extraction techniques. This accomplishment is believed to be the world record in blue OLED efficiency.

  4. Purification and Characterization of OleA from Xanthomonas campestris and Demonstration of a Non-decarboxylative Claisen Condensation Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frias, JA; Richman, JE; Erickson, JS; Wackett, LP

    2011-03-25

    OleA catalyzes the condensation of fatty acyl groups in the first step of bacterial long-chain olefin biosynthesis, but the mechanism of the condensation reaction is controversial. In this study, OleA from Xanthomonas campestris was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The purified protein was shown to be active with fatty acyl-CoA substrates that ranged from C(8) to C(16) in length. With limiting myristoyl-CoA (C(14)), 1 mol of the free coenzyme A was released/mol of myristoyl-CoA consumed. Using [(14)C] myristoyl-CoA, the other products were identified as myristic acid, 2-myristoylmyristic acid, and 14-heptacosanone. 2-Myristoylmyristic acid was indicated to be the physiologically relevant product of OleA in several ways. First, 2-myristoylmyristic acid was the major condensed product in short incubations, but over time, it decreased with the concomitant increase of 14-heptacosanone. Second, synthetic 2-myristoylmyristic acid showed similar decarboxylation kinetics in the absence of OleA. Third, 2-myristoylmyristic acid was shown to be reactive with purified OleC and OleD to generate the olefin 14-heptacosene, a product seen in previous in vivo studies. The decarboxylation product, 14-heptacosanone, did not react with OleC and OleD to produce any demonstrable product. Substantial hydrolysis of fatty acyl-CoA substrates to the corresponding fatty acids was observed, but it is currently unclear if this occurs in vivo. In total, these data are consistent with OleA catalyzing a non-decarboxylative Claisen condensation reaction in the first step of the olefin biosynthetic pathway previously found to be present in at least 70 different bacterial strains.

  5. custom electronic circuitry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    custom electronic circuitry - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  6. OLED Fundamentals: Materials, Devices, and Processing of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blochwitz-Nimoth, Jan; Bhandari, Abhinav; Boesch, Damien; Fincher, Curtis R.; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Gotthold, David W.; Greiner, Mark T.; Kido, Junji; Kondakov, Denis; Korotkov, Roman; Krylova, Valentina A.; Loeser, Falk; Lu, Min-Hao; Lu, Zheng-Hong; Lussem, Bjorn; Moro, Lorenza; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Rostovtsev, Vsevolod V.; Sasabe, Hisahiro; Silverman, Gary; Thompson, Mark E.; Tietze, Max; Tyan, Yuan-Sheng; Weaver, Michael; Xin , Xu; Zeng, Xianghui

    2015-05-26

    What is an organic light emitting diode (OLED)? Why should we care? What are they made of? How are they made? What are the challenges in seeing these devices enter the marketplace in various applications? These are the questions we hope to answer in this book, at a level suitable for knowledgeable non-experts, graduate students and scientists and engineers working in the field who want to understand the broader context of their work. At the most basic level, an OLED is a promising new technology composed of some organic material sandwiched between two electrodes. When current is passed through the device, light is emitted. The stack of layers can be very thin and has many variations, including flexible and/or transparent. The organic material can be polymeric or composed small molecules, and may include inorganic components. The electrodes may consist of metals, metal oxides, carbon nanomaterials, or other species, though of course for light to be emitted, one electrode must be transparent. OLEDs may be fabricated on glass, metal foils, or polymer sheets (though polymeric substrates must be modified to protect the organic material from moisture or oxygen). In any event, the organic material must be protected from moisture during storage and operation. A control circuit, the exact nature of which depends on the application, drives the OLED. Nevertheless, the control circuit should have very stable current control to generate uniform light emission. OLEDs can be designed to emit a single color of light, white light, or even tunable colors. The devices can be switched on and off very rapidly, which makes them suitable for displays or for general lighting. Given the amazing complexity of the technical and design challenges for practical OLED applications, it is not surprising that applications are still somewhat limited. Although organic electroluminescence is more than 50 years old, the modern OLED field is really only about half that age – with the first high-efficiency OLED demonstrated in 1987. Thus, we expect to see exciting advances in the science, technology and commercialization in the coming years. We hope that this book helps to advance the field in some small way. Contributors to this monograph are experts from top academic institutions, industry and national laboratories who provide comprehensive and up-to-date coverage of the rapidly evolving field of OLEDs. Furthermore, this monograph collects in one place, for the first time, key topics across the field of OLEDs, from fundamental chemistry and physics, to practical materials science and engineering topics, to aspects of design and manufacturing. The monograph synthesizes and puts into context information scattered throughout the literature for easy review in one book. The scope of the monograph reflects the necessity to focus on new technological challenges brought about by the transition to manufacturing. In the Section 1, all materials of construction of the OLED device are covered, from substrate to encapsulation. In Section 2, for the first time, additional challenges in devices and processing are addressed. This book is geared towards a broad audience, including materials scientists, device physicists, synthetic chemists and electrical engineers. Furthermore, this book makes a great introduction to scientists in industry and academia, as well as graduate students interested in applied aspects of photophysics and electrochemistry in organic thin films. This book is a comprehensive source for OLED R&D professionals from all backgrounds and institutions.

  7. TSD Custom Construction | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TSD Custom Construction Jump to: navigation, search Name: TSD Custom Construction Place: Madison, WI Website: www.tsdcustomconstruction.com References: TSD Custom Construction1...

  8. Permanent polarization and charge distribution in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs): Insights from near-infrared charge-modulation spectroscopy of an operating OLED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchetti, Alfred P.; Haskins, Terri L.; Young, Ralph H.; Rothberg, Lewis J.

    2014-03-21

    Vapor-deposited Alq{sub 3} layers typically possess a strong permanent electrical polarization, whereas NPB layers do not. (Alq{sub 3} is tris(8-quinolinolato)aluminum(III); NPB is 4,4?-bis[N-(1-naphthyl)-N-phenylamino]biphenyl.) The cause is a net orientation of the Alq{sub 3} molecules with their large dipole moments. Here we report on consequences for an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) with an NPB hole-transport layer and Alq{sub 3} electron-transport layer. The discontinuous polarization at the NPB|Alq{sub 3} interface has the same effect as a sheet of immobile negative charge there. It is more than compensated by a large concentration of injected holes (NPB{sup +}) when the OLED is running. We discuss the implications and consequences for the quantum efficiency and the drive voltage of this OLED and others. We also speculate on possible consequences of permanent polarization in organic photovoltaic devices. The concentration of NPB{sup +} was measured by charge-modulation spectroscopy (CMS) in the near infrared, where the NPB{sup +} has a strong absorption band, supplemented by differential-capacitance and current-voltage measurements. Unlike CMS in the visible, this method avoids complications from modulation of the electroluminescence and electroabsorption.

  9. Potential

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Potential and Frictional Drag on a Floating Sphere in a Flowing Plasma I. H. Hutchinson Plasma Science and Fusion Center Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA...

  10. Application of Developed APCVD Transparent Conducting Oxides and Undercoat Technologies for Economical OLED Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Silverman; Bluhm, Martin; Coffey, James; Korotkov, Roman; Polsz, Craig; Salemi, Alexandre; Smith, Robert; Smith, Ryan; Stricker, Jeff; Xu,Chen; Shirazi, Jasmine; Papakonstantopulous, George; Carson, Steve Philips Lighting GmbH Goldman, Claudia; Hartmann, Sren; Jessen, Frank; Krogmann, Bianca; Rickers, Christoph; Ruske, Manfred, Schwab, Holger; Bertram, Dietrich

    2011-01-02

    Economics is a key factor for application of organic light emitting diodes (OLED) in general lighting relative to OLED flat panel displays that can handle high cost materials such as indium tin oxide (ITO) or Indium zinc oxide (IZO) as the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) on display glass. However, for OLED lighting to penetrate into general illumination, economics and sustainable materials are critical. The issues with ITO have been documented at the DOE SSL R&D and Manufacturing workshops for the last 5 years and the issue is being exaserbated by export controls from China (one of the major sources of elemental indium). Therefore, ITO is not sustainable because of the fluctuating costs and the United States (US) dependency on other nations such as China. Numerous alternatives to ITO/IZO are being evaluated such as Ag nanoparticles/nanowires, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and other metal oxides. Of these other metal oxides, doped zinc oxide has attracted a lot of attention over the last 10 years. The volume of zinc mined is a factor of 80,000 greater than indium and the US has significant volumes of zinc mined domestically, resulting in the ability for the US to be self-sufficient for this element that can be used in optoelectonic applications. The costs of elemental zinc is over 2 orders of magnitude less than indium, reflecting the relative abundance and availablility of the elements. Arkema Inc. and an international primary glass manufacturing company, which is located in the United States, have developed doped zinc oxide technology for solar control windows. The genesis of this DOE SSL project was to determine if doped zinc oxide technology can be taken from the commodity based window market and translate the technology to OLED lighting. Thus, Arkema Inc. sought out experts, Philips Lighting, Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) and National Renewable Research Laboratories (NREL), in OLED devices and brought them into the project. This project had a clear focus on economics and the work plan focused both on doped ZnO process and OLED device structure that would be consistent with the new TCO. The team successfully made 6 inch OLEDs with a serial construction. More process development is required to optimize commercial OLED structures. Feasibility was demonstrated on two different light extraction technologies: 1/4 lambda refractive index matching and high-low-high band pass filter. Process development was also completed on the key precursors for the TCO, which are ready for pilot-plant scale-up. Subsequently, Arkema has developed a cost of ownership model that is consistent with DOE SSL R&D Manufacturing targets as outlined in the DOE SSL R&D Manufacturing 2010 report. The overall outcome of this project was the demonstration that doped zinc oxide can be used for OLED devices without a drop-off in performance while gaining the economic and sustainable benefits of a more readily available TCO. The broad impact of this project, is the facilitation of OLED lighting market penetration into general illumination, resulting in significant energy savings, decreased greenhouse emissions, with no environmental impact issues such as mercury found in Fluorescent technology.

  11. Economic Potential of CHP in Detroit Edison Service Area: The...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economic Potential of CHP in Detroit Edison Service Area: The Customer Perspective, June 2003 Economic Potential of CHP in Detroit Edison Service Area: The Customer Perspective, ...

  12. Experiences from the Consumer Behavior Studies on Engaging Customers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... to customers in prepay plans, in light of the risk of loss of consumer protections. ... A related obstacle is the potential lack of "elasticity" in energy demand for many ...

  13. Application of Developed APCVD Transparent Conducting Oxides and Undercoat Technologies for Economical OLED Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin Bluhm; James Coffey; Roman Korotkov; Craig Polsz; Alexandre Salemi; Robert Smith; Ryan Smith; Jeff Stricker; Chen Xu; Jasmine Shirazi; George Papakonstantopulous; Steve Carson; Claudia Goldman; Soren Hartmann; Frank Jessen; Bianca Krogmann; Christoph Rickers; Manfred Ruske; Holger Schwab; Dietrich Bertram

    2011-01-02

    Economics is a key factor for application of organic light emitting diodes (OLED) in general lighting relative to OLED flat panel displays that can handle high cost materials such as indium tin oxide (ITO) or Indium zinc oxide (IZO) as the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) on display glass. However, for OLED lighting to penetrate into general illumination, economics and sustainable materials are critical. The issues with ITO have been documented at the DOE SSL R&D and Manufacturing workshops for the last 5 years and the issue is being exacerbated by export controls from China (one of the major sources of elemental indium). Therefore, ITO is not sustainable because of the fluctuating costs and the United States (US) dependency on other nations such as China. Numerous alternatives to ITO/IZO are being evaluated such as Ag nanoparticles/nanowires, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and other metal oxides. Of these other metal oxides, doped zinc oxide has attracted a lot of attention over the last 10 years. The volume of zinc mined is a factor of 80,000 greater than indium and the US has significant volumes of zinc mined domestically, resulting in the ability for the US to be self-sufficient for this element that can be used in optoelectronic applications. The costs of elemental zinc is over 2 orders of magnitude less than indium, reflecting the relative abundance and availability of the elements. Arkema Inc. and an international primary glass manufacturing company, which is located in the United States, have developed doped zinc oxide technology for solar control windows. The genesis of this DOE SSL project was to determine if doped zinc oxide technology can be taken from the commodity based window market and translate the technology to OLED lighting. Thus, Arkema Inc. sought out experts, Philips Lighting, Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) and National Renewable Research Laboratories (NREL), in OLED devices and brought them into the project. This project had a clear focus on economics and the work plan focused both on doped ZnO process and OLED device structure that would be consistent with the new TCO. The team successfully made 6 inch OLEDs with a serial construction. More process development is required to optimize commercial OLED structures. Feasibility was demonstrated on two different light extraction technologies: 1/4 lambda refractive index matching and high-low-high band pass filter. Process development was also completed on the key precursors for the TCO, which are ready for pilot-plant scale-up. Subsequently, Arkema has developed a cost of ownership model that is consistent with DOE SSL R&D Manufacturing targets as outlined in the DOE SSL R&D Manufacturing 2010 report. The overall outcome of this project was the demonstration that doped zinc oxide can be used for OLED devices without a drop-off in performance while gaining the economic and sustainable benefits of a more readily available TCO. The broad impact of this project, is the facilitation of OLED lighting market penetration into general illumination, resulting in significant energy savings, decreased greenhouse emissions, with no environmental impact issues such as mercury found in Fluorescent technology. The primary objective of this project was to develop a commercially viable process for 'Substrates' (Substrate/ undercoat/ TCO topcoat) to be used in production of OLED devices (lamps/luminaries/modules). This project focused on using Arkema's recently developed doped ZnO technology for the Fenestration industry and applying the technology to the OLED lighting industry. The secondary objective was the use of undercoat technology to improve light extraction from the OLED device. In optical fields and window applications, technology has been developed to mitigate reflection losses by selecting appropriate thicknesses and refractive indices of coatings applied either below or above the functional layer of interest. This technology has been proven and implemented in the fenestration industry for more than 15 years. Successful completion of this project would provide doped ZnO coated on inexpensive soda lime glass resulting in a significantly lower cost relative to the current ITO coated Flat Panel Display Glass substrates. Additional benefits will be a more consistent TCO that does not need an activation step with better optical performance. Clearly, this will serve to enhance penetration of OLED technologies into the lighting market.

  14. Southern California Edison`s approach to improving office energy use among its customers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duvall-Ward, J.

    1995-12-01

    Southern California Edison (SCE) has 500,000 commercial/industrial/agriculturaI customers and 3.6 million residential customers. As part of a continuing effort to develop programs which encourage customers to use energy-efficient technology, SCE began exploring ways to improve office energy use by its customers. The utility examined the type of equipment it should pursue with the customers, the potential energy savings, and the percent of influence SCE thought it could have on the customer. The program was implemented on August 2, 1994.

  15. Solution-Procesed Small-Molecule OLED Luminaire for Interior Illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Ian

    2012-02-29

    Prototype lighting panels and luminaires were fabricated using DuPont Displays solution-processed small-molecule OLED technology. These lighting panels were based on a spatially-patterned, 3-color design, similar in concept to an OLED display panel, with materials chosen to maximize device efficacy. The majority of the processing steps take place in air (rather than high vacuum). Optimization of device architecture, processing and construction was undertaken, with a final prototype design of 50 cm{sup 2} being fabricated and tested. Performance of these panels reached 35 lm/W at illuminant-A. A unique feature of this technology is the ability to color tune the emission, and color temperatures ranging from 2700 to > 6,500K were attained in the final build. Significant attention was paid to low-cost fabrication techniques.

  16. Stacked white OLED having separate red, green and blue sub-elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen; Qi, Xiangfei; Slootsky, Michael

    2014-07-01

    The present invention relates to efficient organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). The devices employ three emissive sub-elements, typically emitting red, green and blue, to sufficiently cover the visible spectrum. Thus, the devices may be white-emitting OLEDs, or WOLEDs. Each sub-element comprises at least one organic layer which is an emissive layer--i.e., the layer is capable of emitting light when a voltage is applied across the stacked device. The sub-elements are vertically stacked and are separated by charge generating layers. The charge-generating layers are layers that inject charge carriers into the adjacent layer(s) but do not have a direct external connection.

  17. Santee Cooper- Business Custom Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Santee Cooper has developed a Business Custom Rebate as part of their Reduce the Use: Business Prescriptive Rebate Program, which was designed to reduce a business's overall electricity use.

  18. 2014 Total Electric Industry- Customers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Customers (Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A, 4B, 4D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total New England 6,243,013 862,269 28,017 8 ...

  19. "2014 Total Electric Industry- Customers"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Customers" "(Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A, 4B, 4D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U)" "State","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "New England",6243013,8...

  20. Industrial Customer Perspectives on Utility Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Customer Perspectives on Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Industrial Customer Perspectives on Utility Energy Efficiency Programs These presentations from ATK Aerospace Systems, ...

  1. 2012 SEPA Customer Brochure | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2012 SEPA Customer Brochure 2012 SEPA Customer Brochure Southeastern Power Administration 2012 Customer Brochure PDF icon 2012 SEPA Customer Brochure More Documents & Publications Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources Southeastern Power Administration 2008 Annual Report Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee

  2. DuPont Displays Develops Low-Cost Method of Printing OLED Panels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DuPont Displays Inc. (DDI) has developed a novel way of printing color-tunable OLED lighting panels that keeps manufacturing costs low. The method involves processing the organic layers from solution, with most of the process steps taking place under atmospheric conditions rather than in a high vacuum. Industry-standard slot-coating methods are used in conjunction with nozzle printing—in which the solutions of organic materials are continuously jetted through an array of nozzles moving at high speed—allowing the light-emitting materials to be spatially patterned.

  3. Custom Coolers: Order (2013-CE-5315)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Custom Coolers, LLC to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Custom Coolers had failed to certify that certain models of walk-in cooler and freezer components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  4. Custom Organic Electronics Out of the Printer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Custom Organic Electronics Out of the Printer Custom Organic Electronics Out of the Printer Print Thursday, 03 December 2015 12:14 They are thin, light-weight, flexible, and can be...

  5. ,,,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Technologies" ,,,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"En...

  6. Future Power Systems 21 - The Smart Customer | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Future Power Systems 21 - The Smart Customer Future Power Systems 21 - The Smart Customer Future Power Systems 21 - The Smart Customer: From Future Power Systems (FPS) articles 18...

  7. 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Appendices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appendices A Report Prepared for the US Department of Energy February 2002 By TecMRKT Works and Sandia National Laboratories TecMRKT Works Nicholas P. Hall John H. Reed Ph.D Thomas P. Talerico Jeff Riggert Andrew Oh And Sandia National Laboratories Gretchen Jordan FEMP Customer Survey Appendices Table of Contents Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS I LIST OF FIGURES II LIST OF TABLES III APPENDIX A: SURVEY INSTRUMENT 1 APPENDIX B: DETAILED REPONSES 42 1. Participant and Nonparticipant Profiles

  8. Streamline Service Delivery via Customer Communication and Contractor...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Streamline Service Delivery via Customer Communication and Contractor Coordination Streamline Service Delivery via Customer Communication and Contractor Coordination Better ...

  9. Project Profile: Understanding the Evolution of Customer Motivations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Understanding the Evolution of Customer Motivations and Adoption Barriers in Residential Photovoltaics Markets Project Profile: Understanding the Evolution of Customer ...

  10. Becoming a new Hanford Customer - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Becoming a new Hanford Customer About Us Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Program What's New Acceptance Criteria Acceptance Process Becoming a new Hanford Customer Annual Waste Forecast and Funding Arrangements Waste Stream Approval Waste Shipment Approval Waste Receipt Quality Assurance Program Waste Specification Records Tools Points of Contact Becoming a new Hanford Customer Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size The DOE Headquarters, and the

  11. Fabrication and Characterization of New Hybrid Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED): Europium-picrate-triethylene oxide Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarjidan, M. A. Mohd; Abu Zakaria, N. Z. A.; Abd. Majid, W. H. [Solid State Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Kusrini, Eny; Saleh, M. I. [School of Chemical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia)

    2009-07-07

    Thin-film light emitting devices based on organic materials have attracted vast interest in applications such as light emitting diode (LED) and flat-panel display. The organic material can be attached with inorganic material to enhance the performance of the light emitting device. A hybrid OLED based on a new complex of europium picrate (Eu-pic) with triethylene oxide (EO3) ligand is fabricated. The OLED is fabricated by using spin coating technique with acetone as the solvent and aluminum as the top electrode. The optical, photoluminescence (PL) and electrical properties of the sample are carried out by UV-Vis spectroscopy (Jasco V-750), luminescence spectroscopy (Perkin Elmer LS-500) and source measure unit (SMU)(Keithly), respectively.

  12. Residential Energy Efficiency Customer Service Best Practices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Residential Energy Efficiency Customer Service Best Practices, call slides and discussion summary, January 22, 2015.

  13. Idaho Power- Large Commercial Custom Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Large commercial and industrial Idaho Power customers that reduce energy usage through more efficient electrical commercial and industrial processes may qualify for an incentive that is the lesser...

  14. Customer Information and Behavior Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Customer Information and Behavior Working Group

    2012-11-15

    Provides an overview of how state policymakers, utilities, and regulators can overcome barriers to deploying customer energy information and feedback strategies.

  15. BPA Response to Customer Comments-EBBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Integration Team Responses to Customer Comments Received on BPA's Proposed Enhanced BPA Balancing Authority (EBBA) - 61212 Table of Contents 1. Market-based Mechanisms...

  16. Keep Customers-and Energy-From Slipping Through the Cracks |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to potential customers who got lost in the shuffle of sign-up sheets and assessment forms. ... says Glick. "Go back to those who got lost and personally walk them through the process." ...

  17. Impact of information and communications technologies on residental customer energy services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.; Kempton, W.; Eide, A.; Iyer, M.

    1996-10-01

    This study analyzes the potential impact of information and communications technologies on utility delivery of residential customer energy services. Many utilities are conducting trials which test energy-related and non-energy services using advanced communications systems.

  18. Structurally Integrated Photoluminescence-Based Lactate Sensor Using Organic Light Emitting Devices (OLEDs) as the Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chengliang Qian

    2006-08-09

    Multianalyte bio(chemical) sensors are extensively researched for monitoring analytes in complex systems, such as blood serum. As a step towards developing such multianalyte sensors, we studied a novel, structurally integrated, organic light emitting device (OLED)-based sensing platform for detection of lactate. Lactate biosensors have attracted numerous research efforts, due to their wide applications in clinical diagnosis, athletic training and food industry. The OLED-based sensor is based on monitoring the oxidation reaction of lactate, which is catalyzed by the lactate oxidase (LOX) enzyme. The sensing component is based on an oxygen-sensitive dye, Platinum octaethyl porphyrin (PtOEP), whose photoluminescence (PL) lifetime {tau} decreases as the oxygen level increases. The PtOEP dye was embedded in a thin film polystyrene (PS) matrix; the LOX was dissolved in solution or immobilized in a sol-gel matrix. {tau} was measured as a function of the lactate concentration; as the lactate concentration increases, {tau} increases due to increased oxygen consumption. The sensors performance is discussed in terms of the detection sensitivity, dynamic range, and response time. A response time of {approx}32 sec was achieved when the LOX was dissolved in solution and kept in a closed cell. Steps towards development of a multianalyte sensor array using an array of individually addressable OLED pixels were also presented.

  19. Duke Energy Carolinas Customer Scale Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Duke Energy Carolinas' Customer Scale Solar Rebate Program, a part of Duke Energy's voluntary Distributed Energy Resource Program,  was approved by an order issued on July 15, 2015.

  20. SCE&G- Customer Scale Solar Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South Carolina Electric & Gas (SCE&G) Customer Scale Solar Rebate Program, a part of SCE&G's voluntary Distributed Energy Resource Program, was approved by an order issued on July 15,...

  1. Energy Bundle Bonus (WPS Customers Only)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The program website provides an explanation of the term "unrelated projects." In order to collect bonus incentives, customers should fill out the bonus incentive package and attach it to the appr...

  2. AEP Appalachian Power- Non-Residential Custom Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Appalachian Power Custom C&I program offers custom incentives for some of the more common energy efficiency measures. Program incentives are available under the Custom C&I program to ...

  3. Custom Organic Electronics Out of the Printer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Custom Organic Electronics Out of the Printer Custom Organic Electronics Out of the Printer Print Thursday, 03 December 2015 12:14 They are thin, light-weight, flexible, and can be produced cost- and energy-efficiently: printed microelectronic components made of synthetics. Flexible displays and touch screens, glowing films, RFID tags, and solar cells represent future markets. An international team of researchers has now observed the creation of razor-thin polymer electrodes during the printing

  4. Experiences from the Consumer Behavior Studies on Engaging Customers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Experiences from the Consumer Behavior Studies on Engaging Customers (September 2014) Experiences from the Consumer Behavior Studies on Engaging Customers (September 2014) One of ...

  5. Using Mobile Applications to Generate Customer Demand | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Using Mobile Applications to Generate Customer Demand Using Mobile Applications to Generate Customer Demand Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Using...

  6. Impacts of Energy Efficiency Programs on Customer Satisfaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-11-01

    Provides data from nationwide utility customer satisfaction surveys and two case studies to encourage utilities to offer high-quality energy efficiency programs and services for their customers.

  7. V-152: Cisco Unified Customer Voice Portal (CVP) Multiple Vulnerabilit...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: Cisco Unified Customer Voice Portal (CVP) Multiple Vulnerabilities V-152: Cisco Unified Customer Voice Portal (CVP) Multiple Vulnerabilities May 9, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis...

  8. National Grid (Electric)- Large Commercial Energy Efficiency Custom Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Construction Custom Program: National Grid’s new construction program offers energy strategies, technical assistance and financial incentives to customers who are building new facilities,...

  9. So you have customers signed up to participate, now what?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Efficiency Programs Conference Call December 21, 2011 Facilitated by Summer Goodwin, BPA LESSONS LEARNED ON HOW TO KEEP CUSTOMERS ENGAGED So you have customers signed up to...

  10. Sandia Energy - Customer Interface Document for the Molten Salt...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Customer Interface Document for the Molten Salt Test Loop at the NSTTF Home Partnership News News & Events Publications Customer Interface Document for the Molten Salt Test Loop at...

  11. Green marketing, renewables, and free riders: increasing customer demand for a public good

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Pickle, S.

    1997-09-01

    Retail electricity competition will allow customers to select their own power suppliers and some customers will make purchase decisions based, in part, on their concern for the environment. Green power marketing targets these customers under the assumption that they will pay a premium for ``green`` energy products such as renewable power generation. But renewable energy is not a traditional product because it supplies public goods; for example, a customer supporting renewable energy is unable to capture the environmental benefits that their investment provides to non-participating customers. As with all public goods, there is a risk that few customers will purchase ``green`` power and that many will instead ``free ride`` on others` participation. By free riding, an individual is able to enjoy the benefits of the public good while avoiding payment. This report reviews current green power marketing activities in the electric industry, introduces the extensive academic literature on public goods, free riders, and collective action problems, and explores in detail the implications of this literature for the green marketing of renewable energy. Specifically, the authors highlight the implications of the public goods literature for green power product design and marketing communications strategies. They emphasize four mechanisms that marketers can use to increase customer demand for renewable energy. Though the public goods literature can also contribute insights into the potential rationale for renewable energy policies, they leave most of these implications for future work (see Appendix A for a possible research agenda).

  12. Keeping It Simple from the Customer's Perspective - Residential Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design | Department of Energy It Simple from the Customer's Perspective - Residential Program Design Keeping It Simple from the Customer's Perspective - Residential Program Design Provides information on residential program design, target audiences, marketing strategies, and community partnerships, from the Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance. PDF icon Keeping It Simple from the Customer's Perspective More Documents & Publications Streamline Service Delivery via Customer Communication and

  13. Customer Services Handbook, 2010, Office of Administration | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Customer Services Handbook, 2010, Office of Administration Customer Services Handbook, 2010, Office of Administration Customer Services Handbook PDF icon Customer Services Handbook, 2010, Office of Administration More Documents & Publications HQ FNVA Questionnaire Property Representatives Lists - HQ Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 1, Physical Security

  14. Customer Participation in the Smart Grid: Lessons Learned (September 2014)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Customer Participation in the Smart Grid: Lessons Learned (September 2014) Customer Participation in the Smart Grid: Lessons Learned (September 2014) Effective customer education and outreach are key ingredients for Smart Grid success. Smart meter and customer system programs involve complicated equipment and often require customers to "climb learning curves" that necessitate extensive communication and education. Utilities must be prepared to dedicate

  15. Office of Headquarters Procurement Services - Employee Customer Service

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Standards | Department of Energy Office of Headquarters Procurement Services - Employee Customer Service Standards Office of Headquarters Procurement Services - Employee Customer Service Standards CUSTOMER FOCUS The Office of Headquarters Procurement Services (MA-64) serves a variety of customers in the performance of its acquisition and financial assistance mission. Primary among its many customers is each of the Department of Energy Headquarters program offices. MA-64 continually seeks to

  16. Applying vitrification to meet customers` values

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, B. [Scientific Ecology Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Cost-effective waste management solutions that maximize customer value require a thorough and flexible evaluation and integration of approaches, technology applications, and disposal options. This is particulary true in the application of vitrification to low-level radioactive and mixed waste stabilization. Case-specific evaluations are the required to determine the highest value, most cost-effective approaches.

  17. Customer Choice Would Advance Renewable Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Customer Choice Would Advance Renewable Energy Golden, Colo., Oct. 31, 2001 Giving consumers a greater choice of how their electricity is generated could boost solar, wind and other "green power" sources 40 percent by the end of the decade, according to a new study by two U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories. Achieving such a result, however, would require an orderly transition to competitive power markets and a significant expansion of the green pricing programs currently

  18. Modesto Irrigation District- Custom Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The MPower Custom Rebate Program is available to larger commercial, industrial or agricultural customers that replace existing equipment or systems with high efficiency equipment.  To be eligible...

  19. U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Announces Automation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Announces Automation of Form I-94 ArrivalDeparture Record U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) will begin automation of the I-94 records on...

  20. Now Available - Customer Participation in the Smart Grid: Lessons Learned |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Available - Customer Participation in the Smart Grid: Lessons Learned Now Available - Customer Participation in the Smart Grid: Lessons Learned October 15, 2014 - 1:18pm Addthis The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability has released a new report titled "Customer Participation in the Smart Grid: Lessons Learned." The report highlights the experiences of four Recovery Act Smart Grid Investment Grant projects with customer education and outreach

  1. Puget Sound Energy - Energy Efficiency Custom Retrofit Grant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Custom Retrofit Grant Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Nonprofit State Government Federal Government Savings Category Lighting Chillers Furnaces...

  2. Future Power Systems 21 - The Smart Customer | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 - The Smart Customer Future Power Systems 21 - The Smart Customer Future Power Systems 21 - The Smart Customer: From Future Power Systems (FPS) articles 18 and 19 we can see that there are a number of different trading and tariff mechanisms which can be employed on the utility to customer interface to enable participation. From article 20 we see that there will be different pricing profiles on similar day types due to changes in availability of renewable generation. PDF icon Future Power

  3. California Customer Load Reductions during the Electricity Crisis...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentcalifornia-customer-load-reductions-d Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: MandatesTargets This report details the...

  4. Customer Participation in the Smart Grid - Lessons Learned

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ......... 10 5. Call Centers, Web Portals, and Customer Devices ... communicating thermostats, and web portals-require effective communications ...

  5. Guideline For Retrieving Customer Usage Data From Utilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar, held on Dec. 16, 2010, provides information for utilities interested in retrieving data on customer usage.

  6. 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Report (Appendices) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appendices) 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Report (Appendices) Appendix A: Survey Instrument Appendix B: Detailed Responses Appendix C: Adoption and Diffusion of Innovations PDF icon Appendices More Documents & Publications 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Report (Summary Report) 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Report (Main Report

  7. 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Report (Main Report) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Main Report) 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Report (Main Report) This summary presents the key findings and recommendations from the 2001 FEMP customer survey. The key findings presented in this summary are a condensed presentation of the more detailed findings presented in each of the chapters. PDF icon Study Report More Documents & Publications 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Report (Summary

  8. 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Report (Summary Report) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summary Report) 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Report (Summary Report) The study was targeted to collect information from the average FEMP customer. As a result, the respondents in this survey represent 27 different federal agencies and a group of private contractors who have contracts with one or more federal agencies PDF icon Summary Report More Documents & Publications 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Report (Main

  9. Homeostatic control: the utility/customer marketplace for electric power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweppe, F.C.; Tabors, R.D.; Kirtley, J.L.

    1981-09-01

    A load management system is proposed in which the electric utility customer controls his on-site power demand to coincide with the lowest possible cost of power generation. Called Homeostatic Control, this method is founded on feedback between the customer and the utility and on customer independence. The utility has no control beyond the customer's meter. Computers located at the customer's site are continuously fed data on weather conditions, utility generating costs, and demand requirements for space conditioning, lighting, and appliances. The customer then directs the computer to schedule and control the power allotted for these functions. On-site generation by the customer can be incorporated in the system. It is argued that homeostatic control is technically feasible, that the level of control equipment sophistication can be adapted to the benefits received by the customer, that such a system would encourage the use of customer-site energy storage and energy conservation equipment, and that it represents a realistic method for allowing the customer to decide how he will use electric power during an era of increasing costs for power generation. (LCL)

  10. Custom VLSI circuits for high energy physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, S.

    1998-06-01

    This article provides a brief guide to integrated circuits, including their design, fabrication, testing, radiation hardness, and packaging. It was requested by the Panel on Instrumentation, Innovation, and Development of the International Committee for Future Accelerators, as one of a series of articles on instrumentation for future experiments. Their original request emphasized a description of available custom circuits and a set of recommendations for future developments. That has been done, but while traps that stop charge in solid-state devices are well known, those that stop physicists trying to develop the devices are not. Several years spent dodging the former and developing the latter made clear the need for a beginner`s guide through the maze, and that is the main purpose of this text.

  11. Department of Energy Customer Service Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Customer Service Plan Department of Energy Customer Service Plan The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) strives to ensure America's security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental, and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions. Through this work, the Department serves a range of internal and external customers including DOE's employee and contractor workforce, students, scientists and researchers, businesses and other branches of

  12. Unlocking Customer Value: The Virtual Power Plant | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unlocking Customer Value: The Virtual Power Plant Unlocking Customer Value: The Virtual Power Plant The utility world has changed drastically in the last 10 years. New technologies like Smart Meters and fully functional Smart Grid concepts have made large inroads into the utility space and no one should want to be left behind. Utilities also face additional pressures from regulatory bodies who are continuing to encourage carbon reduction and greater customer flexibility. Utilities need to

  13. Using Mobile Applications to Generate Customer Demand | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Mobile Applications to Generate Customer Demand Using Mobile Applications to Generate Customer Demand Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Using Mobile Applications to Generate Customer Demand, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, March 12, 2015. PDF icon Call Slides and Discussion Summary More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Network View | October 2014 Incorporating Behavior Change Efforts Into Energy Efficiency Programs Outreach to Multifamily

  14. Voices of Experience: Insights on Smart Grid Customer Engagement (July

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2013) | Department of Energy Experience: Insights on Smart Grid Customer Engagement (July 2013) Voices of Experience: Insights on Smart Grid Customer Engagement (July 2013) The success of the Smart Grid will depend in part on consumers taking a more proactive role in managing their energy use. This document is the result of a nine-month effort to compile information on the successful approaches used by utilities to engage customers regarding smart grid technology deployments. Voices of

  15. BOULDER COUNTY CUSTOMERS GET ENERGYSMART AND SAVE | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BOULDER COUNTY CUSTOMERS GET ENERGYSMART AND SAVE BOULDER COUNTY CUSTOMERS GET ENERGYSMART AND SAVE BOULDER COUNTY CUSTOMERS GET ENERGYSMART AND SAVE Of the $25 million grant that Boulder County, Colorado, received through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), funding was allocated to three different entities: Boulder County, Garfield County, and the City and County of Denver. This funding helped to develop EnergySmart, an energy efficiency program that focuses on reducing barriers to energy

  16. Duke Energy Progress Customer Scale Solar Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Duke Energy Progress' Customer Scale Solar Rebate Program, a part of Duke Energy's voluntary Distributed Energy Resource Program, was approved by an order issued on July 15, 2015.

  17. Industrial Customer Perspectives on Utility Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These presentations from ATK Aerospace Systems, Owens Corning, and Ingersoll Rand provide context for industrial customer perspectives on utility energy efficiency programs.

  18. Eastport Customs Brokers Win Small Business Award | Jefferson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cynthia Keppel Jefferson Lab Chief Operating Officer Mike Dallas presents Eastport Customs ... Lab's Chief Operating Officer, Mike Dallas, said, "It takes diverse resources and ...

  19. Keeping It Simple from the Customer's Perspective - Residential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Keeping It Simple from the Customer's Perspective - Residential Program Design Provides information on residential program design, target audiences, marketing strategies, and ...

  20. Customer Value Proposition Smart Grid (KEL) (Smart Grid Project...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Smart Grid Projects Smart Grid Projects in Europe Smart Grid Projects - Smart Meter and AMI Smart Grid Projects - Home application Smart Grid Projects - Customer Behavior...

  1. DOE GC Joins Customs Service Trade Data System to Strengthen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of its energy conservation regulations thus ensuring that foreign manufacturers have to follow the same rules as domestic manufacturers. DOE and Customs are also working to...

  2. Responsive pricing for retail competition - a customer perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meade, D.

    1994-12-31

    Market forces have motivated utility customers to institute a work process improvement program which has resulted in reorganizations, increased market focus, re-engineering and cost reductions. The market has also provided motivation to look for new and creative ways to work with customers and suppliers. Factors involved in competitive power sourcing strategies which play a role in customer decisions are discussed. Electricity users need efficient, flexible, customer-focused suppliers and a choice of competitively priced electrical service. Government and regulatory policy needs to support and encourgage competitive actions by utilities so that they can effectively participate in the evolving market.

  3. Nevada Renewable Energy Application For Net Metering Customers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Renewable Energy Application For Net Metering Customers Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Nevada Renewable Energy Application For Net...

  4. Evaluating Electric Vehicle Charging Impacts and Customer Charging...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluating Electric Vehicle Charging Impacts and Customer Charging Behaviors: Experiences from Six Smart Grid Investment Grant Projects (December 2014) Evaluating Electric Vehicle ...

  5. Making the most of Responsive Electricity Customer. Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Making the most of Responsive Electricity Customer. Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: How do we make the most out of using less energy? Making the most of Responsive ...

  6. Net Requirements Transparency Process for Slice/Block Customers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4, 2012 Net Requirements Transparency Process for SliceBlock Customers Description of Changes and a Response to Comments September 24, 2012 Background and Description of Changes:...

  7. NIPSCO Custom Commercial and Industrial Gas and Electric Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NIPSCO’s Commercial and Industrial Custom Electric and Natural Gas Incentive Program offers financial incentives to qualifying large commercial, industrial, non-profit, governmental and...

  8. CET2001 Customer Led Network Revolution (Smart Grid Project)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Europe Smart Grid Projects - Smart Meter and AMI Smart Grid Projects - Grid Automation Distribution Smart Grid Projects - Home application Smart Grid Projects - Customer...

  9. Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Custom, HVAC and Motor Business...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Water Heaters Chillers Heat Pumps Air conditioners Heat recovery Compressed air Motor VFDs Agricultural Equipment CustomOthers pending approval Other EE Tankless Water...

  10. Customizing pays off in steam generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganapathy, V. (ABCO Industries, Inc., Abilene, TX (United States))

    1995-01-01

    Packaged steam generators are the workhorses of chemical process plants, power plants and cogeneration systems. They are available as oil- or gas-fired models, and are used to generate either high-pressure superheated steam (400 to 1,200 psig, at 500 to 900 F) or saturated steam at low pressures (100 to 300 psig). In today's emission- and efficiency- conscious environment, steam generators have to be custom designed. Gone are the days when a boiler supplier--or for that matter an end user--could look up a model number from a list of standard sizes and select one for a particular need. Thus, before selecting a system, it is desirable to know the features of oil- and gas-fired steam generators, and the important variables that influence their selection, design and performance. It is imperative that all of these data are supplied to the boiler supplier so that the engineers may come up with the right design. Some of the parameters which are discussed in this paper are: duty, steam temperature, steam purity, emissions, and furnace design. Superheaters, economizers, and overall performance are also discussed.

  11. Customer adoption of small-scale on-site power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Rubio, F. Javier

    2001-04-01

    The electricity supply system is undergoing major regulatory and technological change with significant implications for the way in which the sector will operate (including its patterns of carbon emissions) and for the policies required to ensure socially and environmentally desirable outcomes. One such change stems from the rapid emergence of viable small-scale (i.e., smaller than 500 kW) generators that are potentially competitive with grid delivered electricity, especially in combined heat and power configurations. Such distributed energy resources (DER) may be grouped together with loads in microgrids. These clusters could operate semi-autonomously from the established power system, or macrogrid, matching power quality and reliability more closely to local end-use requirements. In order to establish a capability for analyzing the effect that microgrids may have on typical commercial customers, such as office buildings, restaurants, shopping malls, and grocery stores, an economic mod el of DER adoption is being developed at Berkeley Lab. This model endeavors to indicate the optimal quantity and type of small on-site generation technologies that customers could employ given their electricity requirements. For various regulatory schemes and general economic conditions, this analysis produces a simple operating schedule for any installed generators. Early results suggest that many commercial customers can benefit economically from on-site generation, even without considering potential combined heat and power and reliability benefits, even though they are unlikely to disconnect from the established power system.

  12. November 16, 2005 Letter from Paul Norman to Customers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    O&M: The costs of the Federal hydro system compare well in North American hydro benchmarking studies. However, as suggested by customers during the Power Function Review, we...

  13. New Tool Yields Custom Environmental Data for Lifecycle Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A new, free online tool developed by a Department of Energy laboratory allows users to customize and analyze the environmental impact of various fuels before they are used to create power.

  14. High temperature solid oxide fuel cell: Customer test units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, E.R.; Veyo, S.E.

    1993-11-01

    There are three 25-kW class SOFC customer test unit programs; two are in Japan (utility joint ventures), one for Southern California Edison Co. The two in Japan are described: Startup, testing, modifications, and operational performance are discussed.

  15. COMMENTS OF THE SLICE CUSTOMERS ON THE REGIONAL DIALOGUE DRAFT...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slice Customers are unable to state that they agree with the substance of this proposed language. It is suggested that BPA delete this paragraph from Slice Contract in its...

  16. Category:Smart Grid Projects - Customer Systems | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Customer Systems" The following 5 pages are in this category, out of 5 total. C City of Tallahassee Smart Grid Project H Honeywell International, Inc Smart Grid Project I...

  17. 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Study Report: April 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-01-18

    This summary presents the key findings and recommendations from the 2001 FEMP customer survey. The key findings presented in this summary are a condensed presentation of the more detailed findings presented in each of the chapters.

  18. Owner/Operator Perspective on Reliability Customer Needs and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SERVICES AS RELIABLE AS THE SUN OwnerOperator Perspective on Reliability Customer Needs and Field Data Sandia National Laboratories Utility-Scale Grid-Tied PV Inverter Reliability...

  19. Microsoft Word - Future Power Systems 21 - The Smart Customer...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... wish to do when faced with sequences of rising and falling tariff prices on a daily basis. ... to get a better view of what prices should be offered. i.e Customer reaction curves. ...

  20. Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, and Response...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Response to Time-Based Rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies (June 2015) Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, and Response to Time-Based Rates from the ...

  1. Now Available: Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Response to Time-Based Rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies Now Available: Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, and Response to Time-Based Rates from the ...

  2. Automated Process for the Fabrication of Highly Customized Thermally

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Insulated Cladding Systems | Department of Energy Automated Process for the Fabrication of Highly Customized Thermally Insulated Cladding Systems Automated Process for the Fabrication of Highly Customized Thermally Insulated Cladding Systems 1 of 2 Resin casting prototype Image: Worcester Polytechnic Institute 2 of 2 A project member completes cuts foam insulating via a process known as computer numerically controlled (CNC) foam cutting. Image: Worcester Polytechnic Institute Lead Performer:

  3. Standby Rates for Customer-Sited Resources - Issues, Considerations, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Elements of Model Tariffs, 2009 | Department of Energy Standby Rates for Customer-Sited Resources - Issues, Considerations, and the Elements of Model Tariffs, 2009 Standby Rates for Customer-Sited Resources - Issues, Considerations, and the Elements of Model Tariffs, 2009 The economic viability of clean, distributed generation (DG) and, in particular, combined heat and power (CHP) facilities, heavily depends on the regulatory policies that determine how they are treated by the

  4. Automated Process for the Fabrication of Highly Customized Thermally

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Insulated Cladding Systems | Department of Energy Automated Process for the Fabrication of Highly Customized Thermally Insulated Cladding Systems Automated Process for the Fabrication of Highly Customized Thermally Insulated Cladding Systems Addthis 1 of 2 Resin casting prototype Image: Worcester Polytechnic Institute 2 of 2 A project member completes cuts foam insulating via a process known as computer numerically controlled (CNC) foam cutting. Image: Worcester Polytechnic Institute

  5. Discussion series on PURPA related topics: information to customers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturgeon, J I

    1980-08-01

    This volume relates primarily to Time-of-Day rates standard, PURPA IB(d)3, and deals with the content and methods of providing rate and conservation information to customers when Time-of-Day rates are used. Information to customers in the Demonstration and Pilot Projects fell mainly into four categories: administrative communications; explanations of new rate structures; information and advice on load management; and facts, recommendations and encouragements about energy conservation and end-use improvement. Administrative communications were about such matters as the existence of Projects, their funding, their periods of performance, the selection of their test customers, conditions of participation, procedural changes during the tests, and the time and conditions of ending the tests. These communications were important to good customer cooperation. All Demonstration Projects devoted considerable effort to the crucial task of clearly explaining the rationale of Time-of-Use (TOU) pricing and the test rate structures. The Projects then presented the concept of TOU pricing as a means of (a) fairly charging customers the true cost of their electricity and (b) rewarding them for shifting consumption to times when costs are less. For the most part, Demonstration Projects gave specific information on the individual customer's own rate structure and none on any others that were under test. The information was presented in face-to-face interviews, group presentations, television, radio, and print media, and traveling exhibits. The results are evaluated. (LCL)

  6. Keep It Simple: Learning How to Think Like the Customer | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Keep It Simple: Learning How to Think Like the Customer Keep It Simple: Learning How to Think Like the Customer Presents lessons learned from Tennessee Valley Authority's home ...

  7. Utility Best Practices Guidance for Providing Business Customers with Energy Use and Cost Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-11-01

    Summarizes the context; current state of utility practices; and the customer, business, and policy cases for providing business customers with consistent, standardized energy use and cost data.

  8. Knowledge is power: How information alone can cause commercial customers to install energy-efficient measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garafalo, A.; Mulholland, C.

    1994-12-31

    As part of their overall efforts to encourage Commercial and Industrial customers to become more energy efficient, many utilities offer Energy Audit Programs. This type of program has two main purposes. First, it offers the utility`s commercial and industrial (C/I) customers the opportunity to identify ways in which they can increase the overall energy efficiency of their facilities through the installation of more energy-efficient lighting, space conditioning, thermal efficiency, and other measures. Secondly, audit programs offer a utility public relations value because such programs usually have a positive reception among customers. The first purpose, however, that of educating customers about the energy efficiency of their facilities, is the key to potential energy savings. Many audit programs are designed to feed directly into a utility`s rebate program, and thus offer good marketing opportunities for demand side management. Many utilities and regulatory bodies consider C/I audit programs to be non-resource or information-only programs. There are quantifiable benefits to these programs beyond the marketing leads they provide for the rebate programs. Since 1987, Applied Energy Group, Inc. (AEG) has been involved in the measurement of savings attributable to energy audit programs. Through years of development and refinement, AEG has developed a process which is able to identify savings attributable solely to a utility`s energy audit program, effectively netting out the results achieved through the efforts of a rebate program. This process also factors out free ridership and ensures that there is no double counting of savings between audit and rebate programs. The findings presented here focus on the work that AEG has done for two of its utility clients: Rochester Gas & Electric (RG&E) and Long Island Lighting Company (LILCO) during the course of evaluating their 1990 and 1991 C/I programs.

  9. Microsoft Word - What RTF customers should know _2013_.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SAFETY-RELATED INFORMATION FOR CUSTOMERS OF THE TAMU CYCLOTRON RADIATION EFFECTS FACILITY * Upon arrival, go to the loading dock double-door entrance and use the nearby buzzer or call box. Wait for someone to let you in. Identify yourself as a SEE-line customer. A key to the entrances equipped with call boxes may be checked out for the subsequent access to the building. The entrance doors always must be closed or directly supervised. * Smoking is not allowed anywhere in or near the building.

  10. Astroparticle physics with a customized low-background broad energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Germanium detector (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Astroparticle physics with a customized low-background broad energy Germanium detector Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Astroparticle physics with a customized low-background broad energy Germanium detector Authors: Aalseth, C. E. [1] ; Amman, M. [2] ; Avignone, F.T. III [3] ; Back, H.O. [4] ; Barabash, A.S. [5] ; Barbeau, P.S. [6] ; Bergevin, M. [2] ; Burritt [7] ; Busch, M. [8]

  11. Study of behavior and determination of customer lifetime value(CLV) using Markov chain model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Permana, Dony; Indratno, Sapto Wahyu; Pasaribu, Udjianna S.

    2014-03-24

    Customer Lifetime Value or CLV is a restriction on interactive marketing to help a company in arranging financial for the marketing of new customer acquisition and customer retention. Additionally CLV can be able to segment customers for financial arrangements. Stochastic models for the fairly new CLV used a Markov chain. In this model customer retention probability and new customer acquisition probability play an important role. This model is originally introduced by Pfeifer and Carraway in 2000 [1]. They introduced several CLV models, one of them only involves customer and former customer. In this paper we expand the model by adding the assumption of the transition from former customer to customer. In the proposed model, the CLV value is higher than the CLV value obtained by Pfeifer and Caraway model. But our model still requires a longer convergence time.

  12. Process for Managing and Customizing HPC Operating Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, David ML

    2014-04-02

    A process for maintaining a custom HPC operating system was developed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) over the past ten years. This process is generic and flexible to manage continuous change as well as keep systems updated while managing communication through well defined pieces of software.

  13. Templates and Examples — Customer Profiles and Personas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find custom templates and EERE-specific examples you can use to plan, conduct, and report on your usability and analysis activities. These templates are examples of forms you might use, but you are not required to use them for EERE products.

  14. Economic Potential of CHP in Detroit Edison Service Area: The Customer Perspective, June 2003

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Study to assess the costs and benefits of distributed energy (DE) technologies to consumers and to better understand the effect of DE on the grid.

  15. The Impact of Rate Design and Net Metering on the Bill Savings from Distributed PV for Residential Customers in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Energy and Resources Group, University of California, Berkeley; Darghouth, Naim R.; Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan

    2011-06-01

    Net metering has become a widespread mechanism in the U.S. for supporting customer adoption of distributed photovoltaics (PV), but has faced challenges as PV installations grow to a larger share of generation in a number of states. This paper examines the value of the bill savings that customers receive under net metering, and the associated role of retail rate design, based on a sample of approximately two hundred residential customers of California's two largest electric utilities. We find that the bill savings per kWh of PV electricity generated varies by more than a factor of four across the customers in the sample, which is largely attributable to the inclining block structure of the utilities' residential retail rates. We also compare the bill savings under net metering to that received under three potential alternative compensation mechanisms, based on California's Market Price Referent (MPR). We find that net metering provides significantly greater bill savings than a full MPR-based feed-in tariff, but only modestly greater savings than alternative mechanisms under which hourly or monthly net excess generation is compensated at the MPR rate.

  16. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, and Response to Time-Based Rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; Hans, Liesel; Scheer, Richard

    2015-06-01

    Time-based rate programs1, enabled by utility investments in advanced metering infrastructure (AMI), are increasingly being considered by utilities as tools to reduce peak demand and enable customers to better manage consumption and costs. There are several customer systems that are relatively new to the marketplace and have the potential for improving the effectiveness of these programs, including in-home displays (IHDs), programmable communicating thermostats (PCTs), and web portals. Policy and decision makers are interested in more information about customer acceptance, retention, and response before moving forward with expanded deployments of AMI-enabled new rates and technologies. Under the Smart Grid Investment Grant Program (SGIG), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) partnered with several utilities to conduct consumer behavior studies (CBS). The goals involved applying randomized and controlled experimental designs for estimating customer responses more precisely and credibly to advance understanding of time-based rates and customer systems, and provide new information for improving program designs, implementation strategies, and evaluations. The intent was to produce more robust and credible analysis of impacts, costs, benefits, and lessons learned and assist utility and regulatory decision makers in evaluating investment opportunities involving time-based rates. To help achieve these goals, DOE developed technical guidelines to help the CBS utilities estimate customer acceptance, retention, and response more precisely.

  17. Distributed energy resources in practice: A case study analysis and validation of LBNL's customer adoption model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Owen; Creighton, Charles; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael

    2003-02-01

    This report describes a Berkeley Lab effort to model the economics and operation of small-scale (<500 kW) on-site electricity generators based on real-world installations at several example customer sites. This work builds upon the previous development of the Distributed Energy Resource Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), a tool designed to find the optimal combination of installed equipment, and idealized operating schedule, that would minimize the site's energy bills, given performance and cost data on available DER technologies, utility tariffs, and site electrical and thermal loads over a historic test period, usually a recent year. This study offered the first opportunity to apply DER-CAM in a real-world setting and evaluate its modeling results. DER-CAM has three possible applications: first, it can be used to guide choices of equipment at specific sites, or provide general solutions for example sites and propose good choices for sites with similar circumstances; second, it can additionally provide the basis for the operations of installed on-site generation; and third, it can be used to assess the market potential of technologies by anticipating which kinds of customers might find various technologies attractive. A list of approximately 90 DER candidate sites was compiled and each site's DER characteristics and their willingness to volunteer information was assessed, producing detailed information on about 15 sites of which five sites were analyzed in depth. The five sites were not intended to provide a random sample, rather they were chosen to provide some diversity of business activity, geography, and technology. More importantly, they were chosen in the hope of finding examples of true business decisions made based on somewhat sophisticated analyses, and pilot or demonstration projects were avoided. Information on the benefits and pitfalls of implementing a DER system was also presented from an additional ten sites including agriculture, education, health care, airport, and manufacturing facilities.

  18. 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Study Report: April 2002

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Study Report A Report Prepared for the US Department of Energy April 2002 By TecMRKT Works and Sandia National Laboratories TecMRKT Works Nicholas P. Hall Thomas P. Talerico John H. Reed Ph.D Jeff Riggert Andrew Oh And Sandia National Laboratories Gretchen Jordan 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Acknowledgements Acknowledgements This project was conducted for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). We would like to thank the following FEMP management and

  19. 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Summary Report: April 2002

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summary Report A Report Prepared for the US Department of Energy April 2002 By TecMRKT Works and Sandia National Laboratories TecMRKT Works Nicholas P. Hall Thomas P. Talerico John H. Reed Ph.D Jeff Riggert Andrew Oh And Sandia National Laboratories Gretchen Jordan FEMP Customer Survey Summary Report Acknowledgements Acknowledgements This project was conducted for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). We would like to thank the following FEMP

  20. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Custom...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BPC Green Builders, Custom Home, New Fairfield, CT DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Custom Home, New Fairfield, CT Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready ...

  1. Modeling of customer adoption of distributed energy resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Chard, Joseph S.; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Lipman, Timothy; Moezzi, Mithra M.; Ouaglal, Boubekeur; Siddiqui, Afzal S.

    2001-08-01

    This report describes work completed for the California Energy Commission (CEC) on the continued development and application of the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). This work was performed at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) between July 2000 and June 2001 under the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Distributed Energy Resources Integration (DERI) project. Our research on distributed energy resources (DER) builds on the concept of the microgrid ({mu}Grid), a semiautonomous grouping of electricity-generating sources and end-use sinks that are placed and operated for the benefit of its members. Although a {mu}Grid can operate independent of the macrogrid (the utility power network), the {mu}Grid is usually interconnected, purchasing energy and ancillary services from the macrogrid. Groups of customers can be aggregated into {mu}Grids by pooling their electrical and other loads, and the most cost-effective combination of generation resources for a particular {mu}Grid can be found. In this study, DER-CAM, an economic model of customer DER adoption implemented in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS) optimization software is used, to find the cost-minimizing combination of on-site generation customers (individual businesses and a {mu}Grid) in a specified test year. DER-CAM's objective is to minimize the cost of supplying electricity to a specific customer by optimizing the installation of distributed generation and the self-generation of part or all of its electricity. Currently, the model only considers electrical loads, but combined heat and power (CHP) analysis capability is being developed under the second year of CEC funding. The key accomplishments of this year's work were the acquisition of increasingly accurate data on DER technologies, including the development of methods for forecasting cost reductions for these technologies, and the creation of a credible example California {mu}Grid for use in this study and in future work. The work performed during this year demonstrates the viability of DER-CAM and of our approach to analyzing adoption of DER.

  2. Keep It Simple: Learning How to Think Like the Customer | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Keep It Simple: Learning How to Think Like the Customer Keep It Simple: Learning How to Think Like the Customer Presents lessons learned from Tennessee Valley Authority's home performance program, including ideas for a follow-up tool. PDF icon Keep It Simple: Learning How to Think Like the Customer More Documents & Publications Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Keep It Simple: Learning How to Think Like the Customer SOUTHEASTERN FEDERAL POWER ALLIANCE - April

  3. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, D.A.

    1986-08-01

    This document describes radioisotope distribution from DOE facilities to private firms including foreign and other DOE facilities. The information is divided into five sections: (1) isotope suppliers, facility contacts, and isotopes or services supplied; (2) customers, suppliers, and isotopes purchased; (3) isotopes purchased cross-referenced with customer numbers; (4) geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and (5) radioisotope sales and transfer - FY 1985.

  4. Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system customer interface document.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald D.

    2013-09-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL is a test capability that allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt. The components tested can range from materials samples, to individual components such as flex hoses, ball joints, and valves, up to full solar collecting systems such as central receiver panels, parabolic troughs, or linear Fresnel systems. MSTL provides realistic conditions similar to a portion of a concentrating solar power facility. The facility currently uses 60/40 nitrate %E2%80%9Csolar salt%E2%80%9D and can circulate the salt at pressure up to 40 bar (600psi), temperature to 585%C2%B0C, and flow rate of 44-50kg/s(400-600GPM) depending on temperature. The purpose of this document is to provide a basis for customers to evaluate the applicability to their testing needs, and to provide an outline of expectations for conducting testing on MSTL. The document can serve as the basis for testing agreements including Work for Others (WFO) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA). While this document provides the basis for these agreements and describes some of the requirements for testing using MSTL and on the site at Sandia, the document is not sufficient by itself as a test agreement. The document, however, does provide customers with a uniform set of information to begin the test planning process.

  5. Number of Customers by State by Sector, 1990-2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Number of Customers by State by Sector, 1990-2014" "Year","State","Industry Sector Category","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Other","Total" 2014,"AK","Total Electric Industry",281438,51017,1287,0,"NA",333742 2014,"AL","Total Electric Industry",2169790,360901,7236,0,"NA",2537927 2014,"AR","Total Electric

  6. PowerChoice Residential Customer Response to TOU Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Jane S.; Moezzi, Mithra; Lutzenhiser, Susan; Woods, James; Dethman, Linda; Kunkle, Rick

    2009-10-01

    Research Into Action, Inc. and the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) worked together to conduct research on the behaviors and energy use patterns of SMUD residential customers who voluntarily signed on to a Time-of-Use rate pilot launched under the PowerChoice label. The project was designed to consider the how and why of residential customers ability and willingness to engage in demand reduction behaviors, and to link social and behavioral factors to observed changes in demand. The research drew on a combination of load interval data and three successive surveys of participating households. Two experimental treatments were applied to test the effects of increased information on households ability to respond to the Time-of-Use rates. Survey results indicated that participants understood the purpose of the Time-of-Use rate and undertook substantial appropriate actions to shift load and conserve. Statistical tests revealed minor initial price effects and more marked, but still modest, adjustments to seasonal rate changes. Tests of the two information interventions indicated that neither made much difference to consumption patterns. Despite the lackluster statistical evidence for load shifting, the analysis points to key issues for critical analysis and development of residential Time-of-Use rates, especially pertinent as California sets the stage for demand response in more California residences.

  7. VISMASHUP: streamlining the creation of custom visualization applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrens, James P; Santos, Emanuele; Lins, Lauro; Freire, Juliana; Silva, Cl'audio T

    2010-01-01

    Visualization is essential for understanding the increasing volumes of digital data. However, the process required to create insightful visualizations is involved and time consuming. Although several visualization tools are available, including tools with sophisticated visual interfaces, they are out of reach for users who have little or no knowledge of visualization techniques and/or who do not have programming expertise. In this paper, we propose VISMASHUP, a new framework for streamlining the creation of customized visualization applications. Because these applications can be customized for very specific tasks, they can hide much of the complexity in a visualization specification and make it easier for users to explore visualizations by manipulating a small set of parameters. We describe the framework and how it supports the various tasks a designer needs to carry out to develop an application, from mining and exploring a set of visualization specifications (pipelines), to the creation of simplified views of the pipelines, and the automatic generation of the application and its interface. We also describe the implementation of the system and demonstrate its use in two real application scenarios.

  8. Customer Engagement in AEP gridSMART Residential Transactive System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widergren, Steven E.; Marinovici, Maria C.; Fuller, Jason C.; Subbarao, Krishnappa; Chassin, David P.; Somani, Abhishek

    2014-12-31

    — In 2013, AEP Ohio (AEP) operated a 5-minute real-time price (RTP) electricity market system on 4 distribution feeders as part of their gridSMART® demonstration project. The RTP households were billed for their electricity usage according to an RTP tariff approved by the Public Utility Commission of Ohio. They were given the incentive that their annual bill would be no greater than if they were on the flat-rate tariff, but they had financial incentives to shift consumption from high price periods to low price periods. Incentives were also available for response under high prices from local events, such as reaching the distribution feeder capacity or a critical peak pricing event. An analysis of this transactive system experiment was completed in early 2014. This paper describes the incentive provided to the customer, the nature of their interaction with the smart thermostat that provided automated response to the transactive signal, and their level of satisfaction with the program.

  9. Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Network (EREN): Customer satisfaction survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, A.V.; Henderson, D.P.

    1996-04-22

    The Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Network (EREN) Customer Satisfaction Survey was developed and executed in support of EREN`s continuous quality improvement (CQI) plan. The study was designed to provide information about the demographic make up of EREN users, the value or benefits they derive from EREN, the kinds and quality of services they want, their levels of satisfaction with existing services, their preferences in both the sources of service and the means of delivery, and to provide benchmark data for the establishment of continuous quality improvement measures. The survey was performed by soliciting voluntary participation from members of the EREN Users Group. It was executed in two phases; the first being conducted by phone using a randomly selected group; and the second being conducted electronically and which was open to all of the remaining members of the Users Group. The survey results are described.

  10. Tour of Zero: Helping Customers Find Better Homes at Lower Costs Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Text Version) | Department of Energy Tour of Zero: Helping Customers Find Better Homes at Lower Costs Webinar (Text Version) Tour of Zero: Helping Customers Find Better Homes at Lower Costs Webinar (Text Version) Below is the text version of the webinar Tour of Zero: Helping Customers Find Better Homes at Lower Costs, presented in October 2015. Watch the presentation. Lindsay Parker: Hi, everyone. Welcome to the Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home technical training webinar series.

  11. Cost-Effective, Customer-Focused, and Contractor-Focused Data Tracking

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems | Department of Energy Cost-Effective, Customer-Focused, and Contractor-Focused Data Tracking Systems Cost-Effective, Customer-Focused, and Contractor-Focused Data Tracking Systems Better Buildings Residential Network Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call Series: Cost-Effective, Customer-Focused and Contractor-Focused Data Tracking Systems, July 24, 2014, Call Slides and Discussion Summary. PDF icon Call Slides and Discussion Summary More Documents & Publications Better

  12. Interactions between Energy Efficiency Programs funded under the Recovery Act and Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Charles A.; Stuart, Elizabeth; Hoffman, Ian; Fuller, Merrian C.; Billingsley, Megan A.

    2011-02-25

    Since the spring of 2009, billions of federal dollars have been allocated to state and local governments as grants for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects and programs. The scale of this American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) funding, focused on 'shovel-ready' projects to create and retain jobs, is unprecedented. Thousands of newly funded players - cities, counties, states, and tribes - and thousands of programs and projects are entering the existing landscape of energy efficiency programs for the first time or expanding their reach. The nation's experience base with energy efficiency is growing enormously, fed by federal dollars and driven by broader objectives than saving energy alone. State and local officials made countless choices in developing portfolios of ARRA-funded energy efficiency programs and deciding how their programs would relate to existing efficiency programs funded by utility customers. Those choices are worth examining as bellwethers of a future world where there may be multiple program administrators and funding sources in many states. What are the opportunities and challenges of this new environment? What short- and long-term impacts will this large, infusion of funds have on utility customer-funded programs; for example, on infrastructure for delivering energy efficiency services or on customer willingness to invest in energy efficiency? To what extent has the attribution of energy savings been a critical issue, especially where administrators of utility customer-funded energy efficiency programs have performance or shareholder incentives? Do the new ARRA-funded energy efficiency programs provide insights on roles or activities that are particularly well-suited to state and local program administrators vs. administrators or implementers of utility customer-funded programs? The answers could have important implications for the future of U.S. energy efficiency. This report focuses on a selected set of ARRA-funded energy efficiency programs administered by state energy offices: the State Energy Program (SEP) formula grants, the portion of Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) formula funds administered directly by states, and the State Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program (SEEARP). Since these ARRA programs devote significant monies to energy efficiency and serve similar markets as utility customer-funded programs, there are frequent interactions between programs. We exclude the DOE low-income weatherization program and EECBG funding awarded directly to the over 2,200 cities, counties and tribes from our study to keep its scope manageable. We summarize the energy efficiency program design and funding choices made by the 50 state energy offices, 5 territories and the District of Columbia. We then focus on the specific choices made in 12 case study states. These states were selected based on the level of utility customer program funding, diversity of program administrator models, and geographic diversity. Based on interviews with more than 80 energy efficiency actors in those 12 states, we draw observations about states strategies for use of Recovery Act funds. We examine interactions between ARRA programs and utility customer-funded energy efficiency programs in terms of program planning, program design and implementation, policy issues, and potential long-term impacts. We consider how the existing regulatory policy framework and energy efficiency programs in these 12 states may have impacted development of these selected ARRA programs. Finally, we summarize key trends and highlight issues that evaluators of these ARRA programs may want to examine in more depth in their process and impact evaluations.

  13. Programs Streamline Process, Add Customers More Quickly After Implementing Evaluation Recommendations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document, from Hydro-Quebec / Empower Programs, outlines how "Programs Streamline Process, Add Customers More Quickly After Implementing Evaluation Recommendations."

  14. Energy Smart Grocer Program- FY2016 Close-Out Form Customer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grocer Program- FY2016 Close-Out Form Customer Authorized Representative Name Contact Person Phone If this is a revision, please fully complete the form with the changed...

  15. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Sterling Brook Custom Homes, Double

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oak, TX | Department of Energy Sterling Brook Custom Homes, Double Oak, TX DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Sterling Brook Custom Homes, Double Oak, TX DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Sterling Brook Custom Homes, Double Oak, TX Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Double Oak, TX, north of Dallas, that scored a HERS 44 without PV. The 3,752-ft2 two-story home served as an energy-efficient model home for the custom home builder: 1,300 visitors toured the home, thousands

  16. SoCalGas- Custom Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas) offers non-residential customers incentive programs to encourage energy efficiency. More information about the incentive amounts and equipment...

  17. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-14-085 Visual Aids for a Customer B3...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 SECTION A. Project Title: Visual Aids for a Customer SECTION B. Project Description The manufacturer will construct two mockup reactor assemblies out of stainless steel to be...

  18. Customer Incentives for Energy Efficiency Through Electric and Natural Gas Rate Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-09-01

    Summarizes the issues and approaches involved in motivating customers to reduce the total energy they consume through energy prices and rate design.

  19. OLED devices with internal outcoupling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Jie Jerry; Sista, Srinivas Prasad; Shi, Xiaolei; Zhao, Ri-An; Chichak, Kelly Scott; Youmans, Jeffrey Michael; Janora, Kevin Henry; Turner, Larry Gene

    2015-03-03

    Optoelectronic devices that have enhanced internal outcoupling are disclosed. The devices include a substrate, an anode, a cathode, an electroluminescent layer, and a hole injecting layer. The hole injecting layer includes inorganic nanoparticles that have a bimodal particle size distribution and which are dispersed in an organic matrix.

  20. 2014 OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... you want to model, specify the device architecture, modify default settings, select labor ... that it is not and work remains, particularly on sustainability and device structure. ...

  1. Solar PV Deployment through Renewable Energy Tariff: An Option for Key Account Customers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Renewable energy tariffs, a new program and rate option being offered by some utilities to large customers, are quickly attracting attention in the renewable energy world as a way to do this. These tariffs allow a high energy usage customer to pay a slight premium in order to obtain all or a portion of their electricity from renewable sources.

  2. Energizing Efficiency's Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhn, Thomas R.

    2006-10-15

    Advances such as 'smart' meters, two-way communication, and automation technology are rapidly improving information exchange between utilities and their customers, and enabling further energy efficiency gains. (author)

  3. Estimated Value of Service Reliability for Electric Utility Customers in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, M.J.; Mercurio, Matthew; Schellenberg, Josh

    2009-06-01

    Information on the value of reliable electricity service can be used to assess the economic efficiency of investments in generation, transmission and distribution systems, to strategically target investments to customer segments that receive the most benefit from system improvements, and to numerically quantify the risk associated with different operating, planning and investment strategies. This paper summarizes research designed to provide estimates of the value of service reliability for electricity customers in the US. These estimates were obtained by analyzing the results from 28 customer value of service reliability studies conducted by 10 major US electric utilities over the 16 year period from 1989 to 2005. Because these studies used nearly identical interruption cost estimation or willingness-to-pay/accept methods it was possible to integrate their results into a single meta-database describing the value of electric service reliability observed in all of them. Once the datasets from the various studies were combined, a two-part regression model was used to estimate customer damage functions that can be generally applied to calculate customer interruption costs per event by season, time of day, day of week, and geographical regions within the US for industrial, commercial, and residential customers. Estimated interruption costs for different types of customers and of different duration are provided. Finally, additional research and development designed to expand the usefulness of this powerful database and analysis are suggested.

  4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: e2 Homes, Winter Park, FL, Custom

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Homes | Department of Energy e2 Homes, Winter Park, FL, Custom Homes DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: e2 Homes, Winter Park, FL, Custom Homes Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Winter Park, FL, that scored HERS 57 without PV or HERS -7 with PV. This 4,305-square-foot custom home has autoclaved aerated concrete walls, a sealed attic with R-20 spray foam, and ductless mini-split heat pumps. PDF icon BA_ZeroEnergyReady_e2Homes_062414.pdf More Documents & Publications

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Amaris Custom Homes, St. Paul, MN |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Custom Homes, St. Paul, MN DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Amaris Custom Homes, St. Paul, MN In this project, the NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team worked with Amaris Custom Homes to develop the first Zero Energy Ready Home in Minnesota's cold climate using reasonable, cost-effective, and replicable construction materials and practices. The result is a passive solar, super-efficient 3542-ft2 walkout ranch-style home with all the creature comforts. PDF

  6. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: e2 Homes, Winter Park, FL, Custom

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Homes | Department of Energy e2 Homes, Winter Park, FL, Custom Homes DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: e2 Homes, Winter Park, FL, Custom Homes Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Winter Park, FL, that scored HERS 57 without PV or HERS -7 with PV. This 4,305-square-foot custom home has autoclaved aerated concrete walls, a sealed attic with R-20 spray foam, and ductless mini-split heat pumps. PDF icon BA_ZeroEnergyReady_e2Homes_062414.pdf More Documents & Publications

  7. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Transformations Inc., Custom House,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Devens, MA | Department of Energy Transformations Inc., Custom House, Devens, MA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Transformations Inc., Custom House, Devens, MA Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Devens, MA, that scored HERS 34 without PV or HERS -21 with PV. This 3,168-square-foot custom home has R-46 double-stud walls, a vented attic with R-67 blown cellulose, plus R-10 rigid XPS under the slab, R-20 closed-cell spray foam on basement walls, triple-pane windows, and

  8. Microsoft Word - Future Power Systems 21 - The Smart Customer.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 - The Smart Customer    Steve Browning Page 1 of 14 May 2010 Overview From Future Power Systems (FPS) articles 18 and 19 we can see that there are a number of different trading and tariff mechanisms which can be employed on the utility to customer interface to enable participation. From article 20 we see that there will be different pricing profiles on similar day types due to changes in availability of renewable generation. The customer interface has to be carefully managed to

  9. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Amaris Custom Homes, St...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The result is a passive solar, super-efficient 3542-ft2 walkout ranch-style home with all the creature comforts. PDF icon Amaris Custom Homes - St. Paul, MN More Documents & ...

  10. Researchers find 3-D printed parts to provide low-cost, custom...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researchers find 3-D printed parts to provide low-cost, custom alternatives for laboratory equipment By Raphael Rosen February 26, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on...

  11. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Amaris Custom Home, St...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME Amaris Custom Homes 2 solar system will provide most of the electricity needs and will be grid-tied to Internet and smartphone monitoring capabilities. ...

  12. DOE GC Joins Customs Service Trade Data System to Strengthen Enforcement Effort

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy today announced that its Office of the General Counsel has joined the Board of Directors of the International Trade Data System, and now has access to the U.S. Customs and...

  13. Customized Resources for Others | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scientific and Technical Information Customized Resources for Others Science Search Tools Home | DOE Collections | Journal Sources | Library Tools | U.S. Federal Agencies | Global Databases OSTI applies these capabilities to provide customized information tools and services for individual DOE offices and non-DOE government entities on a cost-reimbursable basis. These services are provided under the authority of the Economy Act (31 U.S.C. 1535-36). Expertise is available in a range of

  14. NYSERDA's RPS Customer Sited Tier Fuel Cell Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NYSERDA's RPS Customer Sited Tier Fuel Cell Program NYSERDA's RPS Customer Sited Tier Fuel Cell Program Presented at the Clean Energy States Alliance and U.S. Department of Energy Webinar: Fuel Cells and Renewable Portfolio Standards, June 9, 2011. PDF icon infocalljun911_larsen.pdf More Documents & Publications Fuel Cells at Supermarkets: NYSERDA's Perspective Fuel Cells and RPSs: An Introduction NYSERDA's CHP Program Guide, 2010

  15. StrBioLib: a Java library for development of custom computationalstructural

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    biology applications (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect StrBioLib: a Java library for development of custom computationalstructural biology applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: StrBioLib: a Java library for development of custom computationalstructural biology applications Summary: StrBioLib is a library of Java classes useful fordeveloping software for computational structural biology research.StrBioLib contains classes to represent and manipulate proteinstructures,

  16. Analysis of Customer Enrollment Patterns in TIme-Based Rate Programs:

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Initial Results from the SGIG Consumer Behavior Studies (July 2013) | Department of Energy Analysis of Customer Enrollment Patterns in TIme-Based Rate Programs: Initial Results from the SGIG Consumer Behavior Studies (July 2013) Analysis of Customer Enrollment Patterns in TIme-Based Rate Programs: Initial Results from the SGIG Consumer Behavior Studies (July 2013) The U.S. Department of Energy is implementing the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) program under the American Recovery and

  17. ORISE: Delivering Cost Savings and Customer Service with Off-the-Shelf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Software Cost Savings and Customer Service ORISE utilizes off-the-shelf software to provide peer review services at lower cost while meeting customer requirements The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education's (ORISE) Scientific Peer Review Program is no different than any other organization striving to do more with less in the current economy. With smaller budgets and faster turnaround needed for proposal reviews, utilizing Web-based collaboration tools to share information is

  18. Customized atomic force microscopy probe by focused-ion-beam-assisted tip

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    transfer (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Customized atomic force microscopy probe by focused-ion-beam-assisted tip transfer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Customized atomic force microscopy probe by focused-ion-beam-assisted tip transfer We present a technique for transferring separately fabricated tips onto tipless atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers, performed using focused ion beam-assisted nanomanipulation. This method addresses the need in scanning probe microscopy

  19. The Economic Value of PV and Net Metering to Residential Customers in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darghouth, Naim; Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan

    2010-05-17

    In this paper, we analyze the bill savings from PV for residential customers of the California's two largest electric utilities, under existing net metering tariffs as well as under several alternative compensation mechanisms. We find that economic value of PV to the customer is dependent on the structure of the underlying retail electricity rate and can vary quite significantly from one customer to another. In addition, we find that the value of the bill savings from PV generally declines with PV penetration level, as increased PV generation tends to offset lower-priced usage. Customers in our sample from both utilities are significantly better off with net metering than with a feed-in tariff where all PV generation is compensated at long-run avoided generation supply costs. Other compensation schemeswhich allow customers to displace their consumption with PV generation within each hour or each month, and are also based on the avoided costs, yield similar value to the customer as net metering.

  20. Customer Strategies for Responding to Day-Ahead Market HourlyElectricity Pricing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Chuck; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan,Bernie; Boisvert, Dick; Cappers, Peter; Pratt, Donna; Butkins, Kim

    2005-08-25

    Real-time pricing (RTP) has been advocated as an economically efficient means to send price signals to customers to promote demand response (DR) (Borenstein 2002, Borenstein 2005, Ruff 2002). However, limited information exists that can be used to judge how effectively RTP actually induces DR, particularly in the context of restructured electricity markets. This report describes the second phase of a study of how large, non-residential customers' adapted to default-service day-ahead hourly pricing. The customers are located in upstate New York and served under Niagara Mohawk, A National Grid Company (NMPC)'s SC-3A rate class. The SC-3A tariff is a type of RTP that provides firm, day-ahead notice of hourly varying prices indexed to New York Independent System Operator (NYISO) day-ahead market prices. The study was funded by the California Energy Commission (CEC)'s PIER program through the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC). NMPC's is the first and longest-running default-service RTP tariff implemented in the context of retail competition. The mix of NMPC's large customers exposed to day-ahead hourly prices is roughly 30% industrial, 25% commercial and 45% institutional. They have faced periods of high prices during the study period (2000-2004), thereby providing an opportunity to assess their response to volatile hourly prices. The nature of the SC-3A default service attracted competitive retailers offering a wide array of pricing and hedging options, and customers could also participate in demand response programs implemented by NYISO. The first phase of this study examined SC-3A customers' satisfaction, hedging choices and price response through in-depth customer market research and a Constant Elasticity of Substitution (CES) demand model (Goldman et al. 2004). This second phase was undertaken to answer questions that remained unresolved and to quantify price response to a higher level of granularity. We accomplished these objectives with a second customer survey and interview effort, which resulted in a higher, 76% response rate, and the adoption of the more flexible Generalized Leontief (GL) demand model, which allows us to analyze customer response under a range of conditions (e.g. at different nominal prices) and to determine the distribution of individual customers' response.

  1. Presentation Slides: Solar Finance for Residential and Commercial Customers and Potential Roles of State and Local Government

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar provides an overview of how residential and commercial solar projects are financed and the various roles that state and local governments can play to support the deployment of solar within their jurisdictions.

  2. Demonstration of automated price response in large customers in New York City using Auto-DR and OpenADR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Joyce Jihyun; Schetrit, Oren; Yin, Rongxin; Kiliccote, Sila

    2014-05-01

    Demand response (DR) – allowing customers to respond to reliability requests and market prices by changing electricity use from their normal consumption pattern – continues to be seen as an attractive means of demand-side management and a fundamental smart-grid improvement that links supply and demand. From October 2011 to December 2013, the Demand Response Research Center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, and partners Honeywell and Akuacom, have conducted a demonstration project enabling Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) in large commercial buildings located in New York City using Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) communication protocols. In particular, this project focuses on demonstrating how the OpenADR platform, enabled by Akuacom, can automate and simplify interactions between buildings and various stakeholders in New York State and enable the automation of customers’ price response to yield bill savings under dynamic pricing. In this paper, the cost control opportunities under day-ahead hourly pricing and Auto-DR control strategies are presented for four demonstration buildings; present the breakdown of Auto-DR enablement costs; summarize the field test results and their load impact; and show potential bill savings by enabling automated price response under Consolidated Edison’s Mandatory Hourly Pricing (MHP) tariff. For one of the sites, the potential bill savings at the site’s current retail rate are shown. Facility managers were given granular equipment-level opt-out capability to ensure full control of the sites during the Auto-DR implementation. The expected bill savings ranged from 1.1% to 8.0% of the total MHP bill. The automation and enablement costs ranged from $70 to $725 per kW shed. The results show that OpenADR can facilitate the automation of price response, deliver savings to the customers and opt-out capability of the implementation retains control of the sites by facility managers.

  3. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Experiences from the Consumer Behavior Studies on Engaging Customers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; Scheer, Richard

    2014-09-01

    One of the most important aspects for the successful implementation of customer-facing programs is to better understand how to engage and communicate with consumers. Customer-facing programs include time-based rates, information and feedback, load management, and energy efficiency. This report presents lessons learned by utilities through consumer behavior studies (CBS) conducted as part of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) program. The SGIG CBS effort presents a unique opportunity to advance the understanding of consumer behaviors in terms of customer acceptance and retention, and electricity consumption and peak demand impacts. The effort includes eleven comprehensive studies with the aim of evaluating the response of residential and small commercial customers to time-based rate programs implemented in conjunction with advanced metering infrastructure and customer systems such as in-home displays, programmable communicating thermostats, and web portals. DOE set guidelines and protocols that sought to help the utilities design studies that would rigorously test and more precisely estimate the impact of time-based rates on customers’ energy usage patterns, as well as identify the key drivers that motivate behavioral changes.

  4. Customer service model for waste tracking at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorries, Alison M; Montoya, Andrew J; Ashbaugh, Andrew E

    2010-11-10

    The deployment of any new software system in a production facility will always face multiple hurtles in reaching a successful acceptance. However, a new waste tracking system was required at the plutonium processing facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) where waste processing must be integrated to handle Special Nuclear Materials tracking requirements. Waste tracking systems can enhance the processing of waste in production facilities when the system is developed with a focus on customer service throughout the project life cycle. In March 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Technical Services (WTS) replaced the aging systems and infrastructure that were being used to support the plutonium processing facility. The Waste Technical Services (WTS) Waste Compliance and Tracking System (WCATS) Project Team, using the following customer service model, succeeded in its goal to meet all operational and regulatory requirements, making waste processing in the facility more efficient while partnering with the customer.

  5. Enhancing User Customization through Novel Software Architecture for Utility Scale Solar Siting Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brant Peery; Sam Alessi; Randy Lee; Leng Vang; Scott Brown; David Solan; Dan Ames

    2014-06-01

    There is a need for a spatial decision support application that allows users to create customized metrics for comparing proposed locations of a new solar installation. This document discusses how PVMapper was designed to overcome the customization problem through the development of loosely coupled spatial and decision components in a JavaScript plugin architecture. This allows the user to easily add functionality and data to the system. The paper also explains how PVMapper provides the user with a dynamic and customizable decision tool that enables them to visually modify the formulas that are used in the decision algorithms that convert data to comparable metrics. The technologies that make up the presentation and calculation software stack are outlined. This document also explains the architecture that allows the tool to grow through custom plugins created by the software users. Some discussion is given on the difficulties encountered while designing the system.

  6. Impact of Rate Design Alternatives on Residential Solar Customer Bills. Increased Fixed Charges, Minimum Bills and Demand-based Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, Lori; Davidson, Carolyn; McLaren, Joyce; Miller, John

    2015-09-01

    With rapid growth in energy efficiency and distributed generation, electric utilities are anticipating stagnant or decreasing electricity sales, particularly in the residential sector. Utilities are increasingly considering alternative rates structures that are designed to recover fixed costs from residential solar photovoltaic (PV) customers with low net electricity consumption. Proposed structures have included fixed charge increases, minimum bills, and increasingly, demand rates - for net metered customers and all customers. This study examines the electricity bill implications of various residential rate alternatives for multiple locations within the United States. For the locations analyzed, the results suggest that residential PV customers offset, on average, between 60% and 99% of their annual load. However, roughly 65% of a typical customer's electricity demand is non-coincidental with PV generation, so the typical PV customer is generally highly reliant on the grid for pooling services.

  7. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act ( ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance, U.S. General Services Administration - Project 194 U.S. Custom Cargo Inspection Facility, Detroit, MI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-05-31

    This report documents the findings of an on-site audit of the U.S. Customs Cargo Inspection Facility (CIF) in Detroit, Michigan. The federal landlord for this building is the General Services Administration (GSA). The focus of the audit was to identify various no-cost or low-cost energy-efficiency opportunities that, once implemented, would reduce electrical and gas consumption and increase the operational efficiency of the building. This audit also provided an opportunity to identify potential capital cost projects that should be considered in the future to acquire additional energy (electric and gas) and water savings to further increase the operational efficiency of the building.

  8. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Federal Energy Management Program Technical Assistance Project 184 U.S. Customs and Border Protection Laboratory, Houston, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-09-30

    This report documents the findings of an on-site energy audit of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Laboratory in Houston, Texas. The focus of the audit was to identify various no-cost and low-cost energy efficiency opportunities that, once implemented, would reduce electricity and gas consumption and increase the operational efficiency of the building. This audit also provided an opportunity to identify potential capital cost projects that should be considered in the future to acquire additional energy (electric and gas) and water savings to further increase the operational efficiency of the building.

  9. DOE ZERH Webinar: Tour of Zero, Helping Customers Find Better Homes at

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lower Costs | Department of Energy Tour of Zero, Helping Customers Find Better Homes at Lower Costs DOE ZERH Webinar: Tour of Zero, Helping Customers Find Better Homes at Lower Costs Are you interested in helping homebuyers find a better home at a lower cost? The DOE Tour of Zero provides the opportunity for visitors to take a virtual tour of high-performance Zero Energy Ready Homes in every major U.S. climate zone and browse extensive photographs, homeowner testimonials, lists of

  10. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Custom Home, New

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fairfield, CT | Department of Energy Custom Home, New Fairfield, CT DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Custom Home, New Fairfield, CT Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in west Connecticut that scored HERS 39 without solar PV. The 3,000-square-foot two-story home has R-33 double-walls, R-72 flat roof with closed-cell foam and blown cellulose, an ERV, and LED lighting. PDF icon BPC Green Builders - New Fairfield, CT More Documents & Publications DOE Zero

  11. Winning with Wind: Electric Co-ops Providing Clean Energy to Customers |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Winning with Wind: Electric Co-ops Providing Clean Energy to Customers Winning with Wind: Electric Co-ops Providing Clean Energy to Customers March 12, 2014 - 12:02pm Addthis Mehoopany wind farm in Pennsylvania can produce enough energy to power more than 40,000 homes under a contract with Old Dominion Electric Cooperative and the Southern Maryland Electric Cooperative. Old Dominion was named one of the winners of the Wind Cooperative of the Year Award last week. | Photo

  12. Interactions Between Energy Efficiecy Programs Funded Under Recover Act and Utility Customer-funded Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar covered utility customer-funded and Recovery Act-funded energy efficiency programs, results of analysis in 12 case study states, and case study examples.

  13. US Department of Energy radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Houten, N.C.

    1989-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) prepared this edition of the radioisotope customer list at the request of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (ER-73), Office of Energy Research, US Department of Energy (DOE). This is the 25th report in a series dating from 1964. This report covers DOE radioisotope sales and distribution activities by its facilities to domestic, foreign and other DOE facilities for FY 1988. The report is divided into five sections: radioisotope suppliers, facility contacts, and radioisotopes or services supplied; a list of customers, suppliers, and radioisotopes purchased; a list of radioisotopes purchased cross-referenced to customer numbers; geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and radioisotope sales and transfers -- FY 1988. Radioisotopes not previously reported in this series of reports were argon-37, arsenic-72, arsenic-73, bismuth-207, gadolinium-151, rhenium-188, rhodium-101, selenium-72, xenon-123 and zirconium-88. The total value of DOE radioisotope sales for FY 1988 was $11.1 million, an increase of 3% from FY 1987.

  14. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Sterling Brook Custom Homes, Double Oak, TX

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Double Oak, TX, north of Dallas, that scored a HERS 44 without PV. The 3,752-ft2 two-story home served as an energy-efficient model home for the custom...

  15. Commercial utility-to-customer revenue opportunities. Topical report, February 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, K.W.

    1997-02-01

    The report addresses competitive threats and new service opportunities for gas utilities, with emphasis on their commercial customers. It is intended to provide a strategic overview of current competitive issues in the gas industry, as well as current and future commercial service opportunities.

  16. DRIVE Analysis Tool Generates Custom Vehicle Drive Cycles Based on Real-World Data (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-04-01

    This fact sheet from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory describes the Drive-Cycle Rapid Investigation, Visualization, and Evaluation (DRIVE) analysis tool, which uses GPS and controller area network data to characterize vehicle operation and produce custom vehicle drive cycles, analyzing thousands of hours of data in a matter of minutes.

  17. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Sterling Brook Custom Homes — Village Park Eco Home, Double Park, TX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-09-01

    This builder won a Custom Builder honor in the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards for this showcase home that serves as an energy-efficient model home for the custom home builder: 1,300 visitors toured the home, thousands more learned about the home’s advanced construction via the webpage, YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest.

  18. Customer Comments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations & Reliability Projects Expand Projects Skip navigation links Ancillary and Control Area Services (ACS) Practices Forum Attachment K Commercial Business Process...

  19. Custom Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Commercial Program Development Commercial Current Promotions Industrial Federal Agriculture Commercial buildings often have highly complex and unique systems and variable...

  20. Customer Comments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Skip navigation links Financial Information Financial Public Processes Asset Management Cost Verification Process Rate Cases BP-18 Rate Case Related Publications Meetings...

  1. Customer Comments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utilities PNGC Power Public Power Council Renewable Northwest Project Snohomish PUD Wheatridge Wind EnergySwaggart Energy Transmission Western Montana Electric Generating...

  2. Customer Impact Evaluation for the 2009 Southern California Edison Participating Load Pilot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gifford, William; Bodmann, Shawn; Young, Paul; Eto, Joseph H.; Laundergan, Jeremy

    2010-05-28

    The 2009 Participating Load Pilot Customer Impact Evaluation provides evidence that short duration demand response events which cycle off air conditioners for less than thirty minutes in a hot, dry environment do not lead to a significant degradation in the comfort level of residents participating in the program. This was investigated using: (1) Analysis of interval temperature data collected from inside residences of select program participants; and (2) Direct and indirect customer feedback from surveys designed and implemented by Southern California Edison at the conclusion of the program season. There were 100 indoor temperature monitors that were acquired by LBNL for this study that transmitted temperature readings at least once per hour with corresponding timestamps during the program season, June-October, 2009. Recorded temperatures were transferred from the onsite telemetry devices to a mesh network, stored, and then delivered to KEMA for analysis. Following an extensive data quality review, temperature increases during each of the thirty demand response test events were calculated for each device. The results are as follows: (1) Even for tests taking place during outside temperatures in excess of 100 degrees Fahrenheit, over 85 percent of the devices measured less than a 0.5 degree Fahrenheit temperature increase indoors during the duration of the event. (2) For the increases that were observed, none was more than 5 degrees and it was extremely rare for increases to be more than 2 degrees. At the end of the testing season SCE and KEMA designed and conducted a survey of the a facilities and public works managers and approximately 100 customers feedback survey to assess the extent the PLP events were noticed or disrupted the comfort level of participants. While only a small sampling of 3 managers and 16 customer surveys were completed, their responses indicate: (1) No customer reported even a moderate level of discomfort from the cycling-off of their air conditioners during test events; and (2) Very few customers noticed any of the thirty events at all. The results of this study suggest that the impacts on comfort from short-duration interruptions of air-conditioners, even in very hot climates, are for the most part very modest, if they are even noticed at all. Still, we should expect that these impacts will increase with longer interruptions of air-conditioning. By the same token, we should also expect that they will be less significant in cooler climates.

  3. A framework and review of customer outage costs: Integration and analysis of electric utility outage cost surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawton, Leora; Sullivan, Michael; Van Liere, Kent; Katz, Aaron; Eto, Joseph

    2003-11-01

    A clear understanding of the monetary value that customers place on reliability and the factors that give rise to higher and lower values is an essential tool in determining investment in the grid. The recent National Transmission Grid Study recognizes the need for this information as one of growing importance for both public and private decision makers. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy has undertaken this study, as a first step toward addressing the current absence of consistent data needed to support better estimates of the economic value of electricity reliability. Twenty-four studies, conducted by eight electric utilities between 1989 and 2002 representing residential and commercial/industrial (small, medium and large) customer groups, were chosen for analysis. The studies cover virtually all of the Southeast, most of the western United States, including California, rural Washington and Oregon, and the Midwest south and east of Chicago. All variables were standardized to a consistent metric and dollar amounts were adjusted to the 2002 CPI. The data were then incorporated into a meta-database in which each outage scenario (e.g., the lost of electric service for one hour on a weekday summer afternoon) is treated as an independent case or record both to permit comparisons between outage characteristics and to increase the statistical power of analysis results. Unadjusted average outage costs and Tobit models that estimate customer damage functions are presented. The customer damage functions express customer outage costs for a given outage scenario and customer class as a function of location, time of day, consumption, and business type. One can use the damage functions to calculate outage costs for specific customer types. For example, using the customer damage functions, the cost experienced by an ''average'' customer resulting from a 1 hour summer afternoon outage is estimated to be approximately $3 for a residential customer, $1,200 for small-medium commercial and industrial customer, and $82,000 for large commercial and industrial customer. Future work to improve the quality and coverage of information on the value of electricity reliability to customers is described.

  4. Sales to Ultimate Customers (Megawatthours) by State by Sector by Provider, 1990

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sales to Ultimate Customers (Megawatthours) by State by Sector by Provider, 1990-2014" "Year","State","Industry Sector Category","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Other","Total" 2014,"AK","Total Electric Industry",2043614,2761518,1359680,0,"NA",6164812 2014,"AL","Total Electric

  5. Sit Down with Sabin: Henrik Scheller: Customizing plants for biofuels. (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sabin, Russell; Scheller, Henrik

    2014-05-06

    Henrik Scheller from the JBEI appeared on August 3rd, 2011 for this installment of "Sit Down with Sabin," a conversation in which former reporter Sabin Russell chats with Lab staff about innovative science. They will discuss "Customizing plants for biofuels." During this series of conversations, Russell and Lab staff will explore the ups and downs of pioneering science, all without the aid of PowerPoints.

  6. Researchers find 3-D printed parts to provide low-cost, custom alternatives

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for laboratory equipment | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Researchers find 3-D printed parts to provide low-cost, custom alternatives for laboratory equipment By Raphael Rosen February 26, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook 3-D printed parts provide the stands for the aluminum globes in PPPL's Planeterrella, a device that simulates Northern Lights. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) 3-D printed parts provide the stands for the aluminum globes in PPPL's

  7. Researchers find 3-D printed parts to provide low-cost, custom alternatives

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for laboratory equipment | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Researchers find 3-D printed parts to provide low-cost, custom alternatives for laboratory equipment By Raphael Rosen February 26, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook 3-D printed parts provide the stands for the aluminum globes in PPPL's Planeterrella, a device that simulates Northern Lights. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) 3-D printed parts provide the stands for the aluminum globes in PPPL's

  8. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Ferguson Design and Construction Inc., Sagaponack, NY, Custom Home

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Long Island, NY, that scored HERS 43 without PV. This 5,088-square-foot custom home has R-25 double-stud walls, a vaulted roof with R-40 blown cellulose, R-10 XPS under slab, a hydro air system with 91% efficient boiler for forced air and radiant floor heat, and 100% LED lights.

  9. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend, Seattle, WA, Custom Home

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Seattle, WA, that scored HERS 37 without PV, HERS -1 with PV. This 1,915-square-foot custom home has SIP walls and roof, R-20 XPS under the slab, triple-pane windows, an air to water heat pump for radiant heat, and balanced ventilation with timer-controlled fans to bring in and exhaust air.

  10. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Transformations, Inc., Custom House, Devens, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This single-family home features a superinsulated shell with 12-inch double walls filled with open cell spray foam, as well as R-5 triple-pane windows. The 18.33 kW photovoltaic system can produce all the electricity the home can use in a year with enough left over to power an electric car for 30,000 miles.These features helped the builder to win a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the custom home category.

  11. Customer interface document for the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pettit, Kathleen; Kolb, William J.; Gill, David Dennis; Briggs, Ronald D.

    2012-03-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL is a test capability that allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt. The components tested can range from materials samples, to individual components such as flex hoses, ball joints, and valves, up to full solar collecting systems such as central receiver panels, parabolic troughs, or linear Fresnel systems. MSTL provides realistic conditions similar to a portion of a concentrating solar power facility. The facility currently uses 60/40 nitrate 'solar salt' and can circulate the salt at pressure up to 600psi, temperature to 585 C, and flow rate of 400-600GPM depending on temperature. The purpose of this document is to provide a basis for customers to evaluate the applicability to their testing needs, and to provide an outline of expectations for conducting testing on MSTL. The document can serve as the basis for testing agreements including Work for Others (WFO) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA). While this document provides the basis for these agreements and describes some of the requirements for testing using MSTL and on the site at Sandia, the document is not sufficient by itself as a test agreement. The document, however, does provide customers with a uniform set of information to begin the test planning process.

  12. Customer-Economics of Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Impact of High Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings with Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residential photovoltaic (PV) systems in the US are often compensated at the customer's underlying retail electricity rate through net metering. There is growing interest in understanding how potential changes in rates may impact the value of bill savings from PV. This article uses a production cost and capacity expansion model to project California hourly wholesale electricity market prices under a reference scenario and a 33% renewables scenario. Second, based on the wholesale electricity market prices generated by the model, the article develops retail rates (i.e., flat, time-of-use, and real-time pricing) for each future scenario based on standard retail rate design principles. Finally, based on these retail rates, the bill savings from PV are estimated for 226 California residential customers under two types of net metering, for each scenario. The article finds that high renewable penetrations can drive substantial changes in residential retail rates and that these changes, together with variations in retail rate structures and PV compensation mechanisms, interact to place substantial uncertainty on the future value of bill savings from residential PV.

  13. Now Available: Evaluating Electric Vehicle Charging Impacts and Customer Charging Behaviors- Experiences from Six SGIG Projects (December 2014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under OE's Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) program, six utilities evaluated operations and customer charging behaviors for in-home and public electric vehicle charging stations. The report is now available for downloading.

  14. Utility Potential Calculator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Potential Studies in the Northwest V1.0 Utility Potential Calculator V1.0 for Excel 2007 Utility Potential Calculator V1.0 for Excel 2003 Note: BPA developed the Utility...

  15. Customer response to day-ahead wholesale market electricity prices: Case study of RTP program experience in New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.; Hopper, N.; Sezgen, O.; Moezzi, M.; Bharvirkar, R.; Neenan, B.; Boisvert, R.; Cappers, P.; Pratt, D.

    2004-07-01

    There is growing interest in policies, programs and tariffs that encourage customer loads to provide demand response (DR) to help discipline wholesale electricity markets. Proposals at the retail level range from eliminating fixed rate tariffs as the default service for some or all customer groups to reinstituting utility-sponsored load management programs with market-based inducements to curtail. Alternative rate designs include time-of-use (TOU), day-ahead real-time pricing (RTP), critical peak pricing, and even pricing usage at real-time market balancing prices. Some Independent System Operators (ISOs) have implemented their own DR programs whereby load curtailment capabilities are treated as a system resource and are paid an equivalent value. The resulting load reductions from these tariffs and programs provide a variety of benefits, including limiting the ability of suppliers to increase spot and long-term market-clearing prices above competitive levels (Neenan et al., 2002; Boren stein, 2002; Ruff, 2002). Unfortunately, there is little information in the public domain to characterize and quantify how customers actually respond to these alternative dynamic pricing schemes. A few empirical studies of large customer RTP response have shown modest results for most customers, with a few very price-responsive customers providing most of the aggregate response (Herriges et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 2002). However, these studies examined response to voluntary, two-part RTP programs implemented by utilities in states without retail competition.1 Furthermore, the researchers had limited information on customer characteristics so they were unable to identify the drivers to price response. In the absence of a compelling characterization of why customers join RTP programs and how they respond to prices, many initiatives to modernize retail electricity rates seem to be stymied.

  16. Instrument Qualification of Custom Fabricated Water Activity Meter for Hot Cell Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoskey, Jacob K.

    2014-01-22

    This report describes a custom fabricated water activity meter and the results of the qualification of this meter as described in the laboratory test plan LAB-PLN-11-00012, Testing and Validation of an Enhanced Acquisition and Control System. It was calibrated against several NaOH solutions of varying concentrations to quantify the accuracy and precision of the instrument at 20 C and 60 C. Also, a schematic and parts list of the equipment used to make the water activity meter will be presented in this report.

  17. Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers in a Changing Regulatory Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brockway, N.

    2001-05-21

    As the electric industry goes through a transformation to a more market-driven model, traditional grounds for utility energy efficiency have come under fire, undermining the existing mechanisms to fund and deliver such services. The challenge, then, is to understand why the electric industry should sustain investments in helping low-income Americans use electricity efficiently, how such investments should be made, and how these policies can become part of the new electric industry structure. This report analyzes the opportunities and barriers to leveraging electric utility energy efficiency assistance to low-income customers during the transition of the electric industry to greater competition.

  18. Customized electric power storage device for inclusion in a collective microgrid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinett, III, Rush D.; Wilson, David G.; Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    2016-02-16

    An electric power storage device is described herein, wherein the electric power storage device is included in a microgrid. The electric power storage device has at least one of a charge rate, a discharge rate, or a power retention capacity that has been customized for a collective microgrid. The collective microgrid includes at least two connected microgrids. The at least one of the charge rate, the discharge rate, or the power retention capacity of the electric power storage device is computed based at least in part upon specified power source parameters in the at least two connected microgrids and specified load parameters in the at least two connected microgrids.

  19. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Preferred Builders, Old Greenwich, CT, Custom

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Old Greenwich, CT, that scored HERS 42 without PV or HERS 20 with PV. This 2,700-square-foot custom home has advanced framed walls with R-24 blown cellulose plus R-7.5 EPS rigid foam, membrane-coated OSB, a closed-cell spray foamed attic, R-13 closed-cell spray foam under the slab and on basement walls, an ERV, and a gas boiler for forced air and radiant floor heat.

  20. Customized oligonucleotide microchips that convert multiple genetic information to simple patterns, are portable and reusable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mirzabekov, Andrei; Guschin, Dmitry Y.; Chik, Valentine; Drobyshev, Aleksei; Fotin, Alexander; Yershov, Gennadiy; Lysov, Yuri

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to using customized oligonucleotide microchips as biosensors for the detection and identification of nucleic acids specific for different genes, organisms and/or individuals in the environment, in food and in biological samples. The microchips are designed to convert multiple bits of genetic information into simpler patterns of signals that are interpreted as a unit. Because of an improved method of hybridizing oligonucleotides from samples to microchips, microchips are reusable and transportable. For field study, portable laser or bar code scanners are suitable.

  1. Assessment of the Geothermal Potential Within the BPA Marketing Area.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lund, John W.; Allen, Eliot D.

    1980-07-01

    The potential of geothermal energy is estimated that can be used for direct heat applications and electrical power generation within the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) marketing area. The BPA marketing area includes three principal states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho and portions of California, Montana, Wyoming, Nevada, and Utah bordering on these three states. This area covers approximately 384,000 square miles and has an estimated population of 6,760,000. The total electrical geothermal potential within this marketing area is 4077 MW/sub e/ from hydrothermal resources and 16,000 MW/sub e/ from igneous systems, whereas the total thermal (wellhead) potential is 16.15 x 10/sup 15/ Btu/y. Approximately 200 geothermal resource sites were initially identified within the BPA marketing area. This number was then reduced to about 100 sites thought to be the most promising for development by the year 2000. These 100 sites, due to load area overlap, were grouped into 53 composite sites; 21-3/4 within BPA preference customer areas and 31-1/4 within nonpreference customer areas. The geothermal resource potential was then estimated for high-temperature (> 302/sup 0/F = 150/sup 0/C), intermediate-temperature (194 to 302/sup 0/F = 90 to 150/sup 0/C), and low-temperature (< 194/sup 0/F = 90/sup 0/C) resources.

  2. Potential Release Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PRS Potential Release Sites Legacy sites where hazardous materials are found to be above acceptable levels are collectively called potential release sites. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Less than 10 percent of the total number of potential release sites need to go through the full corrective action process. What are potential release sites? Potential release sites are areas around the Laboratory and

  3. Custom data support for the FAst -physics System Testbed and Research (FASTER) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toto, T.; Jensen, M.; Vogelmann, A.; Wagener, R.; Liu, Y.; Lin, W.

    2010-03-15

    The multi-institution FAst -physics System Testbed and Research (FASTER) project, funded by the DOE Earth System Modeling program, aims to evaluate and improve the parameterizations of fast processes (those involving clouds, precipitation and aerosols) in global climate models, using a combination of numerical prediction models, single column models, cloud resolving models, large-eddy simulations, full global climate model output and ARM active and passive remote sensing and in-situ data. This poster presents the Custom Data Support effort for the FASTER project. The effort will provide tailored datasets, statistics, best estimates and quality control data, as needed and defined by FASTER participants, for use in evaluating and improving parameterizations of fast processes in GCMs. The data support will include custom gridding and averaging, for the model of interest, using high time resolution and pixel level data from continuous ARM observations and complementary datasets. In addition to the FASTER team, these datasets will be made available to the ARM Science Team. Initial efforts with respect to data product development, priorities, availability and distribution are summarized here with an emphasis on cloud, atmospheric state and aerosol properties as observed during the Spring 2000 Cloud IOP and the Spring 2003 Aerosol IOP at the ARM Southern Great Plains site.

  4. Astroparticle physics with a customized low-background broad energy Germanium detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Amman, M.; Avignone, Frank T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Barbeau, P. S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Bugg, William; Burritt, Tom H.; Busch, Matthew; Capps, Greg L.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, R. J.; Creswick, R.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Diaz, J.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, Steven R.; Ely, James H.; Esterline, James H.; Farach, H. A.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fujikawa, Brian; Fuller, Erin S.; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Harper, Gregory; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hime, Andrew; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, Mary; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Miley, Harry S.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Myers, Allan W.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Peterson, David; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Prior, Gersende; Qian, J.; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rodriguez, Larry; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof P.; Salazar, Harold; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Swift, Gary; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Van Wechel, T. D.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wolfe, B. A.; Xiang, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, Harold; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhang, C.; Zimmerman, S.

    2011-10-01

    The Majorana Collaboration is building the Majorana Demonstrator, a 60 kg array of high purity germanium detectors housed in an ultra-low background shield at the Sanford Underground Laboratory in Lead, SD. The Majorana Demonstrator will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge while demonstrating the feasibility of a tonne-scale experiment. It may also carry out a dark matter search in the 1-10 GeV/c² mass range. We have found that customized Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors produced by Canberra have several desirable features for a neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment, including low electronic noise, excellent pulse shape analysis capabilities, and simple fabrication. We have deployed a customized BEGe, the Majorana Low-Background BEGe at Kimballton (MALBEK), in a low-background cryostat and shield at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility in Virginia. This paper will focus on the detector characteristics and measurements that can be performed with such a radiation detector in a low-background environment.

  5. Integrated fuses for OLED lighting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pschenitzka, Florian

    2007-07-10

    An embodiment of the present invention pertains to an electroluminescent lighting device for area illumination. The lighting device is fault tolerant due, in part, to the patterning of one or both of the electrodes into strips, and each of one or more of these strips has a fuse formed on it. The fuses are integrated on the substrate. By using the integrated fuses, the number of external contacts that are used is minimized. The fuse material is deposited using one of the deposition techniques that is used to deposit the thin layers of the electroluminescent lighting device.

  6. Manufacturing Process for OLED Integrated Substrate | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Pittsburgh, PA - Universal Display Corporation - Ewing, NJ DOE Total Funding: ... PPG will partner with Universal Display Corporation (UDC) to fabricate and characterize ...

  7. Ultrabright fluorescent OLEDS using triplet sinks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yifan; Forrest, Stephen R; Thompson, Mark

    2013-06-04

    A first device is provided. The first device further comprises an organic light emitting device. The organic light emitting device further comprises an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer further comprises an organic host compound, an organic emitting compound capable of fluorescent emission at room temperature, and an organic dopant compound. The triplet energy of the dopant compound is lower than the triplet energy of the host compound. The dopant compound does not strongly absorb the fluorescent emission of the emitting compound.

  8. Manufacturing Process for OLED Integrated Substrate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1214 2. Low cost sputtered anode, 415 3. IEL, EEL, IELEEL evaluation, 715 4. Process optimization, 716 Budget: Total DOE to date: 841,351 Total future DOE : 1,504,287 ...

  9. OLED Deposition Technology - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact PNNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryLow-cost processing methods will be required if the small organic molecule materials currently under development...

  10. Kauai, Hawaii: Solar Resource Analysis and High Penetration PV Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helm, C.; Burman, K.

    2010-04-01

    Overview of the solar resource assessment conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in cooperation with Kauai Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC) in Hawaii to determine the technical feasibility of increasing the contribution of solar renewable energy generation on the island of Kauaii through the use of photovoltaic (PV) arrays. The analysis, which was performed using a custom version of NREL's In My Back Yard (IMBY) software tool, showed that there is potential to generate enough energy to cover the peak load as reported for Kauai in 2007.

  11. Renewable Energy Economic Potential

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The report describes a geospatial analysis method to estimate the economic potential of several renewable resources available for electricity generation in the United States. Economic potential, one measure of renewable generation potential, is defined in this report as the subset of the available resource technical potential where the cost required to generate the electricity (which determines the minimum revenue requirements for development of the resource) is below the revenue available in terms of displaced energy and displaced capacity.

  12. Table 26. Natural gas home customer-weighted heating degree days

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    96 Created on: 4/26/2016 6:14:01 PM Table 26. Natural gas home customer-weighted heating degree days Month/Year/Type of data New England Middle Atlantic East North Central West North Central South Atlantic CT, ME, MA, NH, RI, VT NJ, NY, PA IL, IN, MI, OH, WI IA, KS, MN, MO, ND, NE, SD DE, FL, GA, MD, DC, NC, SC, VA, WV November Normal 702 665 757 841 443 2014 749 742 909 1,002 562 2015 583 509 596 653 325 % Diff (normal to 2015) -17.0 -23.5 -21.3 -22.4 -26.6 % Diff (2014 to 2015) -22.2 -31.4

  13. Accelerating the Customer-Driven Microgrid Through Real-Time Digital Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I. Leonard; T. Baldwin; M. Sloderbeck

    2009-07-01

    Comprehensive design and testing of realistic customer-driven microgrids requires a high performance simulation platform capable of incorporating power system and control models with external hardware systems. Traditional non real-time simulation is unable to fully capture the level of detail necessary to expose real-world implementation issues. With a real-time digital simulator as its foundation, a high-fidelity simulation environment that includes a robust electrical power system model, advanced control architecture, and a highly adaptable communication network is introduced. Hardware-in-the-loop implementation approaches for the hardware-based control and communication systems are included. An overview of the existing power system model and its suitability for investigation of autonomous island formation within the microgrid is additionally presented. Further test plans are also documented.

  14. Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Network (EREN) customer satisfaction survey, 1997. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, A.V.; Henderson, D.P.

    1997-07-01

    the EREN Customer Satisfaction Survey 1997 was designed to follow up the results of the 1995-96 Surveys, enabling comparison to the 1995- 96 baseline, and to provide additional qualitative feedback about EREN. Both the 1995-96 and 1997 Surveys had these objectives: Identify and define actual EREN users; Determine the value or benefits derived from the use of EREN; Determine the kind and quality of services that users want; Determine the users` levels of satisfaction with existing services; Determine users` preferences in both the sources of service and means of delivery; and Establish continuous quality improvement measures. This report presents the methodology used, scope and limitations of the study, description of the survey instrument, and findings regarding demographics, technical capabilities, usage patterns, general use, importance of and satisfaction with resources, and additional information and comments.

  15. Utility of Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) For The Rapid Manufacture of Customized Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Lonnie J.

    2015-08-01

    This Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Manufacturing Development Facility (MDF) technical collaboration project was conducted in two phases as a CRADA with Local Motors Inc. Phase 1 was previously reported as Advanced Manufacturing of Complex Cyber Mechanical Devices through Community Engagement and Micro-manufacturing and demonstrated the integration of components onto a prototype body part for a vehicle. Phase 2 was reported as Utility of Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) for the Rapid Manufacture of Customized Electric Vehicles and demonstrated the high profile live printing of an all-electric vehicle using ONRL s Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) technology. This demonstration generated considerable national attention and successfully demonstrated the capabilities of the BAAM system as developed by ORNL and Cincinnati, Inc. and the feasibility of additive manufacturing of a full scale electric vehicle as envisioned by the CRADA partner Local Motors, Inc.

  16. RASTtk: A modular and extensible implementation of the RAST algorithm for building custom annotation pipelines and annotating batches of genomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brettin, Thomas; Davis, James J.; Disz, Terry; Edwards, Robert A.; Gerdes, Svetlana; Olsen, Gary J.; Olson, Robert; Overbeek, Ross; Parrello, Bruce; Pusch, Gordon D.; Shukla, Maulik; Thomason, III, James A.; Stevens, Rick; Vonstein, Veronika; Wattam, Alice R.; Xia, Fangfang

    2015-02-10

    The RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology) annotation engine was built in 2008 to annotate bacterial and archaeal genomes. It works by offering a standard software pipeline for identifying genomic features (i.e., protein-encoding genes and RNA) and annotating their functions. Recently, in order to make RAST a more useful research tool and to keep pace with advancements in bioinformatics, it has become desirable to build a version of RAST that is both customizable and extensible. In this paper, we describe the RAST tool kit (RASTtk), a modular version of RAST that enables researchers to build custom annotation pipelines. RASTtk offers a choice of software for identifying and annotating genomic features as well as the ability to add custom features to an annotation job. RASTtk also accommodates the batch submission of genomes and the ability to customize annotation protocols for batch submissions. This is the first major software restructuring of RAST since its inception.

  17. Distributed energy resources customer adoption modeling with combined heat and power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2003-07-01

    In this report, an economic model of customer adoption of distributed energy resources (DER) is developed. It covers progress on the DER project for the California Energy Commission (CEC) at Berkeley Lab during the period July 2001 through Dec 2002 in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Distributed Energy Resources Integration (DERI) project. CERTS has developed a specific paradigm of distributed energy deployment, the CERTS Microgrid (as described in Lasseter et al. 2002). The primary goal of CERTS distributed generation research is to solve the technical problems required to make the CERTS Microgrid a viable technology, and Berkeley Lab's contribution is to direct the technical research proceeding at CERTS partner sites towards the most productive engineering problems. The work reported herein is somewhat more widely applicable, so it will be described within the context of a generic microgrid (mGrid). Current work focuses on the implementation of combined heat and power (CHP) capability. A mGrid as generically defined for this work is a semiautonomous grouping of generating sources and end-use electrical loads and heat sinks that share heat and power. Equipment is clustered and operated for the benefit of its owners. Although it can function independently of the traditional power system, or macrogrid, the mGrid is usually interconnected and exchanges energy and possibly ancillary services with the macrogrid. In contrast to the traditional centralized paradigm, the design, implementation, operation, and expansion of the mGrid is meant to optimize the overall energy system requirements of participating customers rather than the objectives and requirements of the macrogrid.

  18. The Impact of Rate Design and Net Metering on the Bill Savings from Distributed PV for Residential Customers in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darghouth, Naim; Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan

    2010-03-30

    Net metering has become a widespread policy in the U.S. for supporting distributed photovoltaics (PV) adoption. Though specific design details vary, net metering allows customers with PV to reduce their electric bills by offsetting their consumption with PV generation, independent of the timing of the generation relative to consumption - in effect, compensating the PV generation at retail electricity rates (Rose et al. 2009). While net metering has played an important role in jump-starting the residential PV market in the U.S., challenges to net metering policies have emerged in a number of states and contexts, and alternative compensation methods are under consideration. Moreover, one inherent feature of net metering is that the value of the utility bill savings it provides to customers with PV depends heavily on the structure of the underlying retail electricity rate, as well as on the characteristics of the customer and PV system. Consequently, the value of net metering - and the impact of moving to alternative compensation mechanisms - can vary substantially from one customer to the next. For these reasons, it is important for policymakers and others that seek to support the development of distributed PV to understand both how the bill savings varies under net metering, and how the bill savings under net metering compares to other possible compensation mechanisms. To advance this understanding, we analyze the bill savings from PV for residential customers of California's two largest electric utilities, Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) and Southern California Edison (SCE). The analysis is based on hourly load data from a sample of 215 residential customers located in the service territories of the two utilities, matched with simulated hourly PV production for the same time period based on data from the nearest of 73 weather stations in the state.

  19. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Federal Energy Management Program Technical Assistance Project 184 U.S. Customs and Border Protection Data Center, Springfield, Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-09-30

    This report documents the findings of an on-site energy audit of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Data Center in Springfield, Virginia.

  20. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Federal Energy Management Program Technical Assistance Project 184 U.S. Customs and Border Protection Administrative and Laboratory Building, Springfield, Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-09-30

    This report documents the findings of an on-site energy audit of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Laboratory in Springfield, Virginia.

  1. Field matric potential sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2001-01-01

    A method of determining matric potential of a sample, the method comprising placing the sample in a container, the container having an opening; and contacting the sample with a tensiometer via the opening. An apparatus for determining matric potential of a sample, the apparatus comprising a housing configured to receive a sample; a portable matric potential sensing device extending into the housing and having a porous member; and a wall closing the housing to insulate the sample and at least a portion of the matric potential sensing device including the porous member.

  2. The Program Administrator Cost of Saved Energy for Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billingsley, Megan A.; Hoffman, Ian M.; Stuart, Elizabeth; Schiller, Steven R.; Goldman, Charles A.; LaCommare, Kristina

    2014-03-19

    End-use energy efficiency is increasingly being relied upon as a resource for meeting electricity and natural gas utility system needs within the United States. There is a direct connection between the maturation of energy efficiency as a resource and the need for consistent, high-quality data and reporting of efficiency program costs and impacts. To support this effort, LBNL initiated the Cost of Saved Energy Project (CSE Project) and created a Demand-Side Management (DSM) Program Impacts Database to provide a resource for policy makers, regulators, and the efficiency industry as a whole. This study is the first technical report of the LBNL CSE Project and provides an overview of the project scope, approach, and initial findings, including: • Providing a proof of concept that the program-level cost and savings data can be collected, organized, and analyzed in a systematic fashion; • Presenting initial program, sector, and portfolio level results for the program administrator CSE for a recent time period (2009-2011); and • Encouraging state and regional entities to establish common reporting definitions and formats that would make the collection and comparison of CSE data more reliable. The LBNL DSM Program Impacts Database includes the program results reported to state regulators by more than 100 program administrators in 31 states, primarily for the years 2009–2011. In total, we have compiled cost and energy savings data on more than 1,700 programs over one or more program-years for a total of more than 4,000 program-years’ worth of data, providing a rich dataset for analyses. We use the information to report costs-per-unit of electricity and natural gas savings for utility customer-funded, end-use energy efficiency programs. The program administrator CSE values are presented at national, state, and regional levels by market sector (e.g., commercial, industrial, residential) and by program type (e.g., residential whole home programs, commercial new construction, commercial/industrial custom rebate programs). In this report, the focus is on gross energy savings and the costs borne by the program administrator—including administration, payments to implementation contractors, marketing, incentives to program participants (end users) and both midstream and upstream trade allies, and evaluation costs. We collected data on net savings and costs incurred by program participants. However, there were insufficient data on participant cost contributions, and uncertainty and variability in the ways in which net savings were reported and defined across states (and program administrators).

  3. Design and development of the Waukesha Custom Engine Control Air/Fuel Module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, D.W.

    1996-12-31

    The Waukesha Custom Engine Control Air/Fuel Module (AFM) is designed to control the air-fuel ratio for all Waukesha carbureted, gaseous fueled, industrial engine. The AFM is programmed with a personal computer to run in one of four control modes: catalyst, best power, best economy, or lean-burn. One system can control naturally aspirated, turbocharged, in-line or vee engines. The basic system consists of an oxygen sensing system, intake manifold pressure transducer, electronic control module, actuator and exhaust thermocouple. The system permits correct operation of Waukesha engines in spite of changes in fuel pressure or temperature, engine load or speed, and fuel composition. The system utilizes closed loop control and is centered about oxygen sensing technology. An innovative approach to applying oxygen sensors to industrial engines provides very good performance, greatly prolongs sensor life, and maintains sensor accuracy. Design considerations and operating results are given for application of the system to stationary, industrial engines operating on fuel gases of greatly varying composition.

  4. WINDExchange: Potential Wind Capacity

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Potential Wind Capacity Potential wind capacity maps are provided for a 2014 industry standard wind turbine installed on a 110-m tower, which represents plausible current technology options, and a wind turbine on a 140-m tower, which represents near-future technology options. Enlarge image This map shows the wind potential at a 110-m height for the United States. Download a printable map. Click on a state to view the wind map for that state. * Grid Granularity = 400 sq km* 35% Gross Capacity

  5. Ground potential rise monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Zachery Warren; Zevenbergen, Gary Allen

    2012-07-17

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising a first electrode, a second electrode, and a voltage attenuator. The first electrode and the second electrode are both electrically connected to the voltage attenuator. A means for determining the presence of a dangerous ground potential is connected to the voltage attenuator. The device and method further comprises a means for enabling one or more alarms upon the detection of the dangerous ground potential. Preferably, a first transmitter/receiver is connected to the means for enabling one or more alarms. Preferably, a second transmitter/receiver, comprising a button, is electromagnetically connected to the first transmitter/receiver. Preferably, the means for determining the presence of a dangerous ground potential comprises a means for determining the true RMS voltage at the output of the voltage attenuator, a transient detector connected to the output of the voltage attenuator, or a combination thereof.

  6. SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Results for Custom Reaction Intensity and Total Dead Fuels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Lloyd A.; Paresol, Bernard

    2014-09-01

    This report of the geostatistical analysis results of the fire fuels response variables, custom reaction intensity and total dead fuels is but a part of an SRS 2010 vegetation inventory project. For detailed description of project, theory and background including sample design, methods, and results please refer to USDA Forest Service Savannah River Site internal report “SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Report”, (Edwards & Parresol 2013).

  7. RASTtk: A modular and extensible implementation of the RAST algorithm for building custom annotation pipelines and annotating batches of genomes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brettin, Thomas; Davis, James J.; Disz, Terry; Edwards, Robert A.; Gerdes, Svetlana; Olsen, Gary J.; Olson, Robert; Overbeek, Ross; Parrello, Bruce; Pusch, Gordon D.; et al

    2015-02-10

    The RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology) annotation engine was built in 2008 to annotate bacterial and archaeal genomes. It works by offering a standard software pipeline for identifying genomic features (i.e., protein-encoding genes and RNA) and annotating their functions. Recently, in order to make RAST a more useful research tool and to keep pace with advancements in bioinformatics, it has become desirable to build a version of RAST that is both customizable and extensible. In this paper, we describe the RAST tool kit (RASTtk), a modular version of RAST that enables researchers to build custom annotation pipelines. RASTtk offersmore » a choice of software for identifying and annotating genomic features as well as the ability to add custom features to an annotation job. RASTtk also accommodates the batch submission of genomes and the ability to customize annotation protocols for batch submissions. This is the first major software restructuring of RAST since its inception.« less

  8. Ground potential rise monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Zachery W. (Mandan, ND); Zevenbergen, Gary A. (Arvada, CO)

    2012-04-03

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising positioning a first electrode and a second electrode at a distance from each other into the earth. The voltage of the first electrode and second electrode is attenuated by an attenuation factor creating an attenuated voltage. The true RMS voltage of the attenuated voltage is determined creating an attenuated true RMS voltage. The attenuated true RMS voltage is then multiplied by the attenuation factor creating a calculated true RMS voltage. If the calculated true RMS voltage is greater than a first predetermined voltage threshold, a first alarm is enabled at a local location. If user input is received at a remote location acknowledging the first alarm, a first alarm acknowledgment signal is transmitted. The first alarm acknowledgment signal is then received at which time the first alarm is disabled.

  9. Predicting window condensation potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGowan, A.

    1995-07-01

    Although a substantial amount of effort has been expended to develop numerical methods for determining window U-factors, there has been little work to date on using numerical methods to predict condensation potential. It is, perhaps, of direct interest to most ASHRAE members to determine heat loss and solar gains through windows as a preliminary step to sizing heating and cooling equipment, but condensation has long been recognized as an extremely important issue for consumers (and, consequently, for window manufacturers). Moreover, building scientists recognize the link between condensation and increased energy consumption (due to latent loads), reduced occupant comfort and inferior indoor air quality (from the presence of bacteria and mold), and structural damage (where accumulated condensation is absorbed by the building materials, thus reducing their structural stability). The National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) is developing a rating method for condensation potential in fenestration products, as part of its mandate from the Department of Energy. A rating method would benefit from the use of simulation as a supplement to physical condensation resistance testing, to reduce the cost and time required for implementation and increase the flexibility of the rating method. This article outlines the necessary components in the application of numerical methods for evaluating condensation in fenestration products, and describes the status of the development of these methods. The theoretical approach and its practical application are discussed, as well as some comparisons between numerical prediction and physical test results for a sample of products. Much of the technical discussion in this article can be found in ASHRAE Transactions.

  10. The Potential Economic Impact of Electricity Restructuring in the State of Oklahoma: Phase I Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, SW

    2001-03-27

    Because of the recent experiences of several states undergoing restructuring (e.g., higher prices, greater volatility, lower reliability), concerns have been raised in states currently considering restructuring as to whether their systems are equally vulnerable. Factors such as local generation costs, transmission constraints, market concentration, and market design can all play a role in the success or failure of the market. These factors along with the mix of generation capacity supplying the state will influence the relative prices paid by consumers. The purpose of this project is to provide a model and process to evaluate the potential price and economic impacts of restructuring the Oklahoma electric industry. This Phase I report concentrates on providing an analysis of the Oklahoma system in the near-term, using only present generation resources and customer demands. In Phase II, a longer-term analysis will be conducted, incorporating the potential of new generation resources and customer responses. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) model to evaluate marginal-cost-based and regulated prices for the state. The model dispatches the state's power plants to meet the demands from all customers based on the marginal cost of production. Consequent market-clearing prices for each hour of the year are applied to customers' demands to determine the average prices paid. The revenues from the sales are paid to each plant for their generation, resulting in a net profit or loss depending on the plant's costs and prices when it operates. Separately, the model calculates the total cost of generation, including fixed costs such as depreciation, interest and required return on equity. These costs are allocated among the customer classes to establish regulated prices for each class. These prices can be compared to the average market-based prices to see if prices increase or decrease with restructuring. An unchanging transmission and distribution (T&D) component is added to both types of generation prices to determine the overall price of power to each customer class. A base case was established for the state as a whole, using the set of plants and customer demands from 1999 based on data from various industry and government sources. Energy demands from the different customer classes were defined, including wholesale sales outside the state. Plant ownership by specific utilities, whether investor-owned, government, or cooperatives, was not used as a factor in the analysis, except in the generic cost of capital for the different types of utilities. The results showed an average price increase of roughly one cent per kilowatt-hour under a restructured market. This is because in a regulated market each plant will earn just enough to pay all costs and earn a reasonable return on equity. In a restructured market, where prices are based on marginal costs of the most expensive plant operating at any given time, some plants may earn little or nothing over the year while others earn more than the regulated rate of return.

  11. Static tetraquark and pentaquark potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandrou, C.; Koutsou, G.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluate the static qqqq and qqqqq potentials in the quenched theory at {beta}=5.8 and {beta}=6.0 on a lattice of size 16{sup 3}x32. We compare the static potentials to the sum of two meson potentials for the tetraquark system and to the sum of the baryonic and mesonic potentials for the pentaquark state, as well as, with the confining potential obtained in the strong coupling expansion.

  12. Colorado Potential Geothermal Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado PRS Cool Fairways Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the weakened basement rocks. Isostatic gravity was utilized to identify structural basin areas, characterized by gravity low values reflecting weakened basement rocks. Together interpreted regional fault zones and basin outlines define geothermal "exploration fairways", where the potential exists for deep, superheated fluid flow in the absence of Pliocene or younger volcanic units Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4544698.569273 m Left: 144918.141004 m Right: 763728.391299 m Bottom: 4094070.397932 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  13. RANGELAND SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Spangler; George F. Vance; Gerald E. Schuman; Justin D. Derner

    2012-03-31

    Rangelands occupy approximately half of the world's land area and store greater than 10% of the terrestrial biomass carbon and up to 30% of the global soil organic carbon. Although soil carbon sequestration rates are generally low on rangelands in comparison to croplands, increases in terrestrial carbon in rangelands resulting from management can account for significant carbon sequestration given the magnitude of this land resource. Despite the significance rangelands can play in carbon sequestration, our understanding remains limited. Researchers conducted a literature review to identify sustainably management practices that conserve existing rangeland carbon pools, as well as increase or restore carbon sequestration potentials for this type of ecosystem. The research team also reviewed the impact of grazing management on rangeland carbon dynamics, which are not well understood due to heterogeneity in grassland types. The literature review on the impact of grazing showed a wide variation of results, ranging from positive to negative to no response. On further review, the intensity of grazing appears to be a major factor in controlling rangeland soil organic carbon dynamics. In 2003, researchers conducted field sampling to assess the effect of several drought years during the period 1993-2002. Results suggested that drought can significantly impact rangeland soil organic carbon (SOC) levels, and therefore, carbon sequestration. Resampling was conducted in 2006; results again suggested that climatic conditions may have overridden management effects on SOC due to the ecological lag of the severe drought of 2002. Analysis of grazing practices during this research effort suggested that there are beneficial effects of light grazing compared to heavy grazing and non-grazing with respect to increased SOC and nitrogen contents. In general, carbon storage in rangelands also increases with increased precipitation, although researchers identified threshold levels of precipitation where sequestration begins to decrease.

  14. CUSTOMER RESPONSE TO BESTPRACTICES TRAINING AND SOFTWARE TOOLS PROVIDED BY DOE'S INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweitzer, Martin; Martin, Michaela A; Schmoyer, Richard L

    2008-03-01

    The BestPractices program area, which has evolved into the Save Energy Now (SEN) Initiative, is a component of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) that provides technical assistance and disseminates information on energy-efficient technologies and practices to U.S. industrial firms. The BestPractices approach to information dissemination includes conducting training sessions which address energy-intensive systems (compressed air, steam, process heat, pumps, motors, and fans) and distributing DOE software tools on those same topics. The current report documents a recent Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) study undertaken to determine the implementation rate, attribution rate, and reduction factor for industrial end-users who received BestPractices training and registered software in FY 2006. The implementation rate is the proportion of service recipients taking energy-saving actions as a result of the service received. The attribution rate applies to those individuals taking energy-saving actions as a result of the services received and represents the portion of the savings achieved through those actions that is due to the service. The reduction factor is the saving that is realized from program-induced measures as a proportion of the potential savings that could be achieved if all service recipients took action. In addition to examining those factors, the ORNL study collected information on selected characteristics of service recipients, the perceived value of the services provided, and the potential energy savings that can be achieved through implementation of measures identified from the training or software. Because the provision of training is distinctly different from the provision of software tools, the two efforts were examined independently and the findings for each are reported separately.

  15. Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements: Motivating residential customers to invest in comprehensive upgrades that eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Merrian C.

    2010-09-20

    Policy makers and program designers in the U.S. and abroad are deeply concerned with the question of how to scale up energy efficiency to a level that is commensurate both to the scale of the energy and climate challenges we face, and to the potential for energy savings that has been touted for decades. When policy makers ask what energy efficiency can do, the answers usually revolve around the technical and economic potential of energy efficiency - they rarely hone in on the element of energy demand that matters most for changing energy usage in existing homes: the consumer. A growing literature is concerned with the behavioral underpinnings of energy consumption. We examine a narrower, related subject: How can millions of Americans be persuaded to divert valued time and resources into upgrading their homes to eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy? With hundreds of millions of public dollars flowing into incentives, workforce training, and other initiatives to support comprehensive home energy improvements, it makes sense to review the history of these programs and begin gleaning best practices for encouraging comprehensive home energy improvements. Looking across 30 years of energy efficiency programs that targeted the residential market, many of the same issues that confronted past program administrators are relevant today: How do we cost-effectively motivate customers to take action? Who can we partner with to increase program participation? How do we get residential efficiency programs to scale? While there is no proven formula - and only limited success to date with reliably motivating large numbers of Americans to invest in comprehensive home energy improvements, especially if they are being asked to pay for a majority of the improvement costs - there is a rich and varied history of experiences that new programs can draw upon. Our primary audiences are policy makers and program designers - especially those that are relatively new to the field, such as the over 2,000 towns, cities, states, and regions who are recipients of American Reinvestment and Recovery Act funds for clean energy programs. This report synthesizes lessons from first generation programs, highlights emerging best practices, and suggests methods and approaches to use in designing, implementing, and evaluating these programs. We examined 14 residential energy efficiency programs, conducted an extensive literature review, interviewed industry experts, and surveyed residential contractors to draw out these lessons.

  16. Automated Price and Demand Response Demonstration for Large Customers in New York City using OpenADR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Joyce Jihyun; Yin, Rongxin; Kiliccote, Sila

    2013-10-01

    Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR), an XML-based information exchange model, is used to facilitate continuous price-responsive operation and demand response participation for large commercial buildings in New York who are subject to the default day-ahead hourly pricing. We summarize the existing demand response programs in New York and discuss OpenADR communication, prioritization of demand response signals, and control methods. Building energy simulation models are developed and field tests are conducted to evaluate continuous energy management and demand response capabilities of two commercial buildings in New York City. Preliminary results reveal that providing machine-readable prices to commercial buildings can facilitate both demand response participation and continuous energy cost savings. Hence, efforts should be made to develop more sophisticated algorithms for building control systems to minimize customer's utility bill based on price and reliability information from the electricity grid.

  17. Developing custom fire behavior fuel models from ecologically complex fuel structures for upper Atlantic Coastal Plain forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parresol, Bernard, R.; Scott, Joe, H.; Andreu, Anne; Prichard, Susan; Kurth, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Currently geospatial fire behavior analyses are performed with an array of fire behavior modeling systems such as FARSITE, FlamMap, and the Large Fire Simulation System. These systems currently require standard or customized surface fire behavior fuel models as inputs that are often assigned through remote sensing information. The ability to handle hundreds or thousands of measured surface fuelbeds representing the fine scale variation in fire behavior on the landscape is constrained in terms of creating compatible custom fire behavior fuel models. In this study, we demonstrate an objective method for taking ecologically complex fuelbeds from inventory observations and converting those into a set of custom fuel models that can be mapped to the original landscape. We use an original set of 629 fuel inventory plots measured on an 80,000 ha contiguous landscape in the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States. From models linking stand conditions to component fuel loads, we impute fuelbeds for over 6000 stands. These imputed fuelbeds were then converted to fire behavior parameters under extreme fuel moisture and wind conditions (97th percentile) using the fuel characteristic classification system (FCCS) to estimate surface fire rate of spread, surface fire flame length, shrub layer reaction intensity (heat load), non-woody layer reaction intensity, woody layer reaction intensity, and litter-lichen-moss layer reaction intensity. We performed hierarchical cluster analysis of the stands based on the values of the fire behavior parameters. The resulting 7 clusters were the basis for the development of 7 custom fire behavior fuel models from the cluster centroids that were calibrated against the FCCS point data for wind and fuel moisture. The latter process resulted in calibration against flame length as it was difficult to obtain a simultaneous calibration against both rate of spread and flame length. The clusters based on FCCS fire behavior parameters represent reasonably identifiable stand conditions, being: (1) pine dominated stands with more litter and down woody debriscomponents than other stands, (2) hardwood and pine stands with no shrubs, (3) hardwood dominated stands with low shrub and high non-woody biomass and high down woody debris, (4) stands with high grass and forb (i.e., non-woody) biomass as well as substantial shrub biomass, (5) stands with both high shrub and litter biomass, (6) pine-mixed hardwood stands with moderate litter biomass and low shrub biomass, and (7) baldcypress-tupelo stands. Models representing these stand clusters generated flame lengths from 0.6 to 2.3 musing a 30 km h{sub 1} wind speed and fireline intensities of 100-1500 kW m{sub 1} that are typical within the range of experience on this landscape. The fuel models ranked 1 < 2 < 7 < 5 < 4 < 3 < 6 in terms of both flame length and fireline intensity. The method allows for ecologically complex data to be utilized in order to create a landscape representative of measured fuel conditions and to create models that interface with geospatial fire models.

  18. Commercial Building Toplighting: Energy Saving Potential and Potential Paths Forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, Tyson; Roth, Kurt W.

    2008-06-01

    This report documents the energy-saving potential of toplighting, a form of daylighting that combines skylights and electric lighting controls.

  19. Potential benefits of superconductivity to transportation in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rote, D.M.; Johnson, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    Research in US transportation applications of superconductors is strongly motivated by a number of potential national benefits. These include the reduction of dependence on petroleum-based fuels, energy savings, substantially reduced air and noise pollution, increased customer convenience, and reduced maintenance costs. Current transportation technology offers little flexibility to switch to alternative fuels, and efforts to achieve the other benefits are confounded by growing congestion at airports and on urban roadways. A program has been undertaken to identify possible applications of the emerging superconducting applications to transportation and to evaluate potential national benefits. The current phase of the program will select the most promising applications for a more detailed subsequent study. Transportation modes being examined include highway and industrial vehicles, as well as rail, sea, air transport and pipelines. Three strategies are being considered: (1) replacing present components with those employing superconductors, (2) substituting new combinations of components or systems for present systems, and (3) developing completely new technologies. Distinctions are made between low-, medium-, and near-room-temperature superconductors. The most promising applications include magnetically levitated passenger and freight vehicles; replacement of drive systems in locomotives, self-propelled rail cars, and ships; and electric vehicles inductively coupled to electrified roadways.

  20. Estimating Renewable Energy Economic Potential in the United States. Methodology and Initial Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Austin; Beiter, Philipp; Heimiller, Donna; Davidson, Carolyn; Denholm, Paul; Melius, Jennifer; Lopez, Anthony; Hettinger, Dylan; Mulcahy, David; Porro, Gian

    2015-07-30

    This report describes a geospatial analysis method to estimate the economic potential of several renewable resources available for electricity generation in the United States. Economic potential, one measure of renewable generation potential, may be defined in several ways. For example, one definition might be expected revenues (based on local market prices) minus generation costs, considered over the expected lifetime of the generation asset. Another definition might be generation costs relative to a benchmark (e.g., a natural gas combined cycle plant) using assumptions of fuel prices, capital cost, and plant efficiency. Economic potential in this report is defined as the subset of the available resource technical potential where the cost required to generate the electricity (which determines the minimum revenue requirements for development of the resource) is below the revenue available in terms of displaced energy and displaced capacity. The assessment is conducted at a high geospatial resolution (more than 150,000 technology-specific sites in the continental United States) to capture the significant variation in local resource, costs, and revenue potential. This metric can be a useful screening factor for understanding the economic viability of renewable generation technologies at a specific location. In contrast to many common estimates of renewable energy potential, economic potential does not consider market dynamics, customer demand, or most policy drivers that may incent renewable energy generation.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Potential Partners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Potential Partners Potential Partners Sandia and one or more partners outside the federal government collaborate and share the results of a jointly conducted research and development project. Partners can be domestic or foreign and generally come from industry, nonprofit organizations or academia. Becoming a Partner SAM Registration The System for Award Management (SAM) is a government portal that enables secure registration as a potential CRADA Partner with Sandia National Laboratories.

  2. Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data: Custom Engineering trough with glass reflector surface and Sandia-designed receivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-05-01

    Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Custom Engineering trough and Sandia-designed receivers, with glass reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States. Two experimental receivers were tested, one with an antireflective coating on the glass envelope around the receiver tube and one without the antireflective coating.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Potential Sponsors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Potential Sponsors Potential Partners Sandia has worked with a wide variety of Sponsors, including large companies and small businesses based in New Mexico. Projects involve a broad range of technologies including materials and materials processing, advanced manufacturing and precision engineering, microelectronics and photonics, advanced computing and information technologies, modeling and simulation, nanotechnologies, vulnerability analysis, robotics and intelligent systems, failure analysis

  4. The Potential Economic Impact of Electricity Restructuring in the State of Oklahoma: Phase II Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, SW

    2001-10-30

    Because of the recent experiences of several states undergoing restructuring (e.g., higher prices, greater volatility, lower reliability), concerns have been raised in states currently considering restructuring as to whether their systems are equally vulnerable. Factors such as local generation costs, transmission constraints, market concentration, and market design can all play a role in the success or failure of the market. These factors along with the mix of generation capacity supplying the state will influence the relative prices paid by consumers. The purpose of this project is to provide a model and process to evaluate the potential price and economic impacts of restructuring the Oklahoma electric industry. The Phase I report concentrated on providing an analysis of the Oklahoma system in the near-term, using only present generation resources and customer demands. This Phase II study analyzed the Oklahoma power market in 2010, incorporating the potential of new generation resources and customer responses. Five key findings of this Phase II were made: (1) Projected expansion in generating capacity exceeds by over 3,000 MW the demands within the state plus the amount that could be exported with the current transmission system. (2) Even with reduced new plant construction, most new plants could lose money (although residential consumers would see lower rates) unless they have sufficient market power to raise their prices without losing significant market share (Figure S-1). (3) If new plants can raise prices to stay profitable, existing low-cost coal and hydro plants will have very high profits. Average prices to customers could be 5% to 25% higher than regulated rates (Figure S-1). If the coal and hydro plants are priced at cost-based rates (through long-term contracts or continued regulation) while all other plants use market-based rates then prices are lower. (4) Customer response to real-time prices can lower the peak capacity requirements by around 9%, lowering the need for new capacity and reduce prices during the peak demand. (5) Changes to electric prices on the order of 5% to 20% will have only a modest effect on overall economic activity within the state.

  5. A Prospective Quasi-Randomized Comparison of Intraoperatively Built Custom-Linked Seeds Versus Loose Seeds for Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Satoh, Takefumi; Kawakami, Shogo; Tsumura, Hideyasu; Komori, Shouko; Tabata, Ken-ichi; Sekiguchi, Akane; Takahashi, Ryo; Soda, Itaru; Takenaka, Kouji; Iwamura, Masatsugu; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To compare dosimetric parameters, seed migration rates, operation times, and acute toxicities of intraoperatively built custom-linked (IBCL) seeds with those of loose seeds for prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Participants were 140 patients with low or intermediate prostate cancer prospectively allocated to an IBCL seed group (n=74) or a loose seed group (n=66), using quasirandomization (allocated by week of the month). All patients underwent prostate brachytherapy using an interactive plan technique. Computed tomography and plain radiography were performed the next day and 1month after brachytherapy. The primary endpoint was detection of a 5% difference in dose to 90% of prostate volume on postimplant computed tomography 1month after treatment. Seed migration was defined as a seed position >1cm from the cluster of other seeds on radiography. A seed dropped into the seminal vesicle was also defined as a migrated seed. Results: Dosimetric parameters including the primary endpoint did not differ significantly between groups, but seed migration rate was significantly lower in the IBCL seed group (0%) than in the loose seed group (55%; P<.001). Mean operation time was slightly but significantly longer in the IBCL seed group (57min) than in the loose seed group (50min; P<.001). No significant differences in acute toxicities were seen between groups (median follow-up, 9months). Conclusions: This prospective quasirandomized control trial showed no dosimetric differences between IBCL seed and loose seed groups. However, a strong trend toward decreased postimplant seed migration was shown in the IBCL seed group.

  6. Method and system for producing sputtered thin films with sub-angstrom thickness uniformity or custom thickness gradients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Folta, James A.; Montcalm, Claude; Walton, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    A method and system for producing a thin film with highly uniform (or highly accurate custom graded) thickness on a flat or graded substrate (such as concave or convex optics), by sweeping the substrate across a vapor deposition source with controlled (and generally, time-varying) velocity. In preferred embodiments, the method includes the steps of measuring the source flux distribution (using a test piece that is held stationary while exposed to the source), calculating a set of predicted film thickness profiles, each film thickness profile assuming the measured flux distribution and a different one of a set of sweep velocity modulation recipes, and determining from the predicted film thickness profiles a sweep velocity modulation recipe which is adequate to achieve a predetermined thickness profile. Aspects of the invention include a practical method of accurately measuring source flux distribution, and a computer-implemented method employing a graphical user interface to facilitate convenient selection of an optimal or nearly optimal sweep velocity modulation recipe to achieve a desired thickness profile on a substrate. Preferably, the computer implements an algorithm in which many sweep velocity function parameters (for example, the speed at which each substrate spins about its center as it sweeps across the source) can be varied or set to zero.

  7. Completeness for sparse potential scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Zhongwei

    2014-01-15

    The present paper is devoted to the scattering theory of a class of continuum Schrdinger operators with deterministic sparse potentials. We first establish the limiting absorption principle for both modified free resolvents and modified perturbed resolvents. This actually is a weak form of the classical limiting absorption principle. We then prove the existence and completeness of local wave operators, which, in particular, imply the existence of wave operators. Under additional assumptions on the sparse potential, we prove the completeness of wave operators. In the context of continuum Schrdinger operators with sparse potentials, this paper gives the first proof of the completeness of wave operators.

  8. Powertrain Trends and Future Potential

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Powertrain Trends and Future Potential * Global Trends - Fighting Global Warming * Clean Diesel - Neglected in the U.S. for Too Long Agenda DSNE-NA | August 4, 2009 | Robert ...

  9. Estimates of Green potentials. Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danchenko, V I

    2003-02-28

    Optimal Cartan-type covers by hyperbolic discs of carriers of Green {alpha}-potentials are obtained in a simply connected domain in the complex plane and estimates of the potentials outside the carriers are presented. These results are applied to problems on the separation of singularities of analytic and harmonic functions. For instance, uniform and integral estimates in terms of Green capacities of components of meromorphic functions are obtained.

  10. Dear Customer/Stakeholder,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Margaret Lewis and Doug Brawley (PNGC) Workgroup 2: Implementation Manual Dan Villalobos and Ross Holter (Flathead Electric) Workgroup 3: Low Income Boyd Wilson and TBA...

  11. Dear Customer/Stakeholder,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    As a reminder, Workgroup 1 will meet January 16 in Portland, Oregon and by telephone. The agenda can be found here. In preparation for that meeting, BPA has prepared a document of...

  12. Custom Renewable Energy Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project development assistance funding is available for a variety of purposes, including grant writing, feasibility studies, or technical assistance with design, permitting, or utility interconne...

  13. Becoming a Customer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    parts of the OATT and Transmission Services Business Practices to best understand the terms and conditions of open access transmission service that determine the binding rights...

  14. Sandia Energy Customers & Partners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Participates in Preparation of New Mexico Renewable Energy Storage Report http:energy.sandia.govsandia-participates-in-preparation-of-new-mexico-renewable-energy-storage-...

  15. Customers & Partners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  16. Customer Prepay Impact Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Instructions for Use Inputs 1. To use this model, you will need to unprotect the workbook, by going to Select "Unprotect Workbook", and enter the password "bpa". 2. The Input...

  17. WE-F-16A-01: Commissioning and Clinical Use of PC-ISO for Customized, 3D Printed, Gynecological Brachytherapy Applicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunha, J; Sethi, R; Mellis, K; Siauw, T; Sudhyadhom, A; Hsu, I; Pouliot, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: (1) Evaluate the safety and radiation attenuation properties of PCISO, a bio-compatible, sterilizable 3D printing material by Stratasys, (2) establish a method for commissioning customized multi- and single-use 3D printed applicators, (3) report on use of customized vaginal cylinders used to treat a series of serous endometrial cancer patient. Methods: A custom film dosimetry apparatus was designed to hold a Gafchromic radio film segment between two blocks of PC-ISO and 3D-printed using a Fortus 400mc (StrataSys). A dose plan was computed using 13 dwell positions at 2.5 mm spacing and normalized to 1500 cGy at 1 cm. Film exposure was compared to control tests in only air and only water. The average Hounsfield Unit (HU) was computed and used to verify water equivalency. For the clinical use cases, the physician specifies the dimensions and geometry of a custom applicator from which a CAD model is designed and printed. Results: The doses measured from the PC-ISO Gafchromic film test were within 1% of the dose measured in only water between 1cm and 6cm from the channel. Doses increased 74% measured in only air. HU range was 1143. The applicators were sterilized using the Sterrad system multiple times without damage. As of submission 3 unique cylinders have been designed, printed, and used in the clinic. A standardizable workflow for commissioning custom 3D printed applicators was codified and will be reported. Conclusions: Quality assurance (QA) evaluation of the PC-ISO 3D-printing material showed that PC-ISO is a suitable material for a gynecological brachytherapy vaginal cylinder in a clinical setting. With the material commissioning completed, if the physician determines that a better treatment would Result, a customized design is fabricated with limited additional QA necessary. Although this study was specific to PC-ISO, the same setup can be used to evaluate other 3D-printing materials.

  18. Renewable Energy Technical Potential | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Renewable Energy Technical Potential Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Renewable Energy Technical Potential: Renewable energy technical potential represents the achievable...

  19. SU-E-J-42: Customized Deformable Image Registration Using Open-Source Software SlicerRT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaitan, J Cifuentes; Chin, L; Pignol, J; Kirby, N; Pouliot, J; Lasso, A; Pinter, C; Fichtinger, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: SlicerRT is a flexible platform that allows the user to incorporate the necessary images registration and processing tools to improve clinical workflow. This work validates the accuracy and the versatility of the deformable image registration algorithm of the free open-source software SlicerRT using a deformable physical pelvic phantom versus available commercial image fusion algorithms. Methods: Optical camera images of nonradiopaque markers implanted in an anatomical pelvic phantom were used to measure the ground-truth deformation and evaluate the theoretical deformations for several DIR algorithms. To perform the registration, full and empty bladder computed tomography (CT) images of the phantom were obtained and used as fixed and moving images, respectively. The DIR module, found in SlicerRT, used a B-spline deformable image registration with multiple optimization parameters that allowed customization of the registration including a regularization term that controlled the amount of local voxel displacement. The virtual deformation field at the center of the phantom was obtained and compared to the experimental ground-truth values. The parameters of SlicerRT were then varied to improve spatial accuracy. To quantify image similarity, the mean absolute difference (MAD) parameter using Hounsfield units was calculated. In addition, the Dice coefficient of the contoured rectum was evaluated to validate the strength of the algorithm to transfer anatomical contours. Results: Overall, SlicerRT achieved one of the lowest MAD values across the algorithm spectrum, but slightly smaller mean spatial errors in comparison to MIM software (MIM). On the other hand, SlicerRT created higher mean spatial errors than Velocity Medical Solutions (VEL), although obtaining an improvement on the DICE to 0.91. The large spatial errors were attributed to the poor contrast in the prostate bladder interface of the phantom. Conclusion: Based phantom validation, SlicerRT is capable of achieving comparable DIR accuracy to commercial programs such as MIM and VEL.

  20. OLED R&D | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    7 ANNUAL REPORT OHA 2007 ANNUAL REPORT Highlights for FY 2007 include: Personnel security hearings. Under DOE's personnel security program, OHA conducts hearings concerning an individual's eligibility for access to classified information or special nuclear material. In FY 2007, we accelerated our resolution of older cases, reducing the number of older cases from 31 to 7. Whistleblower cases. Under the DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program, OHA conducts investigations and hearings and

  1. Outdoor OLED Luminaire Using Solar Energy for Lighting Pedestrian...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    electrical wires and reducing operating costs by integrating advanced operational controls that, today, are simply not available in commercial luminaires designed for this market. ...

  2. High Efficiency and Stable White OLED Using a Single Emitter

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    requires the use of multiple emissive materials, which will generate color instability and color aging issues, affecting the performance and operational lifetime of WOLEDs. ...

  3. Efficacy of 45 lm/W Achieved in White OLED

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Universal Display Corporation (UDC) successfully demonstrated an all phosphorescent white organic light emitting diode (WOLED™) with a power efficacy of 45 lm/W at 1,000 cd/m2. This high-efficacy device was enabled by lowering the device operating voltage, increasing the outcoupling efficiency to ~40% from ~20%, and by incorporating highly efficient phosphorescent emitters that are capable of converting nearly all current passing through a WOLED into light.

  4. Resolution study of higher-order-mode-based beam position diagnostics using custom-built electronics in strongly coupled 3.9-GHz multi-cavity accelerating module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, P.; Baboi, N.; Jones, R.M.; Eddy, N.

    2012-11-01

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOMs) can provide remote diagnostics information of the beam position and cavity misalignment. In this paper we report on recent studies on the resolution with specially selected series of modes with custom-built electronics. This constitutes the first report of measurements of these cavities in which we obtained a resolution of 20 micron in beam offset. Details of the setup of the electronics and HOM measurements are provided.

  5. Khler potentials for Planck inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roest, Diederik; Scalisi, Marco; Zavala, Ivonne E-mail: m.scalisi@rug.nl

    2013-11-01

    We assess which Khler potentials in supergravity lead to viable single-field inflationary models that are consistent with Planck. We highlight the role of symmetries, such as shift, Heisenberg and supersymmetry, in these constructions. Also the connections to string theory are pointed out. Finally, we discuss a supergravity model for arbitrary inflationary potentials that is suitable for open string inflation and generalise it to the case of closed string inflation. Our model includes the recently discussed supergravity reformulation of the Starobinsky model of inflation as well as an interesting alternative with comparable predictions.

  6. LHC Physics Potential versus Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2009-08-01

    Parton luminosities are convenient for estimating how the physics potential of Large Hadron Collider experiments depends on the energy of the proton beams. I present parton luminosities, ratios of parton luminosities, and contours of fixed parton luminosity for gg, u{bar d}, and qq interactions over the energy range relevant to the Large Hadron Collider, along with example analyses for specific processes.

  7. Nanobiocatalysis and Its Potential Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jungbae; Grate, Jay W.; Wang, Ping

    2008-11-01

    Nanobiocatalysis with enzymes incorporated into nanostructured materials have emerged as a rapidly growing area. Structures including nanoporous media, nanofibers, carbon nanotubes, and nanoparticles have been found to be efficient in manipulating the nanoscale environment of the enzyme and thus promising exciting advances in many areas of enzyme technology. This review will describe these recent developments in nanobiocatalysis and their potential applications in various fields such as trypsin digestion in proteomic analysis, antifouling, biofuel cells, and biosensors.

  8. S.2005: This act may be cited as the TVA Customer Protection Act of 1998, introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session, April 29, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-31

    This Act cited as the TVA Customer Protection Act of 1998 is to amend the Federal Power Act to ensure that certain Federal power customers are provided protection by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, and for other purposes. The topics of the act include disposition of property; foreign operations, protections; TVA power sales; filing and full disclosure of TVA documents; applicability of the antitrust laws; savings provision, and provision of construction equipment, contracting and engineering services.

  9. Assessment of the Economic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appen, Jan von; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Momber, Ilan; Klapp, David; Scheven, Alexander von

    2011-05-01

    As power generation from variable distributed energy resources (DER) grows, energy flows in the network are changing, increasing the requirements for ancillary services, including voltage support. With the appropriate power converter, DER can provide ancillary services such as frequency control and voltage support. This paper outlines the economic potential of DERs coordinated in a microgrid to provide reactive power and voltage support at its point of common coupling. The DER Customer Adoption Model assesses the costs of providing reactive power, given local utility rules. Depending on the installed DER, the cost minimizing solution for supplying reactive power locally is chosen. Costs include the variable cost of the additional losses and the investment cost of appropriately over-sizing converters or purchasing capacitors. A case study of a large health care building in San Francisco is used to evaluate different revenue possibilities of creating an incentive for microgrids to provide reactive power.

  10. Dirac solutions for quaternionic potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Leo, Stefano Giardino, Sergio

    2014-02-15

    The Dirac equation is solved for quaternionic potentials, i?V{sub 0} + j?W{sub 0} (V{sub 0}?R , W{sub 0}?C). The study shows two different solutions. The first one contains particle and anti-particle solutions and leads to the diffusion, tunneling, and Klein energy zones. The standard solution is recovered taking the complex limit of this solution. The second solution, which does not have a complex counterpart, can be seen as a V{sub 0}-antiparticle or |W{sub 0}|-particle solution.

  11. Thin film mixed potential sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Brosha, Eric L.; Mukundan, Rangachary

    2007-09-04

    A mixed potential sensor for oxidizable or reducible gases and a method of making. A substrate is provided and two electrodes are formed on a first surface of the substrate, each electrode being formed of a different catalytic material selected to produce a differential voltage between the electrodes from electrochemical reactions of the gases catalyzed by the electrode materials. An electrolytic layer of an electrolyte is formed over the electrodes to cover a first portion of the electrodes from direct exposure to the gases with a second portion of the electrodes uncovered for direct exposure to the gases.

  12. Potential Hydroelectric Development at Existing Federal Facilities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Potential Hydroelectric Development at Existing Federal Facilities Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Potential Hydroelectric Development at...

  13. Research highlights potential for improved solar cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Potential for improved solar cells Research highlights potential for improved solar cells Research has shown that carrier multiplication is a real phenomenon in tiny semiconductor ...

  14. Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment September 24, 2013 Contact: Linda Vu, +1 510 495 2402, lvu@lbl.gov ...

  15. Potential of Diazorphic, Endophytic Bacteria Associated with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential of Diazorphic, Endophytic Bacteria Associated with Sugarcane for Energycane Production Potential of Diazorphic, Endophytic Bacteria Associated with Sugarcane for Energycane ...

  16. Category:Self Potential | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    page. S Self Potential Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCategory:SelfPotential&oldid794082" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating...

  17. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is...

  18. Ancillary Service Revenue Potential for Geothermal Generators...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ancillary Service Revenue Potential for Geothermal Generators in California Ancillary Service Revenue Potential for Geothermal Generators in California PDF icon Ancillary Service...

  19. Calculate and Plot Complex Potential

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-05-05

    SOLUPLOT is a program designed to calculate and plot complex potential, pH diagrams and log oxygen activity, pH diagrams for aqueous chemical syatems, considering speciation of ligands, from free energy and thermodynamic activity data. These diagrams, commonly referred to as Eh-pH and ao2-pH diagrams, respectively, define areas of predominance in Eh-pH diagrams or ao2-pH space for chemical species of a chemical system at equilibrium. Over an area of predominance, one predominant species is at greatermore » activity than the other species of the system considered. The diagram axes, pH (a measure of hydrogen ion activity) and either Eh or log ao2 (measures of a tendency toward either oxidation or reduction) , are paremeters commonly applied in describing the chemistry of aqueous systems.« less

  20. SU-E-T-59: Calculations of Collimator Scatter Factors (Sc) with and Without Custom-Made Build-Up Caps for CyberKnife

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wokoma, S; Yoon, J; Jung, J; Lee, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of custom-made build-up caps for a diode detector in robotic radiosurgery radiation fields with variable collimator (IRIS) for collimator scatter factor (Sc) calculation. Methods: An acrylic cap was custom-made to fit our SFD (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) diode detector. The cap has thickness of 5 cm, corresponding to a depth beyond electron contamination. IAEA phase space data was used for beam modeling and DOSRZnrc code was used to model the detector. The detector was positioned at 80 cm source-to-detector distance. Calculations were performed with the SFD, with and without the build-up cap, for clinical IRIS settings ranging from 7.5 to 60 mm. Results: The collimator scatter factors were calculated with and without 5 cm build-up cap. They were agreed within 3% difference except 15 mm cone. The Sc factor for 15 mm cone without buildup was 13.2% lower than that with buildup. Conclusion: Sc data is a critical component in advanced algorithms for treatment planning in order to calculate the dose accurately. After incorporating build-up cap, we discovered differences of up to 13.2 % in Sc factors in the SFD detector, when compared against in-air measurements without build-up caps.

  1. Development of a custom monolithic device for data acquisition from a scintillating calorimeter at the superconducting super collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekenberg, T.; Dawson, J.W.; Talaga, R.L.; Stevens, A.E.; Haberichter, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    A clock-driven continuous sequential write/random read data acquisition architecture for a scintillating calorimeter at the SSC is presented. Simplicity of design and operation as well as potentially dead time-less operation are the motivations of this effort. The architecture minimizes the number of fast control signals, thereby reducing pickup from digital control lines by sensitive analog circuits in the front-end device. This architecture also reduces the logic necessary on the front-end device improving reliability and easing design and operation. Operation and design of the front-end device are discussed. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  2. The potential of renewable energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    On June 27 and 28, 1989, the US Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories were convened to discuss plans for the development of a National Energy Strategy (NES) and, in particular, the analytic needs in support of NES that could be addressed by the laboratories. As a result of that meeting, interlaboratory teams were formed to produce analytic white papers on key topics, and a lead laboratory was designated for each core laboratory team. The broad-ranging renewables assignment is summarized by the following issue statement from the Office of Policy, Planning and Analysis: to what extent can renewable energy technologies contribute to diversifying sources of energy supply What are the major barriers to greater renewable energy use and what is the potential timing of widespread commercialization for various categories of applications This report presents the results of the intensive activity initiated by the June 1989 meeting to produce a white paper on renewable energy. Scores of scientists, analysts, and engineers in the five core laboratories gave generously of their time over the past eight months to produce this document. Their generous, constructive efforts are hereby gratefully acknowledged. 126 refs., 44 figs., 32 tabs.

  3. Kazakhstan's potential provides Western opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darnell, R. )

    1993-01-01

    While crude oil production continues to drop in the Russian Federation at a rate of 15% to 20% per year, Kazakhstan's output rose from 440,000 bopd in 1991 to 446,000 bopd, as of November 1992. Much of this increase was exported to the Russian Federation to supplement the latter's declining production. while Kazakhstan received needed Russian goods in exchange for this oil, it isn't getting the hard currency that will be required to upgrade its petroleum industry. This is a serious problem for Kazakh officials, since they are counting on revenues from petroleum exports to invigorate their overall plan for economic growth in this newly independent country. In order to convert Kazakhstan's hydrocarbon potential into economic reality, two critical issues must be addressed immediately. First, Kazakhstan must develop a tax and minerals law that gives multinational petroleum companies an incentive to invest in opening a dedicated crude oil export route through Russia, and at least one alternate export route to the Caspian Sea or Persian Gulf. At present, even the most successful petroleum venture inside Kazakhstan would have to weave its way through the Russian bureaucracy to utilize that existing and inadequate export pipeline system. This quandary, of course, has recently become the undoing of several Western petroleum operations that have managed to actually produce exportable oil inside the Russian Federation itself, but they can't get it out. In addition, three other variables should be considered by any party that is evaluating Kazakhstan as a future area (see map for current fields) of interest for petroleum operations. These are political stability, field operating conditions, and the country's natural gas crisis. Each of these factors, though not as critical as the legal regime and export access, can radically affect how an operator might approach negotiating the terms of its particular project.

  4. Electrolytic Hydrogen Production: Potential Impacts to Utilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrolytic Hydrogen Production Potential Impacts to Utilities Electrolytic Hydrogen Production Workshop February 28, 2014 Frank Novachek Director, Corporate Planning 2...

  5. Potential for Biofuels from Algae (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pienkos, P. T.

    2007-11-15

    Presentation on the potential for biofuels from algae presented at the 2007 Algae Biomass Summit in San Francisco, CA.

  6. ARM Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), Convective...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Availability: ORNL Language: English Subject: 54 Environmental Sciences ARMBE, Soundings; Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE); ...

  7. Partners and Stakeholders: Roles and Potential Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Partners and Stakeholders: Roles and Potential Impact, Chapter 6 from the Clean Energy Finance Guide, Third Edition

  8. The market potential for SMES in electric utility applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is an emerging technology with features that are potentially attractive in electric utility applications. This study evaluates the potential for SMES technology in the generation, transmission, distribution, and use of electric energy; the time frame of the assessment is through the year 2030. Comparisons are made with other technology options, including both commercially available and advanced systems such as various peaking generation technologies, transmission stability improvement technologies, and power quality enhancement devices. The methodology used for this study focused on the needs of the market place, the capabilities of S and the characteristics of the competing technologies. There is widespread interest within utilities for the development of SMES technology, but there is no general consensus regarding the most attractive size. Considerable uncertainty exists regarding the eventual costs and benefits of commercial SMES systems, but general trends have been developed based on current industry knowledge. Results of this analysis indicate that as storage capacity increases, cost increases at a rate faster than benefits. Transmission system applications requiring dynamic storage appear to have the most attractive economics. Customer service applications may be economic in the near term, but improved ride-through capability of end-use equipment may limit the size of this market over time. Other applications requiring greater storage capacity appear to be only marginally economic at best.

  9. Potential Health Hazards of Radiation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation PDF icon Potential Health Hazards of Radiation More Documents & ...

  10. Identify Potential HITs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Impact Technology Catalyst » Identify Potential HITs Identify Potential HITs Identify Potential HITs HIT prioritization is conducted each year based on quantitative, foundational criteria developed through a transparent, collaborative and consistent methodology designed to drive technologies through a step-by-step evaluation. The HIT prioritization methodology helps prioritize technologies for deployment focus and also ensures the open, consistent, two-way transfer of information and

  11. Pumped Storage and Potential Hydropower from Conduits

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ENERGY United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Message from the Secretary Th is Congressional Report, Pumped Storage Hydropower and Potential Hydropower from Conduits, addresses the technical flexibility that existing pumped storage facilities can provide to support intermittent renewable energy generation . This study considered potential upgrades or retrofit of these facilities, the technical potential of existing and new pumped storage facilities to provide grid reliability

  12. Pumped Storage and Potential Hydropower from Conduits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-02-25

    Th is Congressional Report, Pumped Storage Hydropower and Potential Hydropower from Conduits, addresses the technical flexibility that existing pumped storage facilities can provide to support intermittent renewable energy generation. This study considered potential upgrades or retrofit of these facilities, the technical potential of existing and new pumped storage facilities to provide grid reliability benefits, and the range of conduit hydropower opportunities available in the United States.

  13. NREL Research Identifies Increased Potential for Perovskites...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Identifies Increased Potential for Perovskites as a Material for Solar Cells October 30, 2015 Scientists at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory ...

  14. The Snell law for quaternionic potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Leo, Stefano; Ducati, Gisele C.

    2013-12-15

    By using the analogy between optics and quantum mechanics, we obtain the Snell law for the planar motion of quantum particles in the presence of quaternionic potentials.

  15. Alternative Ways of Financing Infrastructure Investment: Potential...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ways of Financing Infrastructure Investment: Potential for 'Novel' Financing Models Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Alternative Ways of Financing...

  16. Guide for Conducting Energy Efficiency Potential Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2007-11-01

    Provides guidance on determining the efficiency potential in a utility footprint, state, or region; evaluating efficiency as a supply-side resource; and developing detailed efficiency program plans.

  17. Aftertreatment Modeling Status, Futur Potential, and Application...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DaimlerChrysler NAFTA Truck Business Unit PDF icon 2004deerzhang.pdf More Documents & Publications SCR Potential and Issues for Heavy-Duty Applications in the United ...

  18. Potential for Data Center Efficiency Improvements | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Data Center Efficiency Improvements Potential for Data Center Efficiency Improvements Document offers an overview of the Federal Energy Management Program's data center activities. ...

  19. Shape invariant potentials in higher dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandhya, R.; Sree Ranjani, S.; Kapoor, A.K.

    2015-08-15

    In this paper we investigate the shape invariance property of a potential in one dimension. We show that a simple ansatz allows us to reconstruct all the known shape invariant potentials in one dimension. This ansatz can be easily extended to arrive at a large class of new shape invariant potentials in arbitrary dimensions. A reformulation of the shape invariance property and possible generalizations are proposed. These may lead to an important extension of the shape invariance property to Hamiltonians that are related to standard potential problems via space time transformations, which are found useful in path integral formulation of quantum mechanics.

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Working with Sandia: Potential...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Potential Suppliers Man with Computer Becoming a Supplier to Sandia Sandia spends about 1 billion each year on purchases of quality products and services to meet its national...

  1. Global Renewable Resource Potential | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Quality of Renewable Energy Potential 3 Representation of Challenges 4 Generation of New Climate Change Mitigation Scenarios 5 References Introduction A wind farm located in...

  2. Webinar: Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Eastern Standard Time (EST). An analysis conducted by Sandia National Laboratories explored potential synergies that may be realized by integrating solar hydrogen production and ...

  3. Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar Hydrogen Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar Hydrogen Production and Concentrating Solar Power: A Systems Analysis U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office January ...

  4. Spontaneous Potential Well Log | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Log Chemical Logging Density Log Gamma Log Image Logs Mud Logging Neutron Log Pressure Temperature Log Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Spontaneous Potential Well Log...

  5. Potential Water and Energy Savings from Showerheads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biermayer, Peter J.

    2005-09-28

    This paper estimates the benefits and costs of six water reduction scenarios. Benefits and costs of showerhead scenarios are ranked in this paper by an estimated water reduction percentage. To prioritize potential water and energy saving scenarios regarding showerheads, six scenarios were analyzed for their potential water and energy savings and the associated dollar savings to the consumer.

  6. Method and system using power modulation and velocity modulation producing sputtered thin films with sub-angstrom thickness uniformity or custom thickness gradients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montcalm, Claude; Folta, James Allen; Walton, Christopher Charles

    2003-12-23

    A method and system for determining a source flux modulation recipe for achieving a selected thickness profile of a film to be deposited (e.g., with highly uniform or highly accurate custom graded thickness) over a flat or curved substrate (such as concave or convex optics) by exposing the substrate to a vapor deposition source operated with time-varying flux distribution as a function of time. Preferably, the source is operated with time-varying power applied thereto during each sweep of the substrate to achieve the time-varying flux distribution as a function of time. Preferably, the method includes the steps of measuring the source flux distribution (using a test piece held stationary while exposed to the source with the source operated at each of a number of different applied power levels), calculating a set of predicted film thickness profiles, each film thickness profile assuming the measured flux distribution and a different one of a set of source flux modulation recipes, and determining from the predicted film thickness profiles a source flux modulation recipe which is adequate to achieve a predetermined thickness profile. Aspects of the invention include a computer-implemented method employing a graphical user interface to facilitate convenient selection of an optimal or nearly optimal source flux modulation recipe to achieve a desired thickness profile on a substrate. The method enables precise modulation of the deposition flux to which a substrate is exposed to provide a desired coating thickness distribution.

  7. Spontaneous Potential (book section) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Spontaneous Potential (book section) Author NA Published NA, The date "NA" was not understood.The date "NA" was not understood....

  8. Solar Power Potential in SE New Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Power Potential in Southeast New Mexico Solar Power Project Opportunities Abound in the Region The WIPP site is receives abundant solar energy with 6-7 kWhsq meter power ...

  9. POTENTIAL DIMETHYLMERCURY CONCENTRATION IN WATER & ORGANIC CONDENSATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MEACHAM, J.E.

    2004-12-28

    This document bounds potential dimethylmercury concentration in water or organic condensate that might form in ventilation systems or cooler tank regions. Dimethylmercury concentrations were extremely low and would be below drinking water standards in the water condensate.

  10. Maximizing the Potential of Renewable Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cell efficiencies by 10%, to over 30%. * Low Cost III-V 1J & 2J Cells - Potential to lower III-V growth cost by 1 - 2 orders of magnitude. * "Kerfless Si" Wafers & Cells -...

  11. Potential Yield Mapping of Dedicated Energy Crops

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1B—Integration of Supply Chains I: Breaking Down Barriers Potential Yield Mapping of Dedicated Energy Crops Chris Daly, Director, PRISM Climate Group, Oregon State University

  12. Applying supersymmetry to energy dependent potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yekken, R.; Lassaut, M.; Lombard, R.J.

    2013-11-15

    We investigate the supersymmetry properties of energy dependent potentials in the D=1 dimensional space. We show the main aspects of supersymmetry to be preserved, namely the factorization of the Hamiltonian, the connections between eigenvalues and wave functions of the partner Hamiltonians. Two methods are proposed. The first one requires the extension of the usual rules via the concept of local equivalent potential. In this case, the superpotential becomes depending on the state. The second method, applicable when the potential depends linearly on the energy, is similar to what has been already achieved by means of the Darboux transform. -- Highlights: Supersymmetry extended to energy dependent potentials. Generalization of the concept of superpotential. An alternative method used for linear E-dependence leads to the same results as Darboux transform.

  13. Tiny Glass Bubbles With Big Potential

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    If these glass microspheres' walls could talk…They would explain how their tiny pores allow the potential for handling, storing and transporting a variety of materials, including drugs that have...

  14. SFA 2.0- Metabolic Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banfield, Jill; Beller, Harry

    2015-02-17

    Berkeley Lab Earth Scientists Jill Banfield and Harry Beller explain the Sustainable Systems SFA 2.0 project's research on metabolic potentialor how metabolic lifestyles of microbial communities modulate in response to as well as influence environmental change.

  15. Environmental Assessment Fact Sheet - Potential Impacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE has prepared a draft Environmental Assessment for Conducting Astrophysics and Other Basic Science Experiments at the WIPP Site. It examines the potential environmental consequences from conducting particular types of scientific experiments in an area of the WIPP underground called the experiment gallery. The environmental assessment also looks at the potential cumulative impacts of conducting experiments and operating the WIPP as a transuranic waste repository. This fact sheet presents

  16. Missing solution in a Cornell potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castro, L.B.; Castro, A.S. de

    2013-11-15

    Missing bound-state solutions for fermions in the background of a Cornell potential consisting of a mixed scalarvectorpseudoscalar coupling is examined. Charge-conjugation operation, degeneracy and localization are discussed. -- Highlights: The Dirac equation with scalarvectorpseudoscalar Cornell potential is investigated. The isolated solution from the SturmLiouville problem is found. Charge-conjugation operation, degeneracy and localization are discussed.

  17. Unearthing Geothermal's Potential | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unearthing Geothermal's Potential Unearthing Geothermal's Potential September 16, 2010 - 12:33pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Our latest geothermal technologies awards are for those who think outside of the box (and below the surface). Secretary of Energy Steven Chu announced $20 million towards the research and development of non-conventional geothermal energy technologies in three areas: low temperatures fluids, geothermal fluids

  18. Researchers modeling the potential for induced seismicity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researchers modeling the potential for induced seismicity Researchers modeling the potential for induced seismicity Researchers conducted modeling studies to better understand triggers of induced earthquake activity caused by injection of large volumes of liquid CO2. October 8, 2014 Summary of multiple injection well simulations after 10 years. Stars represent injection wells. Summary of multiple injection well simulations after 10 years. Stars represent injection wells. The team used the LANL

  19. Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment September 24, 2013 Contact: Linda Vu, +1 510 495 2402, lvu@lbl.gov Calvariasetup.jpg The array transducer in position above the calvaria (skull). Shown are the ends of the array elements above the computational model of the skull. Researchers are using computer simulations to investigate how ultrasound and tiny bubbles injected into the bloodstream might break up blood clots,

  20. Eastern Power Customer Services Manager

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Eastern Power Services organization (PSE) of Northwest Requirements Marketing, Power Services, and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Northwest (NW) Requirements...

  1. Western Power Customer Services Manager

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Western Power Services organization (PSW) of Northwest Requirements Marketing, Power Services, and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Northwest (NW) Requirements...

  2. 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-01-18

    Appendix A: Survey Instrument; Appendix B: Detailed Responses; Appendix C: Adoption and Diffusion of Innovations

  3. Residential Rewards- Xcel Energy Customers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The incentive amounts shown below follow this formula: Standard Reward or Enhanced Reward + Xcel Energy Reward. 

  4. customs | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    this site Budget IG Web Policy Privacy No Fear Act Accessibility FOIA Sitemap Federal Government The White House DOE.gov USA.gov Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA...

  5. Customizing a VOC control technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enneking, J.C.

    1998-12-31

    An extremely important but very difficult element in applying an emission control device to an exhaust stream is to chose the proper technology. Once it has been determined that recovery, rather than destruction, is appropriate, there are still several process choices available. The type of process is generally dictated by the VOC concentration and total air flow rate. Adsorption is usually chosen for low concentrations and high flow rates while refrigeration is usually best for high concentrations and low flow rates. This paper describes six applications. Adsorption was applied to two of them and condensation to the other four. Solvent vapors from a tape coating operation are recovered in an activated carbon adsorption process and reused. VOC`s from soil vapor extraction operations are captured by activated carbon which is regenerated by a mobile unit. VOC`s displaced from filling tank cars at a refinery are condensed at low temperatures in a high pressure system which uses a pressure swing dryer to remove water. Two different processes were installed to prevent VOC emissions from pharmaceutical processing plants. They both use a thermal swing dryer to remove moisture and low temperature condensation to recover the solvent. With very high concentrations of solvent in an inert gas stream, indirect condensation is used to purify the nitrogen and recover the solvent for reuse. Process flow diagrams and operating results are presented.

  6. Enhancement of hole injection and electroluminescence by ordered Ag nanodot array on indium tin oxide anode in organic light emitting diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Mi E-mail: Dockha@kist.re.kr; Mo Yoon, Dang; Kim, Miyoung; Kim, Chulki; Lee, Taikjin; Hun Kim, Jae; Lee, Seok; Woo, Deokha E-mail: Dockha@kist.re.kr; Lim, Si-Hyung

    2014-07-07

    We report the enhancement of hole injection and electroluminescence (EL) in an organic light emitting diode (OLED) with an ordered Ag nanodot array on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) anode. Until now, most researches have focused on the improved performance of OLEDs by plasmonic effects of metal nanoparticles due to the difficulty in fabricating metal nanodot arrays. A well-ordered Ag nanodot array is fabricated on the ITO anode of OLED using the nanoporous alumina as an evaporation mask. The OLED device with Ag nanodot arrays on the ITO anode shows higher current density and EL enhancement than the one without any nano-structure. These results suggest that the Ag nanodot array with the plasmonic effect has potential as one of attractive approaches to enhance the hole injection and EL in the application of the OLEDs.

  7. Property:PotentialHydropowerSites | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Name PotentialHydropowerSites Property Type Number Description The number of potential hydropower sites in a place. Pages using the property "PotentialHydropowerSites"...

  8. Microsoft Word - BPA Utility Potential Calculator Guidebook V1...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    installed, and the result is the overall potential for that device (Figure 1). Figure 1 Energy Efficiency Savings Potential Assessment A potential study expands on this concept...

  9. Potential effects of gallium on cladding materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, D.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Besmann, T.M.; DeVan, J.H.; DiStefano, J.R.; Gat, U.; Greene, S.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Worley, B.A.

    1997-10-01

    This paper identifies and examines issues concerning the incorporation of gallium in weapons derived plutonium in light water reactor (LWR) MOX fuels. Particular attention is given to the more likely effects of the gallium on the behavior of the cladding material. The chemistry of weapons grade (WG) MOX, including possible consequences of gallium within plutonium agglomerates, was assessed. Based on the calculated oxidation potentials of MOX fuel, the effect that gallium may have on reactions involving fission products and possible impact on cladding performance were postulated. Gallium transport mechanisms are discussed. With an understanding of oxidation potentials and assumptions of mechanisms for gallium transport, possible effects of gallium on corrosion of cladding were evaluated. Potential and unresolved issues and suggested research and development (R and D) required to provide missing information are presented.

  10. Bond order potential module for LAMMPS

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-09-11

    pair_bop is a module for performing energy calculations using the Bond Order Potential (BOP) for use in the parallel molecular dynamics code LAMMPS. The bop pair style computes BOP based upon quantum mechanical incorporating both sigma and pi bondings. By analytically deriving the BOP pair bop from quantum mechanical theory its transferability to different phases can approach that of quantum mechanical methods. This potential is extremely effective at modeling 111-V and II-VI compounds such asmore » GaAs and CdTe. This potential is similar to the original BOP developed by Pettifor and later updated by Murdock et al. and Ward et al.« less

  11. Analytic models of plausible gravitational lens potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltz, Edward A.; Marshall, Phil; Oguri, Masamune, E-mail: eabaltz@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: pjm@physics.ucsb.edu, E-mail: oguri@slac.stanford.edu [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, PO Box 20450, MS29, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States)] [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, PO Box 20450, MS29, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Gravitational lenses on galaxy scales are plausibly modelled as having ellipsoidal symmetry and a universal dark matter density profile, with a Sersic profile to describe the distribution of baryonic matter. Predicting all lensing effects requires knowledge of the total lens potential: in this work we give analytic forms for that of the above hybrid model. Emphasising that complex lens potentials can be constructed from simpler components in linear combination, we provide a recipe for attaining elliptical symmetry in either projected mass or lens potential. We also provide analytic formulae for the lens potentials of Sersic profiles for integer and half-integer index. We then present formulae describing the gravitational lensing effects due to smoothly-truncated universal density profiles in cold dark matter model. For our isolated haloes the density profile falls off as radius to the minus fifth or seventh power beyond the tidal radius, functional forms that allow all orders of lens potential derivatives to be calculated analytically, while ensuring a non-divergent total mass. We show how the observables predicted by this profile differ from that of the original infinite-mass NFW profile. Expressions for the gravitational flexion are highlighted. We show how decreasing the tidal radius allows stripped haloes to be modelled, providing a framework for a fuller investigation of dark matter substructure in galaxies and clusters. Finally we remark on the need for finite mass halo profiles when doing cosmological ray-tracing simulations, and the need for readily-calculable higher order derivatives of the lens potential when studying catastrophes in strong lenses.

  12. Economic Energy Savings Potential in Federal Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daryl R.; Dirks, James A.; Hunt, Diane M.

    2000-09-04

    The primary objective of this study was to estimate the current life-cycle cost-effective (i.e., economic) energy savings potential in Federal buildings and the corresponding capital investment required to achieve these savings, with Federal financing. Estimates were developed for major categories of energy efficiency measures such as building envelope, heating system, cooling system, and lighting. The analysis was based on conditions (building stock and characteristics, retrofit technologies, interest rates, energy prices, etc.) existing in the late 1990s. The potential impact of changes to any of these factors in the future was not considered.

  13. Fly Ash Characteristics and Carbon Sequestration Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palumbo, Anthony V.; Amonette, James E.; Tarver, Jana R.; Fagan, Lisa A.; McNeilly, Meghan S.; Daniels, William L.

    2007-07-20

    Concerns for the effects of global warming have lead to an interest in the potential for inexpensive methods to sequester carbon dioxide (CO2). One of the proposed methods is the sequestration of carbon in soil though the growth of crops or forests.4,6 If there is an economic value placed on sequestration of carbon dioxide in soil there may be an an opportunity and funding to utilize fly ash in the reclamation of mine soils and other degraded lands. However, concerns associated with the use of fly ash must be addressed before this practice can be widely adopted. There is a vast extent of degraded lands across the world that has some degree of potential for use in carbon sequestration. Degraded lands comprise nearly 2 X 109 ha of land throughout the world.7 Although the potential is obviously smaller in the United States, there are still approximately 4 X 106 ha of degraded lands that previously resulted from mining operations14 and an additional 1.4 X 108 ha of poorly managed lands. Thus, according to Lal and others the potential is to sequester approximately 11 Pg of carbon over the next 50 years.1,10 The realization of this potential will likely be dependent on economic incentives and the use of soil amendments such as fly ash. There are many potential benefits documented for the use of fly ash as a soil amendment. For example, fly ash has been shown to increase porosity, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved SO42-, CO32-, HCO3-, Cl- and basic cations, although some effects are notably decreased in high-clay soils.8,13,9 The potential is that these effects will promote increased growth of plants (either trees or grasses) and result in greater carbon accumulation in the soil than in untreated degraded soils. This paper addresses the potential for carbon sequestration in soils amended with fly ash and examines some of the issues that should be considered in planning this option. We describe retrospective studies of soil carbon accumulation on reclaimed mine lands, leaching studies of fly ash and carbon sorption studies of fly ash.

  14. Towards an understanding of the nuclear potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, D.G.; Sinclair, D.K.; Sivers, D.

    1988-01-01

    The formalism for investigating the /bar Q/q/bar Q/q system on the lattice is constructed. We describe how the model may be used to study the nuclear potential, and present some preliminary results on the range of the nuclear force. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Kaonic hydrogen atoms with realistic potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Y.; Poonsawat, W.; Khosonthongkee, K.; Kobdaj, C.; Suebka, P.

    2010-06-15

    Kaonic hydrogen is studied with various realistic potentials in an accurate numerical approach based on Sturmian functions. It is found that the mass difference between the K{sup -}p and K-bar{sup 0}n channels has a considerable effect on theoretical results of the energy shift and decay width of kaonic hydrogen. On average, the theoretical result in the isospin symmetry limit is smaller by a factor of about 20% than the full result where the mass difference between the K{sup -}p and K-bar{sup 0}n channels is properly treated. The theoretical results based on realistic local potentials, which reproduce well scattering data, are inconsistent with the recent measurement of the energy shift and decay width of the 1s kaonic hydrogen state by the DEAR Collaboration.

  16. Potential for cogeneration in Maryland. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    Cogeneration is a name given to energy systems that produce both electric power and useful thermal energy such as steam. While cogeneration markets have flourished in California, Texas, and some states, those in Maryland have not. A primary reason is that the industries that have been targeted in other states--e.g., oil refining, pulp and paper, chemicals, food processing--are not major elements of Maryland's industrial base. The study estimates the potential for future cogeneration in Maryland, both large units and small packaged systems, and assesses the potential impact of cogeneration systems on Maryland's energy needs between now and 2005. The study is presented in three volumes. Because of significant differences between large- and small-scale cogeneration, the analysis of these two systems was performed separately. This volume is a summary document presenting the findings from both studies.

  17. Energy Department Announces $10 Million to Advance Innovative...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This funding will help accelerate the development of high-quality light-emitting diode (LED) and organic light-emitting diode (OLED) products with the potential to reduce lighting ...

  18. Energy Savings Potential of Radiative Cooling Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, Nicholas; Wang, Weimin; Alvine, Kyle J.; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2015-11-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Program (BTP), conducted a study to estimate, through simulation, the potential cooling energy savings that could be achieved through novel approaches to capturing free radiative cooling in buildings, particularly photonic ‘selective emittance’ materials. This report documents the results of that study.

  19. Wind Energy Potential in SE New Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    click to return to the Renewable Energy page Return to Renewable Energy Page Wind Energy in Southeast New Mexico Several Ongoing and New Wind Power Projects are Contributing to Making Renewable Energy Sources an Important Economic and Environmental Mainstay of the Region As the accompanying map of New Mexico shows, the best wind power generation potential near WIPP is along the Delaware Mountain ridge line of the southern Guadalupe Mountains, about 50-60 miles southwest. The numeric grid values

  20. Yukawa particles in a confining potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girotto, Matheus Levin, Yan; Santos, Alexandre P. dos; Colla, Thiago

    2014-07-07

    We study the density distribution of repulsive Yukawa particles confined by an external potential. In the weak coupling limit, we show that the mean-field theory is able to accurately account for the particle distribution. In the strong coupling limit, the correlations between the particles become important and the mean-field theory fails. For strongly correlated systems, we construct a density functional theory which provides an excellent description of the particle distribution, without any adjustable parameters.

  1. Assessing the Economic Potential of Advanced Biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Economic Potential of Advanced Biofuels - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste

  2. Polymer escape from a confining potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mkknen, Harri; Faculty of Physical Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavk ; Ikonen, Timo; VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT ; Jnsson, Hannes; Faculty of Physical Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavk; Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912-1843 ; Ala-Nissila, Tapio; Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912-1843

    2014-02-07

    The rate of escape of polymers from a two-dimensionally confining potential well has been evaluated using self-avoiding as well as ideal chain representations of varying length, up to 80 beads. Long timescale Langevin trajectories were calculated using the path integral hyperdynamics method to evaluate the escape rate. A minimum is found in the rate for self-avoiding polymers of intermediate length while the escape rate decreases monotonically with polymer length for ideal polymers. The increase in the rate for long, self-avoiding polymers is ascribed to crowding in the potential well which reduces the free energy escape barrier. An effective potential curve obtained using the centroid as an independent variable was evaluated by thermodynamic averaging and Kramers rate theory then applied to estimate the escape rate. While the qualitative features are well reproduced by this approach, it significantly overestimates the rate, especially for the longer polymers. The reason for this is illustrated by constructing a two-dimensional effective energy surface using the radius of gyration as well as the centroid as controlled variables. This shows that the description of a transition state dividing surface using only the centroid fails to confine the system to the region corresponding to the free energy barrier and this problem becomes more pronounced the longer the polymer is. A proper definition of a transition state for polymer escape needs to take into account the shape as well as the location of the polymer.

  3. FUEL CYCLE POTENTIAL WASTE FOR DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.; Carter, J.

    2010-10-13

    The United States (U.S.) currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel (UNF) is stored on-site in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal in a deep mined geologic repository envisioned. Within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCR&D) develops options to the current commercial fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while minimizing proliferation risks by conducting research and development of advanced fuel cycles, including modified open and closed cycles. The safe management and disposition of used nuclear fuel and/or nuclear waste is a fundamental aspect of any nuclear fuel cycle. Yet, the routine disposal of used nuclear fuel and radioactive waste remains problematic. Advanced fuel cycles will generate different quantities and forms of waste than the current LWR fleet. This study analyzes the quantities and characteristics of potential waste forms including differing waste matrices, as a function of a variety of potential fuel cycle alternatives including: (1) Commercial UNF generated by uranium fuel light water reactors (LWR). Four once through fuel cycles analyzed in this study differ by varying the assumed expansion/contraction of nuclear power in the U.S; (2) Four alternative LWR used fuel recycling processes analyzed differ in the reprocessing method (aqueous vs. electro-chemical), complexity (Pu only or full transuranic (TRU) recovery) and waste forms generated; (3) Used Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel derived from the recovered Pu utilizing a single reactor pass; and (4) Potential waste forms generated by the reprocessing of fuels derived from recovered TRU utilizing multiple reactor passes.

  4. FUEL CYCLE POTENTIAL WASTE FOR DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, J.

    2011-01-03

    The United States (U.S.) currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel (UNF) is stored on-site in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal in a deep mined geologic repository envisioned. Within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCR&D) develops options to the current commercial fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while minimizing proliferation risks by conducting research and development of advanced fuel cycles, including modified open and closed cycles. The safe management and disposition of used nuclear fuel and/or nuclear waste is a fundamental aspect of any nuclear fuel cycle. Yet, the routine disposal of used nuclear fuel and radioactive waste remains problematic. Advanced fuel cycles will generate different quantities and forms of waste than the current LWR fleet. This study analyzes the quantities and characteristics of potential waste forms including differing waste matrices, as a function of a variety of potential fuel cycle alternatives including: (1) Commercial UNF generated by uranium fuel light water reactors (LWR). Four once through fuel cycles analyzed in this study differ by varying the assumed expansion/contraction of nuclear power in the U.S. (2) Four alternative LWR used fuel recycling processes analyzed differ in the reprocessing method (aqueous vs. electro-chemical), complexity (Pu only or full transuranic (TRU) recovery) and waste forms generated. (3) Used Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel derived from the recovered Pu utilizing a single reactor pass. (4) Potential waste forms generated by the reprocessing of fuels derived from recovered TRU utilizing multiple reactor passes.

  5. Fluid properties determine flow line blockage potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, A.

    1996-07-15

    A thorough understanding of fluid properties helps in determining the potential of hydrates, paraffins, or asphaltenes to block subsea flow lines. Thermal, chemical, and mechanical methods are the main ways for preventing deposition. Already in both the North Sea and the Gulf of Mexico, blockages have led to significant losses in production and reserves recovery. This first article in a two-part series discusses thermal and chemical methods in overcoming fluid behavior problems caused by hydrate and other fluid constituents in subsea multiphase flow. The paper discusses subsea production, possible problems, nucleation, growth, deposition, preventing deposition, hydrate predictions, multiphase flow, and hydrate inhibition.

  6. Ohio Hydropower Potential Inventory Phase I report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    The dams researched in the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) files were those contained in a list of Ohio dams provided by the ODNR. The result of this file research is a list of 997 dams contained herein that tabulates information on hydraulic head, stream flow, drainage area, and usage. This listing indicated that all but 137 of the 997 dams can be eliminated from consideration for Phase II research. The second phase would be required to further identify which of the 137 dams might have viable hydroelectric potential and define their basic hydroelectric parameters.

  7. Potential underground risks associated with CAES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirk, Matthew F.; Webb, Stephen Walter; Broome, Scott Thomas; Pfeifle, Thomas W.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2010-10-01

    CAES in geologic media has been proposed to help 'firm' renewable energy sources (wind and solar) by providing a means to store energy when excess energy was available, and to provide an energy source during non-productive renewable energy time periods. Such a storage media may experience hourly (perhaps small) pressure swings. Salt caverns represent the only proven underground storage used for CAES, but not in a mode where renewable energy sources are supported. Reservoirs, both depleted natural gas and aquifers represent other potential underground storage vessels for CAES, however, neither has yet to be demonstrated as a functional/operational storage media for CAES.

  8. Feynman integral treatment of the Bargmann potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaf, A.; Chouchaoui, A. . E-mail: akchouchaoui@yahoo.fr; Lombard, R.J.

    2005-06-01

    A method based on path integral formulation is given for obtaining exact solution of the s states for the Bargmann potentialV(r)=1ka{sup 2}{beta}({beta}-1)e{sup -2r/a}1-e{sup -r/a2}-Ae{sup -r/a}1-e{sup -r=} /{sup a},where {beta} and k are parameters. The exact energy spectrum and the normalised s-state eigenfunctions are obtained from the poles of the Green function and their residues, respectively. The results are compared with their of Schrodinger formalism, special cases are also discussed.

  9. Potential-well distortion in barrier Rf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King Ng

    2004-04-29

    Head-tail asymmetry has been observed in the longitudinal beam profiles in the Fermilab Recycler Ring where protons or antiprotons are stored in rf barrier buckets. The asymmetry is caused by the distortion of the rf potential well in the presence of resistive impedance. Gaussian energy distribution can fit the observed asymmetric beam profile but not without discrepancy. It can also fit the measured energy distribution. On the other hand, generalized elliptic distribution gives a better fit to the beam profile. However, it fails to reproduce the observed energy distribution.

  10. FERC sees huge potential for demand response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-04-15

    The FERC study concludes that U.S. peak demand can be reduced by as much as 188 GW -- roughly 20 percent -- under the most aggressive scenario. More moderate -- and realistic -- scenarios produce smaller but still significant reductions in peak demand. The FERC report is quick to point out that these are estimates of the potential, not projections of what could actually be achieved. The main varieties of demand response programs include interruptible tariffs, direct load control (DLC), and a number of pricing schemes.

  11. Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harding, L.B.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to calculate accurate potential energy surfaces (PES) for both reactive and nonreactive systems. To do this the electronic Schrodinger equation must be solved. Our approach to this problem starts with multiconfiguration self-consistent field (MCSCF) reference wavefunctions. These reference wavefunctions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to accurately describe changes in electronic structure over a broad range of geometries. Electron correlation effects are included via multireference, singles and doubles configuration interaction (MRSDCI) calculations. With this approach, the authors are able to provide useful predictions of the energetics for a broad range of systems.

  12. Numerical prediction of window condensation potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGowan, A.G.

    1995-08-01

    Although a substantial amount of effort has been expended to develop numerical methods for determining windows U-factors (EE 1983; Goss and Curcija 1994; Standaert 1985; CSA 1993a; NFRC 1991), there has been little work to data on using numerical methods to predict condensation potential. It is perhaps of direct interest to most ASHRAE members to determine heat loss and solar gains through windows as a precursor to sizing heating and cooling equipment, but condensation has long been recognized as an extremely important issue for consumers (and, consequently, for window manufacturers). Moreover, building scientists recognize the link between condensation and increased energy consumption (due to latent loads), reduced occupant comfort and indoor air quality (from the presence of bacteria and mold), and structural damage (where accumulated condensation is absorbed by the building material, thus reducing their structural stability). The National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) is developing a rating method for condensation potential in fenestration products as part of its mandate from the US Department of Energy (DOE). A rating method would benefit from the use of simulation as a supplement to physical condensation resistance testing to reduce the cost and time required for implementation and increase the flexibility of the rating method. This paper outlines one of the necessary components in the application of numerical methods for evaluating condensation in fenestration products. The theoretical approach and its practical application are discussed, as well as some comparisons between numerical prediction and physical test results for a sample of products.

  13. The Energy Efficiency Potential of Global Transport to 2050 ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Energy Efficiency Potential of Global Transport to 2050 The Energy Efficiency Potential of Global Transport to 2050 Broad view of sustainability of global transportation PDF ...

  14. Property:PotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacity | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from utility-scale PV in urban areas of a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy...

  15. Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects of Diesel Emissions Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects of Diesel Emissions 2005 ...

  16. Indian Country Solar Energy Potential Estimates & DOE IE Updates

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Financing Colton Heaps National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1 2 1 Potential 3 Refinement 5 Operations & Maintenance 2 Options 4 Implementation 3 Refinement Potential Options ...

  17. EFRC Creative Potential: Thinking Out of the Box | Center for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EFRC Creative Potential: Thinking Out of the Box 31 Mar 2014 Professor Petra Fromme is one ... Creative potential of different groups coming from different backgrounds..., the creative ...

  18. Webinar November 19: Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Webinar November 19: Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar Hydrogen Production and Concentrating Solar Power: A Systems Analysis Webinar November 19: Potential Strategies for...

  19. Analysis of Burnup and Economic Potential of Alternative Fuel...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Analysis of Burnup and Economic Potential of Alternative Fuel Materials in Thermal Reactors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Analysis of Burnup and Economic Potential of ...

  20. Property:PotentialOffshoreWindCapacity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from Offshore Wind for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric...

  1. Potential Induced Degradation (PID) Tests for Commercially Available...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential Induced Degradation (PID) Tests for Commercially Available PV Modules Potential Induced Degradation (PID) Tests for Commercially Available PV Modules Presented at the PV ...

  2. Wind Concurrent Cooling Could Increase Power Transmission Potential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Concurrent Cooling Could Increase Power Transmission Potential by as Much as 40% Wind ... In areas where wind farms are being developed, there is potential to take advantage of ...

  3. Meeting Concerning Potential Test Procedures and Energy Conservation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Concerning Potential Test Procedures and Energy Conservation Standards for Set-Top Boxes and Network Equipment Meeting Concerning Potential Test Procedures and Energy Conservation ...

  4. The Market and Technical Potential for Combined Heat and Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CommercialInstitutional Sector, January 2000 The Market and Technical Potential for ... and developed estimates of additional technical potential for CHP in these markets. ...

  5. The Market and Technical Potential for Combined Heat and Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Sector, January 2000 The Market and Technical Potential for Combined Heat and ... and developed estimates of additional technical potential for CHP in industry. ...

  6. Dynamic Potential Intensity: An improved representation of the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dynamic Potential Intensity: An improved representation of the ocean's impact on tropical cyclones Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dynamic Potential Intensity: An ...

  7. Property:PotentialEGSGeothermalCapacity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from EGS Geothermal for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric...

  8. NREL: Energy Efficiency Potential Mapping (Analysis & Tools for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency Potential Mapping (Analysis & Tools for Building America and Industry - 2015 Peer Review NREL: Energy Efficiency Potential Mapping (Analysis & Tools for Building...

  9. EPA Clean Energy Incentive Program Stakeholder Calls - Potential...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Incentive Program Stakeholder Calls - Potential CEIP Project Partners EPA Clean Energy Incentive Program Stakeholder Calls - Potential CEIP Project Partners November 23,...

  10. Chiral random matrix model at finite chemical potential: Characteristi...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    model at finite chemical potential: Characteristic determinant and edge universality Prev Next Title: Chiral random matrix model at finite chemical potential: ...

  11. Potential Effect of Pollutantn Emissions on Global Warming: First...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential Effect of Pollutantn Emissions on Global Warming: First Comparisong Using External Costs on Urban Buses Potential Effect of Pollutantn Emissions on Global Warming: First ...

  12. Carbon Emissions Reduction Potential in the US Chemicals and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Emissions Reduction Potential in the US Chemicals and Pulp and Paper Industries by Applying CHP Technologies, June 1999 Carbon Emissions Reduction Potential in the US ...

  13. Africa - Technical Potential of Solar Energy to Address Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Technical Potential of Solar Energy to Address Energy Poverty and Avoid GHG Emissions Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Technical Potential of Solar...

  14. Potential Vulnerability of US Petroleum Refineries to Increasing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential Vulnerability of US Petroleum Refineries to Increasing Water Temperature andor Reduced Water Availability Potential Vulnerability of US Petroleum Refineries to ...

  15. Property:IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ntifiedHydrothermalPotential Property Type Quantity Description Conventional hydrothermal electricity generation potential from identified hydrothermal sites, as determined by the...

  16. National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A...

  17. Energy Recovery Potential from Wastewater Utilities through Innovation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery Potential from Wastewater Utilities through Innovation Energy Recovery Potential from Wastewater Utilities through Innovation Breakout Session 3A-Conversion Technologies ...

  18. Combined Heat and Power Market Potential for Opportunity Fuels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combined Heat and Power Market Potential for Opportunity Fuels, August 2004 Combined Heat and Power Market Potential for Opportunity Fuels, August 2004 The purpose of this 2004...

  19. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United...

  20. Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five Methane Reduction Scenarios Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five Methane Reduction Scenarios ...

  1. Light-Duty Diesel Market Potential in North America | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Market Potential in North America Light-Duty Diesel Market Potential in North America 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters PDF icon ...

  2. NREL: Energy Efficiency Potential Mapping (Analysis & Tools for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency Potential Mapping (Analysis & Tools for Building America and Industry - 2015 Peer Review NREL: Energy Efficiency Potential Mapping (Analysis & Tools for Building ...

  3. Pilgrim's Progress: An Update on Geothermal Potential in Alaska...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pilgrim's Progress: An Update on Geothermal Potential in Alaska Pilgrim's Progress: An Update on Geothermal Potential in Alaska November 20, 2014 - 4:32pm Addthis Sunrise at ...

  4. High Power Laser Innovation Sparks Geothermal Power Potential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Power Laser Innovation Sparks Geothermal Power Potential High Power Laser Innovation Sparks Geothermal Power Potential May 29, 2015 - 11:02am Addthis The Energy Department's ...

  5. RADIOACTIVE WASTE STREAMS FROM VARIOUS POTENTIAL NUCLEAR FUEL...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    FROM VARIOUS POTENTIAL NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE OPTIONS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: RADIOACTIVE WASTE STREAMS FROM VARIOUS POTENTIAL NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE OPTIONS Five ...

  6. Thailand-Status and Potential for the Development of Biofuels...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Status and Potential for the Development of Biofuels and Rural Renewable Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Thailand-Status and Potential for the Development of Biofuels and...

  7. DOE Requests Information on Potential New or Revised Categorical...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Requests Information on Potential New or Revised Categorical Exclusions DOE Requests Information on Potential New or Revised Categorical Exclusions December 22, 2009 - 10:33am...

  8. EA-1927: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Potential Land and Facilities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gaseous Diffusion Plant Potential Land and Facilities Transfers; McCracken County, Kentucky EA-1927: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Potential Land and Facilities Transfers; ...

  9. Project Profile: Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential to Reduce Costs Project Profile: Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential to Reduce Costs Pratt Whitney Rocketdyne logo ...

  10. Pennsylvania: New Series of Windows Has Potential to Save Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    New Series of Windows Has Potential to Save Energy for Commercial Buildings Pennsylvania: New Series of Windows Has Potential to Save Energy for Commercial Buildings March 6, 2014...

  11. The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Issues That May Impede Its Expansion The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate-Related Issues That May Impede Its Expansion The Potential Benefits ...

  12. CL-20 Reactivity in the Subsurface Environment and Potential...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Potential for Migration Citation Details In-Document Search Title: CL-20 Reactivity in the Subsurface Environment and Potential for Migration Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzit...

  13. Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on Aquatic Environments The article reviews the results of that workshop, focusing on potential effects on ...

  14. Home Energy Score Program: Update and Overview for Potential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Potential Partners Home Energy Score Program: Update and Overview for Potential Partners Provides an overview of DOE's objectives for the Home Energy Score program ...

  15. Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel Cells Industry Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel Cells Industry Download presentation...

  16. Energy Saving Potentials and Air Quality Benefits of Urban Heat...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Energy Saving Potentials and Air Quality Benefits of Urban Heat Island Mitigation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Energy Saving Potentials and Air Quality ...

  17. Comprehensive Evaluation of the Geothermal Potential within the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comprehensive Evaluation of the Geothermal Potential within the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation Comprehensive Evaluation of the Geothermal Potential within the Pyramid Lake Paiute ...

  18. OTEC: status and potential of private funding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, E.J.; Richards, D.

    1982-01-01

    A financial analysis approach is described for calculating net present values and financial management rates of return for a wide variety of specific OTEC cases. Comparisons are made of the profit potentials, expected market penetration, perceived financial risks, and eventual benefits from the specific cases and logical follow-on construction scenarios. The principal factors of uncertainty as perceived by researchers, builders, and financiers are catalogued. Roles and responsibilities of participants in a financing approach including builder team, government, product user, financial houses, and investors are cited. Cases which have been investigated include 10 to 40 MW/sub e/ scale and 250 to 360 MW/sub e/ scale OTEC plants and plantships; electric power cabled ashore to US islands and the US mainland, methanol, ammonia, hybrid geothermal-OTEC plants for meeting local power demands or making products; and relevant data on other OTEC product possibilities.

  19. Potential nuclear safeguards applications for neutron generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindquist, L.O.

    1980-01-01

    Many nuclear safeguards inspection instruments use neutron sources to interrogate the fissile material (commonly /sup 235/U and /sup 239/Pu) to be measured. The neutron sources currently used in these instruments are isotopics such as Californium-252, Americium-Lithium, etc. It is becoming increasingly more difficult to transport isotopic sources from one measurement location to another. This represents a significant problem for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards inspectors because they must take their safeguards instruments with them to each nuclear installation to make an independent measurement. Purpose of this paper is to review the possibility of replacing isotopic neutron sources now used in IAEA safeguards instruments with electric neutron sources such as deuterium-tritium (D-T, 14-MeV neutrons) or deuterium-deuterium (D-D, 2-MeV neutrons). The potential for neutron generators to interrogate spent-light water reactor fuel assemblies in storage pools is also reviewed.

  20. Evaluation of liquefaction potential for building code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nunziata, C.; De Nisco, G.; Panza, G. F.

    2008-07-08

    The standard approach for the evaluation of the liquefaction susceptibility is based on the estimation of a safety factor between the cyclic shear resistance to liquefaction and the earthquake induced shear stress. Recently, an updated procedure based on shear-wave velocities (V{sub s}) has been proposed which could be more easily applied.These methods have been applied at La Plaja beach of Catania, that experienced liquefaction because of the 1693 earthquake. The detailed geotechnical and V{sub s} information and the realistic ground motion computed for the 1693 event let us compare the two approaches. The successful application of the V{sub s} procedure, slightly modified to fit historical and safety factor information, even if additional field performances are needed, encourages the development of a guide for liquefaction potential analysis, based on well defined V{sub s} profiles to be included in the italian seismic code.

  1. Cogeneration development and market potential in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, F.; Levine, M.D.; Naeb, J.; Xin, D.

    1996-05-01

    China`s energy production is largely dependent on coal. China currently ranks third in global CO{sub 2} emissions, and rapid economic expansion is expected to raise emission levels even further in the coming decades. Cogeneration provides a cost-effective way of both utilizing limited energy resources and minimizing the environmental impacts from use of fossil fuels. However, in the last 10 years state investments for cogeneration projects in China have dropped by a factor of 4. This has prompted this study. Along with this in-depth analysis of China`s cogeneration policies and investment allocation is the speculation that advanced US technology and capital can assist in the continued growth of the cogeneration industry. This study provides the most current information available on cogeneration development and market potential in China.

  2. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Jeffrey R.; Glaser, Steven D.

    2007-09-13

    The self-potential (SP) response during hydraulic fracturing of intact Sierra granite was investigated in the laboratory. Excellent correlation of pressure drop and SP suggests that the SP response is created primarily by electrokinetic coupling. For low pressures, the variation of SP with pressure drop is linear, indicating a constant coupling coefficient (Cc) of -200 mV/MPa. However for pressure drops >2 MPa, the magnitude of the Cc increases by 80% in an exponential trend. This increasing Cc is related to increasing permeability at high pore pressures caused by dilatancy of micro-cracks, and is explained by a decrease in the hydraulic tortuosity. Resistivity measurements reveal a decrease of 2% prior to hydraulic fracturing and a decrease of {approx}35% after fracturing. An asymmetric spatial SP response created by injectate diffusion into dilatant zones is observed prior to hydraulic fracturing, and in most cases this SP variation revealed the impending crack geometry seconds before failure. At rupture, injectate rushes into the new fracture area where the zeta potential is different than in the rock porosity, and an anomalous SP spike is observed. After fracturing, the spatial SP distribution reveals the direction of fracture propagation. Finally, during tensile cracking in a point load device with no water flow, a SP spike is observed that is caused by contact electrification. However, the time constant of this event is much less than that for transients observed during hydraulic fracturing, suggesting that SP created solely from material fracture does not contribute to the SP response during hydraulic fracturing.

  3. Pumped Storage and Potential Hydropower from Conduits | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Pumped Storage and Potential Hydropower from Conduits Pumped Storage and Potential Hydropower from Conduits This U.S. Department of Energy Report to Congress, Pumped Storage Hydropower and Potential Hydropower from Conduits, addresses the technical flexibility that existing pumped storage facilities can provide to support intermittent renewable energy generation. This study considered potential upgrades or retrofit of these facilities, the technical potential of existing and new

  4. Potential of Securitization in Solar PV Finance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowder, T.; Mendelsohn, M.

    2013-12-01

    This report aims to demonstrate, hypothetically and at a high level, what volumes of solar deployment could be supported given solar industry access to the capital markets in the form of security issuance. Securitization is not anticipated to replace tax equity in the near- to mid-term, but it could provide an additional source of funds that would be comparatively inexpensive and could reduce the weighted average cost of capital for a given solar project or portfolio. Thus, the potential to securitize solar assets and seek financing in the capital markets could help to sustain the solar industry when the investment tax credit (ITC) -- one of the federal incentives that has leveraged billions of dollars of private capital in the solar industry -- drops from 30% to 10% at the close of 2016. The report offers analysis on the size of the U.S. third-party financed solar market, as well as on the volumes (in MW) of solar asset origination possible through a $100 million securitization fund (assuming no overcollateralization). It also provides data on the size of the relevant securities markets and how the solar asset class may fit into these markets.

  5. Current-potential characteristics of electrochemical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battaglia, V.S.

    1993-07-01

    This dissertation contains investigations in three distinct areas. Chapters 1 and 2 provide an analysis of the effects of electromagnetic phenomena during the initial stages of cell discharge. Chapter 1 includes the solution to Maxwell`s equations for the penetration of the axial component of an electric field into an infinitely long cylindrical conductor. Chapter 2 contains the analysis of the conductor included in a radial circuit. Chapter 3 provides a complete description of the equations that describe the growth of an oxide film. A finite difference program was written to solve the equations. The system investigated is the iron/iron oxide in a basic, aqueous solution. Chapters 4 and 5 include the experimental attempts for replacing formaldehyde with an innocuous reducing agent for electroless deposition. In chapter 4, current-versus-voltage curves are provided for a sodium thiosulfate bath in the presence of a copper disk electrode. Also provided are the cathodic polarization curves of a copper/EDTA bath in the presence of a copper electrode. Chapter 5 contains the experimental results of work done with sodium hypophosphite as a reducing agent. Mixed-potential-versus-time curves for solutions containing various combinations of copper sulfate, nickel chloride, and hypophosphite in the presence of a palladium disk electrode provide an indication of the reducing power of the solutions.

  6. Insights from Smart Meters: The Potential for Peak-Hour Savings from Behavior-Based Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, Annika; Perry, Michael; Smith, Brian; Sullivan, Michael; Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles

    2014-03-25

    The rollout of smart meters in the last several years has opened up new forms of previously unavailable energy data. Many utilities are now able in real-time to capture granular, household level interval usage data at very high-frequency levels for a large proportion of their residential and small commercial customer population. This can be linked to other time and locationspecific information, providing vast, constantly growing streams of rich data (sometimes referred to by the recently popular buzz word, “big data”). Within the energy industry there is increasing interest in tapping into the opportunities that these data can provide. What can we do with all of these data? The richness and granularity of these data enable many types of creative and cutting-edge analytics. Technically sophisticated and rigorous statistical techniques can be used to pull interesting insights out of this highfrequency, human-focused data. We at LBNL are calling this “behavior analytics”. This kind of analytics has the potential to provide tremendous value to a wide range of energy programs. For example, highly disaggregated and heterogeneous information about actual energy use would allow energy efficiency (EE) and/or demand response (DR) program implementers to target specific programs to specific households; would enable evaluation, measurement and verification (EM&V) of energy efficiency programs to be performed on a much shorter time horizon than was previously possible; and would provide better insights in to the energy and peak hour savings associated with specifics types of EE and DR programs (e.g., behavior-based (BB) programs). In this series, “Insights from Smart Meters”, we will present concrete, illustrative examples of the type of value that insights from behavior analytics of these data can provide (as well as pointing out its limitations). We will supply several types of key findings, including: • Novel results, which answer questions the industry previously was unable to answer; • Proof-of-concept analytics tools that can be adapted and used by others; and • Guidelines and protocols that summarize analytical best practices. This report focuses on one example of the kind of value that analysis of this data can provide: insights into whether behavior-based (BB) efficiency programs have the potential to provide peak-hour energy savings.

  7. FEL potential of eRHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Hao, Y.; Kao, C-C.; Kayran, D.; Murphy, J.B.; Ptitsyn, V.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.

    2010-08-23

    Brookhaven National Laboratory plans to build a 5-to-30 GeV energy-recovery linac (ERL) for its future electron-ion collider, eRHIC. In past few months, the Laboratory turned its attention to the potential of this unique machine for free electron lasers (FELS), which we initially assessed earlier. In this paper, we present our current vision of a possible FEL farm, and of narrow-band FEL-oscillators driven by this accelerator. eRHIC, the proposed electron-ion collider at BNL, takes advantage of the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) complex. Plans call for adding a six-pass super-conducting (SRF) ERL to this complex to collide polarized- and unpolarized- electron beams with heavy ions (with energies up to 130 GeV per nucleon) and with polarized protons (with energies up to 325 GeV). RHIC, with a circumference of 3.834 km, has three-fold symmetry and six straight sections each {approx} 250 m long. Two of these straight sections will accommodate 703-MHz SRF linacs. The maximum energy of the electron beam in eRHIC will be reached in stages, from 5 GeV to 30 GeV, by increasing the lengths of its SRF linacs. We plan to install at the start the six-pass magnetic system with small gap magnets. The structure of the eRHIC's electron beam will be identical with that of its hadron beam, viz., 166 bunches will be filled, reserving about a one-microsecond gap for the abort kicker. With modest modifications, we can assure that eRHIC's ERL will become an excellent driver for continuous wave (CW) FELs (see Fig.1). The eRHIC's beam structure will support the operation of several such FELs in parasitic mode.

  8. Stable and Efficient White OLEDs Based on a Single Emissive Material

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performer: Arizona State University – Tempe, AZPartners: Universal Display Corporation – Ewing, NJDOE Total Funding: $700,000Cost Share: $175,000Project Term: 7/1/15 – 6/30/17Funding...

  9. Innovative High-Performance Deposition Technology for Low-Cost Manufacturing of OLED Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performer: OLEDWorks, LLC – Rochester, NYDOE Total Funding: $1,046,452Cost Share: $1,046,452Project Term: 10/1/2013 – 12/31/2015Funding Opportunity: SSL Manufacturing R&D Funding...

  10. Device structure for OLED light device having multi element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Antoniadis; Homer , Krummacher; Benjamin Claus

    2008-01-22

    An apparatus such as a light source has a multi-element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer disposed over a transparent layer of the light source and on the exterior of said light source. The multi-element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer includes a plurality of light extraction elements and a plurality of luminescence conversion elements. The light extraction elements diffuses the light from the light source while luminescence conversion elements absorbs a first spectrum of light from said light source and emits a second spectrum of light.

  11. OLED lighting devices having multi element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Antoniadis, Homer

    2010-11-16

    An apparatus such as a light source has a multi element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer disposed over a transparent layer of the light source and on the exterior of said light source. The multi-element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer includes a plurality of light extraction elements and a plurality of luminescence conversion elements. The light extraction elements diffuses the light from the light source while luminescence conversion elements absorbs a first spectrum of light from said light source and emits a second spectrum of light.

  12. OLED Lighting in the Offices of Aurora Lighting Design, Inc. | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) | Department of Energy study was composed of several smaller studies done in cooperation with other local entities and experts, all of which are summarized in this report. PDF icon 48632.pdf More Documents & Publications Phase 2 Report: Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS); Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS): Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project

  13. FIA-14-0022- In the Matter of Oles, Morrison, Rinker, Baker LLP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On April 22, 2014, the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) issued a decision denying an appeal (Appeal) from a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) determination issued by the Department of Energy’s...

  14. Breakthroughs in Practical-Sized, High Quality OLED Light Panel Source

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    General Electric Global Research has achieved a major breakthrough, developing a fully functional 2 ft. x 2 ft. light panel that produces more than 1200 lumens of quality white light with an efficacy of 15 lumens per watt. This device offers 50% better energy performance than their previous device, breaking two world records.

  15. 2014 Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2014 Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA Issued 2014 Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA Issued July 7, 2014 - 5:02pm Addthis ...

  16. Renormalization of the Brazilian chiral nucleon-nucleon potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Da Rocha, Carlos A.; Timoteo, Varese S.

    2013-03-25

    In this work we present a renormalization of the Brazilian nucleon-nucleon (NN) potential using a subtractive method. We show that the exchange of correlated two pion is important for isovector channels, mainly in tensor and central potentials.

  17. Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE Offices are encouraged to be inclusive in providing potentially interested parties with opportunities to review NEPA documents.  This Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under...

  18. Reception of longitudinal vector potential radiation with a plasma antenna

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, Robert K. Jr.

    2013-07-28

    To help resolve the long-running debate between physicists and engineers regarding the existence of the magnetic vector potential, herewith we describe an experiment demonstrating reception of time-harmonic vector potential radiation at 1.3 GHz.

  19. Photoinduced changes of the chemical potential in superconducting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Photoinduced changes of the chemical potential in superconducting Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 + ... Title: Photoinduced changes of the chemical potential in superconducting Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 ...

  20. Geothermal Discovery Offers Hope for More Potential Across the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Discovery Offers Hope for More Potential Across the Country Geothermal Discovery Offers Hope for More Potential Across the Country October 17, 2012 - 12:50pm Addthis The solution...