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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Comparison of selected oil-field brines from fields in the Permian basin, West Texas-southeast New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Stiff diagrams of oil-field brines from the west Texas Permian basin are identifiable within the geological framework. Plotted from a simple analysis of three cations and three anions, older Paleozoic waters can be categorized as either 'pristine' or modified, usually by a later influx of Permian or early Pennsylvanian water. These different plots can be segregated by geologic province. The Permian brines differ by age and also by environment (shelf, basin, etc.).

White, H.G. III

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Analysis of hydrocarbon removal methods for the management of oilfield brines and produced waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the Texas Railroad Commission (TRC), ????over 250 billion gallons of produced water is taken out of Texas Soil every year, and more than 35% of this water is not currently fit to use.?? Therefore, it can be assumed that domestically and globally, the petroleum industries challenge has been to develop a high-tech and cost effective method to purify the large volumes of oilfield brines and produced water. Currently, most of the produced water requires several pre- and post- treatment methods to aide in reducing fouling of membranes, separation of components, increasing influent and effluent quality, and preventing unwanted work stoppage during the desalination process. As a result, the pre- and post- treatment conditioning of the produced water affects the economics and scale-up (i.e. residence times, absorption capacity, etc??) of the varying processes parameters. Therefore, this research focuses on developing an economic analysis and determining the adsorption capacity of an organoclay system to remove oil.

Furrow, Brendan Eugene

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

EVALUATIONS OF RADIONUCLIDES OF URANIUM, THORIUM, AND RADIUM ASSOCIATED WITH PRODUCED FLUIDS, PRECIPITATES, AND SLUDGES FROM OIL, GAS, AND OILFIELD BRINE INJECTION WELLS IN MISSISSIPPI  

SciTech Connect

Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are known to be produced as a byproduct of hydrocarbon production in Mississippi. The presence of NORM has resulted in financial losses to the industry and continues to be a liability as the NORM-enriched scales and scale encrusted equipment is typically stored rather than disposed of. Although the NORM problem is well known, there is little publically available data characterizing the hazard. This investigation has produced base line data to fill this informational gap. A total of 329 NORM-related samples were collected with 275 of these samples consisting of brine samples. The samples were derived from 37 oil and gas reservoirs from all major producing areas of the state. The analyses of these data indicate that two isotopes of radium ({sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra) are the ultimate source of the radiation. The radium contained in these co-produced brines is low and so the radiation hazard posed by the brines is also low. Existing regulations dictate the manner in which these salt-enriched brines may be disposed of and proper implementation of the rules will also protect the environment from the brine radiation hazard. Geostatistical analyses of the brine components suggest relationships between the concentrations of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra, between the Cl concentration and {sup 226}Ra content, and relationships exist between total dissolved solids, BaSO{sub 4} saturation and concentration of the Cl ion. Principal component analysis points to geological controls on brine chemistry, but the nature of the geologic controls could not be determined. The NORM-enriched barite (BaSO{sub 4}) scales are significantly more radioactive than the brines. Leaching studies suggest that the barite scales, which were thought to be nearly insoluble in the natural environment, can be acted on by soil microorganisms and the enclosed radium can become bioavailable. This result suggests that the landspreading means of scale disposal should be reviewed. This investigation also suggests 23 specific components of best practice which are designed to provide a guide to safe handling of NORM in the hydrocarbon industry. The components of best practice include both worker safety and suggestions to maintain waste isolation from the environment.

Charles Swann; John Matthews; Rick Ericksen; Joel Kuszmaul

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Salt caverns can be formed in underground salt formations incidentally as a result of mining or intentionally to create underground chambers for product storage or waste disposal. For more than 50 years, salt caverns have been used to store hydrocarbon products. Recently, concerns over the costs and environmental effects of land disposal and incineration have sparked interest in using salt caverns for waste disposal. Countries using or considering using salt caverns for waste disposal include Canada (oil-production wastes), Mexico (purged sulfates from salt evaporators), Germany (contaminated soils and ashes), the United Kingdom (organic residues), and the Netherlands (brine purification wastes). In the US, industry and the regulatory community are pursuing the use of salt caverns for disposal of oil-field wastes. In 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a regulatory determination exempting wastes generated during oil and gas exploration and production (oil-field wastes) from federal hazardous waste regulations--even though such wastes may contain hazardous constituents. At the same time, EPA urged states to tighten their oil-field waste management regulations. The resulting restrictions have generated industry interest in the use of salt caverns for potentially economical and environmentally safe oil-field waste disposal. Before the practice can be implemented commercially, however, regulators need assurance that disposing of oil-field wastes in salt caverns is technically and legally feasible and that potential health effects associated with the practice are acceptable. In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. It investigated regulatory issues; the types of oil-field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location considerations; and disposal operations, closure and remediation issues. It determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could, from technical and legal perspectives, be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, ANL subsequently conducted a preliminary risk assessment on the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in salt caverns. The methodology for the risk assessment included the following steps: identifying potential contaminants of concern; determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants; assessing contaminant toxicities; estimating contaminant intakes; and estimating human cancer and noncancer risks. To estimate exposure routes and pathways, four postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (for noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the EPA target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results lead to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

Elcock, D.

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

5

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MECHANICAL SLIMHOLE TESTING SYSTEM (MSTS) MECHANICAL SLIMHOLE TESTING SYSTEM (MSTS) SLIMHOLE DRILL STEM TESTER APRIL, 1995 FC9524/95DT4 MSTS Test in Casper Wyoming April 19,1995 Background MSTS EXP-2 was shipped back to SPT for modifications and re-testing. A 4-1/2" cased well at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) in Casper Wyoming was selected. The well conditions were: Casper Well Deviation 0 Casing 4-1/2" 10.5#/ft Test depth 5380 ft BHT NOT Tubing 2-3/8" 4.7#/ft Formation Fluid Water & Oil Kill Fluid 10#/gal brine The MSTS was tested with a single 3.06" Dowell packer which was set at 5380 ft, approximately 80 off bottom. The test string was configured: MSTS EXP-2 with Inflate recorder - HPR-D Formation Gage - HPR-D Single packer, Dowell 3.06 TFV - 12 inch stroke no cam 900 ft of 2-3/8" 4.7 #/ft tubing (3000 #)

6

2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Rocky Mountain Oilfield...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Rocky Mountain Oilfield...

7

Oilfield flooding polymer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monomer, polymers containing the monomer, and the use of the polymer in oilfield flooding is disclosed. The subject monomer is represented by the general formula: ##STR1## wherein: n is an integer from 0 to about 4; m is an integer from 0 to about 6; a is an integer equal to at least 1 except where m is equal to 0, a must equal 0 and where m is equal to 1, a must equal 0 or 1; p is an integer from 2 to about 10; b is an integer equal to at least 1 and is of sufficient magnitude that the ratio b/p is at least 0.2; and q is an integer from 0 to 2. The number of hydroxy groups in the monomer is believed to be critical, and therefore the sum of (a+b) divided by the sum (m+p) should be at least 0.2. The moieties linked to the acrylic nitrogen can be joined to provide a ringed structure.

Martin, Fred D. (Socorro, NM); Hatch, Melvin J. (Socorro, NM); Shepitka, Joel S. (Socorro, NM); Donaruma, Lorraine G. (Syosset, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALLIED OIL & TOOL POWERJET SLOTTING TOOL ALLIED OIL & TOOL POWERJET SLOTTING TOOL JANUARY 10, 1996 FC9522 / 95DT3 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS ALLIED OIL & TOOL POWERJET SLOTTING TOOL Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: RALPH SCHULTE RMOTC Project Engineer January 11, 1996 551103/9522:jb CONTENTS Page Summary .......................................................................................................................2 Introduction.....................................................................................................................2 Description of Operations...................................................................................................3 Figure 1 ..........................................................................................................5

9

Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES Project)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES) project was developed in response to a cooperative agreement offering by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Preferred Upstream Management Projects (PUMP III). Project partners included the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) as lead agency working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the California Oil Producers Electric Cooperative (COPE). The project was designed to demonstrate that the entire range of oilfield 'stranded gases' (gas production that can not be delivered to a commercial market because it is poor quality, or the quantity is too small to be economically sold, or there are no pipeline facilities to transport it to market) can be cost-effectively harnessed to make electricity. The utilization of existing, proven distribution generation (DG) technologies to generate electricity was field-tested successfully at four marginal well sites, selected to cover a variety of potential scenarios: high Btu, medium Btu, ultra-low Btu gas, as well as a 'harsh', or high contaminant, gas. Two of the four sites for the OFFGASES project were idle wells that were shut in because of a lack of viable solutions for the stranded noncommercial gas that they produced. Converting stranded gas to useable electrical energy eliminates a waste stream that has potential negative environmental impacts to the oil production operation. The electricity produced will offset that which normally would be purchased from an electric utility, potentially lowering operating costs and extending the economic life of the oil wells. Of the piloted sites, the most promising technologies to handle the range were microturbines that have very low emissions. One recently developed product, the Flex-Microturbine, has the potential to handle the entire range of oilfield gases. It is deployed at an oilfield near Santa Barbara to run on waste gas that is only 4% the strength of natural gas. The cost of producing oil is to a large extent the cost of electric power used to extract and deliver the oil. Researchers have identified stranded and flared gas in California that could generate 400 megawatts of power, and believe that there is at least an additional 2,000 megawatts that have not been identified. Since California accounts for about 14.5% of the total domestic oil production, it is reasonable to assume that about 16,500 megawatts could be generated throughout the United States. This power could restore the cost-effectiveness of thousands of oil wells, increasing oil production by millions of barrels a year, while reducing emissions and greenhouse gas emissions by burning the gas in clean distributed generators rather than flaring or venting the stranded gases. Most turbines and engines are designed for standardized, high-quality gas. However, emerging technologies such as microturbines have increased the options for a broader range of fuels. By demonstrating practical means to consume the four gas streams, the project showed that any gases whose properties are between the extreme conditions also could be utilized. The economics of doing so depends on factors such as the value of additional oil recovered, the price of electricity produced, and the alternate costs to dispose of stranded gas.

Rachel Henderson; Robert Fickes

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAM III PROJECT SAM III PROJECT Sandia National laboratories Prepared for: Project File Documentation Prepared by: MICHAEL J. TAYLOR Project Manager March 31, 1998 JO 850200 : FC 970009 ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a demonstration of the Surface Area Modulation Downhole Telemetry System (SAM 111) at the Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), in partnership with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The project encompassed the testing of a real-time wireless telemetry system in a simulated Measurement-While-Drilling (MWD) environment. A Surface Area Modulation (SAM) technique demonstrated data transmission rates greater than present techniques, in a deployment mode which requires

11

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOVERFLO (SMART CABLE) NOVERFLO (SMART CABLE) LIQUID LEAK DETECTION SYSTEM FEBRUARY 12, 1996 FC9535/96ET3 RMOTC TEST REPORT NOVERFLO LIQUID LEAK DETECTION SYSTEM (SMART CABLE) Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: RALPH SCHULTE RMOTC Project Engineer February 12, 1996 650200/9535:jb CONTENTS Page Summary 1 Introducation 1 NPR-3 Map 2 Description of Operations 3 1 st Test 3 2 nd Test 3 3 rd Test 4 4 th Test 5 Concluding Remarks 5 Acknowledgements 6 Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center Technical Report Noverflo Liquid Leak Detection System (Smart Cable) Summary As part of RMOTC's continuing mission to support and strengthen the domestic oil and gas industry by allowing testing by individual inventors and commercial companies to evaluate their products and technology, RMOTC

12

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AUTOMATIC SHUTDOWN VALVE AUTOMATIC SHUTDOWN VALVE CAMBRIA VALVE CORPORATION OCTOBER 17, 1995 FC9536/95ET1 RMOTC TEST REPORT Automatic Shutdown Valve Cambria Valve Corporation Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: MICHAEL J. TAYLOR RMOTC Project Manager October 17, 1995 551103/9536:jb TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Introduction 1 Figure 1 2 Test Details 3 Table 1 4 Conclusions 5 Acknowledgments 5 ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a test of an Automatic Shutdown Valve (ASDV) for hydraulic systems at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR- 3). The Cambria Valve Corporation (CVC) manufactures the 3-Port ASDV that is designed to automatically shut down the flow of fluid through a hydraulic system in the event of a ruptured line and safely redirect flow to a bypass system. The CVC ASDV effectively demonstrated its

13

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AUTOMATED THREE-PHASE CENTRIFUGE PROJECT AUTOMATED THREE-PHASE CENTRIFUGE PROJECT MARCH 30, 1998 FC9535/96ET5 RMOTC TEST REPORT AUTOMATED THREE-PHASE CENTRIFUGE PROJECT Centech, Inc. Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: MICHAEL J. TAYLOR Project Manager March 30, 1998 850200/650200/650201:9583 ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a test of an Automated ThreePhase Centrifuge at the Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3). Centech, Inc. has manufactured a three-phase centrifuge which has been retrofitted with a PCbased, fuzzy-logic, automated control system, by Los Alamos National Laboratory. The equipment is designed to automatically process tank-bottom wastes within operator-prescribed limits of Basic

14

Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. Argonne determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, Argonne subsequently conducted a preliminary evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in domal salt caverns. Steps used in this evaluation included the following: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing contaminant toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and calculating human cancer and noncancer risk estimates. Five postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (referring to noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results led to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

Elcock, D.

1998-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

15

Quantitative study of oilfield casing damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carrying on the analysis to the cause of casing failure based on engineering factors and geological factors, and choosing the improved analytic hierarchy process to have a quantitative study for oilfield of the casing failure, improved the influence ... Keywords: analytical hierarchy process (AHP), casing damage, quantitative analysis

Deng Rui; Zhang Liang; Guo Haimin

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Multispectral Imaging At Rangely Oilfield Area (Pickles & Cover, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Multispectral Imaging At Rangely Oilfield Area (Pickles & Cover, 2004) Multispectral Imaging At Rangely Oilfield Area (Pickles & Cover, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging At Rangely Oilfield Area (Pickles & Cover, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Rangely Oilfield Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Airborne hyperspectral imaging applied to determine vegetation and CO2 leakage in the Rangely oilfield of northwest Colorado - results may be useful for geothermal exploration. References W. Pickles, W. Cover (2004) Hyperspectral Geobotanical Remote Sensing For Co2 Storage Monitoring Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Multispectral_Imaging_At_Rangely_Oilfield_Area_(Pickles_%26_Cover,_2004)&oldid=511013"

17

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER MICROTURBINE PROJECT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MICROTURBINE PROJECT MICROTURBINE PROJECT Stacy & Stacy Consulting, LLC March 31, 1998 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER MICROTURBINE PROJECT Stacy & Stacy Consulting, LLC Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: MICHAEL J. TAYLOR Project Manager March 31, 1998 JO 850200 : FC 980009 ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a demonstration of gas-fired, integrated microturbine systems at the Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), in partnership with Stacy & Stacy Consulting, LLC (Stacy & Stacy). The project encompassed the testing of two gas microturbine systems at two oil-production wellsites. The microturbine-generators were fueled directly by casinghead gas to power their beam-pumping-unit motors. The system at well 47-A-34 utilized the casinghead sweet gas (0-ppm

18

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MICROBIAL PRODUCTION STIMULATION MARCH 31, 1998 FC970010 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Microbial Production Stimulation for: D. Michael Dennis Geomicrobial Technologies,...

19

Portable brine evaporator unit, process, and system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention discloses a comprehensive, efficient, and cost effective portable evaporator unit, method, and system for the treatment of brine. The evaporator unit, method, and system require a pretreatment process that removes heavy metals, crude oil, and other contaminates in preparation for the evaporator unit. The pretreatment and the evaporator unit, method, and system process metals and brine at the site where they are generated (the well site). Thus, saving significant money to producers who can avoid present and future increases in transportation costs.

Hart, Paul John (Indiana, PA); Miller, Bruce G. (State College, PA); Wincek, Ronald T. (State College, PA); Decker, Glenn E. (Bellefonte, PA); Johnson, David K. (Port Matilda, PA)

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

20

CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says August 31, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The feasibility of using carbon dioxide (CO2) injection for recovering between 250 million and 500 million additional barrels of oil from Kansas oilfields has been established in a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The University of Kansas Center for Research studied the possibility of near-miscible CO2 flooding for extending the life of mature oilfields in the Arbuckle Formation while simultaneously providing permanent geologic storage of carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says August 31, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The feasibility of using carbon dioxide (CO2) injection for recovering between 250 million and 500 million additional barrels of oil from Kansas oilfields has been established in a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The University of Kansas Center for Research studied the possibility of near-miscible CO2 flooding for extending the life of mature oilfields in the Arbuckle Formation while simultaneously providing permanent geologic storage of carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas.

22

Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oilfield Testing Center Oilfield Testing Center Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center General Information Name Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center Facility Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Coordinates 42.9724567°, -106.3160188° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.9724567,"lon":-106.3160188,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

23

Optimization of Electric Energy Consumption in Marginal California Oilfields: Oilfields Energy Consumption Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High electrical cost has always constituted a major expense item in the operation of oilfields. Such high costs are particularly critical to small oil and gas operators. There are opportunities that can substantially reduce electric cost and improve energy usage efficiency. For small operators, this could mean a difference between premature abandonment and continued recovery. Energy reduction in oil production supports the need for energy reduction across all industries brought on by recent electrical en...

2001-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

24

Treatment methods for geothermal brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey is made of commercially available methods currently in use as well as those which might be used to prevent scaling and corrosion in geothermal brines. More emphasis is placed on scaling. Treatments are classified as inhibitors, alterants and coagulants; they are applied to control scaling and corrosion in fresh and waste geothermal brines. Recommendations for research in brine treatment are described.

Phillips, S.L.; Mathur, A.K.; Garrison, W.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES FOR GEOTHERMAL BRINE TREATMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the DOE Geothermal Energy Program, BNL's Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) project is aimed at the development of cost-efficient and environmentally acceptable technologies for the disposal of geothermal wastes. Extensive chemical studies of high and low salinity brines and precipitates have indicated that in addition to trace quantities of regulated substances, e.g., toxic metals such as arsenic and mercury, there are significant concentrations of valuable metals, including gold, silver and platinum. Further chemical and physical studies of the silica product have also shown that the produced silica is a valuable material with commercial potential. A combined biochemical and chemical technology is being developed which (1) solubilizes, separates, and removes environmentally regulated constituents in geothermal precipitates and brines (2) generates an amorphous silica product which may be used as feedstock for the production of revenue generating materials, (3) recover economically valuable trace metals and salts. Geothermal power resources which utilize low salinity brines and use the Stretford process for hydrogen sulfide abatement generate a contaminated sulfur cake. Combined technology converts such sulfur to a commercial grade sulfur, suitable for agricultural use. The R and D activities at BNL are conducted jointly with industrial parties in an effort focused on field applications.

PREMUZIC,E.T.; LIN,M.S.; BOHENEK,M.; JOSHI-TOPE,G.; ZHOU,W.; SHELENKOVA,L.; WILKE,R.

1998-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

26

Biochemical processes for geothermal brine treatment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the DOE Geothermal Energy Program, BNL`s Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) project is aimed at the development of cost-efficient and environmentally acceptable technologies for the disposal of geothermal wastes. Extensive chemical studies of high and low salinity brines and precipitates have indicated that in addition to trace quantities of regulated substances, e.g., toxic metals such as arsenic and mercury, there are significant concentrations of valuable metals, including gold, silver and platinum. Further chemical and physical studies of the silica product have also shown that the produced silica is a valuable material with commercial potential. A combined biochemical and chemical technology is being developed which (1) solubilizes, separates, and removes environmentally regulated constituents in geothermal precipitates and brines, (2) generates an amorphous silica product which may be used as feedstock for the production of revenue generating materials, (3) recover economically valuable trace metals and salts. Geothermal power resources which utilize low salinity brines and use the Stretford process for hydrogen sulfide abatement generate a contaminated sulfur cake. Combined technology converts such sulfur to a commercial grade sulfur, suitable for agricultural use. The R and D activities at BNL are conducted jointly with industrial parties in an effort focused on field applications.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Bohenek, M.; Joshi-Tope, G.; Zhou, W.; Shelenkova, L.; Wilke, R.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Slope |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Slope Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Slope October 18, 2013 - 11:52am Addthis Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska’s North Slope Quick Facts The National Petroleum Reserve was created by President Warren G, Harding in 1923 when the U.S. Navy was converting from coal to oil. The reserve spans 22 million acres across the western North Slope of Alaska-the largest single unit of public lands in the nation. The 800-mile-long trans-Alaska pipeline carries oil from Prudhoe Bay, on Alaska's North Slope, to Valdez, Alaska, the nearest ice-free port. More than 16 million barrels of oil have traveled through the pipeline since the first barrel flowed in 1977.

28

Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Slope |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Slope Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Slope October 18, 2013 - 11:52am Addthis Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska’s North Slope Quick Facts The National Petroleum Reserve was created by President Warren G, Harding in 1923 when the U.S. Navy was converting from coal to oil. The reserve spans 22 million acres across the western North Slope of Alaska-the largest single unit of public lands in the nation. The 800-mile-long trans-Alaska pipeline carries oil from Prudhoe Bay, on Alaska's North Slope, to Valdez, Alaska, the nearest ice-free port. More than 16 million barrels of oil have traveled through the pipeline since the first barrel flowed in 1977.

29

Optimization of Electric Energy Consumption in Marginal California Oilfields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a pilot study of electricity consumption in California oilfields that found significant potential for reducing costs through energy efficiency improvements. It offers suggestions for reducing electricity consumption that, if implemented, could result in a system-wide demand reduction and reduce the need for additional generation and power infrastructure capacity. Moreover, reducing oilfield energy costs would reduce the overall cost of oil production, helping marginal wells remain a...

2003-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

30

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PETROLEUM MAGNETICS INTERNATIONAL PETROLEUM MAGNETICS INTERNATIONAL NOVEMBER 28, 1996 FC9520 / 95PT8 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS PETROLEUM MAGNETIC INTERNATIONAL DOWNHOLE MAGNETS FOR SCALE CONTROL Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field Engineer November 28, 1995 650100/9520:jb ABSTRACT November 28, 1995 The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a field test on the Petroleum Magnetics International (PMI) downhole magnet, at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR- 3) located 35 miles north of Casper in Natrona County, Wyoming. PMI of Odessa, Texas, states that the magnets are designed to reduce scale and paraffin buildup on the rods, tubing

31

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TANK LEVEL GAUGING SYSTEM TANK LEVEL GAUGING SYSTEM JULY 25, 1996 FC9519 / 95PT7 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER TANK LEVEL GAUGING SYSTEM DOUBLE M ELECTRIC Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field Engineer July 25, 1996 551103/9519:jb ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a test of a Tank Level Gauging System at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3). Double M. Electric manufactures the equipment that incorporates an optical-encoder sending unit, cellular communications, and software interface. The system effectively displayed its capabilities for remote monitoring and recording of tank levels.

32

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PETRO-PLUG PETRO-PLUG BENTONITE PLUGGING JANUARY 27, 1998 Report No. RMOTC/97PT22 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS PETRO-PLUG BENTONITE PLUGGING Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: Michael R. Tyler RMOTC Project Manager January 27, 1998 Report No. RMOTC/96ET4 CONTENTS Page Technical Description ...................................................................................................... 1 Problem ............................................................................................................................ 1 Solution ............................................................................................................................ 2 Operation..........................................................................................................................

33

Microbiologically influenced corrosion of oilfield producing well equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This oilfield has been waterflooded for many years. After it was placed under polymer flood, severe corrosion was noted in the producing wells. This corrosion appears to be related to polymer breakthrough. Extensive analyses including various microbiological techniques strongly indicated bacterial involvement and a successful program of biocide treatments were begun on the wells.

Littmann, E.S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

How to treat and recycle heavy clear brine fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clear brine fluids, such as CaCl/sub 2/, are replacing muds in well completions and workovers. These ''solids-free'' fluids have caused increases in well productivity of as much as 850%. To use the fluids in higher density ranges, it is necessary to blend the CaCl/sub 2/ brines with the more expensive bromide fluids. This, in turn, has increased the importance of reclaiming weighted brines to make their use more cost effective. To reclaim clear fluids, the solids picked up during use are removed and the fluid is reused or reweighted. A common problem though is the post-precipitation of dissolved contaminants that may appear in the used brines after several days or weeks in storage. Precipitation also may occur if other heavy fluids are added to adjust density before reuse. Laboratory tests have identified the solids as primarily iron hydroxides and halides. (Halides are salts containing a halogen-flourine, chlorine, bromine, or iodine.) Additional experimentation has shown that pH adjustment at the well site or before transfer to storage facilities can provide a simple and effective way of controlling the precipitation of metal hydroxides and halides. This article discusses methods of pH control, measurement, and adjustment, which will allow for optimum use of clear brine fluids.

Pasztor, A.J.; Snover, J.S.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AJUST A PUMP BEAM PUMPING UNIT AJUST A PUMP BEAM PUMPING UNIT FEBRUARY 19, 1997 FC9532 / 95EC1 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER AJUST A PUMP TEST Rosemond Manufacturing, Inc. (RMI) Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: MICHAEL J. TAYLOR Project Manager February 19, 1997 650200/551107:9532 ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a test of a Model-2000 Ajust A Pump system at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3). Rosemond Manufacturing, Inc. (RMI) manufactures compact beam-pumping units that incorporate energy-efficient gear boxes. The equipment is designed to reduce operating costs and minimize maintenance labor. This report documents the equipment performance and the results of the Ajust A Pump test. The purpose of the test was to demonstrate claims of energy efficiency and reduced labor requirements. The test showed

36

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PERMANENT DOWNHOLE PRESSURE GAUGE PERMANENT DOWNHOLE PRESSURE GAUGE MARCH 15, 1998 FC9553/96PT16 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Sperry-Sun Permanent Downhole Pressure Gauge PROJECT TEST RESULTS March 16, 1998 Michael R. Tyler Project Manager Abstract The Sperry-Sun Downhole Permanent Pressure Gauge (DPPG) is a pressure gauge that is designed to remain in the well for long periods of time providing real time surface data on borehole pressures. The DPPG was field tested at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center in well 63-TPX-10. The instrument was attached to the production string directly above a submersible pump. It was expected to monitor pressure draw-down and build-ups during normal production cycles. During the first two months of the test, the tool worked fine providing a pressure up survey that

37

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MAG-WELL DOWNHOLE MAGNETIC FLUID CONDITIONERS MAG-WELL DOWNHOLE MAGNETIC FLUID CONDITIONERS APRIL 4,1995 FC9511 / 95PT5 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER MAG-WELL DOWNHOLE MAGNETIC FLUID CONDITIONERS PROJECT TEST RESULTES Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field Engineer November 28, 1995 650100/9511:jb ABSTRACT November 28, 1995 The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a field test on the Mag-Well Downhole Magnetic Fluid Conditioners (MFCs), at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR- 3) located 35 miles north of Casper in Natrona County, Wyoming. Mag-Well, Inc., manufactures the MFCs, that are designed to reduce scale and paraffin buildup on the rods, tubing and downhole pump of producing oil wells. The Mag-Well magnetic tools failed to

38

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D-JAX PUMP-OFF CONTROLLER D-JAX PUMP-OFF CONTROLLER APRIL 4,1995 FC9510 / 95PT4 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER D-JAX PUMP-OFF CONTROLLER PROJECT TEST RESULTES Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field Engineer April 4, 1995 55103/9510:jb CONTENTS Page Introduction........................................................................................1 NPR-3 Map........................................................................................2 Benefits of D-JAX Pump-Off Controller.....................................................3 Test Results.......................................................................................3 Production Information..........................................................................4

39

Trace metal speciation in saline waters affected by geothermal brines. Final technical report. [GEOCHEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The computer program GEOCHEM was developed and applied to calculate the speciation of trace elements, such as Li, B, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, and As, in mixtures of geothermal brines with soil waters. A typical speciation calculation involved the simultaneous consideration of about 350 inorganic and organic complexes and about 80 possible solid phases that could form among the macro- and microconstituents in the mixtures. The four geothermal brines chosen for study were from the East Mesa, Heber, and Salton Sea KGRA's. Two examples of East Mesa brine were employed in order to illustrate the effect of brine variability within a given KGRA. The soil waters chosen for study were the Holtville, Rosita, and Vint soil solutions and the Vail 4 drain water. These waters were mixed with the four brines to produce 1%, 5%, and 10% brine combinations. The combinations then were analyzed with the help of GEOCHEM and were interpreted in the context of two proposed general contamination scenarios. The results of the speciation calculations pointed to the great importance, in brine, of sulfide as a precipitating agent for trace metals and of borate as a trace metal-complexing ligand. In general, precipitation and/or exchange adsorption in soil were found to reduce the levels of trace metals well below harmful concentrations. The principal exceptions were Li and B, which did not precipitate and which were at or very hear harmful levels in the soil water-brine mixtures.

Sposito, G.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Gas evolution from geopressured brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The process of gas evolution from geopressured brine is examined using as a basis the many past studies of gas evolution from liquids in porous media. A discussion of a number of speculations that have been made concerning gas evolution from geopressured brines is provided. According to one, rapid pressure reduction will cause methane gas to evolve as when one opens a champagne bottle. It has been further speculated that evolved methane gas would migrate up to form an easily producible cap. As a result of detailed analyses, it can be concluded that methane gas evolution from geopressured brines is far too small to ever form a connected gas saturation except very near to the producing well. Thus, no significant gas cap could ever form. Because of the very low solubility of methaned in brine, the process of methane gas evolution is not at all analogous to evolution of carbon dioxide from champagne. A number of other speculations and questions on gas evolution are analyzed, and procedures for completing wells and testing geopressured brine reservoirs are discussed, with the conclusion that presently used procedures will provide adequate data to enable a good evaluation of this resource.

Matthews, C.S.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominant brine was simulateddistillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated

Zhang, Guoxiang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

SBOT WYOMING ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD CENTER POC Jenny Krom Telephone  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WYOMING WYOMING ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD CENTER POC Jenny Krom Telephone (307) 233-4818 Email jenny.krom@rmotc.doe.gov ADMINISTATIVE / WASTE / REMEDIATION Office Administrative Services 561110 Facilities Support Services 561210 Security Guards and Patrol Services 561612 Security Systems Services (except Locksmiths) 561621 Locksmiths 561622 Exterminating and Pest Control Services 561710 Janitorial Services 561720 Solid Waste Collection 562111 Hazardous Waste Collection 562112 Other Waste Collection 562119 Hazardous Waste Treatment and Disposal 562211 Solid Waste Landfill 562212 Solid Waste Combustors and Incinerators 562213 Other Nonhazardous Waste Treatment and Disposal 562219 Remediation Services 562910 Materials Recovery Facilities 562920 All Other Miscellaneous Waste Management Services 562998

43

The chemical history of $^{14}{\\rm C}$ in deep oilfields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

14C is an overwhelming background in low-background underground experiments, to the point where the observation of the all-important (pp) neutrinos from the Sun can not be observed in carbon-containing experiments. This paper shows that 14C purity can be improved by four orders of magnitude by a careful selection of the gas field. Two large reduction factors are at work: the low chemical affinity of methane to single carbon, and the migration of natural gas away from nitrogen-bearing kerogen during as the oilfield matures.

G. Bonvicini; N. Harris; V. Paolone

2003-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

44

Improved Water Flooding through Injection Brine Modification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crude oil/brine/rock interactions can lead to large variations in the displacement efficiency of waterflooding, by far the most widely applied method of improved oil recovery. Laboratory waterflood tests show that injection of dilute brine can increase oil recovery. Numerous fields in the Powder River basin have been waterflooded using low salinity brine (about 500 ppm) from the Madison limestone or Fox Hills sandstone. Although many uncertainties arise in the interpretation and comparison of field production data, injection of low salinity brine appears to give higher recovery compared to brine of moderate salinity (about 7,000 ppm). Laboratory studies of the effect of brine composition on oil recovery cover a wide range of rock types and crude oils. Oil recovery increases using low salinity brine as the injection water ranged from a low of no notable increase to as much as 37.0% depending on the system being studied. Recovery increases using low salinity brine after establishing residual oil saturation (tertiary mode) ranged from no significant increase to 6.0%. Tests with two sets of reservoir cores and crude oil indicated slight improvement in recovery for low salinity brine. Crude oil type and rock type (particularly the presence and distribution of kaolinite) both play a dominant role in the effect that brine composition has on waterflood oil recovery.

Robertson, Eric Partridge; Thomas, Charles Phillip; Morrow, Norman; (U of Wyoming)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Chemistry of silica in Cerro Prieto brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The precipitation of amorphous silica from synthetic geothermal brines which resemble the flashed brine at Cerro Prieto has been studied. It was found that part of the dissolved silica quickly polymerizes to form suspended colloidal silica. The colloidal silica flocculates and settles slowly at unmodified brine pH values near 7.35. Raising the pH of the brine to about 7.8 by adding base and stirring for a few minutes causes rapid and complete flocculation and settling. These results have been confirmed in the field using actual Cerro Prieto brine. Both in the laboratory and in the field quaternary amines were found to be effective with some brine compositions but not with others. Polyacrylamides do not work at all. These results suggest the following simple preinjection brine treatment process: age the brine for 10 to 20 minutes in a covered holding tank, add 20 to 30 ppM lime (CaO), stir for 5 minutes, and separate the flocculated silica from the brine using a conventional clarifier. The brine coming out of such a process will be almost completely free of suspended solids. The pilot plant tests needed to reduce this conceptual process to practice are discussed. The rate of deposition of silica scale from synthetic brines was separately studied. It was found that a modest decrease in pH could significantly reduce the scaling rate at a reasonable cost. The equilibrium chemistry of Cerro Prieto brine was studied theoretically. These calculations indicate that increasing the brine pH to remove silica might cause some precipitation of carbonate minerals, but also that this problem could easily be eliminated at a reasonable cost if it did arise.

Weres, O.; Tsao, L.; Iglesias, E.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Chemistry of Silica in Cerro Prieto Brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The precipitation of amorphous silica from synthetic geothermal, brines which resemble the flashed brine at Cerro Prieto has been studied. It was found that part of the dissolved silica quickly polymerizes to form suspended colloidal silica. The colloidal silica flocculates and settles slowly at unmodified brine pH values near 7.35. Raising the pH of the brine to about 7.8 by adding base and stirring for a few minutes causes rapid and complete flocculation and settling. these results have been confirmed in the field using actual Cerro Prieto brine. Both in the laboratory and in the field quaternary amines were found to be effective with some brine compositions but not with others. Polyacrylamides do not work at all. These results suggest the following simple preinjection brine treatment process: age the brine for 10-20 minutes in a covered holding tank, add 20-30 ppm lime (CaO), stir for 5 minutes, and separate the flocculated silica from the brine using a conventional clarifier. The brine coming out of such a process will be almost completely free of suspended solids. The pilot plant tests needed to reduce this conceptual process to practice are discussed. The rate of deposition of silica scale from synthetic brines was separately studied. It was found that a modest decrease in pH could significantly reduce the scaling rate at a reasonable cost. The equilibrium chemistry of Cerro Prieto brine was studied theoretically. These calculations indicate that increasing the brine pH to remove silica might cause some precipitation of carbonate minerals, but also that this problem could easily be eliminated at a reasonable cost if it did arise.

Weres, Oleh; Iglesias, Eduardo; Tsao, Leon

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Property:BrineConstituents | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BrineConstituents BrineConstituents Jump to: navigation, search Property Name BrineConstituents Property Type String Description Describes major elements, compounds in geothermal brine This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 1 subproperty: V Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area Pages using the property "BrineConstituents" Showing 2 pages using this property. N North Brawley Geothermal Area + Chlorine, sodium, potassium, and calcium. Silica concentrations are 527 mg/l and total dissolved solids measure 82,900 mg/l. + S Salt Wells Geothermal Area + Cl, Na, SO4, SiO2, HCO3, and minor Ca, K + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:BrineConstituents&oldid=598832#SMWResults" Category: Properties

48

Development Operations Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial County, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Development Operations Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial County, California Abstract N/A Authors Whitescarver and Olin D. Published U.S. Department of Energy, 1984 Report Number N/A DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Development Operations Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial County, California Citation Whitescarver, Olin D.. 1984. Development Operations Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial County, California. (!) : U.S. Department of Energy. Report No.: N/A. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Development_Operations_Hypersaline_Geothermal_Brine_Utilization_Imperial_County,_California&oldid=682648

49

Development Operations Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number NA DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Development Operations Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial...

50

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LOW COST REFRACTURING LOW COST REFRACTURING JANUARY 23, 1998 FC9550/96PT14 RMOTC Test Report Number 96PT14 Low Cost Refracturing Rock Creek Enterprises 980 Rock Creek Road Buffalo, Wyoming 82834 (307) 684-5243 (307) 684-0902 (fax) David H. Doyle, Acting Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center January 23, 1998 Introduction There are relatively few stimulation options available to owners of marginal or stripper wells. These wells are commonly restricted in their production rates because of formation or wellbore damage near the wellbore. Current services available to remove this damage are compared to the small gains possible from old, marginal wells. Over time, several things can occur that cause the flow of oil into the wellbore to be restricted. First, carbonate or sulfate scale can accumulate around the well or in the perforations. The accumulated scale will block oil from

51

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

06/97DT15 06/97DT15 RMOTC Test Report Rotary Steerable Stabilizer Smith Drilling and Completions 16740 Hardy Street P. 0. Box 60068 Houston, Texas, 77205-0068 281-443-3370 Leo Giangiacorno, Acting Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center December 17, 1997 Introduction Directional drilling is more expensive than vertical drilling. This is due to the high maintenance cost of downhole motors and MWD systems required to control hole trajectory. In addition, directional holes have lower penetration rates due to the poor hole cleaning with a non-rotating string. Down time is often spent orienting tool face to obtain the desired trajectory after tile weight is placed on the bit and the reactive torque of the motor is absorbed by the drill string. Holes drilled in this manner often have a tortuous profile compared to holes drilled with a rotary system, increasing the torque

52

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IMPROVED ELASTOMER COMPOUND FOR IMPROVED ELASTOMER COMPOUND FOR PROGRESSIVE CAVITY PUMPS Cameron Elastomer Technology MARCH 23, 1998 FC9563/96PT17 RMOTC Test Report Number 96PT17 Improved Elastomer Compound for Progressive Cavity Pumps Cameron Elastomer Technology 29501 Katy Fwy Katy, Texas 77494-7801 (281) 391-4615 (281) 391-4640 (fax) David H. Doyle, PE, Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center March 23, 1998 Introduction The purpose of this project was to evaluate improved progressing cavity (PC) pump stator elastomer materials in NPR-3 crude under field conditions. The goal of the project was to test an elastomer material that can be used in high API-gravity (greater than 38' API) crude oils. Currently available materials used for the construction of pump stators swell and fail in contact with such crude oils. This limits the applicability of progressing cavity

53

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DYNAMOMETER DYNAMOMETER Sandia National Laboratories FEBRUARY 10, 1998 FC9514 / 95PT6 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Sandia Lab Downhole Dynamometer PROJECT TEST RESULTS February 10, 1998 Michael R. Tyler Project Manager Abstract This test involved the use of Downhole Dynamometer Tools (DDT) that were developed by Albert Engineering and the Sandia National Laboratory. The five (5) Downhole Dynamometers (DDT) were installed in the rod string of well 13-A-21 at predetermined intervals. The DDT tools are equipped with strain gauges and programmable clocks. The tools were place in the well and removed after the data had been gathered. The data gathering is pre-programmed to occur when pumped-off conditions are obtained in the well. This information then reflects the true conditions found downhole in a well in a pumped-

54

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DYNAMOTER DYNAMOTER Sandia National Laboratories FEBRUARY 10, 1998 FC9542 / 96PT11 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Sandia Lab Downhole Dynamometer PROJECT TEST RESULTS February 10, 1998 Michael R. Tyler Project Manager Abstract This test involved the use of Downhole Dynamometer Tools (DDT) that were developed by Albert Engineering and the Sandia National Laboratory. The five (5) Downhole Dynamometers (DDT) were installed in the rod string of well 13-A-21 at predetermined intervals. The DDT tools are equipped with strain gauges and programmable clocks. The tools were place in the well and removed after the data had been gathered. The data gathering is pre-programmed to occur when pumped-off conditions are obtained in the well. This information then reflects the true conditions found downhole in a well in a pumped-off state.

55

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BEAM MOUNTED GAS COMPRESSOR BEAM MOUNTED GAS COMPRESSOR (JACGAS COMPRESSOR) MARCH 3, 1998 FC970004/97PT23 RMOTC Test Report Number 97PT23 Jacgas Compressor Morrison International Iron Horse Compression Ltd. 9852-33 Avenue Edmonton, Alberta T6N 1C6 (403) 462-6847 David H. Doyle, Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center March 3, 1998 Introduction Gas compressors that mount on the walking beam of an oil well pumping unit have been tried with mixed success for many years. Gas compression at the wellhead instead of further downstream can 'increase both oil and gas production by reducing the casinghead gas pressure. Excess pressure on the annulus of the well reduces fluid inflow and restricts production. In old, shallow wells, the small amount of pressure (50 psi) may be sufficient to prevent the well from producing economically. Other applications include the unloading of water

56

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHEMICAL & MICROBIAL CHEMICAL & MICROBIAL PARAFFIN CONTROL PROJECT DECEMBER 17, 1997 FC9544 / 96PT12 RMOTC Test Report Paraffin Control Project BDM Oklahoma/NIPER 220 N. Virginia Bartlesville, OK 4003 918-336-2400, FAX 918-337-4365 Leo Giangiacomo, Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center December 17. 1997 Abstract This report summarizes the field performance results of a comparison of chemical and microbial paraffin control systems. The two systems were selected from laboratory screening work. Well selection was based on production rates, produced fluids, and prior paraffin treatments. The treatments were performed on similar groups of wells over the same period of time, using quantities and techniques recommended by the supplier specifically for the wells to be treated. The tests were conducted by the U. S. Department of

57

Helicopter Surveys for Locating Wells and Leaking Oilfield Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

Prior to the injection of CO2 into geological formations, either for enhanced oil recovery or for CO2 sequestration, it is necessary to locate wells that perforate the target formation and are within the radius of influence for planned injection wells. Locating and plugging wells is necessary because improperly plugged well bores provide the most rapid route for CO2 escape to the surface. This paper describes the implementation and evaluation of helicopter and ground-based well detection strategies at a 100+ year old oilfield in Wyoming where a CO2 flood is planned. This project was jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory and Fugro Airborne Surveys

Hammack, R.W.; Veloski, G.A.; Hodges, G. (Fugro Airborne Surveys)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IN-SITU H IN-SITU H 2 S BIOREMEDIATION JULY 11, 1994 FC9509 / 95PT3 Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center 907 North Poplar, Suite 100, Casper, WY 82601 (307) 261-5000, ext. 5060; FAX (307) 261-5997 IN-SITU H2S BIOREMEDIATION NATIONAL PARAKLEEN COMPANY PREPARED BY Fred Brown Michael R. Tyler 731 W.Wadley Field Engineer Building O July 11, 1994 Suite 130 Midland, Texas 79705 Phone (915)-683-3076 Fax (915)-683-3081 TEST PURPOSE: To treat producing oil wells that contain high concentrations of H2S with a product that will lower the levels of H2S in the well. METHOD OF TREATMENT: A bio-nutrient product (55 gallons) was mixed with 120 bbls of produced tensleep water and the mixture was pumped down the annulus of selected wells. The well was then shut-in for a 24 hour period and then was returned to production.

59

Hydrocarbon content of geopressured brines. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Design Well data (bottomhole pressure minus wellhead pressure, GWR, and hydrocarbon composition) is presented as a function of producing conditions. These are examined in conjunction with the following models to attempt to deduce the reservoir brine saturation level: (1) reservoir contains gas dispersed in the pores and the gas saturation is greater than critical; (2) reservoir brine is gas-saturated; (3) bubble point below hydrostatic pressure; and (4) bubble point between hydrostatic pressure and reservoir pressure. 24 figs., 10 tabs. (ACR)

Osif, T.L.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Evaluation of Membrane Treatment Technology to Optimize and Reduce Hypersalinity Content of Produced Brine for Reuse in Unconventional Gas Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over 18 billion barrels of waste fluids are generated annually from oil and gas production in the United States. As a large amount of water is used for oilfield operations, treating and reusing produced water can cut the consumption of fresh water in well sites. This research has helped to develop a membrane process train for a mobile produced water treatment unit for treating oilfield produced brine for reuse. To design the process train, over 30 sets of combination tests at pilot laboratory scale were performed using pretreatment, microfiltration and nanofiltration processes. Membrane performance was selected based on high flux separation efficiency, high tolerance for solids and fluid treatments. Over 95 % solids rejection and greater than 80 % oil removal efficiency were obtained in all these tests. Process train (pre-treatment and membrane) performance was monitored by chemical analysis of permeate and models fitting experimental data for the process. From the results, hydrocarbon rejection was analyzed; total organic carbon rejection was 47.9 %, total carbon content averaged 37.3 % rejection and total inorganic carbon rejection was at 3.66 %. BTEX removal efficiency ranged from 0.98 % to 52.7 % with the progressive pretreatment methods of using cartridge filters. The nanofiltration membrane showed significant reduction in total dissolved solids and in both anionic and cationic species. The process train is seen to follow a sequence of treatment from cartridge and oil removal filter treatment to microfiltration treatment to ultrafiltration, followed by nanofiltration for the purpose of this research. Further research still needs to be done on to determine the kind of analytical test which will give real time feedback on effectiveness of filters. In summary, the process train developed by TAMU-GPRI possesses distinct advantages in treating oilfield produced brine using membrane technology. These advantages include high quality of permeate, reduced sludge and the possibility of total recycle water systems. The small space requirement, moderate capital costs and ease of operation associated with the use of the mobile unit membrane technology also makes it a very competitive alternative to conventional technologies.

Eboagwu, Uche

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center RMOTC at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OILFIELD TESTING OILFIELD TESTING OILFIELD TESTING CENTER CENTER 2 2 HISTORY OF TEAPOT DOME Mark Milliken 3 3 TEAPOT DOME LOCATION 4 4 Salt Creek 670 MMBBLS 722 BCF Teapot Dome 27 MMBBLS 57 BCF N P R - 3 Cumulative Production 5 5 The Great White Fleet December 1907 - February 1909 6 6 THE END OF COAL-FIRED SHIPS * 2-week cruising time. * Labor and time intensive cleaning and reloading. * At the mercy of foreign countries for coal supply. * 1912: All battleships will be oil-powered. Great White Fleet 7 7 NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES ARE BORN * 1908: Dr. Otis Smith, USGS Director, recommends DOI retain oil lands for fuel reserve for Navy. * 1909: Taft withdraws 3,000,000 acres in Wyoming and California. * 1910: Concern over the President's authority to withdraw lands, so Congress passed the Pickett Act. * 1910: Taft issues a 2nd land withdrawal executive

62

Stability of plutonium(VI) in WIPP brine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The redox stability of plutonium (VI) in WIPP brine was investigated by monitoring the oxidation state as a function of time using a combination of absorption spectrometry, radiochemical counting and filtration. Studies were performed with Pu-239 and Pu-238 in four WIPP brines at concentrations between 10{sup {minus}3} and 10{sup {minus}8} M for durations as long as two years. Two synthetic brines, Brine A and ERDA-6, and two underground collected brines, DH-36 and G-Seep, were used. The stability of Pu(VI) depended on the brine composition and the speciation of the plutonium in that brine. When carbonate was present, a Pu(VI)-carbonate complex was observed that was stable. In the absence of carbonate, Pu(VI) hydrolytic species predominated which had a wide range of stability in the brines investigated. The results reported will help define the speciation of plutonium in WIPP brine and hence its potential for migration.

Reed, D.T.; Okajima, S.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Volatility of HCl and the thermodynamics of brines during brine dryout  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of liquid-vapor partitioning (volatility) of chlorides from brines to steam can be used to indicate the potential for corrosion problems in geothermal systems. Measurements of volatilities of solutes in chloride brines have established a possible mechanism for the production of high-chloride steam from slightly acidic high temperature brines. Questions concerning the fate of NaCl in the steam production process have been addressed through extensive measurements of its volatility from brines ranging in concentration from dilute solutions to halite saturation. Recent measurements of chloride partitioning to steam over brines in contact with Geysers rock samples are consistent with our concept of the process for production of high-chloride steam.

Simonson, J.M.; Palmer, D.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Pore water evolution in oilfield sandstones: constraints from oxygen isotope microanalyses of quartz cement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pore water evolution in oilfield sandstones: constraints from oxygen isotope microanalyses a Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JW, Scotland, UK b Shell Oxygen isotope microanalyses of authigenic quartz, in combination with temperatures of quartz

Haszeldine, Stuart

65

Brine flow in heated geologic salt.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes' governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Brines formed by multi-salt deliquescence  

SciTech Connect

The FY05 Waste Package Environment testing program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory focused on determining the temperature, relative humidity, and solution compositions of brines formed due to the deliquescence of NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} and NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3}-Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} salt mixtures. Understanding the physical and chemical behavior of these brines is important because they define conditions under which brines may react with waste canister surfaces. Boiling point experiments show that NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} and NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3}-Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} salt mixtures form brines that transform to hydrous melts that do not truly 'dry out' until temperatures exceed 300 and 400 C, respectively. Thus a conducting solution is present for these salt assemblages over the thermal history of the repository. The corresponding brines form at lower relative humidity at higher temperatures. The NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture has a mutual deliquescence relative humidity (MDRH) of 25.9% at 120 C and 10.8% at 180 C. Similarly, the KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture has MDRH of 26.4% at 120 C and 20.0% at 150 C. The KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture salts also absorb some water (but do not appear to deliquesce) at 180 C and thus may also contribute to the transfer of electrons at interface between dust and the waste package surface. There is no experimental evidence to suggest that these brines will degas and form less deliquescent salt assemblages. Ammonium present in atmospheric and tunnel dust (as the chloride, nitrate, or sulfate) will readily decompose in the initial heating phase of the repository, and will affect subsequent behavior of the remaining salt mixture only through the removal of a stoichiometric equivalent of one or more anions. Although K-Na-NO{sub 3}-Cl brines form at high temperature and low relative humidity, these brines are dominated by nitrate, which is known to inhibit corrosion at lower temperature. Nitrate to chloride ratios of the NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture are about NO{sub 3}:Cl = 19:1. The role of nitrate on corrosion at higher temperatures is addressed in a companion report (Dixit et al., 2005).

Carroll, S; Rard, J; Alai, M; Staggs, K

2005-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

67

Silica scaling in simulated geothermal brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 6.3 1/sec (100 GPM) titanium corrosion test loop was modified to provide a dynamic facility for studying the formation of silica deposits, their properties and fates, as a function of brine composition, temperature, and flow conditions. Scale formation was studied in a segmented heat exchanger operating under realistic conditions; the segmented design permitted examination of scale formations in five temperature regimes. The program was terminated after minimal exploratory operation because of reduced sponsor perceptions of the need for concern with scaling problems. The runs which were completed dealt cursorily with brine concentration and pH effects. Results are presented.

Bohlmann, E.G.; Shor, A.J.; Berlinski, P.; Mesmer, R.E.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Unconventional gas sources. Volume IV. Geopressured brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following topics are covered: study objectives, regional geology and prospect evaluation, reservoir engineering, drilling and well costs, production and water disposal facilities, pressure maintenance, geothermal and hydraulic energy assessment, operating expense, economic evaluation, environmental considerations, legal considerations, and risks analysis. The study addresses only sandstone brine reservoirs in the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast onshore areas. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Expected brine movement at potential nuclear waste repository salt sites  

SciTech Connect

The BRINEMIG brine migration code predicts rates and quantities of brine migration to a waste package emplaced in a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt. The BRINEMIG code is an explicit time-marching finite-difference code that solves a mass balance equation and uses the Jenks equation to predict velocities of brine migration. Predictions were made for the seven potentially acceptable salt sites under consideration as locations for the first US high-level nuclear waste repository. Predicted total quantities of accumulated brine were on the order of 1 m/sup 3/ brine per waste package or less. Less brine accumulation is expected at domal salt sites because of the lower initial moisture contents relative to bedded salt sites. Less total accumulation of brine is predicted for spent fuel than for commercial high-level waste because of the lower temperatures generated by spent fuel. 11 refs., 36 figs., 29 tabs.

McCauley, V.S.; Raines, G.E.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

NETL: News Release - CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

31, 2011 31, 2011 CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says Near-Miscible Flooding in Arbuckle Formation Would Help Small Producers Tap Additional Domestic Resources Washington, D.C. - The feasibility of using carbon dioxide (CO2) injection for recovering between 250 million and 500 million additional barrels of oil from Kansas oilfields has been established in a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The University of Kansas Center for Research studied the possibility of near-miscible CO2 flooding for extending the life of mature oilfields in the Arbuckle Formation while simultaneously providing permanent geologic storage of carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas. Miscibility refers to the pressure at which the CO2 and oil are completely soluble in one another or form a single phase. Below the minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) the injected CO2 mixes with and swells the oil to reduce its viscosity, increasing its ability to flow through the reservoir more easily to the production well.

71

Hydrocarbons associated with brines from geopressured wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to determine the concentration of the cryocondensates in fluids of the various USDOE Geopressured wells as a function of production volume, to correlate the production of these compounds with reservoir and well production characteristics, to precisely measure solubilities of cryocondensates components in water and sodium chloride solutions (brines) as a function of ionic strength and temperature and the component's distribution coefficients between these solutions and oil, to develop models of the reservoir which are consistent with the data obtained, to monitor the wells for the production of aliphatic oils and relate any such production with the data obtained, and to develop a harsh environment pH probe for use in well brines. Results are summarized.

Not Available

1991-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Geothermal brines and sludges: a new resource  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of cost efficient biochemical processes for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges is the main thrust of a major R&D effort at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). This effort has led to the design of an environmentally acceptable, technically and economically feasible new technology which converts geothermal wastes into products with significant commercial potential. These include valuable metals recovery with a metal extraction and recovery efficiency of better then 80% over short periods of time (5-25 hours). The new technology also yields valuable salts, such as potassium chloride and generates high quality pigment free silica. The basic technology is versatile and can, with slight modifications, be used in the treatment of hypersaline as well as low salinity brines and sludges. Concurrently traces of toxic metals, including radium are removed to levels which are within regulatory limits. The current status of the new biochemical technology will be discussed in this paper.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Lian, H.; Miltenberger, R.P.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Approach to recover strategic metals from brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the proposed research is to evaluate hypersaline brines from geothermal sources and salt domes as possible sources for some strategic metals. This research is suggested because several previous analyses of brine from geothermal wells in the Imperial Valley, California, and from Gulf Coast salt domes, indicate near commercial values for platinum as well as other metals (i.e., gold, silver). Extraction of the platinum should be technically feasible. A research program should include more complete systematic sampling and analysis for resource delineation, followed by bench-scale investigation of several potential extraction processes. This could be followed by engineering feasibility and design studies, for extraction of the metals either as a by-product of other operations or in a stand-alone process.

Raber, E.; Harrar, J.; Gregg, D.

1981-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

74

WETTING BEHAVIOR OF SELECTED CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of aging and displacement temperatures, and brine and oil composition on wettability and the recovery of crude oil by spontaneous imbibition and waterflooding has been investigated. This study is based on displacement tests in Berea Sandstone using three distinctly different crude oils and three reservoir brines. Brine concentration was varied by changing the concentration of total dissolved solids of the synthetic brine in proportion to give brine of twice, one tenth, and one hundredth of the reservoir brine concentration. Aging and displacement temperatures were varied independently. For all crude oils, water-wetness and oil recovery increased with increase in displacement temperature. Tests on the effect of brine concentration showed that salinity of the connate and invading brines can have a major influence on wettability and oil recovery at reservoir temperature. Oil recovery increased over that for the reservoir brine with dilution of both the initial (connate) and invading brine or dilution of either. Removal of light components from the crude oil resulted in increased water-wetness. Addition of alkanes to the crude oil reduced the water-wetness, and increased oil recovery. Relationships between waterflood recovery and wettability are summarized.

G.Q. Tang; N.R. Morrow

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Comparison of elementary geothermal-brine power-production processes  

SciTech Connect

From applied technology geothermal committee meeting; Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA (7 Aug 1973). A comparison of three simple geothermal power- production systems shows that the flashed steam and the compound systems are favored for use with high-temperature brines. The binary system becomes economically competitive only when used on low-temperature brines (enthalpies less than 350 Btu/lb). Geothermal power appears to be economically attractive even when low-temperature brines are used. (auth)

Green, M.A.; Laird, A.D.K.

1973-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Origin, distribution, and movement of brine in the Permian Basin (U. S. A. ). A model for displacement of connate brine  

SciTech Connect

Na-Cl, halite Ca-Cl, and gypsum Ca-Cl brines with salinities from 45 to >300 g/L are identified and mapped in four hydrostratigraphic units in the Permian Basin area beneath western Texas and Oklahoma and eastern New Mexico, providing spatial and lithologic constraints on the interpretation of the origin and movement of brine. Na-Cl brine is derived from meteoric water as young as 5-10 Ma that dissolved anhydrite and halite, whereas Ca-Cl brine is interpreted to be ancient, modified-connate Permian brine that now is mixing with, and being displaced by, the Na-Cl brine. Displacement fronts appear as broad mixing zones with no significant salinity gradients. Evolution of Ca-Cl brine composition from ideal evaporated sea water is attributed to dolomitization and syndepositional recycling of halite and bittern salts by intermittent influx of fresh water and sea water. Halite Ca-Cl brine in the evaporite section in the northern part of the basin differs from gypsum Ca-Cl brine in the south-central part in salinity and Na/Cl ratio and reflects segregation between halite- and gypsum-precipitating lagoons during the Permian. Ca-Cl brine moved downward through the evaporite section into the underlying Lower Permian and Pennsylvanian marine section that is now the deep-basin brine aquifer, mixing there with pre-existing sea water. Buoyancy-driven convection of brine dominated local flow for most of basin history, with regional advection governed by topographically related forces dominant only for the past 5 to 10 Ma. 71 refs., 11 figs.

Bein, A.; Dutton, A.R. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center RMOTC at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RMOTC RMOTC The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC), is an operating oil field focusing on environmentally-balanced energy technologies and alternatives, and is the premiere energy testing and demonstration field in the nation. 3 3 * the opportunity to explore environmentally- balanced solutions to the nation's energy issues * opportunities to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate a variety of energy related technologies * a chance to collaborate with top professionals in the energy, environmental technology, and engineering fields * shared industry knowledge through technology transfer via reports, journal articles, and presentations Located within the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) near Casper, Wyoming, RMOTC offers: RMOTC Offers Solutions 4 4 The Administration and Engineering

78

Application of oil-field well log interpretation techniques to the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An example is presented of the application of oil-field techniques to the Cerro Prieto Field, Mexico. The lithology in this field (sand-shale lithology) is relatively similar to oil-field systems. The study was undertaken as a part of the first series of case studies supported by the Geothermal Log Interpretation Program (GLIP) of the US Department of Energy. The suites of logs for individual wells were far from complete. This was partly because of adverse borehole conditions but mostly because of unavailability of high-temperature tools. The most complete set of logs was a combination of Dual Induction Laterolog, Compensated Formation Density Gamma Ray, Compensated Neutron Log, and Saraband. Temperature data about the wells were sketchy, and the logs had been run under pre-cooled mud condition. A system of interpretation consisting of a combination of graphic and numerical studies was used to study the logs. From graphical studies, evidence of hydrothermal alteration may be established from the trend analysis of SP (self potential) and ILD (deep induction log). Furthermore, the cross plot techniques using data from density and neutron logs may help in establishing compaction as well as rock density profile with depth. In the numerical method, R/sub wa/ values from three different resistivity logs were computed and brought into agreement. From this approach, values of formation temperature and mud filtrate resistivity effective at the time of logging were established.

Ershaghi, I.; Phillips, L.B.; Dougherty, E.L.; Handy, L.L.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Origin and geochemical evolution of the Michigan basin brine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical and isotopic data were collected on 126 oil field brine samples and were used to investigate the origin and geochemical evolution of water in 8 geologic formations in the Michigan basin. Two groups of brine are found in the basin, the Na-Ca-Cl brine in the upper Devonian formations, and Ca-Na-Cl brine from the lower Devonian and Silurian aged formations. Water in the upper Devonian Berea, Traverse, and Dundee formations originated from seawater concentrated into halite facies. This brine evolved by halite precipitation, dolomitization, aluminosilicate reactions, and the removal of SO{sub 4} by bacterial action or by CaSO{sub 4} precipitation. The stable isotopic composition (D, O) is thought to represent dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by meteoric water. Water in the lower Devonian Richfield, Detroit River Group, and Niagara-Salina formations is very saline Ca-Na-Cl brine. Cl/Br suggest it originated from seawater concentrated through the halite and into the MgSO{sub 4} salt facies, with an origin linked to the Silurian and Devonian salt deposits. Dolomitization and halite precipitation increased the Ca/Na, aluminosilicate reactions removed K, and bacterial action or CaSO{sub 4} precipitation removed SO{sub 4} from this brine. Water chemistry in the Ordovician Trenton-Black River formations indicates dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by fresh or seawater. Possible saline end-members include Ordovician seawater, present-day upper Devonian brine, or Ca-Cl brine from the deeper areas in the basin.

Wilson, T.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center RMOTC at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Playing Hide and Seek with Playing Hide and Seek with the Hole-in-the-Wall Gang: Recent Technology Testing at Wyoming's Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) A presentation for The Salt Lake City SPE Chapter October 19, 2005 Tom Anderson Business Development Manager Data Management Project Manager RMOTC Outline * What is RMOTC? * The Hole-in-the-Wall Gang * "Virtual Field Trip" of Teapot Dome * Hiding: - CO 2 Sequestration - Pipeline Leak Detection * Seeking: - Microhole Drilling - High Pressure Jet-Assisted Drillbit - Flow Assurance Test Loop - Tubing Rotator * Sharing Data With Partners The Hole-in-the-Wall Gang Wyoming Doug Judith Spike Joe Brian Jim Mark Ralph Vicki Lyle Butch and Sundance \A1;Flow Assurance Loop 011 024 020 029 032 023 026 033 005 028 021 027 022 004 023 024 034 035 008 025 021 013 003 036 009 017 002 001

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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81

Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center RMOTC at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Renewable Energy Scoping Meeting & Renewable Energy Scoping Meeting March 26, 2004 2 2 RMOTC The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC), is an operating oil field focusing on environmentally-balanced energy technologies and alternatives, and is the premiere energy testing and demonstration field in the nation. 3 3 * the opportunity to explore environmentally- balanced solutions to the nation's energy issues * opportunities to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate a variety of energy related technologies * a chance to collaborate with top professionals in the energy, environmental technology, and engineering fields * shared industry knowledge through technology transfer via reports, journal articles, and presentations Located within the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) near Casper, Wyoming, RMOTC offers:

82

Standard guide for evaluating and qualifying oilfield and refinery corrosion inhibitors in the laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide covers some generally accepted laboratory methodologies that are used for evaluating corrosion inhibitors for oilfield and refinery applications in well defined flow conditions. 1.2 This guide does not cover detailed calculations and methods, but rather covers a range of approaches which have found application in inhibitor evaluation. 1.3 Only those methodologies that have found wide acceptance in inhibitor evaluation are considered in this guide. 1.4 This guide is intended to assist in the selection of methodologies that can be used for evaluating corrosion inhibitors. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory requirements prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Prediction of flashover voltage of non-ceramic insulators under contaminated conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in cold climates are contaminated with salts used for deicing the streets (brine, calcium chloride. However in the presence of light rain, freezing rain, fog or dew the contaminants dissolve to form by several researchers were simulated using Matlab [3, 6-10]. The calculations were done for three widely

84

ABSORBING WIPP BRINES: A TRU WASTE DISPOSAL STRATEGY  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has completed experiments involving 15 each, 250- liter experimental test containers of transuranic (TRU) heterogeneous waste immersed in two types of brine similar to those found in the underground portion of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). To dispose of the waste without removing the brine from the test containers, LANL added commercially available cross-linked polyacrylate granules to absorb the 190 liters of brine in each container, making the waste compliant for shipping to the WIPP in a Standard Waste Box (SWB). Prior to performing the absorption, LANL and the manufacturer of the absorbent conducted laboratory and field tests to determine the ratio of absorbent to brine that would fully absorb the liquid. Bench scale tests indicated a ratio of 10 parts Castile brine to one part absorbent and 6.25 parts Brine A to one part absorbent. The minimum ratio of absorbent to brine was sought because headspace in the containers was limited. However, full scale testing revealed that the ratio should be adjusted to be about 15% richer in absorbent. Additional testing showed that the absorbent would not apply more than 13.8 kPa pressure on the walls of the vessel and that the absorbent would still function normally at that pressure and would not degrade in the approximately 5e-4 Sv/hr radioactive field produced by the waste. Heat generation from the absorption was minimal. The in situ absorption created a single waste stream of 8 SWBs whereas the least complicated alternate method of disposal would have yielded at least an additional 2600 liters of mixed low level liquid waste plus about two cubic meters of mixed low level solid waste, and would have resulted in higher risk of radiation exposure to workers. The in situ absorption saved $311k in a combination of waste treatment, disposal, material and personnel costs compared to the least expensive alternative and $984k compared to the original plan.

Yeamans, D. R.; Wrights, R. S.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

85

Absorbing WIPP brines : a TRU waste disposal strategy.  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has completed experiments involving 15 each, 250-liter experimental test containers of transuranic (TRU) heterogeneous waste immersed in two types of brine similar to those found in the underground portion of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). To dispose of the waste without removing the brine from the test containers, LANL added commercially available cross-linked polyacrylate granules to absorb the 190 liters of brine in each container, making the waste compliant for shipping to the WlPP in a Standard Waste Box (SWB). Prior to performing the absorption, LANL and the manufacturer of the absorbent conducted laboratory and field tests to determine the ratio of absorbent to brine that would fully absorb the liquid. Bench scale tests indicated a ratio of 10 parts Castile brine to one part absorbent and 6.25 parts Brine A to one part absorbent. The minimum ratio of absorbent to brine was sought because headspace in the containers was limited. However, full scale testing revealed that the ratio should be adjusted to be about 15% richer in absorbent. Additional testing showed that the absorbent would not apply more than 13.8 kPa pressure on the walls of the vessel and that the absorbent would still function normally at that pressure and would not degrade in the approximately 5e-4 Sv/hr radioactive field produced by the waste. Heat generation from the absorption was minimal. The in situ absorption created a single waste stream of 8 SWBs whereas the least complicated alternate method of disposal would have yielded at least an additional 2600 liters of mixed low level liquid waste plus about two cubic meters of mixed low level solid waste, and would have resulted in higher risk of radiation exposure to workers. The in situ absorption saved $3 1 lk in a combination of waste treatment, disposal, material and personnel costs compared to the least expensive alternative and $984k compared to the original plan.

Yeamans, D. R. (David R.); Wright, R. (Robert)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

An Iterative Aggregation/Disaggregation Approach for the Solution of a Mixed Integer Nonlinear Oilfield Infrastructure Planning Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A multiperiod MINLP model for offshore oilfield infrastructure planning is presented where nonlinear reservoir behavior is incorporated directly into the formulation. Discrete decisions include the selection of production platforms, well platforms and wells to be installed/drilled, as well as the drilling schedule for the wells over the planning horizon. Continuous decisions include the capacities of the platforms, as well as the production profile for each well in each time period. For the solution of this model, an iterative aggregation/disaggregation algorithm is proposed in which logic-based methods, a bilevel decomposition technique, the use of convex envelopes and aggregation of time periods are integrated. Furthermore, a novel dynamic programming sub-problem is proposed to improve the aggregation scheme at each iteration in order to obtain an aggregate problem that resembles the disaggregate problem more closely. A number of examples are presented to illustrate the performance of the proposed method. Keywords Oilfield planning, MINLP, aggregation, decomposition

Susara A. Van Den Heever; Ignacio Grossmann

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUES'f BY BAKER HUGHES OILFIELD OPERATIONS, INC. ('"BAKER HUGHES")  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REQUES'f BY BAKER HUGHES OILFIELD OPERATIONS, INC. ('"BAKER HUGHES") REQUES'f BY BAKER HUGHES OILFIELD OPERATIONS, INC. ('"BAKER HUGHES") FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RfGHTS UNDER DOE AWARD NO. DE- EE0005505 ; W(A) 2012-013 Baker Hughes has requested a waiver of patent ri ghts of the United States of Americ a for all s ul~ject inventions arising from its participation tmder the above referenced award entitled ·'D irectional Measurement- Wh ile-Drilling System for Geothermal Applications." The purpose of the av,rard is to develop a reliable Directional Measurement-While·· Drill ing (MWD) System for the creation of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). The sys tem to be developed under this award is a probe-based MWD tool for directional drilling that is alternator or battery povvcred, contains a navigation package capable of measuring inclinati

88

DOE/EA-1583: Final Site-wide Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center/Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (October 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER / ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER / NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVE NO. 3 FINAL Site-wide Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact October 2008 U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center 907 N. Poplar Street, Suite 150 Casper WY 82601 DOE/EA-1583 Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center / Naval Petroleum Reserve No.3 Final Site-Wide Environmental Assessment i TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS.................................................................................................vii SUMMARY ................................................................................................................................................ix 1.0 INTRODUCTION .........................................................................................................................1

89

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Experiments were used to examine water content in Permian salt samples (Salado Formation) collected from the WIPP site. The profile of water release and movement is recognized as a function of temperature from 30 to 275 oC using classical gravimetric methods to measure weight loss as a result of heating. The amount of water released from heating the salt was found to be correlated with the salts accessory mineral content (clay, other secondary minerals lost up to 3 wt % while pure halite salt lost less than 0.5 wt % water). Water released from salt at lower temperature was reversible and is attributed to clay hydration and dehydration processes. The analysis

90

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Experiments were used to examine water content in Permian salt samples (Salado Formation) collected from the WIPP site. The profile of water release and movement is recognized as a function of temperature from 30 to 275 oC using classical gravimetric methods to measure weight loss as a result of heating. The amount of water released from heating the salt was found to be correlated with the salts accessory mineral content (clay, other secondary minerals lost up to 3 wt % while pure halite salt lost less than 0.5 wt % water). Water released from salt at lower temperature was reversible and is attributed to clay hydration and dehydration processes. The analysis

91

Actinide (III) solubility in WIPP Brine: data summary and recommendations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solubility of actinides in the +3 oxidation state is an important input into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) performance assessment (PA) models that calculate potential actinide release from the WIPP repository. In this context, the solubility of neodymium(III) was determined as a function of pH, carbonate concentration, and WIPP brine composition. Additionally, we conducted a literature review on the solubility of +3 actinides under WIPP-related conditions. Neodymium(III) was used as a redox-invariant analog for the +3 oxidation state of americium and plutonium, which is the oxidation state that accounts for over 90% of the potential release from the WIPP through the dissolved brine release (DBR) mechanism, based on current WIPP performance assessment assumptions. These solubility data extend past studies to brine compositions that are more WIPP-relevant and cover a broader range of experimental conditions than past studies.

Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean-Francois; Richmann, Michael K.; Reed, Donald T.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Cementation process for minerals recovery from Salton Sea geothermal brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential for minerals recovery from a 1000-MWe combined geothermal power and minerals recovery plant in the Salton Sea is examined. While the possible value of minerals recovered would substantially exceed the revenue from power production, information is insufficient to carry out a detailed economic analysis. The recovery of precious metals - silver, gold, and platinum - is the most important factor in determining the economics of a minerals recovery plant; however, the precious metals content of the brines is not certain. Such a power plant could recover 14 to 31% of the US demand for manganese and substantial amounts of zinc and lead. Previous work on minerals extraction from Salton Sea brines is also reviewed and a new process, based on a fluidized-bed cementation reaction with metallic iron, is proposed. This process would recover the precious metals, lead, and tin present in the brines.

Maimoni, A.

1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

93

Conditioning of geothermal brine effluents for injection: use of coagulants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of various chemical coagulants and flocculants with spent geothermal brine for enhancing the removal of colloidal solids prior to injection was studied. Brine at 80 to 85/sup 0/C was obtained from the injection line of the SDG and E/DOE Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility during a period of operation with Magmamax No. 1 Fluid. The solids consist primarily of an iron-rich amorphous silica and heavy metal sulfides, principally lead. Standard jar testing equipment was used to carry out the tests.

Quong, R.; Shoepflin, F.; Stout, N.D.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Brine and gas recovery from geopressured systems. I. Parametric calculations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of parametric calculations was run with the S-CUBED geopressured-geothermal simulator MUSHRM to assess the effects of important formation, fluid and well parameters on brine and gas recovery from geopressured reservoir systems. The specific parameters considered are formation permeability, pore-fluid salinity, temperature and gas content, well radius and location with respect to reservoir boundaries, desired flow rate, and possible shale recharge. It was found that the total brine and gas recovered (as a fraction of the resource in situ) were most sensitive to formation permeability, pore-fluid gas content, and shale recharge.

Garg, S.K.; Riney, T.D.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Uranium (VI) solubility in carbonate-free ERDA-6 brine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When present, uranium is usually an element of importance in a nuclear waste repository. In the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), uranium is the most prevalent actinide component by mass, with about 647 metric tons to be placed in the repository. Therefore, the chemistry of uranium, and especially its solubility in the WIPP conditions, needs to be well determined. Long-term experiments were performed to measure the solubility of uranium (VI) in carbonate-free ERDA-6 brine, a simulated WIPP brine, at pC{sub H+} values between 8 and 12.5. These data, obtained from the over-saturation approach, were the first repository-relevant data for the VI actinide oxidation state. The solubility trends observed pointed towards low uranium solubility in WIPP brines and a lack of amphotericity. At the expected pC{sub H+} in the WIPP ({approx} 9.5), measured uranium solubility approached 10{sup -7} M. The objective of these experiments was to establish a baseline solubility to further investigate the effects of carbonate complexation on uranium solubility in WIPP brines.

Lucchini, Jean-francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khaing, Hnin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Processing of high salinity brines for subsurface injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Different chemical pretreatments and filtration methods were evaluated as a possible means of clarifying and improving the injectivity of hypersaline brines. Six different downflow media combinations were evaluated over three geopressurized sites, using test data from 4 inch diameter filters. Also, tests were conducted with one hollow fiber ultrafilter unit and two types of disposable cartridge filters. The test procedures are mentioned briefly. (MHR)

Thompson, R.E.; Raber, E.

1979-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

97

Advanced biochemical processes for geothermal brines current developments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) which deals with the development and application of processes for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges has led to the identification and design of cost-efficient and environmentally friendly treatment methodology. Initially the primary goal of the processing was to convert geothermal wastes into disposable materials whose chemical composition would satisfy environmental regulations. An expansion of the R&D effort allowed to identify a combination of biochemical and chemical processes which became a basis for the development of a technology for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges. The new technology satisfies environmental regulatory requirements and concurrently converts the geothermal brines and sludges into commercially promising products. Because the chemical composition of geothermal wastes depends on the type of the resource and therefore differs, the emerging technology has to be also flexible so that it can be readily modified to suit the needs of a particular type of resource. Recent conceptional designs for the processing of hypersaline and low salinity brines and sludges will be discussed.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Bohenek, M.

1997-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

98

Advanced biochemical processes for geothermal brines: Current developments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) which deals with the development and application of processes for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges has led to the identification and design of cost-efficient and environmentally friendly treatment methodology. Initially the primary goal of the processing was to convert geothermal wastes into disposable materials whose chemical composition would satisfy environmental regulations. An expansion of the r and D effort identified a combination of biochemical and chemical processes which became the basis for the development of a technology for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges. The new technology satisfies environmental regulatory requirements and concurrently converts the geothermal brines and sludges into commercially promising products. Because the chemical composition of geothermal wastes depends on the type of the resource, the emerging technology has to be flexible so that it can be readily modified to suit the needs of a particular type of resource. Recent conceptional designs for the processing of hypersaline and low salinity brines and sludges will be discussed.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Bohenek, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Energy Science and Technology Div.; Bajsarowicz, V. [CET Environmental Services, Inc., Richmond, CA (United States); McCloud, M. [C.E. Holt/California Energy, Pasadena, CA (United States)

1997-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

99

Impact-driven pressure management via targeted brine extraction Conceptual studies of CO2 storage in saline formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combining Brine Extraction, desalination, and Residual-Brinebeneficial use such as desalination for drinking water

Birkholzer, J.T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Analysis of anions in geological brines using ion chromatography  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ion chromatographic procedures for the determination of the anions bromide, sulfate, nitrite, nitrate, phosphate, and iodide in brine samples have been developed and are described. The techniques have been applied to the analysis of natural brines, and geologic evaporites. Sample matrices varied over a range from 15,000 mg/L to 200,000 mg/L total halogens, nearly all of which is chloride. The analyzed anion concentrations ranged from less than 5 mg/L in the cases of nitrite, nitrate, and phosphate, to 20,000 mg/L in the case of sulfate. A technique for suppressing chloride and sulfate ions to facilitate the analysis of lower concentration anions is presented. Analysis times are typically less than 20 minutes for each procedure and the ion chromatographic results compare well with those obtained using more time consuming classical chemical analyses. 10 references, 14 figures.

Merrill, R.M.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Power Production from Geothermal Brine with the Rotary Separator Turbine  

SciTech Connect

The rotary separator turbine is a new turbine device that operates with gas-liquid mixtures. This device achieves complete gas-liquid separation, generates power from the liquid and repressurizes the liquid. The use of the rotary separator turbine for geothermal power generation was investigated on this program. A pilot scale unit was designed and tested. Tests were conducted with a clean water/steam mixture and with geothermal brine/steam flows at East Mesa, California; Raft River, Idaho; and Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah. The test results were used to calculate the performance advantage of a rotary separator turbine power system compared to a flash steam power system and a binary power system. The calculated performance advantages were then used to estimate market potential for wellhead and central station Biphase units. The measured performance in the laboratory and in the field agreed to within {+-} 10% of the predicted values. The design goal of 20 kWe was generated both in the laboratory and from brine. Separated steam quality was measured to be greater than 99.96% at all three geothermal resources and in the laboratory. Brine pressure leaving the test unit was greater than reinjection pressure requirements. Maximum brine outlet pressure of 90 psig was demonstrated. The measured performance values would result in a 34% increase in electric power production above a single stage flash steam system. Increasing the size from the pilot size unit (20kWe) to a wellhead unit (2000 kWe) gave a calculated performance advantage of 40%. Based on these favorable results, design, construction and testing of a full-size well-head unit was initiated.

Cerini, Donald J.; Hays, Lance G.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150 C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation experiments do not represent expected conditions in an emplacement drift, but nevertheless illustrate the potential for acid-gas generation at moderate temperatures (<150 C).

Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel, Carl

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

103

INEEL Biotechnology for Oilfield Application--Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery FY-03 Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Biotechnology for Oilfield Operations program supports development, engineering, and application of biotechnology for exploration and production. This continuing INEEL program also supports mitigation of detrimental field conditions. The program is consistent with the United States Department of Energy mission to promote activities and policies through its oil technology and natural gas supply programs to enhance the efficiency and environmental quality of domestic oil and natural gas exploration, recovery, processing, transport, and storage. In addition, the program directly supports the focus areas of Reservoir Life Extension; Advanced Drilling, Completion and Stimulation Systems; Effective Environmental Protection; and Cross Cutting Areas. The program is enhanced by collaborative relationships with industry and academia. For fiscal year 2003, the program focused on production and characterization of biological surfactants from agricultural residuals and the production and application of reactive microbial polymers. This report specifically details: 1. Use of a chemostat reactor operated in batch mode for producing surfactin, with concomitant use of an antifoam to prevent surfactant loss. The program achieved production and recovery of 0.6 g/L of surfactin per 12 hr. 2. Characterization of surfactin produced from agricultural residuals with respect to its ability to mediate changes in surface tension. Conditions evaluated were salt (as NaCl) from 0 to 10% (w/v), pH from 3 to 10, temperature from 21 to 70XC, and combinations of these conditions. When evaluated singularly, pH below 6 and salt concentrations above 30 g/L were found to have an adverse impact on surfactin. Temperatures of 70XC for 95 days had no effect. When the effect of temperature was added to the pH experiment, there were no significant changes, and, again, surface tension, at any temperature, increased at pH below 6. When temperature (70XC) was added to the experiments with salt, the impacts of salt up to 30 g/L were negligible. When all three parameters were combined in one experiment, no increase in surface tension was observed at 80 g/L NaCl, pH 10, and 70XnC. The upper temperature limit of the surfactin was not determined in these experiments. 3. Impact of alkaline soluble, pH reactive biopolymers to alter permeability in Berea sandstone cores. The contributing effect of salt (as NaCl to 2%, w/v), temperatures to 60XC, and crude oil were evaluated. Residual resistance factors were increased 800 fold, compared to cores without biopolymer. This could lead to alternate technology for permeability modification, thus extending the life of a reservoir and preventing premature abandonment.

G. A. Bala; D. F. Bruhn; S. L. Fox; K. S. Noah; K. D. Schaller; E. P. Robertson; X. Xie

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The feasibility of deep well injection for brine disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A generalized methodology for evaluating the technical feasibility of projects involving the disposal of waste brine by injection into deep saline aquifers is developed, primarily from the hydrology and petroleum engineering literature. Data collection, groundwater modeling, and fluid compatibility are discussed in detail. Injection system design, economics, and regulatory considerations are more related to economic than technical feasibility, and are discussed only as they relate to technical feasibility. The methodology is utilized to make a preliminary evaluation of a proposed brine injection project in the Dove Creek area of King and Stonewall Counties, North Central Texas. Four known deep aquifers are modeled, using the SWIFT/486 software, to determine their ability to receive two cfs of brine for a project life of one hundred years. Two aquifers, the Strawn and EUenburger Formations, are predicted to be acceptable for disposal. Each aquifer would require only one disposal well which is favorable for the economics of the project. Additional data, particularly hydraulic conductivity and net aquifer thickness data, are required to make a more definitive technical feasibility determination for this project.

Spongberg, Martin Edward

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Brine pH Modification Scale Control Technology. 2. A Review.pdf | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brine pH Modification Scale Control Technology. 2. A Review.pdf Brine pH Modification Scale Control Technology. 2. A Review.pdf Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Brine pH Modification Scale Control Technology. 2. A Review.pdf Abstract A variety of processes has been deployed at geothermalfields to inhibit or control siliceous scale deposition. It has beenknown for decades that the kinetics of silicic acid polymerizationis retarded when the pH of an aqueous solution is decreased.Therefore, a potential method for controlling siliceous scalingfrom geothermal brine is treatment with acid. Early attempts tocontrol siliceous scaling in geothermal brine-handling equipmentby retarding polymerization led to the belief that the pHhad to be reduced to < 4. Acidifying brine was discourageddue to corrosion concerns.

106

Trace metal speciation in saline waters affected by geothermal brines. [GEOCHEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description is given of the chemical equilibrium computer program GEOCHEM, which has been developed to calculate trace element speciation in soil, irrigation, drainage, or Salton Sea waters affected by geothermal brine. GEOCHEM is applied to irrigation water-brine mixtures and to Salton Sea water-brine mixtures in order to compute the chemical speciation of the elements Cd, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn, along with the oxyanions of As and B. The results suggest that the computer simulation can have an important effect on a program for managing brine spills. Appendices include published papers on related research.

Sposito, G.; Page, A.L.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Community Geothermal Technology Program: Electrodeposition of minerals in geothermal brine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective was to study the materials electrodeposited from geothermal brine, from the HGP-A well in Puna, Hawaii. Due to limitations, only one good set of electrodeposited material was obtained; crystallography indicates that vaterite forms first, followed by calcite and then perhaps aragonite as current density is increased. While the cost to weight ratio is reasonable, the deposition rate is very slow. More research is needed, such as reducing the brittleness. The electrodeposited material possibly could be used as building blocks, tables, benches, etc. 49 figs, 4 tabs, 7 refs.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Geothermal Chemical Modeling Project DOE Advanced Brine Chemistry Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The brine-calcite-anhydrite-silica scale model program is ready to be used by the industry at a research level. Versions are already in use in studies of scaling in geothermal and oil production systems. A set of short course notes has been prepared to help perspective users. IBM and Macintosh versions of the model are available. The gas phase models have been incorporated in the general package for distribution. Both mainframe (SUN) and PC versions (MacIntosh and IBM) of the code have been distributed.

Moeller, N.; Weare, J.H.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Kinetics of silica deposition from simulated geothermal brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Supersaturated brines were passed through columns packed with several forms of silica (crystalline ..cap alpha.. quartz, polycrystalline ..cap alpha.. quartz, and porous Vycor). Also, silica deposition on ThO/sub 2/ microspheres and titanium powder was studied under controlled conditions of supersaturation, pH, temperature, and salinity. The residence time was varied by adjustments of flow rate and column length. The silica contents of the input and effluent solutions were determined colorimetrically by a molybdate method which does not include polymers without special pretreatment. Essentially identical deposition behavior was observed once the substrate was thoroughly coated with amorphous silica and the BET surface area of the coated particles was taken into account. The reaction rate is not diffusion limited in the columns. The silica deposition is a function of the monomeric Si(OH)/sub 4/ concentration in the brine. The deposition on all surfaces examined was spontaneously nucleated. The dependence on the supersaturation concentration, hydroxide ion concentration, surface area, temperature and salinity were examined. Fluoride was shown to have no effect at pH 5.94 and low salinity. The empirical rate law which describes the data in 1 m NaCl in the pH range 5-7 and temperatures from 60 to 120/sup 0/C is given.

Bohlmann, E.G.; Mesmer, R.E.; Berlinski, P.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Improving the performance of brine wells at Gulf Coast strategic petroleum reserve sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the request of the Department of Energy, field techniques were developed to evaluate and improve the injection of brine into wells at Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) sites. These wells are necessary for the disposal of saturated brine removed from salt domes where oil is being stored. The wells, which were accepting brine at 50 percent or less of their initial design rates, were impaired by saturated brine containing particulates that deposited on the sand face and in the geologic formation next to the wellbore. Corrosion of the brine-disposal pipelines and injection wells contributed to the impairment by adding significant amounts of particulates in the form of corrosion products. When tests were implemented at the SPR sites, it was found that the poor quality of injected brines was the primary cause of impaired injection; that granular-media filtration, when used with chemical pretreatment, is an effective method for removing particulates from hypersaline brine; that satisfactory injection-well performance can be attained with prefiltered brines; and that corrosion rates can be substantially reduced by oxygen-scavenging.

Owen, L.B.; Quong, R. (eds.)

1979-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

111

Studies of brine chemistry, precipitation of solids, and scale formation at the Salton Sea geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Factors affecting the precipitation of solids and deposition of scale from the hypersaline brines of the Salton Sea geothermal field - two potential problems in the proposed utilization of these brines for electric power generation - were investigated. The average physical and chemical composition of the fluid from Magmamax No. 1 well was noted and the effects of changes in well flowrate on the chemistry of the brine and the formation of solids were determined. The effects of pH on the process stream chemistry and on the composition and rates of formation of solids and scale that precipitated from this brine were studied. Reduction of the pH from 6 to 4-5 decreased the scaling rates and increased the proportions of bariun sulfate and calcium fluoride in the scales and precipitated solids. These studies were conducted using a small-scale four-stage brine flash system constructed at the site.

Harrar, J.E.; Otto, C.H. Jr.; Deutscher, S.B.; Ryon, R.W.; Tardiff, G.E.

1979-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

112

Methane extraction from geopressured-geothermal brine at wellhead conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Disposal of geopressured-geothermal brine effluents by injection is expected to be costly, even into shallow aquifers. If injection into the production reservoir becomes necessary to maintain productivity and to minimize subsidence, the injection pumping costs can become overwhelming. An option aimed at reducing injection pump operating costs is to maintain a higher than normal pressure at the production wellhead to reduce the injection pumping load. The crucial element, however, is that a significant portion of CH/sub 4/ remains in solution and must be recovered in order for the pressure maintenance option to be cost effective. A laboratory and field test capability has been established, and several methods for extracting dissolved CH/sub 4/ at high temperature and pressure are being evaluated. Solvent extraction and use of hydraulic motors or turbines coupled to CH/sub 4/ recovery systems are the leading candidate methods.

Quong, R.; Owen, L.B.; Locke, F.E.; Otto, C.H.; Netherton, R.; Lorensen, L.E.

1980-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

113

Frio II Brine Pilot: Report on GEOSEQ Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LBNL's GEOSEQ project is a key participant in the Frio IIbrine pilot studying geologic sequestration of CO2. During During theinjection phase of the Frio-II brine pilot, LBNL collected multiple datasets including seismic monitoring, hydrologic monitoring and geochemicalsampling. These data sets are summarized in this report including allCASSM (continuous active source seismic monitoring) travel time data,injection pressure and flow rate data and gaseous sampling and tracerdata. Additional results from aqueous chemistry analysis performed by theU. S. Geological Survey (USGS) are summarized. Post injectionmodification of the flow model for Frio II is shown. Thesemodificationsare intended to facilitate integration with the monitoring data andincorporation of model heterogeneity. Current activities of LBNL's GEOSEQproject related to the Frio II test are shown, including development of anew petrophysical model for improved interpretation of seismic monitoringdata and integration of this data with flow modeling.

Daley, T.M.; Freifeld, B.M.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Doughty, C.; Benson, S.M.

2007-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

114

Weeks Island brine diffuser site study: baseline conditions and environmental assessment technical report  

SciTech Connect

This technical report presents the results of a study conducted at two alternative brine diffuser sites (A and B) proposed for the Weeks Island salt dome, together with an analysis of the potential physical, chemical, and biological effects of brine disposal for this area of the Gulf of Mexico. Brine would result from either the leaching of salt domes to form or enlarge oil storage caverns, or the subsequent use of these caverns for crude oil storage in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program. Brine leached from the Weeks Island salt dome would be transported through a pipeline which would extend from the salt dome either 27 nautical miles (32 statute miles) for Site A, or 41 nautical miles (47 statute miles) for Site B, into Gulf waters. The brine would be discharged at these sites through an offshore diffuser at a sustained peak rate of 39 ft/sup 3//sec. The disposal of large quantities of brine in the Gulf could have a significant impact on the biology and water quality of the area. Physical and chemical measurements of the marine environment at Sites A and B were taken between September 1977 and July 1978 to correlate the existing environmental conditions with the estimated physical extent of tthe brine discharge as predicted by the MIT model (US Dept. of Commerce, 1977a). Measurements of wind, tide, waves, currents, and stratification (water column structure) were also obtained since the diffusion and dispersion of the brine plume are a function of the local circulation regime. These data were used to calculate both near- and far-field concentrations of brine, and may also be used in the design criteria for diffuser port configuration and verification of the plume model. Biological samples were taken to characterize the sites and to predict potential areas of impact with regard to the discharge. This sampling focused on benthic organisms and demersal fish. (DMC)

None

1980-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

115

Buoyancy effects on upward brine displacement caused by CO2 injection  

SciTech Connect

Upward displacement of brine from deep reservoirs driven by pressure increases resulting from CO{sub 2} injection for geologic carbon sequestration may occur through improperly sealed abandoned wells, through permeable faults, or through permeable channels between pinch-outs of shale formations. The concern about upward brine flow is that, upon intrusion into aquifers containing groundwater resources, the brine may degrade groundwater. Because both salinity and temperature increase with depth in sedimentary basins, upward displacement of brine involves lifting fluid that is saline but also warm into shallower regions that contain fresher, cooler water. We have carried out dynamic simulations using TOUGH2/EOS7 of upward displacement of warm, salty water into cooler, fresher aquifers in a highly idealized two-dimensional model consisting of a vertical conduit (representing a well or permeable fault) connecting a deep and a shallow reservoir. Our simulations show that for small pressure increases and/or high-salinity-gradient cases, brine is pushed up the conduit to a new static steady-state equilibrium. On the other hand, if the pressure rise is large enough that brine is pushed up the conduit and into the overlying upper aquifer, flow may be sustained if the dense brine is allowed to spread laterally. In this scenario, dense brine only contacts the lower-most region of the upper aquifer. In a hypothetical case in which strong cooling of the dense brine occurs in the upper reservoir, the brine becomes sufficiently dense that it flows back down into the deeper reservoir from where it came. The brine then heats again in the lower aquifer and moves back up the conduit to repeat the cycle. Parameter studies delineate steady-state (static) and oscillatory solutions and reveal the character and period of oscillatory solutions. Such oscillatory solutions are mostly a curiosity rather than an expected natural phenomenon because in nature the geothermal gradient prevents the cooling in the upper aquifer that occurs in the model. The expected effect of upward brine displacement is either establishment of a new hydrostatic equilibrium or sustained upward flux into the bottom-most region of the upper aquifer.

Oldenburg, C.M.; Rinaldi, A.

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Study of thermal-gradient-induced migration of brine inclusions in salt. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural salt deposits, which are being considered for high-level waste disposal, contain a small volume fraction of water in the form of brine inclusions distributed throughout the salt. Radioactive decay heating of the nuclear wastes will impose a temperature gradient on the surrounding salt which mobilizes the brine inclusions. Inclusions filled completely with brine (the all-liquid inclusions) migrate up the temperature gradient and eventually accumulate brine near the buried waste forms. The brine may slowly corrode or degrade the waste forms, which is undesirable. Therefore it is important to consider the migration of brine inclusions in salt under imposed temperature gradients to properly evaluate the performance of a future salt repository for nuclear wastes. The migration velocities of the inclusions were found to be dependent on temperature, temperature gradient, and inclusion shape and size. The velocities were also dictated by the interfacial mass transfer resistance at brine/solid interface. This interfacial resistance depends on the dislocation density in the crystal, which in turn, depends on the axial compressive loading of the crystal. At low axial loads, the dependence between the velocity and temperature gradient is nonlinear. At high axial loads, the interfacial resistance is reduced and the migration velocity depends linearly on the temperature gradient. All-liquid inclusions filled with mixed brines were also studied. For gas-liquid inclusions, helium, air and argon were compared. Migration studies were also conducted on single crystallites of natural salt as well as in polycrystalline natural salt samples. The behavior of the inclusions at large-ange grain boundaries was observed.

Olander, D.R.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Improving the injectability of high-salinity brines for disposal or waterflooding operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work is part of a study conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to improve the performance of brine injection wells at Gulf Coast Strategic Petroleum Reserve Sites. Our involvement established that granular media filtration, when used with proper chemical pretreatments, provides an effective and economical method for removing particulates from hypersaline brines. This treatment allows for the injection of 200,000 B/D with significantly increased well half-lives of 30 years.

Raber, E.; Thompson, R.E.; Smith, F.H.

1981-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

118

Recovery of energy from geothermal brine and other hot water sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process and system for recovery of energy from geothermal brines and other hot water sources, by direct contact heat exchange between the brine or hot water, and an immiscible working fluid, e.g. a hydrocarbon such as isobutane, in a heat exchange column, the brine or hot water therein flowing countercurrent to the flow of the working fluid. The column can be operated at subcritical, critical or above the critical pressure of the working fluid. Preferably, the column is provided with a plurality of sieve plates, and the heat exchange process and column, e.g. with respect to the design of such plates, number of plates employed, spacing between plates, area thereof, column diameter, and the like, are designed to achieve maximum throughput of brine or hot water and reduction in temperature differential at the respective stages or plates between the brine or hot water and the working fluid, and so minimize lost work and maximize efficiency, and minimize scale deposition from hot water containing fluid including salts, such as brine. Maximum throughput approximates minimum cost of electricity which can be produced by conversion of the recovered thermal energy to electrical energy.

Wahl, III, Edward F. (Claremont, CA); Boucher, Frederic B. (San Juan Capistrano, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Chemical Speciation of Heterogeneously Reduced Pu in Synthetic Brines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy has been used to determine the speciation of Pu precipitates prepared by the heterogeneous reduction of Pu(VI) with Al and Fe in 5M NaCl and an ERDA-6 brine, a simulant from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, New Mexico. NaOCl was added to some of these solutions to determine its effect on Pu speciation. Analysis of the Pu LIII spectra showed that all solids consisted of PuO2+x?y(OH)2y zH2O, compounds with characteristics identical to those prepared by hydrolysis and with Pu?O and Pu?Pu distances identical to those treated at elevated temperature. Additionally, reduction with Al gave compounds with different site distributions than reduction with Fe, and reduction with Al or the addition of NaOCl appeared to suppress the formation of oxo groups and their associated Pu(V) sites.

Ding, Mei; Conca, James L.; Den Auwer, Christophe J.; Gabitov, Rinat I.; Hess, Nancy J.; Paviet-Hartmann, Patricia; Palmer, Phillip D.; LoPresti, Vin; Conradson, Steven D.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations  

SciTech Connect

Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes for the removal of hydrocarbons from produced water. The results of these experiments show that hydrocarbons from produced water can be reduced from 200 ppm to below 29 ppm level. Experiments were also done to remove the dissolved solids (salts) from the pretreated produced water using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. The Report also discusses the results of field testing of various process trains to measure performance of the desalination process. Economic analysis based on field testing, including capital and operational costs, was done to predict the water treatment costs. Cost of treating produced water containing 15,000 ppm total dissolved solids and 200 ppm hydrocarbons to obtain agricultural water quality with less than 200 ppm TDS and 2 ppm hydrocarbons range between $0.5-1.5 /bbl. The contribution of fresh water resource from produced water will contribute enormously to the sustainable development of the communities where oil and gas is produced and fresh water is a scarce resource. This water can be used for many beneficial purposes such as agriculture, horticulture, rangeland and ecological restorations, and other environmental and industrial application.

David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The depth of the oil/brine interface and crude oil leaks in SPR caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring wellhead pressure evolution is the best method of detecting crude oil leaks in SPR caverns while oil/brine interface depth measurements provide additional insight. However, to fully utilize the information provided by these interface depth measurements, a thorough understanding of how the interface movement corresponds to cavern phenomena, such as salt creep, crude oil leakage, and temperature equilibration, as well as to wellhead pressure, is required. The time evolution of the oil/brine interface depth is a function of several opposing factors. Cavern closure due to salt creep and crude oil leakage, if present, move the interface upward. Brine removal and temperature equilibration of the oil/brine system move the interface downward. Therefore, the relative magnitudes of these factors determine the net direction of interface movement. Using a mass balance on the cavern fluids, coupled with a simplified salt creep model for closure in SPR caverns, the movement of the oil/brine interface has been predicted for varying cavern configurations, including both right-cylindrical and carrot-shaped caverns. Three different cavern depths and operating pressures have been investigated. In addition, the caverns were investigated at four different points in time, allowing for varying extents of temperature equilibration. Time dependent interface depth changes of a few inches to a few feet were found to be characteristic of the range of cases studied. 5 refs, 19 figs., 1 tab.

Heffelfinger, G.S.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

JV Task 99-Integrated Risk Analysis and Contaminant Reduction, Watford City, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) conducted a limited site investigation and risk analyses for hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and groundwater at a Construction Services, Inc., site in Watford City, North Dakota. Site investigation confirmed the presence of free product and high concentrations of residual gasoline-based contaminants in several wells, the presence of 1,2-dichloroethane, and extremely high levels of electrical conductivity indicative of brine residuals in the tank area south of the facility. The risk analysis was based on compilation of information from the site-specific geotechnical investigation, including multiphase extraction pilot test, laser induced fluorescence probing, evaluation of contaminant properties, receptor survey, capture zone analysis and evaluation of well head protection area for municipal well field. The project results indicate that the risks associated with contaminant occurrence at the Construction Services, Inc. site are low and, under current conditions, there is no direct or indirect exposure pathway between the contaminated groundwater and soils and potential receptors.

Jaroslav Solc; Barry W. Botnen

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Brine Fields  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Brine Fields Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Brine Fields M. Ferer, (mferer@wvu.edu) Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6315, Grant S. Bromhal, (bromhal@netl.doe.gov) US DOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880; and Duane H. Smith, (dsmith@netl.doe.gov) US DOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 & Department of Physics, West Virginia University. Underground injection of gas is a common practice in the oil and gas industry. Injection into deep, brine-saturated formations is a commercially proven method of sequestering CO 2 . However, it has long been known that displacement of a connate fluid by a less viscous fluid produces unstable displacement fronts with significant fingering. This fingering allows only a

124

Salt effects on stable isotope partitioning and their geochemical implications for geothermal brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has long been recognized that dissolved salts in water can change oxygen and hydrogen isotope partitioning between water and other phases (i.e., vapor, minerals) due to the hydration of ions upon the dissolution of salts in water. However, their effects have not been well determined at elevated temperatures. We are currently conducting a series of hydrothermal experiments of the system brine-vapor or minerals to 350{degrees}C, in order to determine precisely the effects of dissolved salts abundant in brines on isotope partitioning at temperatures encountered in geothermal systems. The so-called ``isotope salt effect`` has important implications for the interpretation and modeling of isotopic data of brines and rocks obtained from geothermal fields. We will show how to use our new results of isotopic partitioning to help better evaluate energy resources of many geothermal fields.

Horita, J.; Cole, D.R.; Wesolowski, D.J.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

R and D, fabrication and testing of pH and CO/sub 2/ sensors for geothermal brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reduction or elimination of scaling is a mandatory requirement for the operation of geothermal power plants. The use of downhole sampling and subsequent analysis for solution chemistry has many disadvantages. These disadvantages include composition change with cooling, risk of sample contamination, and non real-time indication. The use of in-line sensing of solution chemistry avoids these drawbacks but requires sensors which can survive the extremely harsh environment of brine at high temperatures and elevated pressures. Leeds and Northrup had previously undertaken a contract to develop sensors for pH and pCO/sub 2/ which would withstand these harsh environments. A number of sensors were tested at a field site under actual operating conditions. Field test results indicated that certain facets of the design were inadequate to give accurate long term measurement. The primary areas addressed here are replacement of polymeric seals with anodic bonding where possible, improved methods of lead attachment, improved sealing of the pCO/sub 2/ reference feed-through, H/sub 2/S getter optimization and improved passivation of the sensing head. Each of these areas is addressed in detail in the report along with laboratory test results pertaining to the particular phase.

Baxter, R.D.; Clack, P.J.; Phelan, D.M.; Taylor, R.M.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Resources Process Contaminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General Information on process contaminants(3-MCPD). Reference list included. Resources Process Contaminants 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid analysis aocs april articles certified chemists chloropropanediol contaminants dete

127

Process Contaminants (3-MCPD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General information on process contaminants(3-MCPD). Reference list included. Process Contaminants (3-MCPD) 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid analysis aocs april articles certified chemists chloropropanediol contaminants deter

128

ASSESSMENT OF TECHNETIUM LEACHABILITY IN CEMENT STABILIZED BASIN 43 GROUNDWATER BRINE  

SciTech Connect

This report is an initial report on the laboratory effort executed under RPP-PLAN-33338, Test Plan for the Assessment of Technetium Leachability in Cement-Stabilized Basin 43 Groundwater Brine. This report delineates preliminary data obtained under subcontract 21065, release 30, from the RJ Lee Group, Inc., Center for Laboratory Sciences. The report is predicated on CLS RPT-816, Draft Report: Assessment of Technetium Leachability in Cement Stabilized Basin 43 Groundwater Brine. This document will be revised on receipt of the final RJ Lee Group, Inc., Center for Laboratory Sciences report, which will contain data subjected to quality control and quality assurance criteria.

COOKE GA; DUNCAN JB; LOCKREM LL

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

129

Geothermal Power Production from Brine Co-Produced from Oil and Gas Wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Millions of barrels of water (brine) per day are co-produced from oil and gas wells. Currently, the oil and gas industry views this as a waste stream that costs millions of dollars per year to manage, through either treatment or disposal/reinjection. A significant percentage of the co-produced brine, however, flows at sufficient rate and temperature to generate power using a binary power plant, and this is viewed by some as a potential value stream. The value lies in that the co-produced water is "free" ...

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations  

SciTech Connect

Industrial-scale storage of CO{sub 2} in saline sedimentary basins will cause zones of elevated pressure, larger than the CO{sub 2} plume itself. If permeable conduits (e.g., leaking wells) exist between the injection reservoir and overlying shallow aquifers, brine could be pushed upwards along these conduits and mix with groundwater resources. This paper discusses the potential for such brine leakage to occur in temperature- and salinity-stratified systems. Using static mass-balance calculations as well as dynamic well flow simulations, we evaluate the minimum reservoir pressure that would generate continuous migration of brine up a leaking wellbore into a freshwater aquifer. Since the brine invading the well is denser than the initial fluid in the wellbore, continuous flow only occurs if the pressure perturbation in the reservoir is large enough to overcome the increased fluid column weight after full invasion of brine into the well. If the threshold pressure is exceeded, brine flow rates are dependent on various hydraulic (and other) properties, in particular the effective permeability of the wellbore and the magnitude of pressure increase. If brine flow occurs outside of the well casing, e.g., in a permeable fracture zone between the well cement and the formation, the fluid/solute transfer between the migrating fluid and the surrounding rock units can strongly retard brine flow. At the same time, the threshold pressure for continuous flow to occur decreases compared to a case with no fluid/solute transfer.

Birkholzer, J.T.; Nicot, J.-P.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Zhou, Q.; Kraemer, S.; Bandilla, K.W.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Calcium Isotopic Variation in Marine Evaporites and Carbonates: Applications to Late Miocene Mediterranean Brine Chemistry and Late Cenozoic Calcium Cycling in the Oceans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Field: Geochemistry Studies in Isotope Geology Professors J.Isotopes and Brine Evolution .. 3.2.1 General geology andIsotopes and Brine Evolution 3.2.1 General geology and

Hensley, Tabitha Michele

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 7470 of 28,905 results. 61 - 7470 of 28,905 results. Download CX-005611: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 04/12/2011 Location(s): Tonkawa, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005611-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005612: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B3.7 Date: 04/12/2011 Location(s): Ellery, New York Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005612-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-001295: Categorical Exclusion Determination

133

Environmental geochemistry of radioactive contamination.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report attempts to describe the geochemical foundations of the behavior of radionuclides in the environment. The information is obtained and applied in three interacting spheres of inquiry and analysis: (1) experimental studies and theoretical calculations, (2) field studies of contaminated and natural analog sites and (3) model predictions of radionuclide behavior in remediation and waste disposal. Analyses of the risks from radioactive contamination require estimation of the rates of release and dispersion of the radionuclides through potential exposure pathways. These processes are controlled by solubility, speciation, sorption, and colloidal transport, which are strong functions of the compositions of the groundwater and geomedia as well as the atomic structure of the radionuclides. The chemistry of the fission products is relatively simple compared to the actinides. Because of their relatively short half-lives, fission products account for a large fraction of the radioactivity in nuclear waste for the first several hundred years but do not represent a long-term hazard in the environment. The chemistry of the longer-lived actinides is complex; however, some trends in their behavior can be described. Actinide elements of a given oxidation state have either similar or systematically varying chemical properties due to similarities in ionic size, coordination number, valence, and electron structure. In dilute aqueous systems at neutral to basic pH, the dominant actinide species are hydroxy- and carbonato-complexes, and the solubility-limiting solid phases are commonly oxides, hydroxides or carbonates. In general, actinide sorption will decrease in the presence of ligands that complex with the radionuclide; sorption of the (IV) species of actinides (Np, Pu, U) is generally greater than of the (V) species. The geochemistry of key radionuclides in three different environments is described in this report. These include: (1) low ionic strength reducing waters from crystalline rocks at nuclear waste research sites in Sweden; (2) oxic water from the J-13 well at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the site of a proposed repository for high level nuclear waste (HLW) in tuffaceous rocks; and (3) reference brines associated with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The transport behaviors of radionuclides associated with the Chernobyl reactor accident and the Oklo Natural Reactor are described. These examples span wide temporal and spatial scales and include the rapid geochemical and physical processes important to nuclear reactor accidents or industrial discharges as well as the slower processes important to the geologic disposal of nuclear waste. Application of geochemical information to remediating or assessing the risk posed by radioactive contamination is the final subject of this report. After radioactive source terms have been removed, large volumes of soil and water with low but potentially hazardous levels of contamination may remain. For poorly-sorbing radionuclides, capture of contaminated water and removal of radionuclides may be possible using permeable reactive barriers and bioremediation. For strongly sorbing radionuclides, contaminant plumes will move very slowly. Through a combination of monitoring, regulations and modeling, it may be possible to have confidence that they will not be a hazard to current or future populations. Abstraction of the hydrogeochemical properties of real systems into simple models is required for probabilistic risk assessment. Simplifications in solubility and sorption models used in performance assessment calculations for the WIPP and the proposed HLW repository at Yucca Mountain are briefly described.

Bryan, Charles R.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Helium leak testing of a radioactive contaminated vessel under high pressure in a contaminated environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At ANL-W, with the shutdown of EBR-II, R&D has evolved from advanced reactor design to the safe handling, processing, packaging, and transporting spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. New methods of processing spent fuel rods and transforming contaminated material into acceptable waste forms are now in development. Storage of nuclear waste is a high interest item. ANL-W is participating in research of safe storage of nuclear waste, with the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) site in New Mexico the repository. The vessel under test simulates gas generated by contaminated materials stored underground at the WIPP site. The test vessel is 90% filled with a mixture of contaminated material and salt brine (from WIPP site) and pressurized with N2-1% He at 2500 psia. Test acceptance criteria is leakage jar method is used to determine leakage rate using a mass spectrometer leak detector (MSLD). The efficient MSLD and an Al bell jar replaced a costly, time consuming pressure decay test setup. Misinterpretation of test criterion data caused lengthy delays, resulting in the development of a unique procedure. Reevaluation of the initial intent of the test criteria resulted in leak tolerances being corrected and test efficiency improved.

Winter, M.E.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Helium leak testing of a radioactive contaminated vessel under high pressure in a contaminated environment  

SciTech Connect

At ANL-W, with the shutdown of EBR-II, R&D has evolved from advanced reactor design to the safe handling, processing, packaging, and transporting spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. New methods of processing spent fuel rods and transforming contaminated material into acceptable waste forms are now in development. Storage of nuclear waste is a high interest item. ANL-W is participating in research of safe storage of nuclear waste, with the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) site in New Mexico the repository. The vessel under test simulates gas generated by contaminated materials stored underground at the WIPP site. The test vessel is 90% filled with a mixture of contaminated material and salt brine (from WIPP site) and pressurized with N2-1% He at 2500 psia. Test acceptance criteria is leakage < 10{sup -7} cc/seconds at 2500 psia. The bell jar method is used to determine leakage rate using a mass spectrometer leak detector (MSLD). The efficient MSLD and an Al bell jar replaced a costly, time consuming pressure decay test setup. Misinterpretation of test criterion data caused lengthy delays, resulting in the development of a unique procedure. Reevaluation of the initial intent of the test criteria resulted in leak tolerances being corrected and test efficiency improved.

Winter, M.E.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A study of hydrocarbons associated with brines from DOE geopressured wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accomplishments are summarized on the following tasks: distribution coefficients and solubilities, DOE design well sampling, analysis of well samples, review of theoretical models of geopressured reservoir hydrocarbons, monitor for aliphatic hydrocarbons, development of a ph meter probe, DOE design well scrubber analysis, removal and disposition of gas scrubber equipment at Pleasant Bayou Well, and disposition of archived brines.

Keeley, D.F.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A study of hydrocarbons associated with brines from DOE geopressured wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accomplishments are summarized on the following tasks: distribution coefficients and solubilities, DOE design well sampling, analysis of well samples, review of theoretical models of geopressured reservoir hydrocarbons, monitor for aliphatic hydrocarbons, development of a ph meter probe, DOE design well scrubber analysis, removal and disposition of gas scrubber equipment at Pleasant Bayou Well, and disposition of archived brines.

Keeley, D.F.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Recovery 2011 CSPG CSEG CWLS Convention 1 Brine-methane Substitution: The Seismic Response of Coalbeds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an important source of natural gas (Shi and Durucan, 2005). The production of the CBM takes place when coal seam using a tank model which assumes that there is no variation of the reservoir properties). For the Gassmann fluid substitution, we assume a pore fluid of 100% brine as the initial condition and calculate

Ferguson, Robert J.

139

Corrosivity of geothermal brines. Progress report for period ending June 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies carried out during FY 1976 on the corrosivity of ferrous materials in synthetic geothermal brines are described. Electrochemical measurements on the spontaneous corrosion potentials and corrosion rates, and on the kinetics of the anodic and cathodic corrosion reactions of iron and carbon steel were made in 4 M NaCl solution over the pH range from 1 to 11 at temperatures up to 100/sup 0/C in a conventional Pyrex electrochemical cell. A refreshed, stirred titanium autoclave system was designed, constructed, and tested, and will be used for making electrochemical measurements in synthetic brines up to at least 200/sup 0/C. The effect of pH on hydrolysis, precipitation, and electrochemical reactivity of ferrous and ferric ions in 4 M NaCl at 25/sup 0/C was studied, and implications for plant operation are discussed. The pitting potential of type 304 stainless steel in synthetic brine was measured as a function of temperature from 25 to 85/sup 0/C. Plans for research on electrochemical aspects of the corrosion of iron and carbon steel in synthetic geothermal brines during FY1977 are presented. 14 fig. (auth)

Posey, F.A.; Palko, A.A.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Sustainable Carbon Sequestration: Increasing CO2-Storage Efficiency through a CO2-Brine Displacement Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO2 sequestration is one of the proposed methods for reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions to the atmosphere and therefore mitigating global climate change. Few studies on storing CO2 in an aquifer have been conducted on a regional scale. This study offers a conceptual approach to increasing the storage efficiency of CO2 injection in saline formations and investigates what an actual CO2 storage project might entail using field data for the Woodbine aquifer in East Texas. The study considers three aquifer management strategies for injecting CO2 emissions from nearby coal-fired power plants into the Woodbine aquifer. The aquifer management strategies studied are bulk CO2 injection, and two CO2-brine displacement strategies. A conceptual model performed with homogeneous and average reservoir properties reveals that bulk injection of CO2 pressurizes the aquifer, has a storage efficiency of 0.46% and can only last for 20 years without risk of fracturing the CO2 injection wells. The CO2-brine displacement strategy can continue injecting CO2 for as many as 240 years until CO2 begins to break through in the production wells. This offers 12 times greater CO2 storage efficiency than the bulk injection strategy. A full field simulation with a geological model based on existing aquifer data validates the storage capacity claims made by the conceptual model. A key feature in the geological model is the Mexia-Talco fault system that serves as a likely boundary between the saline aquifer region suitable for CO2 storage and an updip fresh water region. Simulation results show that CO2 does not leak into the fresh water region of the iv aquifer after 1000 years of monitoring if the faults have zero transmissibility, but a negligible volume of brine eventually gets through the mostly sealing fault system as pressure across the faults slowly equilibrates during the monitoring period. However, for fault transmissibilities of 0.1 and 1, both brine and CO2 leak into the fresh water aquifer in increasing amounts for both bulk injection and CO2-brine displacement strategies. In addition, brine production wells draw some fresh water into the saline aquifer if the Mexia-Talco fault system is not sealing. A CO2 storage project in the Woodbine aquifer would impact as many as 15 counties with high-pressure CO2 pipelines stretching as long as 875 km from the CO2 source to the injection site. The required percentage of power plant energy capacity was 7.43% for bulk injection, 7.9% for the external brine disposal case, and 10.2% for the internal saturated brine injection case. The estimated total cost was $0.00132$0.00146/kWh for the bulk injection, $0.00191$0.00211/kWh for the external brine disposal case, and $0.0019$0.00209/kWh for the internal saturated brine injection case.

Akinnikawe, Oyewande

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Particle measurement and brine chemistry at the Salton Sea Deep Well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Brine Chemistry Project, a part of the US Department of Energy's Geothermal Energy Program, is addressing operating problems associated with scaling and corrosion at geothermal power plants. Under this project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a series of tests at the Salton Sea Deep Well, which has one of the highest solids contents in the world. The purpose of the tests was to evaluate monitoring instrumentation under field conditions and relate particulate formation to the brine chemistry. The instrumentation, was evaluated under scaling geothermal conditions using two different principles: ultrasonic reflection and laser light scattering. The following conclusions were drawn from the instrumentation testing and brine chemistry and particulate analyses. (1) Using reflected ultrasonic impulses to detect suspended particles has been demonstrate for on-line application in a geothermal brine with strong scaling tendencies. Advantages over laser light scattering include improved high-temperature durability for the transducer and longer operation with less maintenance. (2) Counting and sizing particles using laser light scattering requires constant maintenance in geothermal applications. (3) Silica is the dominant scale species and appears in amounts orders of magnitude greater than other minor species such as barium sulfate. (4) The silica that formed at high temperatures and short residence times is very gelatinous and difficult to filter out of the brine. (5) Correlation of instrument readings with particle collection data was difficult because conditions on the filter (i.e., temperature, flowrate, and pressure) could not be maintained constant for long enough intervals to obtain comparable information. 5 refs., 27 figs., 2 tabs.

Robertus, R.J.; Kindle, C.H.; Sullivan, R.G.; Shannon, D.W.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flow model for carbon dioxide and brine, in Proceedings 9 thGeological Storage of Carbon Dioxide, in: S.J. Baines andGeological Storage of Carbon Dioxide, Geological Society,

Birkholzer, J.T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Resources for Process Contaminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed information regarding 3-MCPD esters and a reference list by topic. Resources for Process Contaminants 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid analysis aocs april articles certified chemists chloropropanediol contaminants de

144

Recovery Act: Molecular Simulation of Dissolved Inorganic Carbons for Underground Brine CO2 Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

To further our understanding and develop the method for measuring the DICs under geological sequestration conditions, we studied the infrared spectra of DICs under high pressure and temperature conditions. First principles simulations of DICs in brine conditions were performed using a highly optimized ReaxFF-DIC forcefield. The thermodynamics stability of each species were determined using the 2PT method, and shown to be consistent with the Reax simulations. More importantly, we have presented the IR spectra of DIC in real brine conditions as a function of temperature and pressure. At near earth conditions, we find a breaking of the O-C-O bending modes into asymmetric and symmetric modes, separated by 100cm{sup -1} at 400K and 5 GPa. These results can now be used to calibrate FTIR laser measurements.

Goddard, William

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

145

Prelimiary investigation desalting of geothermal brines in the Imperial Valley of California  

SciTech Connect

The Imperial Valley Project is an applied research program to provide geologic, hydrologic, engineering, and economic information necessary for development of the geothermal resources of the delta of the lower Colorado River. It is suggested that a desalting pilot plant be associated with the project to develop an economic desalting process if 2 to 3% geothermal brine is produced. The process will be unconventional in that waste heat must be rejected to atmosphere in wet or dry cooling towers. The presence of large amounts of CO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/S, and silica will require gas removal and silicascale control equipment. The plant would process up to 75,000 gallons of brine per day. (MCW)

Spiewak, I.; Hise, E.C.; Reed, S.A.; Thompson, S.A.

1970-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

West Hackberry Brine Disposal Project pre-discharge characterization. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The physical, chemical and biological attributes are described for: (1) a coastal marine environment centered about a Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) brine disposal site 11.4 km off the southwest coast of Louisiana; and (2) the lower Calcasieu and Sabine estuarine systems that provide leach waters for the SPR project. A three month sampling effort, February through April 1981, and previous investigations from the study area are integrated to establish baseline information for evaluation of impacts from brine disposal in the nearshore marine waters and from freshwater withdrawal from the coastal marsh of the Chenier Plain. January data are included for some tasks that sampled while testing and mobilizing their instruments prior to the February field effort. The study addresses the areas of physical oceanography, estuarine hydrology and hydrography, water and sediment quality, benthos, nekton, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and data management.

DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C. (eds.) [eds.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Aromatic hydrocarbons associated with brines from geopressured wells. Annual report, fiscal 1985  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Samples of cryocondensates - materials condensed at - 78.5/sup 0/C were taken on a regular basis from the gas stream for the USDOE geopressured wells. Most of the data has been taken from the Gladys McCall well as it has flowed on a regular and almost continous basis. The cryocondensates, not the ''condensate'' from gas wells, are almost exclusively aromatic hydrocarbons, primarily benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and the xylenes, but contain over 95 compounds, characterized using gas chromatographic-mass spectroscopy. The solubility in water and brine of benezene, toluene, ethylbenzene and o-xylene, some of the components of the cryocondensate, as well as distribution coefficients between water or brine and a standard oil have been measured. 25 refs.

Keeley, D.F.; Meriwether, J.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Scientific Considerations Related to Regulation Development for CO2 Sequestration in Brine Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SCIENTIFIC CONSIDERATIONS RELATED TO REGULATION SCIENTIFIC CONSIDERATIONS RELATED TO REGULATION DEVELOPMENT FOR CO 2 SEQUESTRATION IN BRINE FORMATIONS Chin-Fu Tsang (cftsang@lbl.gov; (510) 486-5782) Sally M. Benson (smbenson@lbl.gov; (510) 486-7071) Earth Sciences Division, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Road, MS 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720 Bruce Kobelski (kobelski.bruce@epa.gov) Robert Smith (smith.robert-eu@epamail.epa.gov) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Drinking Water and Ground Water, Washington D.C. Introduction Reduction of atmospheric emissions of CO 2 (DOE, 1999a) through injection of CO 2 into in deep brine formations is being actively studied both in the U.S. and internationally. If this technology is to be employed broadly enough to make a significant impact on global

149

Biochemical solubilization of toxic salts from residual geothermal brines and waste waters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of solubilizing metal salts such as metal sulfides in a geothermal sludge using mutant Thiobacilli selected for their ability to metabolize metal salts at high temperature is disclosed, The method includes the introduction of mutated Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans to a geothermal sludge or brine. The microorganisms catalyze the solubilization of metal salts, For instance, in the case of metal sulfides, the microorganisms catalyze the solubilization to form soluble metal sulfates.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

150

Biochemical solubilization of toxic salts from residual geothermal brines and waste waters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of solubilizing metal salts such as metal sulfides in a geothermal sludge using mutant Thiobacilli selected for their ability to metabolize metal salts at high temperature is disclosed. The method includes the introduction of mutated Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans to a geothermal sludge or brine. The microorganisms catalyze the solubilization of metal salts. For instance, in the case of metal sulfides, the microorganisms catalyze the solubilization to form soluble metal sulfates. 54 figs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

151

Energy optimization in ice hockey halls I. The system COP as a multivariable function, brine and design choices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is the first in a series of articles addressing the energy optimization in ice hockey halls. Here we adopt an analytical method, called functional optimization, to find which design and operating conditions maximize the Coefficient Of Performance of the entire cooling system (brine pumps and cooling tower), which we call ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$. This is addressed as a function of several variables, like electric consumption and brine physical properties. By maximizing such function, the best configuration and brine choices for the system can thus be determined accurately and rigorously. We investigate the importance of pipe diameter, depth and brine type (ethylene glycol and ammonia) for average-sized ice rinks. An optimal brine density is found, and we compute the weight of the electric consumption of the brine pumps on ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$. Our formulas are validated with heat flow measurement data obtained at an ice hockey hall in Finland. They are also confronted with technical and cost-related constraints, and implemented by simulations with the program COMSOL Multiphysics. The multivariable approach here discussed is general, and can be applied to the rigorous preliminary study of diverse situations in building physics and in many other areas of interest.

Andrea Ferrantelli; Paul Melis; Miska Rikknen; Martti Viljanen

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

152

Use of inhibitors for scale control in brine-producing gas and oil wells  

SciTech Connect

Field and laboratory work have shown that calcium-carbonate scale formation in waters produced with natural gas and oil can be prevented by injection of phosphonate inhibitor into the formation, even if the formation is sandstone without calcite binging material. Inhibitor squeeze jobs have been carried out on DOE's geopressured-geothermal Gladys McCall brine-gas well and GRI's co-production wells in the Hitchcock field. Following the inhibitor squeeze on Gladys McCall, the well produced over five million barrels of water at a rate of approximately 30,000 BPD without calcium-carbonate scaling. Before the inhibitor squeeze, the well could not be produced above 15,000 BPD without significant scale formation. In the GRI brine-gas co-production field tests, inhibitor squeezes have been used to successfully prevant scaling. Laboratory work has been conducted to determine what types of oil field waters are subject to scaling. This research has led to the development of a saturation index and accompanying nomographs which allow prediction of when scale will develop into a problem in brine production.

Tomson, M.B.; Prestwich, S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine  

SciTech Connect

This study is developing a comprehensive study of what is involved in the desalination of oil field produced brine and the technical developments and regulatory changes needed to make the concept a commercial reality. It was originally based on ''conventional'' produced water treatment and reviewed (1) the basics of produced water management, (2) the potential for desalination of produced brine in order to make the resource more useful and available in areas of limited fresh water availability, and (3) the potential beneficial uses of produced water for other than oil production operations. Since we have begun however, a new area of interest has appeared that of brine water treatment at the well site. Details are discussed in this technical progress report. One way to reduce the impact of O&G operations is to treat produced brine by desalination. The main body of the report contains information showing where oil field brine is produced, its composition, and the volume available for treatment and desalination. This collection of information all relates to what the oil and gas industry refers to as ''produced water management''. It is a critical issue for the industry as produced water accounts for more than 80% of all the byproducts produced in oil and gas exploration and production. The expense of handling unwanted waste fluids draws scarce capital away for the development of new petroleum resources, decreases the economic lifetimes of existing oil and gas reservoirs, and makes environmental compliance more expensive to achieve. More than 200 million barrels of produced water are generated worldwide each day; this adds up to more than 75 billion barrels per year. For the United States, the American Petroleum Institute estimated about 18 billion barrels per year were generated from onshore wells in 1995, and similar volumes are generated today. Offshore wells in the United States generate several hundred million barrels of produced water per year. Internationally, three barrels of water are produced for each barrel of oil. Production in the United States is more mature; the US average is about 7 barrels of water per barrel of oil. Closer to home, in Texas the Permian Basin produces more than 9 barrels of water per barrel of oil and represents more than 400 million gallons of water per day processed and re-injected.

David B. Burnett

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

154

Theory and practice of brine processing by industrial-scale magnetic ion polarization and optimization of personal-scale passive solar desalination.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the first section of this work we hope to add to the science of brine management in desalination. We have undertaken a feasibility analysis (more)

Wofsey, Michael Henry

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

UCSD Geothermal Chemical Modeling Project: DOE Advanced Brine Chemistry Program. [University of California at San Diego (UCSD)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE funding to the UCSD Chemical Modeling Group supports research to provide computer models which will reliably characterize the equilibrium chemistry of geothermal brines (solution, solid and gas phases) under variable thermodynamic conditions. With this technology, it will be possible to rapidly and inexpensively predict the chemical behavior of geothermal brines during various resource recovery stages; exploration, production, plant energy extraction and rejection as well as in ancillary programs such as mineral recovery. Our modeling technology is based on recent progress in the physical chemistry of concentrated aqueous solutions. The behavior of these fluids has not been predicted from first principle theories. However, because of the importance of concentrated brines to many industrial and natural processes, there have been numerous efforts to develop accurate phenomenological expressions for predicting the chemical behavior of these brines. One of the most successful of these efforts is that of Pitzer and coworkers. Incorporating the semiempirical equations of Pitzer, we have shown at UCSD that we can create highly accurate models of brine-solid-gas chemistry.

Moeller, N.; Weare, J.H.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Experimental testing of a direct contact heat exchanger for geothermal brine. Final report, July 1, 1978-February 1, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of direct contact heat exchanger (DCHX) experiments were conducted at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site during the period July 1, 1978 to February 1, 1979. The purpose of these tests was to provide additional data necessary to better understand the thermal and hydraulic characteristics of the DCHX binary cycle loop components that may be used to extract energy from geothermal brines. Isobutane and Isopentane were tested as secondary working fluids. The analytical and experimental efforts were directed at the problems of working fluid loss in the effluent brine, carryover of water vapor with the vaporized secondary fluid and the free CO/sub 2/ content of the feed brine. The tests aimed at evaluating the heat transfer performance of various type tubes installed in vertical shell-and-tube secondary fluid condensers. Data was collected while operating a low temperature isopentane cycle with brine preflashed to 210 to 212/sup 0/F; the objective being to gain insight to waste heat recovery applications such as the Arkansas Power and Light project. Possible alternatives for isobutane recovery from the spent brine were investigated. A system was designed and the economic aspects studied.

Urbanek, M.W.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Development of direct heat exchangers for geothermal brines. Final report, October 4, 1977--June 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of experiments during a period of eight months was conducted with the existing Direct Contact Heat Exchanger (DCHX) Loop in order to better understand the thermal and hydraulic characteristics of the equipment. Modifications were made to the equipment which were designed to improve heat transfer and reduce the cost of the heat exchangers. Additional changes were made to the equipment to conduct turbine experiments, condenser experiments, and carryover tests. Further studies of the amounts of dissolved isobutane in the geothermal brine and methods of recovering this dissolved isobutane were also made. The procedures used and the results of the tests performed are presented.

Urbanek, M.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Advanced biochemical processes for geothermal brines FY 1998 annual operating plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the overall Geothermal Energy Research which is aimed at the development of economical geothermal resources production systems, the aim of the Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) effort is the development of economic and environmentally acceptable methods for disposal of geothermal wastes and conversion of by-products to useful forms. Methods are being developed for dissolution, separation and immobilization of geothermal wastes suitable for disposal, usable in inert construction materials, suitable for reinjection into the reservoir formation, or used for recovery of valuable metals.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Radiation chemistry of salt-mine brines and hydrates. [Gamma radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Certain aspects of the radiation chemistry of NaCl-saturated MgCl/sub 2/ solutions and MgCl/sub 2/ hydrates at temperatures in the range of 30 to 180/sup 0/C were investigated through experiments. A principal objective was to establish the values for the yields of H/sub 2/ (G(H/sub 2/)) and accompanying oxidants in the gamma-ray radiolysis of concentrated brines that might occur in waste repositories in salt. We concluded that G(H/sub 2/) from gamma-irradiated brine solution into a simultaneously irradiated, deaerated atmosphere above the solution is between 0.48 and 0.49 over most of the range 30 to 143/sup 0/C. The yield is probably somewhat lower at the lower end of this range, averaging 0.44 at 30 to 45/sup 0/C. Changes in the relative amounts of MgCl/sub 2/ and NaCl in the NaCl-saturated solutions have negligible effects on the yield. The yield of O/sub 2/ into the same atmosphere averages 0.13, independent of the temperature and brine composition, showing that only about 50% of the radiolytic oxidant that was formed along with the H/sub 2/ was present as O/sub 2/. We did not identify the species that compose the remainder of the oxidant. We concluded that the yield of H/sub 2/ from a gamma-irradiated brine solution into a simultaneously irradiated atmosphere containing 5 to 8% air in He may be greater than the yield in deaerated systems by amounts ranging from 0% for temperatures of 73 to 85/sup 0/C, to about 30 and 40% for temperatures in the ranges 100 to 143/sup 0/C and 30 to 45/sup 0/C, respectively. We did not establish the mechanism whereby the air affected the yields of H/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/. The values found in this work for G(H/sub 2/) in deaerated systems are in approximate agreement with the value of 0.44 for the gamma-irradiation yield of H/sub 2/ in pure H/sub 2/O at room temperature. They are also in agreement with the values predicted by extrapolation from the findings of previous researchers for the value for G(H/sub 2/) in 2 M NaCl solutions at room temperature.

Jenks, G.H.; Walton, J.R.; Bronstein, H.R.; Baes, C.F. Jr.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Electric power generation using geothermal brine resources for a proof-of-concept facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A report is given of the initial phase of a proof-of-concept project to establish the technical, environmental, and economic feasibility of utilizing hot brine resources for electric energy production and other industrial applications. Included in the report are the following: summary, conclusions, and recommendations; site selection; Heber site description; development of design bases for an experimental facility and a 10 MWe(Net) generating unit; description of facilities; safety analysis; environmental considerations; implementation plan and schedule; and conceptual capital cost estimate.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Effect of shale-water recharge on brine and gas recovery from geopressured reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concept of shale-water recharge has often been discussed and preliminary assessments of its significance in the recovery of geopressured fluids have been given previously. The present study uses the Pleasant Bayou Reservoir data as a base case and varies the shale formation properties to investigate their impact on brine and gas recovery. The parametric calculations, based on semi-analytic solutions and finite-difference techniques, show that for vertical shale permeabilities which are at least of the order of 10/sup -5/ md, shale recharge will constitute an important reservoir drive mechanism and will result in much larger fluid recovery than that possible in the absence of shale dewatering.

Riney, T.D.; Garg, S.K.; Wallace, R.H. Jr.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Application of freshwater and brine polymer flooding in the North Burbank Unit, Osage County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

A freshwater polymer-flood project was implemented in a 1,440-acre area of the North Burbank Unit (NBU) in 1980 with sequential injection of 4.2 million Ibm of polyacrylamide and 4.0 million Ibm of a 2.9% aluminum citrate crosslinking solution. Response to polymer flooding has been very pronounced, with ultimate incremental oil recovery projected to exceed 2.5 MMSTB of oil and total project oil expected to be 4.5 MMSTB. A crosslinked polymer-flood process for use in brine was developed that displays equally favorable performance characteristics as the freshwater polymer-flooding system.

Moffitt, P.D.; Zornes, D.R.; Moradi-Araghi, A.; McGovern, J.M. (Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Tritium Surface Contamination  

SciTech Connect

Glovebox wipe surveys were conducted to correlate surface tritium contamination with atmospheric tritium levels. Surface contamination was examined as a function of tritium concentration and of tritium form, HT/T2 and HTO. The relationship between atmospheric HTO concentration and cleanup time was also investigated.

Sienkiewicz, Charles J.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Contamination Control Techniques  

SciTech Connect

Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

EBY, J.L.

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

165

Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid (NF) is selected to simulated the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid (OF) is selected to create an aerobic environment with anaerobic pockets. NF is injected periodically while OF is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. NF stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is acceptable. NF can be methane and OF be air, for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially TCE and tetrachloroethylene.

Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Capacity Investigation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation for Geologic Sequestration of CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capacity Investigation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Capacity Investigation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation for Geologic Sequestration of CO 2 Christine Doughty (cadoughty@lbl.gov; 510-486-6453) Karsten Pruess (k_pruess@lbl.gov; 510-486-6732) Sally M. Benson (smbenson@lbl.gov; 510-486-5875) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Rd, MS 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720 Susan D. Hovorka (susan.hovorka@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-4863) Paul R. Knox (paul.knox@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-7313) Bureau of Economic Geology P.O. Box X, The University of Texas Austin, TX 78713 Christopher T. Green (ctgreen@ucdavis.edu; 530-752-1372) University of California, Hydrologic Sciences 1 Shields Ave. Davis, CA 95616 Abstract The capacity of fluvial brine-bearing formations to sequester CO 2 is investigated using numerical simulations of CO

167

Study and testing of direct contact heat exchangers for geothermal brines. Final report, June 1975--July 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The object of the work reported herein was to assess the technical and economic feasibility of preheating and evaporating a secondary fluid via direct contact with hot geothermal brine. The work covered a period of 12 months and included the design, construction, and testing of a unit which heats and vaporizes 10 gpm of isobutane by direct contact with 325/sup 0/F brine. The analytical and experimental efforts explored design and economic characteristics, including anticipated problem areas such as working fluid loss in the brine, production of a stable dispersion of the working fluid in brine, fluids separation, axial mixing and carry-over of water vapor with the working fluid. Isobutane was selected as the working fluid for tests primarily because of the favorable amount of net work produced per pound of geothermal brine and the low amount and cost of working fluid lost in the heat exchange process. The Elgin Spray Tower concept was selected for the preheater and boiler. The test apparatus includes a separate boiler and a separate preheater, each 6'' diameter by 6' high. Brine enters the top of each vessel and leaves the bottom. Isobutane enters the bottom of the preheater through a distributor plate to produce 0.15 inch diameter drops. The experimental unit operated with no major problems and demonstrated its hydraulic and thermal capabilities. Volumetric heat transfer coefficients obtained ranged up to 4000 BTU/hr /sup 0/F ft/sup 3/. Boiling heat transfer coefficients of as high as 17,000 BTU/hr /sup 0/F ft/sup 3/ were obtained with a design value of 10,000 BTU/hr /sup 0/F ft/sup 3/. Amount of isobutane in a 21 percent NaCl solution leaving the preheater was less than 40 ppM. A conceptual design and cost estimate was prepared for a direct contact heat exchange system sized for a 50 MW power plant.

Suratt, W.B.; Hart, G.K.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Fluid sampling and chemical modeling of geopressured brines containing methane. Final report, March 1980-February 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of a flowthrough sampler capable of obtaining fluid samples from geopressured wells at temperatures up to 400/sup 0/F and pressures up to 20,000 psi is described. The sampler has been designed, fabricated from MP35N alloy, laboratory tested, and used to obtain fluid samples from a geothermal well at The Geysers, California. However, it has not yet been used in a geopressured well. The design features, test results, and operation of this device are described. Alternative sampler designs are also discussed. Another activity was to review the chemistry and geochemistry of geopressured brines and reservoirs, and to evaluate the utility of available computer codes for modeling the chemistry of geopressured brines. The thermodynamic data bases for such codes are usually the limiting factor in their application to geopressured systems, but it was concluded that existing codes can be updated with reasonable effort and can usefully explain and predict the chemical characteristics of geopressured systems, given suitable input data.

Dudak, B.; Galbraith, R.; Hansen, L.; Sverjensky, D.; Weres, O.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Brine migration test report: Asse Salt Mine, Federal Republic of Germany: Technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of Brine Migration Tests which were undertaken at the Asse mine of the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) under a bilateral US/FRG agreement. This experiment simulates a nuclear waste repository at the 800-m (2624-ft) level of the Asse salt mine in the Federal Republic of Germany. This report describes the Asse salt mine, the test equipment, and the pretest properties of the salt in the mine and in the vicinity of the test area. Also included are selected test data (for the first 28 months of operation) on the following: brine migration rates, thermomechaical behavior of the salt (including room closure, stress reading, and thermal profiles), borehole gas pressures, and borehole gas analyses. In addition to field data, laboratory analyses of pretest salt properties are included in this report. The operational phase of these experiments was completed on October 4, 1985, with the commencement of cooldown and the start of posttest activities. 7 refs., 68 figs., 48 tabs.

Coyle, A.J.; Eckert, J.; Kalia, H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

High-pressure solvent extraction of methane from geopressured brines: technical evaluation and cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solvent extraction is proposed as a means of recovering dissolved methane from geopressured-geothermal brines at high pressures. The assessment shows that additional investment in a high pressure solvent extraction plant preceding direct injection disposal of brines into isolated aquifers can be profitable. The technical and economic issues are discussed, and compared with other injection methods such as complete depressurization for methane recovery followed by conventional mechanical pumping. The contributions of hydraulic (pressure) energy recovery and geothermal power production are also assessed. For deep injection into the producing formation, it is concluded that methane extraction processes are not applicable, insofar as maintenance of high surface pressures provides no clear-cut energy benefits. As a first step in the evaluation of solvent extraction, the solubility of a promising solvent candidate, n-hexadecane, was measured in 15 wt % NaCl solutions at temperatures up to 150/sup 0/C. The solubility of a potential low cost solvent, No. 2 Diesel fuel, was also measured.

Quong, R.; Otsuki, H.H.; Locke, F.E.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Report on design, construction, and testing of CO/sub 2/ breakout system for geothermal brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A skid mounted test facility has been built for determining conditions at which CO/sub 2/ flashes from geothermal brines. The system has been checked and operated at one geothermal plant. It performed as designed. The equipment is designed to operate at temperatures and pressures typical of wells near Heber, California. (Nominally 180/sup 0/C and 300 to 500 psig). It has heat exchangers which can cool the brine to less than 70/sup 0/C. (The cooling water is recirculated after being cooled by a forced air heat exchanger). Breakout pressures can be determined for any temperature between 70/sup 0/C and wellhead temperature. An adjustable orifice provides final control on pressure required to initiate flashing. The orifice is at the bottom of a sight glass. A light beam shines through the sight glass and focuses on a photoelectric cell. The presence of bubbles scatters light and decreases the output of the cell. Results using the cell were more reproducible than those using the naked eye. Results from one test show a smooth curve over the temperature range 75/sup 0/C to 165/sup 0/C. Agreement between the experimental values and calculated ones is discussed.

Robertus, R.J.; Shannon, D.W.; Sullivan, R.G.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Subsurface Ice and Brine Sampling Using an Ultrasonic/Sonic Gopher for Life Detection and Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is growing evidence for ice and fluids near the surface of Mars with potential discharge of brines, which may preserve a record of past life on the planet. Proven techniques to sample Mars subsurface will be critical for future NASA astrobiology missions that will search for such records. The required technology studies are underway in the McMurdo Dry valleys, Antarctica, which is serving as a Mars analog. The ice layer on Lake Vida in the dry valleys is estimated to be 20-meter thick where below 16-m depth there is a mix of ice and brine, which has never been sampled directly due to logistical constraints. A novel light weight, low power ultrasonic/sonic driller/corer (USDC) mechanism was developed that overcomes the need for high axial loads required by drilling via conventional techniques. The USDC was modified to produce an Ultrasonic/Sonic Gopher that is being developed to core down to the 20-m depth for in situ analysis and sample collection. Coring ice at-20 o C as in Lake Vida suggests that it is a greater challenge and current efforts are focused on the problems of ice core cutting, ice chip handling and potential ice melt (and refreezing) during drilling. An analytical model and a prototype are being developed with an effort to

Y. Bar-cohen; S. Sherrit; Z. Chang; L. Wessel; X. Bao; P. T. Doran; C. H. Fritsen; F. Kenig; C. P. Mckay; A. Murray; T. Peterson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Demonstration of a rotary separator for two-phase brine and steam flows. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of a two-phase rotary separator for geothermal energy conversion was demonstrated. Laboratory tests were conducted with clean water and steam at Biphase Energy Systems, Inc., Santa Monica, California. Field tests were conducted at the Union Oil Co., Tow No. 1 wellsite near Brawley, California. The system tested consisted of the major components of a total flow rotary separator/turbine conversion system. A nozzle converted the brine wellhead enthalpy to two-phase flow kinetic by impinging the nozzle flow tangentially on the inside of the separator. The flow was therefore subjected to the high centrifugal force field in the separator. This caused the liquid phase to collect as a film on the separator drum with very little energy loss. The steam was allowed to flow radially inward to the central steam discharge. Potable water was obtained by condensing the steam exhaust. The brine collection system converted the liquid film kinetic energy to static pressure head. The system was operated for 116 hours in a high salinity environment (115,000 ppM TDS). The system operated properly with no adverse effects from solids precipitation or scale buildup. The rotary separator produced separate flows of pure liquid and steam of greater than 99.5% quality.

Cerini, D.J.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

New constraints on methane fluxes and rates of anaerobic methane oxidation in a Gulf of Mexico brine pool via in situ mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New constraints on methane fluxes and rates of anaerobic methane oxidation in a Gulf of Mexico Keywords: Methane flux Mass spectrometer Brine pool Methane oxidation Gulf of Mexico a b s t r a c t Deep report direct measurements of methane concentrations made in a Gulf of Mexico brine pool located

Girguis, Peter R.

175

Modeling for Airborne Contamination  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Modeling for Airborne Contamination (referred to from now on as ''this report'') is to provide a documented methodology, along with supporting information, for estimating the release, transport, and assessment of dose to workers from airborne radioactive contaminants within the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface during the pre-closure period. Specifically, this report provides engineers and scientists with methodologies for estimating how concentrations of contaminants might be distributed in the air and on the drift surfaces if released from waste packages inside the repository. This report also provides dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways used to derive doses to potentially exposed subsurface workers. The scope of this report is limited to radiological contaminants (particulate, volatile and gaseous) resulting from waste package leaks (if any) and surface contamination and their transport processes. Neutron activation of air, dust in the air and the rock walls of the drift during the preclosure time is not considered within the scope of this report. Any neutrons causing such activation are not themselves considered to be ''contaminants'' released from the waste package. This report: (1) Documents mathematical models and model parameters for evaluating airborne contaminant transport within the MGR subsurface; and (2) Provides tables of dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways for important radionuclides. The dose conversion factors for air submersion and ground exposure pathways are further limited to drift diameters of 7.62 m and 5.5 m, corresponding to the main and emplacement drifts, respectively. If the final repository design significantly deviates from these drift dimensions, the results in this report may require revision. The dose conversion factors are further derived by using concrete of sufficient thickness to simulate the drift walls. The gamma-ray scattering properties of concrete are sufficiently similar to those of the host rock and proposed insert material; use of concrete will have no significant impact on the conclusions. The information in this report is presented primarily for use in performing pre-closure radiological safety evaluations of radiological contaminants, but it may also be used to develop strategies for contaminant leak detection and monitoring in the MGR. Included in this report are the methods for determining the source terms and release fractions, and mathematical models and model parameters for contaminant transport and distribution within the repository. Various particle behavior mechanisms that affect the transport of contaminant are included. These particle behavior mechanisms include diffusion, settling, resuspension, agglomeration and other deposition mechanisms.

F.R. Faillace; Y. Yuan

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method for in situ bioremediation of contaminated soil and groundwater. In particular, the invention relates to remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater by the injection of nutrients to stimulate growth of pollutant-degrading microorganisms. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Energy optimization in ice hockey halls I. The system COP as a multivariable function, brine and design choices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is the first of a series of articles addressing the energy optimization in ice hockey halls. Here we outline an analytic method to predict in which design and operating conditions the COP of the entire cooling system (refrigerator and cooling tower) ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$ is maximum. ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$ is investigated as a function of several variables, like electric consumption and brine physical properties. With this method, the best configuration and brine choices for the system can therefore be determined in advance. We estimate the optimal design of an average-sized ice rink, including pipe diameter, depth and brine type (ethylene glycol and ammonia). We also single out an optimal brine density and show the impact of the electric consumption of the pump on ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$. Our theoretical predictions are validated with heat flow measurement data obtained at an ice hockey hall in Finland. They are also confronted with technical and cost-related constraints, and implemented by simulations with the pr...

Ferrantelli, Andrea; Rikknen, Miska; Viljanen, Martti

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Modeling of an adiabatic packed bed brine-air contactor for use in a solar energy driven food processing system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mathematical model was developed for a packed bed brine-air contacting system which has applications in a solar energy driven food processing system. The model considers mass transfer resistances of both phases, but neglects the heat transfer resistance of the liquid phase. It takes into account the large heat effects associated with water absorption into and desorption from the brine. A computational method was also developed to calculate the minimum air flow rate which would prevent a pinch. A packed bed brine-air contactor was built, and experiments were conducted for a range of brine and air conditions. Good agreement between the computed and experimental results warrants use of the model to design and optimize the packed bed water stripping process. A periodic-flow packed bed heat regenerator was built to recover heat from the exit air of the contactor so as to improve the energy efficiency of the system. It was possible to preheat the inlet air to a temperature close to that of the exit air. The inlet air, however, during its passage through the regenerator picked up the condensate deposited from the exit air. This led to a decrease in the driving potential to mass transfer in the contactor. Optimization studies show that using a combined solar driven boiler and air assisted packed bed water stripper would be more economical than using a solar driven boiler alone or using flat plate solar collectors to drive the water stripper.

Biswal, R.N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Reducing Foreign Lithium Dependence through Co-Production of Lithium from Geothermal Brine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Foreign Lithium Dependence through Co-Production of Lithium from Foreign Lithium Dependence through Co-Production of Lithium from Geothermal Brine Kerry Klein 1 , Linda Gaines 2 1 New West Technologies LLC, Washington, DC, USA 2 Center for Transportation Research, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, USA KEYWORDS Mineral extraction, zinc, silica, strategic metals, Imperial Valley, lithium ion batteries, electric- drive vehicles, battery recycling ABSTRACT Following a 2009 investment of $32.9 billion in renewable energy and energy efficiency research through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, President Obama in his January 2011 State of the Union address promised deployment of one million electric vehicles by 2015 and 80% clean energy by 2035. The United States seems poised to usher in its bright energy future,

180

A Methodology for Measuring the Rate of Reaction of CO2 with Brine-Rock Mixtures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methodology for Measuring the Rate of Reaction of CO Methodology for Measuring the Rate of Reaction of CO 2 with Brine-Rock Mixtures Nicholas B. Janda (nbj2@po.cwru.edu; 216-368-2648) Philip W. Morrison, Jr. (pwm5@po.cwru.edu; 216-368-4238) Department of Chemical Engineering Case Western Reserve University 10900 Euclid Avenue Cleveland, OH 44106-7217 Beverly Z. Saylor (bzs@po.cwru.edu; 216-368-3763) Gerald Matisoff (gxm4@po.cwru.edu; 216-368-3677) Department of Geological Sciences Case Western Reserve University 10900 Euclid Avenue Cleveland, OH 44106-7216 Introduction Storage of carbon dioxide in deep, porous, and permeable reservoir rocks is one of the most promising technologies for reducing emissions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. Although oil and gas reservoirs are a sensible first step for sequestration of carbon dioxide in geologic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Distribution and geochemistry of contaminated subsurface waters in fissured volcanogenic bed rocks of the Lake Karachai Area, Chelyabinsk, Southern Urals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present investigation is devoted to the study of the distribution and geochemistry of contaminated subsurface waters, beneath the site of temporary storage of liquid radioactive waste known as Lake Karachai. For this purpose a method of hydrogeochemical logging (HGCL) together with standard hydrogeochemical and geophysical methods of uncased hole logging were used. The distribution of sodium nitrate brine plumes in the subsurface was determined by the physical and physico-chemical properties of these brines and by the petrochemical composition of enclosing rocks and the structural setting of the flow paths. The latter is represented by fractures and large faults in the bedrock of volcanogenic and volcanogenic-sedimentary rocks of intermediate-to-basic composition. The volcanogenic rocks are overlain in some places by a thin cover of unconsolidated sediments, i.e., by loams and relatively impermeable silts. Contaminated waters flow-in accordance with the eluvium bottom relief towards local areas of natural (Mishelyak and Techa rivers) and artificial (Novogomenskii water intake) discharge of subsurface waters. The large Mishelyak fault, southwest of Lake Karachai and under fluvial sediments of the Mishelyak, is assumed to significantly influence the flow pattern of contaminated waters, diverting them from an intake of drinking water.

Solodov, I.N.; Belichkin, V.I.; Zotov, A.V.; Kochkin, B.T. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Drozhko, E.G. [Atomic Energy of Russia (Russian Federation); Glagolev, A.V.; Skokov, A.N. [Russian Federation Committee on Geological and Subsurface Usage (Russian Federation)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

HTO Contamination on Polymeric Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contamination and Waste / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

Yasunori Iwai; Kazuhiro Kobayashi; Toshihiko Yamanishi

183

Evaluation of materials for systems using cooled, treated geothermal or high-saline brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lack of adequate quantities of clean surface water for use in wet (evaporative) cooling systems indicates the use of high-salinity waste waters, or cooled geothermal brines, for makeup purposes. High-chloride, aerated water represents an extremely corrosive environment. In order to determine metals suitable for use in such an environment, metal coupons were exposed to aerated, treated geothermal brine salted to a chloride concentration of 10,000 and 50,000 ppM (mg/L) for periods of up to 30 days. The exposed coupons were evaluated to determine the general, pitting, and crevice corrosion characteristics of the metals. The metals exhibiting corrosion resistance at 50,000 ppM chloride were then evaluated at 100,000 and 200,000 ppM chloride. Since these were screening tests to select materials for components to be used in a cooling system, with primary emphasis on condenser tubing, several materials were exposed for 4 to 10 months in pilot cooling tower test units with heat transfer for further corrosion evaluation. The results of the screening tests indicate that ferritic stainless steels (29-4-2 and SEA-CURE) exhibit excellent corrosion resistance at all levels of chloride concentration. Copper-nickel alloys (70/30 and Monel 400) exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the high-saline water. The 70/30 copper-nickel alloy, which showed excellent resistance to general corrosion, exhibited mild pitting in the 30-day tests. This pitting was not apparent, however, after 6 months of exposure in the pilot cooling tower tests. The nickel-base alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance, but their high cost prevents their use unless no other material is found feasible. Other materials tested, although unsuitable for condenser tubing material, would be suitable as tube sheet material.

Suciu, D.F.; Wikoff, P.M.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Corrosivity of geothermal brines. Progress report for period ending September 1977. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of studies carried out principally during FY 1976 and FY 1977 on the corrosion of ferrous materials in synthetic geothermal brines are summarized. A survey of prior work on electrochemical aspects of the corrosion of iron and carbon steel in chloride solutions is presented, and some of the results of these investigations are summarized. The principal results of the present studies are then recapitulated. Included are measurements of the corrosion potential, corrosion rate, and polarization behavior of iron and carbon steel in deaerated 4 M NaCl over the pH range from 1 to 11 at temperatures up to 100/sup 0/C in a conventional Pyrex electrochemical cell. The effect of pH on hydrolysis, precipitation, and electrochemical reactivity of ferrous and ferric ions in 4 M NaCl at 25/sup 0/C is presented, and implications for plant operation are discussed. Details of a refreshed, stirred titanium autoclave system are described; the system permits electrochemical measurements to be made up to at least 200/sup 0/in corrosive aqueous saline media. The effect of pH (from pH equals 7 to pH equals 2) and temperature (from 25/sup 0/ to 200/sup 0/C) on the corrosion rate of type A212B carbon steel in deaerated 4 M NaCl is described. A relatively simple numerical correlation describes the data over the entire temperature and pH range. The spontaneous corrosion potentials and pitting potentials of types 304 and 316 stainless steel were measured in deaerated 4 M NaCl at pH equals 5 from 25/sup 0/ to 200/sup 0/C, and the data demonstrate the borderline stability of austenitic stainless steel for brine service. Finally, conclusions and recommendations for further studies are presented.

Posey, F.A.; Palko, A.A.; Bacarella, A.L.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Areawide chemical contamination  

SciTech Connect

Nine case histories illustrate the mounting problems owing to chemical contamination that often extends beyond the workplace into the community. The effects include not only carcinogenesis and teratogenesis, so much in the public's mind, but also severe neurological and gonadal disabilities immediately after exposure. Recognition of causal relationships is often made by astute clinicians. The experience of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission in studying Japanese survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki serves as a model for future studies of communities exposed to unusual environmental contamination.

Miller, R.W.

1981-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

186

Mercury contamination extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mercury is removed from contaminated waste by firstly applying a sulfur reagent to the waste. Mercury in the waste is then permitted to migrate to the reagent and is stabilized in a mercury sulfide compound. The stable compound may then be removed from the waste which itself remains in situ following mercury removal therefrom.

Fuhrmann, Mark (Silver Spring, MD); Heiser, John (Bayport, NY); Kalb, Paul (Wading River, NY)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Subsurface Contamination Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

Y. Yuan

2001-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

188

Subsurface Contamination Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

Y. Yuan

2001-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

189

Radioactive waste isolation in salt: geochemistry of brine in rock salt in temperature gradients and gamma-radiation fields - a selective annotated bibliography  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of the extensive research concerning brine geochemistry and transport is critically important to successful exploitation of a salt formation for isolating high-level radioactive waste. This annotated bibliography has been compiled from documents considered to provide classic background material on the interactions between brine and rock salt, as well as the most important results from more recent research. Each summary elucidates the information or data most pertinent to situations encountered in siting, constructing, and operating a mined repository in salt for high-level radioactive waste. The research topics covered include the basic geology, depositional environment, mineralogy, and structure of evaporite and domal salts, as well as fluid inclusions, brine chemistry, thermal and gamma-radiation effects, radionuclide migration, and thermodynamic properties of salts and brines. 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Hull, A.B.; Williams, L.B.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Evaluation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation, Upper Texas Gulf Coast for Geological Sequestration of CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Evaluation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation, Upper Texas Gulf Coast for Geological Sequestration of CO 2 S. D. Hovorka (susan.hovorka@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-4863) Bureau of Economic Geology, P.O. Box X, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78713 C. Doughty (CADoughty@lbl.gov; 510-486-6453 ) Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Road Mailstop 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720 P. R. Knox (paul.knox@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-7313), Bureau of Economic Geology, P.O. Box X, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78713 C. T. Green (ctgreen@ucdavis.edu; 510-495-2461) University of California, Hydrologic Sciences, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA 95616 K. Pruess(K_Pruess@lbl.gov; 510-486-6732) Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Road Mailstop 90-1116,

191

Removal of hydrogen sulfide from simulated geothermal brines by reaction with oxygen. Final report, October 6, 1975-February 4, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process for controlling hydrogen sulfide emissions and corrosivity in geothermal systems has been evaluated on a small laboratory pilot plant scale and shown to be technically feasible. The hydrogen sulfide was oxidized by oxygen injected directly into a 11.4-liter-(3-gallon)-per-minute flowing stream of simulated geothermal brine. The oxidation of the sulfide was complete at oxygen:sulfide mole ratios of 1.25:1 to 1.5:1, depending on temperature and total dissolved solids in the brine. The reaction products were free sulfur, sulfite and sulfate. The ratio of these was dependent upon the oxygen:sulfide mole ratios; but, generally, more than 80% of the sulfide was converted to sulfate, approximately 10% to free sulfur and less than 10% to sulfite.

Wilson, J.S.; King, J.E.; Bullard, G.R.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Experimental and Computational Studies of Fluid Flow Phenomena in Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Brine and Oil Fields  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EXPERIMENTAL AND COMPUTATIONAL STUDIES OF FLUID EXPERIMENTAL AND COMPUTATIONAL STUDIES OF FLUID FLOW PHENOMENA IN CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN BRINE AND OIL FIELDS Chuang Ji ( chuang.ji@netl.doe.gov ) National Energy Technology Laboratory Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 BOX 5725 Clarkson University Potsdam, NY 13699 Goodarz Ahmadi ( ahmadi@clarkson.edu ) BOX 5725 Clarkson University Potsdam, NY 13699 Duane H. Smith ( duane.smith@netl.doe.gov ) National Energy Technology Laboratory Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 2 INTRODUCTION Sequestration of CO 2 by injection into deep geological formations is a method to reduce CO 2 emissions into the atmosphere. However, when CO 2 is injected underground, it forms fingers extending into the rock pores saturated with brine or petroleum. This flow

193

Hydrocarbons associated with brines from geopressured wells. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, 1 October 1990--30 December 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to determine the concentration of the cryocondensates in fluids of the various USDOE Geopressured wells as a function of production volume, to correlate the production of these compounds with reservoir and well production characteristics, to precisely measure solubilities of cryocondensates components in water and sodium chloride solutions (brines) as a function of ionic strength and temperature and the component`s distribution coefficients between these solutions and oil, to develop models of the reservoir which are consistent with the data obtained, to monitor the wells for the production of aliphatic oils and relate any such production with the data obtained, and to develop a harsh environment pH probe for use in well brines. Results are summarized.

Not Available

1991-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Understanding Long-Term Solute Transport in Sedimentary Basins: Simulating Brine Migration in the Alberta Basin. Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mass transport in deep sedimentary basins places important controls on ore formation, petroleum migration, CO2 sequestration, and geochemical reactions that affect petroleum reservoir quality, but large-scale transport in this type of setting remains poorly understood. This lack of knowledge is highlighted in the resource-rich Alberta Basin, where geochemical and hydrogeologic studies have suggested residence times ranging from hundreds of millions of years to less than 5 My, respectively. Here we developed new hydrogeologic models that were constrained by geochemical observations to reconcile these two very different estimates. The models account for variable-density fluid flow, heat transport, solute transport, sediment deposition and erosion, sediment compressibility, and dissolution of salt deposits, including Cl/Br systematics. Prior interpretations of Cl/Br ratios in the Alberta Basin concluded that the brines were derived from evaporatively-concentrated brines that were subsequently diluted by seawater and freshwater; models presented here show that halite dissolution must have contributed strongly as well, which implies significantly greater rates of mass transport. This result confirms that Cl/Br ratios are subject to significant non-uniqueness and thus do not provide good independent indicators of the origin of brines. Salinity and Cl/Br ratios provided valuable new constraints for basin-scale models, however. Sensitivity studies revealed that permeabilities obtained from core- and field-scale tests were appropriate for basin-scale models, despite the differences in scale between the tests and the models. Simulations of groundwater age show that the residence time of porefluids in much of the basin is less than 100 My. Groundwater age increases with depth and approaches 200 My in the deepest part of the basin, but brines are significantly younger than their host rocks throughout the basin.

Alicia M. Wilson

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

195

Study and testing of direct contact heat exchangers for geothermal brines. Phase II, August 1976--June 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The analytical and experimental studies completed under this project have explored several aspects of geothermal binary power cycles and column type direct contact heat exchangers between geothermal brine and isobutane. A major improvement of the heat exchanger was developed by the combination of the preheater and boiler into a single continuous column. At East Mesa, this new direct contact heat exchanger was tested on geothermal brine in order to correlate the experimental heat transfer data with the theoretical model for use in designing larger plants. Experiments also involved a small radial inflow turbine to produce electricity which marked the first generation of electricity from geothermal brine using a binary cycle. In analytical studies, a comparison of the relationship between column diameter and droplet size was made for both Minard--Johnson and Sakiadis--Johnson model. The Letan--Kehat model for relating column height and temperature profile was analyzed and compared with experimental data. It appears that the experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical models. A detailed design of a 250 Kw pilot plant incorporating the direct contact heat exchanger was completed. This design with estimated costs for it and a 500 Kw pilot plant is incorporated.

Suratt, W.B.; Lee, C.O.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Estimation Of Retained Crude Oil Associated With Crushed Salt And Salt Cores In The Presence Of Near-Saturated Brine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes three experiments whose purpose is to determine the amount of retained oil on massive salt surfaces and in crushed salt in the presence of water and brine. These experiments have application to the decommissioning process for the Weeks Island mine. In the first experiment, oil-coated salt cores were immersed in either fresh water or in 85% brine. In the case of both fluids, the oil was completely removed from the cores within several hours. In the second experiment, oil-coated salt pieces were suspended in air and the oil was allowed to drain. The weight of retained oil clinging to the salt was determined. This experiment was used to estimate the total amount of oil clinging to the roofs of the mine. The total amount of oil clinging to the roofs of the mine is estimated to be between 240 and 400 m 3 (1500 and 2500 BBL). In the third experiment, a pan of oil-soaked crushed salt was immersed in 85% brine, and oil removal from the salt was monitored as a function of...

Timothy Hern Energetic; Timothy J. Ohern; Thomas E. Hinkebein; Thomas W. Grasser

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

ORIGINAL PAPER Bioremediation of oily sludge-contaminated soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

materials in crude-oil storage tanks also causes problems to the environment (Mrayyan and Battikhi 2005 of oily sludge generated in water­oil separation systems at oilfields and accumulation of waste oily as priority environmental pollutants by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA 1986) and are also

Ma, Lena

198

Brine chemistry: scaling and corrosion. Geothermal research study in the Salton Sea region of California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to recommend a reasonable program of brine chemistry research that will result in the development of methods for predicting and controlling scale deposition, and in guidelines for the selection of corrosion-resistant construction materials. First, background information, which is necessary for the understanding of the problems of scaling and corrosion in the Salton Sea KGRA, is presented through a review of the history of geothermal exploration and development in the Salton Sea. Second, literature relevant to the geochemistry of the Salton Sea field is reviewed and important results are emphasized. Third, current research efforts directed toward actual power plant construction are summarized and evaluated. Fourth, research which has been proposed but is not currently funded is discussed. Fifth, because silica scaling has been the most troublesome problem in the past, the basic chemistry of silica and its relationship to scaling is discussed. Sixth, recommendations for future research are made in which a fundamental engineering approach is emphasized. In this approach, experiments would be conducted on actual process equipment and detailed chemical analyses would be performed on site in well-equipped field laboratories. 88 references.

Hoffmann, M.R.

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Advanced biochemical processes for geothermal brines: Annual operating plan, FY 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An R and D program to identify methods for the utilization and/or low cost of environmentally acceptable disposal of toxic geothermal residues has been established at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Laboratory work has shown that a biochemical process developed at BNL, would meet regulatory costs and environmental requirements. In this work, microorganisms which can convert insoluble species of toxic metals, including radionuclides, into soluble species, have been identified. These organisms serve as models in the development of a biochemical process in which toxic metals present in geothermal residual sludges are converted into water soluble species. The produced solution can be reinjected or processed further to concentrate and recover commercially valuable metals. After the biochemical detoxification of geothermal residual sludges, the end-products are non-toxic and meet regulatory requirements. The overall process is a technically and environmentally acceptable cost-efficient process. It is anticipated that the new biotechnology will reduce the cost of surface disposal of sludges derived from geothermal brines by 25% or better.

Premuzic, E.T.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Lattice-Boltzmann modeling of micromodel experiments representing a CO2-brine system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Successful sequestration of CO{sub 2} into deep saline aquifers presents an enormous challenge that requires fundamental understanding of reactive-multi phase flow and transport across many temporal and spatial scales. Of critical importance is accurately predicting the efficiency of CO{sub 2} trapping mechanisms. At the pore scale (e.g., microns to millimeters) the interfacial area between CO{sub 2} and brine, as well as CO{sub 2} and the solid phase, directly influences the amount of CO{sub 2} trapped due to capillary forces, dissolution and mineral precipitation. In this work, we model immiscible displacement micromodel experiments using the lattice-Boltzmann (LB) method. We focus on quantifying interfacial area as a function of capillary numbers and viscosity ratios typically encountered in CO{sub 2} sequestration operations. We show that the LB model adequately predicts the steady-state experimental flow patterns and interfacial area measurements. Based on the steady-state agreement, we use the LB model to investigate interfacial dynamics (e.g., fluid-fluid interfacial velocity and the rate of production of fluid-fluid interfacial area). In addition, we quantify the amount of interfacial area and the interfacial dynamics associated with the capillary trapped nonwetting phase. This is expected to be important for predicting the amount of nonwetting phase subsequently trapped due to dissolution and mineral precipitation.

Porter, Mark L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kang, Qinjun [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tarimala, Sowmitri [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abdel - Fattah, Amr I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carey, James W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Time-lapse crosswell seismic and VSP monitoring of injected CO2 ina brine aquifer  

SciTech Connect

Seismic surveys successfully imaged a small scale C02injection (1,600 tons) conducted in a brine aquifer of the Frio Formationnear Houston, Texas. These time-lapse bore-hole seismic surveys,crosswell and vertical seismic profile (VSP), were acquired to monitorthe C02 distribution using two boreholes (the new injection well and apre-existing well used for monitoring) which are 30 m apart at a depth of1500 m. The crosswell survey provided a high-resolution image of the C02distribution between the wells via tomographic imaging of the P-wavevelocity decrease (up to 500 mls). The simultaneously acquired S-wavetomography showed little change in S-wave velocity, as expected for fluidsubstitution. A rock physics model was used to estimate C02 saturationsof 10-20 percent from the P-wave velocity change. The VSP survey resolveda large (-70 percent) change in reflection amplitude for the Friohorizon. This C02 induced reflection amplitude change allowed estimationof the C02 extent beyond the monitor well and on 3 azimuths. The VSPresult is compared with numerical modeling of C02 saturations and isseismically modeled using the velocity change estimated in the crosswellsurvey.

Daley, Thomas M.; Myer, Larry R.; Peterson, J.E.; Majer, E.L.; Hoversten,G.M.

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

202

Purifying contaminated water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process for removing biorefractory compounds from contaminated water (e.g., oil shale retort waste-water) by contacting same with fragmented raw oil shale. Biorefractory removal is enhanced by preactivating the oil shale with at least one member of the group of carboxylic, acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, ethers, amines, amides, sulfoxides, mixed ether-esters and nitriles. Further purification is obtained by stripping, followed by biodegradation and removal of the cells.

Daughton, Christian G. (San Pablo, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Contamination control device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A contamination control device for use in a gas-insulated transmission bus consisting of a cylindrical center conductor coaxially mounted within a grounded cylindrical enclosure. The contamination control device is electrically connected to the interior surface of the grounded outer shell and positioned along an axial line at the lowest vertical position thereon. The contamination control device comprises an elongated metallic member having a generally curved cross-section in a first plane perpendicular to the axis of the bus and having an arcuate cross-section in a second plane lying along the axis of the bus. Each opposed end of the metallic member and its opposing sides are tapered to form a pair of generally converging and downward sloping surfaces to trap randomly moving conductive particles in the relatively field-free region between the metallic member and the interior surface of the grounded outer shell. The device may have projecting legs to enable the device to be spot welded to the interior of the grounded housing. The control device provides a high capture probability and prevents subsequent release of the charged particles after the capture thereof.

Clark, Robert M. (Ligonier, PA); Cronin, John C. (Greensburg, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Understanding Contamination; Twenty Years of Simulating Radiological Contamination  

SciTech Connect

A wide variety of simulated contamination methods have been developed by researchers to reproducibly test radiological decontamination methods. Some twenty years ago a method of non-radioactive contamination simulation was proposed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that mimicked the character of radioactive cesium and zirconium contamination on stainless steel. It involved baking the contamination into the surface of the stainless steel in order to 'fix' it into a tenacious, tightly bound oxide layer. This type of contamination was particularly applicable to nuclear processing facilities (and nuclear reactors) where oxide growth and exchange of radioactive materials within the oxide layer became the predominant model for material/contaminant interaction. Additional simulation methods and their empirically derived basis (from a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility) are discussed. In the last ten years the INL, working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC), has continued to develop contamination simulation methodologies. The most notable of these newer methodologies was developed to compare the efficacy of different decontamination technologies against radiological dispersal device (RDD, 'dirty bomb') type of contamination. There are many different scenarios for how RDD contamination may be spread, but the most commonly used one at the INL involves the dispersal of an aqueous solution containing radioactive Cs-137. This method was chosen during the DARPA projects and has continued through the NHSRC series of decontamination trials and also gives a tenacious 'fixed' contamination. Much has been learned about the interaction of cesium contamination with building materials, particularly concrete, throughout these tests. The effects of porosity, cation-exchange capacity of the material and the amount of dirt and debris on the surface are very important factors. The interaction of the contaminant/substrate with the particular decontamination technology is also very important. Results of decontamination testing from hundreds of contaminated coupons have lead to certain conclusions about the contamination and the type of decontamination methods being deployed. A recent addition to the DARPA initiated methodology simulates the deposition of nuclear fallout. This contamination differs from previous tests in that it has been developed and validated purely to simulate a 'loose' type of contamination. This may represent the first time that a radiologically contaminated 'fallout' stimulant has been developed to reproducibly test decontamination methods. While no contaminant/methodology may serve as a complete example of all aspects that could be seen in the field, the study of this family of simulation methods provides insight into the nature of radiological contamination.

Emily Snyder; John Drake; Ryan James

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Technical and economic feasibility of salt-gradient solar ponds at the Truscott Brine Lake of the Red River Chloride Control Project. A report to the House-Senate Committee on Appropriations of the Ninety-Seventh Congress  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Truscott Brine Lake is being constructed to impound highly brackish water from a number of sources which would normally flow into the Wichita River, a tributary of the Red River in Knox County, Texas. A 35.4-km (22-mile) pipeline is being constructed to carry the brines from their primary source to the Truscott Brine Lake site. The reservoir is designed to contain 100 years of brine emissions from three chloride emission areas in the Wichita River Basin. The solar ponds and power generating facilities would be located in the Bluff Creek Arm of Truscott Brine Lake. The Truscott Brine Lake study includes: survey of suitability of Truscott Lake site, review of solar pond technology, preconceptual design of solar salt pond power plant, and economic evaluation.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Technology transfer report: feasibility study for the use of geothermal brine in the Ashdod area, Israel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydrothermal potential of the Ashdod area, Israel, was evaluated to determine its suitability as the low grade energy source required to operate the Ashdod desalination plant. An estimated 1250 cubic meters per hour of 120/sup 0/C brine would be adequate to supply the hot water necessary for operating the desalination plant. Considerable interest in oil exploration in the Ashdod area resulted in the drilling of six wells into the Jurassic formations by Oil Exploration (Investments) Ltd. (OEL) in 1976-1980. A small amount of oil was found in two wells, Ashdod 2 and 5. The remaining wells were abandoned as ''dry holes''. Evaluation of the drill cuttings, cores, and the electric logs defined two lithologic units of potential interest for hydrothermal exploitation, the Zohar and Shderot Dolomites. Investigation of the hydrothermal potential of the Jurassic formations underlying the Ashdod area has revealed that the aquifer temperatures range between 85 and 92/sup 0/C. The hydrologic parameters are not well defined; however the matrix permeability of the dolomites and limestones is probably between 1 and 10 md. This is insufficient permeability for a large scale pumping operation such as the one required to operate the desalination plant. Therefore, successful utilization of the resource requires the presence of significant fractures and/or connected vugs in the formation. The very low well productivity and formation plugging may indicate that permeability of the fracture zones may easily be impaired, suggesting that the fracture zones are not suitable production intervals. Until a test is conducted on a properly completed well, it is not possible to evaluate the deliverability of wells tapping these aquifers. 14 refs., 8 figs.

Benson, S.M.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Contaminated nickel scrap processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE will soon choose between treating contaminated nickel scrap as a legacy waste and developing high-volume nickel decontamination processes. In addition to reducing the volume of legacy wastes, a decontamination process could make 200,000 tons of this strategic metal available for domestic use. Contaminants in DOE nickel scrap include {sup 234}Th, {sup 234}Pa, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 239}Pu (trace), {sup 60}Co, U, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 237}Np (trace). This report reviews several industrial-scale processes -- electrorefining, electrowinning, vapormetallurgy, and leaching -- used for the purification of nickel. Conventional nickel electrolysis processes are particularly attractive because they use side-stream purification of process solutions to improve the purity of nickel metal. Additionally, nickel purification by electrolysis is effective in a variety of electrolyte systems, including sulfate, chloride, and nitrate. Conventional electrorefining processes typically use a mixed electrolyte which includes sulfate, chloride, and borate. The use of an electrorefining or electrowinning system for scrap nickel recovery could be combined effectively with a variety of processes, including cementation, solvent extraction, ion exchange, complex-formation, and surface sorption, developed for uranium and transuranic purification. Selected processes were reviewed and evaluated for use in nickel side-stream purification. 80 refs.

Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Wilson, D.F.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

WETTABILITY AND PREDICTION OF OIL RECOVERY FROM RESERVOIRS DEVELOPED WITH MODERN DRILLING AND COMPLETION FLUIDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contamination of crude oils by surface-active agents from drilling fluids or other oil-field chemicals is more difficult to detect and quantify than bulk contamination with, for example, base fluids from oil-based muds. Bulk contamination can be detected by gas chromatography or other common analytical techniques, but surface-active contaminants can be influential at much lower concentrations that are more difficult to detect analytically, especially in the context of a mixture as complex as a crude oil. In this report we present a baseline study of interfacial tensions of 39 well-characterized crude oil samples with aqueous phases that vary in pH and ionic composition. This extensive study will provide the basis for assessing the effects of surface-active contaminant on interfacial tension and other surface properties of crude oil/brine/rock ensembles.

Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Emission Standards for Contaminants (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations list emissions standards for various contaminants, and contain special requirements for anaerobic lagoons. These regulations also describe alternative emissions limits, which may...

210

The implications of UIC and NPDES regulations on selection of disposal options for spent geothermal brine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reviews and evaluates the various options for the disposal of geothermal wastewater with respect to the promulgated regulations for the protection of surface and groundwaters. The Clean Water Act of 1977 and the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments are especially important when designing disposal systems for geothermal fluids. The former promulgates regulations concerning the discharge of wastewater into surface waters, while the latter is concerned with the protection of ground water aquifers through the establishment of underground injection control (UIC) programs. There is a specific category for geothermal fluid discharge if injection is to be used as a method of disposal. Prior to February 1982, the UIC regulations required geothermal power plant to use Class III wells and direct use plants to use Class V wells. More stringent regulatory requirements, including construction specification and monitoring, are imposed on the Class III wells. On February 3, 1982, the classification of geothermal injection wells was changed from a Class III to Class V on the basis that geothermal wells do not inject for the extraction of minerals or energy, but rather they are used to inject brines, from which heat has been extracted, into formations from which they were originally taken. This reclassification implies that a substantial cost reduction will be realized for geothermal fluid injection primarily because well monitoring is no longer mandatory. The Clean Water Act of 1977 provides the legal basis for regulating the discharge of liquid effluent into the nation's surface waters, through a permitting system called the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Discharge quantities, rates, concentrations and temperatures are regulated by the NPDES permits. These permits systems are based upon effluent guidelines developed by EPA on an industry by industry basis. For geothermal energy industry, effluent guidelines have not been formulated and are not currently scheduled. There, are however, water quality standards that control the quantity and quality of wastewaters discharged into surface waters. These standards are established by the states in concert with EPA, and frequently result in NPDES conditions more restrictive than those based on effluent guidelines.

None

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Potential Contaminant Pathways from Hydraulically Fractured Shale to Aquifers. Ground Water. doi: 10.1111/j.1745-6584.2012.00933.x New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES). 2010. Well Development by Hydrofracturing. http://des.nh.gov/o  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing of deep shale beds to develop natural gas has caused concern regarding the potential for various forms of water pollution. Two potential pathwaysadvective transport through bulk media and preferential flow through fracturescould allow the transport of contaminants from the fractured shale to aquifers. There is substantial geologic evidence that natural vertical flow drives contaminants, mostly brine, to near the surface from deep evaporite sources. Interpretative modeling shows that advective transport could require up to tens of thousands of years to move contaminants to the surface, but also that fracking the shale could reduce that transport time to tens or hundreds of years. Conductive faults or fracture zones, as found throughout the Marcellus shale region, could reduce the travel time further. Injection of up to 15,000,000 L of fluid into the shale generates high pressure at the well, which decreases with distance from the well and with time after injection as the fluid advects through the shale. The advection displaces native fluids, mostly brine, and fractures the bulk media widening existing fractures. Simulated pressure returns to pre-injection levels in about 300 d. The overall system requires from 3 to 6 years to reach a new equilibrium reflecting the significant changes caused by fracking the shale, which could allow advective transport to aquifers in less than 10 years. The rapid expansion of hydraulic fracturing requires that monitoring systems be employed to track the movement of contaminants and that gas wells have a reasonable offset from faults.

Tom Myers

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses for gas and brine migration at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, May 1992  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis, stepwise regression analysis and examination of scatterplots are used in conjunction with the BRAGFLO model to examine two phase flow (i.e., gas and brine) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is being developed by the US Department of Energy as a disposal facility for transuranic waste. The analyses consider either a single waste panel or the entire repository in conjunction with the following cases: (1) fully consolidated shaft, (2) system of shaft seals with panel seals, and (3) single shaft seal without panel seals. The purpose of this analysis is to develop insights on factors that are potentially important in showing compliance with applicable regulations of the US Environmental Protection Agency (i.e., 40 CFR 191, Subpart B; 40 CFR 268). The primary topics investigated are (1) gas production due to corrosion of steel, (2) gas production due to microbial degradation of cellulosics, (3) gas migration into anhydrite marker beds in the Salado Formation, (4) gas migration through a system of shaft seals to overlying strata, and (5) gas migration through a single shaft seal to overlying strata. Important variables identified in the analyses include initial brine saturation of the waste, stoichiometric terms for corrosion of steel and microbial degradation of cellulosics, gas barrier pressure in the anhydrite marker beds, shaft seal permeability, and panel seal permeability.

Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Bean, J.E. [New Mexico Engineering Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Butcher, B.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Garner, J.W.; Vaughn, P. [Applied Physics, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schreiber, J.D. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swift, P.N. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Neutron formation temperature gauge and neutron activation analysis brine flow meter. Final report, October 1, 1976--March 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Feasibility studies of nuclear techniques applicable to the determination of geothermal formation temperature and two-phase brine flow downhole have been performed. The formation temperature gauging technique involves injection of fast neutrons into the formation and analysis of the moderated slow neutron energy distribution by appropriately filtered neutron detectors. The scientific feasibility of the method has been demonstrated by analytical computational and experimental evaluation of the system response. A data analysis method has been developed to determine unambiguously the temperature, neutron absorption cross section and neutron moderating power of an arbitrary medium. The initial phase of a program to demonstrate the engineering feasibility of the technique has been performed. A sonde mockup was fabricated and measurements have been performed in a test stand designed to simulate a geothermal well. The results indicate that the formation temperature determined by this method is independent of differences between the temperature in the borehole fluid and the formation, borehole fluid density, and borehole fluid salinity. Estimates of performance specifications for a formation temperature sonde have been made on the basis of information obtained in this study and a conceptual design of a logging system has been developed. The technique for the determination of fluid flow in a well is based on neutron activation analysis of elements present in the brine. An analytical evaluation of the method has been performed. The results warrant further, experimental evaluation.

Vagelatos, N.; Steinman, D.K.; John, J.

1978-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Environmental assessment of the brine pipeline replacement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Facility in Brazoria County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0804, for the proposed replacement of a deteriorated brine disposal pipeline from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Bryan Mound storage facility in Brazoria County, Texas, into the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, the ocean discharge outfall would be moved shoreward by locating the brine diffuser at the end of the pipeline 3.5 miles offshore at a minimum depth of 30 feet. The action would occur in a floodplain and wetlands; therefore, a floodplain/wetlands assessment has been prepared in conjunction with this EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 USC. 4321, et seg.). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This FONSI also includes a Floodplain Statement of Findings in accordance with 10 CFR Part 1022.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

POLYTETRAFLUOROETHYLENE-RICH POLYPHENLENESULFIDE BLEND TOP COATINGS FOR MITIGATING CORROSION OF CARBON STEEL IN 300 DEGREE CELCIUS BRINE.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We evaluated usefulness of a coating system consisting of an underlying polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) layer and top polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-blended PPS layer as low friction, water repellent, anti-corrosion barrier film for carbon steel steam separators in geothermal power plants. The experiments were designed to obtain information on kinetic coefficient of friction, surface free energy, hydrothermal oxidation, alteration of molecular structure, thermal stability, and corrosion protection of the coating after immersing the coated carbon steel coupons for up to 35 days in CO{sub 2}-laden brine at 300 C. The superficial layer of the assembled coating was occupied by PTFE self-segregated from PPS during the melt-flowing process of this blend polymer; it conferred an outstanding slipperiness and water repellent properties because of its low friction and surface free energy. However, PTFE underwent hydrothermal oxidation in hot brine, transforming its molecular structure into an alkylated polyfluorocarboxylate salt complex linked to Na. Although such molecular transformation increased the friction and surface free energy, and also impaired the thermal stability of PTFE, the top PTFE-rich PPS layer significantly contributed to preventing the permeation of moisture and corrosive electrolytes through the coating film, so mitigating the corrosion of carbon steel.

SUGAMA, T.; JUNG, D.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Wetting behavior of selected crude oil/brine/rock systems. Topical report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) and related ensembles showed that wettability and its effect on oil recovery depend on numerous complex interactions. In the present work, the wettability of COBR ensembles prepared using Prudhoe Bay crude oil, a synthetic formation brine, and Berea Sandstone was varied by systematic change in initial water saturation and length of aging time at reservoir temperature (88 C). All displacement tests were run at ambient temperature. Various degrees of water wetness were achieved and quantified by a modified Amott wettability index to water, the relative pseudo work of imbibition, and a newly defined apparent advancing dynamic contact angle. Pairs of spontaneous imbibition (oil recovery by spontaneous imbibition of water) and waterflood (oil recovery vs. pore volumes of water injected) curves were measured for each of the induced wetting states. Several trends were observed. Imbibition rate, and hence water wetness, decreased with increase in aging time and with decrease in initial water saturation. Breakthrough recoveries and final oil recovery by waterflooding increased with decrease in water wetness. Correlations between water wetness and oil recovery by waterflooding and spontaneous imbibition are presented.

Zhou, X.; Morrow, N.R.; Ma, S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

217

Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Us Department Contacts Media Contacts Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study Title Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study Publication Type...

218

Concerns Regarding Lead Contamination and Radiological Controls...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Concerns Regarding Lead Contamination and Radiological Controls at the Nevada Test Site, INS-O-06-02 Concerns Regarding Lead Contamination and Radiological Controls at...

219

Solute-travel time estimates for tile-drained fields. III. Removal of a geothermal brine spill from soil by leaching  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The time required to leach a slug of saline, sodic geothermal brine from the point of injection to the tile outlet of an artificially drained field is calculated. Sprinkler, complete, and partial ponding leaching methods are compared as a function of drain spacing and initial location of the spill, with ponding requiring more water but less time to leach brine out of the system for all situations except where the brine spill occurs near the midpoint between tile lines. Calculation results are presented in dimensionless parameters which scale the drainage system dimensions and the soil water transport properties. A simple calculation is proposed to estimate the volume of leaching fluid required to remove excess Na/sup +/ from the exchange complex, and was found to be in good agreement with the results of laboratory soil column experiments. For fine-textured soils in the Imperial Valley of California it may require up to 30 pore volumes of leaching fluid to lower Na/sup +/ concentrations if saturated gypsum solution is used in reclamation. The results of these calculations suggest that reclamation of fine textured soils could require a prohibitive amount of time unless the brine spill is localized around a drain.

Jury, W.A.; Weeks, L.V.

1978-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

220

ECONOMIC GEOLOGY BULLETIN OF THE SOCIETY OF ECONOMIC GEOLO.GISTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compared these fluids to modern oil-field brines (White, 1958; Hall and Friedman, 1963; Giordano, 1978; T modeling probably also apply.to the Michigan and Forest City basins. Study results suggest that exploration

Bethke, Craig

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221

Interpretation of brine-permeability tests of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site: First interim report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressure-pulse tests have been performed in bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to evaluate the hydraulic properties controlling brine flow through the Salado. Hydraulic conductivities ranging from about 10{sup {minus}14} to 10{sup {minus}11} m/s (permeabilities of about 10{sup {minus}21} to 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2}) have been interpreted from nine tests conducted on five stratigraphic intervals within eleven meters of the WIPP underground excavations. Tests of a pure halite layer showed no measurable permeability. Pore pressures in the stratigraphic intervals range from about 0.5 to 9.3 MPa. An anhydrite interbed (Marker Bed 139) appears to be one or more orders of magnitude more permeable than the surrounding halite. Hydraulic conductivities appear to increase, and pore pressures decrease, with increasing proximity to the excavations. These effects are particularly evident within two to three meters of the excavations. Two tests indicated the presence of apparent zero-flow boundaries about two to three meters from the boreholes. The other tests revealed no apparent boundaries within the radii of influence of the tests, which were calculated to range from about four to thirty-five meters from the test holes. The data are insufficient to determine if brine flow through evaporites results from Darcy-like flow driven by pressure gradients within naturally interconnected porosity or from shear deformation around excavations connecting previously isolated pores, thereby providing pathways for fluids at or near lithostatic pressure to be driven towards the low-pressure excavations. Future testing will be performed at greater distances from the excavations to evaluate hydraulic properties and processes beyond the range of excavation effects.

Beauheim, R.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Saulnier, G.J. Jr.; Avis, J.D. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

CO2brinecaprock interaction: Reactivity experiments on Eau Claire shale and a review of relevant literature  

SciTech Connect

Long term containment of stored CO2 in deep geological reservoirs will depend on the performance of the caprock to prevent the buoyant CO2 from escaping to shallow drinking water aquifers or the ground surface. Here we report new laboratory experiments on CO2-brine-caprock interactions and a review of the relevant literature. The Eau Claire Formation is the caprock overlying the Mount Simon sandstone formation, one of the target geological CO2 storage reservoirs in the Midwest USA region. Batch experiments of Eau Claire shale dissolution in brine were conducted at 200 C and 300 bars to test the extent of fluid-rock reactions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicate minor dissolution of K-feldspar and anhydrite, and precipitation of pore-filling and pore-bridging illite and/or smectite, and siderite in the vicinity of pyrite. We also reviewed relevant reactivity experiments, modeling work, and field observations in the literature in an attempt to help define the framework for future studies on the geochemical systems of the caprock overlain on geological CO2 storage formations. Reactivity of the caprock is generally shown to be low and limited to the vicinity of the CO2-caprock interface, and is related to the original caprock mineralogical and petrophysical properties. Stable isotope studies indicate that CO2 exists in both free phase and dissolved phase within the caprock. Carbonate and feldspar dissolution is reported in most studies, along with clay and secondary carbonate precipitation. Currently, research is mainly focused on the micro-fracture scale geochemistry of the shaly caprock. More attention is required on the potential pore scale reactions that may become significant given the long time scale associated with geological carbon storage

Liua, Faye; Lua, Peng; Griffith, Craig; Hedges, Sheila W.; Soong, Yee; Hellevang, Helge; Zhua,Chen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

JGI - Why Sequence Contaminated Groundwater?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contaminated Groundwater? Contaminated Groundwater? Because the majority of microorganisms in nature have never been cultured, little is known about their genetic properties, biochemical functions, and metabolic characteristics. Although the sequence of the microbial community "genome" can now be determined with high-throughput sequencing technology, the complexity and magnitude of most microbial communities make meaningful data acquisition and interpretation difficult. Thus, the sequence determination of a groundwater microbial community with manageable diversity and complexity (~20 phylotypes) is a timely challenge. The samples for this project come from the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC), Well FW-010. The overall objective is to provide a fundamental and comprehensive

224

Sidelobe Contamination in Bistatic Radars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of sidelobe contamination in a bistatic network is explored. The McGill bistatic network consists of one S-band Doppler radar and two low-gain passive receivers at remote sites. Operational experience with the bistatic network ...

Ramn de Ela; Isztar Zawadzki

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Method for refining contaminated iridium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Contaminated iridium is refined by alloying it with an alloying agent selected from the group consisting of manganese and an alloy of manganese and copper, and then dissolving the alloying agent from the formed alloy to provide a purified iridium powder.

Heshmatpour, Bahman (Waltham, MA); Heestand, Richard L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Properties of Geopressured Brines and Wells in the Gulf Coast and Opportunities for Industrial/Research Participation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geopressured reservoirs exhibit pressure gradients in excess of the normal hydrostatic gradient. In the Gulf Coast area the normal gradient is 0.465 psi/ft. Pressures may approach lithostatic pressure and have been measured as high as 1.05 psi/ft in the Gulf Coast area. Geopressured basins exist worldwide and in a number of U.S. locations, east, west, north and south. The Gulf Coast area has been studied extensively and is the subject of the DOE geopressured-geothermal research at present. The assumed ranges in resource characteristics include: depth from -12,000 to > -20,000 feet, brine flow rate from 20,000 to 40,000 bpd, temperature from 300 to 400 F, bottomhole pressure from 12,000 to 18,500 psi; salinity from 20,000 to 200,000 mg/L, gas-water ratio from 40 to 80 scf/bbl., and condensate from a trace to production. Energy in the geopressured resource includes gas, thermal, and hydraulic energy. It has been estimated that there are 6,000 quads of methane and 11,000 quads of thermal energy in the Gulf Coast area geopressured-geothermal reservoirs. Estimates run as high as 50,000 quad for the thermal energy (Wallace et al, 1978). Present industrial interest in the Pleasant Bayou and Hulin wells includes: desalination plants, an economic study by a power company for regional use, use of generated electricity by a coalition of towns, aquaculture (catfish farming) research program, and an unsolicited proposal for enhanced oil recovery of heavy oil. Direct uses of the hot brine cover dozens of industries and processes. An example of multiple uses in the USSR is shown. Outside agency interest includes the U.S.G.S., N.S.F., G.R.I., and possibly other areas within DOE. A research spin-off: a sensitive in-line benzene monitor has been designed by USL and will be tested in the near future. An in-line pH monitor is also under development for the harsh conditions of the geopressured-geothermal wells.

Wys, J. Nequs- de

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

227

UNDERWATER COATINGS FOR CONTAMINATION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) deactivated several aging nuclear fuel storage basins. Planners for this effort were greatly concerned that radioactive contamination present on the basin walls could become airborne as the sides of the basins became exposed during deactivation and allowed to dry after water removal. One way to control this airborne contamination was to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls were still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market for marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives were easily applied and adhered well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INL fuel pools. Lab-scale experiments were conducted by applying fourteen different commercial underwater coatings to four substrate materials representative of the storage basin construction materials, and evaluating their performance. The coupons included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The evaluation criteria included ease of application, adherence to the four surfaces of interest, no change on water clarity or chemistry, non-hazardous in final applied form and be proven in underwater applications. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected from the underwater coatings tested for application to all four pools. Divers scrubbed loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuumed up the sludge. The divers then applied the coating using a special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pools with no detectable airborne contamination releases.

Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

On-line tests of organic additives for the inhibition of the precipitation of silica from hypersaline geothermal brine II. Tests of nitrogen-containing compounds, silanes, and additional ethoxylated compounds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several new classes of organic compounds have been screened as potential geothermal scale control agents by examining their effect on the precipitation of silica from Magmamax No. 1 brine. The substances were tested using the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Brine Treatment Test System at the Niland, California, Test Site. Solutions of the test substances were injected into flowing brine at 210{sup 0}C, the brine was flashed to 125{sup 0}C, and then the kinetics of solids and silica precipitation from effluent brine held at 90{sup 0}C were measured. Three new types of compounds were shown to have activity as precipitation inhibitors: polyethylene imines, polyethyloxazalines, and quaternary ammonium compounds containing polyoxyethylene. Among the latter, Ethoquad 18/25, which is methyl-polyoxyethylene(15) octadecylammonium chloride, is the leading candidate antiscalant. It is a more powerful inhibitor of silica precipitation than the pure polyoxyethylene polymers, and it apparently has no high temperature solubility limitations. Measurements were made of the concentrations of monomeric silica and the effect of addition of inhibitor at various points in the Brine Treatment Test System. Five different silane compounds showed no activity toward silica.

Harrar, J.E.; Locke, F.E.; Otto, C.H. Jr.; Lorensen, L.E.; Frey, W.P.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Study on scale formation and suppression in heat-exchange systems for simulated geothermal brines. Final report, January 12, 1976-March 5, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Control of scale formation in heat exchangers using simulated geothermal waters can be achieved by lowering the pH of the water to pH 6 or lower. This does not, however, appear to be an economic approach for highly buffered geothermal brines and would lead to severe corrosion problems. Two commercial scale control agents, Calgon CL-165 and Monsanto Dequest 2060, showed promise of effecting scaling in a minor way and should be tested further on actual geothermal waters. Other scale control methods tested were unsuccessful. These included seeding experiments, turbulence promotin and electostatic and electromagnetic devices reputated to modify scale formation. The experiments were performed with tube-in-shell heat exchangers using simulated geothermal waters prepared from a salt dome solution based brine. The scale formed was primarily silica with a small percent of calcium carbonate and traces of magnesium and iron. Physically it was a hydrous soft solid adhering only lightly to the heat exchange surface. This is not typical of geothermal water scales encountered in high temperature brine operations and the results of the scale control expeirments should be evaluated with that in mind.

Wilson, J.S.; King, J.E.; Bullard, G.R.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Analytical Requirements for Petroleum Contaminated Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytical Requirements for Petroleum Contaminated Soils According to 20 NMAC 9.1.704 704. REQUIRED), or other applicable statutes. Page 1 of 1Analytical Requirements for Petroleum Contaminated Soils 4

231

Regulatory Resources for Process Contaminants (3-MCPD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regulatory information and references for 3-MCPD(3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol )process contaminants. Regulatory Resources for Process Contaminants (3-MCPD) 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid analysis aocs april articles certifi

232

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The mission of the Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative is to control the flux of contaminants in soil and water environments for the purpose of...

233

Complexation of Nd(III) with tetraborate ion and its effect on actinide (III) solubility in WIPP brine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential importance of tetraborate complexation on lanthanide(III) and actinide(III) solubility is recognized in the literature but a systematic study of f-element complexation has not been performed. In neodymium solubility studies in WIPP brines, the carbonate complexation effect is not observed since tetraborate ions form a moderately strong complex with neodymium(III). The existence of these tetraborate complexes was established for low and high ionic strength solutions. Changes in neodymium(III) concentrations in undersaturation experiments were used to determine the neodymium with tetraborate stability constants as a function of NaCl ionic strength. As very low Nd(III) concentrations have to be measured, it was necessary to use an extraction pre-concentration step combined with ICP-MS analysis to extend the detection limit by a factor of 50. The determined Nd(III) with borate stability constants at infinite dilution and 25 C are equal to log {beta}{sub 1} = 4.55 {+-} 0.06 using the SIT approach, equal to log {beta}{sub 1} = 4.99 {+-} 0.30 using the Pitzer approach, with an apparent log {beta}{sub 1} = 4.06 {+-} 0.15 (in molal units) at I = 5.6 m NaCl. Pitzer ion-interaction parameters for neodymium with tetraborate and SIT interaction coefficients were also determined and reported.

Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, Michael K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yongliang, Xiong [SNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Effect of explicit representation of detailed stratigraphy on brine and gas flow at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stratigraphic units of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) disposal room horizon includes various layers of halite, polyhalitic halite, argillaceous halite, clay, and anhydrite. Current models, including those used in the WIPP Performance Assessment calculations, employ a ``composite stratigraphy`` approach in modeling. This study was initiated to evaluate the impact that an explicit representation of detailed stratigraphy around the repository may have on fluid flow compared to the simplified ``composite stratigraphy`` models currently employed. Sensitivity of model results to intrinsic permeability anisotropy, interbed fracturing, two-phase characteristic curves, and gas-generation rates were studied. The results of this study indicate that explicit representation of the stratigraphy maintains higher pressures and does not allow as much fluid to leave the disposal room as compared to the ``composite stratigraphy`` approach. However, the differences are relatively small. Gas migration distances are also different between the two approaches. However, for the two cases in which explicit layering results were considerably different than the composite model (anisotropic and vapor-limited), the gas-migration distances for both models were negligible. For the cases in which gas migration distances were considerable, van Genuchten/Parker and interbed fracture, the differences between the two models were fairly insignificant. Overall, this study suggests that explicit representation of the stratigraphy in the WIPP PA models is not required for the parameter variations modeled if ``global quantities`` (e.g., disposal room pressures, net brine and gas flux into and out of disposal rooms) are the only concern.

Christian-Frear, T.L.; Webb, S.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geohydrology Dept.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Properties of geopressured brines and wells in the Gulf Coast and opportunities for industrial/research participation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geopressured reservoirs exhibit pressure gradients in excess of the normal hydrostatic gradient. (In the Gulf Coast area the normal gradient is 0.465 psi/ft.) Pressures may approach lithostatic pressure and have been measured as high as 1.05 psi/ft in the Gulf Coast area. Geopressured basins exist worldwide and in a number of US locations, east, west, north and south. The Gulf Coast area has been studied extensively and is the subject of the DOE geopressured-geothermal research at present. Present industrial interest in the Pleasant Bayou and Hulin wells include: desalination plants, an economic study by a power company for regional use, use of generated electricity by a coalition of towns, aquaculture (catfish farming) research program, and an unsolicited proposal for enhanced oil recovery of heavy oil. Direct uses of the hot brine cover dozens of industries and processes. An example of multiple uses in the USSR is shown. A research spin-off: a sensitive in-line benzene monitor has been designed by USL and will be tested in the near future. An in-line pH monitor is also under development for the harsh conditions of the geopressured-geothermal wells. 24 refs., 12 figs.

Negus-de Wys, J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Constraining the reservoir model of an injected CO2 plume with crosswell CASSM at the Frio-II brine plot  

SciTech Connect

Crosswell CASSM (continuous active-source seismic monitoring) data was acquired as part of the Frio-II brine pilot CO{sub 2} injection experiment. To gain insight into the CO{sub 2} plume evolution, we have integrated the 3D multiphase flow modeling code TOUGH2 with seismic simulation codes via a petrophysical model that predicts seismic velocity for a given CO{sub 2} saturation. Results of forward seismic modeling based on the CO{sub 2} saturation distribution produced by an initial TOUGH2 model compare poorly with the CASSM data, indicating that the initial flow model did not capture the actual CO{sub 2} plume dynamics. Updates to the TOUGH2 model required to better match the CASSM field data indicate vertical flow near the injection well, with increased horizontal plume growth occurring at the top of the reservoir sand. The CASSM continuous delay time data are ideal for constraining the modeled spatiotemporal evolution of the CO{sub 2} plume and allow improvement in reservoir model and estimation of CO{sub 2} plume properties.

Daley, T.M.; Ajo-Franklin, J.; Doughty, C.A.

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Natural Contamination from the Mancos Shale | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Natural Contamination from the Mancos Shale Natural Contamination from the Mancos Shale Natural Contamination from the Mancos...

238

Measurements and Standards for Contaminants in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements and Standards for Contaminants in Environmental Samples. ... Kelly, WR, Long, SE, and Seiber, JR, Standard Reference Materials ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

239

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 of 3) 3 of 3) RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH Student's Guide Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy February 1997 DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Table of Contents Page TERMINAL OBJECTIVE............................................................................1 ENABLING OBJECTIVES...........................................................................1 I. RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION................................................. 2 A. Comparison of Radiation and Radioactive Contamination ..................... 2 B. Types of Contamination.............................................................. 2

240

Google Earth Tour: How Contaminants Got There  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Google Earth Tour: How Contaminants Got There Click here to load the tour...then click the play button below...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

CLEANING OF RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATED OCCUPATIONAL CLOTHING  

SciTech Connect

The soiling and contamination of work clothing and ways of removing this contamination are discussed. Means of disinfection, washing tests with radioactive-contaminated cotton clothing, construction of the laundry, and cleaning protective clothing of plastic and other materials with the help of washing methods and polyphosphates are described. (M.C.G.)

Siewert, G.; Schikora, Th.

1963-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL #12;#12;PNNL-SA-69994 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax- Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

243

Contaminated Outdoor High Voltage Insulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The external insulation of power lines and outdoor substations is a weak point in transmission systems. The insulation is particularly susceptible to failure if proper attention has not been given to its design, condition monitoring, and maintenance. In regions with high contamination levels, regular maintenance and the application of palliative measures can be critical to ensure that the system meets its outage performance targets. This can involve pure maintenance measures such as cleaning the insulato...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

244

Underwater Coatings for Contamination Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is deactivating several fuel storage basins. Airborne contamination is a concern when the sides of the basins are exposed and allowed to dry during water removal. One way of controlling this airborne contamination is to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls are still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market that are used in marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives are easily applied and adhere well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INEEL fuel pools. The four pools considered included 1) Test Area North (TAN-607) with epoxy painted concrete walls; 2) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (CPP-603) with bare concrete walls; 3) Materials Test Reactor (MTR) Canal with stainless steel lined concrete walls; and 4) Power Burst Facility (PBF-620) with stainless steel lined concrete walls on the bottom and epoxy painted carbon steel lined walls on the upper portions. Therefore, the four materials chosen for testing included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The typical water temperature of the pools varies from 55oF to 80oF dependent on the pool and the season. These tests were done at room temperature. The following criteria were used during this evaluation. The underwater coating must: Be easy to apply Adhere well to the four surfaces of interest Not change or have a negative impact on water chemistry or clarity Not be hazardous in final applied form Be proven in other underwater applications. In addition, it is desirable for the coating to have a high pigment or high cross-link density to prevent radiation from penetrating. This paper will detail the testing completed and the test results. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected to be applied by divers after scrubbing loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuuming up the sludge. A special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pool with no airborne contamination problems.

Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann-Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

In situ removal of contamination from soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination, and further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed.

Lindgren, Eric R. (Albuquerque, NM); Brady, Patrick V. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Doffing Procedures for Firefighters' Contaminated Turnout Gear: Documentation for Videotape  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Firefighting in an area contaminated by radioactive materials can result in contaminated clothing that requires careful handling. This report documents a videotape that provides simple how-to procedures for doffing contaminated or potentially contaminated firefighter turnout gear.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Seismic Imaging of UXO-Contaminated Underwater Sites (Interim Report)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Imaging of UXO-Contaminated Underwater Sites Roland GrittoImaging of UXO-Contaminated Underwater Sites over the first

Gritto, Roland; Korneev, Valeri; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Lane

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Desiccant contamination research: Report on the desiccant contamination test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The activity in the cooling systems research involves research on high performance dehumidifiers and chillers that can operate efficiently with the variable thermal outputs and delivery temperatures associated with solar collectors. It also includes work on advanced passive cooling techniques. This report describes the work conducted to improve the durability of solid desiccant dehumidifiers by investigating the causes of degradation of desiccant materials from airborne contaminants and thermal cycling. The performance of a dehumidifier strongly depends on the physical properties and durability of the desiccant material. To make durable and reliable dehumidifiers, an understanding is needed of how and to what degree the performance of a dehumidifier is affected by desiccant degradation. This report, an account of work under Cooling Systems Research, documents the efforts to design and fabricate a test facility to investigate desiccant contamination based on industry and academia recommendations. It also discusses the experimental techniques needed for obtaining high-quality data and presents plans for next year. Researchers of the Mechanical and Industrial Technology Division performed this work at the Solar Energy Research Institute in FY 1988 for DOE's Office of Solar Heat Technologies. 7 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

Pesaran, A.A.; Bingham, C.E.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Desiccant contamination research: Report on the desiccant contamination test facility  

SciTech Connect

The activity in the cooling systems research involves research on high performance dehumidifiers and chillers that can operate efficiently with the variable thermal outputs and delivery temperatures associated with solar collectors. It also includes work on advanced passive cooling techniques. This report describes the work conducted to improve the durability of solid desiccant dehumidifiers by investigating the causes of degradation of desiccant materials from airborne contaminants and thermal cycling. The performance of a dehumidifier strongly depends on the physical properties and durability of the desiccant material. To make durable and reliable dehumidifiers, an understanding is needed of how and to what degree the performance of a dehumidifier is affected by desiccant degradation. This report, an account of work under Cooling Systems Research, documents the efforts to design and fabricate a test facility to investigate desiccant contamination based on industry and academia recommendations. It also discusses the experimental techniques needed for obtaining high-quality data and presents plans for next year. Researchers of the Mechanical and Industrial Technology Division performed this work at the Solar Energy Research Institute in FY 1988 for DOE's Office of Solar Heat Technologies. 7 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

Pesaran, A.A.; Bingham, C.E.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Hydrogen Contamination of Niobium Surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The presence of hydrogen is blamed for dramatic reductions in cavity Q's. Hydrogen concentration is difficult to measure, so there is a great deal of Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt (FUD) associated with the problem. This paper presents measurements of hydrogen concentration depth profiles, commenting on the pitfalls of the methods used and exploring how material handling can change the amount of hydrogen in pieces of niobium. Hydrogen analysis was performed by a forward scattering experiment with Helium used as the primary beam. This technique is variously known as FRES (Forward Recoil Elastic Scattering), FRS, HFS (Hydrogen Forward Scattering), and HRA (Hydrogen Recoil Analysis). Some measurements were also made using SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry). Both HFS and SIMS are capable of measuring a depth profile of Hydrogen. The primary difficulty in interpreting the results from these techniques is the presence of a surface peak which is due (at least in part) to contamination with either water or hydrocarbons. With HFS, the depth resolution is about 30 nm, and the maximum depth profiled is about 300 nm. (This 10-1 ratio is unusually low for ion beam techniques, and is a consequence of the compromises that must be made in the geometry of the experiment, surface roughness, and energy straggling in the absorber foil that must be used to filter out the forward scattered helium.) All the observed HFS spectra include a surface peak which includes both surface contamination and any real hydrogen uptake by the niobium surface. Some contamination occurs during the analysis. The vacuum in the analysis chamber is typically a few times 10{sup -6} torr, and some of the contamination is in the form of hydrocarbons from the pumping system. Hydrocarbons normally form a very thin (less than a monolayer) film which is in equilibrium between arrival rate and the evaporation rate. In the presence of the incoming ion beam, however, these hydrocarbons crack on the surface into non-volatile components. Equilibrium is lost, and the surface builds up a layer of carbon-based gunk.

Viet Nguyen-Tuong; Lawrence Doolittle

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Copyright 2005, Society of Petroleum Engineers This paper was prepared for presentation at the 2005 SPE Annual Technical Conference and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, or members. Papers presented at SPE meetings are subject to publication review by Editorial Committees-972-952-9435. Abstract Oilfield brine is the largest volume of waste generated by the oil and gas industry; typical produced brine volumes may easily exceed the oil production by 10 times with total dissolved solids ranging

252

New Standardization of Ra-228  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the age of formation of the radiobarite (a common constituent of scale and sludge deposits that form in oil-field production equipment) contaminant. ...

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

253

Situ treatment of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system for treating dissolved halogenated organic compounds in groundwater that relies upon electrolytically-generated hydrogen to chemically reduce the halogenated compounds in the presence of a suitable catalyst. A direct current is placed across at least a pair, or an array, of electrodes which are housed within groundwater wells so that hydrogen is generated at the cathode and oxygen at the anode. A pump is located within the well housing in which the cathode(s) is(are) located and draws in groundwater where it is hydrogenated via electrolysis, passes through a well-bore treatment unit, and then transported to the anode well(s) for reinjection into the ground. The well-bore treatment involves a permeable cylinder located in the well bore and containing a packed bed of catalyst material that facilitates the reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated organic compounds by hydrogen into environmentally benign species such as ethane and methane. Also, electro-osmatic transport of contaminants toward the cathode also contributes to contaminant mass removal. The only above ground equipment required are the transfer pipes and a direct circuit power supply for the electrodes. The electrode wells in an array may be used in pairs or one anode well may be used with a plurality of cathode wells. The DC current flow between electrode wells may be periodically reversed which controls the formation of mineral deposits in the alkaline cathode well-bore water, as well as to help rejuvenate the catalysis.

McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Ruiz, Roberto (Tracy, CA); Pico, Tristan M. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Rangely Oilfield Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plants (0) Projects (0) Activities (1) NEPA(0) Geothermal Area Profile Location Colorado Exploration Region Other GEA Development Phase 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir...

255

Rangely Oilfield Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Field Information Development Area: Number of Production Wells: Number of Injection Wells: Number of Replacement Wells: Average Temperature of Geofluid: Sanyal...

256

Intelligent signal processing for oilfield waterflood management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This thesis addresses two problems about water-flood management: (1) infer reservoir heterogeneity using measured injection and production rates, and (2) construct a decision support system to optimize oil production using computing with words (CWW) ...

Feilong Liu / Jerry M. Mendel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Intelligent signal processing for oilfield waterflood management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis addresses two problems about water-flood management: (1) infer reservoir heterogeneity using measured injection and production rates, and (2) construct a decision support system (more)

Liu, Feilong

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Oilfields of the World. Third edition  

SciTech Connect

This third edition (updated to 1984) covers all of the world's major producing areas (both onshore and offshore) on six continents. It offers essential geologic, reserves, and production data on 13 nations that have become commercial oil producers in the last five years: Benin, Cameroon, Congo Republic, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Sudan, Zaire, Greece, The Phillippines, Sharjah, Thailand, Guatemala, and Surinam. Numerous maps display the geologic details of each area. This book also contains full-color maps of the oil and gas fields of the North Sea, Persian Gulf, Mexico, Venezuela, and Brazil.

Tiratsoo, E.N.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Process for reducing radioactive contamination in phosphogypsum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process of two crystallization stages for reducing radioactive contamination of phosphogypsum is disclosed. In the process anhydrite crystals are obtained through dehydration of the radiation containing phosphogypsum in strong sulfuric acid; a portion of the anhydrite crystals containing the radioactive contamination is converted to substantially radiation free gypsum by crystallizing out on a large solids concentration of radiation free gypsum seed crystals; and coarse radiation free gypsum crystals are separated from small anhydrite crystal relics containing substantially all of the radioactive contamination.

Gaynor, J.C.; Palmer, J.W.

1983-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

260

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Contamination Control...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL WORKER TRAINING RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Accident Investigation Report Plutonium Contamination in the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accident Investigation Report Plutonium Contamination in the Zero Power Physics Reactor Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory, November 8, 2011 January 2012 Disclaimer...

262

On-line tests of organic additives for the inhibition of the precipitation of silica from hypersaline geothermal brine IV. Final tests of candidate additives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Brine Treatment Test System at Niland, Imperial Valley, California, has been used to evaluate a number of cationic polymers and surfactants as scale control agents. An initial group of compounds was narrowed to four on the basis of their activity as silica precipitation inhibitors. Three of these and certain combinations of compounds were then given a 40-h test to determine their effectiveness in retarding scales formed at 220, 125, and 90/sup 0/C. The best single compound was Corcat P-18 (Cordova Chemical Co. polyethylene imine, M.W. approx. = 1800). It had no effect on the scale at 220/sup 0/C, but it reduced the scales at 125 and 90/sup 0/C by factors of 4 and 18, respectively, and it also has activity as a corrosion inhibitor. Other promising compounds are PAE HCl (Dynapol poly(aminoethylene, HCl salt)), which also somewhat reduces the 220/sup 0/C scale; Ethoquad 18/25 (Armak methyl polyoxyethylene(15) octadecylammonium chloride); and Mirapol A-15 (a Miranol Chemical polydiquaternary compound). The best additive formulation for the brines of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field appears to be a mixture of one of these silica precipitation inhibitors with a small amount of hydrochloric acid and a phosphonate crystalline deposit inhibitor. Speculations are presented as to the mechanism of inhibition of silica precipitation and recommendations for further testing of these additives.

Harrar, J.E.; Locke, F.E.; Otto, C.H. Jr.; Lorensen, L.E.; Frey, W.P.; Snell, E.O.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Dismantling an alpha-contaminated facility  

SciTech Connect

The difficult task of removing large pieces of highly contaminated equipment from an obsolete plutonium-239 facility was completed in a seven-month operation that included structural alteration of the process building. Detailed job planning, job execution and contamination control were major factors in accomplishing the task. (auth)

Caldwell, R.D.; Harper, R.M.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

CONTAMINATION CONTROL AT THE HANFORD LAUNDRY  

SciTech Connect

The laundry operation consists of a decontamination laundry, non- regulated laundry service, and a central mask cleaning station. Control of radioactive contamination is accomplished by presorting at the point of use, minimizing handling of contaminated articles, and the discharge of waste effluents under controlled conditions. Procedures are described in detail. (C.H.)

Linderoth, C.E.; Little, G.A.

1962-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

265

Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

266

Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

267

Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert,George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand,Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); Delaurentiis,Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

268

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II). 8 figs.

Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.; Gorby, Y.A.; Cole, C.R.; Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

269

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II).

Amonette, James E. (Richland, WA); Fruchter, Jonathan S. (Richland, WA); Gorby, Yuri A. (Richland, WA); Cole, Charles R. (West Richmond, WA); Cantrell, Kirk J. (West Richmond, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Evaporative evolution of a NaClNO 3KCaSO 4MgSi brine at 95 C: Experiments and modeling relevant to Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A synthetic Topopah Spring Tuff water representative of one type of pore water at Yucca Mountain, NV was evaporated at 95 C in a series of experiments to determine the geochemical controls for brines that may form on, and possibly impact upon the long-term integrity of waste containers and drip shields at the designated high-level, nuclear-waste repository. Solution chemistry, condensed vapor chemistry, and precipitate mineralogy were used to identify important chemical divides and to validate geochemical calculations of evaporating water chemistry using a high temperature Pitzer thermodynamic database. The water evolved toward a complex sulfate type brine that contained

Maureen Alai; A Mark Sutton; Susan Carroll

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Phytoremediation of Metal-Contaminated Soils  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent concerns regarding environmental contamination have necessitated the development of appropriate technologies to assess the presence and mobility of metals in soil and estimate possible ways to decrease the level of soil metal contamination. Phytoremediation is an emerging technology that may be used to cleanup contaminated soils. Successful application of phytoremediation, however, depends upon various factors that must be carefully investigated and properly considered for specific site conditions. To efficiently affect the metal removal from contaminated soils we used the ability of plants to accumulate different metals and agricultural practices to improve soil quality and enhance plant biomass. Pot experiments were conducted to study metal transport through bulk soil to the rhizosphere and stimulate transfer of the metals to be more available for plants' form. The aim of the experimental study was also to find fertilizers that could enhance uptake of metals and their removal from contaminated soil.

Shtangeeva, I.; Laiho, J.V-P.; Kahelin, H.; Gobran, G.R.

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Complexity of Groundwater Contaminants at DOE Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the remediation and long-term stewardship of one of the world's largest groundwater contamination portfolios, with a significant number of plumes containing various contaminants, and considerable total mass and activity. As of 1999, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management was responsible for remediation, waste management, or nuclear materials and facility stabilization at 144 sites in 31 states and one U.S. territory, out of which 109 sites were expected to require long-term stewardship. Currently, 19 DOE sites are on the National Priority List. The total number of contaminated plumes on DOE lands is estimated to be 10,000. However, a significant number of DOE sites have not yet been fully characterized. The most prevalent contaminated media are groundwater and soil, although contaminated sediment, sludge, and surface water also are present. Groundwater, soil, and sediment contamination are present at 72% of all DOE sites. A proper characterization of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites is critical for accomplishing one of the primary DOE missions -- planning basic research to understand the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites. Note that the definitions of the terms 'site' and 'facility' may differ from one publication to another. In this report, the terms 'site,' 'facility' or 'installation' are used to identify a contiguous land area within the borders of a property, which may contain more than one plume. The term 'plume' is used here to indicate an individual area of contamination, which can be small or large. Even though several publications and databases contain information on groundwater contamination and remediation technologies, no statistical analyses of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites has been prepared since the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The DOE Groundwater Data Base (GWD) presents data as of 2003 for 221 groundwater plumes at 60 DOE sites and facilities. Note that Riley and Zachara analyzed the data from only 18 sites/facilities including 91 plumes. In this paper, we present the results of statistical analyses of the data in the GWD as guidance for planning future basic and applied research of groundwater contaminants within the DOE complex. Our analyses include the evaluation of a frequency and ranking of specific contaminants and contaminant groups, contaminant concentrations/activities and total contaminant masses and activities. We also compared the results from analyses of the GWD with those from the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The difference between our results and those summarized in the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara could be caused by not only additional releases, but also by the use of modern site characterization methods, which more accurately reveal the extent of groundwater contamination. Contaminated sites within the DOE complex are located in all major geographic regions of the United States, with highly variable geologic, hydrogeologic, soil, and climatic conditions. We assume that the information from the 60 DOE sites included in the GWD are representative for the whole DOE complex. These 60 sites include the major DOE sites and facilities, such as Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Colorado; Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho; Savannah River Site, South Carolina; Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee; and Hanford Reservation, Washington. These five sites alone ccount for 71% of the value of the remediation work.

Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

273

Recycle of radiologically contaminated austenitic stainless steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy owns large quantities of radiologically contaminated austenitic stainless steel which could by recycled for reuse if appropriate release standards were in place. Unfortunately, current policy places the formulation of a release standard for USA industry years, if not decades, away. The Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and various university and industrial partners are participating in initiative to recycle previously contaminated austenitic stainless steels into containers for the storage and disposal of radioactive wastes. This paper describes laboratory scale experiments which demonstrated the decontamination and remelt of stainless steel which had been contaminated with radionuclides.

Imrich, K.J.; Leader, D.R.; Iyer, N.C.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research...

275

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance to EMS care providers for properly handling and packaging potentially radiologically contaminated patients. This procedure applies to Emergency Medical Service care providers who respond to a radioactive material transportation incident that involves potentially contaminated injuries. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient.docx More Documents & Publications Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

276

Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The...

277

Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site...

278

Remediation of Uranium-Contaminated Ground Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The shallow alluvial aquifer at Fry Canyon, Utah, is contaminated with up to 17 mgL uranium leached from processed tailings at an ore upgrader processing plant that was operated...

279

The Effects of Contamination on HVDC Insulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI is currently documenting the various issues that should be considered when converting existing AC lines to high voltage DC (HVDC) lines. One issue that has not yet been dealt with properly is the selection of external DC insulation with respect to contamination. Since the beginning of overhead power transmission, it has been recognized that the performance of external insulation is adversely affected when the insulating surface is contaminated with airborne deposits such as marine salt or industrial...

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

280

Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

METHOD FOR REMOVING CONTAMINATION FROM PRECIPITATES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in the bismuth phosphate carrier precipitation process is presented for the recovery and purification of plutonium. When plutonium, in the tetravalent state, is carried on a bismuth phosphate precipitate, amounts of centain of the fission products are carried along with the plutonium. The improvement consists in washing such fission product contaminated preeipitates with an aqueous solution of ammonium hydrogen fluoride. since this solution has been found to be uniquely effective in washing fission production contamination from the bismuth phosphate precipitate.

Stahl, G.W.

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

DOE/EA-1482: Environmental Assessment for Pilot Experiment for Geological Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide in Saline Aquifer Brine Formations (October 2003)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

82 82 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PILOT EXPERIMENT FOR GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN SALINE AQUIFER BRINE FORMATIONS FRIO FORMATION, LIBERTY COUNTY, TEXAS OCTOBER 2003 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY ii iii National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to provide funds for a field test of the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) at The University of Texas at Austin, under contract with DOE, has studied the potential for sequestration of CO 2 in geologic formations of the United States as part of a broader series of DOE-sponsored research projects to

283

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2010 9, 2010 CX-004275: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 10/19/2010 Location(s): Yale, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory October 18, 2010 CX-004292: Categorical Exclusion Determination Small Scale Electrical Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Process Water Utilized in a Mining Operation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 10/18/2010 Location(s): Reno, Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office October 18, 2010 CX-004290: Categorical Exclusion Determination Greenfield Community College - Geothermal Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 10/18/2010 Location(s): Massachusetts Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

284

FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28, 2011 28, 2011 CX-005653: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot-Scale Testing Evaluating the Effects of Bromine Additions on Continuous Mercury Monitors at Low Mercury Concentrations CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 04/28/2011 Location(s): Grand Forks, North Dakota Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 27, 2011 CX-005649: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 04/27/2011 Location(s): Choctaw, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 19, 2011 CX-005638: Categorical Exclusion Determination Extended Pilot-Scale Testing of the Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne Compact Reformer CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/19/2011

285

FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11, 2010 11, 2010 CX-003386: Categorical Exclusion Determination Radiocarbon As a Reactive Tracer for Tracking Permanent Carbon Dioxide Storage in Basaltic Rocks CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 08/11/2010 Location(s): Palisades, New York Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 11, 2010 CX-003385: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 08/11/2010 Location(s): Bartlesville, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 9, 2010 CX-003288: Categorical Exclusion Determination Site Wide Fire Water Loop Installation CX(s) Applied: B2.3, B2.5 Date: 08/09/2010 Location(s): Albany, Oregon Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

286

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 15040 of 31,917 results. 31 - 15040 of 31,917 results. Download CX-005658: Categorical Exclusion Determination International Colloquium on Environmentally Preferred Advanced Power Generation - ICEPAG 2011 CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 04/28/2011 Location(s): Irvine, California Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005658-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005649: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 04/27/2011 Location(s): Choctaw, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005649-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005623: Categorical Exclusion Determination

287

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.7 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 17, 2011 May 17, 2011 CX-006719: Categorical Exclusion Determination Casing Drilling Test CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B3.7, B5.12 Date: 05/17/2011 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC April 29, 2011 CX-005662: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Use of Scrap Tires for Oil Well Stimulation CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 04/29/2011 Location(s): Upper Falls, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 27, 2011 CX-005649: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 04/27/2011 Location(s): Choctaw, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 20, 2011 CX-006721: Categorical Exclusion Determination Permanent Borehole Array

288

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2010 9, 2010 CX-004278: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of the Triassic Newark Basin of New York and New Jersey for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 10/19/2010 Location(s): Clarkstown, New York Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory October 19, 2010 CX-004275: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 10/19/2010 Location(s): Yale, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory October 18, 2010 CX-004292: Categorical Exclusion Determination Small Scale Electrical Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Process Water Utilized in a Mining Operation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6

289

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.7 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 24, 2010 August 24, 2010 CX-003613: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geothermal Energy Exploration Study CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.7 Date: 08/24/2010 Location(s): King County, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office August 17, 2010 CX-003403: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.7 Date: 08/17/2010 Location(s): Twin Falls, Idaho Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office August 11, 2010 CX-003385: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 08/11/2010 Location(s): Bartlesville, Oklahoma

290

FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12, 2011 12, 2011 CX-005607: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 7 Roof Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.16 Date: 04/12/2011 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 12, 2011 CX-005606: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install Metal Jacketing, Insulation, and Safety Labels CX(s) Applied: B1.5 Date: 04/12/2011 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 12, 2011 CX-005612: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B3.7 Date: 04/12/2011 Location(s): Ellery, New York Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

291

FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20, 2010 20, 2010 CX-004268: Categorical Exclusion Determination Scale-Up of Hydrogen Transport Membranes CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/20/2010 Location(s): Boulder, Colorado Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory October 19, 2010 CX-004274: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 10/19/2010 Location(s): Blackwell, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory October 19, 2010 CX-004277: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of the Triassic Newark Basin of New York and New Jersey for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 10/19/2010 Location(s): Clarkstown, New York Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

292

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 15050 of 31,917 results. 41 - 15050 of 31,917 results. Download CX-003385: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 08/11/2010 Location(s): Bartlesville, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003385-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002500: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Northern Great Plains Water Consortium: Subtask 5.2, Budget Period 3 CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 06/02/2010 Location(s): Grand Forks, North Dakota Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002500-categorical-exclusion-determination Rebate KRS Chapter 278: Natural Gas (Kentucky)

293

Novel Cleanup Agents Designed Exclusively for Oil Field Membrane Filtration Systems Low Cost Field Demonstrations of Cleanup Agents in Controlled Experimental Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of our project is to develop innovative processes and novel cleaning agents for water treatment facilities designed to remove fouling materials and restore micro-filter and reverse osmosis (RO) membrane performance. This project is part of Texas A&M University's comprehensive study of the treatment and reuse of oilfield brine for beneficial purposes. Before waste water can be used for any beneficial purpose, it must be processed to remove contaminants, including oily wastes such as residual petroleum hydrocarbons. An effective way of removing petroleum from brines is the use of membrane filters to separate oily waste from the brine. Texas A&M and its partners have developed highly efficient membrane treatment and RO desalination for waste water including oil field produced water. We have also developed novel and new cleaning agents for membrane filters utilizing environmentally friendly materials so that the water from the treatment process will meet U.S. EPA drinking water standards. Prototype micellar cleaning agents perform better and use less clean water than alternate systems. While not yet optimized, the new system restores essentially complete membrane flux and separation efficiency after cleaning. Significantly the amount of desalinated water that is required to clean the membranes is reduced by more than 75%.

David Burnett; Harold Vance

2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

Contaminants, Water and Human Health: New Lessons from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminants, Water and Human Health: New Lessons from Alligators. Purpose: Many chemicals introduced into the environment ...

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Method of producing hydrogen, and rendering a contaminated biomass inert  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for rendering a contaminated biomass inert includes providing a first composition, providing a second composition, reacting the first and second compositions together to form an alkaline hydroxide, providing a contaminated biomass feedstock and reacting the alkaline hydroxide with the contaminated biomass feedstock to render the contaminated biomass feedstock inert and further producing hydrogen gas, and a byproduct that includes the first composition.

Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

296

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance to EMS care providers for properly handling and packaging potentially radiologically contaminated patients. This procedure applies to Emergency Medical Service care providers who respond to a radioactive material transportation incident that involves potentially contaminated injuries. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient.docx More Documents & Publications Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response

297

Comparison of multiple ecogenomics methods for determining ecosystem function in uranium-contaminated environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to attenuate nletal and radionuclide contamination.problem of metal and radionuclide contamination of soil and

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE FOR THE NFSS CENTRAL DRAINAGE DITCH DECEMBER 1986 Prepared for UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OAK RIDGE OPERATIONS OFFICE Under Contract No. DE-AC05-81OR20722 By Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 I 1.0 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY 1.1 OBJECTIVE AND SCOPE The objective of this report is to describe the methodology used for establishing a supplemental residual contamination guideline for the NFSS vicinity property known as the Central Drainage Ditch (CDD). Supplemental guidelines may exceed authorized guidelines if the resultant dose will not exceed the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr (Ref. 1). This evaluation is based on realistic exposure pathways that were

299

Catalyst regeneration process including metal contaminants removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Spent catalysts removed from a catalytic hydrogenation process for hydrocarbon feedstocks, and containing undesired metals contaminants deposits, are regenerated. Following solvent washing to remove process oils, the catalyst is treated either with chemicals which form sulfate or oxysulfate compounds with the metals contaminants, or with acids which remove the metal contaminants, such as 5-50 W % sulfuric acid in aqueous solution and 0-10 W % ammonium ion solutions to substantially remove the metals deposits. The acid treating occurs within the temperature range of 60.degree.-250.degree. F. for 5-120 minutes at substantially atmospheric pressure. Carbon deposits are removed from the treated catalyst by carbon burnoff at 800.degree.-900.degree. F. temperature, using 1-6 V % oxygen in an inert gas mixture, after which the regenerated catalyst can be effectively reused in the catalytic process.

Ganguli, Partha S. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Isotopic ratio method for determining uranium contamination  

SciTech Connect

The presence of high concentrations of uranium in the subsurface can be attributed either to contamination from uranium processing activities or to naturally occurring uranium. A mathematical method has been employed to evaluate the isotope ratios from subsurface soils at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant (RFP) and demonstrates conclusively that the soil contains uranium from a natural source and has not been contaminated with enriched uranium resulting from RFP releases. This paper describes the method used in this determination which has widespread application in site characterizations and can be adapted to other radioisotopes used in manufacturing industries. The determination of radioisotope source can lead to a reduction of the remediation effort.

Miles, R.E.; Sieben, A.K.

1994-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

System for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

302

Melioration of the radiocesium contaminated land  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method is described of radiocesium fixation in soils contaminated by this radionuclide. To immobilize radiocesium, the soil surface is treated with aqueous hexacyanoferrate solution of alkaline metals. It has been experimentally shown that application of K4 [Fe(CN)6]{\\bullet}3H2O at a rate of 1,3g/kg soil reduces the fraction of exchangeable 137Cs 100-fold (100 times). The method is effective for the plots where contamination is concentrated in the top 1 - 2 cm soil layer.

I. E. Epifanova; E. G. Tertyshnik

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

303

Passive treatment of wastewater and contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect

A bioremediation system using inorganic oxide-reducing microbial consortia for the treatment of, inter alia coal mine and coal yard runoff uses a containment vessel for contaminated water and a second, floating phase for nutrients. Biodegradable oils are preferred nutrients.

Phifer, Mark A. (N. Augusta, SC); Sappington, Frank C. (Dahlonega, GA); Millings, Margaret R. (N. Augusta, SC); Turick, Charles E. (Aiken, SC); McKinsey, Pamela C. (Aiken, SC)

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

304

Estimation of Radionuclide Content in Contaminated Laundry  

SciTech Connect

Radioactively contaminated laundry is normally sent off site for processing. Laundry is defined as radiologically contaminated anti-cs and respirators. This laundry is shipped as "limited quantity," in accordance with 49CFR173.421. This requires that 95% of the radionuclides shipped are characterized and quantified. In addition, the total quantity must be 10(-3) below the A2 limits specified in 49CFR173. In any facility evaluated, the most conservative (highest activity) waste stream was used as the source term. If a new waste stream is established for a facility, its normalized activity should be compared to the evaluated waste stream to ensure the limits are not exceeded. This article documents a method used for estimating the radionuclide content in contaminated laundry. The maximum values were compared to 49CFR173. Itwas determined that if the contaminated laundry/respirators are shipped in an Interstate Nuclear Services (INS), L-59, limited quantity shipping container and the highest contact radiation level on any side, as measured with an ion chamber, does not exceed 0.5 mR h(-1), the container complies with the requirements of 49CFR173 and could be shipped "limited quantity" from any of the facilities evaluated.

Schrader, Bradley J

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FC26-04NT42098 FC26-04NT42098 Clean Tech Innovations, LLC FE 2010 Project SCNGO 2010 Gary Covatch July 1, 2010 - June 1, 2011 Bartlesville, OK Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil - Field Testing Part II The objective of this project is to simplify the application of a new technology for remediation and re-vegetation of brine contaminated soils and to field demonstrate the technology. 07 12 2010 Gary Covatch Digitally signed by Gary Covatch DN: cn=Gary Covatch, o=NETL, ou=SCNGO, email=gary.covatch@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2010.07.12 08:33:14 -04'00' 8 11 2010 john ganz Digitally signed by john ganz DN: cn=john ganz, o=NETL- DOE, ou=140 OPFC, email=john.ganz@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2010.08.11 15:44:37 -04'00' This CX is for Laboratory analysis only, no field tests or sampling.

306

Experimental investigation of the permeability of Kayenta and St. Peter sandstones to hypersaline brine in the temperature interval 70 to 90/sup 0/C at 10. 3-MPa confining pressure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Permeabilities of 10.2 cm in length, 2.5 cm in diameter Kayenta (porosity, 20.7, +- 1.66%) and St. Peter (porosity, 13.6, +- 0.13%) sandstones to Magmamax No. 1 brine containing suspended solids were determined from 70 to 90/sup 0/C at 10.3-MPa confining pressure. Measurements were performed without filters, with one 10-..mu..m filter, and with two 10-..mu..m filters inserted upstream of the core sample. In all cases, there was a dramatic decrease in permeability within the first hour of flow or few hundred pore volumes of flow through the core. Experiments conducted without filters or with one filter yield permeabilities that represent both the rock and the 2- to 3-mm amorphous silica-iron layer on the top face of the core. The experimental results show that if the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF) were composed of porous, sedimentary formations similar to Kayenta sandstone, long-term injection of unmodified Magmamax brine would not be feasible. In the case of acidified brine, most of the permeability decline may result from the mobilization of calcite.

Piwinskii, A.J.; Netherton, R.

1977-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

307

Geochemistry and petrology of surface samples, six boreholes and brines from the Salton Sea geothermal field: A natural analog of a nuclear waste repository in salt: Report No. 3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cuttings from six wells in the Salton Sea geothermal field, and rocks at outcrop that are correlative in age with those encountered at depth in the wells were analyzed in detail. Mineralogy, petrography, x-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, instrumental neutron activation analysis, fission track radiography, oxygen and stable carbon isotopic, uranium-thorium series disequilibrium, and fluid inclusion analyses are reported. Where fluids were being produced from wells, brine chemistry as well as stable isotope and uranium-thorium series analyses are reported. Particular attention has been paid to defining zones of fluid-rock interaction in which analyses of coexisting geothermal reservoir brine and hydrothermally altered sediments could be acquired. A wide span of temperatures, from surficial to greater than 300/degree/C, and salinities ranging from relatively dilute ground waters up to brines of 25 wt% total dissolved solids, span a range of environments that might be encountered in a waste repository in salt. Progressive hydrothermal alteration, mineral formation and element mobility are documented in the data presented. 52 refs., 25 figs., 49 tabs.

Not Available

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Use of data obtained from core tests in the design and operation of spent brine injection wells in geopressured or geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of formation characteristics on injection well performance are reviewed. Use of data acquired from cores taken from injection horizons to predict injectivity is described. And methods for utilizing data from bench scale testing of brine and core samples to optimize injection well design are presented. Currently available methods and equipment provide data which enable the optimum design of injection wells through analysis of cores taken from injection zones. These methods also provide a means of identifying and correcting well injection problems. Methods described in this report are: bulk density measurement; porosity measurement; pore size distribution analysis; permeability measurement; formation grain size distribution analysis; core description (lithology) and composition; amount, type and distribution of clays and shales; connate water analysis; consolidatability of friable reservoir rocks; grain and pore characterization by scanning electron microscopy; grain and pore characterization by thin section analysis; permeability damage and enhancement tests; distribution of water-borne particles in porous media; and reservoir matrix acidizing effectiveness. The precise methods of obtaining this information are described, and their use in the engineering of injection wells is illustrated by examples, where applicable. (MHR)

Jorda, R.M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Full Document and...

310

Analysis of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Analysis of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction Wells at the Tuba City,...

311

Method to Remove Uranium/Vanadium Contamination from Groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

Metzler, Donald R.; Morrison Stanley

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

312

Method to remove uranium/vanadium contamination from groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

Metzler, Donald R. (DeBeque, CO); Morrison, Stanley (Grand Junction, CO)

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

313

Predicting Nickel Precipitate Formation in Contaminated Soils. (3717)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting Nickel Precipitate Formation in Contaminated Soils. (3717) Authors: E. Peltier* - Univ in contaminated soils plays a crucial role in determining the long term fate of toxic metal pollutants speciation in laboratory contaminated soils with thermodynamic and kinetic analyses of precipitate stability

Sparks, Donald L.

314

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

06-97 06-97 February 1997 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 March 2002 Reaffirmation with Errata August 2002 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Reaffirmation with Errata DOE-HDBK-1106-97 Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research

315

Fate and Exposure Modeling of Environmental Contaminants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fate and Exposure Modeling of Environmental Contaminants Fate and Exposure Modeling of Environmental Contaminants Speaker(s): Mathew MacLeod Date: June 29, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Thomas McKone Chemical products pervade modern society, and furnish unprecedented wealth and comfort to citizens of countries with industrialized economies. Demand for products such as pesticides, industrial chemicals, flame-retardants and additives for consumer products requires large scale production and distribution of these chemicals, and they are inevitably released into the environment. Responsible management of chemicals therefore requires a quantitative understanding of amounts released, how the chemicals partition and travel in the environment, and how they might expose and thus adversely affect human and ecological populations. This

316

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 of 3) 2 of 3) Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research Instructor's Guide Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy February 1997 DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Table of Contents Page DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - Course/Lesson Plan.............................. 1 Standardized Core Course Materials................................................... 1 Course Goal.........................................................................1 Target Audience.................................................................. 1 Course Description............................................................... 1 Prerequisites...................................................................... 1

317

Fixation of Radiological Contamination; International Collaborative Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cooperative international project was conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the United Kingdoms National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) to integrate a capture coating with a high performance atomizing process. The initial results were promising, and lead to further trials. The somewhat longer testing and optimization process has resulted in a product that could be demonstrated in the field to reduce airborne radiological dust and contamination.

Rick Demmer

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Purifying contaminated water. [DOE patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process is presented for removing biorefactory compounds from contaminated water (e.g., oil shale retort waste-water) by contacting same with fragmented raw oil shale. Biorefractory removal is enhanced by preactivating the oil shale with at least one member of the group of carboxylic acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, ethers, amines, amides, sulfoxides, mixed ether-esters and nitriles. Further purification is obtained by stripping, followed by biodegradation and removal of the cells.

Daughton, C.G.

1981-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

319

Bioremediation of uranium contaminated soils and wastes  

SciTech Connect

Contamination of soils, water, and sediments by radionuclides and toxic metals from uranium mill tailings, nuclear fuel manufacturing and nuclear weapons production is a major concern. Studies of the mechanisms of biotransformation of uranium and toxic metals under various microbial process conditions has resulted in the development of two treatment processes: (1) stabilization of uranium and toxic metals with reduction in waste volume and (2) removal and recovery of uranium and toxic metals from wastes and contaminated soils. Stabilization of uranium and toxic metals in wastes is accomplished by exploiting the unique metabolic capabilities of the anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium sp. The radionuclides and toxic metals are solubilized by the bacteria directly by enzymatic reductive dissolution, or indirectly due to the production of organic acid metabolites. The radionuclides and toxic metals released into solution are immobilized by enzymatic reductive precipitation, biosorption and redistribution with stable mineral phases in the waste. Non-hazardous bulk components of the waste volume. In the second process uranium and toxic metals are removed from wastes or contaminated soils by extracting with the complexing agent citric acid. The citric-acid extract is subjected to biodegradation to recover the toxic metals, followed by photochemical degradation of the uranium citrate complex which is recalcitrant to biodegradation. The toxic metals and uranium are recovered in separate fractions for recycling or for disposal. The use of combined chemical and microbiological treatment process is more efficient than present methods and should result in considerable savings in clean-up and disposal costs.

Francis, A.J.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

Desiccant contamination in desiccant cooling systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of a desiccant contamination experiment and the impact of the obtained silica gel degradation data on the performance of a desiccant cooling system. A test apparatus was used to thermally cycle several desiccant samples and expose them to ambient'' humid air or contaminated'' humid air. The source of contamination was cigarette smoke. The exposed desiccant samples were removed after 0.5, 1, 2, or 4 months of exposure and their moisture capacities were measured. The silica get samples thermally cycled with ambient air showed a 5% to 30% to 70% of their moisture capacity. Using the obtained degradation data in a system, the impact of desiccant degradation on the performance of a desiccant cooling cycle was estimated. Depending on the degree of desiccant degradation, the decrease in thermal coefficient of performance (COP) and cooling capacity of the system was 10% to 35%. It was found that the COP and the cooling capacity of a system after desiccant degradation can be improved by increasing the rotational speed of the dehumidifier. This indicates that a simple engineering solution may exist to alleviate some type of degradations. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Pesaran, A.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Diamond Shaving of Contaminated Concrete Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning and decontamination of existing facilities presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of surface contamination from concrete floors and walls while eliminating the spread of contamination and volumetric reduction of the waste stream. Numerous methods have been tried with a varying degree of success. Recent technology has made this goal achievable and has been used successfully. This new technology is the Diamond Floor Shaver and Diamond Wall shaver. The Diamond Floor Shaver is a self-propelled, walk behind machine that literally shaves the contaminated concrete surface to specified depths. This is accomplished by using a patented system of 100 dry cutting diamond blades with offset diamond segments that interlock to provide complete shaving of the concrete surface. Grooves are eliminated which allows for a direct frisk reading to analyze results. When attached to an appropriate size vacuum, the dust produced is 100% contained. Dust is collected in drums ready for disposition and disposal. The waste produced in shaving 7,500 square feet at 1/8 inch thickness would fill a single 55 gallon drum. Production is dependent on depth of shaving but averages 100 square feet per hour. The wall shaver uses the same patented diamond drum and blades but is hydraulically driven and is deployed using a robotic arm allowing its operation to be to totally remote. It can reach ceilings as high as 20 feet. Numerous small projects were successfully completed using this technology. Large scale deployment came in 2003. Bluegrass, in conjunction with Bartlett Services, deployed this technology to support decontamination activities for closing of the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons site. Up to six floor shavers and one wall shaver were deployed in buildings B371 and B374. These buildings had up to one half-inch, fixed plutonium and beryllium contamination. Hundred-thousands of square feet of floors and walls were shaved successfully to depths of up to one half inch. Decontamination efforts were so successful the balance of the buildings could be demolished using conventional methods. The shavers helped keep the project on schedule while the vacuum system eliminated the potential for contaminants becoming airborne.

Mullen, Lisa K. [Bluegrass Concrete Cutting Inc., 107 Mildred Street PO Box 427, Greenville, Alabama 36037 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE's Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil March 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. An aerial view of Hanford's D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River.

324

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil March 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. An aerial view of Hanford's D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River.

325

New Challenges in Contamination Control: The Leadership Role of IEST in Shaping Future Research and Practices.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

updated.. WGCC902: MIL-HDBK-406: Contamination Controland Clean Work Stations; MIL-HDBK-407: Contamination Control

Xu, Tengfang; Eudy, Jane; Berndt, Charles

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

BIOREMEDIATION OF URANIUM CONTAMINATED SOILS AND WASTES.  

SciTech Connect

Contamination of soils, water, and sediments by radionuclides and toxic metals from uranium mill tailings, nuclear fuel manufacturing and nuclear weapons production is a major concern. Studies of the mechanisms of biotransformation of uranium and toxic metals under various microbial process conditions has resulted in the development of two treatment processes: (i) stabilization of uranium and toxic metals with reduction in waste volume and (ii) removal and recovery of uranium and toxic metals from wastes and contaminated soils. Stabilization of uranium and toxic metals in wastes is accomplished by exploiting the unique metabolic capabilities of the anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium sp. The radionuclides and toxic metals are solubilized by the bacteria directly by enzymatic reductive dissolution, or indirectly due to the production of organic acid metabolites. The radionuclides and toxic metals released into solution are immobilized by enzymatic reductive precipitation, biosorption and redistribution with stable mineral phases in the waste. Non-hazardous bulk components of the waste such as Ca, Fe, K, Mg and Na released into solution are removed, thus reducing the waste volume. In the second process uranium and toxic metals are removed from wastes or contaminated soils by extracting with the complexing agent citric acid. The citric-acid extract is subjected to biodegradation to recover the toxic metals, followed by photochemical degradation of the uranium citrate complex which is recalcitrant to biodegradation. The toxic metals and uranium are recovered in separate fractions for recycling or for disposal. The use of combined chemical and microbiological treatment process is more efficient than present methods and should result in considerable savings in clean-up and disposal costs.

FRANCIS,A.J.

1998-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

327

Recovery of Mercury From Contaminated Liquid Wastes  

SciTech Connect

The Base Contract program emphasized the manufacture and testing of superior sorbents for mercury removal, testing of the sorption process at a DOE site, and determination of the regeneration conditions in the laboratory. During this project, ADA Technologies, Inc. demonstrated the following key elements of a successful regenerable mercury sorption process: (1) sorbents that have a high capacity for dissolved, ionic mercury; (2) removal of ionic mercury at greater than 99% efficiency; and (3) thermal regeneration of the spent sorbent. ADA's process is based on the highly efficient and selective sorption of mercury by noble metals. Contaminated liquid flows through two packed columns that contain microporous sorbent particles on which a noble metal has been finely dispersed. A third column is held in reserve. When the sorbent is loaded with mercury to the point of breakthrough at the outlet of the second column, the first column is taken off-line and the flow of contaminated liquid is switched to the second and third columns. The spent column is regenerated by heating. A small flow of purge gas carries the desorbed mercury to a capture unit where the liquid mercury is recovered. Laboratory-scale tests with mercuric chloride solutions demonstrated the sorbents' ability to remove mercury from contaminated wastewater. Isotherms on surrogate wastes from DOE's Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee showed greater than 99.9% mercury removal. Laboratory- and pilot-scale tests on actual Y-12 Plant wastes were also successful. Mercury concentrations were reduced to less than 1 ppt from a starting concentration of 1,000 ppt. The treatment objective was 50 ppt. The sorption unit showed 10 ppt discharge after six months. Laboratory-scale tests demonstrated the feasibility of sorbent regeneration. Results show that sorption behavior is not affected after four cycles.

1998-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

328

Portable spotter for fluorescent contaminants on surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable fluorescence-based spotter for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon contamination on personnel and work area surfaces under ambient lighting conditions is provided. This instrument employs beam modulation and phase sensitive detection for discriminating between fluorescence from organic materials from reflected background light and inorganic fluorescent material. The device uses excitation and emission filters to provide differentiation between classes of aromatic organic compounds. Certain inorganic fluorescent materials, including heavy metal compounds, may also be distinguished from the organic compounds, despite both having similar optical properties.

Schuresko, Daniel D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

THE DESIGN OF A RADIOACTIVITY CONTAMINATION METER  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of the design and performance of a portable instrument for measurement of radiation from small quantities of radioactive contamination. The device weighs 4 lb 2 oz, operates on a single flashlight battery for 200 hr, and operates at low temperatures with the proper battery. The most novel feature is a clockworkdriven chopper for a-c. The circuit includes cold cathode tubes and a halogen-quenched G-M tube. Reliability was emphasized in the design. (T.R.H.)

Goulding, F.S.

1954-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

330

HISTORY OF MERCURY USE AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION  

SciTech Connect

Between 1950 and 1963 approximately 11 million kilograms of mercury (Hg) were used at the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 NSC) for lithium isotope separation processes. About 3% of the Hg was lost to the air, soil and rock under facilities, and East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) which originates in the plant site. Smaller amounts of Hg were used at other Oak Ridge facilities with similar results. Although the primary Hg discharges from Y-12 NSC stopped in 1963, small amounts of Hg continue to be released into the creek from point sources and diffuse contaminated soil and groundwater sources within Y-12 NSC. Mercury concentration in EFPC has decreased 85% from not, vert, similar2000 ng/L in the 1980s. In general, methylmercury concentrations in water and in fish have not declined in response to improvements in water quality and exhibit trends of increasing concentration in some cases.Mercury discharges from an industrial plant have created a legacy contamination problem exhibiting complex and at times counter-intuitive patterns in Hg cycling.

Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Southworth, George R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Need for a contamination control textbook  

SciTech Connect

Since the authors have become associated with contamination control technology they have repeatedly found themselves searching for technical information that was either never documented and therefore never reached a technical journal or was too specific to appear in a technical article. On countless occasions they have found other workers frustrated over the same lack of concise and up to date information in the relatively broad and interdisciplinary field of surface science, surface cleaning, and clean room operation and design. It is for these reasons that the authors wish to suggest formally that those engineers, chemists, technicians, and surface scientists working in this field collectively create a textbook that they may use as their first reference and teaching book. The text of this paper suggests a topical outline for a book and gives examples of the kinds of information that it should contain and the types of questions it should address. Included is an extensive bibliography recently collected showing the diversity of disciplines that those working in contamination control must be knowledgeable of and the variety of publications and journals in which these reports and articles are generally found.

Stowers, I.F.; Patton, H.G.; Guntrum, S.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

RECOVERY OF MERCURY FROM CONTAMINATED LIQUID WASTES  

SciTech Connect

Mercury was widely used in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons facilities, resulting in a broad range of mercury-contaminated wastes and wastewaters. Some of the mercury contamination has escaped to the local environment, particularly at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where approximately 330 metric tons of mercury were discharged to the environment between 1953 and 1963 (TN & Associates, 1998). Effective removal of mercury contamination from water is a complex and difficult problem. In particular, mercury treatment of natural waters is difficult because of the low regulatory standards. For example, the Environmental Protection Agency has established a national ambient water quality standard of 12 parts-per-trillion (ppt), whereas the standard is 1.8 ppt in the Great Lakes Region. In addition, mercury in the environment is typically present in several different forms, but sorption processes are rarely effective with more than one or two of these forms. To meet the low regulatory discharge limits, an effective sorption process must be able to address all forms of mercury present in the water. One approach is to apply different sorbents in series depending on the mercury speciation and the regulatory discharge limits. ADA Technologies, Inc. has developed four new sorbents to address the variety of mercury species present in industrial discharges and natural waters. Three of these sorbents have been field tested on contaminated creek water at the Y-12 Plant. Two of these sorbents have been successfully demonstrated very high removal efficiencies for soluble mercury species, reducing mercury concentrations at the outlet of a pilot-scale system to less than 12 ppt for as long as six months. The other sorbent tested at the Y-12 Plant targeted colloidal mercury not removed by standard sorption or filtration processes. At the Y-12 Plant, colloidal mercury appears to be associated with iron, so a sorbent that removes mercury-iron complexes in the presence of a magnetic field was evaluated. Field results indicated good removal of this mercury fraction from the Y-12 waters. In addition, this sorbent is easily regenerated by simply removing the magnetic field and flushing the columns with water. The fourth sorbent is still undergoing laboratory development, but results to date indicate exceptionally high mercury sorption capacity. The sorbent is capable of removing all forms of mercury typically present in natural and industrial waters, including Hg{sup 2+}, elemental mercury, methyl mercury, and colloidal mercury. The process possesses very fast kinetics, which allows for higher flow rates and smaller treatment units. These sorbent technologies, used in tandem or individually depending on the treatment needs, can provide DOE sites with a cost-effective method for reducing mercury concentrations to very low levels mandated by the regulatory community. In addition, the technologies do not generate significant amounts of secondary wastes for disposal. Furthermore, the need for improved water treatment technologies is not unique to the DOE. The new, stringent requirements on mercury concentrations impact other government agencies as well as the private sector. Some of the private-sector industries needing improved methods for removing mercury from water include mining, chloralkali production, chemical processing, and medical waste treatment. The next logical step is to deploy one or more of these sorbents at a contaminated DOE site or at a commercial facility needing improved mercury treatment technologies. A full-scale deployment is planned in fiscal year 2000.

Robin M. Stewart

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

333

in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization  

SciTech Connect

in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization Yoshiko Fujita (Yoshiko.fujita@inl.gov) (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Robert W. Smith (University of Idaho-Idaho Falls, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Subsurface radionuclide and trace metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOEs greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent trace ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide strontium-90, is co-precipitation in calcite. Calcite, a common mineral in the arid western U.S., can form solid solutions with trace metals. The rate of trace metal incorporation is susceptible to manipulation using either abiotic or biotic means. We have previously demonstrated that increasing the calcite precipitation rate by stimulating the activity of urea hydrolyzing microorganisms can result in significantly enhanced Sr uptake. Urea hydrolysis causes the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity, and also by liberating the reactive cations from the aquifer matrix via exchange reactions involving the ammonium ion derived from urea: H2NCONH2 + 3H2O ? 2NH4+ + HCO3- + OH- urea hydrolysis >X:2Ca + 2NH4+ ? 2>X:NH4 + Ca2+ ion exchange Ca2+ + HCO3- + OH- ? CaCO3(s) + H2O calcite precipitation where >X: is a cation exchange site on the aquifer matrix. This contaminant immobilization approach has several attractive features. Urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which is produced by many indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Addition of foreign microbes is unnecessary. In turn the involvement of the native microbes and the consequent in situ generation of reactive components in the aqueous phase (e.g., carbonate and Ca or Sr) can allow dissemination of the reaction over a larger volume and/or farther away from an amendment injection point, as compared to direct addition of the reactants at a well (which can lead to clogging). A final particularly attractive characteristic of this approach is its long-term sustainability; the remediation scheme is geared toward environments that are already saturated with respect to calcite, and in such systems the bulk of any newly precipitated calcite will remain stable once engineered manipulations cease. This means that the co-precipitated contaminants will be effectively sequestered over the long term. We are currently conducting integrated field, laboratory, and computational research to evaluate a) the relationships between urea hydrolysis rate, calcite precipitation rate, and trace metal partitioning under environmentally relevant conditions; and b) the coupling between flow/flux manipulations and calcite precipitate distribution and metal uptake. We are also assessing the application of geophysical and molecular biological tools to monitor the relevant chemical and physical processes. The primary emphasis is on field-scale processes, with the laboratory and modeling activities designed specifically to support the field studies. Field experiments are being conducted in perched water (vadose zone) at the Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP) at the Idaho National Laboratory; the VZRP provides an uncontaminated setting that is an analog of the 90Sr-contaminated vadose zone at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. A summary of results to date will be presented.

Yoshiko Fujita; Robert W. Smith

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments The Deep Vadose Zone - Applied Field Research Initiative has partnered with the Vadose Zone Journal to bring together a special section of the recent issue (November 2012). The section was prepared in association with the Deep Vadose Zone - Applied Field Research Initiative-led symposium at the annual American Chemical Society meeting on "Understanding Behavior and Fate of Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments." The section consists of 12 papers which present novel approaches to characterize, monitor, remediate, and predict the transport and fate of contaminants in vadose zone environments, many of which highlight recent work at the Hanford site. Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments

335

Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study Schematic of soil-gas and contaminant transport into a slab-on-grade building at a former service station site. Three effects are illustrated that can contribute to reducing the amount of contaminant available for entry into the building: biodegradation by soil microorganisms; a layer of soil that limits diffusive movement of the contaminant; and wind-driven ventilation of the soil below the building. Not illustrated are the effects of ventilation on contaminant concentrations inside the building. The transport of soil-gas-borne contaminants into buildings has been documented as a significant source of human exposure to some pollutants indoors; one example is radon, which has received widespread public

336

In-situ remediation system for contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for removing volatile contaminants from a subsurface plume of contamination comprising two sets of wells, a well for injecting a fluid into a saturated zone on one side of the plume and an extracting well for collecting the fluid together with volatilized contaminants from the plume on the other side of the plume is described. The fluid enables the volatile contaminants to be volatilized and carried through the ground to the extracting well. Injecting and extracting wells are preferably horizontal wells positioned below the plume in the saturated zone and above the plume in the vadose zone. The fluid may be air or other gas or a gas and liquid mixture depending on the type of contaminant to be removed and may be preheated to facilitate volatilization. Treatment of the volatilized contamination may be by filtration, incineration, atmospheric dispersion or the like. 3 refs., 3 figs.

Corey, J.C.; Looney, B.B.; Kaback, D.S.

1988-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

337

In-situ remediation system and method for contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for removing volatile contaminants from a subsurface plume of contamination comprising two sets of wells, a well for injecting a fluid into a saturated zone on one side of the plume and an extracting well for collecting the fluid together with volatilized contaminants from the plume on the other side of the plume. The fluid enables the volatile contaminants to be volatilized and carried therewith through the ground to the extracting well. Injecting and extracting wells are preferably horizontal wells positioned below the plume in the saturated zone and above the plume in the vadose zone, respectively. The fluid may be air or other gas or a gas and liquid mixture depending on the type of contaminant to be removed and may be preheated to facilitate volatilization. Treatment of the volatilized contamination may be by filtration, incineration, atmospheric dispersion or the like.

Corey, John C. (Aiken, SC); Looney, Brian B. (Aiken, SC); Kaback, Dawn S. (Aiken, SC)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Located on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the RoMIC-AFRI was established to protect water resources by addressing the challenge of preventing contamination. The initiative at Oak Ridge is a collaborative effort that leverages DOE investments in basic science and applied research and the work of site contractors to address the complex challenges in the remediation of legacy waste at the Oak Ridge Reservation. The mission of the Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants

339

Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford’s largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford's largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford's largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers supporting groundwater cleanup for EM's

340

Microscopic characterization of radionuclide contaminated soils to assist remediation efforts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combination of optical, scanning, and analytical electron microscopies have been used to describe the nature of radionuclide contamination at several sites. These investigations were conducted to provide information for remediation efforts. This technique has been used successfully with uranium-contaminated soils from Fernald, OH, and Portsmouth, OH, thorium-contaminated soil from a plant in Tennessee, plutonium-contamination sand from Johnston Island in the Pacific Ocean, and incinerator ash from Los Alamos, NM. Selecting the most suitable method for cleaning a particular site is difficult if the nature of the contamination is not understood. Microscopic characterization allows the most appropriate method to be selected for removing the contamination and can show the effect a particular method is having on the soil. A method of sample preparation has been developed that allows direct comparison of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, enabling characterization of TEM samples to be more representative of the bulk sample.

Buck, E.C.; Brown, N.R.; Dietz, N.L.; Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

In-situ remediation system and method for contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for removing volatile contaminants from a subsurface plume of contamination comprising two sets of wells, a well for injecting a fluid into a saturated zone on one side of the plume and an extracting well for collecting the fluid together with volatilized contaminants from the plume on the other side of the plume. The fluid enables the volatile contaminants to be volatilized and carried therewith through the ground to the extracting well. Injecting and extracting wells are preferably horizontal wells positioned below the plume in the saturated zone and above the plume in the vadose zone, respectively. The fluid may be air or other gas or a gas and liquid mixture depending on the type of contaminant to be removed and may be preheated to facilitate volatilization. Treatment of the volatilized contamination may be by filtration, incineration, atmospheric dispersion or the like. 3 figs.

Corey, J.C.; Looney, B.B.; Kaback, D.S.

1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

342

System for the removal of contaminant soil-gas vapors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system extracts contaminated vapors from soil or other subsurface regions by using changes in barometric pressure to operate sensitive check valves that control air entry and removal from wells in the ground. The system creates an efficient subterranean flow of air through a contaminated soil plume and causes final extraction of the contaminants from the soil to ambient air above ground without any external energy sources. 4 figs.

Weidner, J.R.; Downs, W.C.; Kaser, T.G.; Hall, H.J.

1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

343

Detection of contamination of municipal water distribution systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for the detection of contaminates of a fluid in a conduit. The conduit is part of a fluid distribution system. A chemical or biological sensor array is connected to the conduit. The sensor array produces an acoustic signal burst in the fluid upon detection of contaminates in the fluid. A supervisory control system connected to the fluid and operatively connected to the fluid distribution system signals the fluid distribution system upon detection of contaminates in the fluid.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

344

Method and apparatus for destroying organic contaminants in aqueous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for destroying organic contaminants, such as trichloroethylene, in aqueous liquids, such as groundwater, utilizing steam stripping integrated with biodegradation. The contaminated aqueous liquid is fed into a steam stripper causing the volatilization of essentially all of the organic contaminants and a portion of the aqueous liquid. The majority of the aqueous liquid is discharged from the steam stripper. The volatilized vapors are then condensed to the liquid phase and introduced into a bioreactor. The bioreactor contains methanotrophic microorganisms which convert the organic contaminants into mainly carbon dioxide. The effluent from the bioreactor is then recycled back to the steam stripper for further processing.

Donaldson, Terrence L. (Lenior City, TN); Wilson, James H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Recovery from Mercury Contamination in the Second Songhua River, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

K. , & Rubin, J. R. (2005). Mercury levels and relationshipsJ. , et al. (1999). Mercury in contaminated coastalEnvironmental costs of mercury pollution. Science of the

Zhang, Z. S.; Sun, X. J.; Wang, Q. C.; Zheng, D. M.; Zheng, N.; Lv, X. G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Fuel Cell System Contaminants...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell System Contaminants Material Screening Data NREL designed this interactive material selector tool to help fuel cell developers and material suppliers explore the results...

347

EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and...

348

Ellipsometric Measurement of Contamination in an Oil Pumped uhv System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determinations have been made of oil contamination on a surface in an oil pumped uhv system for DC702 and DC705 oil

R. M. Rollason; R. W. Fane; W. E. J. Neal

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

RESRAD Computer Code- Evaluation of Radioactively Contaminated Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The evaluation of sites with radioactive contamination was a problem until the RESidual RADioactivity (RESRAD) Computer Code was first released in 1989.

350

Bioremediation of Diesel Contaminated Soil Using Spent Mushroom Compost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Composting has been shown to be an effective bioremediation technique for the treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. In this research, spent mushroom compost (SMC), a sustainable, (more)

Eramo, Alessia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Roadsides, contaminated fields could be unlikely solutions to...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory considered a new idea: using contaminated and unused land to grow crops for biofuel. Negri and Gopalakrishnan knew that hardy, inedible plants like switchgrass or poplar...

352

The Effect of Airborne Contaminants on Fuel Cell Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Institute www.hnei.hawaii.edu The Effect of Airborne Contaminants on Fuel Cell Performance & Durability Richard Rocheleau Trent Molter William Collins Silvia Wessel Hawaii...

353

T.G. Hinton: Remediation of Radioactively Contaminated Ecosystems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Knox and R. Sharitz. 2005. Phytoremediation potential of native trees in a uranium and thorium contaminated wetland. J. Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chem. 264:417-422. Whicker, F....

354

Method and apparatus for destroying organic contaminants in aqueous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for destroying organic contaminants, such as trichloroethylene, in aqueous liquids, such as groundwater, utilizing steam stripping integrated with biodegradation. The contaminated aqueous liquid is fed into a steam stripper causing the volatilization of essentially all of the organic contaminants and a portion of the aqueous liquid. The majority of the aqueous liquid is discharged from the steam stripper. The volatilized vapors are then condensed to the liquid phase and introduced into a bioreactor. The bioreactor contains methanotrophic microorganisms which convert the organic contaminants into mainly carbon dioxide. The effluent from the bioreactor is then recycled back to the steam stripper for further processing. 2 figures.

Donaldson, T.L.; Wilson, J.H.

1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

355

2011 Vittorio de Nora Award Winner: Recycling of Contaminated ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Removal of contaminants such as the coat and organic materials- applied for protection and appearance- are the tail that wags the recycling dog. Successful...

356

Feed gas contaminant removal in ion transport membrane systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxygen ion transport membrane process wherein a heated oxygen-containing gas having one or more contaminants is contacted with a reactive solid material to remove the one or more contaminants. The reactive solid material is provided as a deposit on a support. The one or more contaminant compounds in the heated oxygen-containing gas react with the reactive solid material. The contaminant-depleted oxygen-containing gas is contacted with a membrane, and oxygen is transported through the membrane to provide transported oxygen.

Underwood, Richard Paul (Allentown, PA); Makitka, III, Alexander (Hatfield, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

357

Analysis of surface contaminants on beryllium and aluminum windows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An effort has been made to document the types of contamination which form on beryllium window surfaces due to interaction with a synchrotron radiation beam. Beryllium windows contaminated in a variety of ways (exposure to water and air) exhibited surface powders, gels, crystals and liquid droplets. These contaminants were analyzed by electron diffraction, electron energy loss spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and wet chemical methods. Materials found on window surfaces include beryllium oxide, amorphous carbon, cuprous oxide, metallic copper and nitric acid. Aluminum window surface contaminants were also examined.

Gmur, N.F.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Assessment of heavy metal contamination of roadside soils in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 16, 2008 ... heavy metals was found using factor analysis. Keywords Heavy metals Roadside soils . Transportation period Contamination index .

359

Effect of System Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

liquid-based contaminants derived from structural plastics and assembly aid materials (lubricant, grease, adhesive, seal). A minor part of our efforts is focused on an in situ...

360

Conventional methods for removing sulfur and other contaminants...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conventional methods for removing sulfur and other contaminants from syngas typically rely on chemical or physical absorption processes operating at low temperatures. When cooled...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NREL: Energy Analysis - Renewable Energy on Contaminated Lands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy on Contaminated Lands Map of U.S. Map of Potential Limbo Land Sites for Consideration for Renewable Energy Technology Development. Enlarge image NREL's...

362

Entropic component analysis and its application in geological data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an entropic component analysis for identifying key parameters or variables and the joint effects of various parameters that characterize complex systems. This approach identifies key parameters through solving the variable selection problem. ... Keywords: Logistic likelihood function, Maximum entropy, Model selection, Oil-field brines, Sample classification

Chih-Yuan Tseng; Chien-Chih Chen

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Change Notice 2 Change Notice 2 with Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Page/Section Change

364

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reaffirmation Reaffirmation August 2002 Change Notice 1 December 2004 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Page/Section Change

365

Cleaning oil contaminated beaches with chemicals  

SciTech Connect

Oil-dispersing chemicals were treated for cleaning persistent-type crude oil from experimentally contaminated New Jersey coastal beaches and were found to be generally ineffective. Although they completely cleaned the surface of the oiled sand, they removed little of the total oil. Instead they caused the oil to penetrate more deeply into the underlying sand, thereby compounding the pollution problem by expanding the zone of pollution, complicating any subsequent mechanical removal and, possibly, causing the oil to persist longer. Chemical treatment failed to induce quicksand or cause perceptible erosion of beach sand. A decrease in the cohesiveness of the sand was observed, but this also occurred in the presence of oil alone and could not be attributed to the presence of chemical.

1969-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Models of Geothermal Brine Chemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many significant expenses encountered by the geothermal energy industry are related to chemical effects. When the composition, temperature of pressure of the fluids in the geological formation are changed, during reservoir evolution, well production, energy extraction or injection processes, the fluids that were originally at equilibrium with the formation minerals come to a new equilibrium composition, temperature and pressure. As a result, solid material can be precipitated, dissolved gases released and/or heat lost. Most geothermal energy operations experience these phenomena. For some resources, they create only minor problems. For others, they can have serious results, such as major scaling or corrosion of wells and plant equipment, reservoir permeability losses and toxic gas emission, that can significantly increase the costs of energy production and sometimes lead to site abandonment. In future operations that exploit deep heat sources and low permeability reservoirs, new chemical problems involving very high T, P rock/water interactions and unknown injection effects will arise.

Nancy Moller Weare; John H. Weare

2002-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

367

Membrane distillation of concentrated brines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Salinity is one of the most critical environmental problems for water scarce countries, deteriorating water quality and threatening economic and social consequences. This research encompasses (more)

Mariah, Lynette.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Method for treatment of soils contaminated with organic pollutants  

SciTech Connect

A method for treating soil contaminated by organic compounds wherein an ozone containing gas is treated with acid to increase the stability of the ozone in the soil environment and the treated ozone applied to the contaminated soil to decompose the organic compounds. The soil may be treated in situ or may be removed for treatment and refilled.

Wickramanayake, Godage B. (Cranbury, NJ)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Investigation of contamination bearing algae in the Columbia River  

SciTech Connect

Recent discussions in the group have given rise to the problem of determining whether the beta contamination found in the Columbia River is carried by the algae which are found in the retention basin. The algae accumulate in the basin and apparently remain there longer than the retained water, and thus may be contaminated to a greater extent than the water itself.

Paas, H.J.

1947-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

370

Methods to quantify contamination effects on silica gel samples  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a study to establish methods for measuring sorption degradation of contaminated solid desiccants and determining the identity and nature of the contaminants. A literature search was conducted to determine how contaminants affect the sorption properties of silica gel and advanced solid desiccant materials; the search yielded 73 papers. Silica gel was chosen for the contamination study; nine samples from various batches and suppliers were tested. Methods were established (1) to measure the degradation of desiccant adsorption capacity caused by regeneration processes and/or exposure to contaminants and (2) to determine the nature of these contaminants. Sorption measurements on a limited number of fresh silica gel samples showed that the water adsorption capacity varied about +-10%. The silica gel sample regenerated with electric heaters exhibited a maximum capacity degradation of 7%. Silica gel samples processed in other ways lost between 20% and 47% capacity, depending on the age and cycle of regeneration. The contaminants found were silicon, oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Contamination can degrade the water sorption capacity of desiccants.

Pesaran, A.A.; Thomas, T.M.; Penney, T.R.; Czanderna, A.W.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

A transportable fluorescence imagining system for detecting fecal contaminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feces are the primary source of many pathogenic organisms that can potentially contaminate agricultural commodities. Feces generally contain chlorophyll a and related compounds due to ingestion of plant materials. Fluorescent responses of these compounds ... Keywords: Fecal contamination, Fluorescence, Food safety, Multispectral imaging

Alan M. Lefcourt; Moon S. Kim; Yud-Ren Chen

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Guide for Characterization of Sites Contaminated with Energetic Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the remediation of federal facility sites contaminated with explosives or radioactive wastes. EPA/625/R-93 be contaminated by EM: · Firing ranges - Small-arms ranges - Artillery ranges - Anti-tank ranges - Tank/013. EPA Method (1994) Nitroaromatics and nitramines by HPLC. In Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste

373

Toxicology and Risk Assessment for Process Contaminants (3-MCPD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Toxicology and Risk Assessment references for 3-MCPD (3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol )or process contaminants. Toxicology and Risk Assessment for Process Contaminants (3-MCPD) 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid analysis aocs apri

374

Potential Contaminant Pathways from Hydraulically Fractured Shale to Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Contaminant Pathways from Hydraulically Fractured Shale to Aquifers by Tom Myers Abstract Hydraulic fracturing of deep shale beds to develop natural gas has caused concern regarding the potential and preferential flow through fractures--could allow the transport of contaminants from the fractured shale

375

ORISE: Dose Coefficients for Intakes of Radionuclides via Contaminated  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dose Coefficients for Intakes of Radionuclides via Contaminated Wounds Dose Coefficients for Intakes of Radionuclides via Contaminated Wounds Dose coefficients for 38 radionuclides based on NCRP Wound Model and ICRP biokinetic models This report is intended to assist health physics and medical staff in more rapidly assessing the potential dosimetric consequences of a contaminated wound. The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Wound Model describing the retention of selected radionuclides at the site of a contaminated wound and their uptake into the transfer compartment has been combined with the International Commission on Radiological Protection element-specific systemic models for those radionuclides to derive dose coefficients for intakes via contaminated wounds. Examples are also provided on using the dose coefficients to generate derived reference

376

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments April 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Deep Vadose Zone - Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI) partnered with the Vadose Zone Journal to create a special section of the journal's November 2012 issue. DVZ-AFRI conducted a symposium at the annual American Chemical Society meeting on "Understanding Behavior and Fate of Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments." They produced 12 papers that present novel approaches to characterize, monitor, remediate and predict the transport and fate of contaminants in vadose zone environments, many of which highlight recent work at the Hanford site. The publications can be accessed here. For more information, contact Skip Chamberlain with the EM's Office of Soil

377

Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this User's Guide is to provide instructors with an overview of the key points covered in the video. The Student Handout portion of this Guide is designed to assist the instructor in reviewing those points with students. The Student Handout should be distributed to students after the video is shown and the instructor should use the Guide to facilitate a discussion on key activities and duties at the scene. PRE-HOSPITAL PRACTICES FOR HANDLING A RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED PATIENT More Documents & Publications Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient

378

Methods for removing contaminant matter from a porous material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

Fox, Robert V. (Idaho Falls, ID); Avci, Recep (Bozeman, MT); Groenewold, Gary S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

379

System to control contamination during retrieval of buried TRU waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Between 1950 and 1970 the Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Plant generated transuranic (TRU) contaminated waste, which was buried at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This waste must now be retrieved and sent to a permanent disposal site. During retrieval the main contaminates to be controlled are compounds of plutonium and americium. Since these substances are small sized, and extremely mobile, airborne concentrations must be kept to a minimum to effectively eliminate personnel uptake during retrieval operations. This report describes an invention that relates to a system to control contamination due to TRU airborne particles and was developed consisting of an outer containment building, an inner containment area, a dust suppression system including an electrostatic contaminate capture subsystem, a contamination control system including a moisture control subsystem, a rapid monitoring subsystem, and a lifting and moving system including recovery and repackaging subsystems, and a lifting and moving system including recovery and repackaging subsystems.

Menkhaus, D.E.; Loomis, G.G.; Feldman, E.M.; Scott, D.W.; Mullen, C.K.; Meyer, L.C.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

Fall 1998 200 East area biological vector contamination report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the investigation into the cause of the spread of radioactive contamination in September and October 1998 at the Hanford Site's 200 East Area and its subsequent spread to the City of Richland Landfill; identify the source of the contamination; and present corrective actions. The focus and thrust of managing the incident was based on the need to accomplish the following, listed in order of importance: (1) protect the health and safety of the Site workers and the public; (2) contain and control the spread of contamination; (3) identify the source of contamination and the pathways for its spread; and (4) identify the causal factors enabling the contamination.

CONNELL, D.J.

1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Low contaminant formic acid fuel for direct liquid fuel cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A low contaminant formic acid fuel is especially suited toward use in a direct organic liquid fuel cell. A fuel of the invention provides high power output that is maintained for a substantial time and the fuel is substantially non-flammable. Specific contaminants and contaminant levels have been identified as being deleterious to the performance of a formic acid fuel in a fuel cell, and embodiments of the invention provide low contaminant fuels that have improved performance compared to known commercial bulk grade and commercial purified grade formic acid fuels. Preferred embodiment fuels (and fuel cells containing such fuels) including low levels of a combination of key contaminants, including acetic acid, methyl formate, and methanol.

Masel, Richard I. (Champaign, IL); Zhu, Yimin (Urbana, IL); Kahn, Zakia (Palatine, IL); Man, Malcolm (Vancouver, CA)

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

382

PRE-HOSPITAL PRACTICES FOR HANDLING A RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED PATIENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the enclosed printed study material do not by themselves provide sufficient skills to safely engage in or perform duties related to emergency response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. Meeting that goal is beyond the scope of this video and requires either additional specific areas of competency or more hours of training

383

Armored Enzyme Nanoparticles for Remediation of Subsurface Contaminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The remediation of subsurface contaminants is a critical problem for the Department of Energy, other government agencies, and our nation. Severe contamination of soil and groundwater exists at several DOE sites due to various methods of intentional and unintentional release. Given the difficulties involved in conventional removal or separation processes, it is vital to develop methods to transform contaminants and contaminated earth/water to reduce risks to human health and the environment. Transformation of the contaminants themselves may involve conversion to other immobile species that do not migrate into well water or surface waters, as is proposed for metals and radionuclides; or degradation to harmless molecules, as is desired for organic contaminants. Transformation of contaminated earth (as opposed to the contaminants themselves) may entail reductions in volume or release of bound contaminants for remediation. Research at Rensselaer focused on the development of haloalkane dehalogenase as a critical enzyme in the dehalogenation of contaminated materials (ultimately trichloroethylene and related pollutants). A combination of bioinformatic investigation and experimental work was performed. The bioinformatics was focused on identifying a range of dehalogenase enzymes that could be obtained from the known proteomes of major microorganisms. This work identified several candidate enzymes that could be obtained through relatively straightforward gene cloning and expression approaches. The experimental work focused on the isolation of haloalkane dehalogenase from a Xanthobacter species followed by incorporating the enzyme into silicates to form biocatalytic silicates. These are the precursors of SENs. At the conclusion of the study, dehalogenase was incorporated into SENs, although the loading was low. This work supported a single Ph.D. student (Ms. Philippa Reeder) for two years. The project ended prior to her being able to perform substantive bioinformatics efforts that would identify more promising dehalogenase enzymes. The SEN synthesis, however, was demonstrated to be partially successful with dehalogenases. Further work would provide optimized dehalogenases in SENs for use in pollution remission.

Jonathan S. Dordick; Jay Grate; Jungbae Kim

2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

384

Transuranic contaminated waste functional definition and implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to examine the problem(s) of TRU waste classification and to document the development of an easy-to-apply standard(s) to determine whether or not this waste package should be emplaced in a geologic repository for final disposition. Transuranic wastes are especially significant because they have long half-lives and some are rather radiotoxic. Transuranic radionuclides are primarily produced by single or multiple neutron capture by U-238 in fuel elements during the operation of a nuclear reactor. Reprocessing of spent fuel elements attempts to remove plutonium, but since the separation is not complete, the resulting high-activity liquids still contain some plutonium as well as other transuranics. Likewise, transuranic contamination of low-activity wastes also occurs when the transuranic materials are handled or processed, which is primarily at federal facilities involved in R and D and nuclear weapons production. Transuranics are persistent in the environment and, as a general rule, are strongly retained by soils. They are not easily transported through most food chains, although some reconcentration does take place in the aquatic food chain. They pose no special biological hazard to humans upon ingestion because they are weakly absorbed from the gastrointestional tract. A greater hazard results from inhalation since they behave like normal dust and fractionate accordingly.

Kniazewycz, B.G.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Assessment of hot gas contaminant control  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to gather data and information to assist DOE in responding to the NRC recommendation on hot gas cleanup by performing a comprehensive assessment of hot gas cleanup systems for advanced coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) including the status of development of the components of the hot gas cleanup systems, and the probable cost and performance impacts. The scope and time frame of information gathering is generally responsive to the boundaries set by the National Research council (NRC), but includes a broad range of interests and programs which cover hot gas cleanup through the year 2010. As the status of hot gas cleanup is continually changing, additional current data and information are being obtained for this effort from this 1996 METC Contractors` Review Meeting as well as from the 1996 Pittsburgh Coal Conference, and the University of Karlsruhe Symposium. The technical approach to completing this work consists of: (1) Determination of the status of hot gas cleanup technologies-- particulate collection systems, hot gas desulfurization systems, and trace contaminant removal systems; (2) Determination of hot gas cleanup systems cost and performance sensitivities. Analysis of conceptual IGCC and PFBC plant designs with hot gas cleanup have been performed. The impact of variations in hot gas cleanup technologies on cost and performance was evaluated using parametric analysis of the baseline plant designs and performance sensitivity.

Rutkowski, M.D.; Klett, M.G.; Zaharchuk, R.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Biological Treatment of Petroleum in Radiologically Contaminated Soil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This chapter describes ex situ bioremediation of the petroleum portion of radiologically co-contaminated soils using microorganisms isolated from a waste site and innovative bioreactor technology. Microorganisms first isolated and screened in the laboratory for bioremediation of petroleum were eventually used to treat soils in a bioreactor. The bioreactor treated soils contaminated with over 20,000 mg/kg total petroleum hydrocarbon and reduced the levels to less than 100 mg/kg in 22 months. After treatment, the soils were permanently disposed as low-level radiological waste. The petroleum and radiologically contaminated soil (PRCS) bioreactor operated using bioventing to control the supply of oxygen (air) to the soil being treated. The system treated 3.67 tons of PCRS amended with weathered compost, ammonium nitrate, fertilizer, and water. In addition, a consortium of microbes (patent pending) isolated at the Savannah River National Laboratory from a petroleum-contaminated site was added to the PRCS system. During operation, degradation of petroleum waste was accounted for through monitoring of carbon dioxide levels in the system effluent. The project demonstrated that co-contaminated soils could be successfully treated through bioventing and bioaugmentation to remove petroleum contamination to levels below 100 mg/kg while protecting workers and the environment from radiological contamination.

BERRY, CHRISTOPHER

2005-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

387

Comparing statistical tests for detecting soil contamination greater than background  

SciTech Connect

The Washington State Department of Ecology (WSDE) recently issued a report that provides guidance on statistical issues regarding investigation and cleanup of soil and groundwater contamination under the Model Toxics Control Act Cleanup Regulation. Included in the report are procedures for determining a background-based cleanup standard and for conducting a 3-step statistical test procedure to decide if a site is contaminated greater than the background standard. The guidance specifies that the State test should only be used if the background and site data are lognormally distributed. The guidance in WSDE allows for using alternative tests on a site-specific basis if prior approval is obtained from WSDE. This report presents the results of a Monte Carlo computer simulation study conducted to evaluate the performance of the State test and several alternative tests for various contamination scenarios (background and site data distributions). The primary test performance criteria are (1) the probability the test will indicate that a contaminated site is indeed contaminated, and (2) the probability that the test will indicate an uncontaminated site is contaminated. The simulation study was conducted assuming the background concentrations were from lognormal or Weibull distributions. The site data were drawn from distributions selected to represent various contamination scenarios. The statistical tests studied are the State test, t test, Satterthwaite`s t test, five distribution-free tests, and several tandem tests (wherein two or more tests are conducted using the same data set).

Hardin, J.W.; Gilbert, R.O.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study  

SciTech Connect

Data centers require continuous air conditioning to address high internal heat loads (heat release from equipment) and maintain indoor temperatures within recommended operating levels for computers. Air economizer cycles, which bring in large amounts of outside air to cool internal loads when weather conditions are favorable, could save cooling energy. There is reluctance from many data center owners to use this common cooling technique, however, due to fear of introducing pollutants and potential loss of humidity control. Concerns about equipment failure from airborne pollutants lead to specifying as little outside air as permissible for human occupants. To investigate contamination levels, particle monitoring was conducted at 8 data centers in Northern California. Particle counters were placed at 3 to 4 different locations within and outside of each data center evaluated in this study. Humidity was also monitored at many of the sites to determine how economizers affect humidity control. Results from this study indicate that economizers do increase the outdoor concentration in data centers, but this concentration, when averaged annually, is still below current particle concentration limits. Study results are summarized below: (1) The average particle concentrations measured at each location, both outside and at the servers, are shown in Table 1. Measurements show low particle concentrations at all data centers without economizers, regardless of outdoor particle concentrations. Particle concentrations were typically an order of magnitude below both outside particle concentrations and recently published ASHRAE standards. (2) Economizer use caused sharp increases in particle concentrations when the economizer vents were open. The particle concentration in the data centers, however, quickly dropped back to pre-economizer levels when the vents closed. Since economizers only allow outside air part of the time, the annual average concentrations still met the ASHRAE standards. However, concentration were still above the levels measured in data centers that do not use economizers (3) Current filtration in data centers is minimal (ASHRAE 40%) since most air is typically recycled. When using economizers, modest improvements in filtration (ASHRAE 85%) can reduce particle concentrations to nearly match the level found in data centers that do not use economizers. The extra cost associated with improve filters was not determined in this study. (4) Humidity was consistent and within the ASHRAE recommended levels for all data centers without economizers. Results show that, while slightly less steady, humidity in data centers with economizers can also be controlled within the ASHRAE recommended levels. However, this control of humidity reduces energy savings by limiting the hours the economizer vents are open. (5) The potential energy savings from economizer use has been measured in one data center. When economizers were active, mechanical cooling power dropped by approximately 30%. Annual savings at this center is estimated within the range of 60-80 MWh/year, representing approximately a 5% savings off the mechanical energy load of the data center. Incoming temperatures and humidity at this data center were conservative relative to the ASHRAE acceptable temperature and humidity ranges. Greater savings may be available if higher temperature humidity levels in the data center area were permitted. The average particle concentrations measured at each of the eight data center locations are shown in Table 1. The data centers ranged in size from approximately 5,000 ft{sup 2} to 20,000 ft{sup 2}. The indoor concentrations and humidity in Table 1 represents measurements taken at the server rack. Temperature measurements at the server rack consistently fell between 65-70 F. The Findings section contains a discussion of the individual findings from each center. Data centers currently operate under very low contamination levels. Economizers can be expected to increase the particle concentration in data centers, but the increase appears to still be

Shehabi, Arman; Tschudi, William; Gadgil, Ashok

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

389

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Texaco Dual Action Pumping System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Texaco Dual Action Pumping System Texaco Dual Action Pumping System PROJECT TEST RESULTS March 16, 1998 Michael R. Tyler Project Manager Abstract The Texaco Dual Action Pumping System (DAPS) is designed to separate water from the oil in the casing-tubing annulas and inject most of the water into a lower formation while lifting the oil and remaining water to the surface. As oil production declines in a well the water production can increase. The lifting cost can be reduced per barrel of oil if less water is brought to the surface and processed. The DAPS was installed in a well that had been producing four (4) barrels of oil per day (bopd) and 46 barrels of water per day (bwpd), from the zone that became the injection zone. The well was recompleted in a shallower zone that was expected to yield an excessive quantity of

390

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1,000 words (plus % Fluor Daniel (NPOSR), Inc. 6 pages of data) 907 North Poplar, Suite 100 First Rights Only Casper, Wyoming 82601 1994 RMOTC ('107) 261-5000, ext....

391

Novel Precipitation Hardened Aluminum Alloys for Oilfield Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amorphous Coatings Produced by Spray Forming and Thermal Spray of Fe-Cr- Nb-B ... Fluorescent Nanoparticle Tracers for Oil Exploration and Production.

392

Property Enhancement of Oilfield Alloys through Ultrasonic Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrosion of Mild Steel in Extreme Oil and Gas Environments Corrosion ... Fluorescent Nanoparticle Tracers for Oil Exploration and Production Formation of...

393

Synthesis of Disintegrable Metal Composite for Oilfield Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... with enhanced corrosion rate for use in self-disintegratable tools in oil and gas ... Doing Projects in a Foreign Language Communications Management,...

394

Treatment of Oilfield Produced Water with Dissolved Air Flotation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Produced water is one of the major by products of oil and gas exploitation which is produced in large amounts up to 80% of the (more)

Jaji, Kehinde Temitope

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Integrating Nuclear Energy to Oilfield Operations Two Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fossil fuel resources that require large energy inputs for extraction, such as the Canadian oil sands and the Green River oil shale resource in the western USA, could benefit from the use of nuclear power instead of power generated by natural gas combustion. This paper discusses the technical and economic aspects of integrating nuclear energy with oil sands operations and the development of oil shale resources. A high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) that produces heat in the form of high pressure steam (no electricity production) was selected as the nuclear power source for both fossil fuel resources. Both cases were based on 50,000 bbl/day output. The oil sands case was a steam-assisted, gravity-drainage (SAGD) operation located in the Canadian oil sands belt. The oil shale development was an in-situ oil shale retorting operation located in western Colorado, USA. The technical feasibility of the integrating nuclear power was assessed. The economic feasibility of each case was evaluated using a discounted cash flow, rate of return analysis. Integrating an HTGR to both the SAGD oil sands operation and the oil shale development was found to be technically feasible for both cases. In the oil sands case, integrating an HTGR eliminated natural gas combustion and associated CO2 emissions, although there were still some emissions associated with imported electrical power. In the in situ oil shale case, integrating an HTGR reduced CO2 emissions by 88% and increased natural gas production by 100%. Economic viabilities of both nuclear integrated cases were poorer than the non-nuclear-integrated cases when CO2 emissions were not taxed. However, taxing the CO2 emissions had a significant effect on the economics of the non-nuclear base cases, bringing them in line with the economics of the nuclear-integrated cases. As we move toward limiting CO2 emissions, integrating non-CO2-emitting energy sources to the development of energy-intense fossil fuel resources is becoming increasingly important. This paper attempts to reduce the barriers that have traditionally separated fossil fuel development and application of nuclear power and to promote serious discussion of ideas about hybrid energy systems.

Eric P. Robertson; Lee O. Nelson; Michael G. McKellar; Anastasia M. Gandrik; Mike W. Patterson

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

A method of fabricating coated splices for oilfield applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method is needed to make a critical splice for a downhole tool in the petroleum industry. The goal is to connect two wires, cover the connection with a protective coating, and then assess the integrity of the finished ...

Killian, Lauren A. (Lauren Ashley), 1981-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is also possible. Well 83A4 at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 was selected as a test well. This well is rod pumped and had a stable production history. It produced enough...

398

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

controller that remotely monitors and indicates the power utilized by the electric motor driving a conventional beam pumping unit. The parameters monitored include the...

399

Mercury Contamination in the Northeastern United States: Science-Based Decision Making About Fish Consumption .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mercury contamination poses a known threat to human health, yet the degree of contamination and resulting human exposure remains unknown in many regions. Assessments of (more)

Shayler, Hannah

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

A Comparison of Popular Remedial Technologies for Petroleum Contaminated Soils from Leaking Underground Storage Tanks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1992. Bioremediation of Petroleum Contaminated Sites. BocaApplied Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons. Columbus:Eve. 1998. Remediation of Petroleum Contaminated Soils. Boca

Kujat, Jonathon D.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

CO2-H2O Mixtures in the Geological Sequestration of CO2. II. Partitioning in Chloride Brines at 12-100 °C and 1-600 bar.  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

CO CO 2 -H 2 O Mixtures in the Geological Sequestration of CO 2 . II. Partitioning in Chloride Brines at 12-100°C and up to 600 bar. Nicolas Spycher and Karsten Pruess Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 90-1116, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California, USA September 2004 ABSTRACT Correlations presented by Spycher et al. (2003) to compute the mutual solubilities of CO 2 and H 2 O are extended to include the effect of chloride salts in the aqueous phase. This is accomplished by including, in the original formulation, activity coefficients for aqueous CO 2 derived from several literature sources, primarily for NaCl solutions. Best results are obtained when combining the solubility correlations of Spycher et al. (2003) with the activity coefficient formulation of Rumpf et al. (1994) and Duan and Sun (2003), which

402

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater July 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov Tania Reyes, CHPRC (509) 373-6828 Tania_Reyes@rl.gov Department of Energy goal for fiscal year 2013 met early Note: Photos and graphics are available for downloading on our website link: http://ow.ly/mO5cT RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) has exceeded this year's goal for treating 1.4 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site in Washington state. "In the last few years, DOE built three new groundwater treatment facilities, and now we are seeing the results," said Briant Charboneau,

403

Mercury-Contaminated Hydraulic Mining Debris in San Francisco Bay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S, and Flegal AR 2008. Mercury in the San Francisco Estuary.may 2010 Mercury-Contaminated Hydraulic Mining Debris in Sancontaminants such as ele- mental mercury and cyanide used in

Bouse, Robin M; Fuller, Christopher C; Luoma, Sam; Hornberger, Michelle I; Jaffe, Bruce E; Smith, Richard E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Assessment of SRS radiological liquid and airborne contaminants and pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compiles and documents the radiological critical-contaminant/critical-pathway analysis performed for SRS. The analysis covers radiological releases to the atmosphere and to surface water, which are the principal media that carry contaminants off site. During routine operations at SRS, limited amounts of radionuclides are released to the environment through atmospheric and/or liquid pathways. These releases potentially result in exposure to offsite people. Though the groundwater beneath an estimated 5 to 10 percent of SRS has been contaminated by radionuclides, there is no evidence that groundwater contaminated with these constituents has migrated offsite (Arnett, 1996). Therefore, with the notable exception of radiological source terms originating from shallow surface water migration into site streams, onsite groundwater was not considered as a potential exposure pathway to offsite people.

Jannik, G.T.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Decontaminating and Melt Recycling Tritium Contaminated Stainless Steel  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and several university and industrial partners are evaluating recycling radioactively contaminated stainless steel. The goal of this program is to recycle contaminated stainless steel scrap from US Department of Energy national defense facilities. There is a large quantity of stainless steel at the DOE Savannah River Site from retired heavy water moderated Nuclear material production reactors (for example heat exchangers and process water piping), that will be used in pilot studies of potential recycle processes. These parts are contaminated by fission products, activated species, and tritium generated by neutron irradiation of the primary reactor coolant, which is heavy (deuterated) water. This report reviews current understanding of tritium contamination of stainless steel and previous studies of decontaminating tritium exposed stainless steel. It also outlines stainless steel refining methods, and proposes recommendations based on this review.

Clark, E.A.

1995-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

406

Catalytic destruction of groundwater contaminants in reactive extraction wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system for remediating groundwater contaminated with halogenated solvents, certain metals and other inorganic species based on catalytic reduction reactions within reactive well bores. The groundwater treatment uses dissolved hydrogen as a reducing agent in the presence of a metal catalyst, such a palladium, to reduce halogenated solvents (as well as other substituted organic compounds) to harmless species (e.g., ethane or methane) and immobilize certain metals to low valence states. The reactive wells function by removing water from a contaminated water-bearing zone, treating contaminants with a well bore using catalytic reduction, and then reinjecting the treated effluent into an adjacent water-bearing zone. This system offers the advantages of a compact design with a minimal surface footprint (surface facilities) and the destruction of a broad suite of contaminants without generating secondary waste streams.

McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Reinhard, Martin (Stanford, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at 331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal for the Rock Springs In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Test Site remediation that would be performed at the Rock Springs site in Sweetwater County, Wyoming. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 31, 2000 EA-1331: Finding of No Significant Impact Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site July 31, 2000 EA-1331: Final Environmental Assessment

408

Categorical Exclusion for Pinnacle Peak Substation PCB contaminated Electrical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion for Pinnacle Peak Substation PCB contaminated Electrical Equipment Removal Project located north of Phoenix, Maricopa County, Arizona RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION A. Proposed Action: Western proposes drain and dispose of PCB contaminated oil from two bushings, and decontaminate one· bushing and rack, break apart PCB contaminated concrete and excavate PCB contaminated soil at Pinnacle Peak Substation. Western will be use existing access roads and vehicles such as cranes, backhoes, dozers, bucket trucks, crew trucks and pickup trucks to bring personnel and equipment to the work area. This work is necessary to maintain the safety and reliability of the bulk electrical system. The project is located in Maricopa County, Arizona. The attached map shows the

409

NETL: Gasification Systems - Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Project Number: DE-SC00008243 TDA Research, Inc. is developing a high-capacity, low-cost sorbent that removes anhydrous ammonia (NH3), mercury (Hg), and trace contaminants from coal- and coal/biomass-derived syngas. The clean-up system will be used after the bulk warm gas sulfur removal step, and remove NH3 and Hg in a regenerable manner while irreversibly capturing all other trace metals (e.g., Arsenic, Selenium) reducing their concentrations to sub parts per million (ppm) levels. Current project plans include identifying optimum chemical composition and structure that provide the best sorbent performance for removing trace contaminants, determining the effect of operating parameters, conducting multiple-cycle experiments to test the life of the sorbent for NH3 and Hg removal, and conducting a preliminary design of the sorbent reactor.

410

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater July 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov Tania Reyes, CHPRC (509) 373-6828 Tania_Reyes@rl.gov Department of Energy goal for fiscal year 2013 met early Note: Photos and graphics are available for downloading on our website link: http://ow.ly/mO5cT RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) has exceeded this year's goal for treating 1.4 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site in Washington state. "In the last few years, DOE built three new groundwater treatment facilities, and now we are seeing the results," said Briant Charboneau,

411

EA-1599: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located at the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

99: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located 99: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky, for Controlled Radiological Applications EA-1599: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky, for Controlled Radiological Applications Summary This EA was being prepared to evaluate potential environmental impacts of a proposal to dispose of nickel scrap that is volumetrically contaminated with radioactive materials and that DOE recovered from equipment it had used in uranium enrichment. This EA is on hold. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities at this time.

412

Groundwater Contamination and Treatment at Department of Energy Sites 2008  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this document is to provide DOE Program/Project Managers, upper management, and other interested parties with a snapshot in time of the status of major groundwater contamination and...

413

Groundwater Contamination and Treatment at Department of Energy Sites 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document provides DOE Program/Project Managers, senior management, and other interested parties with a snapshot in time of the status of major groundwater contamination and remedial approaches...

414

Presentations and Papers on Process Contaminants (3-MCPD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentations and papers 3-MCPD EFL, ILSI World Conference on Oilseed Processing, Fats & Oils Processing, Biofuels & Applications Presentations and Papers on Process Contaminants (3-MCPD) 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid anal

415

Influence of Ground Clutter Contamination on Polarimetric Radar Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of ground clutter contamination on the estimation of polarimetric radar parameters, horizontal reflectivity (Zh), differential reflectivity (Zdr), correlation coefficient (?h?), and differential propagation phase (dp) was examined. ...

Katja Friedrich; Urs Germann; Pierre Tabary

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Mercury-Contaminated Hydraulic Mining Debris in San Francisco Bay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

may 2010 Mercury-Contaminated Hydraulic Mining Debris in SanCA 94025 Abstract The hydraulic gold-mining process usedsediment created by hydraulic gold mining in the Sierra

Bouse, Robin M; Fuller, Christopher C; Luoma, Sam; Hornberger, Michelle I; Jaffe, Bruce E; Smith, Richard E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Rapid and Robust Detection Methods for Poison and Microbial Contamination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Real-time on-site monitoring of analytes is currently in high demand for food contamination, water, medicines, and ingestible household products that were never tested appropriately. Here we introduce chemical methods for ...

Lu, Peter J.

418

Mechanisms of metal release from contaminated coastal sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fate of trace metals in contaminated coastal sediments is poorly understood, yet critical for effective coastal management. The aim of this thesis is to investigate and quantify the mechanisms leading to the release ...

Kalnejais, Linda H

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Contaminant Fate and Transport in North America: From Emission...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contaminant Fate and Transport in North America: From Emission to Human Exposure Speaker(s): Mathew MacLeod Date: March 1, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of...

420

Effect of water contamination on aging of hydraulic oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A. Rozenberg, Influence of Lubricating Oils on Reliability and Life of ... Oil samples were contaminated with water by mixing with 0.I, 0.5 ... The reserve of antioxi-.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Groundwater Contamination and Treatment at Department of Energy Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this document is to provide DOE Program/Project Managers, upper management, and other interested parties with a snapshot in time of the status of major groundwater contamination and...

422

Transuranic contaminated waste form characterization and data base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume contains 5 appendices. Title listing are: technologies for recovery of transuranics; nondestructive assay of TRU contaminated wastes; miscellaneous waste characteristics; acceptance criteria for TRU waste; and TRU waste treatment technologies.

Kniazewycz, B.G.; McArthur, W.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Fuzzy one-class classification model using contamination neighborhoods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fuzzy classification model is studied in the paper. It is based on the contaminated (robust) model which produces fuzzy expected risk measures characterizing classification errors. Optimal classification parameters of the models are derived by minimizing ...

Lev V. Utkin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Evaporative Evolution of a Na-Cl-NO3-K-Ca-SO4-Mg-Si Brine at 95(degree)C: Experiments and Modeling relevant to Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A synthetic Topopah Spring Tuff water representative of one type of pore water at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (USA) was evaporated at 95 C in a series of experiments to determine the geochemical controls for brines that may form on, and possibly impact upon the long-term integrity of waste containers and drip shields at the designated high-level, nuclear-waste repository. Solution chemistry, condensed vapor chemistry, and precipitate mineralogy were used to identify important chemical divides and to validate geochemical calculations of evaporating water chemistry using a high temperature Pitzer thermodynamic database. The water evolved towards a complex ''sulfate type'' brine that contained about 45 mol% Na, 40 mol% Cl, 9 mol% NO{sub 3}, 5 mol% K, and less than 1 mol% each of SO{sub 4}, Ca, Mg, {Sigma}CO{sub 2}(aq), F, and Si. All measured ions in the condensed vapor phase were below detection limits. The mineral precipitates identified were halite, anhydrite, bassanite, niter and nitratine. Trends in the solution composition and identification of CaSO{sub 4} solids suggest that fluorite, carbonate, sulfate, and magnesium-silicate precipitation control the aqueous solution composition of sulfate type waters by removing fluoride, calcium, and magnesium during the early stages of evaporation. In most cases, the high temperature Pitzer database, used by EQ3/6 geochemical code, sufficiently predicts water composition and mineral precipitation during evaporation. Predicted solution compositions are generally within a factor of two of the experimental values. The model predicts that sepiolite, bassanite, amorphous silica, calcite, halite and brucite are the solubility controlling mineral phases.

Alai, M; Sutton, M; Carroll, S A

2004-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

425

Contaminant Boundary at the Faultless Underground Nuclear Test  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) have reached agreement on a corrective action strategy applicable to address the extent and potential impact of radionuclide contamination of groundwater at underground nuclear test locations. This strategy is described in detail in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 2000). As part of the corrective action strategy, the nuclear detonations that occurred underground were identified as geographically distinct corrective action units (CAUs). The strategic objective for each CAU is to estimate over a 1,000-yr time period, with uncertainty quantified, the three-dimensional extent of groundwater contamination that would be considered unsafe for domestic and municipal use. Two types of boundaries (contaminant and compliance) are discussed in the FFACO that will map the three-dimensional extent of radionuclide contamination. The contaminant boundary will identify the region wi th 95 percent certainty that contaminants do not exist above a threshold value. It will be prepared by the DOE and presented to NDEP. The compliance boundary will be produced as a result of negotiation between the DOE and NDEP, and can be coincident with, or differ from, the contaminant boundary. Two different thresholds are considered for the contaminant boundary. One is based on the enforceable National Primary Drinking Water Regulations for radionuclides, which were developed as a requirement of the Safe Drinking Water Act. The other is a risk-based threshold considering applicable lifetime excess cancer-risk-based criteria The contaminant boundary for the Faultless underground nuclear test at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) is calculated using a newly developed groundwater flow and radionuclide transport model that incorporates aspects of both the original three-dimensional model (Pohlmann et al., 1999) and the two-dimensional model developed for the Faultless data decision analysis (DDA) (Pohll and Mihevc, 2000). This new model includes the uncertainty in the three-dimensional spatial distribution of lithology and hydraulic conductivity from the 1999 model as well as the uncertainty in the other flow and transport parameters from the 2000 DDA model. Additionally, the new model focuses on a much smaller region than was included in the earlier models, that is, the subsurface within the UC-1 land withdrawal area where the 1999 model predicted radionuclide transport will occur over the next 1,000 years. The purpose of this unclassified document is to present the modifications to the CNTA groundwater flow and transport model, to present the methodology used to calculate contaminant boundaries, and to present the Safe Drinking Water Act and risk-derived contaminant boundaries for the Faultless underground nuclear test CAU.

Greg Pohll; Karl Pohlmann; Jeff Daniels; Ahmed Hassan; Jenny Chapman

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

System to control contamination during retrieval of buried TRU waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system to control contamination during the retrieval of hazardous waste comprising an outer containment building, an inner containment building, within the outer containment building, an electrostatic radioactive particle recovery unit connected to and in communication with the inner and outer containment buildings, and a contaminate suppression system including a moisture control subsystem, and a rapid monitoring system having the ability to monitor conditions in the inner and outer containment buildings.

Menkhaus, Daniel E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Loomis, Guy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mullen, Carlan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Scott, Donald W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Feldman, Edgar M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Meyer, Leroy C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

A multilayer groundwater sampler for characterizing contaminant plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report describes activities related to the design and initial demonstration of a passive multilayer groundwater sampling system. The apparatus consists of remotely controlled cylinders filled with deionized water which are connected in tandem. Vertical fine structure of contaminants are easily defined. Using the apparatus in several wells may lead to three dimensional depictions of groundwater contamination, thereby providing the information necessary for site characterization and remediation.

Kaplan, E.; Heiser, J.

1992-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

428

A multilayer groundwater sampler for characterizing contaminant plumes. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This final report describes activities related to the design and initial demonstration of a passive multilayer groundwater sampling system. The apparatus consists of remotely controlled cylinders filled with deionized water which are connected in tandem. Vertical fine structure of contaminants are easily defined. Using the apparatus in several wells may lead to three dimensional depictions of groundwater contamination, thereby providing the information necessary for site characterization and remediation.

Kaplan, E.; Heiser, J.

1992-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

429

Phytoremediation of contaminated soils and groundwater: lessons from the field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of plants and associated microorganisms to remove, contain, inactivate, or degrade harmful environmental contaminants (generally termed phytoremediation) and to revitalize contaminated sites is gaining more and more attention. In this review, prerequisites for a successful remediation will be discussed. The performance of phytoremediation as an environmental remediation technology indeed depends on several factors including the extent of soil contamination, the availability and accessibility of contaminants for rhizosphere microorganisms and uptake into roots (bioavailability), and the ability of the plant and its associated microorganisms to intercept, absorb, accumulate, and/or degrade the contaminants. The main aim is to provide an overview of existing field experience in Europe concerning the use of plants and their associated microorganisms whether or not combined with amendments for the revitalization or remediation of contaminated soils and undeep groundwater. Contaminations with trace elements (except radionuclides) and organics will be considered. Because remediation with transgenic organisms is largely untested in the field, this topic is not covered in this review. Brief attention will be paid to the economical aspects, use, and processing of the biomass. It is clear that in spite of a growing public and commercial interest and the success of several pilot studies and field scale applications more fundamental research still is needed to better exploit the metabolic diversity of the plants themselves, but also to better understand the complex interactions between contaminants, soil, plant roots, and microorganisms (bacteria and mycorrhiza) in the rhizosphere. Further, more data are still needed to quantify the underlying economics, as a support for public acceptance and last but not least to convince policy makers and stakeholders (who are not very familiar with such techniques).

Vangronsveld, J.; van der Lelie, D.; Herzig, R.; Weyens, N.; Boulet, J.; Adriaensen, K.; Ruttens, A.; Thewys, T.; Vassilev, A.; Meers, E.; Nehnevajova, E.; Mench, M.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Handbook of Remedial Alternatives for MGP Sites with Contaminated Sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminated sediment management is a rapidly developing and maturing field of environmental engineering, with an expansive set of publicly available documents in the scientific and engineering literature. This Handbook of Remedial Alternatives for MGP Sites with Contaminated Sediments provides a compendium of the state-of-the-practice from the literature, and augments it with practical case-study experience from the field. It is intended to provide MGP site-managers with a single source document for eva...

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

431

System to control contamination during retrieval of buried TRU waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described to control contamination during the retrieval of hazardous waste comprising an outer containment building, an inner containment building, within the outer containment building, an electrostatic radioactive particle recovery unit connected to and in communication with the inner and outer containment buildings, and a contaminate suppression system including a moisture control subsystem, and a rapid monitoring system having the ability to monitor conditions in the inner and outer containment buildings.

Menkhaus, D.E.; Loomis, G.G.; Mullen, C.K.; Scott, D.W.; Feldman, E.M.; Meyer, L.C.

1993-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

432

Kinetics of Cd Release from Some Contaminated Calcareous Soils  

SciTech Connect

Contamination of soils with heavy metals may pose long-term risk to groundwater quality leading to health implications. Bioavailability of heavy metals, like cadmium (Cd) is strongly affected by sorption and desorption processes. The release of heavy metals from contaminated soils is a major contamination risks to natural waters. The release of Cd from contaminated soils is strongly influenced by its mobility and bioavailability. In this study, the kinetics of Cd desorption from ten samples of contaminated calcareous soils, with widely varying physicochemical properties, were studied using 0.01 M EDTA extraction. The median percentage of Cd released was about 27.7% of the total extractable Cd in the soils. The release of Cd was characterized by an initial fast release rate (of labile fractions) followed by a slower release rate (of less labile fractions) and a model of two first-order reactions adequately describes the observed release of Cd from the studied soil samples. There was positive correlation between the amount of Cd released at first phase of release and Cd in exchangeable fraction, indicating that this fraction of Cd is the main fraction controlling the Cd in the kinetic experiments. There was strongly negative correlation between the amount of Cd released at first and second phases of release and residual fraction, suggesting that this fraction did not contribute in Cd release in the kinetic experiments. The results can be used to provide information for evaluation of Cd potential toxicity and ecological risk from contaminated calcareous soils.

Sajadi Tabar, S.; Jalali, M., E-mail: jalali@basu.ac.ir [Bu-Ali Sina University, Department of Soil Science, College of Agriculture (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

Management of Contaminated Autologous Grafts in Plastic Surgery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Contamination of autologous grafts unfortunately occurs in plastic surgery, but the literature provides no guidance for management of such incidents. Methods: American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery members were asked to complete an online survey that asked about the number and causes of graft contaminations experienced, how surgeons dealt with the problem, the clinical outcomes, and patient disclosure. Results: Nineteen hundred surgeons were asked to participate in the survey, and 223 responded. Of these, 70 % had experienced at least 1 graft contamination incident, with 26 % experiencing 4 or more. The most frequently reported reason for graft contamination was a graft falling on the floor (reported by 75%). Nearly two thirds of the contaminated grafts related to craniofacial procedures. Ninety-four percent of grafts were managed with decontamination and completion of the operation. The most common method of decontamination was washing with povidone-iodine, but this practice is contrary to recommendations in the literature. Only 3 surgeons (1.9%) said a clinical infection developed following decontaminated graft use. Patients were not informed in 60 % of graft contamination incidents. The survey results and review of the literature led

Robert F. Centeno; A Ankit R. Desai; Marla E. Watson; Ma C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Bioaugmentation of TNT-contaminated soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microbial transformation of trinitrotoluene (TNT) in phics. contaminated soil was investigated in this research. A Bacillus sp., isolated from soil obtained from an army ammunition facility, was used to enhance the rate of TNT removal over a 360 day test period. The soil treatments in this study included: (1) the Bacillus sp., (2) the existing indigenous microorganisms, and (3) a sterile control. The disappearance of TNT, as measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), was compared to the reduction in mutagenic activity of hexane:acetone solvent extracts, as measured in the Salmonella/microsome assay with the histidine requiring TA98 tester strain. The results indicated a similar TNT removal rate in all three treatments. The TNT in the microbial treatments started at approximately 47[]13 mg g[] soil. By day 360, this concentration was reduced to 28[]10 mg g soil in the Bacillus sp the indigenous microbial treatment. The sterile control treatment and 26[]8 mg g[] which was reduced to 22[]2 started with a day 0 TNT concentration of 31[]6 mg g [] day 360. This represented a disappearance of between 30-40% of the g [] y original TNT in all three treatments. The reduction in mutagenicity, as indicated by weighted activity calculations, differed between the microbial treatments and the sterile control. A 50-60% reduction was observed in the microbial treatments. In the boxes treated with the addition of the Bacillus sp. the weighted activity at a dose of 16 :g/plate started at 49[]13 net revenants per microgram solvent extract on microgram after 360 days. The solvent extracts from soil treated with indigenous microorganisms went from a weighted activity of 47[]15 net revenants per microgram on day 0 to 17[]5 on day 360. The sterile control did not reduce mutagenicity by any appreciable amount. The day 0 weighted activity was measured to be 44[]11 net revenants per microgram solvent extract and on day 360 it was 50[]1 . The TNT concentrations in the sterile control samples were lowest throughout the study however, the mutagenicity was highest.

Bokelmann, Annamarie

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Uraniferous Phosphates: Resource, Security Risk, or Contaminant  

SciTech Connect

The escalation of the price of uranium (U) yellow cake (summer high = $130/0.454 kg (lb) has called into question the continuing availability of sufficient stockpiles and ores to process. As was developed during the years following World War II, the establishment and maintenance of a strategic inventory is a reasonable consideration for today. Therefore, it becomes critical to look at potential secondary resources beyond the classical ore suites now being utilized. The most economically viable future secondary source seems to be the byproducts of the beneficiation of phosphoric acids derived from phosphate ores. Phosphorous (P) is an essential nutrient for plants; its deficiency can result in highly restrictive limitations in crop productivity. Acidic soils in tropical and subtropical regions of the world are often P deficient with high P-sorption (fixation) capacities. To correct this deficiency, efficient water-soluble P fertilizers are required. The use of raw phosphate rocks not only adds phosphate but also its contained contaminants, including uranium to the treated land. Another immediate difficulty is phosphogypsum, the standard byproduct of simple extraction. It, for practical purposes, has been selectively classified as TENORM by regulators. The imposition of these standards presents major current and future disposal and re-utilization problems. Therefore, establishing an economically viable system that allows for uranium byproduct extraction from phosphoric acids is desirable. Such a system would be dependent on yellow cake base price stability, reserve estimates, political conditions, nation-state commitment, and dependence on nuclear energy. The accumulation of yellow cake from the additional extraction process provides a valuable commodity and allows the end acid to be a more environmentally acceptable product. The phosphogypsum already accumulated, as well as that which is in process, will not make a viable component for a radiation disposal devise (RDD). Concern for weapon proliferation by rogue nation states from the byproduct production of yellowcake is an unlikely scenario. To extract the fissile U-235 (0.07%) isotope from the yellowcake (99.3%) requires the erection of a costly major gaseous diffusion or a cascading centrifuge facility. Such a facility would be extremely difficult to mask. Therefore, from a diminished security risk and positive economic and environmental viewpoints, the utilization of a phosphoric acid beneficiation process extracting uranium is desirable. (authors)

LeMone, D.V.; Goodell, Ph.C. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas at El Paso, Texas (United States); Gibbs, S.G. [U. T. Houston School of Public Health, El Paso, Texas (United States); Winston, J.W. [Medical Physicist, Radiological Physics, Inc., El Paso, Texas (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Texas Water Resources: Vulnerability from Contaminants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical models of flow and transport are commonly applied for the sustainable management of water resources and for the selection of appropriate remediation techniques. However, these numerical models are not always accurate due to uncertain parameters and the disparity of scales across which observations are made, hydrological processes occur, and modeling is conducted. The modeling framework becomes further complex because hydrologic processes are coupled with chemical and biological processes. This dissertation focuses on the most widespread contaminants of surface and ground water, which are E. coli and nitrate, respectively. Therefore, this research investigates the linkages between bio-chemical and hydrologic processes for E. coli transport, explores the spatio-temporal variability of nitrate, quantifies uncertainty, and develops models for both E. coli and nitrate transport that better characterize these biogeochemical linkages. A probabilistic framework in the form of Bayesian Neural Networks (BNN) was used to estimate E. coli loads in surface streams and was compared with a conventional model LOADEST. This probabilistic framework is crucial when water quality data are scarce, and most models require a large number of mechanistic parameters to estimate E. coli concentrations. Results indicate that BNN provides better characterization of E. coli at higher loadings. Results also provide the physical, chemical, and biological factors that are critical in the estimation of E. coli concentrations in Plum Creek, Texas. To explore model parameters that control the transport of E. coli in the groundwater (GW) and surface water systems, research was conducted in Lake Granbury, Texas. Results highlight the importance of flow regimes and seasonal variability on E. coli transport. To explore the spatio-temporal variability of nitrate across the Trinity and Ogallala aquifers in Texas, an entropy-based method and a numerical study were employed. Results indicate that the overall mean nitrate-N has declined from 1940 to 2008 in the Trinity Aquifer as opposed to an increase in the Ogallala Aquifer. The numerical study results demonstrate the effect of different factors like GW pumping, flow parameters, hydrogeology of the site at multiple spatial scales. To quantify the uncertainty of nitrate transport in GW, an ensemble Kalman filter was used in combination with the MODFLOW-MT3DMS models. Results indicate that the EnKF notably improves the estimation of nitrate-N concentrations in GW. A conceptual modeling framework with deterministic physical processes and stochastic bio-chemical processes was devised to independently model E. coli and nitrate transport in the subsurface. Results indicate that model structural uncertainty provides useful insights to modeling E. coli and nitrate transport.

Dwivedi, Dipankar

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

NOVEL TECHNOLOGIES FOR GASEOUS CONTAMINANTS CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to develop technologies for cleaning/conditioning the syngas from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system to meet the tolerance limits for contaminants such as H{sub 2}S, COS, NH{sub 3}, HCN, HCl, and alkali for fuel cell and chemical production applications. RTI's approach is to develop a modular system that (1) removes reduced sulfur species to sub-ppm levels using a hybrid process consisting of a polymer membrane and a regenerable ZnO-coated monolith or a mixed metal oxide sorbent; (2) removes hydrogen chloride vapors to sub-ppm levels using an inexpensive, high-surface area material; and (3) removes NH{sub 3} with acidic adsorbents. RTI is working with MEDAL, Inc., and North Carolina State University (NCSU) to develop polymer membrane technology for bulk removal of H{sub 2}S from syngas. These membranes are being engineered to remove the acid gas components (H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O) from syngas by focusing on the ''solubility selectivity'' of the novel polymer compositions. The desirable components of the syngas (H{sub 2} and CO) are maintained at high-pressure conditions as a non-permeate stream while the impurities are transported across the membrane to the low pressure side. RTI tested commercially available and novel materials from MEDAL using a high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) permeation apparatus. H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} selectivities >30 were achieved, although there was a strong negative dependence with temperature. MEDAL believes that all the polymer compositions tested so far can be prepared as hollow fiber membrane modules using the existing manufacturing technology. For fuel cell and chemical applications, additional sulfur removal (beyond that achievable with the membranes) is required. To overcome limitations of conventional ZnO pellets, RTI is testing a monolith with a thin coating of high surface area zinc-oxide based materials. Alternatively, a regenerable sorbent developed by DOE/NETL (RVS-1) is being evaluated for this application. A multi-cycle test of 2-in. (5-cm) diameter monolith samples demonstrated that HCl vapors is being accomplished by low-cost materials that combine the known effectiveness of sodium carbonate as an active matrix used with enhanced surface area supports for greater reactivity and capacity at the required operating temperatures. RTI is working with SRI International on this task. Sorbents prepared using diatomaceous earth and sepiolite, impregnated with sodium carbonate achieved steady-state HCl level <100 ppb (target is 10 ppb). Research is continuing to optimize the impregnation and calcination procedures to provide an optimum pore size distribution and other properties. RTI and SRI International have established the feasibility of a process to selectively chemisorb NH3 from syngas on high surface area molecular sieve adsorbents at high temperatures by conducting a series of temperature-programmed reactions at 225 C (437 F). Significant levels of NH{sub 3} were adsorbed on highly acidic adsorbents; the adsorbed NH{sub 3} was subsequently recovered by heating the adsorbent and the regenerated adsorbent was reused. A comprehensive technical and economic evaluation of this modular gas cleaning process was conducted by Nexant to compare capital and operating cost with existing amine based processes. Nexant estimated a total installed cost of $42 million for the RTI process for a 500 MWe IGCC plant based on its current state of development. By comparison, Nexant estimated the installed cost for an equivalent sized plant based on the Rectisol process (which would achieve the same sulfur removal specification) to be $75 million. Thus the RTI process is economically competitive with a state-of-the-art process for syngas cleanup.

B.S. Turk; T. Merkel; A. Lopez-Ortiz; R.P. Gupta; J.W. Portzer; G.N. Krishnan; B.D. Freeman; G.K. Fleming

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

438

NOVEL TECHNOLOGIES FOR GASEOUS CONTAMINANTS CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to develop technologies for cleaning/conditioning the syngas from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system to meet the tolerance limits for contaminants such as H{sub 2}S, COS, NH{sub 3}, HCN, HCl, and alkali for fuel cell and chemical production applications. RTI's approach is to develop a modular system that (1) removes reduced sulfur species to sub-ppm levels using a hybrid process consisting of a polymer membrane and a regenerable ZnO-coated monolith or a mixed metal oxide sorbent; (2) removes hydrogen chloride vapors to sub-ppm levels using an inexpensive, high-surface area material; and (3) removes NH{sub 3} with acidic adsorbents. RTI is working