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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

A cost-effective statistical screening method to detect oilfield brine contamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A statistical screening method has been developed using Tolerance Limits for barium (Ba{sup +2}) to identify contamination of a fresh-water aquifer by oilfield brines. The method requires an understanding of the local hydrochemistry of oilfield brines, inexpensive, Publicly available hydrochemical data, a single sample analysis from the suspect well and the application of a simple statistical procedure. While this method may not provide absolute evidence of oilfield brine contamination of a fresh-water aquifer, it does identify conditions where brine contamination is a strong probability over other possible sources of chlorides.

Alyanak, N.; Grace, J.T.; Campbell, M.D. [United Resources International, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Characterization of a soil contaminated by oilfield brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brine contamination of soil is a common environmental problem associated with the onshore production of oil and gas. A site of extensive contamination in Oklahoma has been characterized using conductimetry, direct potentiometry (pH- and chloride-selective electrodes), and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (for Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}) to determine the extent of the contamination and the efficacy of various remediation technologies.

Al-Mutairi, K.; Harris, T. [Univ. of Tulsa, OH (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Exposure and effects of oilfield brine discharges on western sandpipers (Calidris mauri) in Nueces Bay, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Discharge of oilfield brines into fresh and estuarine waters is a common disposal practice in Texas. Petroleum crude oil (PCO) extraction from underground stores includes the removal of a significant amount of water along with the oil. Several methods may be used to separate the oil and water fractions, including tank batteries, heat separation, and skimming ponds. Disposal of the resultant produced water (oilfield brine) may be accomplished by deep-well injection or discharge to surface waters. In Texas, an estimated 766,000 barrels of oilfield brine were discharged daily into tidal waters in 1979. The maximum concentration for oil and grease in these discharges permitted by the Texas Railroad Commission is 25 ppm. Several studies have shown that oilfield brines are toxic to a wide range of marine life, yet little is known about their effects on birds and mammals. Exposure to petroleum in oilfield wastes could evoke toxicological effects in some waterbird species. Avian responses to PCO exposure are highly variable, including cessation of growth, osmoregulatory impairment, endocrine dysfunction, hemolytic anemia, altered blood chemistry, cytochrome P450 induction, reduced reproductive success, and mortality. Oilfield brine discharges may soon be the largest and most pervasive source of contaminants entering Texas estuaries. Migratory and resident birds feeding in the vicinity of discharge sites may be ingesting food items contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy metals and salts in sufficient quantities to evoke toxicity. The present study of wintering western sandpipers (Calidris mauri) that feed and roost near discharge sites sought to examine oilfield brine exposure and effects through quantification of contaminant burdens, morphological characteristics, and cytochrome P450-associated monooxygenase activities. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

Rattner, B.A.; Melancon, M.J. [National Biological Survey, Laurel, MD (United States); Capizzi, J.L. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); King, K.A. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Phoenix, AZ (United States); LeCaptain, L.J. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Spokane, WA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

New Energy Efficient Method for Cleaning Oilfield Brines with Carbon Dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEW ENERGY EFFICIENT METHOD FOR CLEANING OILFIELD BRINES WITH CARBON DIOXIDE C. T. LITTLE A. F. SEIBERT Research Engineer Technical Manager Amoco Oil Company Separations Research Program Naperville, Illinois The University of Texas Austin... dioxide to clean oilfield brines. The new treatment method, described in this work, is actually an enhancement of existing gas flotation technology. The enhancement results from the use of carbon dioxide as the sweeping gas combined with its ability...

Little, C. T.; Seibert, A. F.; Bravo, J. L.; Fair, J. R.

5

Analysis of hydrocarbon removal methods for the management of oilfield brines and produced waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and globally, the petroleum industries challenge has been to develop a high-tech and cost effective method to purify the large volumes of oilfield brines and produced water. Currently, most of the produced water requires several pre- and post- treatment methods...

Furrow, Brendan Eugene

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Origin of the oil-field brines in the Paris basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From Br{sup {minus}}/Cl{sup {minus}} ratios coupled with stable-isotope compositions, the components of deep sedimentary brines - namely, primary and secondary brines (from dissolving evaporites) and diluting waters of meteoric origin - can be identified, and in favorable cases, their respective proportions can be quantified. Dilution of primary marine brines (mother liquors of halite) by meteoric waters has occurred in the Dogger and the Keuper aquifers. The presence of highly saline brines (molality of Cl{sup {minus}} = 3.9) in the Rhaetian aquifer may be due to dissolution of primary marine halite by sea water with minor contributions of primary brines. The resulting mixture is diluted by meteoric circulation.

Matray, J.M. (Service Geochimie Minerale, Pau (France)); Fontes, J.C. (Universite de Paris-Sud, Orsay (France))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

In cooperation with Fort Peck Tribes Office of Environmental Protection Delineation of Brine Contamination in and near the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;#12;Delineation of Brine Contamination in and near the East Poplar Oil Field, Fort Peck Indian Reservation citation: Thamke, J.N., and Smith, B.D., 2014, Delineation of brine contamination in and near the EastIn cooperation with Fort Peck Tribes Office of Environmental Protection Delineation of Brine

Torgersen, Christian

8

Remediation of brine-contaminated soil using calcium nitrate, gypsum, and straw.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Salt-affected soils from point source brine contamination are common in the active oil field in SE Saskatchewan. A remediation process that included dewatering by sub-surface… (more)

Nielsen, Jennifer I.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

EVALUATIONS OF RADIONUCLIDES OF URANIUM, THORIUM, AND RADIUM ASSOCIATED WITH PRODUCED FLUIDS, PRECIPITATES, AND SLUDGES FROM OIL, GAS, AND OILFIELD BRINE INJECTION WELLS IN MISSISSIPPI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are known to be produced as a byproduct of hydrocarbon production in Mississippi. The presence of NORM has resulted in financial losses to the industry and continues to be a liability as the NORM-enriched scales and scale encrusted equipment is typically stored rather than disposed of. Although the NORM problem is well known, there is little publically available data characterizing the hazard. This investigation has produced base line data to fill this informational gap. A total of 329 NORM-related samples were collected with 275 of these samples consisting of brine samples. The samples were derived from 37 oil and gas reservoirs from all major producing areas of the state. The analyses of these data indicate that two isotopes of radium ({sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra) are the ultimate source of the radiation. The radium contained in these co-produced brines is low and so the radiation hazard posed by the brines is also low. Existing regulations dictate the manner in which these salt-enriched brines may be disposed of and proper implementation of the rules will also protect the environment from the brine radiation hazard. Geostatistical analyses of the brine components suggest relationships between the concentrations of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra, between the Cl concentration and {sup 226}Ra content, and relationships exist between total dissolved solids, BaSO{sub 4} saturation and concentration of the Cl ion. Principal component analysis points to geological controls on brine chemistry, but the nature of the geologic controls could not be determined. The NORM-enriched barite (BaSO{sub 4}) scales are significantly more radioactive than the brines. Leaching studies suggest that the barite scales, which were thought to be nearly insoluble in the natural environment, can be acted on by soil microorganisms and the enclosed radium can become bioavailable. This result suggests that the landspreading means of scale disposal should be reviewed. This investigation also suggests 23 specific components of best practice which are designed to provide a guide to safe handling of NORM in the hydrocarbon industry. The components of best practice include both worker safety and suggestions to maintain waste isolation from the environment.

Charles Swann; John Matthews; Rick Ericksen; Joel Kuszmaul

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Emplacement and release of brines from subsurface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Groundwater contamination by dense brines is addressed fromgroundwater contamination where dense brines might have beenbrines can become long-term sources of groundwater contamination

Hunt, James R; Flowers, Tracey C

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Salt caverns can be formed in underground salt formations incidentally as a result of mining or intentionally to create underground chambers for product storage or waste disposal. For more than 50 years, salt caverns have been used to store hydrocarbon products. Recently, concerns over the costs and environmental effects of land disposal and incineration have sparked interest in using salt caverns for waste disposal. Countries using or considering using salt caverns for waste disposal include Canada (oil-production wastes), Mexico (purged sulfates from salt evaporators), Germany (contaminated soils and ashes), the United Kingdom (organic residues), and the Netherlands (brine purification wastes). In the US, industry and the regulatory community are pursuing the use of salt caverns for disposal of oil-field wastes. In 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a regulatory determination exempting wastes generated during oil and gas exploration and production (oil-field wastes) from federal hazardous waste regulations--even though such wastes may contain hazardous constituents. At the same time, EPA urged states to tighten their oil-field waste management regulations. The resulting restrictions have generated industry interest in the use of salt caverns for potentially economical and environmentally safe oil-field waste disposal. Before the practice can be implemented commercially, however, regulators need assurance that disposing of oil-field wastes in salt caverns is technically and legally feasible and that potential health effects associated with the practice are acceptable. In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. It investigated regulatory issues; the types of oil-field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location considerations; and disposal operations, closure and remediation issues. It determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could, from technical and legal perspectives, be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, ANL subsequently conducted a preliminary risk assessment on the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in salt caverns. The methodology for the risk assessment included the following steps: identifying potential contaminants of concern; determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants; assessing contaminant toxicities; estimating contaminant intakes; and estimating human cancer and noncancer risks. To estimate exposure routes and pathways, four postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (for noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the EPA target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results lead to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

Elcock, D.

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

12

Description and operation of a mobile wellhead analyzer for the determination of unstable constituents in oilfield waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A brine analyzer was designed which measures pH, Eh, O/sub 2/, conductivity, S/sup 2 -/, HCO/sub 3//sup -/, CO/sub 3//sup 2 -/, and CO/sub 2/ in oilfield water at the wellhead. When brine samples are collected in the field and transported to the laboratory for analysis, many of the unstable constituents change in concentration. The amount of change depends on the sampling method, sample storage, ambient conditions, and the level of the constituents in the original sample. Thus, a wellhead analysis is necessary if reliable data are to be obtained on unstable constituents in oilfield brines.

Hoke, S.H.; Collins, A.G.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MECHANICAL SLIMHOLE TESTING SYSTEM (MSTS) MECHANICAL SLIMHOLE TESTING SYSTEM (MSTS) SLIMHOLE DRILL STEM TESTER APRIL, 1995 FC9524/95DT4 MSTS Test in Casper Wyoming April 19,1995 Background MSTS EXP-2 was shipped back to SPT for modifications and re-testing. A 4-1/2" cased well at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) in Casper Wyoming was selected. The well conditions were: Casper Well Deviation 0 Casing 4-1/2" 10.5#/ft Test depth 5380 ft BHT NOT Tubing 2-3/8" 4.7#/ft Formation Fluid Water & Oil Kill Fluid 10#/gal brine The MSTS was tested with a single 3.06" Dowell packer which was set at 5380 ft, approximately 80 off bottom. The test string was configured: MSTS EXP-2 with Inflate recorder - HPR-D Formation Gage - HPR-D Single packer, Dowell 3.06 TFV - 12 inch stroke no cam 900 ft of 2-3/8" 4.7 #/ft tubing (3000 #)

14

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center March 31, 1998 RMOTC Test Report GMT Production Stimulation Test Executive Summary The sulfates in oilfield...

15

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ALLIED OIL & TOOL POWERJET SLOTTING TOOL ALLIED OIL & TOOL POWERJET SLOTTING TOOL JANUARY 10, 1996 FC9522 / 95DT3 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS ALLIED OIL & TOOL POWERJET SLOTTING TOOL Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: RALPH SCHULTE RMOTC Project Engineer January 11, 1996 551103/9522:jb CONTENTS Page Summary .......................................................................................................................2 Introduction.....................................................................................................................2 Description of Operations...................................................................................................3 Figure 1 ..........................................................................................................5

16

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

brine  management  or   extracted  water  management  infrastructure  or  where  nearby  fresh  water  resources  need  to  be   carefully  monitored  for  later  contamination.  

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Pseudokarst topography in a humid environment caused by contaminant-induced colloidal dispersion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with traditional piping erosion. In areas of sinkholes, geophysical measurements of apparent electrical conductivity delineated anomalously high conductivity levels that are interpreted as a brine release from a nearby oil-field waste injection well...

Sassen, Douglas Spencer

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

18

Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES Project)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES) project was developed in response to a cooperative agreement offering by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Preferred Upstream Management Projects (PUMP III). Project partners included the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) as lead agency working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the California Oil Producers Electric Cooperative (COPE). The project was designed to demonstrate that the entire range of oilfield 'stranded gases' (gas production that can not be delivered to a commercial market because it is poor quality, or the quantity is too small to be economically sold, or there are no pipeline facilities to transport it to market) can be cost-effectively harnessed to make electricity. The utilization of existing, proven distribution generation (DG) technologies to generate electricity was field-tested successfully at four marginal well sites, selected to cover a variety of potential scenarios: high Btu, medium Btu, ultra-low Btu gas, as well as a 'harsh', or high contaminant, gas. Two of the four sites for the OFFGASES project were idle wells that were shut in because of a lack of viable solutions for the stranded noncommercial gas that they produced. Converting stranded gas to useable electrical energy eliminates a waste stream that has potential negative environmental impacts to the oil production operation. The electricity produced will offset that which normally would be purchased from an electric utility, potentially lowering operating costs and extending the economic life of the oil wells. Of the piloted sites, the most promising technologies to handle the range were microturbines that have very low emissions. One recently developed product, the Flex-Microturbine, has the potential to handle the entire range of oilfield gases. It is deployed at an oilfield near Santa Barbara to run on waste gas that is only 4% the strength of natural gas. The cost of producing oil is to a large extent the cost of electric power used to extract and deliver the oil. Researchers have identified stranded and flared gas in California that could generate 400 megawatts of power, and believe that there is at least an additional 2,000 megawatts that have not been identified. Since California accounts for about 14.5% of the total domestic oil production, it is reasonable to assume that about 16,500 megawatts could be generated throughout the United States. This power could restore the cost-effectiveness of thousands of oil wells, increasing oil production by millions of barrels a year, while reducing emissions and greenhouse gas emissions by burning the gas in clean distributed generators rather than flaring or venting the stranded gases. Most turbines and engines are designed for standardized, high-quality gas. However, emerging technologies such as microturbines have increased the options for a broader range of fuels. By demonstrating practical means to consume the four gas streams, the project showed that any gases whose properties are between the extreme conditions also could be utilized. The economics of doing so depends on factors such as the value of additional oil recovered, the price of electricity produced, and the alternate costs to dispose of stranded gas.

Rachel Henderson; Robert Fickes

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SAM III PROJECT SAM III PROJECT Sandia National laboratories Prepared for: Project File Documentation Prepared by: MICHAEL J. TAYLOR Project Manager March 31, 1998 JO 850200 : FC 970009 ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a demonstration of the Surface Area Modulation Downhole Telemetry System (SAM 111) at the Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), in partnership with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The project encompassed the testing of a real-time wireless telemetry system in a simulated Measurement-While-Drilling (MWD) environment. A Surface Area Modulation (SAM) technique demonstrated data transmission rates greater than present techniques, in a deployment mode which requires

20

Applications of geographic information systems (GIS) in decision analysis for monitoring aquifer systems during oilfield development projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) coupled with numerical ground water models provide a powerful Decision Support System (DSS) and visualization tool for monitoring aquifer systems during oilfield development projects. A GIS is a coupled software/hardware system that stores, processes, and displays a variety of data structures (raster, vector, TIN, CAD) that have been geographically referenced to some common map projection and coordinate system. Georeferencing allows the analyst to integrate diverse types of data layers into thematic maps for analysis of spatial trends and analyses. The integration of quasi 3-D numerical ground water models with GIS provides project managers with a Decision Support System (DSS) to assess potential impacts to aquifer systems during oilfield development projects. The rapid advancement in desktop PC computing power and data storage has allowed software developers to produce 32-bit GIS and data integration software applications. A variety of image processing, GIS, and numerical ground water modeling software will be used to demonstrate techniques for monitoring and visualizing the migration of an oilfield brine plume leaking during an oilfield development project. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of data structures and on database design to create a DSS within a desktop GIS to serve Project Managers during oilfield development.

Blundell, S.; Baldwin, D.O.; Anderson, N.J. [Integrated Geoscience, Inc., Helena, MT (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

brine in the wellbore up to the base of the freshwater aquifer and would thereby lead to contamination.

Birkholzer, J.T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Energy Department Sells Historic Teapot Dome Oilfield  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Today, the Energy Department finalized the sale of the historic Teapot Dome Oilfield located 35 miles north of Casper, Wyoming to Stranded Oil Resources Corporation, a subsidiary of Allegheny Capital Corporation.

23

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NOVERFLO (SMART CABLE) NOVERFLO (SMART CABLE) LIQUID LEAK DETECTION SYSTEM FEBRUARY 12, 1996 FC9535/96ET3 RMOTC TEST REPORT NOVERFLO LIQUID LEAK DETECTION SYSTEM (SMART CABLE) Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: RALPH SCHULTE RMOTC Project Engineer February 12, 1996 650200/9535:jb CONTENTS Page Summary 1 Introducation 1 NPR-3 Map 2 Description of Operations 3 1 st Test 3 2 nd Test 3 3 rd Test 4 4 th Test 5 Concluding Remarks 5 Acknowledgements 6 Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center Technical Report Noverflo Liquid Leak Detection System (Smart Cable) Summary As part of RMOTC's continuing mission to support and strengthen the domestic oil and gas industry by allowing testing by individual inventors and commercial companies to evaluate their products and technology, RMOTC

24

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AUTOMATIC SHUTDOWN VALVE AUTOMATIC SHUTDOWN VALVE CAMBRIA VALVE CORPORATION OCTOBER 17, 1995 FC9536/95ET1 RMOTC TEST REPORT Automatic Shutdown Valve Cambria Valve Corporation Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: MICHAEL J. TAYLOR RMOTC Project Manager October 17, 1995 551103/9536:jb TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Introduction 1 Figure 1 2 Test Details 3 Table 1 4 Conclusions 5 Acknowledgments 5 ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a test of an Automatic Shutdown Valve (ASDV) for hydraulic systems at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR- 3). The Cambria Valve Corporation (CVC) manufactures the 3-Port ASDV that is designed to automatically shut down the flow of fluid through a hydraulic system in the event of a ruptured line and safely redirect flow to a bypass system. The CVC ASDV effectively demonstrated its

25

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AUTOMATED THREE-PHASE CENTRIFUGE PROJECT AUTOMATED THREE-PHASE CENTRIFUGE PROJECT MARCH 30, 1998 FC9535/96ET5 RMOTC TEST REPORT AUTOMATED THREE-PHASE CENTRIFUGE PROJECT Centech, Inc. Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: MICHAEL J. TAYLOR Project Manager March 30, 1998 850200/650200/650201:9583 ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a test of an Automated ThreePhase Centrifuge at the Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3). Centech, Inc. has manufactured a three-phase centrifuge which has been retrofitted with a PCbased, fuzzy-logic, automated control system, by Los Alamos National Laboratory. The equipment is designed to automatically process tank-bottom wastes within operator-prescribed limits of Basic

26

Strontium isotopic study of subsurface brines from Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The abundance of the radiogenic isotope /sup 87/Sr in a subsurface brine can be used as a tracer of brine origin, evolution, and diagenetic effects. The authors have determined the /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios of over 60 oil-field waters from the Illinois basin, where brine origin is perplexing because of the absence of any significant evaporite strata. Initially, they analyzed brines from 15 petroleum-producing sandstone and carbonate units; waters from Ordovician, Silurian, Devonian, and Mississippian strata have /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios in the range 0.7079-0.7108. All but those from the Ste. Genevieve Limestone (middle Mississippian) are more radiogenic in /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr than seawater values for this interval of geologic time. The detrital source of the more radiogenic /sup 87/Sr may be the New Albany Shale group, considered to be a major petroleum source rock in the basin. The /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios of Ste. Genevieve brines apparently evolved without a contribution from fluid-shale interaction.

hetherington, E.A.; Stueber, A.M.; Pushkar, P.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. Argonne determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, Argonne subsequently conducted a preliminary evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in domal salt caverns. Steps used in this evaluation included the following: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing contaminant toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and calculating human cancer and noncancer risk estimates. Five postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (referring to noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results led to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

Elcock, D.

1998-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

28

Portable brine evaporator unit, process, and system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention discloses a comprehensive, efficient, and cost effective portable evaporator unit, method, and system for the treatment of brine. The evaporator unit, method, and system require a pretreatment process that removes heavy metals, crude oil, and other contaminates in preparation for the evaporator unit. The pretreatment and the evaporator unit, method, and system process metals and brine at the site where they are generated (the well site). Thus, saving significant money to producers who can avoid present and future increases in transportation costs.

Hart, Paul John (Indiana, PA); Miller, Bruce G. (State College, PA); Wincek, Ronald T. (State College, PA); Decker, Glenn E. (Bellefonte, PA); Johnson, David K. (Port Matilda, PA)

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

29

Multispectral Imaging At Rangely Oilfield Area (Pickles & Cover, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Multispectral Imaging At Rangely Oilfield Area (Pickles & Cover, 2004) Multispectral Imaging At Rangely Oilfield Area (Pickles & Cover, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging At Rangely Oilfield Area (Pickles & Cover, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Rangely Oilfield Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Airborne hyperspectral imaging applied to determine vegetation and CO2 leakage in the Rangely oilfield of northwest Colorado - results may be useful for geothermal exploration. References W. Pickles, W. Cover (2004) Hyperspectral Geobotanical Remote Sensing For Co2 Storage Monitoring Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Multispectral_Imaging_At_Rangely_Oilfield_Area_(Pickles_%26_Cover,_2004)&oldid=511013"

30

Drop in drilling hurts oil-field chemicals market  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Drop in drilling hurts oil-field chemicals market ... But events in the past few years have proven that notion faulty, and oil-field chemicals have fallen on hard times as drilling activity declines. ... The consumption of oil-field chemicals is directly related to drilling activity, and two new studies point out how far that market has declined and where opportunities still exist. ...

1985-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

31

2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2013 and 2014 within the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center . The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing...

32

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER MICROTURBINE PROJECT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MICROTURBINE PROJECT MICROTURBINE PROJECT Stacy & Stacy Consulting, LLC March 31, 1998 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER MICROTURBINE PROJECT Stacy & Stacy Consulting, LLC Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: MICHAEL J. TAYLOR Project Manager March 31, 1998 JO 850200 : FC 980009 ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a demonstration of gas-fired, integrated microturbine systems at the Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), in partnership with Stacy & Stacy Consulting, LLC (Stacy & Stacy). The project encompassed the testing of two gas microturbine systems at two oil-production wellsites. The microturbine-generators were fueled directly by casinghead gas to power their beam-pumping-unit motors. The system at well 47-A-34 utilized the casinghead sweet gas (0-ppm

33

CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says August 31, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The feasibility of using carbon dioxide (CO2) injection for recovering between 250 million and 500 million additional barrels of oil from Kansas oilfields has been established in a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The University of Kansas Center for Research studied the possibility of near-miscible CO2 flooding for extending the life of mature oilfields in the Arbuckle Formation while simultaneously providing permanent geologic storage of carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas.

34

CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says August 31, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The feasibility of using carbon dioxide (CO2) injection for recovering between 250 million and 500 million additional barrels of oil from Kansas oilfields has been established in a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The University of Kansas Center for Research studied the possibility of near-miscible CO2 flooding for extending the life of mature oilfields in the Arbuckle Formation while simultaneously providing permanent geologic storage of carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas.

35

Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oilfield Testing Center Oilfield Testing Center Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center General Information Name Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center Facility Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Coordinates 42.9724567°, -106.3160188° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.9724567,"lon":-106.3160188,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

36

Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Slope |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Slope Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Slope October 18, 2013 - 11:52am Addthis Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska’s North Slope Quick Facts The National Petroleum Reserve was created by President Warren G, Harding in 1923 when the U.S. Navy was converting from coal to oil. The reserve spans 22 million acres across the western North Slope of Alaska-the largest single unit of public lands in the nation. The 800-mile-long trans-Alaska pipeline carries oil from Prudhoe Bay, on Alaska's North Slope, to Valdez, Alaska, the nearest ice-free port. More than 16 million barrels of oil have traveled through the pipeline since the first barrel flowed in 1977.

37

Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Slope |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Slope Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Slope October 18, 2013 - 11:52am Addthis Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska’s North Slope Quick Facts The National Petroleum Reserve was created by President Warren G, Harding in 1923 when the U.S. Navy was converting from coal to oil. The reserve spans 22 million acres across the western North Slope of Alaska-the largest single unit of public lands in the nation. The 800-mile-long trans-Alaska pipeline carries oil from Prudhoe Bay, on Alaska's North Slope, to Valdez, Alaska, the nearest ice-free port. More than 16 million barrels of oil have traveled through the pipeline since the first barrel flowed in 1977.

38

doi:10.1016/j.gca.2003.10.013 Coprecipitation in the Barite Isostructural Family: 2. Numerical Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

brine. A one-dimensional coupled reactive mass transport model shows a strikingly different transport drainage, potential radionuclide migration in fouled waste repositories, metal contaminant transport is commonly present in oil-field brines but at such low levels that the oil-field brines themselves do

Polly, David

39

Efficacy of Ultraviolet Light and Antimicrobials to Reduce Listeria monocytogenes in Chill Brines.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Chill brines used in ready-to-eat meat processing may be an important source of post-processing contamination by Listeria monocytogenes. The purpose of this study was to… (more)

Parikh, Priti P.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TANK LEVEL GAUGING SYSTEM TANK LEVEL GAUGING SYSTEM JULY 25, 1996 FC9519 / 95PT7 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER TANK LEVEL GAUGING SYSTEM DOUBLE M ELECTRIC Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field Engineer July 25, 1996 551103/9519:jb ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a test of a Tank Level Gauging System at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3). Double M. Electric manufactures the equipment that incorporates an optical-encoder sending unit, cellular communications, and software interface. The system effectively displayed its capabilities for remote monitoring and recording of tank levels.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PETROLEUM MAGNETICS INTERNATIONAL PETROLEUM MAGNETICS INTERNATIONAL NOVEMBER 28, 1996 FC9520 / 95PT8 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS PETROLEUM MAGNETIC INTERNATIONAL DOWNHOLE MAGNETS FOR SCALE CONTROL Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field Engineer November 28, 1995 650100/9520:jb ABSTRACT November 28, 1995 The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a field test on the Petroleum Magnetics International (PMI) downhole magnet, at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR- 3) located 35 miles north of Casper in Natrona County, Wyoming. PMI of Odessa, Texas, states that the magnets are designed to reduce scale and paraffin buildup on the rods, tubing

42

Validation of classical density-dependent solute transport theory for stable, high-concentration-gradient brine displacements in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-concentration-gradient brine displacements in coarse and medium sands S.J. Watson a,1 , D.A. Barry a,1 , R.J. Schotting b,*, S.M. Hassanizadeh b a School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Contaminated Land Assessment and Remediation by a brine solution, under either constant head or constant volume flux conditions. The experimental data

Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

43

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PETRO-PLUG PETRO-PLUG BENTONITE PLUGGING JANUARY 27, 1998 Report No. RMOTC/97PT22 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS PETRO-PLUG BENTONITE PLUGGING Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: Michael R. Tyler RMOTC Project Manager January 27, 1998 Report No. RMOTC/96ET4 CONTENTS Page Technical Description ...................................................................................................... 1 Problem ............................................................................................................................ 1 Solution ............................................................................................................................ 2 Operation..........................................................................................................................

44

Offshore Oilfield Development Planning under Uncertainty and Fiscal Considerations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Offshore Oilfield Development Planning under Uncertainty and Fiscal Considerations Vijay Gupta1 of uncertainty and complex fiscal rules in the development planning of offshore oil and gas fields which involve, Offshore Oil and Gas, Multistage Stochastic, Endogenous, Production Sharing Agreements (PSAs) 1

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

45

The brine underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee, USA: Characterization, genesis, and environmental implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The deep hydrogeologic system underlying the Oak Ridge Atomic Reservation contains brine. Its origin was assessed using existing and newly acquired chemical and isotopic data. The proposed model which best fits the data is modification of residual brine from which halite has been precipitated. Potential sources for this brine are in the Appalachian Mountains in the east, where bedded halite is documented, and where the hydraulic gradient needed to move the residual brine exists. Other models, such as ultrafiltration and halite dissolution, were also evaluated. In places, contaminants such as radionuclides, heavy metals, nitrates, and organic compounds have reached the deep system. The chemical and isotopic features of the brine were examined with respect to its potential discharge, contaminated in places, into shallow, freshwater systems. The observations suggest that whereas the origin of the salts in the brine may be very old, influx of recent water takes place. Consequently, the brine is not isolated (in terms of recharge and discharge) from the overlying active and fresh-water-bearing units. 78 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Nativ, R. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem, Rehovot (Israel)] [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem, Rehovot (Israel)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

History and Analysis of Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) for Oilfield Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to environments. Both of these conditions are inherent to the petroleum industry and provide substantial incentive for investigating DAS for oilfield applications....

Kimbell, Jeremiah

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PERMANENT DOWNHOLE PRESSURE GAUGE PERMANENT DOWNHOLE PRESSURE GAUGE MARCH 15, 1998 FC9553/96PT16 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Sperry-Sun Permanent Downhole Pressure Gauge PROJECT TEST RESULTS March 16, 1998 Michael R. Tyler Project Manager Abstract The Sperry-Sun Downhole Permanent Pressure Gauge (DPPG) is a pressure gauge that is designed to remain in the well for long periods of time providing real time surface data on borehole pressures. The DPPG was field tested at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center in well 63-TPX-10. The instrument was attached to the production string directly above a submersible pump. It was expected to monitor pressure draw-down and build-ups during normal production cycles. During the first two months of the test, the tool worked fine providing a pressure up survey that

48

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MAG-WELL DOWNHOLE MAGNETIC FLUID CONDITIONERS MAG-WELL DOWNHOLE MAGNETIC FLUID CONDITIONERS APRIL 4,1995 FC9511 / 95PT5 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER MAG-WELL DOWNHOLE MAGNETIC FLUID CONDITIONERS PROJECT TEST RESULTES Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field Engineer November 28, 1995 650100/9511:jb ABSTRACT November 28, 1995 The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a field test on the Mag-Well Downhole Magnetic Fluid Conditioners (MFCs), at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR- 3) located 35 miles north of Casper in Natrona County, Wyoming. Mag-Well, Inc., manufactures the MFCs, that are designed to reduce scale and paraffin buildup on the rods, tubing and downhole pump of producing oil wells. The Mag-Well magnetic tools failed to

49

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AJUST A PUMP BEAM PUMPING UNIT AJUST A PUMP BEAM PUMPING UNIT FEBRUARY 19, 1997 FC9532 / 95EC1 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER AJUST A PUMP TEST Rosemond Manufacturing, Inc. (RMI) Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: MICHAEL J. TAYLOR Project Manager February 19, 1997 650200/551107:9532 ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a test of a Model-2000 Ajust A Pump system at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3). Rosemond Manufacturing, Inc. (RMI) manufactures compact beam-pumping units that incorporate energy-efficient gear boxes. The equipment is designed to reduce operating costs and minimize maintenance labor. This report documents the equipment performance and the results of the Ajust A Pump test. The purpose of the test was to demonstrate claims of energy efficiency and reduced labor requirements. The test showed

50

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

D-JAX PUMP-OFF CONTROLLER D-JAX PUMP-OFF CONTROLLER APRIL 4,1995 FC9510 / 95PT4 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER D-JAX PUMP-OFF CONTROLLER PROJECT TEST RESULTES Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field Engineer April 4, 1995 55103/9510:jb CONTENTS Page Introduction........................................................................................1 NPR-3 Map........................................................................................2 Benefits of D-JAX Pump-Off Controller.....................................................3 Test Results.......................................................................................3 Production Information..........................................................................4

51

Brining studies at Pepper Products Inc.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Department) A. B. Childers (Member) V. E. Sweat (Member) December 1988 Abstract Optimum brining conditions, causes of secondary fermentation, and salt fluctuation were investigated. Jalapeno peppers held in brine solution undergo lactic acid... fermentation, controlled by level of acidification and concentration of salt. Only brining at 7. 5% NaCl, with no added acetic acid, resulted in loss of all fermentable sugars. However, salt concentration fluctuated widely in this sample. Brining in 25...

Okoro, John Daniel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

52

Modeling gas and brine migration for assessing compliance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of the WIPP Project Integration Office (WPIO) of the DOE, the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) Department of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has completed preliminary uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of gas and brine migration away from the undisturbed repository. This paper contains descriptions of the numerical model and simulations, including model geometries and parameter values, and a summary of major conclusions from sensitivity analyses. Because significant transport of contaminants can only occur in a fluid (gas or brine) medium, two-phase flow modeling can provide an estimate of the distance to which contaminants can migrate. Migration of gas or brine beyond the RCRA ``disposal-unit boundary`` or the Standard`s accessible environment constitutes a potential, but not certain, violation and may require additional evaluations of contaminant concentrations.

Vaughn, P. [Applied Physics, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Butcher, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Helton, J. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Swift, P. [Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program, 1991 report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The data presented in this report are the result of Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) during 1991. These BSEP activities document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and seepage of that brine into the excavations at the WIPP. When excavations began at the WIPP in 1982, small brine seepages (weeps) were observed on the walls. Brine studies began as part of the Site Validation Program and were formalized as a program in its own right in 1985. During nine years of observations (1982--1991), evidence has mounted that the amount of brine seeping into the WIPP excavations is limited, local, and only a small fraction of that required to produce hydrogen gas by corroding the metal in the waste drums and waste inventory. The data through 1990 is discussed in detail and summarized by Deal and others (1991). The data presented in this report describes progress made during the calendar year 1991 and focuses on four major areas: (1) quantification of the amount of brine seeping across vertical surfaces in the WIPP excavations (brine ``weeps); (2) monitoring of brine inflow, e.g., measuring brines recovered from holes drilled downward from the underground drifts (downholes), upward from the underground drifts (upholes), and from subhorizontal holes; (3) further characterization of brine geochemistry; and (4) preliminary quantification of the amount of brine that might be released by squeezing the underconsolidated clays present in the Salado Formation.

Deal, D.E.; Abitz, R.J.; Myers, J.; Martin, M.L.; Milligan, D.J.; Sobocinski, R.W.; Lipponer, P.P.J. [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Belski, D.S. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.] [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Research Initiative Will Demonstrate Low Temperature Geothermal Electrical Power Generation Systems Using Oilfield Fluids  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) is announcing a new collaboration with the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) to demonstrate the versatility, reliability, and deployment capabilities of low-temperature geothermal electrical power generation systems using co-produced water from oilfield operations at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) in Wyoming.

55

SBOT WYOMING ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD CENTER POC Jenny Krom Telephone  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WYOMING WYOMING ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD CENTER POC Jenny Krom Telephone (307) 233-4818 Email jenny.krom@rmotc.doe.gov ADMINISTATIVE / WASTE / REMEDIATION Office Administrative Services 561110 Facilities Support Services 561210 Security Guards and Patrol Services 561612 Security Systems Services (except Locksmiths) 561621 Locksmiths 561622 Exterminating and Pest Control Services 561710 Janitorial Services 561720 Solid Waste Collection 562111 Hazardous Waste Collection 562112 Other Waste Collection 562119 Hazardous Waste Treatment and Disposal 562211 Solid Waste Landfill 562212 Solid Waste Combustors and Incinerators 562213 Other Nonhazardous Waste Treatment and Disposal 562219 Remediation Services 562910 Materials Recovery Facilities 562920 All Other Miscellaneous Waste Management Services 562998

56

The chemical history of $^{14}{\\rm C}$ in deep oilfields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

14C is an overwhelming background in low-background underground experiments, to the point where the observation of the all-important (pp) neutrinos from the Sun can not be observed in carbon-containing experiments. This paper shows that 14C purity can be improved by four orders of magnitude by a careful selection of the gas field. Two large reduction factors are at work: the low chemical affinity of methane to single carbon, and the migration of natural gas away from nitrogen-bearing kerogen during as the oilfield matures.

G. Bonvicini; N. Harris; V. Paolone

2003-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

57

Improved Water Flooding through Injection Brine Modification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crude oil/brine/rock interactions can lead to large variations in the displacement efficiency of waterflooding, by far the most widely applied method of improved oil recovery. Laboratory waterflood tests show that injection of dilute brine can increase oil recovery. Numerous fields in the Powder River basin have been waterflooded using low salinity brine (about 500 ppm) from the Madison limestone or Fox Hills sandstone. Although many uncertainties arise in the interpretation and comparison of field production data, injection of low salinity brine appears to give higher recovery compared to brine of moderate salinity (about 7,000 ppm). Laboratory studies of the effect of brine composition on oil recovery cover a wide range of rock types and crude oils. Oil recovery increases using low salinity brine as the injection water ranged from a low of no notable increase to as much as 37.0% depending on the system being studied. Recovery increases using low salinity brine after establishing residual oil saturation (tertiary mode) ranged from no significant increase to 6.0%. Tests with two sets of reservoir cores and crude oil indicated slight improvement in recovery for low salinity brine. Crude oil type and rock type (particularly the presence and distribution of kaolinite) both play a dominant role in the effect that brine composition has on waterflood oil recovery.

Robertson, Eric Partridge; Thomas, Charles Phillip; Morrow, Norman; (U of Wyoming)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Property:BrineConstituents | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BrineConstituents BrineConstituents Jump to: navigation, search Property Name BrineConstituents Property Type String Description Describes major elements, compounds in geothermal brine This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 1 subproperty: V Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area Pages using the property "BrineConstituents" Showing 2 pages using this property. N North Brawley Geothermal Area + Chlorine, sodium, potassium, and calcium. Silica concentrations are 527 mg/l and total dissolved solids measure 82,900 mg/l. + S Salt Wells Geothermal Area + Cl, Na, SO4, SiO2, HCO3, and minor Ca, K + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:BrineConstituents&oldid=598832#SMWResults" Category: Properties

59

Development Operations Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial County, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Development Operations Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial County, California Abstract N/A Authors Whitescarver and Olin D. Published U.S. Department of Energy, 1984 Report Number N/A DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Development Operations Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial County, California Citation Whitescarver, Olin D.. 1984. Development Operations Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial County, California. (!) : U.S. Department of Energy. Report No.: N/A. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Development_Operations_Hypersaline_Geothermal_Brine_Utilization_Imperial_County,_California&oldid=682648

60

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DYNAMOTER DYNAMOTER Sandia National Laboratories FEBRUARY 10, 1998 FC9542 / 96PT11 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Sandia Lab Downhole Dynamometer PROJECT TEST RESULTS February 10, 1998 Michael R. Tyler Project Manager Abstract This test involved the use of Downhole Dynamometer Tools (DDT) that were developed by Albert Engineering and the Sandia National Laboratory. The five (5) Downhole Dynamometers (DDT) were installed in the rod string of well 13-A-21 at predetermined intervals. The DDT tools are equipped with strain gauges and programmable clocks. The tools were place in the well and removed after the data had been gathered. The data gathering is pre-programmed to occur when pumped-off conditions are obtained in the well. This information then reflects the true conditions found downhole in a well in a pumped-off state.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BEAM MOUNTED GAS COMPRESSOR BEAM MOUNTED GAS COMPRESSOR (JACGAS COMPRESSOR) MARCH 3, 1998 FC970004/97PT23 RMOTC Test Report Number 97PT23 Jacgas Compressor Morrison International Iron Horse Compression Ltd. 9852-33 Avenue Edmonton, Alberta T6N 1C6 (403) 462-6847 David H. Doyle, Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center March 3, 1998 Introduction Gas compressors that mount on the walking beam of an oil well pumping unit have been tried with mixed success for many years. Gas compression at the wellhead instead of further downstream can 'increase both oil and gas production by reducing the casinghead gas pressure. Excess pressure on the annulus of the well reduces fluid inflow and restricts production. In old, shallow wells, the small amount of pressure (50 psi) may be sufficient to prevent the well from producing economically. Other applications include the unloading of water

62

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CHEMICAL & MICROBIAL CHEMICAL & MICROBIAL PARAFFIN CONTROL PROJECT DECEMBER 17, 1997 FC9544 / 96PT12 RMOTC Test Report Paraffin Control Project BDM Oklahoma/NIPER 220 N. Virginia Bartlesville, OK 4003 918-336-2400, FAX 918-337-4365 Leo Giangiacomo, Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center December 17. 1997 Abstract This report summarizes the field performance results of a comparison of chemical and microbial paraffin control systems. The two systems were selected from laboratory screening work. Well selection was based on production rates, produced fluids, and prior paraffin treatments. The treatments were performed on similar groups of wells over the same period of time, using quantities and techniques recommended by the supplier specifically for the wells to be treated. The tests were conducted by the U. S. Department of

63

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LOW COST REFRACTURING LOW COST REFRACTURING JANUARY 23, 1998 FC9550/96PT14 RMOTC Test Report Number 96PT14 Low Cost Refracturing Rock Creek Enterprises 980 Rock Creek Road Buffalo, Wyoming 82834 (307) 684-5243 (307) 684-0902 (fax) David H. Doyle, Acting Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center January 23, 1998 Introduction There are relatively few stimulation options available to owners of marginal or stripper wells. These wells are commonly restricted in their production rates because of formation or wellbore damage near the wellbore. Current services available to remove this damage are compared to the small gains possible from old, marginal wells. Over time, several things can occur that cause the flow of oil into the wellbore to be restricted. First, carbonate or sulfate scale can accumulate around the well or in the perforations. The accumulated scale will block oil from

64

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

06/97DT15 06/97DT15 RMOTC Test Report Rotary Steerable Stabilizer Smith Drilling and Completions 16740 Hardy Street P. 0. Box 60068 Houston, Texas, 77205-0068 281-443-3370 Leo Giangiacorno, Acting Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center December 17, 1997 Introduction Directional drilling is more expensive than vertical drilling. This is due to the high maintenance cost of downhole motors and MWD systems required to control hole trajectory. In addition, directional holes have lower penetration rates due to the poor hole cleaning with a non-rotating string. Down time is often spent orienting tool face to obtain the desired trajectory after tile weight is placed on the bit and the reactive torque of the motor is absorbed by the drill string. Holes drilled in this manner often have a tortuous profile compared to holes drilled with a rotary system, increasing the torque

65

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

IMPROVED ELASTOMER COMPOUND FOR IMPROVED ELASTOMER COMPOUND FOR PROGRESSIVE CAVITY PUMPS Cameron Elastomer Technology MARCH 23, 1998 FC9563/96PT17 RMOTC Test Report Number 96PT17 Improved Elastomer Compound for Progressive Cavity Pumps Cameron Elastomer Technology 29501 Katy Fwy Katy, Texas 77494-7801 (281) 391-4615 (281) 391-4640 (fax) David H. Doyle, PE, Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center March 23, 1998 Introduction The purpose of this project was to evaluate improved progressing cavity (PC) pump stator elastomer materials in NPR-3 crude under field conditions. The goal of the project was to test an elastomer material that can be used in high API-gravity (greater than 38' API) crude oils. Currently available materials used for the construction of pump stators swell and fail in contact with such crude oils. This limits the applicability of progressing cavity

66

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DYNAMOMETER DYNAMOMETER Sandia National Laboratories FEBRUARY 10, 1998 FC9514 / 95PT6 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Sandia Lab Downhole Dynamometer PROJECT TEST RESULTS February 10, 1998 Michael R. Tyler Project Manager Abstract This test involved the use of Downhole Dynamometer Tools (DDT) that were developed by Albert Engineering and the Sandia National Laboratory. The five (5) Downhole Dynamometers (DDT) were installed in the rod string of well 13-A-21 at predetermined intervals. The DDT tools are equipped with strain gauges and programmable clocks. The tools were place in the well and removed after the data had been gathered. The data gathering is pre-programmed to occur when pumped-off conditions are obtained in the well. This information then reflects the true conditions found downhole in a well in a pumped-

67

The electrochemical analysis of sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate in solutions containing oilfield impurities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE ELECTROCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF SODIUM DODECYLBENZENESULFONATE IN SOLUTIONS CONTAINING OILFIELD IMPURITIES A Thesis by MICHAEL CARL BECKER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering THE ELECTROCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF SODIUM DODECYLBENZENESULFONATE IN SOLUTIONS CONTAINING OILFIELD IMPURITIES A Thesis by MICHAEL CARL BECKER Approved as to style...

Becker, Michael Carl

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

68

The Brine Shrimp's Butterfly Stroke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the fluid dynamics of brine shrimp larvae swimming in this gallery of fluid motion video. Time resolved particle image velocimetry was performed using nano-particles as seeding material to measure the time dependent velocity and vorticity fields. The Reynolds number of the flow was roughly 8 and the Womerseley number (ratio of periodic forcing to viscous forcing) was about 5. Vorticity dynamics reveals the formation of a vortex ring structure at the tip of each arm at the beginning of the power stroke. This two vortex system evolves dramatically with time as the stroke progresses. The outer circulation is noted to weaken while the inner circulation strengthens over the power stroke. The gaining strength of the inner vortex correlates with the acceleration and forward movement of the larvae.

Johnson, Brennan; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Sampling procedure for atmospheric geothermal brines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermodynamic and chemical changes can alter the characteristics of geothermal brine samples significantly. A procedure which minimizes these changes has been developed for sampling atmospheric geothermal brines. The method is fast with minimal cooling and yields representative samples which have been stabilized to preserve their integrity. The procedure provides reliable suspended solids data and both the solid and liquid samples are suitable for elemental analysis. The procedure is also a valuable tool to aid in monitoring a geothermal brine conditioning system. Data are included from a flow test at an MCR Geothermal well in the Imperial Valley area of California to illustrate the utility of the sampling procedure.

Kochelek, J.T.; Zienty, D.F.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Fate of Brine Applied to Unpaved Roads at a Radioactive Waste Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between 1984 and 1993, MgCl2 brine was used to suppress dust on unpaved roads at a radioactive waste subsurface disposal area. Because Cl– might enhance corrosion of buried metals in the waste, we investigated the distribution and fate of Cl– in the vadose zone using pore water samples collected from suction lysimeters and soluble salt concentrations extracted from sediment samples. The Cl/Br mass ratio and the total dissolved Cl– concentration of pore water show that brine contamination occurs primarily within 13 m of treated roads, but can extend as much as 30 m laterally in near-surface sedimentary deposits. Within the deep vadose zone, which consists of interlayered basalt lava flows and sedimentary interbeds, brine has moved up to 110 m laterally. This lateral migration suggests formation of perched water and horizontal transport during periods of high recharge. In a few locations, brine migrated to depths of 67 m within 3 to 5 yr. Elevated Cl– concentrations were found to depths of 2 m in roadbed material. In drainage ditches along roads, where runoff accumulates and recharge of surface water is high, Cl– was flushed from the sediments in 3 to 4 yr. In areas of lower recharge, Cl– remained in the sediments after 5 yr. Vertical brine movement is directly related to surface recharge through sediments. The distribution of Cl– in pore water and sediments is consistent with estimates of vadose zone residence times and spatial distribution of surface water recharge from other investigations at the subsurface disposal area.

Larry C. Hull; Carolyn W. Bishop

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Integrated process for coalbed brine disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A brine disposal process is described that converts the brine stream of a coalbed gas producing site into clean water for agricultural use, combustion products and water vapor that can be released into the atmosphere and dry solids that can be recycled for industrial consumption. The process uses a reverse osmosis unit, a submerged combustion evaporator and a pulse combustion dryer. Pretreatment of the brine feedstream is necessary to prevent fouling of the membranes of the reverse osmosis unit and to separate from the brine stream hazardous metal and other constituents that may make the permeate from the reverse osmosis unit unsuitable for agricultural or other use. A chemical modeling code is used to calculate the saturation states of solids that may precipitate and foul the reverse osmosis membranes. Sodium carbonate is added to the brine to precipitate carbonates of Ba, Ca, Mg and Sr prior to filtration, acidification, and passage into the reverse osmosis unit. Optimization of the process in terms of types and amounts of additives is possible with analysis using the modeling code. The minimum amounts of additives to prevent scaling are calculated. In a typical operation, a brine feedstream of 1,000 m{sup 3}/day (6,290 bpd) that may have a total dissolved salt concentration (TDS) of 7,000 ppm will be separated into a permeate stream of 750 m{sup 3}/day (4,718 bpd) with a TDS of 400 ppm and a concentrated brine stream of 250 m{sup 3}/day (1,573 bpd) with a TDS of 26,800 ppm. The submerged combustion evaporator will concentrate this latter stream to a concentration of 268,000 ppm and reduce the volume to 25 m{sup 3}/day (158 bpd). The pulse combustion dryer can dry the concentrated brine mixture to a low moisture salt. Energy costs to operate the reverse osmosis unit are primarily the pumping costs.

Brandt, H. [AQUATECH Services, Inc., Fair Oaks, CA (United States)]|[California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Bourcier, W.L.; Jackson, K.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

IN-SITU H IN-SITU H 2 S BIOREMEDIATION JULY 11, 1994 FC9509 / 95PT3 Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center 907 North Poplar, Suite 100, Casper, WY 82601 (307) 261-5000, ext. 5060; FAX (307) 261-5997 IN-SITU H2S BIOREMEDIATION NATIONAL PARAKLEEN COMPANY PREPARED BY Fred Brown Michael R. Tyler 731 W.Wadley Field Engineer Building O July 11, 1994 Suite 130 Midland, Texas 79705 Phone (915)-683-3076 Fax (915)-683-3081 TEST PURPOSE: To treat producing oil wells that contain high concentrations of H2S with a product that will lower the levels of H2S in the well. METHOD OF TREATMENT: A bio-nutrient product (55 gallons) was mixed with 120 bbls of produced tensleep water and the mixture was pumped down the annulus of selected wells. The well was then shut-in for a 24 hour period and then was returned to production.

73

Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center RMOTC at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OILFIELD TESTING OILFIELD TESTING OILFIELD TESTING CENTER CENTER 2 2 HISTORY OF TEAPOT DOME Mark Milliken 3 3 TEAPOT DOME LOCATION 4 4 Salt Creek 670 MMBBLS 722 BCF Teapot Dome 27 MMBBLS 57 BCF N P R - 3 Cumulative Production 5 5 The Great White Fleet December 1907 - February 1909 6 6 THE END OF COAL-FIRED SHIPS * 2-week cruising time. * Labor and time intensive cleaning and reloading. * At the mercy of foreign countries for coal supply. * 1912: All battleships will be oil-powered. Great White Fleet 7 7 NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES ARE BORN * 1908: Dr. Otis Smith, USGS Director, recommends DOI retain oil lands for fuel reserve for Navy. * 1909: Taft withdraws 3,000,000 acres in Wyoming and California. * 1910: Concern over the President's authority to withdraw lands, so Congress passed the Pickett Act. * 1910: Taft issues a 2nd land withdrawal executive

74

Volatility of HCl and the thermodynamics of brines during brine dryout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of liquid-vapor partitioning (volatility) of chlorides from brines to steam can be used to indicate the potential for corrosion problems in geothermal systems. Measurements of volatilities of solutes in chloride brines have established a possible mechanism for the production of high-chloride steam from slightly acidic high temperature brines. Questions concerning the fate of NaCl in the steam production process have been addressed through extensive measurements of its volatility from brines ranging in concentration from dilute solutions to halite saturation. Recent measurements of chloride partitioning to steam over brines in contact with Geysers rock samples are consistent with our concept of the process for production of high-chloride steam.

Simonson, J.M.; Palmer, D.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Hydrogeologic aspects of brine disposal in the East Poplar oil field, Fort Peck Indian Reservation, northeastern Montana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The East Poplar Oil Field encompasses about 70 square miles in the south-central part of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. Oil production began in 1952 from the Mississippian Madison Group. Production depths range from about 5,500 to 6,000 feet below land surface. Large quantities of brine (water having a dissolved-solids concentration greater than 35,000 milligrams per liter) have been produced with the oil. The brine has a dissolved-solids concentration of as much as 160,000 milligrams per liter. Most of the brine has been disposed of by injection into shallower subsurface formations (mainly the Lower Cretaceous Dakota Sandstone at depths of about 3,300 feet and the Upper Cretaceous Judith River Formation at depths of about 1,000 feet). Smaller quantities of brine have been directed to storage and evaporation pits. Handling, transport, and disposal of the brine have resulted in its movement into and migration through shallow Quaternary alluvial and glacial deposits along the Poplar River valley. Locally, domestic water supplies are obtained from these deposits. The major point, sources of shallow ground-water contamination probably is leakage of brine from corroded disposal-well casing and pipelines. Using electromagnetic geophysical techniques and auger drilling, three saline-water plumes in alluvial deposits and one plum in glacial deposits have been delineated. Dominant constituents in plume areas are sodium and chloride, whereas those in nonplume areas are sodium and bicarbonate.

Craigg, S.D.; Thamke, J.N. (Geological Survey, Helena, MT (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Evidence for ground-water circulation in the brine-filled aquitard, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical methods were used to assess active ground-water circulation in a brine-filled, deep (> 50 m below land surface) aquitard underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee. In places, the brine which was presumed to be stagnant in the past, contains various contaminants. If ground-water circulation is viable in the brine-containing formations, then remediation or containment of the deep-seated contaminants should be considered a high priority. Data used to determine this included (1) spatial and temporal pressures and hydraulic heads measured in the aquitard, (2) hydraulic parameters of the formations in question, (3) vertical temperature gradients, and (4) spatial and temporal chemical and isotopic composition of the saline ground water. Conclusions suggest that the saline water contained at depth is not isolated (in terms of recharge and discharge) from the overlying active and fresh-water-(< 500 mg/l) bearing units. Consequently, influx of young water (and contamination) from land surface does occur. Potential discharge into the shallow aquifers was assumed where the hydraulic head of the saline water was higher than that in the shallow aquifers, accounting for temperature and salinity anomalies observed close to land surface. The confined water (and dissolved solutes) move along open conduits at relatively high velocity into adjacent, more permeable units.

Nativ, R. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Soil and Water Sciences; Halleran, A.; Hunley, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Brine flow in heated geologic salt.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes' governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic  Geology Billion  Gallons  per  Year Brine  Use  Sequence Carbon  dioxide  Capture  and  Storage Carbon  Dioxide Coal-­?

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Modeling and Computational Strategies for Optimal Development Planning of Offshore Oilfields under Complex Fiscal Rules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling and Computational Strategies for Optimal Development Planning of Offshore Oilfields under Complex Fiscal Rules ... In particular, we consider a recently proposed multifield site strategic planning model for offshore oil and gas fields as a basis to include the generic fiscal rules with ringfencing provisions. ...

Vijay Gupta; Ignacio E. Grossmann

2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

80

Field testing of new multilateral drilling and completion technology at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has played an important role in bringing new multilateral well technology to the marketplace. Multilateral technology is more complex than most new technologies being brought to the oilfield. It is very difficult to test new designs in the laboratory or conventional test wells. They must be tested downhole in specialized wells to work out design and procedural details. Most of the applications for multilateral technology are in high cost drilling areas, such as offshore or in remote, environmentally sensitive areas. For this reason, opportunities for testing the new technology in the course of routine drilling and completion operations are scarce. Operators are not willing to risk expensive rig time, or losing a wellbore itself, on a test. RMOTC offers a neutral site where the technology can be tested in a relatively low cost environment. There are two drilling rigs and three workover and completion rigs available. Most associated services such as warehouse, roustabouts, backhoe, welders, and mechanics are also available on site, while specialized oilfield services and machine shops are available in nearby Casper. Technologies such as the hollow whipstock, adjustable stabilizer, downhole kickoff assembly, single trip sidetrack tool, stacked multidrain system, rotary steerable systems, and procedures for abandoning an open hole lateral have benefited through the use of RMOTC`s facilities. This paper details the capabilities of the new technologies and the benefits of testing them in a real oilfield environment before taking them to market.

Giangiacomo, L.A. [Fluor Daniel NPOSR, Inc., Casper, WY (United States). Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Oilfield testing center aids industry in evaluating cutting-edge innovations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center at Teapot Dome keeps a producing field open for research and development. Using a producing oil field for research is the surest way to determine the success or failure of a new invention or technique. The field has 600 producing wells and 68 injection wells.

Duey, R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Removing Radium-226 Contamination From Ion Exchange Resins Used in Drinking Water Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Removing Radium-226 Contamination From Ion Exchange Resins Used in Drinking Water Treatment P r o b of groundwater containing high levels of radium-226 activity (Objective 1) were regenerated with prescribed brine that the concentration of salt in the brine cleaning solution was the most influential factor in the resin regeneration

83

Brine tolerant polymer for oil recovery applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a beta-alanine-type branched partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide, which is added to an aqueous injection fluid to increase the viscosity of the fluid. The polymer resists plugging of the wellbore face and/or matrix pores and is brine tolerant when injected into a subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing formation.

Tackett, J.E.

1987-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

84

Chemistry of Silica in Cerro Prieto Brines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

data was generated by t e CFE Laioratory a t Cerro Prietowere performed a t the CFE Laboratory a t Cerro P r i e t oe h e l p of J,. Fausto L of CFE. Brine from Cerro P r i e t

Weres, Oleh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Chemistry of Silica in Cerro Prieto Brines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

data was generated by t e CFE Laioratory a t Cerro Prietowere performed a t the CFE Laboratory a t Cerro P r i e t oe h e l p of J,. Fausto L of CFE. Brine from Cerro P r i e t

Weres, O.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The Impact of Tax Shocks and Oil Price Volatility on Risk - A Study of North Sea Oilfield Projects   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the impact of market volatility and increased fiscal take on risk in strategic natural resource projects. An increase in 2006 UK oilfield taxation is used as a natural experiment for assessing the impact of a ...

Kretzschmar, Gavin Lee; Moles, Peter

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

A preliminary evaluation model for reservoir hydrocarbon-generating potential established based on dissolved hydrocarbons in oilfield water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A large number of oilfield water samples were analyzed in this work. Research ... relationship between the concentrations and distribution of dissolved hydrocarbons suggested that the contents and composition of ...

Hongjing Zhao; Weilin Sun; Baotian He; Bowen Mei…

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Fate of Magnesium Chloride Brine Applied to Suppress Dust from Unpaved Roads at the INEEL Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between 1984 and 1993, MgCl2 brine was used to suppress dust on unpaved roads at a radioactive waste subsurface disposal area. Because Cl– might enhance corrosion of buried metals in the waste, we investigated the distribution and fate of Cl– in the vadose zone using pore water samples collected from suction lysimeters and soluble salt concentrations extracted from sediment samples. The Cl/Br mass ratio and the total dissolved Cl– concentration of pore water show that brine contamination occurs primarily within 13 m of treated roads, but can extend as much as 30 m laterally in near-surface sedimentary deposits. Within the deep vadose zone, which consists of interlayered basalt lava flows and sedimentary interbeds, brine has moved up to 110 m laterally. This lateral migration suggests formation of perched water and horizontal transport during periods of high recharge. In a few locations, brine migrated to depths of 67 m within 3 to 5 yr. Elevated Cl– concentrations were found to depths of 2 m in roadbed material. In drainage ditches along roads, where runoff accumulates and recharge of surface water is high, Cl– was flushed from the sediments in 3 to 4 yr. In areas of lower recharge, Cl– remained in the sediments after 5 yr. Vertical brine movement is directly related to surface recharge through sediments. The distribution of Cl– in pore water and sediments is consistent with estimates of vadose zone residence times and spatial distribution of surface water recharge from other investigations at the subsurface

Larry Hull; Carolyn Bishop

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Depositional Environment, Reservoir Properties, and EOR Potential of an Incised-valley-fill Sandstone, Pleasant Prairie Oilfield, Haskell County, Kansas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Depositional Environment, Reservoir Properties, and EOR Potential of an Incised-valley- fill Sandstone, Pleasant Prairie Oilfield, Haskell County, Kansas By © 2012 Peter J. Senior B.S., Kansas State University, 2009 Submitted.../02/2012 The Thesis Committee for Peter J. Senior certifies that this is the approved version of the following thesis: Depositional Environment, Reservoir Properties, and EOR Potential of an Incised-valley- fill Sandstone, Pleasant Prairie Oilfield, Haskell...

Senior, Peter

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

90

NETL: News Release - CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

31, 2011 31, 2011 CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says Near-Miscible Flooding in Arbuckle Formation Would Help Small Producers Tap Additional Domestic Resources Washington, D.C. - The feasibility of using carbon dioxide (CO2) injection for recovering between 250 million and 500 million additional barrels of oil from Kansas oilfields has been established in a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The University of Kansas Center for Research studied the possibility of near-miscible CO2 flooding for extending the life of mature oilfields in the Arbuckle Formation while simultaneously providing permanent geologic storage of carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas. Miscibility refers to the pressure at which the CO2 and oil are completely soluble in one another or form a single phase. Below the minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) the injected CO2 mixes with and swells the oil to reduce its viscosity, increasing its ability to flow through the reservoir more easily to the production well.

91

Polyacrylamide polymer viscosity as a function of brine composition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computer model has been developed which predicts the viscosity of polymer and oil field brine mixtures. The polymers used were Amoco- Sweepaid 103 and Dow- Pusher 500 polyacrylamide polymers. All of the experiments were conducted at 1200 ppM polymer concentration. The computer input consists of the ionic strength of the brine in the mixture and the fraction of that ionic strength due to sodium ions. The computer program makes predictions of viscosity by referencing a family of viscosity curves for various mixtures of sodium chloride and calcium chloride in 1200 ppM polymer solutions. The model has been tested using 59 mixtures of brines and polymers. The ionic strength of the brine in the mixtures varied from 0.0018 to 0.025. The fraction of the brines' total ionic strength due to sodium ions varied from 0.22 to 0.49. The brines consisted predominantly of sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, chloride, bicarbonate and sulfate ions.

French, T.R.; Stacy, N.; Collins, A.G.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

OUT Success Stories: Chemical Treatments for Geothermal Brines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE research helped develop the large, untapped geothermal resource beneath the Salton Sea in California's Imperial Valley. The very hot brines under high pressure make them excellent for electric power production. The brines are very corrosive and contain high concentrations of dissolved silica. DOE worked with San Diego Gas and Electric Company to find a solution to the silica-scaling problem. This innovative brine treatment eliminated scaling and made possible the development of the Salton Sea geothermal resource.

Burr, R.

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Origin, distribution, and movement of brine in the Permian Basin (U. S. A. ). A model for displacement of connate brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Na-Cl, halite Ca-Cl, and gypsum Ca-Cl brines with salinities from 45 to >300 g/L are identified and mapped in four hydrostratigraphic units in the Permian Basin area beneath western Texas and Oklahoma and eastern New Mexico, providing spatial and lithologic constraints on the interpretation of the origin and movement of brine. Na-Cl brine is derived from meteoric water as young as 5-10 Ma that dissolved anhydrite and halite, whereas Ca-Cl brine is interpreted to be ancient, modified-connate Permian brine that now is mixing with, and being displaced by, the Na-Cl brine. Displacement fronts appear as broad mixing zones with no significant salinity gradients. Evolution of Ca-Cl brine composition from ideal evaporated sea water is attributed to dolomitization and syndepositional recycling of halite and bittern salts by intermittent influx of fresh water and sea water. Halite Ca-Cl brine in the evaporite section in the northern part of the basin differs from gypsum Ca-Cl brine in the south-central part in salinity and Na/Cl ratio and reflects segregation between halite- and gypsum-precipitating lagoons during the Permian. Ca-Cl brine moved downward through the evaporite section into the underlying Lower Permian and Pennsylvanian marine section that is now the deep-basin brine aquifer, mixing there with pre-existing sea water. Buoyancy-driven convection of brine dominated local flow for most of basin history, with regional advection governed by topographically related forces dominant only for the past 5 to 10 Ma. 71 refs., 11 figs.

Bein, A.; Dutton, A.R. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Evaluation of CO2 enhanced oil recovery and sequestration potential in low permeability reservoirs, Yanchang Oilfield, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Sequestrating CO2 in reservoirs can substantially enhance oil recovery and effectively reduce greenhouse gas emission. To evaluate the potential of CO2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration for Yanchang Oilfield in China, a screening standard which was suitable for CO2-EOR and sequestration in Yanchang Oilfield was proposed based on its characteristics of strong heterogeneity, high water content and severe fluid channeling after water flooding. In addition, an efficient calculation method – stream tube simulation method was presented to figure out CO2 sequestration coefficient and oil recovery factor. After screening and evaluating, it turned out that 148 out of 176 blocks in 22 oilfields were suitable for CO2-EOR and sequestration. CO2 flooding after water flooding can produce 180.21 × 106 t more crude oil and sequestrate 223.38 × 106 t CO2. The average incremental oil recovery rate of miscible reservoirs was 12.49% and the average CO2 sequestration coefficient was 0.27 t/t while the two values were 6.83% and 0.18 t/t for immiscible reservoirs. There are comparatively more reservoirs that are suitable for CO2-EOR and sequestration in Yanchang Oilfield than normal, which can obviously enhance oil recovery and means a great potential for CO2 sequestration. CO2-EOR and sequestration in Yanchang Oilfield has a bright application prospect.

D.F. Zhao; X.W. Liao; D.D. Yin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Consolidation and permeability of salt in brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The consolidation and loss of permeability of salt crystal aggregates, important in assessing the effects of water in salt repositories, has been studied as a function of several variables. The kinetic behavior was similar to that often observed in sintering and suggested the following expression for the time dependence of the void fraction: phi(t) = phi(0) - (A/B)ln(1 + Bt/z(0)/sup 3/), where A and B are rate constants and z(0) is initial average particle size. With brine present, A and phi(0) varied linearly with stress. The initial void fraction was also dependent to some extent on the particle size distribution. The rate of consolidation was most rapid in brine and least rapid in the presence of only air as the fluid. A brine containing 5 m MgCl/sub 2/ showed an intermediate rate, presumably because of the greatly reduced solubility of NaCl. A substantial wall effect was indicated by an observed increase in the void fraction of consolidated columns with distance from the top where the stress was applied and by a dependence of consolidation rate on the column height and radius. The distance through which the stress fell by a factor of phi was estimated to change inversely as the fourth power of the column diameter. With increasing temperature (to 85/sup 0/C), consolidation proceeded somewhat more rapidly and the wall effect was reduced. The permeability of the columns dropped rapidly with consolidation, decreasing with about the sixth power of the void fraction. In general, extrapolation of the results to repository conditions confirms the self-sealing properties of bedded salt as a storage medium for radioactive waste.

Shor, A.J.; Baes, C.F. Jr.; Canonico, C.M.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Study on fine geological modelling of the fluvial sandstone reservoir in Daqing oilfield  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These paper aims at developing a method for fine reservoir description in maturing oilfields by using close spaced well logging data. The main productive reservoirs in Daqing oilfield is a set of large fluvial-deltaic deposits in the Songliao Lake Basin, characterized by multi-layers and serious heterogeneities. Various fluvial channel sandstone reservoirs cover a fairly important proportion of reserves. After a long period of water flooding, most of them have turned into high water cut layers, but there are considerable residual reserves within them, which are difficult to find and tap. Making fine reservoir description and developing sound a geological model is essential for tapping residual oil and enhancing oil recovery. The principal reason for relative lower precision of predicting model developed by using geostatistics is incomplete recognition of complex distribution of fluvial reservoirs and their internal architecture`s. Tasking advantage of limited outcrop data from other regions (suppose no outcrop data available in oilfield) can only provide the knowledge of subtle changing of reservoir parameters and internal architecture. For the specific geometry distribution and internal architecture of subsurface reservoirs (such as in produced regions) can be gained only from continuous infilling logging well data available from studied areas. For developing a geological model, we think the first important thing is to characterize sandbodies geometries and their general architecture`s, which are the framework of models, and then the slight changing of interwell parameters and internal architecture`s, which are the contents and cells of the model. An excellent model should possess both of them, but the geometry is the key to model, because it controls the contents and cells distribution within a model.

Zhoa Han-Qing [Daqing Research Institute, Helongjiang (China)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center RMOTC at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RMOTC RMOTC The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC), is an operating oil field focusing on environmentally-balanced energy technologies and alternatives, and is the premiere energy testing and demonstration field in the nation. 3 3 * the opportunity to explore environmentally- balanced solutions to the nation's energy issues * opportunities to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate a variety of energy related technologies * a chance to collaborate with top professionals in the energy, environmental technology, and engineering fields * shared industry knowledge through technology transfer via reports, journal articles, and presentations Located within the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) near Casper, Wyoming, RMOTC offers: RMOTC Offers Solutions 4 4 The Administration and Engineering

98

A novel model and sensitivity analysis for viscoelastic polymer flooding in offshore oilfield  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Polymer flooding has been widely used in petroleum industry. With the development of theory and technology, some problems in the existing models of polymer flooding appear during simulation. Based on the characteristics of polymer and offshore oilfield such as viscoelasticity, degradation effect and strong salt-sensitive effect, a novel model of viscoelastic polymer flooding is built, and the validation is verified. After comparing the distributions of effective viscosity and residual oil of taking account of elasticity and taking no account of elasticity, it is used to investigate the effects of injection rate, polymer molecular weight, salinity, degradation rate and well space.

Jing Wang; Huiqing Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Evaporite diagenesis driven by synsedimentary evolution of brines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Back-reaction of brines has modified cyclic shallow water carbonate-sulfate-halite sequences (Permian) in the Palo Duro basin, Texas Panhandle. Successive parts of regressive evaporite cycles were deposited from progressively more highly evaporated seawater. The reaction of the brine with sediments deposited during earlier parts of each cycle was the major force criving diagenetic reactions and determining the final mineralogy. Normal marine limestones at the base of cycles were dolomitized in the shallow subsurface environments by brines that precipitated brine-pool evaporites in the upper parts of cycles. Gypsum dehydrated to anhydrite at burial depths of 1-2m beneath the brine-pool floor as brine salinity increased toward halite saturation. Diagenetic limpid dolomite and anhydrite replacing halite were probably derived from mixed meteoric and evaporated-marine brines squeezed from mudstone beds during compaction in the shallow subsurface. Anhydrite and halite pervasively cemented and partly replaced carbonates and gypsum. The resulting low permeability limited later diagenetic alteration, so that the early diagenetic textures and mineralogy were preserved in the burial environment. Reduction in permeability occurred before the transgression initiating the next cycle; the only major result of the introduction of seawater into the evaporite environment was dissolution of the last-deposited few meters of halite.

Hovorka, S.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Origin and geochemical evolution of the Michigan basin brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical and isotopic data were collected on 126 oil field brine samples and were used to investigate the origin and geochemical evolution of water in 8 geologic formations in the Michigan basin. Two groups of brine are found in the basin, the Na-Ca-Cl brine in the upper Devonian formations, and Ca-Na-Cl brine from the lower Devonian and Silurian aged formations. Water in the upper Devonian Berea, Traverse, and Dundee formations originated from seawater concentrated into halite facies. This brine evolved by halite precipitation, dolomitization, aluminosilicate reactions, and the removal of SO{sub 4} by bacterial action or by CaSO{sub 4} precipitation. The stable isotopic composition (D, O) is thought to represent dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by meteoric water. Water in the lower Devonian Richfield, Detroit River Group, and Niagara-Salina formations is very saline Ca-Na-Cl brine. Cl/Br suggest it originated from seawater concentrated through the halite and into the MgSO{sub 4} salt facies, with an origin linked to the Silurian and Devonian salt deposits. Dolomitization and halite precipitation increased the Ca/Na, aluminosilicate reactions removed K, and bacterial action or CaSO{sub 4} precipitation removed SO{sub 4} from this brine. Water chemistry in the Ordovician Trenton-Black River formations indicates dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by fresh or seawater. Possible saline end-members include Ordovician seawater, present-day upper Devonian brine, or Ca-Cl brine from the deeper areas in the basin.

Wilson, T.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

CharacteristicGalerkin and Mixed Finite Element Approximation of Contamination by Compressible  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characteristic­Galerkin and Mixed Finite Element Approximation of Contamination by Compressible­disposal contamination in porous media is modeled by a coupled system of partial differential equations for the brine, radionuclides, and heat and by a mixed finite element method for the pressure and velocity

Chou, So-Hsiang

102

Integrated process for coalbed brine and methane disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a technology and project to demonstrate and commercialize a brine disposal process for converting the brine stream of a coalbed gas producing site into clean water for agricultural use and dry solids that can be recycled for industrial consumption. The process also utilizes coalbed methane (CBM) released from coal mining for the combustion process thereby substantially reducing the potential for methane emissions to the atmosphere. The technology is ideally suited for the treatment and disposal of produced brines generated from the development of coal mines and coalbed methane resources worldwide. Over the next 10 to 15 years, market potential for brine elimination equipment and services is estimated to be in the range of $1 billion.

Byam, J.W. Jr.; Tait, J.H.; Brandt, H.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Laboratory Analysis of a New Sand Consolidation Material for Oilfield Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proprietary Additive PV Pore Volume(s) SEM Scanning Electron Microscope UCS Unconfined Compressive Strength VES Viscoelastic Surfactant viii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT... ........................ 16 5 Comparison of cure profile ? Amine v. Phenolic ....................................... 26 6 Round 7 Syringe Test SEM Photos ............................................................ 43 7 Oil-Wetting Surfactant and Brine Emulsion Test...

Filbrandt, Joseph Daniel

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

104

Power-law scaling of spatially correlated porosity and log(permeability) sequences from north-central North Sea Brae oilfield well core  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......well core data are courtesy of Marathon Oil (UK) Ltd. Figure 1 Overlay of...The Brae oilfield is operated by Marathon Oil UK Ltd. We are grateful to Mark Stephenson of Marathon for generously making the Brae......

P. C. Leary; F. Al-Kindy

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

An Examination of Cultural Values and Employees' Perceptions of Support on Affective Reaction and the Desire to Participate in a Formal Mentoring Program in an Oilfield Services Corporation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

support), affective reaction (job satisfaction and organizational commitment), and the intent to participate in a formal mentoring program in an oilfield services organization. A 44-item electronic survey was utilized to collect data. The questionnaire...

Hayes, Hanna Bea

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

106

Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center RMOTC at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Playing Hide and Seek with Playing Hide and Seek with the Hole-in-the-Wall Gang: Recent Technology Testing at Wyoming's Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) A presentation for The Salt Lake City SPE Chapter October 19, 2005 Tom Anderson Business Development Manager Data Management Project Manager RMOTC Outline * What is RMOTC? * The Hole-in-the-Wall Gang * "Virtual Field Trip" of Teapot Dome * Hiding: - CO 2 Sequestration - Pipeline Leak Detection * Seeking: - Microhole Drilling - High Pressure Jet-Assisted Drillbit - Flow Assurance Test Loop - Tubing Rotator * Sharing Data With Partners The Hole-in-the-Wall Gang Wyoming Doug Judith Spike Joe Brian Jim Mark Ralph Vicki Lyle Butch and Sundance \A1;Flow Assurance Loop 011 024 020 029 032 023 026 033 005 028 021 027 022 004 023 024 034 035 008 025 021 013 003 036 009 017 002 001

107

Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center RMOTC at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Renewable Energy Scoping Meeting & Renewable Energy Scoping Meeting March 26, 2004 2 2 RMOTC The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC), is an operating oil field focusing on environmentally-balanced energy technologies and alternatives, and is the premiere energy testing and demonstration field in the nation. 3 3 * the opportunity to explore environmentally- balanced solutions to the nation's energy issues * opportunities to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate a variety of energy related technologies * a chance to collaborate with top professionals in the energy, environmental technology, and engineering fields * shared industry knowledge through technology transfer via reports, journal articles, and presentations Located within the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) near Casper, Wyoming, RMOTC offers:

108

Standard guide for evaluating and qualifying oilfield and refinery corrosion inhibitors in the laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This guide covers some generally accepted laboratory methodologies that are used for evaluating corrosion inhibitors for oilfield and refinery applications in well defined flow conditions. 1.2 This guide does not cover detailed calculations and methods, but rather covers a range of approaches which have found application in inhibitor evaluation. 1.3 Only those methodologies that have found wide acceptance in inhibitor evaluation are considered in this guide. 1.4 This guide is intended to assist in the selection of methodologies that can be used for evaluating corrosion inhibitors. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory requirements prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

ABSORBING WIPP BRINES: A TRU WASTE DISPOSAL STRATEGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has completed experiments involving 15 each, 250- liter experimental test containers of transuranic (TRU) heterogeneous waste immersed in two types of brine similar to those found in the underground portion of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). To dispose of the waste without removing the brine from the test containers, LANL added commercially available cross-linked polyacrylate granules to absorb the 190 liters of brine in each container, making the waste compliant for shipping to the WIPP in a Standard Waste Box (SWB). Prior to performing the absorption, LANL and the manufacturer of the absorbent conducted laboratory and field tests to determine the ratio of absorbent to brine that would fully absorb the liquid. Bench scale tests indicated a ratio of 10 parts Castile brine to one part absorbent and 6.25 parts Brine A to one part absorbent. The minimum ratio of absorbent to brine was sought because headspace in the containers was limited. However, full scale testing revealed that the ratio should be adjusted to be about 15% richer in absorbent. Additional testing showed that the absorbent would not apply more than 13.8 kPa pressure on the walls of the vessel and that the absorbent would still function normally at that pressure and would not degrade in the approximately 5e-4 Sv/hr radioactive field produced by the waste. Heat generation from the absorption was minimal. The in situ absorption created a single waste stream of 8 SWBs whereas the least complicated alternate method of disposal would have yielded at least an additional 2600 liters of mixed low level liquid waste plus about two cubic meters of mixed low level solid waste, and would have resulted in higher risk of radiation exposure to workers. The in situ absorption saved $311k in a combination of waste treatment, disposal, material and personnel costs compared to the least expensive alternative and $984k compared to the original plan.

Yeamans, D. R.; Wrights, R. S.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

110

Absorbing WIPP brines : a TRU waste disposal strategy.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has completed experiments involving 15 each, 250-liter experimental test containers of transuranic (TRU) heterogeneous waste immersed in two types of brine similar to those found in the underground portion of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). To dispose of the waste without removing the brine from the test containers, LANL added commercially available cross-linked polyacrylate granules to absorb the 190 liters of brine in each container, making the waste compliant for shipping to the WlPP in a Standard Waste Box (SWB). Prior to performing the absorption, LANL and the manufacturer of the absorbent conducted laboratory and field tests to determine the ratio of absorbent to brine that would fully absorb the liquid. Bench scale tests indicated a ratio of 10 parts Castile brine to one part absorbent and 6.25 parts Brine A to one part absorbent. The minimum ratio of absorbent to brine was sought because headspace in the containers was limited. However, full scale testing revealed that the ratio should be adjusted to be about 15% richer in absorbent. Additional testing showed that the absorbent would not apply more than 13.8 kPa pressure on the walls of the vessel and that the absorbent would still function normally at that pressure and would not degrade in the approximately 5e-4 Sv/hr radioactive field produced by the waste. Heat generation from the absorption was minimal. The in situ absorption created a single waste stream of 8 SWBs whereas the least complicated alternate method of disposal would have yielded at least an additional 2600 liters of mixed low level liquid waste plus about two cubic meters of mixed low level solid waste, and would have resulted in higher risk of radiation exposure to workers. The in situ absorption saved $3 1 lk in a combination of waste treatment, disposal, material and personnel costs compared to the least expensive alternative and $984k compared to the original plan.

Yeamans, D. R. (David R.); Wright, R. (Robert)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Contaminant Sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Contaminant sources include almost every component in the manufacturing process: people, materials, processing equipment, and manufacturing environments. People can generate contaminating particles, gases, conden...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

DOE/EA-1583: Final Site-wide Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center/Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (October 2008)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER / ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER / NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVE NO. 3 FINAL Site-wide Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact October 2008 U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center 907 N. Poplar Street, Suite 150 Casper WY 82601 DOE/EA-1583 Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center / Naval Petroleum Reserve No.3 Final Site-Wide Environmental Assessment i TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS.................................................................................................vii SUMMARY ................................................................................................................................................ix 1.0 INTRODUCTION .........................................................................................................................1

113

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUES'f BY BAKER HUGHES OILFIELD OPERATIONS, INC. ('"BAKER HUGHES")  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

REQUES'f BY BAKER HUGHES OILFIELD OPERATIONS, INC. ('"BAKER HUGHES") REQUES'f BY BAKER HUGHES OILFIELD OPERATIONS, INC. ('"BAKER HUGHES") FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RfGHTS UNDER DOE AWARD NO. DE- EE0005505 ; W(A) 2012-013 Baker Hughes has requested a waiver of patent ri ghts of the United States of Americ a for all s ul~ject inventions arising from its participation tmder the above referenced award entitled ·'D irectional Measurement- Wh ile-Drilling System for Geothermal Applications." The purpose of the av,rard is to develop a reliable Directional Measurement-While·· Drill ing (MWD) System for the creation of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). The sys tem to be developed under this award is a probe-based MWD tool for directional drilling that is alternator or battery povvcred, contains a navigation package capable of measuring inclinati

114

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Experiments were used to examine water content in Permian salt samples (Salado Formation) collected from the WIPP site. The profile of water release and movement is recognized as a function of temperature from 30 to 275 oC using classical gravimetric methods to measure weight loss as a result of heating. The amount of water released from heating the salt was found to be correlated with the salts accessory mineral content (clay, other secondary minerals lost up to 3 wt % while pure halite salt lost less than 0.5 wt % water). Water released from salt at lower temperature was reversible and is attributed to clay hydration and dehydration processes. The analysis

115

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Experiments were used to examine water content in Permian salt samples (Salado Formation) collected from the WIPP site. The profile of water release and movement is recognized as a function of temperature from 30 to 275 oC using classical gravimetric methods to measure weight loss as a result of heating. The amount of water released from heating the salt was found to be correlated with the salts accessory mineral content (clay, other secondary minerals lost up to 3 wt % while pure halite salt lost less than 0.5 wt % water). Water released from salt at lower temperature was reversible and is attributed to clay hydration and dehydration processes. The analysis

116

Actinide (III) solubility in WIPP Brine: data summary and recommendations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solubility of actinides in the +3 oxidation state is an important input into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) performance assessment (PA) models that calculate potential actinide release from the WIPP repository. In this context, the solubility of neodymium(III) was determined as a function of pH, carbonate concentration, and WIPP brine composition. Additionally, we conducted a literature review on the solubility of +3 actinides under WIPP-related conditions. Neodymium(III) was used as a redox-invariant analog for the +3 oxidation state of americium and plutonium, which is the oxidation state that accounts for over 90% of the potential release from the WIPP through the dissolved brine release (DBR) mechanism, based on current WIPP performance assessment assumptions. These solubility data extend past studies to brine compositions that are more WIPP-relevant and cover a broader range of experimental conditions than past studies.

Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean-Francois; Richmann, Michael K.; Reed, Donald T.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Cementation process for minerals recovery from Salton Sea geothermal brines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential for minerals recovery from a 1000-MWe combined geothermal power and minerals recovery plant in the Salton Sea is examined. While the possible value of minerals recovered would substantially exceed the revenue from power production, information is insufficient to carry out a detailed economic analysis. The recovery of precious metals - silver, gold, and platinum - is the most important factor in determining the economics of a minerals recovery plant; however, the precious metals content of the brines is not certain. Such a power plant could recover 14 to 31% of the US demand for manganese and substantial amounts of zinc and lead. Previous work on minerals extraction from Salton Sea brines is also reviewed and a new process, based on a fluidized-bed cementation reaction with metallic iron, is proposed. This process would recover the precious metals, lead, and tin present in the brines.

Maimoni, A.

1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

118

Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential January 3, 2014 - 9:05am Addthis John Fox, CEO of Electratherm,...

119

Uranium (VI) solubility in carbonate-free ERDA-6 brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When present, uranium is usually an element of importance in a nuclear waste repository. In the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), uranium is the most prevalent actinide component by mass, with about 647 metric tons to be placed in the repository. Therefore, the chemistry of uranium, and especially its solubility in the WIPP conditions, needs to be well determined. Long-term experiments were performed to measure the solubility of uranium (VI) in carbonate-free ERDA-6 brine, a simulated WIPP brine, at pC{sub H+} values between 8 and 12.5. These data, obtained from the over-saturation approach, were the first repository-relevant data for the VI actinide oxidation state. The solubility trends observed pointed towards low uranium solubility in WIPP brines and a lack of amphotericity. At the expected pC{sub H+} in the WIPP ({approx} 9.5), measured uranium solubility approached 10{sup -7} M. The objective of these experiments was to establish a baseline solubility to further investigate the effects of carbonate complexation on uranium solubility in WIPP brines.

Lucchini, Jean-francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khaing, Hnin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Oil production enhancement through a standardized brine treatment. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to permit the environmentally safe discharge of brines produced from oil wells in Pennsylvania to the surface waters of the Commonwealth and to rapidly brings as many wells as possible into compliance with the law, the Pennsylvania Oil and Gas Association (POGAM) approached the Pennsylvania State University to develop a program designed to demonstrate that a treatment process to meet acceptable discharge conditions and effluent limitations can be standardized for all potential stripper wells brine discharge. After the initial studies, the first phase of this project was initiated. A bench-scale prototype model was developed for conducting experiments in laboratory conditions. The experiments pursued in the laboratory conditions were focused on the removal of ferrous iron from synthetically made brine. Iron was selected as the primary heavy metals for studying the efficiency of the treatment process. The results of a number of experiments in the lab were indicative of the capability of the proposed brine treatment process in the removal of iron. Concurrent with the laboratory experiments, a comprehensive and extensive kinetic study was initiated. This study was necessary to provide the required data base for process modeling. This study included the investigation of the critical pH as well as the rate and order of reactions of the studied elements: aluminum, lead, zinc, and copper. In the second phase of this project, a field-based prototype was developed to evaluate and demonstrate the treatment process effectiveness. These experiments were conducted under various conditions and included the testing on five brines from different locations with various dissolved constituents. The outcome of this research has been a software package, currently based on iron`s reactivity, to be used for design purposes. The developed computer program was refined as far as possible using the results from laboratory and field experiments.

Adewumi, A.; Watson, R.; Tian, S.; Safargar, S.; Heckman, S.; Drielinger, I.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

CX-005612: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part IICX(s) Applied: B3.6, B3.7Date: 04/12/2011Location(s): Ellery, New YorkOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

122

2 INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRUDE/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION AT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERACTION AT RESERVOIR CONDITIONS 2.1.1 Introduction In the previous section, the fluid/rock interactions in this section and expand the understanding of the interactions of the Spraberry reservoir rock, oil and brine, brine displacement and rock wettability using low permeability Spraberry cores. A schematic

Schechter, David S.

123

Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150 C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation experiments do not represent expected conditions in an emplacement drift, but nevertheless illustrate the potential for acid-gas generation at moderate temperatures (<150 C).

Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel, Carl

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

124

Nanofiltration separation of polyvalent and monovalent anions in desalination brines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work, as part of a global membrane process for the recovery of alkali and acids from reverse osmosis (RO) desalination brines, focuses on the nanofiltration (NF) separation of polyvalent and monovalent anions, more specifically sulfate and chloride. This pretreatment stage plays a key role in the whole recovery process. Working with model brines simulating the concentration of RO concentrates, 0.2–1.2 M chloride concentration and 0.1 M sulfate concentration, the experimental performance and modeling of the NF separation is reported. The study has been carried out with the NF270 (Dow Filmtec) membrane. The effect of operating pressure (500–2000 kPa), ionic strength (0.4–1.3 M) and chloride initial concentration (0.2–1.2 M) on the membrane separation capacity has been investigated. Finally, the Donnan Steric Pore Model (DSPM) together with experimentally determined parameters, effective pore radius (rp), thickness of the membrane effective layer (?) and effective membrane charge density (Xd), was proved accurate enough to satisfactorily describe the experimental results. In this work we provide for the first time the analysis of partitioning effects and transport mechanism in the NF separation of sulfate and chloride anions in concentrations that simulate those found in RO desalination brines.

A. Pérez-González; R. Ibáńez; P. Gómez; A.M. Urtiaga; I. Ortiz; J.A. Irabien

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Brine pH Modification Scale Control Technology. 2. A Review.pdf | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brine pH Modification Scale Control Technology. 2. A Review.pdf Brine pH Modification Scale Control Technology. 2. A Review.pdf Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Brine pH Modification Scale Control Technology. 2. A Review.pdf Abstract A variety of processes has been deployed at geothermalfields to inhibit or control siliceous scale deposition. It has beenknown for decades that the kinetics of silicic acid polymerizationis retarded when the pH of an aqueous solution is decreased.Therefore, a potential method for controlling siliceous scalingfrom geothermal brine is treatment with acid. Early attempts tocontrol siliceous scaling in geothermal brine-handling equipmentby retarding polymerization led to the belief that the pHhad to be reduced to < 4. Acidifying brine was discourageddue to corrosion concerns.

126

Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline lake for RSL formation, CaCl2 brines and chloride deposits in basins may provide clues to the origin of ancient,2,10­14 , the composition of the brine is unlike any other body of water in the world, as ,90% of the salt is CaCl2 1

Marchant, David R.

127

EA-1956: Site-Wide Environmental Assessment for the Divestiture of Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center and Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, Natrona County, Wyoming  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Draft Site-Wide EA: Public Comment Period Ends 04/14/2014DOE is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of the proposed discontinuation of DOE operations at, and the proposed divestiture of, the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) and Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR-3).

128

The development of appropriate brine electrolysers for disinfection of rural water supplies .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A comparative study of electrolysers using different anodic materials for the electrolysis of brine (sodium chloride) for the production of sodium hypochlorite as a source… (more)

Siguba, Maxhobandile

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Water quality in the vicinity of Mosquito Creek Lake, Trumbull County, Ohio, in relation of the chemistry of locally occurring oil, natural gas, and brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to describe current water quality and the chemistry of oil, natural gas, and brine in the Mosquito Creek Lake area. Additionally, these data are used to characterize water quality in the Mosquito Creek Lake area in relation to past oil and natural gas well drilling and production. To meet the overall objective, several goals for this investigation were established. These include (1) collect water-quality and subsurface-gas data from shallow sediments and rock that can be used for future evaluation of possible effects of oil and natural gas well drilling and production on water supplies, (2) characterize current surface-water and ground-water quality as it relates to the natural occurrence and (or) release of oil, gas, and brine (3) sample and chemically characterize the oil in the shallow Mecca Oil Pool, gas from the Berea and Cussewago Sandstone aquifers, and the oil, gas, and brine from the Clinton sandstone, and (4) identify areas where aquifers are vulnerable to contamination from surface spills at oil and natural gas drilling and production sites.

Barton, G.J.; Burruss, R.C.; Ryder, R.T.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

Conclusions after eleven years of studying brine at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was established to demonstrate the safe disposal of defense-generated transuranic waste in the United States. When excavations began at the WIPP in 1982, small brine seepages (weeps) were observed on the walls. WIPP performance assessment activities raised the concern that the brine could cause anoxic corrosion of metal in the waste storage drums and waste inventory, potentially producing large quantities of hydrogen gas, which would affect the long-term performance of Thee repository. Th WIPP Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program was developed to investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences. The WIPP is excavated in the Salado Formation, which is bedded salt of Permian age. The sediments exposed in the excavations consist of clear halite and polyhalitic halite, halite containing clay, thin clay seams, and interbedded anhydrite layers. The clear halite beds contain little brine and are effectively impermeable. The clay within the salt and in the clay seams contains brine that is released to the excavations, although virtually all of the brine release occurs within the first few years of mining. Consequently, by the time the waste storage rooms at the WIPP are filled and sealed, most of the brine that can be derived from the clay will have evaporated. These is no observed evidence from the WIPP excavations that brine will seep into the working from the anhydrite beds. It has been postulated, however, that brine could seep through the underlying anhydrite Marker Bed 139 (MB139). Recently acquired data on the hydrologic properties of MB139 show that, even if flow through the anhydrite occurs, the brine released to the storage rooms could only corrode a small percentage of the susceptible metal in the repository.

Deal, D.E. [IT Corporation, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bills, R.A. [Department of Energy, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

Isolation of Halobacterium salinarum retrieved directly from halite brine inclusions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Halite crystals were selected from a 186m subsurface core taken from the Badwater salt pan, Death Valley, California to ascertain if halophilic Archaea and their associated 16S rDNA can survive over several tens of thousands of years. Using a combined microscope microdrill/micropipette system, fluids from brine inclusions were aseptically extracted from primary, hopper texture, halite crystals from 8 and 85 metres below the surface (mbls). U-Th disequilibrium dating indicates that these halite layers were deposited at 9600 and 97000 years before present (ybp) respectively.

Mormile, Melanie R.; Biesen, Michelle A.; Gutierrez, M. Carmen; Ventosa, Antonio; Pavlovich, Justin B.; Onstott, T C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Reverse osmosis process successfully converts oil field brine into freshwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A state-of-the-art process in the San Ardo oil field converted produced brine into freshwater. The conversion process used chemical clarification, softening, filtration, and reverse osmosis (RO). After extensive testing resolved RO membrane fouling problems, the pilot plant successfully handled water with about 7,000 mg/l. of total dissolved solids, 250 mg/l. silica, and 170 mg/l. soluble oil. The treated water complies with the stringent California drinking water standard. The paper describes water reclamation, the San Ardo process, stability, reverse osmosis membrane fouling, membranes at high pH, water quality, and costs.

Tao, F.T.; Curtice, S.; Hobbs, R.D.; Sides, J.L.; Wieser, J.D. (Texaco Inc., Bellaire, TX (United States)); Dyke, C.A.; Tuohey, D. (Texaco Inc., Beacon, NY (United States)); Pilger, P.F. (Texaco E and P Inc., Denver, CO (United States))

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

133

Geochemistry of Salado Formation brines recovered from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intergranular brines recovered from the repository horizon of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) have major- and trace-element compositions that reflect seawater evaporation and diagenetic processes. Brines obtained from repository drill holes are heterogenous with respect to composition, but their compositional fields are distinct from those obtained from fluid inclusions in WIPP halite. The heterogeneity of brine compositions within the drill-hole population indicates a lack of mixing and fluid homogenization within the salt at the repository level. Compositional differences between intergranular (drill hole) and intragranular (fluid inclusions) brines is attributed to isolation of the latter from diagenetic fluids that were produced from dehydration reactions involving gypsum and clay minerals. Modeling of brine-rock equilibria indicates that equilibration with evaporite minerals controls the concentrations of major elements in the brine. Drill-hole brines are in equilibrium with the observed repository minerals halite, anhydrite, magnesite, polyhalite and quartz. The equilibrium model supports the derivation of drill-hole brines from near-field fluid, rather than large-scale vertical migration of fluids from the overlying Rustler or underlying Castile Formations. 13 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

Abitz, R.; Myers, J.; Drez, P.; Deal, D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Dynamics and storage of brine in mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics and storage of brine in mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems Fabrice J. Fontaine1 substantially different from seawater as a result of phase separation and segregation of the resulting vapor below seawater for over a decade, which raises important questions concerning the fate of brines

Wilcock, William

135

NEW MARINE DECAPOD CRUSTACEANS FROM WATERS INFLUENCED BY HYDROmERMAL DISCHARGE, BRINE, AND HYDROCARBON SEEPAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and waters influenced by brine and hydrocarbon seeps continue to yield species new to science. Such enNEW MARINE DECAPOD CRUSTACEANS FROM WATERS INFLUENCED BY HYDROmERMAL DISCHARGE, BRINE, AND HYDROCARBON SEEPAGE AUSTIN B. WILLIAMS} ABSTRACT Five species of decapod crustaceans new to science

136

RIS-M-2260 HEAT GRADIENT INDUCED MIGRATION OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN ROCK SALT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;#12;- 5 - 1. INTRODUCTION The storage of heat producing radioactive waste in rock salt, will produce of the brine migration under influence of the decreasing heat production in the waste. A general expressionRISĂ?-M-2260 HEAT GRADIENT INDUCED MIGRATION OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN ROCK SALT Mathematical treatment

137

Separation and Fixation of Toxic Components in Salt Brines Using a Water-Based Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efforts to implement new water quality standards, increase water reuse and reclamation, and minimize the cost of waste storage motivate the development of new processes for stabilizing wastewater residuals that minimize waste volume, water content and the long-term environmental risk from related by-products. This work explores the use of an aqueous-based emulsion process to create an epoxy/rubber matrix for separating and encapsulating waste components from salt laden, arsenic contaminated, amorphous iron hydrate sludges. Such sludges are generated from conventional water purification precipitation/adsorption processes, used to convert aqueous brine streams to semi-solid waste streams, such as ion exchange/membrane separation, and from other precipitative heavy metal removal operations. In this study, epoxy and polystyrene butadiene (PSB) rubber emulsions are mixed together and then combined with a surrogate sludge. The surrogate sludge consists of amorphous iron hydrate with 1 part arsenic fixed to the surface of the hydrate per 10 parts iron mixed with sodium nitrate and chloride salts and water. The resulting emulsion is cured and dried at 80 °C to remove water. Microstructure characterization by electron microscopy confirms that the epoxy/PSB matrix surrounds and encapsulates the arsenic laden amorphous iron hydrate phase while allowing the salt to migrate to internal and external surfaces of the sample. Salt extraction studies indicate that the porous nature of the resulting matrix promotes the separation and removal of as much as 90% of the original salt content in only one hour. Long term leaching studies based on the use of the infinite slab diffusion model reveal no evidence of iron migration or, by inference, arsenic migration, and demonstrate that the diffusion coefficients of the unextracted salt yield leachability indices within regulations for non-hazardous landfill disposal. Because salt is the most mobile species, it is inferred that arsenic leaches from the host material at an even slower rate, making the waste forms amenable to unregulated land disposal options. These results indicate that the environmentally-benign, water-based emulsion processing of epoxy/PSB polymeric hosts show great promise as a separation and fixation technology for treating brine streams from wastewater treatment facilities.

Franks, C.; Quach, A.; Birnie III, D.; Ela, W.; Saez, A.E.; Zelinski, B.; Smith, H.; Smith, G.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Regional evaluation of brine management for geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Gas Exploration and Production Waste: Availability, Options, and Costs.gases, carcinogenic production contaminants, and unpredictable production rates greatly increase the cost and

Breunig, H.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Brine inclusions in halite and the origin of the Middle Devonian Prairie evaporites of Western Canada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brines were extracted from fluid inclusions in Lower Salt halite of the Middle Devonian Prairie Formation in Saskatchewan, Canada. The brines were analyzed by ion chromatography and were found to be of the Na-K-Mg-Ca-Cl type. They do not fall along a simple evaporation trend. Brines from clear, diagenetic halite are significantly lower in Na{sup +} and higher in Mg{sup 2+}, and Cl{sup {minus}} than brines from cloudy, subaqueously formed halite with chevron structures. The isotopic composition of strontium and sulfur in anhydrite associated with the halites was found to be the same as that of Middle Devonian seawater. The composition of the inclusion brines can be derived from that of modern seawater by evaporation, extensive dolomitization of limestone, and albitization of clay minerals. Other evolution paths are, however, also feasible, and it is impossible to rule out effects due to the addition of nonmarine waters (hydrothermal solutions, surface runoff, and groundwater), or dissolutional recycling of existing evaporites within the Prairie evaporite basin. These analyses and published data on brine inclusions in halite from a number of Phanerozoid evaporite deposits show that the Na-K-Mg-Ca-Cl type brine is more common than the Na-K-Mg-Cl-SO{sub 4} type, which is expected from evaporation of modern seawater.

Horita, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical and Analytical Sciences Div.; Weinberg, A.; Das, N.; Holland, H.D. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Experience with minerals recovery from geothermal and other brines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The commercial extraction of minerals from geothermal fluids is not a novelty, although there appear to be no current commercial activities. Products which have been commercially recovered from geothermal fluids include NaC1, CaC1/sub 2/, H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/, and NH/sub 3/. Sites of significant commercial activity include Larderello, Italy and the Imperial Valley in California. Furthermore, a few pilot-plant systems have been tested for this purpose. Commercial recovery from natural non-geothermal brines has a long history, which may have implications for geothermal energy applications. The technical feasibility and economic benefits of large-scale minerals production in conjunction with geothermal energy exploitation remain speculative. In any case, the uncertainties can be resolved only on a site- and product-specific basis.

Crane, C.H.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Strontium isotope quantification of siderite, brine and acid mine drainage contributions to abandoned gas well discharges in the Appalachian Plateau  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unplugged abandoned oil and gas wells in the Appalachian region can serve as conduits for the movement of waters impacted by fossil fuel extraction. Strontium isotope and geochemical analysis indicate that artesian discharges of water with high total dissolved solids (TDS) from a series of gas wells in western Pennsylvania result from the infiltration of acidic, low Fe (Fe < 10 mg/L) coal mine drainage (AMD) into shallow, siderite (iron carbonate)-cemented sandstone aquifers. The acidity from the AMD promotes dissolution of the carbonate, and metal- and sulfate-contaminated waters rise to the surface through compromised abandoned gas well casings. Strontium isotope mixing models suggest that neither upward migration of oil and gas brines from Devonian reservoirs associated with the wells nor dissolution of abundant nodular siderite present in the mine spoil through which recharge water percolates contribute significantly to the artesian gas well discharges. Natural Sr isotope composition can be a sensitive tool in the characterization of complex groundwater interactions and can be used to distinguish between inputs from deep and shallow contamination sources, as well as between groundwater and mineralogically similar but stratigraphically distinct rock units. This is of particular relevance to regions such as the Appalachian Basin, where a legacy of coal, oil and gas exploration is coupled with ongoing and future natural gas drilling into deep reservoirs.

Chapman, Elizabeth C.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Hedin, Robert S.; Weaver, Theodore J.; Edenborn, Harry M.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Hybrid electrodialysis reverse osmosis system design and its optimization for treatment of highly saline brines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The demand is rising for desalination technologies to treat highly saline brines arising from hydraulic fracturing processes and inland desalination. Interest is growing in the use of electrical desalination technologies ...

McGovern, Ronan Killian

143

E-Print Network 3.0 - acartia tonsa brine Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: acartia tonsa brine Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Vol. 114: 203-208,1994 MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Summary: . divergens attacking it. Ingestion rates of P, cf....

144

Proper use of sodium bisulfite with minimal salt penetration during brine immersion freezing of shrimp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROPER USE OF SODIUM BISULFITE WITH MINIMAL SALT PENETRATION DURING BRINE IMMERSION FREEZING OF SHRIMP A Thesis by SUZANNE RENE BROUSSARD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the reguirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE MAY 1988 OC o Z m Z IJ III s Z Major Subject: Food Science and Technology PROPER USE OF SODIUM BISULFITE WITH MINIMAL SALT PENETRATION DURING BRINE IMMERSION FREEZING OF SHRIMP A Thesis by SUZANNE RENE...

Broussard, Suzanne Rene

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

145

The effects of an ambient salinity gradient on the dilution of dense brine jets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF AN AMBIENT SALINITY GRADIENT ON THE DILUTION OF DENSE BRINE JETS A Thesis by GARY WAYNE MCCULLOUGH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Ocean Engineering THE EFFECTS OF AN AMBIENT SALINITY GRADIENT ON THE DILUTION OF DENSE BRINE JETS A Thesis by GARY NAYNE MCCULLOUGH Approved as to style and content by: Robert E. Randall (Chair of Committee...

McCullough, Gary Wayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

146

Recovery of energy from geothermal brine and other hot water sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Process and system for recovery of energy from geothermal brines and other hot water sources, by direct contact heat exchange between the brine or hot water, and an immiscible working fluid, e.g. a hydrocarbon such as isobutane, in a heat exchange column, the brine or hot water therein flowing countercurrent to the flow of the working fluid. The column can be operated at subcritical, critical or above the critical pressure of the working fluid. Preferably, the column is provided with a plurality of sieve plates, and the heat exchange process and column, e.g. with respect to the design of such plates, number of plates employed, spacing between plates, area thereof, column diameter, and the like, are designed to achieve maximum throughput of brine or hot water and reduction in temperature differential at the respective stages or plates between the brine or hot water and the working fluid, and so minimize lost work and maximize efficiency, and minimize scale deposition from hot water containing fluid including salts, such as brine. Maximum throughput approximates minimum cost of electricity which can be produced by conversion of the recovered thermal energy to electrical energy.

Wahl, III, Edward F. (Claremont, CA); Boucher, Frederic B. (San Juan Capistrano, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Numerical simulations of lab-scale brine-water mixing experiments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory-scale experiments simulating the injection of fresh water into brine in a Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) cavern were performed at Sandia National Laboratories for various conditions of injection rate and small and large injection tube diameters. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code FLUENT was used to simulate these experiments to evaluate the predictive capability of FLUENT for brine-water mixing in an SPR cavern. The data-model comparisons show that FLUENT simulations predict the mixing plume depth reasonably well. Predictions of the near-wall brine concentrations compare very well with the experimental data. The simulated time for the mixing plume to reach the vessel wall was underpredicted for the small injection tubes but reasonable for the large injection tubes. The difference in the time to reach the wall is probably due to the three-dimensional nature of the mixing plume as it spreads out at the air-brine or oil-brine interface. The depth of the mixing plume as it spreads out along the interface was within a factor of 2 of the experimental data. The FLUENT simulation results predict the plume mixing accurately, especially the water concentration when the mixing plume reaches the wall. This parameter value is the most significant feature of the mixing process because it will determine the amount of enhanced leaching at the oil-brine interface.

Khalil, Imane; Webb, Stephen Walter

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Chemical analyses of geothermal waters and Strategic Petroleum Reserve brines for metals of economic importance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waters from seven hydrothermal-geothermal, one geopressured-geothermal, and six Strategic Petroleum Reserve wells have been surveyed for 12 metals of economic importance using trace chemical analysis techniques. The elements sought were Cr, Co, Mn, Ta, Sn, V, Nb, Li, Sr, Pt, Au and Ag. Platinum was found at a concentration of approx. 50 ppb in a brine from the Salton Sea geothermal area. Brine from this region, as has been known from previous studies, is also rich in Li, Sr and Mn. Higher concentrations (approx. 900 ppm) of Sr are found in the high-salinity geopressured brines. None of the fluids contained interesting concentrations of the other metals. Good recovery of precious metals at sub-ppm concentrations from synthetic high salinity brines was achieved using Amborane reductive resin, but similar recovery in the laboratory using real brines could not be demonstrated. Several analytical techniques were compared in sensitivity for the determination of the precious metals; neutron activation analysis with carrier separation is the best for gold and platinum in geothermal brines. 26 references, 7 tables.

Harrar, J.E.; Raber, E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program 1992--1993 report and summary of BSEP data since 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the last one that is currently scheduled in the sequence of reports of new data, and therefore, also includes summary comments referencing important data obtained by BSEP since 1983. These BSEP activities document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and seepage of that brine into the excavations at the (WIPP) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. A project concern is that enough brine might be present after sealing and closure to generate large quantities of hydrogen gas by corroding the metal in the waste drums and waste inventory. This report describes progress made during the calendar years 1992 and 1993 and focuses on four major areas: (1) monitoring of brine inflow, e.g., measuring brines recovered from holes drilled downward from the underground drifts (downholes), upward from the underground drifts (upholes), and from subhorizontal holes from the underground drifts; (2) observations of weeps in the Air Intake Shaft (AIS); (3) further characterization of brine geochemistry; and (4) additional characterization of the hydrologic conditions in the fractured zone beneath the excavations.

Deal, D.E.; Abitz, R.J. [I. T. Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States); Belski, D.S. [USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Project Office

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Ground level concentration of sulfur dioxide at Kuwait`s major population centers during the oil-field fires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the Iraqi occupation, Kuwait`s oil wells were ignited. the fires were damaging to the country`s oil resources and air quality. The impact of the oil-field fires on the air quality was studied to determine the level of exposure to pollutants in major population centers. The period of July-September 1991 was selected for examination. A mathematical model was used to compute the ground-level concentration isopleths. The results of these computations are supported by significant concentrations measured and reported by the Environmental Protection Council, Kuwait. The ground-level concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the major population centers, whether measure or estimated, were less than the ambient standards of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s air pollution index. The dispersive characteristics were classified according to wind conditions. The results of this assessment provide historical data on Kuwait`s oil fires and may be useful in assessing risks resulting from this catastrophe. 6 refs., 10 fig., 2 tab.

Al-Ajmi, D.N.; Marmoush, Y.R. [Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (Kuwait)] [Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (Kuwait)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Brine clarity maintenance in salinity-gradient solar ponds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Brine transparency is an important part of the maintenance of a salinity-gradient solar pond as it affects the amount of solar radiation reaching the storage zone and hence has an influence on the thermal performance. There is a wide range of factors that can hinder the transmission of light in a solar pond. Algal and microbial growths are the most common problems encountered in working solar ponds and control of their densities is essential to maintain transparency. Two different chemical treatment methods for algae growth prevention are described in this paper: chlorine and a novel chemical product – copper ethylamine complex. The latter method has never been implemented previously in a working pond. This paper discusses the theory of the algae control methods used and presents the experimental results of the chemical treatments. The results showed that Cupricide is more effective than chlorine and is therefore the recommended chemical for algae control in solar ponds; it improves the water transparency especially in the upper convective zone and lower convective zone with all measurement values less than 1 NTU. Chlorine was found to be more corrosive than Cupricide due to the acidic effect it has on the pH. The preliminary cost analysis showed that granular chlorine is the cheapest chemical. A more detailed financial analysis is nevertheless required to refine these costs.

Neus Gasulla; Yusli Yaakob; Jimmy Leblanc; Aliakbar Akbarzadeh; Jose Luis Cortina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume III. Biological oceanography. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program began discharging brine into the Gulf of Mexico from its West Hackberry site near Cameron, Louisiana in May 1981. The brine originates from underground salt domes being leached with water from the Intracoastal Waterway, making available vast underground storage caverns for crude oil. The effects of brine discharge on aquatic organisms are presented in this volume. The topics covered are: benthos; nekton; phytoplankton; zooplankton; and data management.

DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Estimates of the solubilities of waste element radionuclides in waste isolation pilot plant brines: A report by the expert panel on the source term  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluation of the long-term performance of the WIPP includes estimation of the cumulative releases of radionuclide elements to the accessible environment. Nonradioactive lead is added because of the large quantity expected in WIPP wastes. To estimate the solubilities of these elements in WIPP brines, the Panel used the following approach. Existing thermodynamic data were used to identify the most likely aqueous species in solution through the construction of aqueous speciation diagrams. Existing thermodynamic data and expert judgment were used to identify potential solubility-limiting solid phases. Thermodynamic data were used to calculate the activities of the radionuclide aqueous species in equilibrium with each solid. Activity coefficients of the radionuclide-bearing aqueous species were estimated using Pitzer`s equations. These activity coefficients were then used to calculate the concentration of each radionuclide at the 0.1 and 0.9 fractiles. The 0.5 fractile was chosen to represent experimental data with activity coefficient corrections as described above. Expert judgment was used to develop the 0.0, 0.25, 0.75, and 1.0 fractiles by considering the sensitivity of solubility to the potential variability in the composition of brine and gas, and the extent of waste contaminants, and extending the probability distributions accordingly. The results were used in the 1991 and 1992 performance assessment calculations. 68 refs.

Hobart, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); [Glenn T. Seaborg Inst. for Transactinium Science, Livermore, CA (United States); Bruton, C.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Dept.; Millero, F.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States). Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Chou, I.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States); Trauth, K.M.; Anderson, D.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes for the removal of hydrocarbons from produced water. The results of these experiments show that hydrocarbons from produced water can be reduced from 200 ppm to below 29 ppm level. Experiments were also done to remove the dissolved solids (salts) from the pretreated produced water using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. The Report also discusses the results of field testing of various process trains to measure performance of the desalination process. Economic analysis based on field testing, including capital and operational costs, was done to predict the water treatment costs. Cost of treating produced water containing 15,000 ppm total dissolved solids and 200 ppm hydrocarbons to obtain agricultural water quality with less than 200 ppm TDS and 2 ppm hydrocarbons range between $0.5-1.5 /bbl. The contribution of fresh water resource from produced water will contribute enormously to the sustainable development of the communities where oil and gas is produced and fresh water is a scarce resource. This water can be used for many beneficial purposes such as agriculture, horticulture, rangeland and ecological restorations, and other environmental and industrial application.

David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

155

Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL, LBNL and SNL for the Used Fuel Disposition Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The report summarizes laboratory and field observations and numerical modeling related to coupledprocesses involving brine and vapor migration in geologic salt, focusing on recent developments and...

156

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

61 - 7470 of 28,905 results. 61 - 7470 of 28,905 results. Download CX-005611: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 04/12/2011 Location(s): Tonkawa, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005611-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005612: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B3.7 Date: 04/12/2011 Location(s): Ellery, New York Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005612-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-001295: Categorical Exclusion Determination

157

Contaminant-Generation Mechanisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the last chapter, the areas where contaminants are generated were discussed. Knowing the location of contaminant generation is helpful in controlling that contamination, but understanding the mechanisms is ...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

The depth of the oil/brine interface and crude oil leaks in SPR caverns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monitoring wellhead pressure evolution is the best method of detecting crude oil leaks in SPR caverns while oil/brine interface depth measurements provide additional insight. However, to fully utilize the information provided by these interface depth measurements, a thorough understanding of how the interface movement corresponds to cavern phenomena, such as salt creep, crude oil leakage, and temperature equilibration, as well as to wellhead pressure, is required. The time evolution of the oil/brine interface depth is a function of several opposing factors. Cavern closure due to salt creep and crude oil leakage, if present, move the interface upward. Brine removal and temperature equilibration of the oil/brine system move the interface downward. Therefore, the relative magnitudes of these factors determine the net direction of interface movement. Using a mass balance on the cavern fluids, coupled with a simplified salt creep model for closure in SPR caverns, the movement of the oil/brine interface has been predicted for varying cavern configurations, including both right-cylindrical and carrot-shaped caverns. Three different cavern depths and operating pressures have been investigated. In addition, the caverns were investigated at four different points in time, allowing for varying extents of temperature equilibration. Time dependent interface depth changes of a few inches to a few feet were found to be characteristic of the range of cases studied. 5 refs, 19 figs., 1 tab.

Heffelfinger, G.S.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Evaporative Evolution of Carbonate-Rich Brines from Synthetic Topopah Spring Tuff Pore Water, Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evaporation of a range of synthetic pore water solutions representative of the potential high-level-nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, NV is being investigated. The motivation of this work is to understand and predict the range of brine compositions that may contact the waste containers from evaporation of pore waters, because these brines could form corrosive thin films on the containers and impact their long-term integrity. A relatively complex synthetic Topopah Spring Tuff pore water was progressively concentrated by evaporation in a closed vessel, heated to 95 C in a series of sequential experiments. Periodic samples of the evaporating solution were taken to determine the evolving water chemistry. According to chemical divide theory at 25 C and 95 C our starting solution should evolve towards a high pH carbonate brine. Results at 95 C show that this solution evolves towards a complex brine that contains about 99 mol% Na{sup +} for the cations, and 71 mol% Cl{sup -}, 18 mol% {Sigma}CO{sub 2}(aq), 9 mol%SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} for the anions. Initial modeling of the evaporating solution indicates precipitation of aragonite, halite, silica, sulfate and fluoride phases. The experiments have been used to benchmark the use of the EQ3/6 geochemical code in predicting the evolution of carbonate-rich brines during evaporation.

Sutton, M; Alai, M; Carroll, S A

2004-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

160

Developing a process for commercial silica production from Salton Sea brines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this joint LLNL-CalEnergy project is to develop a method for precipitating marketable silica from spent Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF) brines. Many markets for silica exist. We have initially targeted production of silica as a rubber additive. Silica reinforced rubber gives tires less rolling resistance, greater tear strength, and better adhesion to steel belts. Previous silica precipitates produced by CalEnergy from Salton Sea brines were not suitable as rubber additives. They did not to disperse well in the rubber precursors and produced inferior rubber. CalEnergy currently minimizes silica scaling in some of their production facilities by acidifying the brine pH. The rate of silica precipitation slows down as the pH is lowered, so that energy extraction and brine reinfection are possible without unacceptable amounts of scaling even with more than 700 ppm SiO{sub 2} in solution. We are adding a step in which a small amount of base is added to the acidified brine to precipitate silica before reinfection. By carefully controlling the type, rate, and amount of base addition, we can optimize the properties of the precipitate to approach those of an ideal rubber additive.

Bourcier, W; McCutcheon, M; Leif, R; Bruton, C

2000-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Development and application of accurate detection and assay techniques for oilfield scale inhibitors in produced water samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the application of chemical inhibitors in field squeeze treatments for the prevention of sulfate and carbonate mineral scale formation, it is very important that the chemical species involved can be accurately assayed. When the inhibitor concentration drops below a predetermined threshold level for scale inhibition (C{sub t}) then the well may need to be resqueezed. The accurate assay of scale inhibitors down to concentration levels of a few ppm in real field brines can be a difficult task. In this paper, the authors examine a number of interferences which often make assay techniques very difficult to apply in field produced brines. The inhibitors examined include phosphonates (PH), polyacrylates (PAA) and phosphinopolycarboxylates (PPCA). The main objective of this work is to develop suitable pre-treatment/purification techniques which allow the standard wet chemical techniques to be applied effectively after appropriate modification. Successful techniques all based on careful modification of existing methods have been developed by which these common inhibitors can be assayed very accurately at ppm and sub-ppm levels in a variety of North Sea field produced waters. This paper examines some of the major problems and interferences associated with poor analysis and introduces modified methods which can be applied in the field without the use of expensive equipment. It is also shown that different detection methods can often be employed in order to avoid more extensive clean-up strategies. Finally, instrumental methods such as ICP analysis (commonly used for phosphonates) are examined and pre-treatment methods are developed which allow phosphino-polycarboxylic acid based inhibitors to be assayed very accurately by this method. The results from an independent assessment by a North Sea operator, using spiked field produced water, are also presented as an independent verification of the accuracy of the techniques which have been developed in this work.

Graham, G.M.; Sorbie, K.S.; Boak, L.S. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Taylor, K.; Blilie, L.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Brine Fields  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Brine Fields Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Brine Fields M. Ferer, (mferer@wvu.edu) Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6315, Grant S. Bromhal, (bromhal@netl.doe.gov) US DOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880; and Duane H. Smith, (dsmith@netl.doe.gov) US DOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 & Department of Physics, West Virginia University. Underground injection of gas is a common practice in the oil and gas industry. Injection into deep, brine-saturated formations is a commercially proven method of sequestering CO 2 . However, it has long been known that displacement of a connate fluid by a less viscous fluid produces unstable displacement fronts with significant fingering. This fingering allows only a

163

Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industrial-scale storage of CO{sub 2} in saline sedimentary basins will cause zones of elevated pressure, larger than the CO{sub 2} plume itself. If permeable conduits (e.g., leaking wells) exist between the injection reservoir and overlying shallow aquifers, brine could be pushed upwards along these conduits and mix with groundwater resources. This paper discusses the potential for such brine leakage to occur in temperature- and salinity-stratified systems. Using static mass-balance calculations as well as dynamic well flow simulations, we evaluate the minimum reservoir pressure that would generate continuous migration of brine up a leaking wellbore into a freshwater aquifer. Since the brine invading the well is denser than the initial fluid in the wellbore, continuous flow only occurs if the pressure perturbation in the reservoir is large enough to overcome the increased fluid column weight after full invasion of brine into the well. If the threshold pressure is exceeded, brine flow rates are dependent on various hydraulic (and other) properties, in particular the effective permeability of the wellbore and the magnitude of pressure increase. If brine flow occurs outside of the well casing, e.g., in a permeable fracture zone between the well cement and the formation, the fluid/solute transfer between the migrating fluid and the surrounding rock units can strongly retard brine flow. At the same time, the threshold pressure for continuous flow to occur decreases compared to a case with no fluid/solute transfer.

Birkholzer, J.T.; Nicot, J.-P.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Zhou, Q.; Kraemer, S.; Bandilla, K.W.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Formation of Thetis Deep metal-rich sediments in the absence of brines, Red Sea M.C. Pierret a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formation of Thetis Deep metal-rich sediments in the absence of brines, Red Sea M.C. Pierret a , N October 2009 Available online 23 October 2009 Keywords: Pb­Sr­Nd isotopes REE Metal-rich sediments-rich sediments covered by brine pools. It is generally agreed that these metal-rich deposits precipitated from

Demouchy, Sylvie

165

Coupling Sorption to Soil Weathering during Reactive Transport: Impacts of Mineral Transformation and Sorbate Aging on Contaminant Speciation and Mobility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford subsurface has become contaminated with highly alkaline, radioactive waste generated as a result of weapons production. The radioactive brine was stored in underground storage tanks, a number of which developed leaks and contaminated the surrounding subsurface. The high pH and ionic strength of these wastes has been predicted to accelerate the degree of soil weathering to produce new mineral phases--cancrinite and sodalite among the most abundant. Previous work has demonstrated that Cs and Sr, which along with I represent the most radioactive components in the waste, are sequestered by these neo-formed solids. The present work is aimed at assessing the stability of these neo-formed solids, with special emphasis on the degree of Cs, Sr and I release under ambient (neutral pH, low ionic strength) conditions expected to return to the Hanford area after the caustic radioactive brine waste is removed.

Carl I. Steefel; Aaron Thompson; Jon Chorover

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF TEMPERATURE EFFECTS DURING THE INJECTION OF CARBON DIOXIDE INTO BRINE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF TEMPERATURE EFFECTS DURING THE INJECTION OF CARBON DIOXIDE INTO BRINE for the simulation of carbon dioxide injection into geological formations is currently an intensive field of research for the balance of thermal energy, we can investigate numerically the effects of temperature variations during

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

167

Sulfate Removal from Reject Brined in Inland Desalination with Zero Liquid Discharge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sulfate is one of the most problematic ions present in reject brine in desalination systems due to its high potential of scale formation and membrane fouling; making it an obstacle in the application of zero liquid discharge. The ultra-high lime...

Almasri, Dema A

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

168

Author's personal copy Fossil brines preserved in the St-Lawrence Lowlands,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

halite disso- lution. 87 Sr/86 Sr ratios and Ca excess indicate prolonged interactions with silicate degassing, are identical to their production ratios in rocks. The source of salinity (halite dissolution during Devonian­Silurian time. Brines might result from infiltration of Devonian water leaching halite

Long, Bernard

169

Accurate Thermodynamic Model for the Calculation of H2S Solubility in Pure Water and Brines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accurate Thermodynamic Model for the Calculation of H2S Solubility in Pure Water and Brines Zhenhao, 2007 A thermodynamic model calculating the solubility of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in pure water phase. With this specific interaction approach, this model is able to predict H2S solubility in other

Zhu, Chen

170

Brine Assemblages of Ultrasmall Microbial Cells within the Ice Cover of Lake Vida, Antarctica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Antarctica, is one of the largest lakes in the McMurdo...the abundance of the larger cells, consists of...vol) (30). After drilling, brine infiltrated the borehole until it reached a...107 cells ml1, while larger cells (0.2 to 1...

Emanuele Kuhn; Andrew S. Ichimura; Vivian Peng; Christian H. Fritsen; Gareth Trubl; Peter T. Doran; Alison E. Murray

2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

171

Hydrogeology, chemical and microbial activity measurement through deep permafrost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

illustrated that drill brine contamination in permafrostDespite the contamination of drilling brine in the U-tubepermafrost, contamination with drilling brine can be over-

Stotler, R.L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Contamination Control Overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many high-technology products currently manufactured are affected adversely if contamination is deposited in or on the product during manufacture or use. Contamination can be defined as any condition, material, p...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Operation of a mineral-recovery unit on brine from the Salton Sea known geothermal resource area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bureau of Mines operated a mineral recovery unit to recover metal values from post-flash geothermal brines from the Salton Sea known geothermal resource area as part of its research into the use of plentiful resources. The brine was available for metals recovery after its heat content had been used to generate electricity. The brine source was treated with lime to precipitate the contained iron, manganese, lead, and zinc before injection of the heat-depleted brine into the underground reservoir. Data are presented on the effects of process variables, such as rate and method of lime addition and air oxidation versus air exclusion. Variations in precipitation of metal values, composition of precipitates, effectiveness of slurry thickeners, and methods of treating the precipitates to recover metal values are discussed.

Schultze, L.E.; Bauer, D.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

The effect of stratigraphic dip on brine inflow and gas migration at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The natural dip of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), although regionally only about 111, has the potential to affect brine inflow and gas-migration distances due to buoyancy forces. Current models, including those in WIPP Performance Assessment calculations, assume a perfectly horizontal repository and stratigraphy. With the addition of buoyancy forces due to the dip, brine and gas flow patterns can be affected. Brine inflow may increase due to countercurrent flow, and gas may preferentially migrate up dip. This scoping study has used analytical and numerical modeling to evaluate the impact of the dip on brine inflow and gas-migration distances at the WIPP in one, two, and three dimensions. Sensitivities to interbed permeabilities, two-phase curves, gas-generation rates, and interbed fracturing were studied.

Webb, S.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Larson, K.W. [INTERA, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [INTERA, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Corrosion of selected metals and a high-temperature thermoplastic in hypersaline geothermal brine. Report of investigations/1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bureau of Mines conducted corrosion research to determine suitable construction materials for geothermal resource recovery plants. Weight loss, pitting and crevice corrosion, U-bend stress corrosion, and electrochemical polarization measurements were made on selected metals in brine and steam process environments produced from high-enthalpy hypersaline brine from geothermal well Magmamax No. 1 at the Salton Sea Known Geothermal Resources Area, Imperial Valley, Calif.

Conrad, R.K.; Carter, J.P.; Cramer, S.D.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Sorption of lithium from a geothermal brine by pelletized mixed aluminum-lithium hydrous oxides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An inorganic ion exchanger was evaluated by the Bureau of Mines for recovering lithium from geothermal brines. The ion exchanger or sorbent was mixed hydrous oxide of aluminum and lithium that had been dried at 100 C. The dried precipitate was pelletized with a sodium silicate binder to improve flow rates in sorption tests. The sorbent was loaded to 2 mg Li/g of pellets and sorption from the solution was independent of the concentrations of Ca, Fe, Mn, and Zn. Manganese and zinc were sorbed by the pellets but did not suppress lithium sorption. Lithium was desorbed with water, but none of the washing solutions investigated removed entrained brine without stripping lithium. The complex nature of the sorption mechanisms is discussed.

Schultze, L.E.; Bauer, D.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Re-assessing the impact of desalination plants brine discharges on eroding beaches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sea outfall discharge is a practical way to dispose of brine waste stream from a coastal desalination plant. However, sandy beaches are changing as a result of coastal erosion. Coastline urban developments are the manmade permanent changing of beaches, where the coastlines are being dredged and reclaimed as artificial land. Therefore, if a plant is built and operated with an outfall to satisfy the imposed site's environmental regulation compliance but the beach is subsequently being eroded, what action needs to be done to make sure the imposed criteria that minimize the impact on the marine environment can still be met? A mathematical model is presented that accounts the effect of beach erosion for estimating the brine's outfall adverse impact on the environment.

H.H. Al-Barwani; Anton Purnama

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Scientific Considerations Related to Regulation Development for CO2 Sequestration in Brine Formations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SCIENTIFIC CONSIDERATIONS RELATED TO REGULATION SCIENTIFIC CONSIDERATIONS RELATED TO REGULATION DEVELOPMENT FOR CO 2 SEQUESTRATION IN BRINE FORMATIONS Chin-Fu Tsang (cftsang@lbl.gov; (510) 486-5782) Sally M. Benson (smbenson@lbl.gov; (510) 486-7071) Earth Sciences Division, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Road, MS 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720 Bruce Kobelski (kobelski.bruce@epa.gov) Robert Smith (smith.robert-eu@epamail.epa.gov) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Drinking Water and Ground Water, Washington D.C. Introduction Reduction of atmospheric emissions of CO 2 (DOE, 1999a) through injection of CO 2 into in deep brine formations is being actively studied both in the U.S. and internationally. If this technology is to be employed broadly enough to make a significant impact on global

179

Stress protein induction in speckled trout exposed to contaminants in the natural environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The induction of contaminant-specific stress proteins in estuarine organisms inhabiting chemical contaminated sites appears to contribute to pollution tolerance in these populations. In this study, the authors examined (1) stress protein induction speckled trout (Cynoscion nebulosus) exposed to petroleum and petrochemical pollutants in Galveston Bay, and (2) the relationship between stress protein responses and other physiological biomarkers of stress. Mature speckled trout were collected alive by gill net at a reference site north of the Texas City Dike and two contaminated sites, one in the Texas City Channel in lower Galveston Bay adjacent to a large number of petrochemical plants, and the other in Tabbs Bay, an oilfield produced water discharge area in upper Galveston Bay. Tissue samples were dissected from a total of 45 fish and frozen immediately on dry ice. Stress proteins were identified in liver, kidney, gill and gonad tissues using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and were quantified by imaging densitometry. Stress proteins ranging in size from 13 to 80 kDa were found to be elevated in liver gill and ovary of speckled trout collected from the two contaminated sites, compared to those from the reference site. In addition, the stress protein profiles of tissues from fish collected at Tabbs Bay differed markedly from the Texas City Channel fish, suggesting that both the type of contaminant exposure and the ambient environmental conditions may affect stress protein induction. The stress protein results were compared to other physiological and reproductive biomarkers measured in these fish in an effort to determine possible long-term effects of pollutants on estuarine fish populations.

Howard, C.L.; Whitt, K.R.; Arndt, L.M. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

A model for the evolution of brines in salt from the lower Salado Formation, southeastern New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluid inclusions were collected from a bedded salt horizon in the lower Permian Salado Formation in the Delaware Basin, southeastern New Mexico. The sampling horizon, at a depth of approximately 645 meters, consists primarily of recrystallized halite, with thin layers of anhydrite. Other trace minerals, dispersed throughout the salt, include quartz, polyhalite, gypsum, K-feldspar, magnesite, and clays. The chemistry of the inclusion fluids and the associated mineralogy suggest that these brines represent Permian seawater that has undergone evaporation and subsequent modification by diagenetic reactions, dominated by the alteration of calcium sulfate to polyhalite and magnesite formation. The range of fluid inclusion compositions suggests a significant departure from a simple seawater evaporation model. Other brines from the same horizon in the Salado Formation were sampled and analyzed for the same elements as the fluid inclusions, and differed significantly from them primarily by the depletion of Mg relative to K. The association of these brines with argillaceous and/or anhydritic halite containing a suite of authigenic minerals (quartz, magnesite, and Mg-rich clays) suggests that these are intergranular brines with compositions determined over a much longer time scale than that required by the fluid inclusions. The principal reactions affecting intergranular brine chemistry are dehydration of gypsum, dewatering of detrital clays, and uptake of Mg during clay diagenesis. Overall, the observed variation in brine compositions implies that, if large-scale hydrologic circulation is occurring in the Salado halite, the time scale is limited by the rate required for low-temperature silicate diagenesis.

Stein, C.L.; Krumhansl, J.L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Hydrological and geochemical monitoring for a CO2 sequestration pilot in a brine formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrological and geochemical monitoring are key components of site characterization and CO2 plume monitoring for a pilot test to inject CO2 into a brine-bearing sand of the fluvial-deltaic Frio formation in the upper Texas Gulf Coast. In situ, injected CO2 forms a supercritical phase that has gas-like properties (low density and viscosity) compared to the surrounding brine, while some CO2 dissolves in the brine. The pilot test employs one injection well and one monitor well, with continuous pressure and flow-rate monitoring in both wells, and continuous surface fluid sampling and periodic down-hole fluid sampling from the monitor well. Pre-injection site-characterization includes pump tests with pressure-transient analysis to estimate single-phase flow properties, establish hydraulic connectivity between the wells, determine appropriate boundary conditions, and analyze ambient phase conditions within the formation. Additionally, a pre-injection tracer test furnishes estimates of kinematic porosity and the geometry of flow paths between injection and monitor wells under single-phase conditions. Pre-injection geochemical sampling provides a baseline for subsequent geochemical monitoring and helps determine the optimal tracers to accompany CO2 injection. During CO2 injection, hydrological monitoring enables estimation of two-phase flow properties and helps track the movement of the injected CO2 plume, while geochemical sampling provides direct evidence of the arrival of CO2 and tracers at the monitor well. Furthermore, CO2-charged water acts as a weak acid, and reacts to some extent with the minerals in the aquifer, producing a distinct chemical signature in the water collected at the monitor well. Comparison of breakthrough curves for the single-phase tracer test and the CO2 (and its accompanying tracers) illuminates two-phase flow processes between the supercritical CO2 and native brine, an area of current uncertainty that must be better understood to effectively sequester CO2 in saline aquifers.

Doughty, Christine; Pruess, Karsten; Benson, Sally M.; Freifeld, Barry M.; Gunter, William D.

2004-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

182

Salt Brine Blending to Optimize Deicing and Anti-icing Performance and Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chloride (MgCl2) w/additives ·Envirotech Serv., Scotwood Ind., NA Salt ·Calcium Chloride (CaCl2) ·Tiger 135% 90% 115% Thawrox Gold Treated MgCl2 150% 120% 115% Ice Slicer CaCl2 130% 95% 70% Ice Bite @ 3 gal to Salt Brine Material Base @ 12 F @20 F @ 28 F Calcium Chloride CaCl2 160% 185% 135% RGP-8 CaCl2 170% 80

Minnesota, University of

183

Biochemical solubilization of toxic salts from residual geothermal brines and waste waters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of solubilizing metal salts such as metal sulfides in a geothermal sludge using mutant Thiobacilli selected for their ability to metabolize metal salts at high temperature is disclosed. The method includes the introduction of mutated Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans to a geothermal sludge or brine. The microorganisms catalyze the solubilization of metal salts. For instance, in the case of metal sulfides, the microorganisms catalyze the solubilization to form soluble metal sulfates. 54 figs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

184

Recovering lithium chloride from a geothermal brine. Report of investigations/1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bureau of Mines has devised techniques to recover lithium from geothermal brines as the chloride. More than 99 pct of the lithium was precipitated from a brine containing 170 mg/L Li by adding a solution of A1C13 and increasing the pH to 7.5 with lime slurry. The Li-Al precipitate was dissolved in HCl and sparged with gaseous HC1 to recover the A1C13; this resulted in a solution containing LiCl and CaC12. The solution was evaporated at 100C to obtain a mixture of the chlorides from which 97 pct of the lithium was recovered and 90 pct of the calcium was rejected by leaching with tetrahydrofuran. The LiC1 recovered by evaporation of the tetrahydrofuran was purified by dissolution in water and treatment with oxalic acid. The final LiC1 solution contained 89 pct of the lithium originally present in the brine and had a purity of 99.9 pct.

Schultze, L.E.; Bauer, D.J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Contamination analysis unit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantifies of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surface by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings.

Gregg, Hugh R. (Livermore, CA); Meltzer, Michael P. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Contamination analysis unit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantities of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surfaces by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics. It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings. 1 fig.

Gregg, H.R.; Meltzer, M.P.

1996-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

187

Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodicially forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene.

Hazen, Terry C. (Augusta, GA); Fliermans, Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Surface and Volume Contamination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Will there be volume contamination/activation guides as well as updated contamination guides? The only guidance being developed for volumetric contamination is a Technical Standard for accelerator facilities. However, a revised version of ANSI N13.12-1999 is expected in the future and it will be assessed to determine its acceptability for use as a pre-approved authorized limit. It is noted that ANSI N13.12-1999 is only applicable to personal property not structures.

189

Evaporative evolution of Martian brines based on halogens in nakhlites and MER samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Comparison of Cl and Br from Nakhla viens to MER samples suggests two kinds of brine solutions existed on Mars, one early and one late in the evaporation sequence. These solutions precipitated the secondary salts at the Meridiani and Gusev sites. We have recently reported the Cl and Br abundances determined by APS X-ray Microprobe and EMPA analyses of secondary aqueous minerals in Nakhla veins and discussed the significance of Cl-Br correlations with respect to the evolution of brine solutions on Mars. In that study, we suggested that the low Br concentration ({approx}10 ppm) in Lafayette Iddingsite is indicative of early stage of evaporation during progressive evolution of Martian brine solutions, which is, in turn, consistent with the petrographic evidence of early deposition of salt sequence of carbonate-sulfate- and no halite in Lafayette. We showed that the high Br concentrations of {approx}240 ppm in secondary salts in Nakhla veins similarly indicate late stages of evaporation in evolving Martian brine solutions which is again consistent with petrographic evidence of late stage deposition of salt sequence i.e. carbonate-sulfate-halite in Nakhla. When sea water evaporates under equilibrium conditions, the most insoluble carbonates (siderite and calcite) deposit first, followed by sulfates (gypsum and anhydrite) and finally the water-soluble halides are precipitated when the water content is sufficiently low. In the present study, we make a detailed comparison of Cl/Br ratios in secondary minerals in nakhlites with those in MER soils and rocks at Gusev and Meridiani and show that the compositions of solutions that inundated Lafayette iddingsite (early stage) and Nakhla veins (late stage) include the range of solution-compositions that gave rise to a variety of secondary salts at Gusev and Meridiani sites. Further, the results obtained here suggest that two kinds of brine solutions (one, late and the other, early or intermediate stage) seem to have inundated most of the rocks and soils to varying degrees and precipitated the secondary salts at Meridiani and Gusev sites.

Rao, M.N.; Sutton, S.R.; McKay, D.S. (Lockheed); (UC); (NASA)

2005-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

190

Washing of field weathered crude oil contaminated soil with an environmentally compatible surfactant, alkyl polyglucoside  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Weathered crude oil contaminated soils (COCSs), which are much more difficult to remediate than those freshly contaminated, are widespread especially at the sites of oil fields and industries. Surfactant enhanced ex situ soil washing could be used to remediate COCSs, but surfactant toxicity becomes one of the major concerns. In this study, a class of green surfactants, alkyl polyglucosides (APGs), were tested in washing the field weathered COCS with relatively high oil concentration (123 mg g?1 dry soil) from Jilin Oilfield, Northeastern China. APG1214, characterized with longer alkyl chain, was more effective than APG0810 in crude oil removal. Adding inorganic sodium salts into APG1214 solution further improved the crude oil removal efficiency (CORE). Washing parameters (temperature, washing time, agitation speed and solution/soil ratio) were investigated and further optimized integratedly with an orthogonal design. At the optimum conditions, the CORE reached 97%. GC/MS analysis showed that the proportion of small n-alkanes (C16–C23) in residual crude oil gradually increased, which was helpful to interpret the oil removal mechanism. Moreover, eminent effect on removal of large n-alkanes was achieved from the synergy between APG1214 and inorganic salts, which was opposite to the effect when they were added separately. This study demonstrated a promising way to remediate COCS with ecologically compatible surfactant and provided guidelines for its practical application.

Mei Han; Guodong Ji; Jinren Ni

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Multiscale modeling of surfactant phase behavior in the remediation of DNAPL contamination.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The brine barrier remediation technique (BBRT) has been proposed as a novel Brine barrier remediation techniques (BBRT) that use surfactants have been proposed for remediating… (more)

Fan, Xiangyu.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Boron isotope geochemistry as a tracer for the evolution of brines and associated hot springs from the Dead Sea, Israel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A boron isotope study combined with analyses of elemental boron, lithium, and chlorine is used to suggest that brines from the Dead Sea and on-shore hypersaline thermal springs (Hamme Yesha, Hamme Zohar, and Hamme Mazor) are the products of interaction of evaporated seawater with detrital sediments. The high {delta}{sup 11}B values of the Dead Sea brines (55.7 to 57.4{per thousand} versus NBS-951) and the hot springs (52.2 to 55.7{per thousand}), and low B/Li ratios (2.0 to 2.3 and 2.5 to 2.7, respectively), relative to seawater, indicate preferential removal of {sup 10}B from the brines and hence boron adsorption onto clay minerals. The brackish 'En Feshcha springs and the freshwater 'En Dawid and Nahal Arugot springs yield lower B contents and {delta}{sup 11}B values (37.7 to 40.6{per thousand} and 33.8 to 36.9{per thousand}, respectively). The {delta}{sup 11}B values and B contents of diluted Dead Sea brines lie on calculated mixing lines between the composition of the brackish and freshwater springs with the composition of the Dead Sea. The {delta}{sup 11}B values of the hot springs, however, given their boron content, are significantly lower than those of the mixing lines. Thus, waters from the hot springs cannot be a mixing product of the Dead Sea brine with freshwater. Instead, the Dead Sea brine has evolved from the brines of the hot springs through further isotopic fractionation and boron adsorption onto detrital sediments.

Vengosh, A. (Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia) Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel)); Starinsky, A.; Kolodny, Y. ( Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel)); Chivas, A.R. (Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid (NF) is selected to simulated the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid (OF) is selected to create an aerobic environment with anaerobic pockets. NF is injected periodically while OF is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. NF stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is acceptable. NF can be methane and OF be air, for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially TCE and tetrachloroethylene.

Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Bioremediation of contaminated sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contaminants in bottom sediments have historically been considered to have minimal environmental impact because they are buried, sorbed or electrostatically bound to clay particles, or incorporated into humus. Physical and chemical conditions such as alkalinity, pH, and redox of the sediments also play a part in sequestering contaminants. As long as the sediments are undisturbed, the contaminants are considered stabilized and not an immediate environmental problem. Resuspension of bottom sediments makes contaminants more available for dispersal into the marine environment. Events that can cause resuspension include storm surges, construction activity, and dredging. During resuspension, sediment particles move from an anaerobic to aerobic environment, changing their redox characteristics, and allowing the indigenous aerobic bacteria to grow and utilize certain classes of contaminants as energy sources. The contaminants are also more available for use because the mixing energy imparted to the particles during resuspension enhances mass transfer, allowing contaminants to enter the aqueous phase more rapidly. The contaminants targeted in this research are polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a class of contaminant commonly found in bottom sediments near highly industrialized areas. PAH sources include fossil fuel combustion and petroleum spills. Previous research has shown that PAHs can be biodegraded. Size and structure, i.e., number and configuration of condensed rings, can affect compound disappearance. The focus of this research was to examine the relationship between resuspension and biodegradation of PAHs in lab scale slurry reactors. The rate and extent of contaminant release from the sediments into an uncontaminated water column was determined. Oxygen demand of initially anaerobic sediments were investigated. Then rate and extent of phenanthrene biodegradation was examined.

Hughes, J.B.; Jee, V.; Ward, C.H. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

PILOT TESTING: PRETREATMENT OPTIONS TO ALLOW RE-USE OF FRAC FLOWBACK AND PRODUCED BRINE FOR GAS SHALE RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the A&M DOE NETL Project No. DE-FE0000847 was to develop a mobile, multifunctional water treatment capability designed specifically for “pre-treatment” of field waste brine. The project consisted of constructing s mobile “field laboratory” incorporating new technology for treating high salinity produced water and using the lab to conduct a side-by-side comparison between this new technology and that already existing in field operations. A series of four field trials were performed utilizing the mobile unit to demonstrate the effectiveness of different technology suitable for use with high salinity flow back brines and produced water. The design of the mobile unit was based on previous and current work at the Texas A&M Separation Sciences Pilot Plant. The several treatment techniques which have been found to be successful in both pilot plant and field tests had been tested to incorporate into a single multifunctional process train. Eight different components were evaluated during the trials, two types of oil and grease removal, one BTEX removal step, three micro-filters, and two different nanofilters. The performance of each technique was measured by its separation efficiency, power consumption, and ability to withstand fouling. The field trials were a success. Four different field brines were evaluated in the first trial in New York. Over 16,000 gallons of brine were processed. Using a power cost of $.10 per kWh, media pretreatment power use averaged $0.004 per barrel, solids removal $.04 per barrel and brine “softening” $.84 per barrel. Total power cost was approximately $1.00 per barrel of fluid treated. In Pennsylvania, brines collected from frac ponds were tested in two additional trials. Each of the brines was converted to an oil-free, solids-free brine with no biological activity. Brines were stable over time and would be good candidates for use as a make-up fluid in a subsequent fracturing fluid design. Reports on all of the field trials and subcontractor research have been summarized in this Final Report. Individual field trial reports and research reports are contained in the companion volume titled “Appendices”

Burnett, David

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Geochemistry of two pressurized brines from the Castile Formation in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major and minor element data and isotopic data from the ERDA-6 and WIPP-12 testing indicate that the brine reservoirs encountered in the Upper Castile Formation are largely in equilibrium with their surrounding host rock environment. This contention is supported by thermodynamic and stable isotope data. It is not possible to assign an absolute age to the brine based on uranium disequilibrium considerations, but the data do indicate that the brine reequilibrated with a new rock environment at least two million years ago. Information and data evaluated herein indicate the likelihood that the brines encountered are predominantly, if not entirely, derived from a trapped seawater source subsequently modified by diagenesis. Major ion/bromide ratios indicate that halite dissolution has occurred to some extent subsequent to deposition of the Castile anhydrites and entrapment of the seawater brine. Mechanisms for additional halite dissolution are discussed. Based on the degree of present halite saturation, it is concluded that the potential for future dissolution of halite is minimal.

Faith, S.; Spiegler, P.; Rehfeldt, K.R.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Integrated modeling and experimental programs to predict brine and gas flow at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluation of the performance of the WIPP repository involves modeling of brine and gas flow in the host rocks of the Salado Formation, which consist of halite and anhydrite interbeds. Numerous physical, chemical, and structural processes, must be understood to perform this modeling. Gas generation within the repository is strongly coupled to the amount of brine inflow to the repository because brine aids in the corrosion of metals and associated generation of hydrogen gas. Increasing gas pressure in the repository decreases the rate of brine inflow. Ultimately, the gas pressure may exceed the brine pressure and gas may flow out of the repository. Relative-permeability curves and a correlation between threshold pressure and permeability taken from studies reported in the literature were used in PA models prior to being experimentally verified as appropriate for WIPP. In addition, interbed permeabilities were treated as constant and independent of effective stress in early models. Subsequently, the process of interbed fracturing (or fracture dilation) was recognized to limit gas pressures in the repository to values below lithostatic, and assumed (and unverified) relationships between porosity, permeability, and pore pressure were employed. Parameter-sensitivity studies performed using the simplified models identified important parameters for which site-specific data were needed. Unrealistic modeling results, such as room pressures substantially above lithostatic, showed the need to include additional processes in the models. Field and laboratory experimental programs have been initiated in conjunction with continued model development to provide information on important processes and parameters.

Beauheim, R.L.; Howarth, S.M.; Vaughn, P.; Webb, S.W.; Larson, K.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Subsurface contaminants focus area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

CFD Simulation of Brine-Seawater Mixing in a Rotary Energy Recovery Device  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CFD Simulation of Brine-Seawater Mixing in a Rotary Energy Recovery Device ... The effects of operational conditions on the mixing behavior of rotary energy recovery device have been systematically investigated through the combined methods of computational fluid dynamics and validating experiments in this paper. ... The obtained formulas between mixing and dimensionless flow length provide a simple way to calculate and predict the mixing of device, which will be beneficial to design and operate the rotary energy recovery device in a lower mixing level. ...

Enle Xu; Yue Wang; Liming Wu; Shichang Xu; Yuxin Wang; Shichang Wang

2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

200

Capacity Investigation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation for Geologic Sequestration of CO2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capacity Investigation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Capacity Investigation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation for Geologic Sequestration of CO 2 Christine Doughty (cadoughty@lbl.gov; 510-486-6453) Karsten Pruess (k_pruess@lbl.gov; 510-486-6732) Sally M. Benson (smbenson@lbl.gov; 510-486-5875) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Rd, MS 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720 Susan D. Hovorka (susan.hovorka@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-4863) Paul R. Knox (paul.knox@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-7313) Bureau of Economic Geology P.O. Box X, The University of Texas Austin, TX 78713 Christopher T. Green (ctgreen@ucdavis.edu; 530-752-1372) University of California, Hydrologic Sciences 1 Shields Ave. Davis, CA 95616 Abstract The capacity of fluvial brine-bearing formations to sequester CO 2 is investigated using numerical simulations of CO

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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201

Personnel and Contamination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Everyone concerned with contamination control dreams of the day when automation will remove the need for employees to actually handle the wafers. This wish arises from the fact that humans are such a major factor...

M. Kozicki; S. Hoenig; P. Robinson

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Modeling for Airborne Contamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of Modeling for Airborne Contamination (referred to from now on as ''this report'') is to provide a documented methodology, along with supporting information, for estimating the release, transport, and assessment of dose to workers from airborne radioactive contaminants within the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface during the pre-closure period. Specifically, this report provides engineers and scientists with methodologies for estimating how concentrations of contaminants might be distributed in the air and on the drift surfaces if released from waste packages inside the repository. This report also provides dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways used to derive doses to potentially exposed subsurface workers. The scope of this report is limited to radiological contaminants (particulate, volatile and gaseous) resulting from waste package leaks (if any) and surface contamination and their transport processes. Neutron activation of air, dust in the air and the rock walls of the drift during the preclosure time is not considered within the scope of this report. Any neutrons causing such activation are not themselves considered to be ''contaminants'' released from the waste package. This report: (1) Documents mathematical models and model parameters for evaluating airborne contaminant transport within the MGR subsurface; and (2) Provides tables of dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways for important radionuclides. The dose conversion factors for air submersion and ground exposure pathways are further limited to drift diameters of 7.62 m and 5.5 m, corresponding to the main and emplacement drifts, respectively. If the final repository design significantly deviates from these drift dimensions, the results in this report may require revision. The dose conversion factors are further derived by using concrete of sufficient thickness to simulate the drift walls. The gamma-ray scattering properties of concrete are sufficiently similar to those of the host rock and proposed insert material; use of concrete will have no significant impact on the conclusions. The information in this report is presented primarily for use in performing pre-closure radiological safety evaluations of radiological contaminants, but it may also be used to develop strategies for contaminant leak detection and monitoring in the MGR. Included in this report are the methods for determining the source terms and release fractions, and mathematical models and model parameters for contaminant transport and distribution within the repository. Various particle behavior mechanisms that affect the transport of contaminant are included. These particle behavior mechanisms include diffusion, settling, resuspension, agglomeration and other deposition mechanisms.

F.R. Faillace; Y. Yuan

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

203

Minimum Ultraviolet Light Dose Determination and Characterization of Stress Responses that Affect Dose for Listeria monocytogenes Suspended in Distilled Water, Fresh Brine, and Spent Brine.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Foodborne illnesses caused by Listeria monocytogenes have long been associated with ready-to-eat (RTE) meats contaminated after the primary thermal process has been applied. It is… (more)

McKinney, Julie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Spontaneous Imbibition of Aqueous Surfactant Solutions into Neutral to Oil-Wet Carbonate Cores:? Effects of Brine Salinity and Composition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Knowing that the brine salinity of carbonate reservoirs can vary in the range of salinity range than what was done in the previous experiments (salinities of 1?5 g/L). ... Thus, the increase in temperature seemed to make the effect of the salinity gradient observed at 40 °C vanish. ... Even though the increase in temperature from 40 °C to 70 °C make the effect of the salinity gradient of 1.0?10 wt % vanish, the final oil recovery was significantly lower (?45%, from Figure 3), compared to brine that contains sulfate at similar salinities (?70%, from Figure 6). ...

Skule Strand; Dag C. Standnes; Tor Austad

2003-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

205

Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL LBNL and SNL for the UFD Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes laboratory and field observations and numerical modeling related to coupled processes involving brine and vapor migration in geologic salt, focusing on recent developments and studies conducted at Sandia, Los Alamos, and Berkeley National Laboratories. Interest into the disposal of heat-generating waste in salt has led to interest into water distribution and migration in both run-of-mine crushed and intact geologic salt. Ideally a fully coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical simulation is performed using numerical models with validated constitutive models and parameters. When mechanical coupling is not available, mechanical effects are prescribed in hydraulic models as source, boundary, or initial conditions. This report presents material associated with developing appropriate initial conditions for a non-mechanical hydrologic simulation of brine migration in salt. Due to the strong coupling between the mechanical and hydrologic problems, the initial saturation will be low for the excavation disturbed zone surrounding the excavation. Although most of the material in this report is not new, the author hopes it is presented in a format making it useful to other salt researchers.

Kuhlman, Kristopher L.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

A XANES study of Cu speciation in high-temperature brines using synthetic fluid inclusions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cu K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra were recorded from individual synthetic brine fluid inclusions as a function of temperature up to 500 C. The inclusions serve as sample cells for high-temperature spectroscopic studies of aqueous Cu-Cl speciation. Cu{sup +} and Cu{sup 2+} can both be identified from characteristic pre-edge features. Mixed oxidation states can be deconvoluted using linear combinations of Cu{sup +} and Cu{sup 2+} spectra. This work illustrates how complex Cu XANES spectra can be interpreted successfully. Cu{sup 2+} is the stable oxidation state in solution at room temperature and Cu{sup +} at high temperatures. The change in oxidation state with temperature was completely reversible. Cu{sup +} was found to occur exclusively as the linear species [CuCl{sub 2}]{sup -} in solutions containing KCl with Cu:Cl ratios up to 1:6. In the absence of K{sup +}, there is evidence for higher order coordination of Cu{sup +}, in particular the tetrahedral complex [CuCl{sub 4}]{sup 3-}. The importance of such complexes in natural ore-forming fluids is yet to be determined, but may explain the vapor-phase partitioning of Cu as a Cl complex from a Cl-rich brine.

Berry, Andrew J.; Hack, Alistair C.; Mavrogenes, John A.; Newville, Matthew; Sutton, Stephen R. (UC); (ANU)

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

207

Report on design, construction, and testing of CO/sub 2/ breakout system for geothermal brines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A skid mounted test facility has been built for determining conditions at which CO/sub 2/ flashes from geothermal brines. The system has been checked and operated at one geothermal plant. It performed as designed. The equipment is designed to operate at temperatures and pressures typical of wells near Heber, California. (Nominally 180/sup 0/C and 300 to 500 psig). It has heat exchangers which can cool the brine to less than 70/sup 0/C. (The cooling water is recirculated after being cooled by a forced air heat exchanger). Breakout pressures can be determined for any temperature between 70/sup 0/C and wellhead temperature. An adjustable orifice provides final control on pressure required to initiate flashing. The orifice is at the bottom of a sight glass. A light beam shines through the sight glass and focuses on a photoelectric cell. The presence of bubbles scatters light and decreases the output of the cell. Results using the cell were more reproducible than those using the naked eye. Results from one test show a smooth curve over the temperature range 75/sup 0/C to 165/sup 0/C. Agreement between the experimental values and calculated ones is discussed.

Robertus, R.J.; Shannon, D.W.; Sullivan, R.G.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Sensitivity study of CO2 storage capacity in brine aquifers withclosed boundaries: Dependence on hydrogeologic properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In large-scale geologic storage projects, the injected volumes of CO{sub 2} will displace huge volumes of native brine. If the designated storage formation is a closed system, e.g., a geologic unit that is compartmentalized by (almost) impermeable sealing units and/or sealing faults, the native brine cannot (easily) escape from the target reservoir. Thus the amount of supercritical CO{sub 2} that can be stored in such a system depends ultimately on how much pore space can be made available for the added fluid owing to the compressibility of the pore structure and the fluids. To evaluate storage capacity in such closed systems, we have conducted a modeling study simulating CO{sub 2} injection into idealized deep saline aquifers that have no (or limited) interaction with overlying, underlying, and/or adjacent units. Our focus is to evaluate the storage capacity of closed systems as a function of various reservoir parameters, hydraulic properties, compressibilities, depth, boundaries, etc. Accounting for multi-phase flow effects including dissolution of CO{sub 2} in numerical simulations, the goal is to develop simple analytical expressions that provide estimates for storage capacity and pressure buildup in such closed systems.

Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, C-F.

2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

209

Phase-field theory of brine entrapment in sea ice: Short-time frozen microstructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the early phase of brine entrapment in sea ice, using a phase field model. This model for a first-order phase transition couples non-conserved order parameter kinetics to salt diffusion. The evolution equations are derived from a Landau-Ginzburg order parameter gradient dynamics together with salinity conservation. The numerical solution of model equations by an exponential time differencing scheme describes the time evolution of phase separation between liquid water with high salinity and the ice phase with low salinity. The numerical solution in one and two dimensions indicates the formation of one dominant wavelength which sets the length scale of short-time frozen structures. A stability analysis provides the phase diagram in terms of two Landau parameters. It is distinguished an uniform ice phase, a homogeneous liquid saline water solution and a phase where solidification structures can be formed. The Landau parameters are extracted from the supercooling and superheating as well as the freezing point temperature of water. With the help of realistic parameters the distribution of brine inclusions is calculated and found in agreement with the measured samples. The size of the ice domains separating regions of concentrated seawater depends on salinity and temperature and corresponds to the size of sea ice platelets obtained from a morphological stability analysis for the solidification of salt water.

Silke Thoms; Bernd Kutschan; Klaus Morawetz

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Modeling Coupled THMC Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, we present FY2014 progress by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) related to modeling of coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. LBNL’s work on the modeling of coupled THMC processes in salt was initiated in FY2012, focusing on exploring and demonstrating the capabilities of an existing LBNL modeling tool (TOUGH-FLAC) for simulating temperature-driven coupled flow and geomechanical processes in salt. This work includes development related to, and implementation of, essential capabilities, as well as testing the model against relevant information and published experimental data related to the fate and transport of water. we provide more details on the FY2014 work, first presenting updated tools and improvements made to the TOUGH-FLAC simulator, and the use of this updated tool in a new model simulation of long-term THM behavior within a generic repository in a salt formation. This is followed by the description of current benchmarking and validations efforts, including the TSDE experiment. We then present the current status in the development of constitutive relationships and the dual-continuum model for brine migration. We conclude with an outlook for FY2015, which will be much focused on model validation against field experiments and on the use of the model for the design studies related to a proposed heater experiment.

Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco Martin, Laura; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

211

Brine and Gas Flow Patterns Between Excavated Areas and Disturbed Rock Zone in the 1996 Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for a Single Drilling Intrusion that Penetrates Repository and Castile Brine Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is located in southeastern New Mexico, is being developed for the geologic disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Waste disposal will take place in panels excavated in a bedded salt formation approximately 2000 ft (610 m) below the land surface. The BRAGFLO computer program which solves a system of nonlinear partial differential equations for two-phase flow, was used to investigate brine and gas flow patterns in the vicinity of the repository for the 1996 WIPP performance assessment (PA). The present study examines the implications of modeling assumptions used in conjunction with BRAGFLO in the 1996 WIPP PA that affect brine and gas flow patterns involving two waste regions in the repository (i.e., a single waste panel and the remaining nine waste panels), a disturbed rock zone (DRZ) that lies just above and below these two regions, and a borehole that penetrates the single waste panel and a brine pocket below this panel. The two waste regions are separated by a panel closure. The following insights were obtained from this study. First, the impediment to flow between the two waste regions provided by the panel closure model is reduced due to the permeable and areally extensive nature of the DRZ adopted in the 1996 WIPP PA, which results in the DRZ becoming an effective pathway for gas and brine movement around the panel closures and thus between the two waste regions. Brine and gas flow between the two waste regions via the DRZ causes pressures between the two to equilibrate rapidly, with the result that processes in the intruded waste panel are not isolated from the rest of the repository. Second, the connection between intruded and unintruded waste panels provided by the DRZ increases the time required for repository pressures to equilibrate with the overlying and/or underlying units subsequent to a drilling intrusion. Third, the large and areally extensive DRZ void volumes is a significant source of brine to the repository, which is consumed in the corrosion of iron and thus contributes to increased repository pressures. Fourth, the DRZ itself lowers repository pressures by providing storage for gas and access to additional gas storage in areas of the repository. Fifth, given the pathway that the DRZ provides for gas and brine to flow around the panel closures, isolation of the waste panels by the panel closures was not essential to compliance with the U.S. Environment Protection Agency's regulations in the 1996 WIPP PA.

ECONOMY,KATHLEEN M.; HELTON,JON CRAIG; VAUGHN,PALMER

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The effects of viscosity and subsurface heterogeneity on a brine barrier approach to DNAPL remediation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) are a long-term source of groundwater contamination. Difficulties of current remediation methods have led to the study of a novel… (more)

Murphy, Lauren L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Engineered Treatment of As-laden Regeneration Brine from Ion Exchange Processes .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Arsenic (As) contamination of drinking water sources has been one of the most challenging global environmental issues. In the United States, the newly revised maximum… (more)

STEINWINDER, THOMAS

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Neptunium(V) and neptunium(VI) solubilities in synthetic brines of interest to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solubility of Np(V) and Np(VI) has been measured in three synthetic Na-K-Mg-Cl brines in the presence of CO{sub 2}(g). Experiments were prepared from oversaturation by adding an excess of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} or NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} to the brines and allowing the neptunium solids to precipitate. Vessels were maintained in contact with fixed CO{sub 2}(g) partial pressures at constant pH and 24 {+-} 1 C. Dissolved Np(V) concentrations decreased several orders of magnitude within the first 100 days of the experiment, while dissolved Np(VI) concentrations decreased initially but then remained relatively constant for more than 400 days. The solid phases formed in all experiments were identified by X-ray powder diffraction as KNpO{sub 2}CO{sub 3}{center_dot}xH{sub 2}O(s). Steady state concentrations for Np(V) are similar to those observed for Pu(V) in the same brines under the same conditions, where Pu occurs predominantly as Pu(V). Similarly, steady state concentrations for Np(VI), which was not reduced over a two year period, compare well with measured Pu(VI) concentrations in the same brines before the Pu(VI) was reduced to Pu(V).

Novak, C.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nitsche, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.]|[Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Silber, H.B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.]|[San Jose State Univ., CA (United States). Chemistry Dept.] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

Energy optimization in ice hockey halls I. The system COP as a multivariable function, brine and design choices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work is the first of a series of articles addressing the energy optimization in ice hockey halls. Here we outline an analytic method to predict in which design and operating conditions the COP of the entire cooling system (refrigerator and cooling tower) ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$ is maximum. ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$ is investigated as a function of several variables, like electric consumption and brine physical properties. With this method, the best configuration and brine choices for the system can therefore be determined in advance. We estimate the optimal design of an average-sized ice rink, including pipe diameter, depth and brine type (ethylene glycol and ammonia). We also single out an optimal brine density and show the impact of the electric consumption of the pump on ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$. Our theoretical predictions are validated with heat flow measurement data obtained at an ice hockey hall in Finland. They are also confronted with technical and cost-related constraints, and implemented by simulations with the pr...

Ferrantelli, Andrea; Räikkönen, Miska; Viljanen, Martti

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

A Methodology for Measuring the Rate of Reaction of CO2 with Brine-Rock Mixtures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Methodology for Measuring the Rate of Reaction of CO Methodology for Measuring the Rate of Reaction of CO 2 with Brine-Rock Mixtures Nicholas B. Janda (nbj2@po.cwru.edu; 216-368-2648) Philip W. Morrison, Jr. (pwm5@po.cwru.edu; 216-368-4238) Department of Chemical Engineering Case Western Reserve University 10900 Euclid Avenue Cleveland, OH 44106-7217 Beverly Z. Saylor (bzs@po.cwru.edu; 216-368-3763) Gerald Matisoff (gxm4@po.cwru.edu; 216-368-3677) Department of Geological Sciences Case Western Reserve University 10900 Euclid Avenue Cleveland, OH 44106-7216 Introduction Storage of carbon dioxide in deep, porous, and permeable reservoir rocks is one of the most promising technologies for reducing emissions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. Although oil and gas reservoirs are a sensible first step for sequestration of carbon dioxide in geologic

217

Reducing Foreign Lithium Dependence through Co-Production of Lithium from Geothermal Brine  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Foreign Lithium Dependence through Co-Production of Lithium from Foreign Lithium Dependence through Co-Production of Lithium from Geothermal Brine Kerry Klein 1 , Linda Gaines 2 1 New West Technologies LLC, Washington, DC, USA 2 Center for Transportation Research, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, USA KEYWORDS Mineral extraction, zinc, silica, strategic metals, Imperial Valley, lithium ion batteries, electric- drive vehicles, battery recycling ABSTRACT Following a 2009 investment of $32.9 billion in renewable energy and energy efficiency research through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, President Obama in his January 2011 State of the Union address promised deployment of one million electric vehicles by 2015 and 80% clean energy by 2035. The United States seems poised to usher in its bright energy future,

218

Brine-in-crude-oil emulsions at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metastable water-in-crude-oil emulsion formation could occur in a Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) cavern if water were to flow into the crude-oil layer at a sufficient rate. Such a situation could arise during a drawdown from a cavern with a broken-hanging brine string. A high asphaltene content (> 1.5 wt %) of the crude oil provides the strongest predictor of whether a metastable water-in-crude-oil emulsion will form. However there are many crude oils with an asphaltene content > 1.5 wt % that don't form stable emulsions, but few with a low asphaltene content that do form stable emulsions. Most of the oils that form stable emulsions are %E2%80%9Csour%E2%80%9D by SPR standards indicating they contain total sulfur > 0.50 wt %.

Nemer, Martin B.; Lord, David L.; MacDonald, Terry L.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Phase-field theory of brine entrapment in sea ice: Short-time frozen microstructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the early phase of brine entrapment in sea ice, using a phase field model. This model for a first-order phase transition couples non-conserved order parameter kinetics to salt diffusion. The evolution equations are derived from a Landau-Ginzburg order parameter gradient dynamics together with salinity conservation. The numerical solution of model equations by an exponential time differencing scheme describes the time evolution of phase separation between liquid water with high salinity and the ice phase with low salinity. The numerical solution in one and two dimensions indicates the formation of one dominant wavelength which sets the length scale of short-time frozen structures. A stability analysis provides the phase diagram in terms of two Landau parameters. It is distinguished an uniform ice phase, a homogeneous liquid saline water solution and a phase where solidification structures can be formed. The Landau parameters are extracted from the supercooling and superheating as well as the freezin...

Thoms, Silke; Morawetz, Klaus

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Light hydrocarbon geochemistry of brines and sediments of the red sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1LGTIT II'YDROC/', REIGN GEOCIII'IITS'IRY GI' BTITNES IIND SRuZSIRNIS O? YIIR RZD SRR . T'. 1'. Sl S RO(cRR rII, DQN !' iT RRR AI!pcoverl s. s 'o style and cootent hyr 'o-Cheittreri ol Corrrrci tt. ee) r, rrr rl!I! e: ) j Deccr, het 1'rI79... The Ai 7 antis II Deep has i. &o ? tin& ! ay) . = !if i!& s-:I:, oif icar . 7y rii '. ferenL lig!it hydrocarbon con&sr:i ar. i&n . The l, a c. , in tbe iso layers a7so aprirertly come fro. d'I'&c:&nt sources. Tli. . up!&cr. brine (Ti50'0, Cl s /3...

Burke, Roger Allen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Mercury contamination extraction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Mercury is removed from contaminated waste by firstly applying a sulfur reagent to the waste. Mercury in the waste is then permitted to migrate to the reagent and is stabilized in a mercury sulfide compound. The stable compound may then be removed from the waste which itself remains in situ following mercury removal therefrom.

Fuhrmann, Mark (Silver Spring, MD); Heiser, John (Bayport, NY); Kalb, Paul (Wading River, NY)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Subsurface Contamination Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

Y. Yuan

2001-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

223

Magnetic signature of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and sediments at the former oil field Hänigsen, Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Magnetic properties of hydrocarbon (HC) containing soils and sediments from two sites (Site A and B) of the former oil-field Hänigsen were analyzed in order to determine whether magnetic methods can be employe...

Moti L. Rijal; Katharina Porsch; Erwin Appel…

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Management of Transuranic Contaminated Material  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish guidelines for the generation, treatment, packaging, storage, transportation, and disposal of transuranic (TRU) contaminated material.

1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

Purifying contaminated water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Process for removing biorefractory compounds from contaminated water (e.g., oil shale retort waste-water) by contacting same with fragmented raw oil shale. Biorefractory removal is enhanced by preactivating the oil shale with at least one member of the group of carboxylic, acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, ethers, amines, amides, sulfoxides, mixed ether-esters and nitriles. Further purification is obtained by stripping, followed by biodegradation and removal of the cells.

Daughton, Christian G. (San Pablo, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Radioactive waste isolation in salt: geochemistry of brine in rock salt in temperature gradients and gamma-radiation fields - a selective annotated bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluation of the extensive research concerning brine geochemistry and transport is critically important to successful exploitation of a salt formation for isolating high-level radioactive waste. This annotated bibliography has been compiled from documents considered to provide classic background material on the interactions between brine and rock salt, as well as the most important results from more recent research. Each summary elucidates the information or data most pertinent to situations encountered in siting, constructing, and operating a mined repository in salt for high-level radioactive waste. The research topics covered include the basic geology, depositional environment, mineralogy, and structure of evaporite and domal salts, as well as fluid inclusions, brine chemistry, thermal and gamma-radiation effects, radionuclide migration, and thermodynamic properties of salts and brines. 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Hull, A.B.; Williams, L.B.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Understanding Contamination; Twenty Years of Simulating Radiological Contamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wide variety of simulated contamination methods have been developed by researchers to reproducibly test radiological decontamination methods. Some twenty years ago a method of non-radioactive contamination simulation was proposed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that mimicked the character of radioactive cesium and zirconium contamination on stainless steel. It involved baking the contamination into the surface of the stainless steel in order to 'fix' it into a tenacious, tightly bound oxide layer. This type of contamination was particularly applicable to nuclear processing facilities (and nuclear reactors) where oxide growth and exchange of radioactive materials within the oxide layer became the predominant model for material/contaminant interaction. Additional simulation methods and their empirically derived basis (from a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility) are discussed. In the last ten years the INL, working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC), has continued to develop contamination simulation methodologies. The most notable of these newer methodologies was developed to compare the efficacy of different decontamination technologies against radiological dispersal device (RDD, 'dirty bomb') type of contamination. There are many different scenarios for how RDD contamination may be spread, but the most commonly used one at the INL involves the dispersal of an aqueous solution containing radioactive Cs-137. This method was chosen during the DARPA projects and has continued through the NHSRC series of decontamination trials and also gives a tenacious 'fixed' contamination. Much has been learned about the interaction of cesium contamination with building materials, particularly concrete, throughout these tests. The effects of porosity, cation-exchange capacity of the material and the amount of dirt and debris on the surface are very important factors. The interaction of the contaminant/substrate with the particular decontamination technology is also very important. Results of decontamination testing from hundreds of contaminated coupons have lead to certain conclusions about the contamination and the type of decontamination methods being deployed. A recent addition to the DARPA initiated methodology simulates the deposition of nuclear fallout. This contamination differs from previous tests in that it has been developed and validated purely to simulate a 'loose' type of contamination. This may represent the first time that a radiologically contaminated 'fallout' stimulant has been developed to reproducibly test decontamination methods. While no contaminant/methodology may serve as a complete example of all aspects that could be seen in the field, the study of this family of simulation methods provides insight into the nature of radiological contamination.

Emily Snyder; John Drake; Ryan James

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Geochemical evidence for possible natural migration of Marcellus Formation brine to shallow aquifers in Pennsylvania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...opportunities . Environ Sci Technol 44 : 5679 – 5684 . 3 Howarth RW Ingraffea A Engelder T ( 2011 ) Natural gas: Should fracking stop? Nature 477 : 271 – 275 . 4 Osborn SG Vengosh A Warner NR Jackson RB ( 2011 ) Methane contamination of drinking water...

Nathaniel R. Warner; Robert B. Jackson; Thomas H. Darrah; Stephen G. Osborn; Adrian Down; Kaiguang Zhao; Alissa White; Avner Vengosh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Understanding Mechanisms of Radiological Contamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last 50 years, the study of radiological contamination and decontamination has expanded significantly. This paper addresses the mechanisms of radiological contamination that have been reported and then discusses which methods have recently been used during performance testing of several different decontamination technologies. About twenty years ago the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL began a search for decontamination processes which could minimize secondary waste. In order to test the effectiveness of these decontamination technologies, a new simulated contamination, termed SIMCON, was developed. SIMCON was designed to replicate the types of contamination found on stainless steel, spent fuel processing equipment. Ten years later, the INL began research into methods for simulating urban contamination resulting from a radiological dispersal device (RDD). This work was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and included the initial development an aqueous application of contaminant to substrate. Since 2007, research sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has advanced that effort and led to the development of a contamination method that simulates particulate fallout from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND). The IND method diverges from previous efforts to create tenacious contamination by simulating a reproducible “loose” contamination. Examining these different types of contamination (and subsequent decontamination processes), which have included several different radionuclides and substrates, sheds light on contamination processes that occur throughout the nuclear industry and in the urban environment.

Rick Demmer; John Drake; Ryan James, PhD

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Experimental and Computational Studies of Fluid Flow Phenomena in Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Brine and Oil Fields  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EXPERIMENTAL AND COMPUTATIONAL STUDIES OF FLUID EXPERIMENTAL AND COMPUTATIONAL STUDIES OF FLUID FLOW PHENOMENA IN CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN BRINE AND OIL FIELDS Chuang Ji ( chuang.ji@netl.doe.gov ) National Energy Technology Laboratory Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 BOX 5725 Clarkson University Potsdam, NY 13699 Goodarz Ahmadi ( ahmadi@clarkson.edu ) BOX 5725 Clarkson University Potsdam, NY 13699 Duane H. Smith ( duane.smith@netl.doe.gov ) National Energy Technology Laboratory Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 2 INTRODUCTION Sequestration of CO 2 by injection into deep geological formations is a method to reduce CO 2 emissions into the atmosphere. However, when CO 2 is injected underground, it forms fingers extending into the rock pores saturated with brine or petroleum. This flow

231

Evaluation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation, Upper Texas Gulf Coast for Geological Sequestration of CO2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Evaluation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation, Upper Texas Gulf Coast for Geological Sequestration of CO 2 S. D. Hovorka (susan.hovorka@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-4863) Bureau of Economic Geology, P.O. Box X, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78713 C. Doughty (CADoughty@lbl.gov; 510-486-6453 ) Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Road Mailstop 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720 P. R. Knox (paul.knox@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-7313), Bureau of Economic Geology, P.O. Box X, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78713 C. T. Green (ctgreen@ucdavis.edu; 510-495-2461) University of California, Hydrologic Sciences, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA 95616 K. Pruess(K_Pruess@lbl.gov; 510-486-6732) Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Road Mailstop 90-1116,

232

Understanding Long-Term Solute Transport in Sedimentary Basins: Simulating Brine Migration in the Alberta Basin. Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass transport in deep sedimentary basins places important controls on ore formation, petroleum migration, CO2 sequestration, and geochemical reactions that affect petroleum reservoir quality, but large-scale transport in this type of setting remains poorly understood. This lack of knowledge is highlighted in the resource-rich Alberta Basin, where geochemical and hydrogeologic studies have suggested residence times ranging from hundreds of millions of years to less than 5 My, respectively. Here we developed new hydrogeologic models that were constrained by geochemical observations to reconcile these two very different estimates. The models account for variable-density fluid flow, heat transport, solute transport, sediment deposition and erosion, sediment compressibility, and dissolution of salt deposits, including Cl/Br systematics. Prior interpretations of Cl/Br ratios in the Alberta Basin concluded that the brines were derived from evaporatively-concentrated brines that were subsequently diluted by seawater and freshwater; models presented here show that halite dissolution must have contributed strongly as well, which implies significantly greater rates of mass transport. This result confirms that Cl/Br ratios are subject to significant non-uniqueness and thus do not provide good independent indicators of the origin of brines. Salinity and Cl/Br ratios provided valuable new constraints for basin-scale models, however. Sensitivity studies revealed that permeabilities obtained from core- and field-scale tests were appropriate for basin-scale models, despite the differences in scale between the tests and the models. Simulations of groundwater age show that the residence time of porefluids in much of the basin is less than 100 My. Groundwater age increases with depth and approaches 200 My in the deepest part of the basin, but brines are significantly younger than their host rocks throughout the basin.

Alicia M. Wilson

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

233

Evaluation of brine disposal from the Bryan Mound site of the strategic petroleum reserve program. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On March 10, 1980, the Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program began leaching the Bryan Mound salt dome and discharging the resulting brine into the coastal waters off Freeport, Texas. During the months of March and April, a team of scientists and engineers from Texas A and M University conducted an intensive environmental study of the area surrounding the diffuser site. A pipeline has been laid from the Bryan Mound site to a location 12.5 statute miles (20 km) offshore. The last 3060 ft (933 m) of this pipeline is a 52-port diffuser through which brine can be discharged at a maximum rate of 680,000 barrels per day. Initially, 16 ports were open which permitted a maximum discharge rate of 350,000 barrels per day and a continuous brine discharge was achieved on March 13, 1980. The purpose of this report is to describe the findings of the project team during the intensive postdisposal study period of March and April, 1980. The major areas of investigation are physical oceanography, analysis of the discharge plume, water and sediment quality, nekton, benthos, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and data management.

Case, Robert J.; Chittenden, Jr, Mark E.; Harper, Jr, Donald E.; Kelly, Jr, Francis J.; Loeblich, Laurel A.; McKinney, Larry D.; Minello, Thomas J.; Park, E. Taisoo; Randall, Robert E.; Slowey, J. Frank

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Adsorption and desorption of contaminants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microbial remediation of sites Contaminated with organics is well documented, however, there are some significant problems that remain to be solved in the areas of contaminants sorbed to soils and non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contamination. Methods of in situ bioremediation techniques employ either the stimulation of indigenous populations by nutrient addition, or the addition of prepared bacterial cultures to the subsurface environment. Problems of contaminant sorption and NAPL`s are related in that both encompass reduced contaminant bioavailability. Non-aqueous phase liquids have been identified as a priority area for research in the In situ Program due to their presence at DOE sites and the lack of adequate technology to effectively treat this contamination. Bioremediation technologies developed as a result of this project are easily transferred to industry.

Palumbo, A.V.; Strong-Gunderson, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); DeFlaun, M.; Ensley, B. [Envirogen, Inc., Lawrenceville, NJ (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Standards for Contamination Control Areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of standards and specifications used for contamination control is to establish controls and definitions that will allow satisfactory cleanroom construction and good product fabrication within cleanr...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Can fracking contaminate drinking water?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tiny cracks link deep shale gas reservoirs to shallow aquifers, but they may not be to blame for reports of contaminated drinking water

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Protections: Sediment Control = Contaminant Retention  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sediment Control Protections: Sediment Control Contaminant Retention LANL maintains hundreds of wells, stream sampling stations and stormwater control structures to protect...

238

Emission Standards for Contaminants (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations list emissions standards for various contaminants, and contain special requirements for anaerobic lagoons. These regulations also describe alternative emissions limits, which may...

239

Testing efficiency of storage in the subsurface: frio brine pilot experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Can we demonstrate that subsurface storage is an effective method of reducing emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere? The Frio Brine Pilot Experiment is designed to test storage performance of a typical subsurface environment in an area where large-volume sources and sinks are abundant, near Houston, Texas, USA. We employed extensive pre-experiment characterization and modeling to identify significant factors that increase or decrease risk of leakage from the injection zone. We then designed the experiment to focus on those factors, as well as to test for presence or absence of events that are not expected. A fully developed reservoir model of heterogeneous reworked fluvial sandstones of the Frio Formation documents three-dimensional compartmentalization of the injection horizon by faulting associated with salt-dome intrusion and growth. Modeling using the TOUGH2 simulator showed that a significant source of uncertainty for subsurface performance of injected CO2 is residual CO2 saturation during storage. If initial displacement of water during injection is efficient and capillary effects create the expected residual saturation of 30 percent CO2, the volume occupied by the plume will be limited, and long-term storage can be expected even in an open system. If, however, during injection, CO2 moves out from the injection well along high-permeability pathways, it may not contact most pores, and residual saturation will have a smaller effect on storage. Our experiment is therefore designed to monitor plume geometry and CO2 saturation near the injection well and closely spaced observation well. Leakage out of the injection zone as a result of well engineering or other flaws in the seal is also monitored in the sandstone immediately overlying the injection zone and at the surface using multiple techniques. Permitting strategies include cooperation among two State agencies, as well as Federal NEPA assessment, because of the innovative aspects of the experiment.

Hovorka, Susan D.; Doughty, Christine; Holtz, Mark

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

240

Technology transfer report: feasibility study for the use of geothermal brine in the Ashdod area, Israel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydrothermal potential of the Ashdod area, Israel, was evaluated to determine its suitability as the low grade energy source required to operate the Ashdod desalination plant. An estimated 1250 cubic meters per hour of 120/sup 0/C brine would be adequate to supply the hot water necessary for operating the desalination plant. Considerable interest in oil exploration in the Ashdod area resulted in the drilling of six wells into the Jurassic formations by Oil Exploration (Investments) Ltd. (OEL) in 1976-1980. A small amount of oil was found in two wells, Ashdod 2 and 5. The remaining wells were abandoned as ''dry holes''. Evaluation of the drill cuttings, cores, and the electric logs defined two lithologic units of potential interest for hydrothermal exploitation, the Zohar and Shderot Dolomites. Investigation of the hydrothermal potential of the Jurassic formations underlying the Ashdod area has revealed that the aquifer temperatures range between 85 and 92/sup 0/C. The hydrologic parameters are not well defined; however the matrix permeability of the dolomites and limestones is probably between 1 and 10 md. This is insufficient permeability for a large scale pumping operation such as the one required to operate the desalination plant. Therefore, successful utilization of the resource requires the presence of significant fractures and/or connected vugs in the formation. The very low well productivity and formation plugging may indicate that permeability of the fracture zones may easily be impaired, suggesting that the fracture zones are not suitable production intervals. Until a test is conducted on a properly completed well, it is not possible to evaluate the deliverability of wells tapping these aquifers. 14 refs., 8 figs.

Benson, S.M.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Contamination and solid state welds.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since sensitivity to contamination is one of the verities of solid state joining, there is a need for assessing contamination of the part(s) to be joined, preferably nondestructively while it can be remedied. As the surfaces that are joined in pinch welds are inaccessible and thus provide a greater challenge, most of the discussion is of the search for the origin and effect of contamination on pinch welding and ways to detect and mitigate it. An example of contamination and the investigation and remediation of such a system is presented. Suggestions are made for techniques for nondestructive evaluation of contamination of surfaces for other solid state welds as well as for pinch welds. Surfaces that have good visual access are amenable to inspection by diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy. Although other techniques are useful for specific classes of contaminants (such as hydrocarbons), DRIFT can be used most classes of contaminants. Surfaces such as the interior of open tubes or stems that are to be pinch welded can be inspected using infrared reflection spectroscopy. It must be demonstrated whether or not this tool can detect graphite based contamination, which has been seen in stems. For tubes with one closed end, the technique that should be investigated is emission infrared spectroscopy.

Mills, Bernice E.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Contaminants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to contaminants. At NREL, we are researching system-derived contaminants and hydrogen fuel quality. Air contaminants are of interest as well. NREL also participates in the U.S....

243

West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume II. Physical and chemical oceanography. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which is located in southwestern Louisiana, and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Contents of Volume II include: introduction; physical oceanography; estuarine hydrology and hydrography; analysis of discharge plume; and water and sediment quality.

DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume IV. Bibliography and supporting data for physical oceanography. Final report. [421 references  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which is located in southwestern Louisiana and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Volume IV contains the following: bibliography; appendices for supporting data for physical oceanography, and summary of the physical oceanography along the western Louisiana coast.

DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.) [eds.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The implications of UIC and NPDES regulations on selection of disposal options for spent geothermal brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reviews and evaluates the various options for the disposal of geothermal wastewater with respect to the promulgated regulations for the protection of surface and groundwaters. The Clean Water Act of 1977 and the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments are especially important when designing disposal systems for geothermal fluids. The former promulgates regulations concerning the discharge of wastewater into surface waters, while the latter is concerned with the protection of ground water aquifers through the establishment of underground injection control (UIC) programs. There is a specific category for geothermal fluid discharge if injection is to be used as a method of disposal. Prior to February 1982, the UIC regulations required geothermal power plant to use Class III wells and direct use plants to use Class V wells. More stringent regulatory requirements, including construction specification and monitoring, are imposed on the Class III wells. On February 3, 1982, the classification of geothermal injection wells was changed from a Class III to Class V on the basis that geothermal wells do not inject for the extraction of minerals or energy, but rather they are used to inject brines, from which heat has been extracted, into formations from which they were originally taken. This reclassification implies that a substantial cost reduction will be realized for geothermal fluid injection primarily because well monitoring is no longer mandatory. The Clean Water Act of 1977 provides the legal basis for regulating the discharge of liquid effluent into the nation's surface waters, through a permitting system called the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Discharge quantities, rates, concentrations and temperatures are regulated by the NPDES permits. These permits systems are based upon effluent guidelines developed by EPA on an industry by industry basis. For geothermal energy industry, effluent guidelines have not been formulated and are not currently scheduled. There, are however, water quality standards that control the quantity and quality of wastewaters discharged into surface waters. These standards are established by the states in concert with EPA, and frequently result in NPDES conditions more restrictive than those based on effluent guidelines.

None

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Modifications of Carbonate Fracture Hydrodynamic Properties by CO{sub 2}-Acidified Brine Flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acidic reactive flow in fractures is relevant in subsurface activities such as CO{sub 2} geological storage and hydraulic fracturing. Understanding reaction-induced changes in fracture hydrodynamic properties is essential for predicting subsurface flows such as leakage, injectability, and fluid production. In this study, x-ray computed tomography scans of a fractured carbonate caprock were used to create three dimensional reconstructions of the fracture before and after reaction with CO{sub 2}-acidified brine (Ellis et al., 2011, Greenhouse Gases: Sci. Technol., 1:248-260). As expected, mechanical apertures were found to increase substantially, doubling and even tripling in some places. However, the surface geometry evolved in complex ways including ‘comb-tooth’ structures created from preferential dissolution of calcite in transverse sedimentary bands, and the creation of degraded zones, i.e. porous calcite-depleted areas on reacted fracture surfaces. These geometric alterations resulted in increased fracture roughness, as measured by surface Z{sub 2} parameters and fractal dimensions D{sub f}. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted to quantify the changes in hydraulic aperture, fracture transmissivity and permeability. The results show that the effective hydraulic apertures are smaller than the mechanical apertures, and the changes in hydraulic apertures are nonlinear. Overestimation of flow rate by a factor of two or more would be introduced if fracture hydrodynamic properties were based on mechanical apertures, or if hydraulic aperture is assumed to change proportionally with mechanical aperture. The differences can be attributed, in part, to the increase in roughness after reaction, and is likely affected by contiguous transverse sedimentary features. Hydraulic apertures estimated by the 1D statistical model and 2D local cubic law (LCL) model are consistently larger than those calculated from the CFD simulations. In addition, a novel ternary segmentation method was devised to handle the degraded zones, allowing for a bounding analysis of the effects on hydraulic properties. We found that the degraded zones account for less than 15% of the fracture volume, but cover 70% to 80% of the fracture surface. When the degraded zones are treated as part of the fracture, the fracture transmissivities are two to four times larger because the fracture surfaces after reaction are not as rough as they would be if one considers the degraded zone as part of the rock. Therefore, while degraded zones created during geochemical reactions may not significantly increase mechanical aperture, this type of feature cannot be ignored and should be treated with prudence when predicting fracture hydrodynamic properties.

Deng, Hang; Ellis, Brian R.; Peters, Catherine A.; Fitts, Jeffrey P.; Crandall, Dustin; Bromhal, Grant S.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Gaseous, Chemical, and Other Contaminant Descriptions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most contamination control technology considers generalized and often unidentified particulate material as the major contaminant, but there are many situations in which gases, chemical films, microbiological m...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Radiologically Contaminated Patient.docx More Documents & Publications Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Medical ExaminerCoroner...

249

Effects of a sulfide system produced by a natural brine seep on sandy-bottom community structure at the East Flower Garden Bank, northwest Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF A SULFIDE SYSTEM PRODUCED BY A NATURAL BRINE SEEP ON SANDY-BOTTOM COI'1MUNITY STRUCTURE AT THE EAST FLOWER GARDEN BANK, NORTHWEST GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by EDWARD ANDREW WOODS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM... University in partia 1 fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1982 Major Subject: Oceanography EFFECTS OF A SULFIDE SYSTEM PRODUCED BY A NATURAL BRINE SEEP ON SANDY-BOTTOM COMMUNITY STRUCTURE AT THE EAST FLOWER...

Woods, Edward Andrew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

250

Environmental assessment of the brine pipeline replacement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Facility in Brazoria County, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0804, for the proposed replacement of a deteriorated brine disposal pipeline from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Bryan Mound storage facility in Brazoria County, Texas, into the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, the ocean discharge outfall would be moved shoreward by locating the brine diffuser at the end of the pipeline 3.5 miles offshore at a minimum depth of 30 feet. The action would occur in a floodplain and wetlands; therefore, a floodplain/wetlands assessment has been prepared in conjunction with this EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 USC. 4321, et seg.). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This FONSI also includes a Floodplain Statement of Findings in accordance with 10 CFR Part 1022.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Particulate Contaminant Descriptions and Definitions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particulate contaminants can be either solid or liquid. Many of these materials were originally suspended in air or in a process fluid; others derive from nearby sources, such as activities of personnel working i...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Fire in a contaminated area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document supports the development and presentation of the following accident scenario in the TWRS Final Safety Analysis Report: Fire in Contaminated Area. The calculations needed to quantify the risk associated with this accident scenario are included within.

Ryan, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

253

Method for testing earth samples for contamination by organic contaminants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Provided is a method for testing earth samples for contamination by organic contaminants, and particularly for aromatic compounds such as those found in diesel fuel and other heavy fuel oils, kerosene, creosote, coal oil, tars and asphalts. A drying step is provided in which a drying agent is contacted with either the earth sample or a liquid extract phase to reduce to possibility of false indications of contamination that could occur when humic material is present in the earth sample. This is particularly a problem when using relatively safe, non-toxic and inexpensive polar solvents such as isopropyl alcohol since the humic material tends to be very soluble in those solvents when water is present. Also provided is an ultraviolet spectroscopic measuring technique for obtaining an indication as to whether a liquid extract phase contains aromatic organic contaminants. In one embodiment, the liquid extract phase is subjected to a narrow and discrete band of radiation including a desired wave length and the ability of the liquid extract phase to absorb that wavelength of ultraviolet radiation is measured to provide an indication of the presence of aromatic organic contaminants. 2 figs.

Schabron, J.F.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Metamorphosed Plio-Pleistocene evaporites and the origins of hypersaline brines in the Salton Sea geothermal system, California: Fluid inclusion evidence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Salton Sea geothermal system (SSGS) occurs in Plio-Pleistocene deltaic-lacustrine-evaporite sediments deposited in the Salton Trough, an active continental rift zone. Temperatures up to 365{degree}C and hypersaline brines with up to 26 wt.% TDS are encountered at 1-3 km depth in the sediments, which are undergoing active greenschist facies hydrothermal metamorphism. Previous models for the origins of the Na-Ca-K-Cl brines have assumed that the high salinities were derived mainly from the downward percolation of cold, dense brines formed by low-temperature dissolution of shallow non-marine evaporites. New drillcores from the central part of the geothermal field contain metamorphosed, bedded evaporites at 1 km depth consisting largely of hornfelsic anhydrite interbedded with anhydrite-cemented solution-collapse shale breccias. Fluid inclusions trapped within the bedded and breccia-cementing anhydrite homogenize at 300{degree}C and contain saline Na-Ca-K-Cl brines. Some of the inclusions contain up to 50 vol.% halite, sylvite and carbonate crystals at room temperature, and some halite crystals persist to above 300{degree}C upon laboratory heating. The data are consistent with the trapping of halite-saturated Na-Ca-K-Cl fluids during hydrothermal metamorphism of the evaporites and accompanying solution collapse of interbedded shales. The authors conclude that many of the slat crystals in inclusions are the residuum of bedded evaporitic salt that was dissolved during metamorphism by heated connate fluids.

McKibben, M.A.; Williams, A.E.; Okubo, Susumu (Univ. of California, Riverside (USA))

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Results of brine flow testing and disassembly of a crushed salt/bentonite block seal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Small-Scale Seal Performance Tests, Series C, a set of in situ experiments conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, are designed to evaluate the performance of various seal materials emplaced in large (0.9-m-diameter) boreholes. This report documents the results of fluid (brine) flow testing and water and clay content analyses performed on one emplaced seal comprised of 100% salt blocks and 50%/50% crushed salt/bentonite blocks and disassembled after nearly three years of brine injection testing. Results from the water content analyses of 212 samples taken from within this seal show uniform water content throughout the 50%/50% salt/bentonite blocks with saturations about 100%. Clay content analyses from the 100% salt endcaps of the seal show a background clay content of about 1% by weight uniformly distributed, with the exception of samples taken at the base of the seal at the borehole wall interface. These samples show clay contents up to 3% by weight, which suggests some bentonite may have migrated under pressure to that interface. Results of the brine-flow testing show that the permeability to brine for this seal was about 2 to 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} darcy (2 to 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}16} m{sup 2}).

Finley, R.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, R.L. [Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Potential for the localized corrosion of alloy 22 Waste Packages in Multiple-Salt Deliquescent Brines in the Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been postulated that the deliquescence of multiple-salt systems in dust deposits and the consequent localized corrosion in high-temperature brines could lead to premature failure of the Alloy 22 waste packages in the Yucca Mountain repository. EPRI has developed a decision tree approach to determine if the various stages leading to waste package failure are possible and whether the safety of the repository system could be compromised as a result. Through a series of arguments, EPRI has shown that it is highly unlikely that the multiple-salt deliquescent brines will form in the first place and, even if they did, that they would not be thermodynamically stable, that the postulated brines are not corrosive and would not lead to the initiation of localized corrosion of Alloy 22, that even if localized corrosion did initiate that the propagation would stifle and cease long before penetration of the waste package outer barrier, and that even if premature waste package failures did occur from this cause that the safety of the overall system would not be compromised. EPRI concludes, therefore, that the postulated localized corrosion of the waste packages due to high-temperature deliquescent brines is neither a technical nor a safety issue of concern for the Yucca Mountain repository. (authors)

King, F. [Integrity Corrosion Consulting, Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Arthur, R.; Apted, M. [Monitor Scientific LLC, Denver, CO (United States); Kessler, J.H. [Electric Power Research Institute, Charlotte, NC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Reactive transport modeling to study changes in water chemistry induced by CO2 injection at the Frio-I brine pilot  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To demonstrate the potential for geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers, the Frio-I Brine Pilot was conducted, during which 1600 tons of CO{sub 2} were injected into a high-permeability sandstone and the resulting subsurface plume of CO{sub 2} was monitored using a variety of hydrogeological, geophysical, and geochemical techniques. Fluid samples were obtained before CO{sub 2} injection for baseline geochemical characterization, during the CO{sub 2} injection to track its breakthrough at a nearby observation well, and after injection to investigate changes in fluid composition and potential leakage into an overlying zone. Following CO{sub 2} breakthrough at the observation well, brine samples showed sharp drops in pH, pronounced increases in HCO{sub 3}{sup -} and aqueous Fe, and significant shifts in the isotopic compositions of H{sub 2}O and dissolved inorganic carbon. Based on a calibrated 1-D radial flow model, reactive transport modeling was performed for the Frio-I Brine Pilot. A simple kinetic model of Fe release from the solid to aqueous phase was developed, which can reproduce the observed increases in aqueous Fe concentration. Brine samples collected after half a year had lower Fe concentrations due to carbonate precipitation, and this trend can be also captured by our modeling. The paper provides a method for estimating potential mobile Fe inventory, and its bounding concentration in the storage formation from limited observation data. Long-term simulations show that the CO{sub 2} plume gradually spreads outward due to capillary forces, and the gas saturation gradually decreases due to its dissolution and precipitation of carbonates. The gas phase is predicted to disappear after 500 years. Elevated aqueous CO{sub 2} concentrations remain for a longer time, but eventually decrease due to carbonate precipitation. For the Frio-I Brine Pilot, all injected CO{sub 2} could ultimately be sequestered as carbonate minerals.

Kharaka, Y.K; Doughty, C.; Freifeld, B.M.; Daley, T.M.; Xu, T.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Economic and thermal feasibility of multi stage flash desalination plant with brine–feed mixing and cooling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Improving the performance of MSF (multi stage flash) desalination plants is a major challenge for desalination industry. High feed temperature in summer shortens the evaporation range of MSF plants and limits their yield. Installing a cooler at the feed intake expands the evaporation range of MSF plants and increases their yield. Adding a cooler and a mixing chamber increases the capital and operational costs of MSF plants. This paper presents thermal and economic analysis of installing a feed cooler at the plant intake. The profit of selling the additionally produced water must cover the cost of the cooling system. The selling prices for a reasonable breakeven depend on the selected cooling temperature. The cost of installing coolers capable of maintaining feed–brine mixture temperatures of 18–20 °C shows breakeven selling prices of 0.5–0.9 $/m3. These prices fall within the current range of potable water selling prices.

Majed M. Alhazmy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Cleaning Contaminated Water at Fukushima  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crystalline Silico-Titanates (CSTs) are synthetic zeolites designed by Sandia National Laboratories scientists to selectively capture radioactive cesium and other group I metals. They are being used for cleanup of radiation-contaminated water at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. Quick action by Sandia and its corporate partner UOP, A Honeywell Company, led to rapid licensing and deployment of the technology in Japan, where it continues to be used to clean up cesium contaminated water at the Fukushima power plant.

Rende, Dean; Nenoff, Tina

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

260

JGI - Why Sequence Contaminated Groundwater?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Contaminated Groundwater? Contaminated Groundwater? Because the majority of microorganisms in nature have never been cultured, little is known about their genetic properties, biochemical functions, and metabolic characteristics. Although the sequence of the microbial community "genome" can now be determined with high-throughput sequencing technology, the complexity and magnitude of most microbial communities make meaningful data acquisition and interpretation difficult. Thus, the sequence determination of a groundwater microbial community with manageable diversity and complexity (~20 phylotypes) is a timely challenge. The samples for this project come from the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC), Well FW-010. The overall objective is to provide a fundamental and comprehensive

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Cleaning Contaminated Water at Fukushima  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Crystalline Silico-Titanates (CSTs) are synthetic zeolites designed by Sandia National Laboratories scientists to selectively capture radioactive cesium and other group I metals. They are being used for cleanup of radiation-contaminated water at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. Quick action by Sandia and its corporate partner UOP, A Honeywell Company, led to rapid licensing and deployment of the technology in Japan, where it continues to be used to clean up cesium contaminated water at the Fukushima power plant.

Rende, Dean; Nenoff, Tina

2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

262

Interpretation of brine-permeability tests of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site: First interim report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pressure-pulse tests have been performed in bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to evaluate the hydraulic properties controlling brine flow through the Salado. Hydraulic conductivities ranging from about 10{sup {minus}14} to 10{sup {minus}11} m/s (permeabilities of about 10{sup {minus}21} to 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2}) have been interpreted from nine tests conducted on five stratigraphic intervals within eleven meters of the WIPP underground excavations. Tests of a pure halite layer showed no measurable permeability. Pore pressures in the stratigraphic intervals range from about 0.5 to 9.3 MPa. An anhydrite interbed (Marker Bed 139) appears to be one or more orders of magnitude more permeable than the surrounding halite. Hydraulic conductivities appear to increase, and pore pressures decrease, with increasing proximity to the excavations. These effects are particularly evident within two to three meters of the excavations. Two tests indicated the presence of apparent zero-flow boundaries about two to three meters from the boreholes. The other tests revealed no apparent boundaries within the radii of influence of the tests, which were calculated to range from about four to thirty-five meters from the test holes. The data are insufficient to determine if brine flow through evaporites results from Darcy-like flow driven by pressure gradients within naturally interconnected porosity or from shear deformation around excavations connecting previously isolated pores, thereby providing pathways for fluids at or near lithostatic pressure to be driven towards the low-pressure excavations. Future testing will be performed at greater distances from the excavations to evaluate hydraulic properties and processes beyond the range of excavation effects.

Beauheim, R.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Saulnier, G.J. Jr.; Avis, J.D. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Effects of oil and gas exploration and production of shallow groundwater in North Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Upon completion of an oil and gas well in North Dakota, the drilling fluid is commonly buried in shallow trenches near the bore hole. These drilling fluids are salt-water based (approx. =250,000 mg/1 NaCl) and may contain high levels of chromium, lead, and other toxic trace elements. During the 1950s and 1960s, brines produced with the oil were generally disposed of in evaporation ponds. Currently, these produced waters are disposed of in brine-injection wells. A 5-year ongoing study funded by NDGS and later supported by ND Water Resources Research Institute through NDMMRRI was initiated to determine the effects of these oil-field wastes on shallow aquifers in the glaciated and nonglaciated portions of North Dakota. The areal and vertical extent of groundwater contamination was delineated using chemical analyses of water and sediment samples from the saturated and unsaturated zones, in combination with earth-resistivity surveys. Degradation of groundwater by leachate generated from buried drilling fluids is generally localized, due primarily to the relatively low volumes of wastes. However, the toxicity of these fluids makes disposal near shallow aquifers potentially hazardous. Migration of saline leachate from an abandoned brine-disposal pond has contaminated the shallow subsurface zone beneath an area of 3-5 ha at one study site. Leakage from brine-injection wells is potentially the most serious contamination problem. At one location, brine and hydrocarbon migration from an injection well has contaminated an aquifer beneath an area of several km/sup 2/.

Murphy, E.C.; Kehew, A.E.; Beal, W.A.; Groenewold, G.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

UNDERWATER COATINGS FOR CONTAMINATION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) deactivated several aging nuclear fuel storage basins. Planners for this effort were greatly concerned that radioactive contamination present on the basin walls could become airborne as the sides of the basins became exposed during deactivation and allowed to dry after water removal. One way to control this airborne contamination was to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls were still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market for marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives were easily applied and adhered well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INL fuel pools. Lab-scale experiments were conducted by applying fourteen different commercial underwater coatings to four substrate materials representative of the storage basin construction materials, and evaluating their performance. The coupons included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The evaluation criteria included ease of application, adherence to the four surfaces of interest, no change on water clarity or chemistry, non-hazardous in final applied form and be proven in underwater applications. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected from the underwater coatings tested for application to all four pools. Divers scrubbed loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuumed up the sludge. The divers then applied the coating using a special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pools with no detectable airborne contamination releases.

Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Potential Carcinogenicity of Food Additives and Contaminants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Carcinogenicity of Food Additives and Contaminants 1...RESEARCH VOL.35 Food Additives and Contaminants argument...substance that caused removal of the cranberries...consideration was given to the removal of Tween 60 as a food additive. The compound has...

Philippe Shubik

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Emerging chemical contaminants in water and wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...contaminants in water and wastewater' compiled and edited by Michael...contaminants in water and wastewater Michael R. Templeton 1...activated sludge process in wastewater treatment, whereby the pollutants...the impact on agricultural recycling. Disinfection by-products...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The mission of the Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative is to control the flux of contaminants in soil and water environments for the purpose of...

268

Reliability and Consistency of Surface Contamination Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface contamination evaluation is a tough problem since it is difficult to isolate the radiations emitted by the surface, especially in a highly irradiating atmosphere. In that case the only possibility is to evaluate smearable (removeable) contamination since ex-situ countings are possible. Unfortunately, according to our experience at CEA, these values are not consistent and thus non relevant. In this study, we show, using in-situ Fourier Transform Infra Red spectrometry on contaminated metal samples, that fixed contamination seems to be chemisorbed and removeable contamination seems to be physisorbed. The distribution between fixed and removeable contamination appears to be variable. Chemical equilibria and reversible ion exchange mechanisms are involved and are closely linked to environmental conditions such as humidity and temperature. Measurements of smearable contamination only give an indication of the state of these equilibria between fixed and removeable contamination at the time and in the environmental conditions the measurements were made.

Rouppert, F.; Rivoallan, A.; Largeron, C.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

269

Emerging contaminants and microorganisms into the environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Workshop Emerging contaminants and microorganisms into the environment: contamination pathways Environmental Engineering Division Surname _____________________Name____________________ Job Environmental Engineering Division (SEED) Department of Civil Engineering University of Salerno Via Ponte don

Costagliola, Gennaro

270

Webinar: NREL's Fuel Cell Contaminant Database | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

NREL's Fuel Cell Contaminant Database Webinar: NREL's Fuel Cell Contaminant Database Below is the text version of the webinar titled "NREL's Fuel Cell Contaminant Database,"...

271

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 of 3) 3 of 3) RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH Student's Guide Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy February 1997 DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Table of Contents Page TERMINAL OBJECTIVE............................................................................1 ENABLING OBJECTIVES...........................................................................1 I. RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION................................................. 2 A. Comparison of Radiation and Radioactive Contamination ..................... 2 B. Types of Contamination.............................................................. 2

272

In situ bioremediation of petrol contaminated groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Bacterial Diversity and Aerobic Biodegradation Potential in a BTEX-Contaminated Aquifer Water Air Soil21/11/08 1 In situ bioremediation of petrol contaminated groundwater Guido Miguel Delgadillo EVS and facts · Likelihood of contamination · Benefits of in situ bioremediation So... Ask not what groundwater

Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

273

Review of soil contamination guidance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of existing and proposed radioactive soil contamination standards and guidance was conducted for United Nuclear Corporation (UNC), Office of Surplus Facilities Management. Information was obtained from both government agencies and other sources during a literature survey. The more applicable standards were reviewed, evaluated, and summarized. Information pertaining to soil contamination for both facility operation and facility decommissioning was obtained from a variety of sources. These sources included: the Code of Federal Regulations, regulatory guides, the Federal Register, topical reports written by various government agencies, topical reports written by national laboratories, and publications from the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). It was difficult to directly compare the standards and guidance obtained from these sources since each was intended for a specific situation and different units or bases were used. However, most of the information reviewed was consistent with the philosophy of maintaining exposures at levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA).

Mueller, M.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Soldat, J.K.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Semi-analytical model of brine and CO2 leakage through an abandoned plugged well. Applications for determining an Area of Review and CO2 leakage rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Semi-analytical model of brine and CO2 leakage through an abandoned plugged well. Applications for determining an Area of Review and CO2 leakage rate Arnaud Réveillère, Jérémy Rohmer, Frédéric Wertz / contact the leak, and of CO2,g as a first approach. Compared to the state of the art, it adds the possibility

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

275

INTRAVAL Phase 2 WIPP 1 test case report: Modeling of brine flow through halite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the WIPP 1 test case studied as part of INTRAVAL, an international project to study validation of geosphere transport models. The WIPP 1 test case involved simulation of measured brine-inflow rates to boreholes drilled into the halite strata surrounding the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository. The goal of the test case was to evaluate the use of Darcy`s law to describe brine flow through halite. The general approach taken was to try to obtain values of permeability and specific capacitance that would be: (1) consistent with other available data and (2) able to provide reasonable simulations of all of the brine-inflow experiments performed in the Salado Formation. All of the teams concluded that the average permeability of the halite strata penetrated by the holes was between approximately 10{sup {minus}22} and 10{sup {minus}21} m{sup 2}. Specific capacitances greater than 10{sup {minus}10} Pa{sup {minus}1} are inconsistent with the known constitutive properties of halite and are attributed to deformation, possibly ongoing, of the halite around the WIPP excavations. All project teams found that Darcy-flow models could replicate the experimental data in a consistent and reasonable manner. Discrepancies between the data and simulations are attributed to inadequate representation in the models of processes modifying the pore-pressure field in addition to the experiments themselves, such as ongoing deformation of the rock around the excavations. Therefore, the conclusion from the test case is that Darcy-flow models can reliably be used to predict brine flow to WIPP excavations, provided that the flow modeling is coupled with measurement and realistic modeling of the pore-pressure field around the excavations. This realistic modeling of the pore-pressure field would probably require coupling to a geomechanical model of the stress evolution around the repository.

Beauheim, R.L. [ed.] [ed.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

In situ removal of contamination from soil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination. The process also uses further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed. 5 figs.

Lindgren, E.R.; Brady, P.V.

1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

277

Underwater Coatings for Contamination Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is deactivating several fuel storage basins. Airborne contamination is a concern when the sides of the basins are exposed and allowed to dry during water removal. One way of controlling this airborne contamination is to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls are still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market that are used in marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives are easily applied and adhere well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INEEL fuel pools. The four pools considered included 1) Test Area North (TAN-607) with epoxy painted concrete walls; 2) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (CPP-603) with bare concrete walls; 3) Materials Test Reactor (MTR) Canal with stainless steel lined concrete walls; and 4) Power Burst Facility (PBF-620) with stainless steel lined concrete walls on the bottom and epoxy painted carbon steel lined walls on the upper portions. Therefore, the four materials chosen for testing included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The typical water temperature of the pools varies from 55oF to 80oF dependent on the pool and the season. These tests were done at room temperature. The following criteria were used during this evaluation. The underwater coating must: · Be easy to apply · Adhere well to the four surfaces of interest · Not change or have a negative impact on water chemistry or clarity · Not be hazardous in final applied form · Be proven in other underwater applications. In addition, it is desirable for the coating to have a high pigment or high cross-link density to prevent radiation from penetrating. This paper will detail the testing completed and the test results. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected to be applied by divers after scrubbing loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuuming up the sludge. A special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pool with no airborne contamination problems.

Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann-Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Constraining the reservoir model of an injected CO2 plume with crosswell CASSM at the Frio-II brine plot  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crosswell CASSM (continuous active-source seismic monitoring) data was acquired as part of the Frio-II brine pilot CO{sub 2} injection experiment. To gain insight into the CO{sub 2} plume evolution, we have integrated the 3D multiphase flow modeling code TOUGH2 with seismic simulation codes via a petrophysical model that predicts seismic velocity for a given CO{sub 2} saturation. Results of forward seismic modeling based on the CO{sub 2} saturation distribution produced by an initial TOUGH2 model compare poorly with the CASSM data, indicating that the initial flow model did not capture the actual CO{sub 2} plume dynamics. Updates to the TOUGH2 model required to better match the CASSM field data indicate vertical flow near the injection well, with increased horizontal plume growth occurring at the top of the reservoir sand. The CASSM continuous delay time data are ideal for constraining the modeled spatiotemporal evolution of the CO{sub 2} plume and allow improvement in reservoir model and estimation of CO{sub 2} plume properties.

Daley, T.M.; Ajo-Franklin, J.; Doughty, C.A.

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Effect of explicit representation of detailed stratigraphy on brine and gas flow at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stratigraphic units of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) disposal room horizon includes various layers of halite, polyhalitic halite, argillaceous halite, clay, and anhydrite. Current models, including those used in the WIPP Performance Assessment calculations, employ a ``composite stratigraphy`` approach in modeling. This study was initiated to evaluate the impact that an explicit representation of detailed stratigraphy around the repository may have on fluid flow compared to the simplified ``composite stratigraphy`` models currently employed. Sensitivity of model results to intrinsic permeability anisotropy, interbed fracturing, two-phase characteristic curves, and gas-generation rates were studied. The results of this study indicate that explicit representation of the stratigraphy maintains higher pressures and does not allow as much fluid to leave the disposal room as compared to the ``composite stratigraphy`` approach. However, the differences are relatively small. Gas migration distances are also different between the two approaches. However, for the two cases in which explicit layering results were considerably different than the composite model (anisotropic and vapor-limited), the gas-migration distances for both models were negligible. For the cases in which gas migration distances were considerable, van Genuchten/Parker and interbed fracture, the differences between the two models were fairly insignificant. Overall, this study suggests that explicit representation of the stratigraphy in the WIPP PA models is not required for the parameter variations modeled if ``global quantities`` (e.g., disposal room pressures, net brine and gas flux into and out of disposal rooms) are the only concern.

Christian-Frear, T.L.; Webb, S.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geohydrology Dept.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Los Alamos racquetball contamination incident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several employees of the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility were found to have low levels of radioactivity on their hands and clothing when they arrived for work one morning. The initial concern was that the stringent contamination or material controls at the facility had failed, and that one or more of the employees had either accidentally or intentionally removed plutonium from the Laboratory premises. Fortunately, however, an investigation revealed that the source of the radioactivity was radon daughters electrostatically collected upon the surface of the racquetball and transferred by physical contact to the employees during an early morning racquetball game. This paper describes the events leading to the discovery of this phenomenon. 1 figure.

McAtee, J.L.; Stafford, R.G.; Dowdy, E.J.; Prestwood, R.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Situ treatment of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for treating dissolved halogenated organic compounds in groundwater that relies upon electrolytically-generated hydrogen to chemically reduce the halogenated compounds in the presence of a suitable catalyst. A direct current is placed across at least a pair, or an array, of electrodes which are housed within groundwater wells so that hydrogen is generated at the cathode and oxygen at the anode. A pump is located within the well housing in which the cathode(s) is(are) located and draws in groundwater where it is hydrogenated via electrolysis, passes through a well-bore treatment unit, and then transported to the anode well(s) for reinjection into the ground. The well-bore treatment involves a permeable cylinder located in the well bore and containing a packed bed of catalyst material that facilitates the reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated organic compounds by hydrogen into environmentally benign species such as ethane and methane. Also, electro-osmatic transport of contaminants toward the cathode also contributes to contaminant mass removal. The only above ground equipment required are the transfer pipes and a direct circuit power supply for the electrodes. The electrode wells in an array may be used in pairs or one anode well may be used with a plurality of cathode wells. The DC current flow between electrode wells may be periodically reversed which controls the formation of mineral deposits in the alkaline cathode well-bore water, as well as to help rejuvenate the catalysis.

McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Ruiz, Roberto (Tracy, CA); Pico, Tristan M. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

INVESTIGATIONS ON THE USE OF ANODIC STRIPPING VOLTAMMETRY FOR THE ANALYSES OF LEAD IN SALINE ENVIRONMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

brines, and volcanic outgassing (Handbook of Geochemistry, 1974, p.82-I-l): (c) industrial contamination

Case, Charles W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Biogeochemical Processes In Ethanol Stimulated Uranium Contaminated...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted with uranium contaminated subsurface sediment to assess the geochemical and microbial community response to ethanol amendment. A...

284

Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humiditylevels for computers. Air economizer cycles, which bring insites to determine how economizers affect humidity control.

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Effect of dilution and contaminants on strength and hydraulic conductivity of sand grouted with colloidal silica gel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Colloidal silica (CS) is a low-viscosity liquid that can be made to gel by addition of brine. This property allows it to be injected into, or mixed with, soil, so that after gelling the colloidal silica blocks the pore space in the soil and forms a barrier to the flow of contaminated groundwater or non-aqueous liquids (NAPLs). Gelled-in-place CS was first studied for the petroleum industry and later for protecting groundwater quality. Noll investigated the use of colloidal silica diluted so that its solids content was reduced from 30% (a typical nominal value for material as delivered) to values as low as 5%. The more dilute colloids could still be made to gel, although more slowly, and the resulting gel was weaker. Because the proposed application of colloidal silica grout involves emplacing it in the subsurface by permeation, jet grouting, or soil mixing where its role as a barrier will be to resist flow of contaminants, the effects of these contaminants on the properties of the grouted soil is also of interest. This work comprised four tasks. In Task 1, samples of grouted sand were prepared with a range of CS dilutions, for measurement of hydraulic conductivity and unconfined-compressive strength. In Task 2, these properties were measured on samples of grouted sand that incorporated 5% volumetric saturation of NAPLs. In Task 3, samples, prepared without any contaminants, were immersed in contaminant liquids and tested after 30 and 90 days. Task 4 was added because NAPL contamination in the samples of Tasks 2 and 3 impelled modifications in the test methods, and comparison of the results of Task 2 and Task 1 suggested that these modifications had introduced errors. In Task 4, samples were tested both ways, to confirm that in Tasks 2 and 3 strength was underestimated and hydraulic conductivity was overestimated. Despite the existence of these known systematic errors, the inclusion of control samples in Tasks 2 and 3 permits conclusions to be drawn from these data.

Persoff, P.; Apps, J.A.; Moridis, G.J. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency left intentionally blank.] #12;Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy PNNL-SA-69994 under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

287

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II). 8 figs.

Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.; Gorby, Y.A.; Cole, C.R.; Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

288

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II).

Amonette, James E. (Richland, WA); Fruchter, Jonathan S. (Richland, WA); Gorby, Yuri A. (Richland, WA); Cole, Charles R. (West Richmond, WA); Cantrell, Kirk J. (West Richmond, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

The Health Risks: Seafood Contamination, Harmful Algal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Health Risks: Seafood Contamination, Harmful Algal Blooms and Polluted Beaches Seafood in shell- fish such as oysters, and accumula- tion of heavy metals, contaminants or biotoxins in seafood respiratory symptoms in people visiting beaches, marine mammal die-offs, shellfish closures, and seafood

290

Oxygen and Nitrogen Contamination During Arc Welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ) : ,- Oxygen and Nitrogen Contamination During Arc Welding T. W. Eagar Department of }faterials, mechanisms, and expected levels of oxygen and nitrogen contamination during gas tungsten arc, gas metal arc indicating the importance of dec9mposition of SiOz into silicon monoxide and oxygen are presented, indicating

Eagar, Thomas W.

291

Accident Investigation of the February 7, 2013, Scissor Lift Accident in the West Hackberry Brine Tank-14 Resulting in Injury, Strategic Petroleum Reserve West Hackberry, LA  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On February 15, 2013, an Accident Investigation Board (the Board) was appointed to investigate an accident that resulted in serious injuries caused when a scissor lift tipped over in Brine Tank-14 (WHT-14) at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, West Hackberry, Louisiana, site on February 7, 2013. The Board’s responsibilities have been completed with respect to this investigation. The analysis and the identification of the direct cause, root causes, contributing causes, and judgments of need resulting from this investigation were performed in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 225.1B, Accident Investigations.

292

Scrubbing of contaminants from contaminated air streams with aerogel materials with optional photocatalytic destruction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method for separating a vaporous or gaseous contaminant from an air stream contaminated therewith. This method includes the steps of: (a) passing said contaminated air into a contact zone in which is disposed an aerogel material capable of selecting adsorbing said contaminant from air and therein contacting said contaminated air with an aerogel material; and (b) withdrawing from said zone, air depleted of said contaminant. For present purposes, "contaminant" means a material not naturally occurring in ambient air and/or a material naturally occurring in air but present at a concentration above that found in ambient air. Thus, the present invention scrubs (or treats) air for the purpose of returning it to its ambient composition. Also disclosed herein is a process for the photocatalytic destruction of contaminants from an air stream wherein the contaminated air stream is passed into a control cell or contact zone in which is disposed a photocatalytic aerogel and exposing said aerogel to ultraviolet (UV) radiation for photocatalytically destroying the adsorbed contaminant, and withdrawing from said cell an exhaust air stream depleted in said contaminant.

Attia, Yosry A. (221 Oakland Park Ave., Columbus, OH 43214)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Pasteurization of naturally contaminated water with solar energy.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...naturally contaminated water with solar energy. D A Ciochetti R H Metcalf A solar...investigate the potential of using solar energy to pasteurize naturally contaminated...naturally contaminated water with solar energy. | A solar box cooker (SBC...

D A Ciochetti; R H Metcalf

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Removal of Contaminants from Soils by Electric Fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...CONTAMINANTS FROM GROUNDWATER, GROUND WATER MONITORING AND REMEDIATION 6 : 85 ( 1986 ). SEGALL...electrode pairs placed in the ground. The contaminants in a liquid...be classified as ubiquitous ground-water contaminants (7). These...

Ronald F. Probstein; R. Edwin Hicks

1993-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

295

Chemistry of fluid inclusions in halite from the Salina group of the Michigan basin: Implications for Late Silurian seawater and the origin of sedimentary brines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluid was extracted from 18 fluid inclusions in halite of the Late Silurian Salina Group exposed in the Crystal Mine on the outskirts of Detroit, Michigan. Compared with modern seawater evaporated to the same degree, the inclusion fluids are severely depleted in SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}, somewhat depleted in Na{sup +} and Mg{sup +2}, and greatly enriched in Ca{sup +2}. The composition of the inclusion fluids can be derived from Silurian seawater with a composition close to that of modern seawater, if it is assumed that the composition of the Silurian seawater was modified by dolomitizing CaCO{sub 3}-rich sediments and by albitizing silicate minerals during its evolution into evaporite brines. Since the evolution of the brines involved a number of chemical reactions, it is impossible to recover the initial concentration of all of the major ions in the parent Silurian seawater from the composition of the inclusion fluids alone. It is likely, however, that the m{sub K+}/m{sub Br-} ratio and the functions in Late Silurian seawater had values close to those of modern seawater. Measurements of the isotopic composition of sulfur and of Sr in anhydrite within and associated with the halite host of the fluid inclusions are consistent with previous measurements of {delta}{sup 34}S in Silurian marine anhydrites and with the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios of Late Silurian marine carbonates.

Das, N.; Horita, J.; Holland, H.D. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Assessing inhalation exposure from airborne soil contaminants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of estimation of inhalation exposure to airborne soil contaminants is presented. this method is derived from studies of airborne soil particles with radioactive tags. The concentration of contaminants in air (g/m{sup 3}) can be derived from the product of M, the suspended respirable dust mass concentration (g/m{sup 3}), S, the concentration of contaminant in the soil (g/g), and E{sub f}, an enhancement factor. Typical measurement methods and values of M, and E{sub f} are given along with highlights of experiences with this method.

Shinn, J.H.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

due to patchy brine-CO2 saturation .... Case 4: A brine saturated sample with a fractal frame and ..... foods, groundwater flow and contamination among others.

santos

298

Acoustics in Porous Media. - Department of Mathematics, Purdue ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Case 4: A brine saturated sample with a fractal frame and ... Brine saturated medium with fractures. 2. .... groundwater flow and contamination among others.

robiel

299

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance to EMS care providers for properly handling and packaging potentially radiologically contaminated patients. This procedure applies to Emergency Medical Service care providers who respond to a radioactive material transportation incident that involves potentially contaminated injuries. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient.docx More Documents & Publications Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

300

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Accident Investigation of the August 21, 2012, Contamination...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

August 21, 2012, Contamination Incident at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Accident Investigation of the August 21, 2012, Contamination...

302

Microbial Reduction of Intragrain U(VI) in Contaminated Sediment...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Intragrain U(VI) in Contaminated Sediment. Microbial Reduction of Intragrain U(VI) in Contaminated Sediment. Abstract: The accessibility of precipitated, intragrain U(VI) in a...

303

Oilfields of the World. Third edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This third edition (updated to 1984) covers all of the world's major producing areas (both onshore and offshore) on six continents. It offers essential geologic, reserves, and production data on 13 nations that have become commercial oil producers in the last five years: Benin, Cameroon, Congo Republic, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Sudan, Zaire, Greece, The Phillippines, Sharjah, Thailand, Guatemala, and Surinam. Numerous maps display the geologic details of each area. This book also contains full-color maps of the oil and gas fields of the North Sea, Persian Gulf, Mexico, Venezuela, and Brazil.

Tiratsoo, E.N.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Rangely Oilfield Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Date: Well Name: Location: Depth: Initial Flow Rate: "fa" is not declared as a valid unit of measurement for this property. The given value was not understood. Flow Test...

305

Batteries from Brine  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Low-temp geothermal technologies are meeting a growing demand for strategic materials in clean manufacturing.

306

Desalination: Freezing out Brine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... PLANS for a large experimental desalination plant to be built at Ipswich are being considered by the government, Lord Kennet, ... by repeated condensation. This method has been adopted by several countries which have embarked on desalination programmes, but its economic viability has often been questioned. The power consumed by the ...

1970-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

307

Bioaugmentation of TNT-contaminated soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbial transformation of trinitrotoluene (TNT) in phics. contaminated soil was investigated in this research. A Bacillus sp., isolated from soil obtained from an army ammunition facility, was used to enhance the rate of TNT removal over a 360 day...

Bokelmann, Annamarie

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Re-Emergence of Emerging Contaminants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Incredibly, these companies are exempt from scrutiny under the Safe Drinking Water Act by congressional edict in 2005, even though fracking wells penetrate through drinking water aquifers. ... Faulty well casings may allow direct contamination of aquifer units with these chemicals. ...

Jerald L. Schnoor

2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

309

Surfactant screening of diesel-contaminated soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At one installation, approximately 60,000 gal of No. 2 diesel fuel leaked into the subsurface environment, with contamination at depths of 6 to 34 m below the surface. Argonne National Laboratory was contracted to perform treatability studies for site remediation. The treatability studies focused on four separate phases: (1) leachability studies on the various contaminated soil borings, (2) air stripping studies, (3) bioremediation studies, and (4) surfactant screening/surfactant flooding studies. This paper summarizes the fourth phase of the research program in which twenty-one surfactants were screened for possible use to mobilize the organics from the contaminated soil prior to bioremediation. Anionic surfactants resulted in the greatest degree of diesel mobilization. The most promising surfactants will be employed on actual contaminated soil samples obtained from the site. 18 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

Peters, R.W.; Montemagno, C.D.; Shem, L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Lewis, B.A. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Guide to treatment technology for contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a guide for the screening of alternative treatment technologies for contaminated soils. The contents of this guide are organized into: 1. Introduction, II. Utilizing the table, III. Tables: Contamination Versus Technology, TV. Contaminant Waste Groups, and V. References. The four Contaminations Versus Technology tables are designed to identify the effectiveness and/or potential applicability of technologies to some or all compounds within specific waste groups. The tables also present limitations and special use considerations for the particular treatment technology. The phase of development of the technology is also included in the table. The phases are: Available, Innovative, and Emerging technologies. The technologies presented in this guide are organized according to the method of treatment. The four (4) treatment methods are Biological, Solidification/Stabilization, Thermal, and Chemical/Physical Treatment. There are several processing methods; some are well developed and proven, and others are in the development stage.

Tran, H.; Aylward, R.

1992-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

311

Cross-Contamination of Crops in Horticulture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Like cross-contamination, coexistence is not new to horticulture. However, the advent of GM crops ... very far, whereas canola-rapeseed pollen is light and can travel long distances. There is...

Prof. Dane Scott

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

GIS Techniques for Mapping Groundwater Contamination Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The groundwater contamination risk map of a samplealluvial area was produced by using the IlwisGeographical Information System (GIS) to construct andto overlay thematic maps. The risk map has beenderived from the...

Daniela Ducci

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Estimating exposure of terrestrial wildlife to contaminants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes generalized models for the estimation of contaminant exposure experienced by wildlife on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The primary exposure pathway considered is oral ingestion, e.g. the consumption of contaminated food, water, or soil. Exposure through dermal absorption and inhalation are special cases and are not considered hereIN. Because wildlife mobile and generally consume diverse diets and because environmental contamination is not spatial homogeneous, factors to account for variation in diet, movement, and contaminant distribution have been incorporated into the models. To facilitate the use and application of the models, life history parameters necessary to estimate exposure are summarized for 15 common wildlife species. Finally, to display the application of the models, exposure estimates were calculated for four species using data from a source operable unit on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Assessment of Remedial Actions for Contaminated Sites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the investigation in the field of remedial actions on contaminated land, an appropriate concept ... site, an evaluation of the existing alternative remedial techniques is necessary. The comparative evaluat...

Th. Neteler; H. L. Jessberger

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Contaminated Aquatic Ecosystems Restoration: A Case Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We use Decision Analysis methods to rank intervention strategies after contamination by radionuclides of an aquatic ecosystem. We assume certainty since the validation of models used to quantify impacts of cou...

E. Gallego; S. Ríos-Insua; A. Mateos; D. Ríos Insua

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

31 - 15040 of 31,917 results. 31 - 15040 of 31,917 results. Download CX-005658: Categorical Exclusion Determination International Colloquium on Environmentally Preferred Advanced Power Generation - ICEPAG 2011 CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 04/28/2011 Location(s): Irvine, California Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005658-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005649: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 04/27/2011 Location(s): Choctaw, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005649-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005623: Categorical Exclusion Determination

317

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.7 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

May 17, 2011 May 17, 2011 CX-006719: Categorical Exclusion Determination Casing Drilling Test CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B3.7, B5.12 Date: 05/17/2011 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC April 29, 2011 CX-005662: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Use of Scrap Tires for Oil Well Stimulation CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 04/29/2011 Location(s): Upper Falls, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 27, 2011 CX-005649: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 04/27/2011 Location(s): Choctaw, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 20, 2011 CX-006721: Categorical Exclusion Determination Permanent Borehole Array

318

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9, 2010 9, 2010 CX-004278: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of the Triassic Newark Basin of New York and New Jersey for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 10/19/2010 Location(s): Clarkstown, New York Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory October 19, 2010 CX-004275: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 10/19/2010 Location(s): Yale, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory October 18, 2010 CX-004292: Categorical Exclusion Determination Small Scale Electrical Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Process Water Utilized in a Mining Operation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6

319

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.7 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 24, 2010 August 24, 2010 CX-003613: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geothermal Energy Exploration Study CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.7 Date: 08/24/2010 Location(s): King County, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office August 17, 2010 CX-003403: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.7 Date: 08/17/2010 Location(s): Twin Falls, Idaho Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office August 11, 2010 CX-003385: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 08/11/2010 Location(s): Bartlesville, Oklahoma

320

FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

12, 2011 12, 2011 CX-005607: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 7 Roof Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.16 Date: 04/12/2011 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 12, 2011 CX-005606: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install Metal Jacketing, Insulation, and Safety Labels CX(s) Applied: B1.5 Date: 04/12/2011 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 12, 2011 CX-005612: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B3.7 Date: 04/12/2011 Location(s): Ellery, New York Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9, 2010 9, 2010 CX-004275: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 10/19/2010 Location(s): Yale, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory October 18, 2010 CX-004292: Categorical Exclusion Determination Small Scale Electrical Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Process Water Utilized in a Mining Operation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 10/18/2010 Location(s): Reno, Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office October 18, 2010 CX-004290: Categorical Exclusion Determination Greenfield Community College - Geothermal Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 10/18/2010 Location(s): Massachusetts Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

322

FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

28, 2011 28, 2011 CX-005653: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot-Scale Testing Evaluating the Effects of Bromine Additions on Continuous Mercury Monitors at Low Mercury Concentrations CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 04/28/2011 Location(s): Grand Forks, North Dakota Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 27, 2011 CX-005649: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 04/27/2011 Location(s): Choctaw, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 19, 2011 CX-005638: Categorical Exclusion Determination Extended Pilot-Scale Testing of the Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne Compact Reformer CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/19/2011

323

FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

11, 2010 11, 2010 CX-003386: Categorical Exclusion Determination Radiocarbon As a Reactive Tracer for Tracking Permanent Carbon Dioxide Storage in Basaltic Rocks CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 08/11/2010 Location(s): Palisades, New York Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 11, 2010 CX-003385: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 08/11/2010 Location(s): Bartlesville, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 9, 2010 CX-003288: Categorical Exclusion Determination Site Wide Fire Water Loop Installation CX(s) Applied: B2.3, B2.5 Date: 08/09/2010 Location(s): Albany, Oregon Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

324

FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

20, 2010 20, 2010 CX-004268: Categorical Exclusion Determination Scale-Up of Hydrogen Transport Membranes CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/20/2010 Location(s): Boulder, Colorado Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory October 19, 2010 CX-004274: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 10/19/2010 Location(s): Blackwell, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory October 19, 2010 CX-004277: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of the Triassic Newark Basin of New York and New Jersey for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 10/19/2010 Location(s): Clarkstown, New York Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

325

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

41 - 15050 of 31,917 results. 41 - 15050 of 31,917 results. Download CX-003385: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 08/11/2010 Location(s): Bartlesville, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003385-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002500: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Northern Great Plains Water Consortium: Subtask 5.2, Budget Period 3 CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 06/02/2010 Location(s): Grand Forks, North Dakota Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002500-categorical-exclusion-determination Rebate KRS Chapter 278: Natural Gas (Kentucky)

326

A petroleum contaminated soil bioremediation facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The amount of petroleum contaminated soil (PCS) at the Savannah River site (SRS) that has been identified, excavated and is currently in storage has increased several fold during the last few years. Several factors have contributed to this problem: (1) South Carolina Department of Health ad Environmental control (SCDHEC) lowered the sanitary landfill maximum concentration for total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in the soil from 500 to 100 parts per million (ppm), (2) removal and replacement of underground storage tanks at several sites, (3) most recently SCDHEC disallowed aeration for treatment of contaminated soil, and (4) discovery of several very large contaminated areas of soil associated with leaking underground storage tanks (LUST), leaking pipes, disposal areas, and spills. Thus, SRS has an urgent need to remediate large quantities of contaminated soil that are currently stockpiled and the anticipated contaminated soils to be generated from accidental spills. As long as we utilize petroleum based compounds at the site, we will continue to generate contaminated soil that will require remediation.

Lombard, K.; Hazen, T.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Factors impacting contaminant body burdens and contaminant effects at different trophic levels in an estuarine ecosystem.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Organic contaminants continue to enter coastal ecosystems, creating stress for animals that inhabit these areas. A variety of factors such as land use, climate, and… (more)

Hopper, Tiffany L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

An integrated experimental and numerical study: Developing a reaction transport model that couples chemical reactions of mineral dissolution/precipitation with spatial and temporal flow variations in CO2/brine/rock systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: Generate and characterize mineral dissolution/precipitation reactions in supercritical CO2/brine/rock systems under pressure-temperature-chemistry conditions resembling CO2injection into EGS. Characterize three-dimensional spatial and temporal distributions of rock structures subject to mineral dissolution/precipitation processes by X-ray tomography, SEM imaging, and Microprobe analysis.

329

Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine and Trace Metal Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer, Version 2.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) consists of 5 U.S DOE national laboratories collaborating to develop a framework for predicting the risks associated with carbon sequestration. The approach taken by NRAP is to divide the system into components, including injection target reservoirs, wellbores, natural pathways including faults and fractures, groundwater and the atmosphere. Next, develop a detailed, physics and chemistry-based model of each component. Using the results of the detailed models, develop efficient, simplified models, termed reduced order models (ROM) for each component. Finally, integrate the component ROMs into a system model that calculates risk profiles for the site. This report details the development of the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer at PNNL. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer uses a Wellbore Leakage ROM developed at LANL as input. The detailed model, using the STOMP simulator, covers a 5x8 km area of the Edwards Aquifer near San Antonio, Texas. The model includes heterogeneous hydraulic properties, and equilibrium, kinetic and sorption reactions between groundwater, leaked CO2 gas, brine, and the aquifer carbonate and clay minerals. Latin Hypercube sampling was used to generate 1024 samples of input parameters. For each of these input samples, the STOMP simulator was used to predict the flux of CO2 to the atmosphere, and the volume, length and width of the aquifer where pH was less than the MCL standard, and TDS, arsenic, cadmium and lead exceeded MCL standards. In order to decouple the Wellbore Leakage ROM from the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM, the response surface was transformed to replace Wellbore Leakage ROM input parameters with instantaneous and cumulative CO2 and brine leakage rates. The most sensitive parameters proved to be the CO2 and brine leakage rates from the well, with equilibrium coefficients for calcite and dolomite, as well as the number of illite and kaolinite sorption sites proving to be of secondary importance. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM was developed using nonlinear regression to fit the response surface with a quadratic polynomial. The goodness of fit was excellent for the CO2 flux to the atmosphere, and very good for predicting the volumes of groundwater exceeding the pH, TDS, As, Cd and Pb threshold values.

Bacon, Diana H.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Method of producing hydrogen, and rendering a contaminated biomass inert  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for rendering a contaminated biomass inert includes providing a first composition, providing a second composition, reacting the first and second compositions together to form an alkaline hydroxide, providing a contaminated biomass feedstock and reacting the alkaline hydroxide with the contaminated biomass feedstock to render the contaminated biomass feedstock inert and further producing hydrogen gas, and a byproduct that includes the first composition.

Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

331

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance to EMS care providers for properly handling and packaging potentially radiologically contaminated patients. This procedure applies to Emergency Medical Service care providers who respond to a radioactive material transportation incident that involves potentially contaminated injuries. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient.docx More Documents & Publications Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response

332

DOE/EA-1482: Environmental Assessment for Pilot Experiment for Geological Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide in Saline Aquifer Brine Formations (October 2003)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

82 82 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PILOT EXPERIMENT FOR GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN SALINE AQUIFER BRINE FORMATIONS FRIO FORMATION, LIBERTY COUNTY, TEXAS OCTOBER 2003 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY ii iii National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to provide funds for a field test of the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) at The University of Texas at Austin, under contract with DOE, has studied the potential for sequestration of CO 2 in geologic formations of the United States as part of a broader series of DOE-sponsored research projects to

333

A Comparison of the Corrosion Resistance of Iron-Based Amorphous Metals and Austenitic Alloys in Synthetic Brines at Elevated Temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several hard, corrosion-resistant and neutron-absorbing iron-based amorphous alloys have now been developed that can be applied as thermal spray coatings. These new alloys include relatively high concentrations of Cr, Mo, and W for enhanced corrosion resistance, and substantial B to enable both glass formation and neutron absorption. The corrosion resistances of these novel alloys have been compared to that of several austenitic alloys in a broad range of synthetic brines, with and without nitrate inhibitor, at elevated temperature. Linear polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy have been used for in situ measurement of corrosion rates for prolonged periods of time, while scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) have been used for ex situ characterization of samples at the end of tests. The application of these new coatings for the protection of spent nuclear fuel storage systems, equipment in nuclear service, steel-reinforced concrete will be discussed.

Farmer, J C

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

334

Remediation of water contamination using catalytic technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Remediation of contaminated ground and underground water is becoming a critical issue in Europe and worldwide. We discuss here the role of catalysis in water remediation, with reference to two specific examples of catalytic water remediation technologies: (i) the elimination of nitrate and pesticides from water contaminated as a result of agricultural practices and (ii) the conversion of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in contaminated underground water. Of particular interest is a technology based on catalytic membranes for remediation of water contaminated by nitrate, which offers various advantages with respect to conventional technologies. Using a Pd-Cu-based catalytic membrane, a reaction temperature below 15 °C, a mixed 4:1 CO2:H2 feed and controlling bulk solution pH by \\{HCl\\} addition, it is possible to obtain a nitrate conversion higher than 80% even with ammonium ion formation below 0.5 ppm, i.e. the maximum concentration allowed to meet the requirements for drinking water quality. In MTBE conversion in contaminated underground water, acid zeolites with suitable pore structures (channel structure and pore openings) such as H-ZSM-5 and H-BEA can be used as catalytic permeable reactive barriers for in situ remediation. These zeolites not only act as adsorbents for both MTBE and its reaction products, but also effectively catalyze the hydrolysis of MTBE to t-butyl alcohol (TBA) and methanol (MeOH) which then can be rapidly biodegraded by indigenous microorganisms.

Gabriele Centi; Siglinda Perathoner

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 5, Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of gas and brine migration for undisturbed performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Before disposing of transuranic radioactive waste in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) must evaluate compliance with applicable long-term regulations of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Sandia National Laboratories is conducting iterative performance assessments (PAs) of the WIPP for the DOE to provide interim guidance while preparing for a final compliance evaluation. This volume of the 1992 PA contains results of uncertainty and sensitivity analyses with respect to migration of gas and brine from the undisturbed repository. Additional information about the 1992 PA is provided in other volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of WIPP PA and results of a preliminary comparison with 40 CFR 191, Subpart B. Volume 2 describes the technical basis for the performance assessment, including descriptions of the linked computational models used in the Monte Carlo analyses. Volume 3 contains the reference data base and values for input parameters used in consequence and probability modeling. Volume 4 contains uncertainty and sensitivity analyses with respect to the EPA`s Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191, Subpart B). Finally, guidance derived from the entire 1992 PA is presented in Volume 6. Results of the 1992 uncertainty and sensitivity analyses indicate that, conditional on the modeling assumptions and the assigned parameter-value distributions, the most important parameters for which uncertainty has the potential to affect gas and brine migration from the undisturbed repository are: initial liquid saturation in the waste, anhydrite permeability, biodegradation-reaction stoichiometry, gas-generation rates for both corrosion and biodegradation under inundated conditions, and the permeability of the long-term shaft seal.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE FOR THE NFSS CENTRAL DRAINAGE DITCH DECEMBER 1986 Prepared for UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OAK RIDGE OPERATIONS OFFICE Under Contract No. DE-AC05-81OR20722 By Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 I 1.0 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY 1.1 OBJECTIVE AND SCOPE The objective of this report is to describe the methodology used for establishing a supplemental residual contamination guideline for the NFSS vicinity property known as the Central Drainage Ditch (CDD). Supplemental guidelines may exceed authorized guidelines if the resultant dose will not exceed the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr (Ref. 1). This evaluation is based on realistic exposure pathways that were

337

Historic contamination along Oakland Inner Harbor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the ongoing remedial investigations (RI) at the Navy`s fleet and Industrial Supply Center, Oakland (FISCO)-Alameda Facility/Alameda Annex (the facility), FISC Oakland, and NAS Alameda, the presence of widespread historic chemical contaminants along the interface between the fill material and the former marshland deposits has been discovered. The historic contaminants are believed to have accumulated within the marshland areas prior to the filling activities along the Oakland Inner Harbor. The historic contaminants consist of heavy petroleum hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), apparently generated by the former industries in the area. Three solid waste management units (SWMUs) and eight areas of concern ( AOCs) were identified at the facility. Three SWMUs and 1 AOC were recommended for site investigations as high-priority.

Bird, J.C. [Versar, Inc. Alameda, CA (United States); Shafer, D.L. [PRC Environmental Management, Inc,. Rancho Cordova, CA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Contaminant trap for gas-insulated apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A contaminant trap for a gas-insulated electrical conductor is provided. A resinous dielectric body such as Kel-F wax, grease or other sticky polymeric or oligomeric compound is disposed on the inside wall of the outer housing for the conductor. The resinous body is sufficiently sticky at ambient temperatures to immobilize contaminant particles in the insulating gas on the exposed surfaces thereof. An electric resistance heating element is disposed in the resinous body to selectively raise the temperature of the resinous body to a molten state so that the contaminant particles collected on the surface of the body sink into the body so that the surface of the resinous body is renewed to a particle-less condition and, when cooled, returns to a sticky collecting surface.

Adcock, James L. (Knoxville, TN); Pace, Marshall O. (Knoxville, TN); Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FC26-04NT42098 FC26-04NT42098 Clean Tech Innovations, LLC FE 2010 Project SCNGO 2010 Gary Covatch July 1, 2010 - June 1, 2011 Bartlesville, OK Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil - Field Testing Part II The objective of this project is to simplify the application of a new technology for remediation and re-vegetation of brine contaminated soils and to field demonstrate the technology. 07 12 2010 Gary Covatch Digitally signed by Gary Covatch DN: cn=Gary Covatch, o=NETL, ou=SCNGO, email=gary.covatch@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2010.07.12 08:33:14 -04'00' 8 11 2010 john ganz Digitally signed by john ganz DN: cn=john ganz, o=NETL- DOE, ou=140 OPFC, email=john.ganz@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2010.08.11 15:44:37 -04'00' This CX is for Laboratory analysis only, no field tests or sampling.

340

Removing dissolved inorganic contaminants from water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the physicochemical treatment processes typically used to remove the more common inorganic contaminants from water and wastewater. These are precipitation, coprecipitation, adsorption, ion exchange, membrane separations by reverse osmosis and electrodialysis, and combinations of these processes. The general criteria for process selection are discussed, and the processes and their typical applications are described.

Clifford, D.; Subramonian, S.; Sorg, T.J.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Application of Waves for Remediation of Contaminated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Hydrodynamics, Novosibirsk, 630090, Russia, and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pearlstone Center was designed mainly to provide a qualitative assessment (i.e., changes in pressure due to the propagating wave domestic and/or industrial spills, and contamination due to the mishandling of oil products. Restoration

Gross, Amit

342

Potential Carcinogenicity of Food Additives and Contaminants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Carcinogenicity of Food Additives and Contaminants 1...as a result of the manufacturing process used; an example...Specifi cations of food additives are of immense significance...use of DES as a food additive for cattle. I am unable...occupational hazards from manufacturing these materials even...

Philippe Shubik

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Active airborne contamination control using electrophoresis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In spite of our best efforts, radioactive airborne contamination continues to be a formidable problem at many of the Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex sites. For workers that must enter areas with high levels of airborne contamination, personnel protective equipment (PPE) can become highly restrictive, greatly diminishing productivity. Rather than require even more restrictive PPE for personnel in some situations, the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is actively researching and developing methods to aggressively combat airborne contamination hazards using electrophoretic technology. With appropriate equipment, airborne particulates can be effectively removed and collected for disposal in one simple process. The equipment needed to implement electrophoresis is relatively inexpensive, highly reliable, and very compact. Once airborne contamination levels are reduced, less PPE is required and a significant cost savings may be realized through decreased waste and maximized productivity. Preliminary ``cold,`` or non-radioactive, testing results at the RFP have shown the technology to be effective on a reasonable scale, with several potential benefits and an abundance of applications.

Veatch, B.D.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Review Paper/ Biodegradation in Contaminated Aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) in the treatment of ground water contamination, particularly for hydrocarbons (for reviews, see Christensen et al of biologically reactive compounds in ground water has been an area of intense study in recent decades. Much through an engineering approach. Many ground water scientists have used geochemical methods, targeting

345

Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Full Document and...

346

Method to Remove Uranium/Vanadium Contamination from Groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

Metzler, Donald R.; Morrison Stanley

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

347

Analysis of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Analysis of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Analysis of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction Wells at the Tuba...

348

Microsoft Word - NGNP_Contamination Control Report-050108 FINAL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

94 NGNP-NHS 50-CC Contamination Control 8 of 101 NGNP-Contamination Control Report-050108.doc 2008 Westinghouse Electric Company LLC LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1-1...

349

Taking It from Brown to Green: Renewable Energy on Contaminated...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Taking It from Brown to Green: Renewable Energy on Contaminated Lands Taking It from Brown to Green: Renewable Energy on Contaminated Lands U.S. Department of Energy Office of...

350

Chemistry of Metal Contaminants in Water Project at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry of Metal Contaminants in Water Chemistry of Metal Contaminants in Water BylaskaZinc.jpg A plot of difference electron density of a Zn2++6H2O250H2O system from AIMDMM...

351

Recommendation 195: Mitigation of Contamination in Bear Creek Burial Grounds  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The ORSSAB requests DOE provide possible remedial actions to mitigate releases of contamination from Bear Creek Burial Grounds.

352

DTECTEUR DE CONTAMINATION RADIOACTIVE Par M. BRIRE et J. WEILL,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

623. D�TECTEUR DE CONTAMINATION RADIOACTIVE Par M. BRI�RE et J. WEILL, Division des Constructions rapidement sur leurs mains, chaussures et vêtements toute trace de contamination. Le principe utilisé permet'utilisation. LE JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE ET LE RADIUM. TOME 14, NOVEMBRE 1953, , Le détecteur de contamination

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

353

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

06-97 06-97 February 1997 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 March 2002 Reaffirmation with Errata August 2002 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Reaffirmation with Errata DOE-HDBK-1106-97 Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research

354

Fate and Exposure Modeling of Environmental Contaminants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fate and Exposure Modeling of Environmental Contaminants Fate and Exposure Modeling of Environmental Contaminants Speaker(s): Mathew MacLeod Date: June 29, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Thomas McKone Chemical products pervade modern society, and furnish unprecedented wealth and comfort to citizens of countries with industrialized economies. Demand for products such as pesticides, industrial chemicals, flame-retardants and additives for consumer products requires large scale production and distribution of these chemicals, and they are inevitably released into the environment. Responsible management of chemicals therefore requires a quantitative understanding of amounts released, how the chemicals partition and travel in the environment, and how they might expose and thus adversely affect human and ecological populations. This

355

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 of 3) 2 of 3) Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research Instructor's Guide Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy February 1997 DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Table of Contents Page DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - Course/Lesson Plan.............................. 1 Standardized Core Course Materials................................................... 1 Course Goal.........................................................................1 Target Audience.................................................................. 1 Course Description............................................................... 1 Prerequisites...................................................................... 1

356

Purifying contaminated water. [DOE patent application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Process is presented for removing biorefactory compounds from contaminated water (e.g., oil shale retort waste-water) by contacting same with fragmented raw oil shale. Biorefractory removal is enhanced by preactivating the oil shale with at least one member of the group of carboxylic acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, ethers, amines, amides, sulfoxides, mixed ether-esters and nitriles. Further purification is obtained by stripping, followed by biodegradation and removal of the cells.

Daughton, C.G.

1981-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

357

Diamond Shaving of Contaminated Concrete Surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decommissioning and decontamination of existing facilities presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of surface contamination from concrete floors and walls while eliminating the spread of contamination and volumetric reduction of the waste stream. Numerous methods have been tried with a varying degree of success. Recent technology has made this goal achievable and has been used successfully. This new technology is the Diamond Floor Shaver and Diamond Wall shaver. The Diamond Floor Shaver is a self-propelled, walk behind machine that literally shaves the contaminated concrete surface to specified depths. This is accomplished by using a patented system of 100 dry cutting diamond blades with offset diamond segments that interlock to provide complete shaving of the concrete surface. Grooves are eliminated which allows for a direct frisk reading to analyze results. When attached to an appropriate size vacuum, the dust produced is 100% contained. Dust is collected in drums ready for disposition and disposal. The waste produced in shaving 7,500 square feet at 1/8 inch thickness would fill a single 55 gallon drum. Production is dependent on depth of shaving but averages 100 square feet per hour. The wall shaver uses the same patented diamond drum and blades but is hydraulically driven and is deployed using a robotic arm allowing its operation to be to totally remote. It can reach ceilings as high as 20 feet. Numerous small projects were successfully completed using this technology. Large scale deployment came in 2003. Bluegrass, in conjunction with Bartlett Services, deployed this technology to support decontamination activities for closing of the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons site. Up to six floor shavers and one wall shaver were deployed in buildings B371 and B374. These buildings had up to one half-inch, fixed plutonium and beryllium contamination. Hundred-thousands of square feet of floors and walls were shaved successfully to depths of up to one half inch. Decontamination efforts were so successful the balance of the buildings could be demolished using conventional methods. The shavers helped keep the project on schedule while the vacuum system eliminated the potential for contaminants becoming airborne.

Mullen, Lisa K. [Bluegrass Concrete Cutting Inc., 107 Mildred Street PO Box 427, Greenville, Alabama 36037 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Session 21: Disposal of Flashed Brine Dosed with CaCO3 Scale Inhibitor: What Happens When the Inhibitor is Exhausted?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inhibited, flashed brine is thermodynamically poised to deposit CaCO{sub 3}. Eventually the scale inhibitor will be overcome by dilution in native reservoir fluid, sorption on rocks, slow overgrowth of CaCO{sub 3}, decomposition, or some combination of processes. Consequences to the reservoir which receives the fluid apparently have not been previously explored. However, Huff-Puff tests (monitored backflow of injected tracers), carried out at East Mesa in the summer of 1983, have provided a starting point for addressing the questions. An effective lifetime of about 14 hours is indicated for one inhibitor. Additionally, reactions between injected fluid and native resource fluid have been observed in two contexts: (1) the native fluid around the disposal well is the unflashed counterpart of the injectate; (2) the native fluid around the disposal well is chemically distinct from the injectate and from its unflashed counterpart. In the two cases investigated, situation (1) yielded significant reaction (deposition of CaCO{sub 3}) whereas, situation (2) appeared unreactive. These outcomes have important implications regarding the mechanics of reservoir management for long-term electricity production.

Michels, D.E.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE's Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil March 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. An aerial view of Hanford's D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil March 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. An aerial view of Hanford's D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River.

362

Salinity controls on trophic interactions among invertebrates and algae of solar evaporation ponds in the Mojave Desert and relation to shorebird foraging and selenium risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contamination (Cieminski and Flake The absence of Se in brine ?brine ?y larvae Ephy- dra cinerea Jones. Archives of Environmental Contaminationbrine shrimp tis- sue Se levels in the same range as those observed here, selenium contamination

Herbst, David B

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Carbonate Leaching of Uranium from Contaminated Soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uranium (U) was successfully removed from contaminated soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site near Fernald, Ohio. ... The concentrations of uranium and other metals in the effluent were analyzed using a Varian Liberty 200 inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrophotometer (ICP-AES) or a kinetic phosphorescence analyzer (KPA). ... When 30% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was added prior to the carbonate solution, no increase in the removal of uranium was detected (data not shown) due to effervescence with heating, liberating carbon dioxide, and thus preventing uniform distribution of H2O2. ...

C. F. V. Mason; W. R. J. R. Turney; B. M. Thomson; N. Lu; P. A. Longmire; C. J. Chisholm-Brause

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

Long Length Contaminated Equipment Maintenance Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide the maintenance requirements of the Long Length Contaminated Equipment (LLCE) trailers and provide a basis for the maintenance frequencies selected. This document is applicable to the LLCE Receiver trailer and Transport trailer assembled by Mobilized Systems Inc. (MSI). Equipment used in conjunction with, or in support of, these trailers is not included. This document does not provide the maintenance requirements for checkout and startup of the equipment following the extended lay-up status which began in the mid 1990s. These requirements will be specified in other documentation.

ESVELT, C.A.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated wastes are discussed in this overview in terms of two components of hazard: radiobiological hazard, and radioecological hazard. Radiobiological hazard refers to human uptake of alpha-emitters by inhalation and ingestion, and the resultant dose to critical organs of the body. Radioecological hazard refers to the processes of release from buried wastes, transport in the environment, and translocation to man through the food chain. Besides detailing the sources and magnitude of hazards, this brief review identifies the uncertainties in their estimation, and implications for the regulatory process.

Rodgers, J.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Results of Performance Assessments 34.A.1 BACKGROUND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of contaminated brine from the WIPP repository in the subsurface environment beyond the 1 The "controlled area

367

Mobilization of a trapped non-wetting fluid from a three-dimensional porous medium Sujit S. Datta, T. S. Ramakrishnan, and David A. Weitz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

situations ranging from the spreading of contaminants in groundwater aquifers to the storage of CO2 in brine

368

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Located on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the RoMIC-AFRI was established to protect water resources by addressing the challenge of preventing contamination. The initiative at Oak Ridge is a collaborative effort that leverages DOE investments in basic science and applied research and the work of site contractors to address the complex challenges in the remediation of legacy waste at the Oak Ridge Reservation. The mission of the Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants

369

Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford’s largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford's largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford's largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers supporting groundwater cleanup for EM's

370

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments The Deep Vadose Zone - Applied Field Research Initiative has partnered with the Vadose Zone Journal to bring together a special section of the recent issue (November 2012). The section was prepared in association with the Deep Vadose Zone - Applied Field Research Initiative-led symposium at the annual American Chemical Society meeting on "Understanding Behavior and Fate of Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments." The section consists of 12 papers which present novel approaches to characterize, monitor, remediate, and predict the transport and fate of contaminants in vadose zone environments, many of which highlight recent work at the Hanford site. Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments

371

Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 4 Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study Schematic of soil-gas and contaminant transport into a slab-on-grade building at a former service station site. Three effects are illustrated that can contribute to reducing the amount of contaminant available for entry into the building: biodegradation by soil microorganisms; a layer of soil that limits diffusive movement of the contaminant; and wind-driven ventilation of the soil below the building. Not illustrated are the effects of ventilation on contaminant concentrations inside the building. The transport of soil-gas-borne contaminants into buildings has been documented as a significant source of human exposure to some pollutants indoors; one example is radon, which has received widespread public

372

Total effective dose equivalent associated with fixed uranium surface contamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the technical basis for establishing a uranium fixed-contamination action level, a fixed uranium surface contamination level exceeding the total radioactivity values of Appendix D of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, part 835 (10CFR835), but below which the monitoring, posting, and control requirements for Radiological Areas are not required for the area of the contamination. An area of fixed uranium contamination between 1,000 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} and that level corresponding to an annual total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) of 100 mrem requires only routine monitoring, posting to alert personnel of the contamination, and administrative control. The more extensive requirements for monitoring, posting, and control designated by 10CFR835 for Radiological Areas do not have to be applied for these intermediate fixed-contamination levels.

Bogard, J.S.; Hamm, R.N.; Ashley, J.C.; Turner, J.E.; England, C.A.; Swenson, D.E.; Brown, K.S.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

In-situ remediation system and method for contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for removing volatile contaminants from a subsurface plume of contamination comprising two sets of wells, a well for injecting a fluid into a saturated zone on one side of the plume and an extracting well for collecting the fluid together with volatilized contaminants from the plume on the other side of the plume. The fluid enables the volatile contaminants to be volatilized and carried therewith through the ground to the extracting well. Injecting and extracting wells are preferably horizontal wells positioned below the plume in the saturated zone and above the plume in the vadose zone, respectively. The fluid may be air or other gas or a gas and liquid mixture depending on the type of contaminant to be removed and may be preheated to facilitate volatilization. Treatment of the volatilized contamination may be by filtration, incineration, atmospheric dispersion or the like. 3 figs.

Corey, J.C.; Looney, B.B.; Kaback, D.S.

1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

374

Treatment of Organic-Contaminated Wastewater by Pervaporation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TREATMENT OF ORGANIC-CONTAMINATED WASTEWATER BY PERVAPORATION J.G. WIJMANS J. KASCHEMEKAT R.W. BAKER V.L. SIMMONS Research Director Design Engineer President Marketing Director Membrane Technology and Research, Inc., Menlo Park, CA ABSTRACT...-CONTAMINATED WASTEWATER BY PERVAPORATION J.G. WIJMANS Research Director J. KASCHEMEKAT R.W. BAKER V.L. SIMMONS Design Engineer President Marketing Director Membrane Technology and Research, Inc., Menlo Park, CA ABSTRACT The removal and recovery of organic contaminants...

Wijmans, J. G.; Kaschemekat, J.; Baker, R. W.; Simmons, V. L.

375

T.G. Hinton: Remediation of Radioactively Contaminated Ecosystems...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

trucking of the contaminated sediments to another location. Relevant works Hinton, T. G., D. I. Kaplan, A. S. Knox and R. Sharitz. 2005. Phytoremediation potential of native...

376

Impacts of Ethanol in Gasoline on Subsurface Contamination.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The increasing use of ethanol as a gasoline additive has raised concerns over the potential impacts ethanol might have on groundwater contamination. In North America,… (more)

Freitas, Juliana Gardenalli de

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Hedgehog(tm) Water Contaminant Removal System - Energy Innovation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

recirculating treatment system reduces the levels of contaminants in water storage tanks. A recirculation pump continually sends water though a treatment in order to reduce...

378

Method and apparatus for destroying organic contaminants in aqueous liquids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for destroying organic contaminants, such as trichloroethylene, in aqueous liquids, such as groundwater, utilizing steam stripping integrated with biodegradation. The contaminated aqueous liquid is fed into a steam stripper causing the volatilization of essentially all of the organic contaminants and a portion of the aqueous liquid. The majority of the aqueous liquid is discharged from the steam stripper. The volatilized vapors are then condensed to the liquid phase and introduced into a bioreactor. The bioreactor contains methanotrophic microorganisms which convert the organic contaminants into mainly carbon dioxide. The effluent from the bioreactor is then recycled back to the steam stripper for further processing. 2 figures.

Donaldson, T.L.; Wilson, J.H.

1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

379

T.G. Hinton: Radioactive Contaminants in Terrestrial Ecosystems...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

largely in the Ukraine and Switzerland, this work has concentrated on the role of resuspension in the contamination of agricultural plants. Whereas other researchers have shown...

380

Feed gas contaminant removal in ion transport membrane systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An oxygen ion transport membrane process wherein a heated oxygen-containing gas having one or more contaminants is contacted with a reactive solid material to remove the one or more contaminants. The reactive solid material is provided as a deposit on a support. The one or more contaminant compounds in the heated oxygen-containing gas react with the reactive solid material. The contaminant-depleted oxygen-containing gas is contacted with a membrane, and oxygen is transported through the membrane to provide transported oxygen.

Underwood, Richard Paul (Allentown, PA); Makitka, III, Alexander (Hatfield, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Controls on arsenic mobility in contaminated wetland and riverbed streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arsenic mobility and transport in the environment are strongly influenced by associations with solid phases. This dissertation investigates the mechanisms affecting arsenic retention in contaminated wetland and riverbed ...

Keon, Nicole E. (Nicole Elise), 1974-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Microscopic Reactive Diffusion of Uranium in the Contaminated...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

States. Abstract: Microscopic and spectroscopic analysis of uranium-contaminated sediment cores beneath the BX waste tank farm at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford...

383

Water contamination and colloidal stability of motor oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water contamination of motor oils during storage and use in low- ... of additives worsens the performance properties of the motor oils.

S. V. Korneev; V. M. Dudkin; A. V. Kolunin

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

C l x C l x contaminant concentrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dioxins 41 legacy Pesticides (dieldrin, ddt, and chlordane) 47 summary Points 49 references 51 contaminants in sport fish, such as dioxins and organochlorine pesticides, the advice is driven

385

Surfactant-enhanced electrokinetic remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Concern over soil and groundwater contamination has created a demand for new and efficient remediation technologies. Surfactant-enhanced electrokinetic remediation is an innovative technique which has… (more)

Thomas, Steven P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Submitted to Risk Management of Contaminated Sediments -International Workshop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Venice International University, Island of San Servolo, Venice, Italy Contaminated Sediments) and the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has been investigating

Brookhaven National Laboratory

387

RESRAD Computer Code- Evaluation of Radioactively Contaminated Sites  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The evaluation of sites with radioactive contamination was a problem until the RESidual RADioactivity (RESRAD) Computer Code was first released in 1989.

388

Quantifying environmental risk of groundwater contaminated with volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Doctor of Philosophy%%%Water quality guidelines (WQGs) present concentrations of contaminants that are designed to be protective of aquatic ecosystems. In Australia, guidance for assessment of… (more)

Hunt, James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Information Only Withdrawal Boundary. Culebra transport releases had an inconsequential contribution to total  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, however. In order for this released volume of brine to be contaminated with waste, it is necessary that contaminated brine in the waste area migrate to the non-waste area prior to intrusion. Waste panels repository areas are located to the north. For waste-contaminated brine to be located in a non-waste area

390

Year Project Title USGS contact(s) Published paper, data source,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

information Keywords 1 2003-present Delineation of brine contamination in and near the East Poplar oil field_poplar/index.html Project assesses brine contamination to the shallow aquifers and surface water. Energy Development, Williston Basin, Brine contamination, Groundwater, Surface Water, East Poplar oil field, Fort Peck Indian

Torgersen, Christian

391

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Change Notice 2 Change Notice 2 with Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Page/Section Change

392

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reaffirmation Reaffirmation August 2002 Change Notice 1 December 2004 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Page/Section Change

393

Explosive Contamination from Substrate Surfaces: Differences and Similarities in Contamination Techniques using RDX and C-4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The amount of time that an explosive is present on the surface of a material is dependent upon the original amount of explosive on the surface, temperature, humidity, rain, etc. This laboratory study focused on looking at similarities and differences in three different surface contamination techniques that are used when performance testing explosive trace detection equipment in an attempt to determine how effective the techniques are at replicating actual field samples. The three techniques used were dry transfer deposition of solutions using the Transportation Security Laboratory (TSL) patented dry transfer techniques (US patent 6470730), direct deposition of explosive standards, and fingerprinting of actual explosives. Explosives were deposited on the surface of one of five substrates using one of the three different deposition techniques. The process was repeated for each surface type using each contamination technique. The surface types used were: 50% cotton/50% polyester as found in T-shirts, 100% cotton with a smooth surface such as that found in a cotton dress shirt, 100% cotton on a rough surface such as that found on canvas or denim, suede leather such as might be found on jackets, purses, or shoes, and metal obtained from a car hood at a junk yard. The samples were not pre-cleaned prior to testing and contained sizing agents, and in the case of the metal, oil and dirt. The substrates were photographed using a Zeiss Discover V12 stereoscope with Axiocam ICc1 3 megapixel digital camera to determine the difference in the crystalline structure and surface contamination in an attempt to determine differences and similarities associated with current contamination techniques.

C.J. Miller; T.S. Yoder

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The Variational Ising Classifier (VIC) algorithm for coherently contaminated data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Variational Ising Classifier (VIC) algorithm for coherently contaminated data Oliver Williams) in test images which have not explicitly been encountered in training data. The Variational Ising-dimension, for image contours [5], the Variational Ising Classi- fier (VIC) models contamination explicitly as switches

Martin, Ralph R.

395

Capture zone design for a contaminated shallow unconfined aquifer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the early 1950's to 1987. The extent of the ground water contamination has impacted City of Austin properties, private residential areas, and is migrating towards the Colorado River to the South. A capture zone is proposed to stop the contaminants...

Cann, Eric Roy

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

396

Remediation of arsenic-contaminated soils and groundwaters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An in situ method is described for extraction of arsenic contaminants from a soil medium and remediation of the medium including contacting the medium with an extractant solution, directing the solution within and through the medium, and collecting the solution and contaminants. The method can also be used for arsenate and/or arsenite removal. 8 figs.

Peters, R.W.; Frank, J.R.; Feng, X.

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

397

The Transport of Nuclear Contamination in Fractured Porous Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and dispersion of nuclear contamination through a granitic medium having densely spaced fracturesThe Transport of Nuclear Contamination in Fractured Porous Media Jim Douglas, Jr. #3; Anna M that takes the relevant time scales of the ow and the nuclear decay. 1 Introduction We formulate a model

Douglas Jr., Jim

398

Electron Microbeam Investigation of Uranium-Contaminated Soils from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Electron Microbeam Investigation of Uranium-Contaminated Soils from Oak Ridge, TN, USA J O Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, Department of Geological Sciences, Indiana University, 1001 East 10th Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 Two samples of uranium-contaminated soil from the Department of Energy

Zhu, Chen

399

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments April 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Deep Vadose Zone - Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI) partnered with the Vadose Zone Journal to create a special section of the journal's November 2012 issue. DVZ-AFRI conducted a symposium at the annual American Chemical Society meeting on "Understanding Behavior and Fate of Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments." They produced 12 papers that present novel approaches to characterize, monitor, remediate and predict the transport and fate of contaminants in vadose zone environments, many of which highlight recent work at the Hanford site. The publications can be accessed here. For more information, contact Skip Chamberlain with the EM's Office of Soil

400

Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this User's Guide is to provide instructors with an overview of the key points covered in the video. The Student Handout portion of this Guide is designed to assist the instructor in reviewing those points with students. The Student Handout should be distributed to students after the video is shown and the instructor should use the Guide to facilitate a discussion on key activities and duties at the scene. PRE-HOSPITAL PRACTICES FOR HANDLING A RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED PATIENT More Documents & Publications Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ORISE: Dose Coefficients for Intakes of Radionuclides via Contaminated  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dose Coefficients for Intakes of Radionuclides via Contaminated Wounds Dose Coefficients for Intakes of Radionuclides via Contaminated Wounds Dose coefficients for 38 radionuclides based on NCRP Wound Model and ICRP biokinetic models This report is intended to assist health physics and medical staff in more rapidly assessing the potential dosimetric consequences of a contaminated wound. The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Wound Model describing the retention of selected radionuclides at the site of a contaminated wound and their uptake into the transfer compartment has been combined with the International Commission on Radiological Protection element-specific systemic models for those radionuclides to derive dose coefficients for intakes via contaminated wounds. Examples are also provided on using the dose coefficients to generate derived reference

402

Methods for removing contaminant matter from a porous material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

Fox, Robert V. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Avci, Recep (Bozeman, MT) [Bozeman, MT; Groenewold, Gary S. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

403

Method for detecting organic contaminants in water supplies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for detecting organic contaminants in water supplies. A sampling unit is employed which includes a housing having at least one opening therein and a tubular member positioned within the housing having a central passageway surrounded by a side wall. The side wall is made of a composition designed to absorb the contaminants. In use, the sampling unit is immersed in a water supply. The water supply contacts the tubular member through the opening in the housing, with any contaminants being absorbed into the side wall of the tubular member. A carrier gas is then passed through the central passageway of the tubular member. The contaminants will diffuse out of the side wall and into the central passageway where they will subsequently combine with the carrier gas, thereby yielding a gaseous product. The gaseous product is then analyzed to determine the amount and type of contaminants therein.

Dooley, Kirk J. (Shelley, ID); Barrie, Scott L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Buttner, William J. (White Bear Lake, MN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

PRE-HOSPITAL PRACTICES FOR HANDLING A RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED PATIENT  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the enclosed printed study material do not by themselves provide sufficient skills to safely engage in or perform duties related to emergency response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. Meeting that goal is beyond the scope of this video and requires either additional specific areas of competency or more hours of training

405

Chapter 28 - Nanotechnology for Contaminated Subsurface Remediation: Possibilities and Challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Groundwater represents a significant source of potable and industrial process water throughout the world. With population growth the availability of this precise resource is becoming increasingly scarce. Historically, the subsurface was thought to act as a natural filter of wastes injected into the ground. The potential for these wastes to persist in the subsurface for decades, potentially contaminating drinking water sources was ignored. Not only do toxic compounds have significant detrimental impacts on the environment and human health, there are also economic and social costs associated with contaminated groundwater. Due to increased demands on groundwater resources and historical contamination there is a need to remediate contaminated groundwater to meet current and future demands. At many hazardous sites, however, current remediation technologies routinely defy attempts at satisfactory restoration. As a result new, innovative remediation technologies are required. Nanomaterials are receiving widespread interest in a variety of fields due to their unique, beneficial chemical, physical, and mechanical properties. They have recently been proposed to address a number of environmental problems including the remediation of the contaminated subsurface. A wide variety of nanoparticles, such as metallic (e.g., zero valent iron or bimetallic nanoparticles) and carbon based nanoparticles (e.g., C60 nanoparticles) have been investigated to assess their potential for contaminated site remediation. Studies suggest that nanoparticles have the ability to convert or sequester a wide variety of subsurface contaminants (e.g., chlorinated solvents and heavy metals). In addition they are more reactive than similar, larger sized, reactive materials. The majority of these studies have, however, been conducted at the batch scale. Considerable work is necessary prior to the application of nanotechnology for contaminated site remediation. One problem, for example, is the delivery of reactive nanometals to the contaminated source zone where they will react. This chapter will summarize the use of nanoparticles for contaminated site remediation and highlight some of the challenges that remain unresolved.

Denis M. O’Carroll

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

The Patroon Creek Contamination Migration Investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shaw performed a Site Investigation (SI) for sediment within the Unnamed Tributary of the Patroon Creek, a section of the Patroon Creek, and the Three Mile Reservoir as part of the overall contract with the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to remediate the Colonie Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Site. The Unnamed Tributary formerly flowed through the former Patroon Lake, which was located on the main site property and was used as a landfill for radiological and chemical wastes. The objective of the investigation was to determine the absence/presence of radioactive contamination within the three Areas of Concern (AOC). In order to accomplish this objective, Shaw assembled a team to produce a Technical Memorandum that provided an in-depth understanding of the environmental conditions related to the Patroon Creek. Upon completion and analysis of the Technical Memorandum, a Conceptual Site Model (CSM) was constructed and a Technical Planning Program (TPP) was held to develop a Sediment Investigation Work Plan and Sediment Investigation Sampling and Analysis Plan. A total of 32 sample locations were analyzed using on-site direct gamma scans with a Pancake Geiger-Mueller (PGM) instrument for screening purposes and samples were analyzed at on-site and off-site laboratories. The highest interval from each core scan was selected for on-site analysis utilizing a High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. Eight of these samples were sent off-site for gamma/alpha spectroscopy confirmation. The data collected during the SI indicated that the U-238 cleanup criterion was exceeded in sediment samples collected from two locations within the Unnamed Tributary but not in downstream sections of Patroon Creek or Three Mile Reservoir. Future actions for impacted sediment in the Unnamed Tributary will be further evaluated. Concentrations of U-238 and Th-232 in all other off-site sediment samples collected from the Unnamed Tributary, Patroon Creek, and the Three Mile Reservoir indicate that no further action is required in these areas. The data was also compared to ecological screening criteria. None of the contaminants of concern (U-238, Th-232, and U-235) had concentrations exceeding the screening values. The evaluation indicates no adverse impacts to ecological receptors. (authors)

Dufek, K.; Zafran, A. [Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure, Colonie FUSRAP Site, 1130 Central Avenue, Colonie, New York 12205 (United States); Moore, J.T. [United States Army Corps of Engineers-New York District, 26 Federal Plaza, Room 1811, New York, NY 10278-0090 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

American Mineralogist, Volume 90, pages 371381, 2005 0003-004X/05/0203371$05.00/DOI: 10.2138/am.2005.1599 371  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, amorphous silica is often contaminated with metals in higher salinity brines. The most common metal silicate in geothermal brines commonly range from 0.5 to 20 wt%. When these brines are brought to the surface through of the brines, while concentrat- ing the dissolved solids. Consequently, Ă?ashing usually results

408

Process for treating waste water having low concentrations of metallic contaminants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for treating waste water having a low level of metallic contaminants by reducing the toxicity level of metallic contaminants to an acceptable level and subsequently discharging the treated waste water into the environment without removing the treated contaminants.

Looney, Brian B; Millings, Margaret R; Nichols, Ralph L; Payne, William L

2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

409

Models of Geothermal Brine Chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many significant expenses encountered by the geothermal energy industry are related to chemical effects. When the composition, temperature of pressure of the fluids in the geological formation are changed, during reservoir evolution, well production, energy extraction or injection processes, the fluids that were originally at equilibrium with the formation minerals come to a new equilibrium composition, temperature and pressure. As a result, solid material can be precipitated, dissolved gases released and/or heat lost. Most geothermal energy operations experience these phenomena. For some resources, they create only minor problems. For others, they can have serious results, such as major scaling or corrosion of wells and plant equipment, reservoir permeability losses and toxic gas emission, that can significantly increase the costs of energy production and sometimes lead to site abandonment. In future operations that exploit deep heat sources and low permeability reservoirs, new chemical problems involving very high T, P rock/water interactions and unknown injection effects will arise.

Nancy Moller Weare; John H. Weare

2002-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

410

TRACING THE CONTAMINANT HISTORY OF AN URBAN WATERSHED THROUGH AN EXAMINATION OF AQUATIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRACING THE CONTAMINANT HISTORY OF AN URBAN WATERSHED THROUGH AN EXAMINATION OF AQUATIC SEDIMENTS. A smaller organic contaminant database indicates sediment PAH levels exceed probable effect level criteria

411

Effect of Coal Gas Contaminants on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Operation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal Gas Contaminants on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Operation. Effect of Coal Gas Contaminants on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Operation. Abstract: The operation of solid oxide fuel cells...

412

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha contaminated wastes Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and solid radioactively contaminated wastes in unlined... that uses electrical power to heat and melt contaminated soil, fusing the ... Source: Pint, Bruce A. - Materials...

413

E-Print Network 3.0 - adriatic seafood contamination Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

adriatic seafood contamination Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: adriatic seafood contamination Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 U.S....

414

Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data centers require continuous air conditioning to address high internal heat loads (heat release from equipment) and maintain indoor temperatures within recommended operating levels for computers. Air economizer cycles, which bring in large amounts of outside air to cool internal loads when weather conditions are favorable, could save cooling energy. There is reluctance from many data center owners to use this common cooling technique, however, due to fear of introducing pollutants and potential loss of humidity control. Concerns about equipment failure from airborne pollutants lead to specifying as little outside air as permissible for human occupants. To investigate contamination levels, particle monitoring was conducted at 8 data centers in Northern California. Particle counters were placed at 3 to 4 different locations within and outside of each data center evaluated in this study. Humidity was also monitored at many of the sites to determine how economizers affect humidity control. Results from this study indicate that economizers do increase the outdoor concentration in data centers, but this concentration, when averaged annually, is still below current particle concentration limits. Study results are summarized below: (1) The average particle concentrations measured at each location, both outside and at the servers, are shown in Table 1. Measurements show low particle concentrations at all data centers without economizers, regardless of outdoor particle concentrations. Particle concentrations were typically an order of magnitude below both outside particle concentrations and recently published ASHRAE standards. (2) Economizer use caused sharp increases in particle concentrations when the economizer vents were open. The particle concentration in the data centers, however, quickly dropped back to pre-economizer levels when the vents closed. Since economizers only allow outside air part of the time, the annual average concentrations still met the ASHRAE standards. However, concentration were still above the levels measured in data centers that do not use economizers (3) Current filtration in data centers is minimal (ASHRAE 40%) since most air is typically recycled. When using economizers, modest improvements in filtration (ASHRAE 85%) can reduce particle concentrations to nearly match the level found in data centers that do not use economizers. The extra cost associated with improve filters was not determined in this study. (4) Humidity was consistent and within the ASHRAE recommended levels for all data centers without economizers. Results show that, while slightly less steady, humidity in data centers with economizers can also be controlled within the ASHRAE recommended levels. However, this control of humidity reduces energy savings by limiting the hours the economizer vents are open. (5) The potential energy savings from economizer use has been measured in one data center. When economizers were active, mechanical cooling power dropped by approximately 30%. Annual savings at this center is estimated within the range of 60-80 MWh/year, representing approximately a 5% savings off the mechanical energy load of the data center. Incoming temperatures and humidity at this data center were conservative relative to the ASHRAE acceptable temperature and humidity ranges. Greater savings may be available if higher temperature humidity levels in the data center area were permitted. The average particle concentrations measured at each of the eight data center locations are shown in Table 1. The data centers ranged in size from approximately 5,000 ft{sup 2} to 20,000 ft{sup 2}. The indoor concentrations and humidity in Table 1 represents measurements taken at the server rack. Temperature measurements at the server rack consistently fell between 65-70 F. The Findings section contains a discussion of the individual findings from each center. Data centers currently operate under very low contamination levels. Economizers can be expected to increase the particle concentration in data centers, but the increase appears to still be

Shehabi, Arman; Tschudi, William; Gadgil, Ashok

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

415

Procedures for sampling radium-contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two procedures for sampling the surface layer (0 to 15 centimeters) of radium-contaminated soil are recommended for use in remedial action projects. Both procedures adhere to the philosophy that soil samples should have constant geometry and constant volume in order to ensure uniformity. In the first procedure, a ''cookie cutter'' fashioned from pipe or steel plate, is driven to the desired depth by means of a slide hammer, and the sample extracted as a core or plug. The second procedure requires use of a template to outline the sampling area, from which the sample is obtained using a trowel or spoon. Sampling to the desired depth must then be performed incrementally. Selection of one procedure over the other is governed primarily by soil conditions, the cookie cutter being effective in nongravelly soils, and the template procedure appropriate for use in both gravelly and nongravelly soils. In any event, a minimum sample volume of 1000 cubic centimeters is recommended. The step-by-step procedures are accompanied by a description of the minimum requirements for sample documentation. Transport of the soil samples from the field is then addressed in a discussion of the federal regulations for shipping radioactive materials. Interpretation of those regulations, particularly in light of their application to remedial action soil-sampling programs, is provided in the form of guidance and suggested procedures. Due to the complex nature of the regulations, however, there is no guarantee that our interpretations of them are complete or entirely accurate. Preparation of soil samples for radium-226 analysis by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy is described.

Fleischhauer, H.L.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at 331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal for the Rock Springs In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Test Site remediation that would be performed at the Rock Springs site in Sweetwater County, Wyoming. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 31, 2000 EA-1331: Finding of No Significant Impact Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site July 31, 2000 EA-1331: Final Environmental Assessment

417

Categorical Exclusion for Pinnacle Peak Substation PCB contaminated Electrical  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion for Pinnacle Peak Substation PCB contaminated Electrical Equipment Removal Project located north of Phoenix, Maricopa County, Arizona RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION A. Proposed Action: Western proposes drain and dispose of PCB contaminated oil from two bushings, and decontaminate one· bushing and rack, break apart PCB contaminated concrete and excavate PCB contaminated soil at Pinnacle Peak Substation. Western will be use existing access roads and vehicles such as cranes, backhoes, dozers, bucket trucks, crew trucks and pickup trucks to bring personnel and equipment to the work area. This work is necessary to maintain the safety and reliability of the bulk electrical system. The project is located in Maricopa County, Arizona. The attached map shows the

418

NETL: Gasification Systems - Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Project Number: DE-SC00008243 TDA Research, Inc. is developing a high-capacity, low-cost sorbent that removes anhydrous ammonia (NH3), mercury (Hg), and trace contaminants from coal- and coal/biomass-derived syngas. The clean-up system will be used after the bulk warm gas sulfur removal step, and remove NH3 and Hg in a regenerable manner while irreversibly capturing all other trace metals (e.g., Arsenic, Selenium) reducing their concentrations to sub parts per million (ppm) levels. Current project plans include identifying optimum chemical composition and structure that provide the best sorbent performance for removing trace contaminants, determining the effect of operating parameters, conducting multiple-cycle experiments to test the life of the sorbent for NH3 and Hg removal, and conducting a preliminary design of the sorbent reactor.

419

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater July 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov Tania Reyes, CHPRC (509) 373-6828 Tania_Reyes@rl.gov Department of Energy goal for fiscal year 2013 met early Note: Photos and graphics are available for downloading on our website link: http://ow.ly/mO5cT RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) has exceeded this year's goal for treating 1.4 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site in Washington state. "In the last few years, DOE built three new groundwater treatment facilities, and now we are seeing the results," said Briant Charboneau,

420

EA-1599: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located at the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

99: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located 99: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky, for Controlled Radiological Applications EA-1599: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky, for Controlled Radiological Applications Summary This EA was being prepared to evaluate potential environmental impacts of a proposal to dispose of nickel scrap that is volumetrically contaminated with radioactive materials and that DOE recovered from equipment it had used in uranium enrichment. This EA is on hold. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities at this time.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater July 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov Tania Reyes, CHPRC (509) 373-6828 Tania_Reyes@rl.gov Department of Energy goal for fiscal year 2013 met early Note: Photos and graphics are available for downloading on our website link: http://ow.ly/mO5cT RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) has exceeded this year's goal for treating 1.4 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site in Washington state. "In the last few years, DOE built three new groundwater treatment facilities, and now we are seeing the results," said Briant Charboneau,

422

Mercury-Contaminated Hydraulic Mining Debris in San Francisco Bay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S, and Flegal AR 2008. Mercury in the San Francisco Estuary.may 2010 Mercury-Contaminated Hydraulic Mining Debris in Sancontaminants such as ele- mental mercury and cyanide used in

Bouse, Robin M; Fuller, Christopher C; Luoma, Sam; Hornberger, Michelle I; Jaffe, Bruce E; Smith, Richard E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Sustainable treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated industrial land   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Land contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons is a widespread and global environmental pollution issue from recovery and refining of crude oil and the ubiquitous use of hydrocarbons in industrial processes and applications. ...

Cunningham, Colin John

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

424

Detection of contaminants using a MEMS FAIMS sensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detecting the presence of contaminants in water is a critical mission, but thorough testing often requires extensive time at a remote facility. A MEMS implementation of a FAIMS (High-Field Asymmetric-Waveform Ion Mobility ...

Carr, Kristin (Kristin Malia)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

A Stakeholder’s Perspective on Contaminated Land Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NICOLE, the Network for the management of Industrially Contaminated Land in Europe is a leading forum on this matter in Europe, promoting co-operation between industry, academia and service providers. NICOLE’s...

Lida Schelwald- Van der Kley; Johan de Fraye…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Chemical and radiochemical characterization of depleted uranium in contaminated soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main results of chemical and radiochemical characterization and fractionation of depleted uranium in soils contaminated during the Balkan conflict ... the paper. Alpha-spectrometric analysis of used depleted

M. B. Radenkovi?; A. B. Kandi?; I. S. Vukana?…

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Catalytic destruction of groundwater contaminants in reactive extraction wells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for remediating groundwater contaminated with halogenated solvents, certain metals and other inorganic species based on catalytic reduction reactions within reactive well bores. The groundwater treatment uses dissolved hydrogen as a reducing agent in the presence of a metal catalyst, such a palladium, to reduce halogenated solvents (as well as other substituted organic compounds) to harmless species (e.g., ethane or methane) and immobilize certain metals to low valence states. The reactive wells function by removing water from a contaminated water-bearing zone, treating contaminants with a well bore using catalytic reduction, and then reinjecting the treated effluent into an adjacent water-bearing zone. This system offers the advantages of a compact design with a minimal surface footprint (surface facilities) and the destruction of a broad suite of contaminants without generating secondary waste streams.

McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Reinhard, Martin (Stanford, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Geotechnical properties of oil-contaminated Kuwaiti sand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large quantities of oil-contaminated sands resulted from exploded oil wells, burning oil fires, the destruction of oil storage tanks, and the formation of oil lakes in Kuwait at the end of the Gulf War. An extensive laboratory testing program was carried out to determine the geotechnical characteristics of this material. Testing included basic properties, compaction and permeability tests, and triaxial and consolidation tests on clean and contaminated sand at the same relative density. Contaminated specimens were prepared by mixing the sand with oil in the amount of 6% by weight or less to match field conditions. The influence of the type of oil, and relative density was also investigated by direct shear tests. The results indicated a small reduction in strength and permeability and an increase in compressibility due to contamination. The preferred method of disposal of this material is to use it as a stabilizing material for other projects such as road construction.

Al-Sanad, H.A.; Eid, W.K.; Ismael, N.F. [Kuwait Univ., Safat (Kuwait). Dept. of Civil Engineering] [Kuwait Univ., Safat (Kuwait). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

USE OF APATITE FOR CHEMICAL STABILIZATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater at many Federal and civilian industrial sites is often contaminated with toxic metals at levels that present a potential concern to regulatory agencies. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has some unique problems associated with radionuclides (primarily uranium), but metal contaminants most likely drive risk-based cleanup decisions, from the perspective of human health, in groundwater at DOE and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Sites include lead (Pb), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), mercury (Hg), zinc (Zn), selenium (Se), antimony (Sb), copper (Cu) and nickel (Ni). Thus, the regulatory ''drivers'' for toxic metals in contaminated soils/groundwaters are very comparable for Federal and civilian industrial sites, and most sites have more than one metal above regulatory action limits. Thus improving the performance of remedial technologies for metal-contaminated groundwater will have ''dual use'' (Federal and civilian) benefit.

Dr. William D. Bostick

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Particle Contamination on a Thermal Flying-Height Control Slider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particle contamination on a slider in a hard disk drive (HDD) affects the HDD’s reliability. With the introduction of the thermal flying-height control (TFC) slider, the temperature in the head–disk interface (HD...

Nan Liu; David B. Bogy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Transuranic contaminated waste form characterization and data base  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains 5 appendices. Title listing are: technologies for recovery of transuranics; nondestructive assay of TRU contaminated wastes; miscellaneous waste characteristics; acceptance criteria for TRU waste; and TRU waste treatment technologies.

Kniazewycz, B.G.; McArthur, W.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Contamination sensitivity and the development of disease-avoidant behaviour  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...orientation of the ancient Greeks that the gods will inevitably punish those who transgress...conservation and contamination: invisible particles as a plausible mechanism. Dev. Psychol...preschool child's conception of invisible particles in the context of dissolving. Dev. Psychol...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Simple Method for Killing Halophilic Bacteria in Contaminated Solar Salt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...growth and also to sterilize solar salt. Two samples of solar salt, contaminated with red...it had a much lower buffering capacity than the used salt, presumably...economical method of freeing solar salt from halophilic bacteria...

D. J. Kushner; G. Masson; N. E. Gibbons

1965-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Scale-dependent desorption of uranium from contaminated subsurface...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to investigate the scale-dependent desorption of uranyl U(VI) from a contaminated sediment collected from the Hanford 300 Area at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford...

435

Chapter 8: Modelling Sediment Records of Atmospherically Deposited Contaminants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

73 Chapter 8: Modelling Sediment Records of Atmospherically Deposited Contaminants 8.1. Catchment the Water Column...............................................79 8.3 Water Column to Bottom Sediment Transfer......................................80 #12;Chapter 8: Modelling Sediment Records... 74 8

Short, Daniel

436

Depleted uranium internal contamination: Carcinogenesis and leukemogenesis in vivo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Association for Cancer Research 1 May 2005...Proc Amer Assoc Cancer Res, Volume 46, 2005 Depleted uranium internal contamination...Proc Amer Assoc Cancer Res, Volume 46, 2005] 2080 Depleted uranium is a heavy metal...

Alexandra C. Miller; Mike Stewart; Rafael Rivas; Robert Merlot; and Paul Lison

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Depleted uranium mobility and fractionation in contaminated soil (Southern Serbia)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the Balkan conflict in 1999, soil in contaminated areas was enriched in depleted uranium (DU) isotopic signature, relative to the in-situ natural uranium present. After the military activities, most...

Mirjana B. Radenkovi?; Svjetlana A. Cupa?…

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Rapid and Robust Detection Methods for Poison and Microbial Contamination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Real-time on-site monitoring of analytes is currently in high demand for food contamination, water, medicines, and ingestible household products that were never tested appropriately. Here we introduce chemical methods for ...

Lu, Peter J.

439

An integrated treatment methodology for PCB-contaminated soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study proposed coupling two different treatment technologies, chemical dehalogenation using potassium polyethylene glycol (KPEG) and bioremediation, to optimize the destruction and detoxification of PCB-contaminated soil. Changes in toxicity...

Garcia, Shannon S

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Lead Groundwater Contamination of Groundwater in the Northeast ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The detailed description of the migration of pollutants is fundamental for the groundwater monitoring and it ... historical data with a, groundwater contamination sampling for water quality analyses ... can be toxic to living organisms. Lead can ...

2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Dose assessment for radioactive contamination of a child  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dose assessments produced using the computer code MCNP are important to simulate events that are difficult to recreate experimentally. An emergency scenario involving whole-body skin contamination is one example of such an event. For these scenarios...

Kowalczik, Jeffrey Aaron

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Innovative Remediation Technology for Contaminated Military Sites: A Canadian Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel and innovative technology has been developed in Canada to clean-up soil contaminated with a wide range of organic pollutants, including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, chlorinated phenols, phthala...

Igor J. Marvan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Salmonella contamination during production of domestic and imported canaloupe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this study, 8 cantaloupe farms and packing sheds from the United States (U.S.) and Mexico were sampled to evaluate cantaloupe contamination with Salmonella and Escherichia coli during production and processing. Samples collected from external...

Uribe, Imelda Mercado

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Alternatives Generation Analysis Long Length Contaminated Equipment Removal System Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long length contaminated equipment was designed and built to aid in the remote removal and transport of highly radioactive, contaminated equipment from various locations in the tank farms to disposal. The equipment has been stored in an open lay-down yard area, exposed to the elements for the past year and a half. The possible alternatives available to provide shelter for the equipment are investigated.

BOGER, R.M.

1999-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

445

Treatment options for tank farms long-length contaminated equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluated a variety of treatment and disposal technologies for mixed waste (MW) meeting the following criteria: 1. Single-Shell and Double-Shell Tank System (tank farms) equipment and other debris; 2. length greater than 12 feet; and contaminated with listed MW from the tank farms. This waste stream, commonly referred to as tank farms long-length contaminated equipment (LLCE), poses a unique and costly set of challenges during all phases of the waste management lifecycle.

Josephson, W.S.

1995-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

446

Engineered Polymeric Nanoparticles for Bioremediation of Hydrophobic Contaminants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Some investigators have reported increased rates of PAH biodegradation in the presence of surfactant micelles because of enhanced contaminant solubilization (9?11), but others have reported inhibitory effects of surfactants on biodegradation (12?14). ... Alternatively, in pump-and-treat or soil washing type remediation processes, PMUA particles could be applied (in a manner similar to the use of surfactant micelles) to enhance the rate of removal of hydrophobic contaminants. ...

Warapong Tungittiplakorn; Claude Cohen; Leonard W. Lion

2004-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

447

SRNL EMERGENCY RESPONSE CAPABILITY FOR ATMOSPHERIC CONTAMINANT RELEASES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emergency response to an atmospheric release of chemical or radiological contamination is enhanced when plume predictions, field measurements, and real-time weather information are integrated into a geospatial framework. The Weather Information and Display (WIND) System at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilizes such an integrated framework. The rapid availability of predictions from a suite of atmospheric transport models within this geospatial framework has proven to be of great value to decision makers during an emergency involving an atmospheric contaminant release.

Koffman, L; Chuck Hunter, C; Robert Buckley, R; Robert Addis, R

2006-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

448

Reverse osmosis treatment to remove inorganic contaminants from drinking water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the research project was to determine the removal of inorganic contaminants from drinking water using several state-of-the-art reverse osmosis membrane elements. A small 5-KGPD reverse osmosis system was utilized and five different membrane elements were studied individually with the specific inorganic contaminants added to several natural Florida ground waters. Removal data were also collected on naturally occurring substances.

Huxstep, M.R.; Sorg, T.J.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

System to control contamination during retrieval of buried TRU waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system to control contamination during the retrieval of hazardous waste comprising an outer containment building, an inner containment building, within the outer containment building, an electrostatic radioactive particle recovery unit connected to and in communication with the inner and outer containment buildings, and a contaminate suppression system including a moisture control subsystem, and a rapid monitoring system having the ability to monitor conditions in the inner and outer containment buildings.

Menkhaus, Daniel E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Loomis, Guy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mullen, Carlan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Scott, Donald W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Feldman, Edgar M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Meyer, Leroy C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Please cite this article in press as: Birkholzer, J.T., et al., Brine flow up a well caused by pressure perturbation from geologic carbon sequestration: Static and dynamic evaluations. Int. J. Greenhouse Gas Control (2011), doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2011.01.003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by pressure perturbation from geologic carbon sequestration: Static and dynamic evaluations. Int. J.elsevier.com/locate/ijggc Brine flow up a well caused by pressure perturbation from geologic carbon sequestration: Static carbon sequestration (GCS) has drawn increasing con- sideration as a promising method to mitigate

Zhou, Quanlin

451

Screening-level approach for estimating contaminant export from tributaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The in-place pollutant export model (IPX) is a screening-level model for estimating contaminant export from tributaries with contaminated sediments to receiving waterbodies. IPX is a modified version of the USEPA`s WASP4 modeling framework. IPX synthesizes sediment transport processes for sediment aging, decreased sediment resuspendability with increasing age, and resuspension of freshly deposited sediments as a function of water velocity, into an expanded WASP4 contaminant transport and fate chassis while retaining the computational flexibility of the original framework. These process descriptions are needed to accurately simulate contaminant transport and substantially improve the framework for application to tributary systems subject to significant deposition and resuspension events. The potential for applying IPX is broad; water quality impairments attributable to contaminated sediments are widespread due to discharges from industry, agriculture, and mining and ore processing. IPX has been successfully applied to the upper and lower Fox River in Wisconsin, and the Buffalo and Oswego Rivers in New York, all impaired by contaminated sediments.

Velleux, M. [Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources, Madison, WI (United States); Gailani, J. [Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MS (United States); Endicott, D. [EPA Large Lakes Research Station, Grosse Ile, MI (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Uraniferous Phosphates: Resource, Security Risk, or Contaminant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The escalation of the price of uranium (U) yellow cake (summer high = $130/0.454 kg (lb) has called into question the continuing availability of sufficient stockpiles and ores to process. As was developed during the years following World War II, the establishment and maintenance of a strategic inventory is a reasonable consideration for today. Therefore, it becomes critical to look at potential secondary resources beyond the classical ore suites now being utilized. The most economically viable future secondary source seems to be the byproducts of the beneficiation of phosphoric acids derived from phosphate ores. Phosphorous (P) is an essential nutrient for plants; its deficiency can result in highly restrictive limitations in crop productivity. Acidic soils in tropical and subtropical regions of the world are often P deficient with high P-sorption (fixation) capacities. To correct this deficiency, efficient water-soluble P fertilizers are required. The use of raw phosphate rocks not only adds phosphate but also its contained contaminants, including uranium to the treated land. Another immediate difficulty is phosphogypsum, the standard byproduct of simple extraction. It, for practical purposes, has been selectively classified as TENORM by regulators. The imposition of these standards presents major current and future disposal and re-utilization problems. Therefore, establishing an economically viable system that allows for uranium byproduct extraction from phosphoric acids is desirable. Such a system would be dependent on yellow cake base price stability, reserve estimates, political conditions, nation-state commitment, and dependence on nuclear energy. The accumulation of yellow cake from the additional extraction process provides a valuable commodity and allows the end acid to be a more environmentally acceptable product. The phosphogypsum already accumulated, as well as that which is in process, will not make a viable component for a radiation disposal devise (RDD). Concern for weapon proliferation by rogue nation states from the byproduct production of yellowcake is an unlikely scenario. To extract the fissile U-235 (0.07%) isotope from the yellowcake (99.3%) requires the erection of a costly major gaseous diffusion or a cascading centrifuge facility. Such a facility would be extremely difficult to mask. Therefore, from a diminished security risk and positive economic and environmental viewpoints, the utilization of a phosphoric acid beneficiation process extracting uranium is desirable. (authors)

LeMone, D.V.; Goodell, Ph.C. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas at El Paso, Texas (United States); Gibbs, S.G. [U. T. Houston School of Public Health, El Paso, Texas (United States); Winston, J.W. [Medical Physicist, Radiological Physics, Inc., El Paso, Texas (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Subsurface and Plant Contamination During Natural Attenuation and Phytoremediation of Silt Loam Contaminated with Chlorinated Organic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Root establishment of perennial ryegrass (L. Perenne) in diesel contaminated subsurface soil layers. Environ. Pollut. 145...15226510903353120 USEPA. 1996a. Clean up the nations waste sites: Markets and technology trends. Office of Solid Waste and Emergency...

Changhwan Cho; Soyoung Park; Kijune Sung

454

CO2-H2O Mixtures in the Geological Sequestration of CO2. II. Partitioning in Chloride Brines at 12-100 °C and 1-600 bar.  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

CO CO 2 -H 2 O Mixtures in the Geological Sequestration of CO 2 . II. Partitioning in Chloride Brines at 12-100°C and up to 600 bar. Nicolas Spycher and Karsten Pruess Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 90-1116, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California, USA September 2004 ABSTRACT Correlations presented by Spycher et al. (2003) to compute the mutual solubilities of CO 2 and H 2 O are extended to include the effect of chloride salts in the aqueous phase. This is accomplished by including, in the original formulation, activity coefficients for aqueous CO 2 derived from several literature sources, primarily for NaCl solutions. Best results are obtained when combining the solubility correlations of Spycher et al. (2003) with the activity coefficient formulation of Rumpf et al. (1994) and Duan and Sun (2003), which

455

Environmental Response Team Standard Operating Procedures for Contaminated Water Diving Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dilution of Contaminants ·· Small Closed Body of WaterSmall Closed Body of Water ·· Pond or Flooded QuarryPond or FloodedEnvironmental Response Team Standard Operating Procedures for Contaminated Water Diving Operations for Contaminated Water Diving OperationsProcedures for Contaminated Water Diving Operations AAUS March 2010 Meeting

Sura, Philip

456

Nearshore hydrodynamics as loading and forcing factors for Escherichia coli contamination at an embayed beach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of contamination during subsequent sediment resuspension events, suggesting that deposition­resuspension cycles

457

Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability.

Dinh, H.

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

458

Contaminants in Used Lubricating Oils and Their Fate during Distillation/Hydrotreatment Re-Refining  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Contaminants in Used Lubricating Oils and Their Fate during Distillation/Hydrotreatment Re-Refining ...

Dennis W. Brinkman; John R. Dickson

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado

460

This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in contaminated subsurface systems through the introduction of brine solutions remediation of contaminated soils using brine solutions and during the geological sequestration of CO2. The success of such techniques relies on the accurate prediction of the location of the brine during

Anderson, Daniel M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oilfield brine contaminated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

SIMON: A mobile robot for floor contamination surveys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Robotics Development group at the Savannah River Site is developing an autonomous robot to perform radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot scans floors at a speed of one-inch/second and stops, sounds an alarm, and flashes lights when contamination in a certain area is detected. The contamination of interest here is primarily alpha and beta-gamma. The contamination levels are low to moderate. The robot, a Cybermotion K2A, is radio controlled, uses dead reckoning to determine vehicle position, and docks with a charging station to replenish its batteries and calibrate its position. It has an ultrasonic collision avoidance system as well as two safety bumpers that will stop the robot's motion when they are depressed. Paths for the robot are preprogrammed and the robot's motion can be monitored on a remote screen which shows a graphical map of the environment. The radiation instrument being used is an Eberline RM22A monitor. This monitor is microcomputer based with a serial I/O interface for remote operation. Up to 30 detectors may be configured with the RM22A. For our purposes, two downward-facing gas proportional detectors are used to scan floors, and one upward-facing detector is used for radiation background compensation. SIMON is interfaced with the RM22A in such a way that it scans the floor surface at one-inch/second, and if contamination is detected, the vehicle stops, alarms, and activates a voice synthesizer. Future development includes using the contamination data collected to provide a graphical contour map of a contaminated area. 3 refs.

Dudar, E.; Teese, G.; Wagner, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

SIMON: A mobile robot for floor contamination surveys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Robotics Development group at the Savannah River Site is developing an autonomous robot to perform radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot scans floors at a speed of one-inch/second and stops, sounds an alarm, and flashes lights when contamination in a certain area is detected. The contamination of interest here is primarily alpha and beta-gamma. The contamination levels are low to moderate. The robot, a Cybermotion K2A, is radio controlled, uses dead reckoning to determine vehicle position, and docks with a charging station to replenish its batteries and calibrate its position. It has an ultrasonic collision avoidance system as well as two safety bumpers that will stop the robot`s motion when they are depressed. Paths for the robot are preprogrammed and the robot`s motion can be monitored on a remote screen which shows a graphical map of the environment. The radiation instrument being used is an Eberline RM22A monitor. This monitor is microcomputer based with a serial I/O interface for remote operation. Up to 30 detectors may be configured with the RM22A. For our purposes, two downward-facing gas proportional detectors are used to scan floors, and one upward-facing detector is used for radiation background compensation. SIMON is interfaced with the RM22A in such a way that it scans the floor surface at one-inch/second, and if contamination is detected, the vehicle stops, alarms, and activates a voice synthesizer. Future development includes using the contamination data collected to provide a graphical contour map of a contaminated area. 3 refs.

Dudar, E.; Teese, G.; Wagner, D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

463

OPEN AIR DEMOLITION OF FACILITIES HIGHLY CONTAMINATED WITH PLUTONIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The demolition of highly contaminated plutonium buildings usually is a long and expensive process that involves decontaminating the building to near free- release standards and then using conventional methods to remove the structure. It doesn't, however, have to be that way. Fluor has torn down buildings highly contaminated with plutonium without excessive decontamination. By removing the select source term and fixing the remaining contamination on the walls, ceilings, floors, and equipment surfaces; open-air demolition is not only feasible, but it can be done cheaper, better (safer), and faster. Open-air demolition techniques were used to demolish two highly contaminated buildings to slab-on-grade. These facilities on the Department of Energy's Hanford Site were located in, or very near, compounds of operating nuclear facilities that housed hundreds of people working on a daily basis. To keep the facilities operating and the personnel safe, the projects had to be creative in demolishing the structures. Several key techniques were used to control contamination and keep it within the confines of the demolition area: spraying fixatives before demolition; applying fixative and misting with a fine spray of water as the buildings were being taken down; and demolishing the buildings in a controlled and methodical manner. In addition, detailed air-dispersion modeling was done to establish necessary building and meteorological conditions and to confirm the adequacy of the proposed methods. Both demolition projects were accomplished without any spread of contamination outside the modest buffer areas established for contamination control. Furthermore, personnel exposure to radiological and physical hazards was significantly reduced by using heavy equipment rather than ''hands on'' techniques.

LLOYD, E.R.

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

464

Evaporative Evolution of a Na-Cl-NO3-K-Ca-SO4-Mg-Si Brine at 95(degree)C: Experiments and Modeling relevant to Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A synthetic Topopah Spring Tuff water representative of one type of pore water at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (USA) was evaporated at 95 C in a series of experiments to determine the geochemical controls for brines that may form on, and possibly impact upon the long-term integrity of waste containers and drip shields at the designated high-level, nuclear-waste repository. Solution chemistry, condensed vapor chemistry, and precipitate mineralogy were used to identify important chemical divides and to validate geochemical calculations of evaporating water chemistry using a high temperature Pitzer thermodynamic database. The water evolved towards a complex ''sulfate type'' brine that contained about 45 mol% Na, 40 mol% Cl, 9 mol% NO{sub 3}, 5 mol% K, and less than 1 mol% each of SO{sub 4}, Ca, Mg, {Sigma}CO{sub 2}(aq), F, and Si. All measured ions in the condensed vapor phase were below detection limits. The mineral precipitates identified were halite, anhydrite, bassanite, niter and nitratine. Trends in the solution composition and identification of CaSO{sub 4} solids suggest that fluorite, carbonate, sulfate, and magnesium-silicate precipitation control the aqueous solution composition of sulfate type waters by removing fluoride, calcium, and magnesium during the early stages of evaporation. In most cases, the high temperature Pitzer database, used by EQ3/6 geochemical code, sufficiently predicts water composition and mineral precipitation during evaporation. Predicted solution compositions are generally within a factor of two of the experimental values. The model predicts that sepiolite, bassanite, amorphous silica, calcite, halite and brucite are the solubility controlling mineral phases.

Alai, M; Sutton, M; Carroll, S A

2004-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

465

Uranium contamination of the Aral Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Located in an endorrheic basin, the Aral Sea is mainly fed by water from two large rivers, the Syrdarya and the Amudarya. As a result, contaminants in dissolved and suspended form discharged by the rivers are accumulating in the lake. The northern Small Aral water contained 37 µg l? 1uranium and water in the western basin of the Large Aral up to 141 µg l? 1uranium in 2002, 2004 and 2006. The present day uranium concentrations in Aral Sea water mainly originate from the Syrdarya River due to uranium mining and tailings in the river watershed, and have been elevated up to 5 times compared to the pre-desiccation times by the ongoing desiccation in the western basin of the Large Aral. Current data indicate that groundwater does not seem to contribute much to the uranium budget. The uranium concentration in the lake is controlled by internal lake processes. Due to the high ionic strength of the Aral Sea water uranium is kept soluble. 238U/Cl?mass ratios range from 5.88 to 6.15 µg g? 1in the Small Aral and from 3.00 to 3.32 µg g? 1in the Large Aral. Based on the238U/Cl?mass ratios, a removal rate of 8% uranium from the water column inventory to the sediments has been estimated for anoxic waters, and it ranges between 2% and 5% in oxic waters, over periods of time without mixing. Most of the uranium removal seems to occur by co-precipitation with calcite and gypsum both in anoxic and oxic waters. According to simulations with PHREEQC, uraninite precipitation contributes little to the removal from anoxic Aral Sea water. In most of the sampled locations, water column removal of uranium matches the sediment inventory. Based on budget calculations, the future development of uranium load in the Aral Sea has been estimated for different scenarios. If the Syrdarya River discharge is below or in balance with the loss by evaporation, the uranium concentration in the Small Aral will increase from 37 µg l–1to 55 µg l? 1in 20 years time. When the river discharge is larger than loss by evaporation, present-day uranium concentration in the lake may be kept at the current level or even decrease slightly. From the ecotoxicological point of view, an increase in Syrdarya River discharge as the major water source will be crucial for the water quality of the Small Aral, despite its high uranium load. However, as it is intended to restore fishery in the Small Aral, accumulation of uranium in fish has to be monitored. Since the western basin of the Large Aral received no Syrdarya River water since 2005, and may become disconnected from the eastern basin, the slightly higher observed uranium removal from anoxic waters may result in a decrease in uranium concentrations in the western basin by 20% in 20 years time.

Jana Friedrich

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

NOVEL TECHNOLOGIES FOR GASEOUS CONTAMINANTS CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to develop technologies for cleaning/conditioning the syngas from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system to meet the tolerance limits for contaminants such as H{sub 2}S, COS, NH{sub 3}, HCN, HCl, and alkali for fuel cell and chemical production applications. RTI's approach is to develop a modular system that (1) removes reduced sulfur species to sub-ppm levels using a hybrid process consisting of a polymer membrane and a regenerable ZnO-coated monolith or a mixed metal oxide sorbent; (2) removes hydrogen chloride vapors to sub-ppm levels using an inexpensive, high-surface area material; and (3) removes NH{sub 3} with acidic adsorbents. RTI is working with MEDAL, Inc., and North Carolina State University (NCSU) to develop polymer membrane technology for bulk removal of H{sub 2}S from syngas. These membranes are being engineered to remove the acid gas components (H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O) from syngas by focusing on the ''solubility selectivity'' of the novel polymer compositions. The desirable components of the syngas (H{sub 2} and CO) are maintained at high-pressure conditions as a non-permeate stream while the impurities are transported across the membrane to the low pressure side. RTI tested commercially available and novel materials from MEDAL using a high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) permeation apparatus. H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} selectivities >30 were achieved, although there was a strong negative dependence with temperature. MEDAL believes that all the polymer compositions tested so far can be prepared as hollow fiber membrane modules using the existing manufacturing technology. For fuel cell and chemical applications, additional sulfur removal (beyond that achievable with the membranes) is required. To overcome limitations of conventional ZnO pellets, RTI is testing a monolith with a thin coating of high surface area zinc-oxide based materials. Alternatively, a regenerable sorbent developed by DOE/NETL (RVS-1) is being evaluated for this application. A multi-cycle test of 2-in. (5-cm) diameter monolith samples demonstrated that <0.5 ppm sulfur can be achieved. Removal of HCl vapors is being accomplished by low-cost materials that combine the known effectiveness of sodium carbonate as an active matrix used with enhanced surface area supports for greater reactivity and capacity at the required operating temperatures. RTI is working with SRI International on this task. Sorbents prepared using diatomaceous earth and sepiolite, impregnated with sodium carbonate achieved steady-state HCl level <100 ppb (target is 10 ppb). Research is continuing to optimize the impregnation and calcination procedures to provide an optimum pore size distribution and other properties. RTI and SRI International have established the feasibility of a process to selectively chemisorb NH3 from syngas on high surface area molecular sieve adsorbents at high temperatures by conducting a series of temperature-programmed reactions at 225 C (437 F). Significant levels of NH{sub 3} were adsorbed on highly acidic adsorbents; the adsorbed NH{sub 3} was subsequently recovered by heating the adsorbent and the regenerated adsorbent was reused. A comprehensive technical and economic evaluation of this modular gas cleaning process was conducted by Nexant to compare capital and operating cost with existing amine based processes. Nexant estimated a total installed cost of $42 million for the RTI process for a 500 MWe IGCC plant based on its current state of development. By comparison, Nexant estimated the installed cost for an equivalent sized plant based on the Rectisol process (which would achieve the same sulfur removal specification) to be $75 million. Thus the RTI process is economically competitive with a state-of-the-art process for syngas cleanup.

B.S. Turk; T. Merkel; A. Lopez-Ortiz; R.P. Gupta; J.W. Portzer; G.N. Krishnan; B.D. Freeman; G.K. Fleming

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

467

The Western Airborne Contaminant Assessment Project (WACAP): An Interdisciplinary Evaluation of the Impacts of Airborne Contaminants in Western U.S. National Parks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Western Airborne Contaminant Assessment Project (WACAP): An Interdisciplinary Evaluation of the Impacts of Airborne Contaminants in Western U.S. National Parks ... U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado ...

Dixon H. Landers; Staci Massey Simonich; Daniel Jaffe; Linda Geiser; Donald H. Campbell; Adam Schwindt; Carl Schreck; Michael Kent; Will Hafner; Howard E. Taylor; Kimberly Hageman; Sascha Usenko; Luke Ackerman; Jill Schrlau; Neil Rose; Tamara Blett; Marilyn Morrison Erway

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

468

Decommissioning of the TA-42 plutonium contaminated incinerator facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1978, a plutonium (/sup 239/Pu) contaminated incinerator facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, was decommissioned. The project involved dismantling the facility and burying the debris at an on-site radioactive solid waste disposal/storage area. Contaminated soil from the 5000 m/sup 2/ area was also buried. The facility was constructed in 1951 to incinerate /sup 239/Pu contaminated wastes. It was later used as a decontamination facility. The major features included a 185-m/sup 2/ floor area control building, incinerator, cyclone dust collector, spray cooler, venturi scrubber, air filter bank, ash separator, and two 140 000-liter ash storage tanks. Six-hundred cubic meters of debris and 1200 m/sup 3/ of soil contaminated with less than 10 nCi /sup 239/Pu per gram of soil were buried at the Laboratory disposal area. Five cubic meters of /sup 239/Pu contaminated ash residues containing more than 10 nCi /sup 239/Pu per gram of waste were packaged and stored to meet the Department of Energy's 20-year retrievable storage criteria. The operation consumed 80 work days and 5800 manhours at a cost of $150 000. This report presents the details concerning decommissioning procedures, the health physics, the waste management, the environmental surveillance results, and a cost breakdown for the operation.

Harper, J.R.; Garde, R.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Use of passive sampling devices to determine soil contaminant concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effective remediation of contaminated sites requires accurate identification of chemical distributions. A rapid sampling method using passive sampl