National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for oil supply development

  1. International Oil Supplies and Demands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  2. International Oil Supplies and Demands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--90 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  3. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decision making...

  4. International Oil Supplies and Demands. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world`s dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group`s thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  5. International Oil Supplies and Demands. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--90 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world`s dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group`s thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  6. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2012 | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Emergencies 2012 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2012 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2012.pdf (3.86 MB) More Documents & Publications IEA Response ...

  7. Oil- and gas-supply modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gass, S.I.

    1982-05-01

    The symposium on Oil and Gas Supply Modeling, held at the Department of Commerce, Washington, DC (June 18-20, 1980), was funded by the Energy Information Administration of the Department of Energy and co-sponsored by the National Bureau of Standards' Operations Research Division. The symposium was organized to be a forum in which the theoretical and applied state-of-the-art of oil and gas supply models could be presented and discussed. Speakers addressed the following areas: the realities of oil and gas supply, prediction of oil and gas production, problems in oil and gas modeling, resource appraisal procedures, forecasting field size and production, investment and production strategies, estimating cost and production schedules for undiscovered fields, production regulations, resource data, sensitivity analysis of forecasts, econometric analysis of resource depletion, oil and gas finding rates, and various models of oil and gas supply. This volume documents the proceedings (papers and discussion) of the symposium. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  8. The oil price and non-OPEC supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seymour, A.

    1991-01-01

    The design of any effective oil pricing policy by producers depends on a knowledge of the nature and complexity of supply responses. This book examines the development of non-OPEX oil reserves on a field-by-filed basis to determine how much of the increase in non-OPEC production could be attributable to the price shocks and how much was unambiguously due to decisions and developments that preceded the price shocks. Results are presented in eighteen case-studies of non-OPEC producers. This study will be of interest to economists and planners specializing in the upstream and to policy makers both in oil producing and consuming countries.

  9. Updated Hubbert curves analyze world oil supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanhoe, L.F.

    1996-11-01

    The question is not whether, but when, world crude oil production will start to decline, ushering in the permanent oil shock era. While global information for predicting this event is not so straightforward as the data M. King Hubbert used in creating his famous Hubbert Curve that predicted the US (Lower 48 states, or US/48) 1970 oil production peak, there are strong indications that most of the world`s large exploration targets have now been found. Meanwhile, the earth`s population is exploding along with the oil needs of Asia`s developing nations. This article reviews Hubbert`s original analyses on oil discovery and production curves for the US/48 and projects his proven methodology onto global oil discoveries and production as of 1992. The world`s oil discovery curve peaked in 1962, and thence declined, as a Hubbert Curve predicts. However, global production was restricted after the 1973 Arab oil embargo. Otherwise, world production would have peaked in the mid-1990s. Two graphs show alternate versions of future global oil production.

  10. World oil price behavior during oil supply disruptions: what can we learn from the past

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birdsall, T.H.

    1980-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to: (1) examine how world oil prices have behaved during past oil supply disruptions, (2) attempt to understand why world oil prices have behaved during disruptions as they have, and (3) see what history foretells, if anything, for the behavior of world oil prices during future oil supply disruptions.

  11. Oil supply increase due in 1996`s second half

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, R.J.

    1996-07-29

    The crucial oil-market issue for this year`s second half is new supply. Production will increase again outside the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. And Iraq has general approval to resume exports under limits set by the United Nations, although start of the exports has been delayed by at least 60 days. The big question is the market`s ability to absorb the supply gains. As usual, the market`s need for oil in the second half will depend on economies. So far in 1996, economic growth has pushed consumption to levels unexpected a year ago. Demand the rest of the year depends heavily on economic performances of the industrialized nations that make up the organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and the rapidly growing nations of the Asia-Pacific region. Growth in countries elsewhere in the developing world, especially Latin America, remains a wild card. The paper discusses the worldwide outlook, crude oil prices, US product prices, natural gas prices, US economy, US energy demand, natural gas in the US, US oil demand, gasoline prices, distillate gains, resid slumps, LPG, ethane, US supply, production patterns, rise in refinery capacity, imports, stocks, and stock coverage.

  12. AEO2012 Preliminary Assumptions: Oil and Gas Supply

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3 Oil and Gas Supply Working Group Meeting Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuels Analysis ... for Annual Energy Outlook 2013: Oil and Gas Working Group Overview 2 Office of ...

  13. Carbon Dioxide Enhanced Oil Recovery Untapped Domestic Energy Supply

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oil and water form separate Oily surfaces can be cleaned if a solvent is used that is completely miscible with the oil. Oily surfaces can be cleaned if a solvent is used 5 Untapped Domestic Energy Supply and Long Term Carbon Storage Solution oil/CO 2 miscibility increases. For this reason, oil field operators must consider the pressure of a depleted oil reservoir when evaluating its suitability for CO 2 enhanced oil recovery. Low pressured reservoirs may need to be re-pressurized by injecting

  14. Carbon Dioxide Enhanced Oil Recovery Untapped Domestic Energy Supply

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oily surfaces can be cleaned if a solvent is used that is completely miscible with the oil. 5 Untapped Domestic Energy Supply and Long Term Carbon Storage Solution oil/CO 2 miscibility increases. For this reason, oil field operators must consider the pressure of a depleted oil reservoir when evaluating its suitability for CO 2 enhanced oil recovery. Low pressured reservoirs may need to be re-pressurized by injecting water (see page 6 sidebar on waterflooding). When the injected CO 2 and

  15. Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. Projected production estimates of US crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian/Antrim shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects US domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted profitability to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

  16. Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-24

    The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. It is prepared in accordance with the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, Section 57(b)(2)). Projected production estimates of U.S. crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects U.S. domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted drilling expenditures and average drilling costs to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

  17. Rising U.S. oil output leads world oil supply growth

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rising U.S. oil output leads world oil supply growth U.S. crude oil production reached 7 million barrels per day at the end of 2012 for the first time in two decades and is well on its way to topping 8 million barrels per day by 2014. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration expects daily oil output will average 7.3 million barrels this year and then increase to 8.1 million barrels next year. The increase in U.S. and other North American oil production will account

  18. 2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available - focusing on stockdraw - and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also

  19. Documentation of the oil and gas supply module (OGSM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSK, to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. It is prepared in accordance with the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, Section 57(b)(2). OGSM is a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply potential and related issues. Its primary function is to produce forecast of crude oil, natural gas production, and natural gas imports and exports in response to price data received endogenously (within NEMS) from the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) and the Petroleum Market Model (PMM). To accomplish this task, OGSM does not provide production forecasts per se, but rather parameteres for short-term domestic oil and gas production functions and natural gas import functions that reside in PMM and NGTDM.

  20. Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply Statistics www.eia.gov Natural Gas Monthly August 2016 U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 August 2016 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Monthly ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States

  1. Impact of oil shortage on plastic medical supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, G.B.; Kline, B.

    1981-03-01

    There is good evidence that production of plastic medical equipment may be a minuscule fraction of the overall petrochemical industry; yet, it is not immune to serious supply shortfall in an oil shortage crisis of either economic or military nature. In support of this allegation, researchers have introduced documented evidence that the US health care industry experienced plastic supply shortfall in the form of increased lead time and cost as a direct result of the 1973-1974 embargo. The industry was fortunate in that there was some cushion effect from residual inventories and that the embargo did not last longer. As a further example, it has been shown that the British industry was not so fortunate; it experienced definite signs of medical plastic shortfall and reaction by the medical profession. The US industry, from manufacturer to consumer, lacks contingency planning in spite of lessons learned from the last embargo. Contrary to the apparent consensus of popular opinion, plan is more than a four-lettered word. More planning and implementation is required if the US health care industry is to be ready to cope with the next oil shortage crisis.

  2. Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development Robert Keiter; John Ruple...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conjunctive Surface and Groundwater Management in Utah: Implications for Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development Robert Keiter; John Ruple; Heather Tanana; Rebecca Holt 29 ENERGY...

  3. Heavy oil development in Canada - The need for upgrading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, P.C.

    1987-01-01

    The author first reviews Canada's petroleum reserves, then summarizes the problem facing Canada regarding dwindling supplies of conventional light and medium crude oils and briefly describes Canada's refining capability. With that background, he attempts to analyze the problems that face heavy oil producers in attempting to market their product and propose a potential solution to these problems as illustrated by Husky Oil's approach - the construction of a heavy oil upgrader. He closes by sharing his views on the future of heavy oil development and the policy issues facing our governments.

  4. Markets during world oil supply crises: an analysis of industry, consumer, and governmental response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erfle, Stephen; Pound, John; Kalt, Joseph

    1981-04-01

    An analysis of the response of American markets to supply crises in world oil markets is presented. It addresses four main issues: the efficiency of the operation of American oil markets during oil supply crises; the problems of both economic efficiency and social equity which arise during the American adaptation process; the propriety of the Federal government's past policy responses to these problems; and the relationship between perceptions of the problems caused by world oil crises and the real economic natures of these problems. Specifically, Chapter 1 presents a theoretical discussion of the effects of a world supply disruption on the price level and supply availability of the world market oil to any consuming country including the US Chapter 2 provides a theoretical and empirical analysis of the efficiency of the adaptations of US oil product markets to higher world oil prices. Chapter 3 examines the responses of various groups of US oil firms to the alterations observed in world markets, while Chapter 4 presents a theoretical explanation for the price-lagging behavior exhibited by firms in the US oil industry. Chapter 5 addresses the nature of both real and imagined oil market problems in the US during periods of world oil market transition. (MCW)

  5. Non-OPEC oil supply continues to grow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, D.H.

    1995-12-25

    Global reserves of crude oil remain at 1 trillion bbl, according to OGJ`s annual survey of producing countries. Significant gains are in Brazil, Colombia, Congo, Egypt, Libya, Nigeria, Oman, and Papua New Guinea. Decreases were reported by Indonesia, Norway, the U.K., Iran, Canada, Mexico, and the US. Natural gas reserves slipped to 4.9 quadrillion cu ft. The major production trend is a lasting surge from outside of OPEC. This year`s Worldwide Production report begins with a detailed analysis of this crucial development by an international authority. This article discusses the OECD outlook by region and the turnaround in production in the former Soviet Union.

  6. Oil

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department works to ensure domestic and global oil supplies are environmentally sustainable and invests in research and technology to make oil drilling cleaner and more efficient.

  7. Factors that will influence oil and gas supply and demand in the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holditch, S.A.; Chianelli, R.R.

    2008-04-15

    A recent report published by the National Petroleum Council (NPC) in the United States predicted a 50-60% growth in total global demand for energy by 2030. Because oil, gas, and coal will continue to be the primary energy sources during this time, the energy industry will have to continue increasing the supply of these fuels to meet this increasing demand. Achieving this goal will require the exploitation of both conventional and unconventional reservoirs of oil and gas in (including coalbed methane) an environmentally acceptable manner. Such efforts will, in turn, require advancements in materials science, particularly in the development of materials that can withstand high-pressure, high-temperature, and high-stress conditions.

  8. Oil and Gas Supply Module of the National Energy Modeling System: Model Documentation 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil and Gas Supply Module of the National Energy Modeling System: Model Documentation 2014 July 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | NEMS Model Documentation 2014: Oil and Gas Supply Module i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are

  9. Product Supplied for Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Finished

  10. Kalimantan field development hikes gas supply for LNG export

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suharmoko, G.R. )

    1991-10-14

    This paper reports on the development of Tambora and Tunu gas fields in Kalimantan that have increased available gas supply for the export of liquefied natural gas (LNG) from Indonesia. The demand for LNG is increasing in the energy thirsty Far East market. And Indonesia, the world's largest exporter, is keeping pace by expanding the Bontang liquefaction plant in East Kalimantan. A fifth train, with a capacity of around 2.5 million tons/year, began operating in January 1990. Start-up of a sixth train, of identical capacity, is planned for January 1994. The Bontang plant is operated by PT Badak on behalf of Pertamina, the Indonesian state oil and gas mining company. The feed to the fifth train comes primarily from the first-phase development of Total Indonesie's two gas fields, Tambora and Tunu. The sixth train will be fed by a second-phase development of the Tunu field.

  11. DOE, States Seek Closer Collaboration on Oil and Gas Supply and Delivery, Climate Change Mitigation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An agreement aimed at improving cooperation and collaboration in the areas of oil and natural gas supply, delivery, and climate change mitigation, has been signed by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC).

  12. EIA model documentation: Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. Projected production estimates of US crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projects are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects US domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted drilling expenditures and average drilling costs to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region.

  13. Future world oil supplies: There is a finite limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanhoe, L.F.

    1995-10-01

    The question is not whether, but when, world crude productivity will start to decline, ushering in the permanent oil shock era. While global information for predicting this ``event`` is not so straightforward as the data M. King Hubbert used in creating his famous curve that predicted the US oil production peak, there are indications that most of the large exploration targets have been found, at the same time that the world`s population is exploding. This theme and a discussion of ``reserve`` and ``resource`` definitions and use, or abuse, are the subjects of this article. Discussions and illustrations give one indication of where the world is in crude production and reserves, and where it is headed.

  14. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    374 33 4,092 2,128 3,351 69 54 4,048 479 5,465 Crude Oil 45 - - - - 900 191 70 -38 1,126 119 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 329 -1 55 28 -81 - - 11 14 90 215 Pentanes Plus 34 -1 - - - 0 - - 0 - 4 29 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 295 - - 55 28 -82 - - 11 14 86 186 Ethane/Ethylene 135 - - 0 - -119 - - 2 - 17 -3 Propane/Propylene 110 - - 37 24 38 - - 3 - 62 144 Normal Butane/Butylene 34 - - 17 2 0 - - 6 1 6 40 Isobutane/Isobutylene 16 - - 0 2 0 - - -1 13 0 5 Other Liquids - -

  15. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,508 978 4,808 2,166 -154 -17 -79 4,592 505 5,271 Crude Oil 1,673 - - - - 2,058 -115 -51 -217 3,683 99 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 835 -20 208 69 -126 - - 309 78 289 290 Pentanes Plus 99 -20 - - 0 155 - - 6 24 198 5 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 737 - - 208 69 -281 - - 303 54 91 285 Ethane/Ethylene 279 - - - - -133 - - 4 - 63 79 Propane/Propylene 303 - - 120 55 -120 - - 174 - 10 174 Normal Butane/Butylene 97 - - 92 6 -27 - - 125 4 17 22 Isobutane/Isobutylene 57 - - -3 7

  16. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1,030 14 695 326 -681 9 -14 668 11 729 Crude Oil 643 - - - - 315 -330 2 -18 647 1 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 387 0 21 7 -364 - - 11 17 3 19 Pentanes Plus 59 0 - - - -48 - - 0 6 2 3 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 327 - - 21 7 -316 - - 11 11 1 16 Ethane/Ethylene 117 - - - - -115 - - 2 - - 0 Propane/Propylene 134 - - 9 6 -127 - - 1 - 0 21 Normal Butane/Butylene 52 - - 11 0 -47 - - 9 4 1 3 Isobutane/Isobutylene 24 - - 1 1 -27 - - 0 7 - -9 Other Liquids - - 14 - - 3 18 -18 6

  17. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1,040 27 3,154 1,585 508 51 -156 2,960 452 3,108 Crude Oil 983 - - - - 1,258 127 8 -36 2,399 14 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 58 0 94 11 - - - 28 61 46 26 Pentanes Plus 26 0 - - - - - - 0 21 1 4 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 31 - - 94 11 - - - 28 40 46 22 Ethane/Ethylene 0 - - - - - - - - - - 0 Propane/Propylene 11 - - 47 11 - - - 4 - 29 36 Normal Butane/Butylene 7 - - 44 0 - - - 25 19 17 -10 Isobutane/Isobutylene 13 - - 3 - - - - -1 21 - -4 Other Liquids - - 27 - - 137

  18. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1,086 15 662 340 -715 -38 10 637 18 686 Crude Oil 762 - - - - 326 -425 -44 9 602 8 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 323 0 13 10 -297 - - 1 20 7 21 Pentanes Plus 55 0 - - - -45 - - 0 6 5 -1 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 268 - - 13 10 -252 - - 1 14 2 22 Ethane/Ethylene 77 - - - - -76 - - 0 - - 1 Propane/Propylene 122 - - 9 9 -110 - - 0 - 0 29 Normal Butane/Butylene 50 - - 3 0 -40 - - 1 7 2 5 Isobutane/Isobutylene 19 - - 0 1 -25 - - 0 7 0 -13 Other Liquids - - 15 - - 1 8 -5 1 15

  19. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    369,558 35,210 623,399 302,286 9,238 -1,703 590,222 156,194 594,978 2,077,498 Crude Oil 261,028 - - - - 228,320 3,220 -11,881 492,960 11,489 0 1,223,700 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 108,530 -665 26,382 3,475 - - 24,697 12,892 34,311 65,822 211,782 Pentanes Plus 13,410 -665 - - 4 - - 383 4,630 6,226 1,510 20,935 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 95,120 - - 26,382 3,471 - - 24,314 8,262 28,085 64,312 190,847 Ethane/Ethylene 41,404 - - 25 - - - 6,614 - 2,414 32,401 51,566

  20. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,319 1,174 20,780 10,076 308 -57 19,674 5,206 19,833 Crude Oil 8,701 - - - - 7,611 107 -396 16,432 383 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 3,618 -22 879 116 - - 823 430 1,144 2,194 Pentanes Plus 447 -22 - - 0 - - 13 154 208 50 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 3,171 - - 879 116 - - 810 275 936 2,144 Ethane/Ethylene 1,380 - - 1 - - - 220 - 80 1,080 Propane/Propylene 1,157 - - 590 96 - - 286 - 742 815 Normal Butane/Butylene 311 - - 295 10 - - 305 66 108 137 Isobutane/Isobutylene 322

  1. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1,213 980 122,761 63,840 100,522 2,062 1,606 121,451 14,360 163,960 198,551 Crude Oil 1,348 - - - - 27,006 5,743 2,103 -1,144 33,768 3,576 0 16,685 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 9,865 -15 1,644 839 -2,431 - - 333 421 2,704 6,444 6,334 Pentanes Plus 1,018 -15 - - - 14 - - 11 - 128 878 203 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 8,847 - - 1,644 839 -2,445 - - 322 421 2,576 5,566 6,131 Ethane/Ethylene 4,036 - - 14 - -3,574 - - 66 - 513 -103 366 Propane/Propylene 3,291 - - 1,118 718 1,147

  2. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    75,232 29,328 144,249 64,976 -4,629 -508 -2,382 137,745 15,165 158,122 335,233 Crude Oil 50,177 - - - - 61,740 -3,442 -1,537 -6,518 110,479 2,977 0 150,638 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 25,055 -609 6,251 2,061 -3,770 - - 9,259 2,341 8,682 8,706 56,453 Pentanes Plus 2,960 -609 - - 4 4,645 - - 168 721 5,948 163 9,361 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 22,095 - - 6,251 2,057 -8,415 - - 9,091 1,620 2,734 8,543 47,092 Ethane/Ethylene 8,383 - - - - -3,989 - - 133 - 1,901 2,360 5,937

  3. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    21,004 3,686 240,921 116,120 -90,690 5,896 4,195 222,187 112,784 157,771 1,349,503 Crude Oil 160,724 - - - - 92,388 3,768 2,344 -2,605 257,341 4,489 0 972,590 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 60,280 -17 15,054 43 17,128 - - 13,949 7,783 21,444 49,312 140,327 Pentanes Plus 6,869 -17 - - - -3,215 - - 221 3,100 77 239 10,985 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 53,411 - - 15,054 43 20,343 - - 13,728 4,683 21,366 49,074 129,342 Ethane/Ethylene 25,477 - - 11 - 11,010 - - 6,370 - - 30,128

  4. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,367 123 8,031 3,871 -3,023 197 140 7,406 3,759 5,259 Crude Oil 5,357 - - - - 3,080 126 78 -87 8,578 150 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 2,009 -1 502 1 571 - - 465 259 715 1,644 Pentanes Plus 229 -1 - - - -107 - - 7 103 3 8 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1,780 - - 502 1 678 - - 458 156 712 1,636 Ethane/Ethylene 849 - - 0 - 367 - - 212 - - 1,004 Propane/Propylene 599 - - 377 - 209 - - 104 - 641 439 Normal Butane/Butylene 120 - - 130 1 75 - - 139 38 66 82 Isobutane/Isobutylene

  5. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    30,900 412 20,857 9,790 -20,439 265 -433 20,027 316 21,876 45,716 Crude Oil 19,300 - - - - 9,454 -9,893 57 -527 19,403 42 0 24,402 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 11,600 -10 624 201 -10,927 - - 326 506 90 566 3,588 Pentanes Plus 1,776 -10 - - - -1,444 - - -5 177 53 97 328 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 9,824 - - 624 201 -9,483 - - 331 329 37 469 3,260 Ethane/Ethylene 3,506 - - - - -3,447 - - 45 - - 14 502 Propane/Propylene 4,028 - - 277 178 -3,803 - - 38 - 1 641 1,303 Normal

  6. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    31,209 805 94,611 47,560 15,236 1,522 -4,688 88,812 13,570 93,249 148,494 Crude Oil 29,479 - - - - 37,732 3,824 253 -1,087 71,969 406 0 59,385 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 1,730 -14 2,809 331 - - - 830 1,841 1,391 794 5,080 Pentanes Plus 787 -14 - - - - - - -12 632 19 134 58 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 943 - - 2,809 331 - - - 842 1,209 1,372 660 5,022 Ethane/Ethylene 2 - - - - - - - - - - 2 - Propane/Propylene 338 - - 1,402 323 - - - 130 - 856 1,077 1,151 Normal

  7. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4,631,167 399,635 7,260,943 3,431,210 130,585 158,333 6,882,105 1,733,771 7,079,331 2,014,788 Crude Oil 3,436,537 - - - - 2,682,946 55,121 91,814 5,915,532 167,258 0 1,176,487 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 1,194,630 -7,655 223,448 52,563 - - 21,920 188,270 353,016 899,780 197,273 Pentanes Plus 156,568 -7,655 - - 4,027 - - -45 53,404 66,494 33,087 20,543 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1,038,062 - - 223,448 48,536 - - 21,965 134,866 286,522 866,693 176,730 Ethane/Ethylene

  8. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    12,688 1,095 19,893 9,401 358 434 18,855 4,750 19,395 Crude Oil 9,415 - - - - 7,351 151 252 16,207 458 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 3,273 -21 612 144 - - 60 516 967 2,465 Pentanes Plus 429 -21 - - 11 - - 0 146 182 91 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 2,844 - - 612 133 - - 60 369 785 2,375 Ethane/Ethylene 1,108 - - 6 0 - - -3 - 65 1,051 Propane/Propylene 1,117 - - 559 112 - - 51 - 615 1,121 Normal Butane/Butylene 324 - - 55 10 - - 12 169 98 110 Isobutane/Isobutylene 296 - - -7

  9. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    18,493 10,299 1,386,705 615,305 1,341,370 42,058 35,012 1,368,120 90,331 2,020,767 192,970 Crude Oil 17,461 - - - - 227,582 153,586 40,768 1,159 409,330 28,908 0 16,298 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 101,032 -191 14,223 16,761 -4,395 - - 937 12,599 16,573 97,321 8,270 Pentanes Plus 11,667 -191 - - 9 4 - - 99 583 706 10,101 209 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 89,365 - - 14,223 16,752 -4,399 - - 838 12,016 15,867 87,220 8,061 Ethane/Ethylene 30,795 - - 170 - -31,804 - - 30 - -

  10. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    325 28 3,799 1,686 3,675 115 96 3,748 247 5,536 Crude Oil 48 - - - - 624 421 112 3 1,121 79 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 277 -1 39 46 -12 - - 3 35 45 267 Pentanes Plus 32 -1 - - 0 0 - - 0 2 2 28 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 245 - - 39 46 -12 - - 2 33 43 239 Ethane/Ethylene 84 - - 0 - -87 - - 0 - - -2 Propane/Propylene 110 - - 37 41 76 - - 3 - 38 223 Normal Butane/Butylene 36 - - 2 1 0 - - -1 23 6 11 Isobutane/Isobutylene 14 - - -1 4 0 - - 0 10 0 7 Other Liquids - - 29 -

  11. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    938,803 337,875 1,648,603 880,978 -179,813 5,075 45,559 1,573,850 158,221 1,853,890 334,507 Crude Oil 684,654 - - - - 841,415 -149,968 -7,459 39,872 1,299,921 28,849 0 150,472 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 254,149 -6,980 40,909 25,611 -16,520 - - 2,143 33,456 92,412 169,158 54,687 Pentanes Plus 32,237 -6,980 - - 45 46,186 - - 857 6,692 62,712 1,227 9,997 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 221,912 - - 40,909 25,566 -62,706 - - 1,286 26,764 29,700 167,931 44,690 Ethane/Ethylene

  12. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    572 926 4,517 2,414 -493 14 125 4,312 433 5,079 Crude Oil 1,876 - - - - 2,305 -411 -20 109 3,561 79 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 696 -19 112 70 -45 - - 6 92 253 463 Pentanes Plus 88 -19 - - 0 127 - - 2 18 172 3 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 608 - - 112 70 -172 - - 4 73 81 460 Ethane/Ethylene 191 - - 0 0 -27 - - 2 - 65 98 Propane/Propylene 274 - - 112 57 -122 - - -2 - 4 318 Normal Butane/Butylene 94 - - 2 7 -26 - - 4 27 12 33 Isobutane/Isobutylene 48 - - -1 6 4 - - 0 46 0

  13. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    764,126 37,360 2,865,360 1,309,259 -1,087,330 56,793 70,483 2,650,249 1,331,308 1,893,527 1,297,642 Crude Oil 2,066,856 - - - - 1,085,333 95,312 11,559 41,650 3,113,888 103,522 0 931,007 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 697,270 -207 145,337 4,588 129,222 - - 18,599 109,314 228,253 620,044 125,761 Pentanes Plus 81,397 -207 - - 3,955 -29,697 - - -991 34,994 439 21,006 9,983 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 615,873 - - 145,337 633 158,919 - - 19,590 74,320 227,814 599,038 115,778

  14. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,573 102 7,850 3,587 -2,979 156 193 7,261 3,647 5,188 Crude Oil 5,663 - - - - 2,974 261 32 114 8,531 284 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 1,910 -1 398 13 354 - - 51 299 625 1,699 Pentanes Plus 223 -1 - - 11 -81 - - -3 96 1 58 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1,687 - - 398 2 435 - - 54 204 624 1,641 Ethane/Ethylene 755 - - 5 - 190 - - -4 - - 955 Propane/Propylene 599 - - 360 0 156 - - 52 - 551 512 Normal Butane/Butylene 131 - - 40 2 67 - - 6 86 66 81 Isobutane/Isobutylene 202 -

  15. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    396,272 5,367 241,768 124,089 -260,935 -13,868 3,558 232,453 6,470 250,212 45,547 Crude Oil 278,279 - - - - 119,074 -155,092 -16,161 3,234 219,796 3,070 0 23,545 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 117,993 -123 4,589 3,561 -108,299 - - 387 7,148 2,691 7,495 3,622 Pentanes Plus 20,168 -123 - - - -16,493 - - 20 2,045 1,914 -427 310 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 97,825 - - 4,589 3,561 -91,806 - - 367 5,103 777 7,922 3,312 Ethane/Ethylene 27,979 - - - - -27,855 - - -86 - - 210 432

  16. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    413,474 8,734 1,118,507 501,579 186,709 40,528 3,721 1,057,433 147,442 1,060,934 144,121 Crude Oil 389,288 - - - - 409,542 56,162 26,413 5,899 872,597 2,909 0 55,165 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 24,186 -154 18,390 2,042 -8 - - -146 25,753 13,086 5,763 4,933 Pentanes Plus 11,099 -154 - - 18 - - - -30 9,090 723 1,180 44 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 13,087 - - 18,390 2,024 -8 - - -116 16,663 12,363 4,583 4,889 Ethane/Ethylene 35 - - - - - - - - - - 35 - Propane/Propylene

  17. Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1,133 24 3,064 1,374 512 111 10 2,897 404 2,907 Crude Oil 1,067 - - - - 1,122 154 72 16 2,391 8 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 66 0 50 6 0 - - 0 71 36 16 Pentanes Plus 30 0 - - 0 - - - 0 25 2 3 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 36 - - 50 6 0 - - 0 46 34 13 Ethane/Ethylene 0 - - - - - - - - - - 0 Propane/Propylene 12 - - 41 5 - - - -2 - 22 39 Normal Butane/Butylene 12 - - 7 0 - - - 2 25 12 -20 Isobutane/Isobutylene 11 - - 3 0 0 - - 0 21 0 -6 Other Liquids - - 24 - - 114 306 23 3

  18. U.S. Crude Oil Supply & Disposition

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Supply Field Production (Commercial) 285,000 265,254 284,400 268,380 275,715 261,028 1920-2016 Alaskan 15,987 14,715 15,843 14,667 15,661 14,103 1981-2016 Lower 48 States 269,013 250,539 268,557 253,713 260,054 246,925 1993-2016 Imports 237,910 229,402 249,300 229,100 246,323 228,320 1920-2016 Commercial 237,910 229,402 249,300 229,100 246,323 228,320 2001-2016 Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) 1977-2009 Adjustments (Commercial) 2,868 -3,546

  19. U.S. Crude Oil Supply & Disposition

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Supply Field Production (Commercial) 1,998,554 2,058,916 2,372,312 2,715,220 3,198,694 3,436,537 1859-2015 Alaskan 218,904 204,829 192,368 187,954 181,175 176,240 1981-2015 Lower 48 States 1,779,650 1,854,087 2,179,943 2,527,266 3,017,519 3,260,296 1993-2015 Imports 3,362,856 3,261,422 3,120,755 2,821,480 2,680,626 2,682,946 1910-2015 Commercial 3,362,856 3,261,422 3,120,755 2,821,480 2,680,626 2,682,946 2001-2015 Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR)

  20. Final report to the President on oil supply shortages during 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-07-01

    Stockpile levels at the beginning of 1979, imports during the first half of the year, and inventory management were primarily responsible for the oil supply shortage in the spring and summer of 1979. There was a 3.1% reduction in oil supply in May to July of 1979 relative to the same period in 1978, and a 0.2% reduction relative to 1977. The reduction in available oil between 1979 and previous years was even greater than the reduction in supply. Domestic production of crude oil declined between May to July of 1978 and the same period in 1979. This was consistent with the long-term trend. Free-world oil production dropped by about 2 million b/d during the first quarter of 1979 as a result of the loss of Iranian production. Production returned to pre-disruption levels by the middle of 1979. The US share of free-world oil supply dropped by 2% in the second quarter of 1979 compared to the 1977-78 average. Gasoline supplied to consumers during May to July 1979 was 8.5% less than in the same period in 1978, and 7 to 9% less than the amount that would have been consumed if there had been no supply restriction. Compared to 1978, reduced gasoline production during this period in 1979 accounted for 36% of the supply reduction, and reduced use of stocks accounted for 64% of the supply reduction. Refiners could have made more gasoline available during May to July of 1979 without reducing stocks below minimum operating levels. The yield of gasoline relative to other petroleum products went down in May to July of 1979 as compared to the same period in 1977 and 1978. Most of the increase was in production of petrochemical feedstocks. Refiners who were bound by DOE price controls or who were complying with CWPS guidelines could not have increased allowable revenues by delaying the sale of gasoline. Virtually all of the gasoline price increases that took place between January and August 1979 were based on cost increases.

  1. Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    published in the NGM, is developed by the National Weather Service Climate Analysis Center, Camp Springs, Maryland. The data are available weekly with monthly summaries...

  2. Policy Analysis of Water Availability and Use Issues for Domestic Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruple, John; Keiter, Robert

    2010-12-31

    Oil shale and oil sands resources located within the intermountain west represent a vast, and as of yet, commercially untapped source of energy. Development will require water, and demand for scarce water resources stands at the front of a long list of barriers to commercialization. Water requirements and the consequences of commercial development will depend on the number, size, and location of facilities, as well as the technologies employed to develop these unconventional fuels. While the details remain unclear, the implication is not – unconventional fuel development will increase demand for water in an arid region where demand for water often exceeds supply. Water demands in excess of supplies have long been the norm in the west, and for more than a century water has been apportioned on a first-come, first-served basis. Unconventional fuel developers who have not already secured water rights stand at the back of a long line and will need to obtain water from willing water purveyors. However, uncertainty regarding the nature and extent of some senior water claims combine with indeterminate interstate river management to cast a cloud over water resource allocation and management. Quantitative and qualitative water requirements associated with Endangered Species protection also stand as barriers to significant water development, and complex water quality regulations will apply to unconventional fuel development. Legal and political decisions can give shape to an indeterminate landscape. Settlement of Northern Ute reserved rights claims would help clarify the worth of existing water rights and viability of alternative sources of supply. Interstate apportionment of the White River would go a long way towards resolving water availability in downstream Utah. And energy policy clarification will help determine the role oil shale and oil sands will play in our nation’s future.

  3. GIS Method for Developing Wind Supply Curves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, D.; Heimiller, D.; Cowlin, S.

    2008-06-01

    This report describes work conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as part of the Wind Technology Partnership (WTP) sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This project has developed methods that the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) intends to use in the planning and development of China's 30 GW of planned capacity. Because of China's influence within the community of developing countries, the methods and the approaches here may help foster wind development in other countries.

  4. Oil Stop Valve : Oil Spill Containment Research and Development Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourn, Robert D.

    1982-07-01

    This report summarizes the research and development project conducted by the Civil Engineering Section, Division of Substation and Control Engineering, to determine the effectiveness of the oil stop valve for use in the Bonneville Power Administration's Oil Spill Containment and Countermeasure Program. The most attractive alternative to lagoons and separator tanks was found in the oil stop valve manufactured by AFL/Clark Industries of Riviera Beach, Florida. This small, direct-acting and relatively inexpensive valve requires little maintenance and can either be employed independently, using existing drain lines for effluent storage, or in conjunction with oil separator tanks and lagoon systems. The AFL/Clark valve requires no power and has only one moving part, a ballasted float having a specific gravity between that of oil and water. In water, the float rides above the throat of the discharge pipe allowing water to flow out. When oil enters the water the float begins losing its relative bouyancy and sinks until it seats itself over the throat of the outlet, closing the valve. Usually installed in a manhole within a typical storm drainage system, the valve backs spilled oil into drainways and contains it for temporary storage within the switchyard.

  5. Developments in oil shale in 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knutson, C.F.; Dana, G.F.; Solti, G.; Qian, J.L.; Ball, F.D.; Hutton, A.C.; Hanna, J.; Russell, P.L.; Piper, E.M.

    1988-10-01

    Oil shale development continued at a slow pace in 1987. The continuing interest in this commodity is demonstrated by the 342 oil shale citations added to the US Department of Energy Energy Database during 1987. The Unocal project in Parachute, Colorado, produced 600,000 bbl of synfuel in 1987. An appreciable amount of 1987's activity was associated with the nonsynfuel uses of oil shale. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Main Generator Seal Oil Supply Reliability Improvements at Southern California Edison's San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simma, Fred Y.; Chetwynd, Russell J.; Rowe, Stuart A.

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents the justification for the approach, details and results of the Main Generator Seal Oil System reliability enhancements on the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, SONGS. The SONGS, Unit 3 experienced substantial turbine damage in early 2001 after the turbine bearings lubrication oil supply failed. During a loss of off-site power incident, power was lost to the two AC powered turbine lubrication oil pumps due to a breaker failure in the switchgear and the DC powered emergency bearing lubricating oil pump failed to start due to a breaker trip. The SONGS turbine generators coasted down from full speed to a full stop without lubricating oil. This resulted in significant bearing, journal and steam path damage that required a four-month duration repair outage during a time period where electricity was in short supply in the State of California. The generator hydrogen sealing system remained operable during this event, however it was recognized during the event follow up investigation that this system had vulnerabilities to failure similar to the bearing lubrication system. In order to prevent a reoccurrence of this extremely costly event, SONGS has taken actions to modify both of these critical turbine generator systems by adding additional, continuously operating pumps with a new, independent power source and independently routed cables. The main challenge was to integrate the additional equipment into the existing lubrication and seal oil systems. The lubrication Oil System was the first system to be retro-fitted and these results already have been presented. Reference 2. This paper provides the result of the reliability enhancements for the Main Generator Seal Oil System, which concludes the turbine/generator critical oil systems reliability improvements, performed by SONGS. It is worth noting that the design team discovered and corrected a number of other significant operational issues, which had been present from the early days and also learned

  7. Pipeline issues shape southern FSU oil, gas development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-22

    To future production from southern republics of the former Soviet Union (FSU), construction and revitalization of pipelines are as important as the supply of capital. Export capacity will limit production and slow development activity in the region until new pipelines are in place. Plenty of pipeline proposals have come forward. The problem is politics, which for every proposal so far complicates routing or financing or both. Russia has made clear its intention to use pipeline route decisions to retain influence in the region. As a source of external pressure, it is not alone. Iran and Turkey also have made strong bids for the southern FSU`s oil and gas transport business. Diplomacy thus will say as much as commerce does about how transportation issues are settled and how quickly the southern republics move toward their potentials to produce oil and gas. The paper discusses possible routes and the problems with them, the most likely proposal, and future oil flows.

  8. Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) power supply design and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neumeyer, C.; Bronner, G.; Lu, E.; Ramakrishnan, S.

    1995-04-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is an advanced tokamak project aimed at the production of quasi-steady state plasmas with advanced shape, heating, and particle control. TPX is to be built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) using many of the facilities from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). TPX will be the first tokamak to utilize superconducting (SC) magnets in both the toroidal field (TF) and poloidal field (PF) systems. This new feature requires a departure from the traditional tokamak power supply schemes. This paper describes the plan for the adaptation of the PPPL/FTR power system facilities to supply TPX. Five major areas are addressed, namely the AC power system, the TF, PF and Fast Plasma Position Control (FPPC) power supplies, and quench protection for the TF and PF systems. Special emphasis is placed on the development of new power supply and protection schemes.

  9. Development of the oil-water monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanson, C.

    1990-04-02

    The oil-water monitor is a device invented by Dr. Claude Swanson of Applied Physics Technology to respond to the petroleum-loss problem in crude oil transfers. It is a device which measures water content in crude oil and other petroleum products, in a flowing pipe such as a pipeline or tanker manifold. It is capable of accurately measuring the water contamination levels in crude oil shipments, in real time as the crude oil flows through the loading manifold into the tanker, or at the receiving point as the oil is off-loaded It has application in the verification of oil volumes and concentration of contaminants at petroleum transfer points. The industry-estimated level of water loss at transfer points due to inadequate monitoring technology amounts to several billion dollars per year, so there is a definite perceived need within the petroleum community for this type of accurate water monitoring technology. The device has been patented, and initial feasibility experiments have been conducted. The present research is directed toward developing and demonstrating a bench model prototype of the oil-water monitor, complete with the computer software and automated microwave equipment and electronics which will demonstrate the performance of the invention, for implementation in full-scale fielded systems. 3 figs.

  10. International oil and gas exploration and development activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-29

    This report is part of an ongoing series of quarterly publications that monitors discoveries of oil and natural gas in foreign countries and provides an analysis of the reserve additions that result. The report is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program (FESAP). It presents a summary of discoveries and reserve additions that result from recent international exploration and development activities. It is intended for use by petroleum industry analysts, various government agencies, and political leaders in the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy plans, policy, and legislation. 25 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Demand for oil and energy in developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, C. Jr.; Relles, D.A.; Navarro, J.

    1980-05-01

    How much of the world's oil and energy supply will the non-OPEC less-developed countries (NOLDCs) demand in the next decade. Will their requirements be small and thus fairly insignificant compared with world demand, or large and relatively important. How will world demand be affected by the economic growth of the NOLDCs. In this report, we try to develop some reasonable forecasts of NOLDC energy demands in the next 10 years. Our focus is mainly on the demand for oil, but we also give some attention to the total commercial energy requirements of these countries. We have tried to be explicit about the uncertainties associated with our forecasts, and with the income and price elasticities on which they are based. Finally, we consider the forecasts in terms of their implications for US policies concerning the NOLDCs and suggest areas of future research on NOLDC energy issues.

  12. Alaska Oil and Gas Exploration, Development, and Permitting Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard McMahon; Robert Crandall

    2006-03-31

    This is the final technical report for Project 15446, covering the grant period of October 2002 through March 2006. This project connects three parts of the oil exploration, development, and permitting process to form the foundation for an advanced information technology infrastructure to better support resource development and resource conservation. Alaska has nearly one-quarter of the nation's supply of crude oil, at least five billion barrels of proven reserves. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists report that the 1995 National Assessment identified the North Slope as having 7.4 billion barrels of technically recoverable oil and over 63 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. From these reserves, Alaska produces roughly one-fifth of the nation's daily crude oil production, or approximately one million barrels per day from over 1,800 active wells. The broad goal of this grant is to increase domestic production from Alaska's known producing fields through the implementation of preferred upstream management practices. (PUMP). Internet publication of extensive and detailed geotechnical data is the first task, improving the permitting process is the second task, and building an advanced geographical information system to offer continuing support and public access of the first two goals is the third task. Excellent progress has been made on all three tasks; the technical objectives as defined by the approved grant sub-tasks have been met. The end date for the grant was March 31, 2006.

  13. SOLVENT-BASED ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY PROCESSES TO DEVELOP WEST...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SOLVENT-BASED ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY PROCESSES TO DEVELOP WEST SAK ALASKA NORTH SLOPE HEAVY OIL RESOURCES Citation Details In-Document Search Title: SOLVENT-BASED ENHANCED OIL ...

  14. U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Bruce Duncan

    2013-02-22

    The objective of the report is to provide an assessment of the domestic supply chain and manufacturing infrastructure supporting the U.S. offshore wind market. The report provides baseline information and develops a strategy for future development of the supply chain required to support projected offshore wind deployment levels. A brief description of each of the key chapters includes: » Chapter 1: Offshore Wind Plant Costs and Anticipated Technology Advancements. Determines the cost breakdown of offshore wind plants and identifies technical trends and anticipated advancements in offshore wind manufacturing and construction. » Chapter 2: Potential Supply Chain Requirements and Opportunities. Provides an organized, analytical approach to identifying and bounding the uncertainties associated with a future U.S. offshore wind market. It projects potential component-level supply chain needs under three demand scenarios and identifies key supply chain challenges and opportunities facing the future U.S. market as well as current suppliers of the nation’s land-based wind market. » Chapter 3: Strategy for Future Development. Evaluates the gap or competitive advantage of adding manufacturing capacity in the U.S. vs. overseas, and evaluates examples of policies that have been successful . » Chapter 4: Pathways for Market Entry. Identifies technical and business pathways for market entry by potential suppliers of large-scale offshore turbine components and technical services. The report is intended for use by the following industry stakeholder groups: (a) Industry participants who seek baseline cost and supplier information for key component segments and the overall U.S. offshore wind market (Chapters 1 and 2). The component-level requirements and opportunities presented in Section 2.3 will be particularly useful in identifying market sizes, competition, and risks for the various component segments. (b) Federal, state, and local policymakers and economic development

  15. Outlook for Non-OPEC Oil Supply Growth in 2008-2009 (Released in the STEO February 2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    In 2008-2009, the Energy Information Administration expects that non-OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) petroleum supply growth will surpass that in recent years because of the large number of new oil projects scheduled to come online during the forecast period.

  16. ALASKA OIL AND GAS EXPLORATION, DEVELOPMENT, AND PERMITTING PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard McMahon; Robert Crandall; Chas Dense; Sean Weems

    2003-11-19

    This is the second technical report, covering the period from April 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003. This project brings together three parts of the oil exploration, development, and permitting process to form the foundation for a more fully integrated information technology infrastructure for the State of Alaska. The geo-technical component is a shared effort between the State Department of Administration and the US Department of Energy. The Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission is rapidly converting high volumes of paper documents and geo-technical information to formats suitable for search and retrieval over the Internet. The permitting component is under the lead of the DNR Office of Project Management and Permitting. A web-based system will enable the public and other review participants to track permit status, submit and view comments, and obtain important project information on-line. By automating several functions of the current manual process, permit applications will be completed more quickly and accurately, and agencies will be able to complete reviews with fewer delays. Structural changes are taking place in terms of organization, statutory authority, and regulatory requirements. Geographic Information Systems are a central component to the organization of information, and the delivery of on-line services. Progress has been made to deploy the foundation system for the shared GIS based on open GIS protocols to the extent feasible. Alaska has nearly one-quarter of the nation's supply of crude oil, at least five billion barrels of proven reserves. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists report that the 1995 National Assessment identified the North Slope as having 7.4 billion barrels of technically recoverable oil and over 63 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. From these reserves, Alaska produces roughly one-fifth of the nation's daily crude oil production, or approximately one million barrels per day from over 1,800 active wells.

  17. Bio-Oil Co-Processing: Expanding the Refinery Supply System ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Understanding and specifying bio-oil intermediate requirements for use in petroleum ... to discuss the potential for bio-oil co-processing, the challenges currently ...

  18. ALASKA OIL AND GAS EXPLORATION, DEVELOPMENT, AND PERMITTING PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard McMahon; Robert Crandall; Chas Dense; Sean Weems

    2003-08-04

    The objective of this project is to eliminate three closely inter-related barriers to oil production in Alaska through the use of a geographic information system (GIS) and other information technology strategies. These barriers involve identification of oil development potential from existing wells, planning projects to efficiently avoid conflicts with other interests, and gaining state approvals for exploration and development projects. Each barrier is the result of either current labor-intensive methods or poorly accessible information. This project brings together three parts of the oil exploration, development, and permitting process to form the foundation for a more fully integrated information technology infrastructure for the State of Alaska. This web-based system will enable the public and other review participants to track permit status, submit and view comments, and obtain important project information online. By automating several functions of the current manual process, permit applications will be completed more quickly and accurately, and agencies will be able to complete reviews with fewer delays. The application will include an on-line diagnostic Coastal Project Questionnaire to determine the suite of permits required for a specific project. The application will also automatically create distribution lists based on the location and type of project, populate document templates for project review start-ups, public notices and findings, allow submission of e-comments, and post project status information on the Internet. Alaska has nearly one-quarter of the nation's supply of crude oil, at least five billion barrels of proven reserves. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists report that the 1995 National Assessment identified the North Slope as having 7.4 billion barrels of technically recoverable oil and over 63 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. From these reserves, Alaska produces roughly one-fifth of the nation's daily crude oil production

  19. Development of More Effective Biosurfactants for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McInerney, M.J.; Mouttaki, H.; Folmsbee, M.; Knapp, R.; Nagle, D.

    2003-01-24

    The overall goal of this research was to develop effective biosurfactant production for enhanced oil recovery in the United States.

  20. U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development This report seeks to provide an organized, analytical approach to identifying and bounding uncertainties around offshore wind manufacturing and supply chain capabilities; projecting potential component-level supply chain needs under three demand scenarios; and identifying key supply chain challenges and opportunities facing the future U.S. market and current suppliers of the

  1. U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    an organized, analytical approach to identifying and bounding uncertainties around offshore wind manufacturing and supply chain capabilities; projecting potential...

  2. U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Bruce

    2013-02-22

    This report seeks to provide an organized, analytical approach to identifying and bounding uncertainties around offshore wind manufacturing and supply chain capabilities; projecting potential component-level supply chain needs under three demand scenarios; and identifying key supply chain challenges and opportunities facing the future U.S. market and current suppliers of the nation’s landbased wind market.

  3. The impact of oil on a developing country

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikein, A.

    1990-01-01

    This book provides an analysis of the impact of the oil industry on a particular developing country, Nigeria over a period of 32 years. Arguing that previous studies on the oil industry in developing countries have tended to focus only on the economic significance of oil, ignoring its societal costs, the author uses a multidimensional approach that enables him to identify the linkage between the performance of the oil industry and the pattern of Nigeria's national and regional development.

  4. International Oil and Gas Exploration and Development

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1993-01-01

    Presents country level data on oil reserves, oil production, active drilling rigs, seismic crews, wells drilled, oil reserve additions, and oil reserve to production ratios (R/P ratios) for about 85 countries, where available, from 1970 through 1991. World and regional summaries are given in both tabular and graphical form.

  5. Oil and natural gas supply and demand trends in North America...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TX By Adam Sieminski U.S. Energy Information Administration Historical and projected oil prices 2 crude oil price price per barrel (real 2010 dollars) Sources: U.S. Energy...

  6. Ecuador steps up pace of oil development activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-23

    This paper reports that oil companies operating in Ecuador plan to quicken the pace of oil development this year. After delays in 1991, companies plan a series of projects to develop reserves discovered the past 3 years estimated at more than 600 million bbl. Oil and Gas Journal estimated Ecuador's proved crude reserves at 1.55 billion bbl as of Jan. 1, 1992. The development push is part of a larger effort needed to ensure Ecuador's status as an oil exporter into the next century. Ecuador is the smallest crude oil producer and exporter in the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries.

  7. Figure 8. Technically Recoverable and Commercially Developable Oil

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8. Technically Recoverable and Commercially Developable Oil at 95 Percent, Mean, and 5 Percent Probabilities for Given Oil Prices as a Percentage of Technically Recoverable Oil for the ANWR 1002 Area of the Alaska North Slope fig8.jpg (38547 bytes) Source: United States Geological Survey, "Economics of Undiscovered Oil in the 1002 Area of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge," 1998

  8. Australian developments in oil shale processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    This study gives some background on Australian oil shale deposits, briefly records some history of oil shale processing in the country and looks at the current status of the various proposals being considered to produce syncrudes from Australian oil shales. 5 refs.

  9. U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... the land-based wind market, with some potential concerns over supplies of rare earth elements (for permanent magnet generators) and larger-sized bearings and forgings (BTM 2011). ...

  10. Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Oil and Gas Supply...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    explicitly modeled to determine the direct impacts on supply, reserves, and various economic parameters. The success of the technology program is measured by estimating the...

  11. Oil Shale Development from the Perspective of NETL's Unconventional Oil Resource Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.W.; Shadle, L.J.; Hill, D.

    2007-01-01

    The history of oil shale development was examined by gathering relevant research literature for an Unconventional Oil Resource Repository. This repository contains over 17,000 entries from over 1,000 different sources. The development of oil shale has been hindered by a number of factors. These technical, political, and economic factors have brought about R&D boom-bust cycles. It is not surprising that these cycles are strongly correlated to market crude oil prices. However, it may be possible to influence some of the other factors through a sustained, yet measured, approach to R&D in both the public and private sectors.

  12. Volume 9: A Review of Socioeconomic Impacts of Oil Shale Development WESTERN OIL SHALE DEVELOPMENT: A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotariu, G. J.

    1982-02-01

    The development of an oil shale industry in northwestern Colorado and northeastern Utah has been forecast at various times since early this century, but the comparatively easy accessibility of other oil sources has forestalled development. Decreasing fuel supplies, increasing energy costs, and the threat of a crippling oil embargo finally may launch a commercial oil shale industry in this region. Concern for the possible impacts on the human environment has been fostered by experiences of rapid population growth in other western towns that have hosted energy resource development. A large number of studies have attempted to evaluate social and economic impacts of energy development and to determine important factors that affect the severity of these impacts. These studies have suggested that successful management of rapid population growth depends on adequate front-end capital for public facilities, availability of housing, attention to human service needs, long-range land use and fiscal planning. This study examines variables that affect the socioeconomic impacts of oil shale development. The study region is composed of four Colorado counties: Mesa, Moffat, Garfield and Rio Blanco. Most of the estimated population of 111 000 resides in a handful of urban areas that are separated by large distances and rugged terrain. We have projected the six largest cities and towns and one planned company town (Battlement Mesa) to be the probable centers for potential population impacts caused by development of an oil shale industry. Local planners expect Battlement Mesa to lessen impacts on small existing communities and indeed may be necessary to prevent severe regional socioeconomic impacts. Section II describes the study region and focuses on the economic trends and present conditions in the area. The population impacts analyzed in this study are contingent on a scenario of oil shale development from 1980-90 provided by the Department of Energy and discussed in Sec. III. We

  13. Oil shale fines process developments in Brazil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisboa, A.C.; Nowicki, R.E. ); Piper, E.M. )

    1989-01-01

    The Petrobras oil shale retorting process, utilizes the particle range of +1/4 inch - 3 1/2 inches. The UPI plant in Sao Mateus do Sul has over 106,000 hours of operation, has processed over 6,200,000 metric tons of shale and has produced almost 3,000,000 barrels of shale oil. However, the nature of the raw oil shale is such that the amount of shale less than 1/4 inch that is mined and crushed and returned to the mine site is about 20 percent, thereby, increasing the cost of oil produced by a substantial number. Petrobras has investigated several systems to process the fines that are not handled by the 65 MTPH UPI plant and the 260 MTPH commercial plant. This paper provides an updated status of each of these processes in regard to the tests performed, potential contributions to an integrated use of the oil shale mine, and future considerations.

  14. Research and information needs for management of oil shale development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-05-01

    This report presents information and analysis to assist BLM in clarifying oil shale research needs. It provides technical guidance on research needs in support of their regulatory responsibilities for onshore mineral activities involving oil shale. It provides an assessment of research needed to support the regulatory and managerial role of the BLM as well as others involved in the development of oil shale resources on public and Indian lands in the western United States.

  15. Development of a photovoltaic power supply for wireless sensor networks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, Matthew R.; Kyker, Ronald D.

    2005-06-01

    This report examines the design process of a photovoltaic (solar) based power supply for wireless sensor networks. Such a system stores the energy produced by an array of photovoltaic cells in a secondary (rechargeable) battery that in turn provides power to the individual node of the sensor network. The goal of such a power supply is to enable a wireless sensor network to have an autonomous operation on the order of years. Ideally, such a system is as small as possible physically while transferring the maximum amount of available solar energy to the load (the node). Within this report, there is first an overview of current solar and battery technologies, including characteristics of different technologies and their impact on overall system design. Second is a general discussion of modeling, predicting, and analyzing the extended operation of a small photovoltaic power supply and setting design parameters. This is followed by results and conclusions from the testing of a few basic systems. Lastly, some advanced concepts that may be considered in order to optimize future systems will be discussed.

  16. Western oil shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 1. Main report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    The general goal of this study is to present the prospects of shale oil within the context of (1) environmental constraints, (2) available natural and economic resources, and (3) the characteristics of existing and emerging technology. The objectives are: to review shale oil technologies objectively as a means of supplying domestically produced fuels within environmental, social, economic, and legal/institutional constraints; using available data, analyses, and experienced judgment, to examine the major points of uncertainty regarding potential impacts of oil shale development; to resolve issues where data and analyses are compelling or where conclusions can be reached on judgmental grounds; to specify issues which cannot be resolved on the bases of the data, analyses, and experienced judgment currently available; and when appropriate and feasible, to suggest ways for the removal of existing uncertainties that stand in the way of resolving outstanding issues.

  17. Oil and gas development in East Siberia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sagers, M.J.

    1994-03-01

    The East Siberian region, which comprises nearly 43% of Russia`s territory (including the Sakha (Yakut) republic), has substantial hydrocarbon potential that is impeded by significant logistical problems, the daunting physical environment, and technical challenges posed by the geological complexity of the region. The area`s three major oil and gas provinces are the Lena-Tunguska (with the greatest potential), Lena-Vilyuy, and Yenisey-Anabar. The paper focuses on assessment of reserves, production potential, and history, as well as joint-venture activity involving foreign capital. Foreign investment is targeting gas deposits in the Vilyuy basin and elsewhere in the Sakha republic and small oil deposits serving local markets in the Yakutsk and Noril`sk areas. Forecasts do not envisage substantial production of oil from the region before the year 2010. Future gas production levels are less predictable despite the ambitious plans to export gas from Sakha to South Korea. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Western oil shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 8. Health effects of oil shale development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotariu, G.J.

    1982-02-01

    Information on the potential health effects of a developing oil shale industry can be derived from two major sources: (1) the historical experience in foreign countries that have had major industries; and (2) the health effects research that has been conducted in the US in recent years. The information presented here is divided into two major sections: one dealing with the experience in foreign countries and the second dealing with the more recent work associated with current oil shale development in the US. As a result of the study, several observations can be made: (1) most of the current and historical data from foreign countries relate to occupational hazards rather than to impacts on regional populations; (2) neither the historical evidence from other countries nor the results of current research have shown pulmonary neoplasia to be a major concern, however, certain types of exposure, particularly such mixed source exposures as dust/diesel or dust/organic-vapor have not been adequately studied and the lung cancer question is not closed; (3) the industry should be alert to the incidence of skin disease in the industrial setting, however, automated techniques, modern industrial hygiene practices and realistic personal hygiene should greatly reduce the hazards associated with skin contact; and (4) the entire question of regional water contamination and any resultant health hazard has not been adequately addressed. The industrial practice of hydrotreating the crude shale oil will diminish the carcinogenic hazard of the product, however, the quantitative reduction of biological activity is dependent on the degree of hydrotreatment. Both Soviet and American experimentalists have demonstrated a correlation betweed carcinogenicity/toxicity and retorting temperature; the higher temperatures producing the more carcinogenic or toxic products.

  19. Development of Nuclear Renewable Oil Shale Systems for Flexible Electricity and Reduced Fossil Fuel Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel Curtis; Charles Forsberg; Humberto Garcia

    2015-05-01

    We propose the development of Nuclear Renewable Oil Shale Systems (NROSS) in northern Europe, China, and the western United States to provide large supplies of flexible, dispatchable, very-low-carbon electricity and fossil fuel production with reduced CO2 emissions. NROSS are a class of large hybrid energy systems in which base-load nuclear reactors provide the primary energy used to produce shale oil from kerogen deposits and simultaneously provide flexible, dispatchable, very-low-carbon electricity to the grid. Kerogen is solid organic matter trapped in sedimentary shale, and large reserves of this resource, called oil shale, are found in northern Europe, China, and the western United States. NROSS couples electricity generation and transportation fuel production in a single operation, reduces lifecycle carbon emissions from the fuel produced, improves revenue for the nuclear plant, and enables a major shift toward a very-low-carbon electricity grid. NROSS will require a significant development effort in the United States, where kerogen resources have never been developed on a large scale. In Europe, however, nuclear plants have been used for process heat delivery (district heating), and kerogen use is familiar in certain countries. Europe, China, and the United States all have the opportunity to use large scale NROSS development to enable major growth in renewable generation and either substantially reduce or eliminate their dependence on foreign fossil fuel supplies, accelerating their transitions to cleaner, more efficient, and more reliable energy systems.

  20. U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 19,180 18,882 18,490 18,961 19,106 19,395 1973-2015 Crude Oil 0 0 0 0 0 0 1981-2015 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs 2,265 2,237 2,301 2,495 2,448 2,465 1983-2015 Pentanes Plus 92 32 50 56 52 91 1983-2015 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 2,173 2,204 2,251 2,440 2,396 2,375 1973-2015 Ethane/Ethylene 880 950 958 990 1,048 1,051 1983-2015 Propane/Propylene 1,160 1,153 1,175 1,275 1,167 1,121 1973-2015 Normal Butane/Butylene 108

  1. Oil and gas developments in North Africa in 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, R.C.

    1987-10-01

    Licensed oil acreage in the 6 North Africa countries (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan and Tunisia) totaled 1,500,000 km/sup 2/ at the end of 1986, down 290,000 km/sup 2/ from 1985. About 50% of the relinquishments were in Libya. Most oil and gas discoveries were made in Egypt (16 oil and 2 gas). Several oil finds were reported in onshore Libya, and 1 was reported in Algeria in the southeastern Sahara. According to available statistics, development drilling decreased from 1985 levels, except in Tunisia. A 6.3% decline in oil production took place in 1986, falling below the 3 million bbl level (2,912,000 b/d). Only sparse data are released on the gas output in North Africa. 6 figures, 27 tables.

  2. Opportunities for renewable energy technologies in water supply in developing country villages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niewoehner, J.; Larson, R.; Azrag, E.; Hailu, T.; Horner, J.; VanArsdale, P.

    1997-03-01

    This report provides the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) with information on village water supply programs in developing countries. The information is intended to help NREL develop renewable energy technologies for water supply and treatment that can be implemented, operated, and maintained by villagers. The report is also useful to manufacturers and suppliers in the renewable energy community in that it describes a methodology for introducing technologies to rural villages in developing countries.

  3. U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    19,055 19,680 19,616 19,264 19,202 19,833 1963-2016 Crude Oil 0 0 0 0 0 0 1981-2016 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs 2,957 2,724 2,507 2,297 2,261 2,194 1981-2016 Pentanes Plus 59 1 63 42 30 50 1981-2016 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 2,898 2,723 2,444 2,255 2,230 2,144 1973-2016 Ethane/Ethylene 1,104 1,094 1,116 1,075 1,084 1,080 1981-2016 Propane/Propylene 1,577 1,490 1,160 918 894 815 1973-2016 Normal Butane/Butylene 109 57 72 150 125 137 1981-2016 Isobutane/Isobutylene 108 83 96 112 128 112 1981-2016

  4. Heating oil supply/price monitoring report: Part I. Historic data, August 1978-July 1979. Part II. Current data, August 1979-May 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The 1973-1974 oil embargo brought national realization to the importance, and need for the collection and analysis of energy data. The Maine Office of Energy Resources (OER) is responsible for the establishment and implementation of energy plans and policies in the State of Maine. The Supply/Price Monitoring System has been created to assist energy planners both in Maine and the nation. This survey is used to analyze trends in home heating oil supply and price, and as a tool in responding to inquiries from: citizens, other state agencies, federal and local offices, and the Office of the Governor. This report will describe the Supply/Price Monitoring System, and the results obtained from the survey, during the period August 1, 1979 through May 31, 1980. Historical data is also provided as required by the aforementioned agreement between the OER and the US Department of Energy.

  5. Heating oil supply/price monitoring report. Part I. Historic data, August 1978-July 1979; Part II. Current data, August 1979-May 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The 1973-1974 oil embargo brought national realization to the importance, and need for the collection and analysis of energy data. The Maine Office of Energy Resources (OER) is responsible for the establishment and implementation of energy plans and policies in the State of Maine. The Supply/Price Monitoring System has been created to assist energy planners both in Maine and the nation. This survey is used to analyze trends in home heating oil supply and price, and as a tool in responding to inquiries from: citizens, other state agencies, federal and local offices, and the Office of the Governor. This report will describe the Supply/Price Monitoring System, and the results obtained from the survey, during the period August 1, 1979 through May 31, 1980. Historical data are also provided as required by the aforementioned agreement between the OER and the US Department of Energy.

  6. U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    590,718 570,721 608,108 577,923 595,262 594,978 1981-2016 Crude Oil 0 0 0 0 0 0 1981-2016 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs 91,675 79,004 77,710 68,899 70,078 65,822 1981-2016 Pentanes Plus 1,837 28 1,953 1,249 936 1,510 1981-2016 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 89,838 78,975 75,758 67,650 69,142 64,312 1981-2016 Ethane/Ethylene 34,222 31,731 34,598 32,255 33,595 32,401 1981-2016 Propane/Propylene 48,892 43,203 35,967 27,530 27,723 24,435 1981-2016 Normal Butane/Butylene 3,385 1,645 2,229 4,495 3,868 4,109

  7. Trends in electricity demand and supply in the developing countries, 1980--1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, S.; Campbell, C.

    1992-11-01

    This report provides an overview of trends concerning electricity demand and supply in the developing countries in the 1980--1990 period, with special focus on 13 major countries for which we have assembled consistent data series. We describe the linkage between electricity demand and economic growth, the changing sectoral composition of electricity consumption, and changes in the mix of energy sources for electricity generation. We also cover trends in the efficiency of utility electricity supply with respect to power plant efficiency and own-use and delivery losses, and consider the trends in carbon dioxide emissions from electricity supply.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF SHALLOW VISCOUS OIL RESERVES IN NORTH SLOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-07-01

    North Slope of Alaska has huge oil deposits in heavy oil reservoirs such as Ugnu, West Sak and Shrader Bluff etc. The viscosity of the last two reservoir oils vary from {approx}30 cp to {approx}3000 cp and the amount in the range of 10-20 billion barrels. High oil viscosity and low formation strength impose problems to high recovery and well productivity. Water-alternate-gas injection processes can be effective for the lower viscosity end of these deposits in West Sak and Shrader Bluff. Several gas streams are available in the North Slope containing NGL and CO{sub 2} (a greenhouse gas). The goal of this research is to develop tools to find optimum solvent, injection schedule and well-architecture for a WAG process in North Slope shallow sand viscous oil reservoirs. In the last quarter, we have developed streamline generation and convection subroutines for miscible gas injection. The WAG injection algorithms are being developed. We formulated a four-phase relative permeability model based on two-phase relative permeabilities. The new relative permeability formulations are being incorporated into the simulator. Wettabilities and relative permeabilities are being measured. Plans for the next quarter includes modeling of WAG injection in streamline based simulation, relative permeability studies with cores, incorporation of complex well-architecture.

  9. The Design and Development of The EBIS LEBT Solenoid Power Supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Y.; Addessi, J.; Alessi, J.; Lambiase, R.; Liaw, C.J.; Pikin, A.; Sandberg, J.; Zhang, W.; Zubets, V.

    2010-05-23

    This power supply was designed and developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) as part of a new ion preinjector system called EBIS (Electron Beam Ion Source). It consists of a charging power supply, a capacitor bank, a discharge and recovery circuit and control circuits. The output is fed through cables into a solenoid magnet. The magnet's inductance is 1.9mH. The maximum charging voltage is 1000V. The power supply output is a half sine wave of 13ms duration. The repetition rate is 5Hz. The power supply output can be set to any value between 250A and 1900A in one second in order to accommodate the varying species of ions specified by different machine users.

  10. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, September 2005 (Thousand Barrels) Field Production Refinery and Blender Net Production...

  11. Oil exports, structural change, and economic development in Iran

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emami-Khoi, A.

    1981-01-01

    Within the broad Chenery-Kuznets framework, using structural change as a major indicator of economic development, this study investigates the direction and magnitude and broad features of structural change in Iran, and the role of oil production and exports in that change. Although the study covers a larger horizon, the analysis is focused on the period 1955 through 1977. A similar but less-detailed investigation is conducted for Algeria, Indonesia, and Venezuela also, and a cross-country, comparative perspective is generated. The study shows that, in general, the structural changes in Iran have either been weak (for example, in production and employment), or they are contrary to what the model would predict (for instance in trade). The pattern of structural change observed in Iran, therefore, does not indicate any significant economic development even though per capita income increased five-fold over the period 1955 through 1977. In short, oil does not appear to have been an engine of economic development in Iran. The situation appears broadly similar for the other three countries. Based on these findings, the study offers some suggestions concerning the future economic strategies that should enhance very considerably the contribution that oil industry can make toward Iran's economic development, and should thus accelerate the pace of economic development. These suggestions may be useful to other oil-exporting countries as well.

  12. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and Development Wells

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wells Drilled (Number) Exploratory and Development NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Dry Holes NA NA NA...

  13. Oil industry development and trade liberalization in the Western Hemisphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall, S.J.

    1993-12-31

    This paper provides an overview of oil industry developments in the Western Hemisphere with particular emphasis on Latin America since the inauguration of the Enterprise for the Americas Initiative by George Bush. The author discusses these developments in the context of the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (concluded in 1989), and the negotiation in 1992 of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). This paper is concerned essentially with the oil industry and does not discuss the importance of natural gas for Canadian producers nor the fact that much of Latin American oil production (notably in Mexico) is associated with natural gas. The author examines the shift to trade and investment liberalization and privatization in the 1980s and early 1990s, especially in Latin America--where the most dramatic transformation has occurred. The author suggests that investment patterns in the industry have been only marginally related to trade liberalization, and have derived more from considerations of resource availability, exploration and development costs, market factors, and the general state of the international economy--all of which have contributed in the 1980s to significant restructuring and downsizing among a number of major corporations. The author also notes the important increase in an internal Latin American market, and the role of regional organizations such as ARPEL-the Association of Latin American State Oil Company Producers. 31 refs., 3 tabs.

  14. Report on Performance of Prototype Dynatronix Power Supplies Developed Under a Phase I DOE SBIR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, Eric W.; Merriman, Jason H.

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prototype power supplies fabricated by Dynatronix, Inc. This project supports the advancement of electroforming capabilities to produce ultra-high purity copper. Ultra-high purity copper is an essential material used for a range of current and future fundamental nuclear physics programs such as the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The Mach 30 power supplies are a new design built to the specifications from the requirements of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with regard to timing, voltage, current output, and the required tolerances. The parameters used in these tests were developed empirically over a number of years based on a combination of thermodynamic and kinetics of the electroplating process. The power supplies were operated in a typical cleanroom environment for the production electroforming at PNNL. The units that were received by PNNL in July, 2010 have performed satisfactorily and have demonstrated short term durability.

  15. Development of unconventional oil and gas (UOG) must be done...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    unconventional oil and gas (UOG) must be done in responsible ways to minimize surface ... Office of Oil and Natural Gas Goals * To reduce the amount of land and time needed for oil ...

  16. EIS-0068: Development Policy Options for the Naval Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves prepared this programmatic statement to examine the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of development projects on the Naval Oil Shale Reserve 1, and examine select alternatives, such as encouraging production from other liquid fuel resources (coal liquefaction, biomass, offshore oil and enhanced oil recovery) or conserving petroleum in lieu of shale oil production.

  17. Development of Authorized Limits for Portsmouth Oil Inventory...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Authorized Limits for Portsmouth Oil Inventory Disposition September 12, 2012 By ... closure M E Environmental Management PORTS Oil Disposition Problem in Late 2007 * Need to ...

  18. Development and Standardization of Techniques for Bio-oil Characteriza...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Standardization of Techniques for Bio-oil Characterization Jack Ferrell, NREL; ... quantitative analytical methods for bio-oil characterization - Standard methods do not ...

  19. Methods of Managing Water in Oil Shale Development - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cost of producing potable water is low Reuse of water in drilling procedures Significant dewatering of the oil shale deposit Applications and Industries Oil shale drilling ...

  20. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 248,959 - - - - 235,269 8,443 10,330 474,643 7,698 0

  1. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0.PDF Table 10. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 573 - - - - 309

  2. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1.PDF Table 11. PAD District 5 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 35,538 -

  3. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2.PDF Table 12. PAD District 5 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,146 - - - -

  4. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .PDF Table 2. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 8,031 - - - - 7,589 272 333 15,311 248 0 Natural Gas Plant

  5. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .PDF Table 3. PAD District 1 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,408 - -

  6. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    TABLE4.PDF Table 4. PAD District 1 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 45 - - - -

  7. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    TABLE5.PDF Table 5. PAD District 2 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil .............................................................

  8. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    TABLE6.PDF Table 6. PAD District 2 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,529 - - -

  9. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    TABLE7.PDF Table 7. PAD District 3 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................

  10. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    TABLE8.PDF Table 8. PAD District 3 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 4,737 - - -

  11. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    TABLE9.PDF Table 9. PAD District 4 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil .............................................................

  12. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    June 2016 Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 261,028 - - - - 228,320 3,220 -11,881 492,960

  13. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 June 2016 Table 10. PAD District 2 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil

  14. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 June 2016 Table 11. PAD District 2 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,673 - - - -

  15. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 June 2016 Table 12. PAD District 2 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-June 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil

  16. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 June 2016 Table 13. PAD District 3 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................

  17. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 June 2016 Table 14. PAD District 3 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6

  18. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 June 2016 Table 15. PAD District 3 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 5,357 - - -

  19. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 June 2016 Table 16. PAD District 3 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-June 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6

  20. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 June 2016 Table 17. PAD District 4 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................

  1. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 June 2016 Table 18. PAD District 4 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6

  2. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 June 2016 Table 19. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 643 - - - -

  3. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    June 2016 Table 2. U.S. Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 1,639,778 - - - - 1,420,355

  4. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 June 2016 Table 20. PAD District 4 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-June 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil

  5. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 June 2016 Table 21. PAD District 5 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil .............................................................

  6. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 June 2016 Table 22. PAD District 5 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil

  7. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 June 2016 Table 23. PAD District 5 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 983 - - - -

  8. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 June 2016 Table 24. PAD District 5 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-June 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil

  9. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    June 2016 Table 3. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 8,701 - - - - 7,611 107 -396 16,432 383 0 Natural Gas Plant

  10. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    June 2016 Table 4. U.S. Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-June 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 9,010 - - - - 7,804 34 259 16,107 481

  11. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    June 2016 Table 5. PAD District 1 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,348 -

  12. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    June 2016 Table 6. PAD District 1 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil

  13. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    June 2016 Table 7. PAD District 1 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 45 - - - - 900

  14. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 June 2016 Table 8. PAD District 1 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-June 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil

  15. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 June 2016 Table 9. PAD District 2 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 50,177

  16. Oil and gas developments in North Africa in 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, R.C.

    1986-10-01

    Petroleum rights in the 6 North African countries (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan, and Tunisia) covered in this paper were 1,839,817 km/sup 2/ at the end of 1985, a decrease of 3% from the 1,896,446 km/sup 2/ held at the end of 1984. This decrease mainly is due to significant relinquishments made in Algeria, Egypt, and Tunisia. Morocco, however, had an increase of 18,087 km/sup 2/. Oil discoveries were reported in Algeria (possibly 5), Libya (at least 2), and Egypt (16). Only 1 gas find was made (in Morocco). According to sparse information, development drilling may have decreased markedly during 1985. Oil and condensate production increased by 3.1% to approximately 3,054,000 b/d compared to about 2,963,400 b/d in 1984. No statistics are currently available on gas production in North Africa. 8 figures, 27 tables.

  17. Petroleum supply monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-05-01

    Information on the supply and distribution of petroleum and petroleum products in the US as of March 1983 is presented. Data include statistics on crude oil, motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gases, imports, exports, stocks, and transport. This issue also features 2 articles entitled: Summer Gasoline Overview and Principal Factors Influencing Motor Gasoline Demand. (DMC)

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF BYPASSED OIL RESERVES USING BEHIND CASING RESISTIVITY MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. Conner; Jeffrey A. Blesener

    2005-02-07

    Tubing and rods of the S.P. Pedro-Nepple No.1 well were pulled and the well was prepared for running of Schlumberger's Cased Hole Formation Resistivity Tool (CHFR) in selected intervals. The CHFR tool was successfully run and data was captured. The CHFR formation resistivity readings were compared to original open hole resistivity measurements. Separation between the original and CHFR resistivity curves indicate both swept and un-swept sand intervals. Both watered out sand intervals and those with higher remaining oil saturation have been identified. Due to the nature of these turbidite sands being stratigraphically continuous, both the swept and unswept layers have been correlated across to one of the four nearby offset shallow wells. As a result of the cased hole logging, one well was selected for a workover to recomplete high oil saturated shallow sand intervals. During the second report period, well S.P. Pedro-Nepple No.2 was plugged back with cement excluding the previously existing production interval, squeeze cemented behind casing, selectively perforated in the shallower ''Bell'' zone and placed on production to develop potential new oil reserves and increase overall well productivity. Prior workover production averaged 3.0 BOPD for the previous six-months. Post workover well production was marginally increased to 3.7 BOPD on average for the following six months.

  19. Oil and gas exploration and development in Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nations, D.; Doss, A.K.; Ubarra, R.

    1984-07-01

    Recent oil and gas exploration activity has been widespread throughout Arizona. Development drilling has continued in the Dineh-bi-keyah and Teec-nos-Pos fields in the northeastern corner, and exploratory drilling continues to test potential Paleozoic reservoirs elsewhere on the plateau. Several shallow wells north of the Grand Canyon encountered shows and limited recoveries of oil from Permian and Triassic rocks. The greatest activity has occurred along the Overthrust trend from northwestern to southeastern Arizona. Several million acres were leased and eight exploratory wells drilled along this trend. None were discoveries, but the presence of a Laramide thrust fault in the vicinity of Tombstone was established. The other tests have neither proved nor disproved the concept of the Overthrust belt in southern Arizona. Recent discoveries in the nonmarine Tertiary and marine Paleozoic of southern Nevada have stimulated interest in the oil potential of similar rocks and structures in the Basin and Range province of Arizona, which are coincident with the Overthrust trend. Reported gas discoveries by Pemex in Miocene marine sediments of the Gulf of California have stimulated leasing in the Yuma area, where one uncompleted well is reported to be a potential producer. The Pedregosa basin of extreme southeastern Arizona remains an area of great interest to explorationists because of the presence of a 25,000-ft (7600-m) sequence of Paleozoic marine sediments similar to those of the Permian basin, and Cretaceous marine rocks, including coral-rudist reefs, similar to those that produce in Texas and Mexico.

  20. Development of Bypassed Oil Reserves Using Behind Casing Resistivity Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. Conner

    2004-02-14

    Tubing and rods of the S.P. Pedro-Nepple No.1 well were pulled and the well was prepared for running of Schlumberger's Cased Hole Formation Resistivity Tool (CHFR) in selected intervals. The CHFR tool was successfully run and data was captured. The CHFR formation resistivity readings were compared to original open hole resistivity measurements. Separation between the original and CHFR resistivity curves indicate both swept and un-swept sand intervals. Both watered out sand intervals and those with higher remaining oil saturation have been identified. Due to the nature of these turbidite sands being stratigraphically continuous, both the swept and unswept layers have been correlated across to one of the four nearby offset shallow wells. As a result of the cased hole logging, one well was selected for a workover to recomplete and test suspected oil saturated shallow sand intervals. Well S.P. Pedro-Nepple No.2 was plugged back with cement excluding the previously existing production interval, squeeze cemented behind casing, selectively perforated in the shallower ''Bell'' zone and placed on production to develop potential new oil reserves and increase overall well productivity. Prior workover production averaged 3.0 BOPD for the previous six-months from the original ''Meyer'' completion interval. Post workover well production was increased to 5.3 BOPD on average for the following fifteen months. In December 2005, a bridge plug was installed above the ''Bell'' zone to test the ''Foix'' zone. Another cement squeeze was performed behind casing, selectively perforated in the shallower ''Foix'' zone and placed on production. The ''Foix'' test has produced water and a trace of oil for two months.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF BYPASSED OIL RESERVES USING BEHIND CASING RESISTIVITY MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. Conner; Jeffrey A. Blesener

    2006-04-02

    Tubing and rods of the S.P. Pedro-Nepple No.1 well were pulled and the well was prepared for running of Schlumberger's Cased Hole Formation Resistivity Tool (CHFR) in selected intervals. The CHFR tool was successfully run and data was captured. The CHFR formation resistivity readings were compared to original open hole resistivity measurements. Separation between the original and CHFR resistivity curves indicate both swept and un-swept sand intervals. Both watered out sand intervals and those with higher remaining oil saturation have been identified. Due to the nature of these turbidite sands being stratigraphically continuous, both the swept and unswept layers have been correlated across to one of the four nearby offset shallow wells. As a result of the cased hole logging, one well was selected for a workover to recomplete and test suspected oil saturated shallow sand intervals. Well S.P. Pedro-Nepple No.2 was plugged back with cement excluding the previously existing production interval, squeeze cemented behind casing, selectively perforated in the shallower ''Bell'' zone and placed on production to develop potential new oil reserves and increase overall well productivity. Prior workover production averaged 3.0 BOPD for the previous six-months from the original ''Meyer'' completion interval. Post workover well production was increased to 5.3 BOPD on average for the following fifteen months. In December 2005, a bridge plug was installed above the ''Bell'' zone to test the ''Foix'' zone. Another cement squeeze was performed behind casing, selectively perforated in the shallower ''Foix'' zone and placed on production. The ''Foix'' test has produced water and a trace of oil for two months.

  2. Requirements and potential development pathways for fission energy supply infrastructures of the 21st century - a systems viewpoint.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade, D. C.

    1999-06-14

    Using an energy supply systems approach, we envision attributes and characteristic needs of a future global fission-based energy supply infrastructure, enumerate potential pathways for meeting those needs, and identify the underlying enabling science and technology developments for R and D efforts to meet the needs.

  3. Unconventional oil and gas (UOG) development and operations release...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Oil and Natural Gas Goals The Administration has set a goal to reduce methane emissions from the oil and gas sector by 40-45 percent from 2012 levels by 2025. Achieving ...

  4. Outlook for Non-OPEC Oil Supply in 2010-2011 (Released in the STEO January 2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    Two large categories define the world's producing countries of crude oil and other liquid fuels (hereafter liquids): those that are members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and those that are outside that group (non-OPEC). This article takes a closer look at the latter category.

  5. Proceedings: 1987 fuel supply seminar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prast, W.G.

    1988-08-01

    The seventh annual EPRI Fuel Supply Seminar was held in Baltimore, Maryland, from October 6 to 8, 1987. The major emphasis of the meeting was on identifying fuel market risks and planning concerns in order to cope with inherent uncertainties and make informed fuel supply decisions. Sessions dealt with the natural gas markets including the prospects for continued availability of gas as a boiler fuel, the relationship of gas and oil prices and the relevance of different regulatory issues. Other sessions addressed the political dimensions of world oil supply and the role of oil inventories in price dynamics, the interaction of world trade cycles, interest rates and currency fluctuations on utility fuel planning, and the role of strategic fuel planning in various utilities. The changing coal transportation market was the subject of several presentations, concluding with a review of utility experiences in integrating coal transportation and coal supply procurement. Presentations were made by various specialists including EPRI research contractors reporting on the results of ongoing research, speakers drawn from the utility, coal and natural gas industries, and independent consultants. The principal purpose of the seminar continues to be to provide utility fuel planners and fuel procurement managers with data and insights into the structure, operations and uncertainties of the fuel markets, thereby supporting their development of flexible fuel strategies and contributing to integrated utility decision making. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the energy data base.

  6. Energy Department Announces $2 Million to Develop Supply Chain, Manufacturing Competitiveness Analysis for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department today announced up to $2 million to develop the domestic supply chain for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and study the competitiveness of U.S. hydrogen and fuel cell system and component manufacturing.

  7. Supply Chain | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NISACSupply Chain content top National Transportation Fuels Model Posted by tmanzan on Oct 3, 2012 in | Comments 0 comments National Transportation Fuels Model This model informs analyses of the availability of transportation fuel in the event the fuel supply chain is disrupted. The portion of the fuel supply system represented by the network model (see figure) spans from oil fields to fuel distribution terminals. Different components of this system (e.g., crude oil import terminals, refineries,

  8. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 June 2016 Appendix D Northeast Reserves Reserves inventories are not considered to be in the commercial sector and are excluded from EIA's commercial motor gasoline and distillate fuel oil supply and disposition statistics, such as those reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and This Week In Petroleum. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve classifed as ultra-low sulfur distillate (15 parts per million) Terminal Operator Location Thousand Barrels Buckeye

  9. SE Gobe: Papua New Guinea`s second oil development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langston, M.V.; McCaul, T.R.; Fitzmorris, R.E.

    1994-12-31

    A reservoir development plan was developed from a detailed geological model of the SE Gobe Iagifu reservoir. This model incorporated sequence stratigraphy and extensive core and log analysis to provide the detailed layering framework for reservoir simulation. Cross-sectional balancing techniques were applied to field derived dip and strike, dipmeter log, and RFT data to obtain a structural model for the reservoir. Cross-sectional, sector and, finally, full field reservoir simulation models were constructed and used by the team to generate a reservoir development and management plan. The simulation models were used to examine the relative merits of vertical, deviated and horizontal wells, well placement, offtake rates, gas compression requirements and pressure maintenance strategies. Due to the uncertainty in the size and shape of the field, development options were considered at each of three reserve levels: proven, probable and possible. The simulation results showed that well rates should be held to less than 8,000 stb/d and that horizontal wells, with a length of at least 700 m, generally out-performed vertical wells. Oil recovery ranged between 34 and 45% of OOIP. The cases offering the best recoveries included both water injection and horizontal wells.

  10. Venezuelan projects advance to develop world`s largest heavy oil reserves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croft, G.; Stauffer, K.

    1996-07-08

    A number of joint venture projects at varying stages of progress promise to greatly increase Venezuela`s production of extra heavy oil. Units of Conoco, Chevron, Total, Arco, and Mobil have either signed agreements or are pursuing negotiations with affiliates of state-owned Petroleos de Venezuela SA on the development of huge reserves of 8--10{degree} gravity crude. Large heavy oil resources are present in the oil producing areas of eastern and western Venezuela, and the largest are in eastern Venezuela`s Orinoco heavy oil belt. The paper discusses the Orinoco heavy oil belt geology and several joint ventures being implemented.

  11. Oil and gas developments in North Africa in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, R.Ch.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum rights in the 6 North African countries (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan, and Tunisia) covered in this paper were 1,906,065 km/sup 2/ at the end of 1984, an increase of 4.6% from the 1,821,966 km/sup 2/ in force at the end of 1983. This increase is due to large awards in the Sudan despite significant relinquishments elsewhere. Seismic surveys conducted during 1984 decreased to about 510.5 crew-months onshore and 29.5 crew-months offshore. However, exploration in and off Egypt was higher compared to 1983. Exploratory drilling was lower, with only 125 wells drilled compared to 179 tests completed in 1983. The main decrease was in Egypt and Sudan, but drilling in Libya resulted in 20 more completions. A significant oil discovery was made in the offshore part of the Sirte basin, off southwest Cyrenaica. The success rate in North Africa ranged from 19% to 50% (Libya). Development drilling increased during 1984, as higher activity appears to have taken place in 3 countries. Oil production, with an estimated daily rate of 2,952,570 bbl, was up 2.8% from 1983 (2,871,460 BOPD). In Egypt, 7 fields located in the Gulf of Suez area went on stream during the year. Political unrest, which prevailed in southern Sudan during most of 1984, will likely delay the start-up of production in several fields. No statistics are available on gas production in North African countries.

  12. Oil and gas developments in North Africa in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, R.C.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum rights in the 6 North African countries (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan, and Tunisia) covered in this paper were 1,906,065 km/sup 2/ at the end of 1984. An increase of 4.6% from the 1,821,966 km/sup 2/ in force at the end of 1983. This increase is due to large awards in the Sudan despite significant relinquishments elsewhere. Seismic surveys conducted during 1984 decreased to about 510.5 crew-months onshore and 29.5 crew-months offshore. However, exploration in and off Egypt was higher compared to 1983. Exploratory drilling was lower, with only 125 wells drilled compared to 179 tests completed in 1983. The main decrease was in Egypt and Sudan, but drilling in Libya resulted in 20 more completions. A significant oil discovery was made in the offshore part of the Sirte basin, off southwest Cyrenaica. The success rate in North America ranged from 19% to 50% (Libya). Development drilling increased during 1984, as higher activity appears to have taken place in 3 countries. Oil production, with an estimated daily rate of 2,952,570 bbl, was 2.8% from 1983 (2,871,460 BOPD). In Egypt, 7 fields located in the Gulf of Suez area went on stream during the year. Political unrest, which prevailed in southern Sudan during most of 1984, will likely delay the start-up of production in several fields. No statistics are available on gas production in North African countries. 9 figures, 27 tables.

  13. Fossil fuels supplies modeling and research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leiby, P.N.

    1996-06-01

    The fossil fuel supplies modeling and research effort focuses on models for US Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) planning and management. Topics covered included new SPR oil valuation models, updating models for SPR risk analysis, and fill-draw planning. Another task in this program area is the development of advanced computational tools for three-dimensional seismic analysis.

  14. Western oil shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 7: an ecosystem simulation of perturbations applied to shale oil development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    Progress is outlined on activities leading toward evaluation of ecological and agricultural impacts of shale oil development in the Piceance Creek Basin region of northwestern Colorado. After preliminary review of the problem, it was decided to use a model-based calculation approach in the evaluation. The general rationale and objectives of this approach are discussed. Previous studies were examined to characterize climate, soils, vegetation, animals, and ecosystem response units. System function was methodically defined by developing a master list of variables and flows, structuring a generalized system flow diagram, constructing a flow-effects matrix, and conceptualizing interactive spatial units through spatial matrices. The process of developing individual mathematical functions representing the flow of matter and energy through the various system variables in different submodels is discussed. The system model diagram identified 10 subsystems which separately account for flow of soil temperatures, soil water, herbaceous plant biomass, shrubby plant biomass, tree cover, litter biomass, shrub numbers, animal biomass, animal numbers, and land area. Among these coupled subsystems there are 45 unique kinds of state variables and 150 intra-subsystem flows. The model is generalizeable and canonical so that it can be expanded, if required, by disaggregating some of the system state variables and allowing for multiple ecological response units. It integrates information on climate, surface water, ecology, land reclamation, air quality, and solid waste as it is being developed by several other task groups.

  15. Development Practices for Optimized MEOR in Shallow Heavy Oil Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shari Dunn-Norman

    2006-09-30

    The goal of this project is to demonstrate an economically viable and sustainable method of producing shallow heavy oil reserves in southwest Missouri and southeast Kansas using a combination of microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) and hydraulic fracturing of vertical wells.

  16. Canola-Based Automotive Oil Research and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Ira N.; Kammerman, Steven B.

    2009-12-07

    convert to bio-based products. The U.S. needs closer cooperation between the producers of agricultural products and the industry that makes the final product. Consequently, without ample government support, green technology projects will not be developed rapidly and in a substantial size to be able to realize the economies of scale needed. State and federal government collaboration and participation, including financial support, is imperative to the rapid development of incentives to ensure a sustained total conversion by the private sector and government to biobased lubricants and other industrial bioproducts. State and local governments can assist this industry by making certain that all of their fleets and those of their contractors use green oil.

  17. Recent hydrocarbon developments in Latin America: Key issues in the downstream oil sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, K.; Pezeshki, S.

    1995-03-01

    This report discusses the following: (1) An overview of major issues in the downstream oil sector, including oil demand and product export availability, the changing product consumption pattern, and refineries being due for major investment; (2) Recent upstream developments in the oil and gas sector in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela; (3) Recent downstream developments in the oil and gas sector in Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Cuba, and Venezuela; (4) Pipelines in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico; and (5) Regional energy balance. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Development of long life three phase uninterruptible power supply using flywheel energy storage unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Isao; Okita, Yoshihisa; Andoh, Itaru

    1995-12-31

    According to development of computer applications, uninterruptible power supplies (UPS) are indispensable to the industrial field. But the cost for maintaining the conventional UPS is very high, because frequent replacement of parts which have short life time is necessary. This paper describes the research and development of a new UPS which has long life parts for maintenance free. To lengthen the life time, the following techniques are introduced: (1) a flywheel energy storage unit having more than 20 years life time; (2) electrolytic capacitor less inverter and converter. By using these techniques, a three phase UPS rating 5kVA, 200V is developed, and excellent performance is obtained: input power factor is over 99.7%; output voltage distortion is under 1.5%; transformer less UPS achieves light weight system; the UPS have function of automatic output voltage balance using auxiliary diode rectifier; input current harmonic distortion is less than 1.2%, even if the single phase load is connected.

  19. Assessment of industry needs for oil shale research and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackworth, J.H.

    1987-05-01

    Thirty-one industry people were contacted to provide input on oil shale in three subject areas. The first area of discussion dealt with industry's view of the shape of the future oil shale industry; the technology, the costs, the participants, the resources used, etc. It assessed the types and scale of the technologies that will form the industry, and how the US resource will be used. The second subject examined oil shale R D needs and priorities and potential new areas of research. The third area of discussion sought industry comments on what they felt should be the role of the DOE (and in a larger sense the US government) in fostering activities that will lead to a future commercial US oil shale shale industry.

  20. International oil and gas exploration and development: 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This report starts where the previous quarterly publication ended. This first publication of a new annual series contains most of the same data as the quarterly report, plus some new material, through 1991. It also presents historical data covering a longer period of time than the previous quarterly report. Country-level data on oil reserves, oil production, active drilling rigs, seismic crews, wells drilled, oil reserve additions, and oil reserve-to-production rations (R/P ratios) are listed for about 85 countries, where available, from 1970 through 1991. World and regional summaries are given in both tabular and graphical form. The most popular table in the previous quarterly report, a listing of new discoveries, continues in this annual report as Appendix A.

  1. Field development options for a waterflooded heavy-oil reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasraie, M. ); Sammon, P.H. ); Jespersen, P.J. )

    1993-09-01

    Battrum Unit 4 is a moderately heavy-oil reservoir in Saskatchewan producing under waterflood from a thin sand. This paper describes a history match of previous field behavior and systematically analyzes through the use of numerical simulation the potential benefits to production of further waterflooding (with and without infill drilling), steamflooding, and horizontal drilling. It is found that the remaining oil recovery potential of a steamflood with horizontal well is significantly higher than that of any of the waterflood options.

  2. Development prospects of the capital-surplus oil-exporting countries. [Monograph

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habluetzel, R.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the political and economic factors that are likely to determine, in the next five years, the absorptive capacity for investment and consumption in the capital-surplus oil-exporting countries; this permits an evaluation of the prospective size of their oil surplus under specific assumptions of oil export volume and oil prices. Starting with an analysis of the notion that the volume of oil production, beyond a specific point for each country, is of a discretionary nature, the paper proceeds to review the experience of the oil-surplus countries during the last seven years in absorbing oil income and creating a domestic income base for the post-oil era. The results of this experience and its side effects (in the form of inflation and immigrant labor) and their political and economic implications are reviewed in the context of different resource endowments and societal structures with a view to understanding the likely development and expenditures the governments will take. The paper concludes with a prognosis of likely levels of total oil income, domestic absorptions, and oil surpluses for the six countries. 4 references, 26 tables.

  3. United States Fuel Resiliency Volume III U.S. Fuels Supply Infrastruct...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The global and U.S. oil, natural gas, and refined products markets, supply patterns, and .........7 A. Crude Oil ......

  4. Western oil-shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 2: technology characterization and production scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    A technology characterization of processes that may be used in the oil shale industry is presented. The six processes investigated are TOSCO II, Paraho Direct, Union B, Superior, Occidental MIS, and Lurgi-Ruhrgas. A scanario of shale oil production to the 300,000 BPD level by 1990 is developed. (ACR)

  5. Obama Administration Announces Members of Steering Team to Lead Interagency Coordination of Unconventional Oil and Gas Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department announces two members (policy and technical) to unconventional oil and gas research and development steering team.

  6. Implementation of the national desalination and water purification technology roadmap : structuring and directing the development of water supply solutions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Kevin M.; Dorsey, Zachary; Miller, G. Wade; Brady, Patrick Vane; Mulligan, Conrad; Rayburn, Chris

    2006-06-01

    In the United States, economic growth increasingly requires that greater volumes of freshwater be made available for new users, yet supplies of freshwater are already allocated to existing users. Currently, water for new users is made available through re-allocation of xisting water supplies-for example, by cities purchasing agricultural water rights. Water may also be made available through conservation efforts and, in some locales, through the development of ''new'' water from non-traditional sources such as the oceans, deep aquifer rackish groundwater, and water reuse.

  7. Supply Chain Sustainability Analysis of Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreati...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supply Chain Sustainability Analysis of Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-Oil to Produce Hydrocarbon Fuels Title Supply Chain Sustainability Analysis of Fast Pyrolysis and...

  8. History of western oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, P.L.

    1980-01-01

    The history of oil shale in the United States since the early 1900's is detailed. Research on western oil shale probably began with the work of Robert Catlin in 1915. During the next 15 years there was considerable interest in the oil shales, and oil shale claims were located, and a few recovery plants were erected in Colorado, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming, and Montana. Little shale soil was produced, however, and the major oil companies showed little interest in producing shale oil. The early boom in shale oil saw less than 15 plants produce a total of less than 15,000 barrels of shale oil, all but about 500 barrels of which was produced by the Catlin Operation in Nevada and by the US Bureau of Mines Rulison, Colorado operation. Between 1930 and 1944 plentiful petroleum supplies at reasonable prices prevent any significant interest in shale oil, but oil shortages during World War II caused a resurgence of interest in oil shale. Between 1940 and 1969, the first large-scale mining and retorting operations in soil shale, and the first attempts at true in situ recovery of shale oil began. Only 75,000 barrels of shale oil were produced, but major advancements were made in developing mine designs and technology, and in retort design and technology. The oil embargo of 1973 together with a new offering of oil shale leases by the Government in 1974 resulted in the most concentrated efforts for shale oil production to date. These efforts and the future prospects for shale oil as an energy source in the US are discussed.

  9. Development of an In Situ Biosurfactant Production Technology for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.J. McInerney; R.M. Knapp; Kathleen Duncan; D.R. Simpson; N. Youssef; N. Ravi; M.J. Folmsbee; T.Fincher; S. Maudgalya; Jim Davis; Sandra Weiland

    2007-09-30

    The long-term economic potential for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is large with more than 300 billion barrels of oil remaining in domestic reservoirs after conventional technologies reach their economic limit. Actual EOR production in the United States has never been very large, less than 10% of the total U. S. production even though a number of economic incentives have been used to stimulate the development and application of EOR processes. The U.S. DOE Reservoir Data Base contains more than 600 reservoirs with over 12 billion barrels of unrecoverable oil that are potential targets for microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). If MEOR could be successfully applied to reduce the residual oil saturation by 10% in a quarter of these reservoirs, more than 300 million barrels of oil could be added to the U.S. oil reserve. This would stimulate oil production from domestic reservoirs and reduce our nation's dependence on foreign imports. Laboratory studies have shown that detergent-like molecules called biosurfactants, which are produced by microorganisms, are very effective in mobilizing entrapped oil from model test systems. The biosurfactants are effective at very low concentrations. Given the promising laboratory results, it is important to determine the efficacy of using biosurfactants in actual field applications. The goal of this project is to move biosurfactant-mediated oil recovery from laboratory investigations to actual field applications. In order to meet this goal, several important questions must be answered. First, it is critical to know whether biosurfactant-producing microbes are present in oil formations. If they are present, then it will be important to know whether a nutrient regime can be devised to stimulate their growth and activity in the reservoir. If biosurfactant producers are not present, then a suitable strain must be obtained that can be injected into oil reservoirs. We were successful in answering all three questions. The specific objectives

  10. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.PDF Table 13. Crude Oil Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks by PAD District, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Process PAD Districts U.S. Total 1 2 3 4 5 Total Daily Average Supply Field Production .................................................... 1,408 47,406 146,833 17,773 35,538 248,959 8,031 Alaskan ............................................................. - - - - - - - - - 16,799 542 Lower 48 States ................................................ - - - - -

  11. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 June 2016 Table 25. Crude Oil Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks by PAD District, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Process PAD Districts U.S. Total 1 2 3 4 5 Total Daily Average Supply Field Production .................................................... 1,348 50,177 160,724 19,300 29,479 261,028 8,701 Alaskan ............................................................. - - - - - - - - - 14,103 470 Lower 48 States ................................................ - - - - -

  12. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Lyle, J.H.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1984 totaled 4,088,853,000 bbl (an average rate of 11,144,407 BOPD), down less than 1.0% from the revised total of 4,112,116,000 bbl produced in 1983. Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, and Oman had significant increases; Iran and Dubai had significant decreases. Jordan produced oil, although a minor amount, for the first time ever, and new production facilities were in the planning stage in Syria, North Yemen, and Oman, which will bring new fields on stream when completed.

  13. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.

    1986-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1985 totaled 3,837,580,000 bbl (an average rate of 10,513,917 BOPD), down 2.2% from the revised 1984 total of 3,924,034,000 bbl. Iran, Iraq, Dubai, Oman, and Syria had significant increases; Kuwait, Kuwait-Saudi Arabia Divided Neutral Zone, Saudi Arabia, and Qatar had significant decreases. New fields went on production in Iraq, Abu Dhabi, Oman, and Syria. In North Yemen, the first ever oil production in that country was nearing the start-up stage at year end. 9 figures, 9 tables.

  14. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Lyle, J.H.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1984 totaled 4,088,853,000 bbl (an average rate of 11,144,407 BOPD), down less than 1.0% from the revised total of 4,112,116,000 bbl produced in 1983. Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, and Oman had significant increases; Iran and Dubai had significant decreases. Jordan produced oil, although a minor amount, for the first time ever, and new production facilities were in the planning stage in Syria, North Yemen, and Oman, which will bring new fields on stream when completed. 4 figures, 9 tables.

  15. Minimizing the environmental impact of oil and gas developments in the tropics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, A.B.; Gordon, D.L.; Guerin-McManus, M.

    1997-07-01

    The next big frontier for oil and gas development will be the humid tropics, where more than 80% of exploration and production is expected to take place in the next decade. The tropical areas targeted by these operations not only hold large stores of oil and gas, but are also frequently undeveloped and remote, located in or near important and sensitive ecosystems. Within the tropics the most heavily targeted area is the Latin American Neotropics (New World tropics), which include South America, Mesoamerica and the Caribbean. A regionwide move toward privatization of state oil industries, growing liberalization of markets, and contractual incentives for foreign investment make this region a prime target for oil exploration and development. Proper evaluation of available technologies and planning will help determine how and where mitigation efforts should be directed to prevent and control environmental impacts.

  16. Expanded unconventional oil and gas (UOG) development has led to increased seism

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Expanded unconventional oil and gas (UOG) development has led to increased seismicity in several areas of the country, including areas where it was previously very uncommon. The primary cause of these earthquakes, which can reach magnitude 3.0 to 6.0, is large-scale wastewater injection from oil and gas production. In order to provide useful information to regulators and those who manage wastewater, the Department of Energy (DOE) is funding collaborative efforts to 1) identify the risks, 2)

  17. Planning and management of the Nido Reef Complex Oil Field development, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harry, R.Y.

    1981-01-01

    As Operator for the Northeast Palawan consortium, Philippines-Cities Service, Inc., commenced the Philippines first commercial offshore oil production from the Nido Reef Complex Oil Field on February 1, 1979, some 11 months after a decision by management to start development. The relative speed at which design, fabrication, and construction were accomplished is attributed to the use of the concepts of project planning, task force approach, and project management. This paper presents the above concepts as applied to the Nido Complex.

  18. Oil shale technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. (Akron Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    Oil shale is undoubtedly an excellent energy source that has great abundance and world-wide distribution. Oil shale industries have seen ups and downs over more than 100 years, depending on the availability and price of conventional petroleum crudes. Market forces as well as environmental factors will greatly affect the interest in development of oil shale. Besides competing with conventional crude oil and natural gas, shale oil will have to compete favorably with coal-derived fuels for similar markets. Crude shale oil is obtained from oil shale by a relatively simple process called retorting. However, the process economics are greatly affected by the thermal efficiencies, the richness of shale, the mass transfer effectiveness, the conversion efficiency, the design of retort, the environmental post-treatment, etc. A great many process ideas and patents related to the oil shale pyrolysis have been developed; however, relatively few field and engineering data have been published. Due to the vast heterogeneity of oil shale and to the complexities of physicochemical process mechanisms, scientific or technological generalization of oil shale retorting is difficult to achieve. Dwindling supplied of worldwide petroleum reserves, as well as the unprecedented appetite of mankind for clean liquid fuel, has made the public concern for future energy market grow rapidly. the clean coal technology and the alternate fuel technology are currently of great significance not only to policy makers, but also to process and chemical researchers. In this book, efforts have been made to make a comprehensive text for the science and technology of oil shale utilization. Therefore, subjects dealing with the terminological definitions, geology and petrology, chemistry, characterization, process engineering, mathematical modeling, chemical reaction engineering, experimental methods, and statistical experimental design, etc. are covered in detail.

  19. Crude Oil Days of Supply

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 0 0 0 0 0 1986-2015 East Coast (PADD 1) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1986-2015 Midwest (PADD 2) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1986-2015 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1986-2015 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1986-2015 West Coast (PADD 5) 0 0 0 0 0 0

    Weekly Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 07/22/16 07/29/16 08/05/16 08/12/16 08/19/16 08/26/16 View History U.S. 31.3 31.3 31.3 31.2 31.3 31.5 1982

  20. STEO September 2012 - oil production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    EIA analyst Sam Gorgen explains: "Higher oil supplies, especially from North Dakota and Texas, boosted U.S. oil production. The number of on-shore drilling rigs targeting oil ...

  1. Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin; Thaer N. N. Mahmoud; Daryl S. Sequeira; Amit P. Sharma

    2006-09-30

    This is the final report describing the evolution of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' from its conceptual stage in 2002 to the field implementation of the developed technology in 2006. This comprehensive report includes all the experimental research, models developments, analyses of results, salient conclusions and the technology transfer efforts. As planned in the original proposal, the project has been conducted in three separate and concurrent tasks: Task 1 involved a physical model study of the new GAGD process, Task 2 was aimed at further developing the vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for gas-oil miscibility determination, and Task 3 was directed at determining multiphase gas-oil drainage and displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks at realistic pressures and temperatures. The project started with the task of recruiting well-qualified graduate research assistants. After collecting and reviewing the literature on different aspects of the project such gas injection EOR, gravity drainage, miscibility characterization, and gas-oil displacement characteristics in porous media, research plans were developed for the experimental work to be conducted under each of the three tasks. Based on the literature review and dimensional analysis, preliminary criteria were developed for the design of the partially-scaled physical model. Additionally, the need for a separate transparent model for visual observation and verification of the displacement and drainage behavior under gas-assisted gravity drainage was identified. Various materials and methods (ceramic porous material, Stucco, Portland cement, sintered glass beads) were attempted in order to fabricate a satisfactory visual model. In addition to proving the effectiveness of the GAGD process (through measured oil recoveries in the range of 65 to 87% IOIP), the visual models demonstrated three possible

  2. New noncatalytic heavy-oil process developed in Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, I.P.; Souhrada, F.; Woods, H.J.

    1982-11-22

    Describes Gulf Canada's hydrogen addition upgrading process, named Donor Refined Bitumen (DRB), which involves the pyrolysis of the residuum portion of the bitumen or heavy oil in the presence of an efficient hydrogen donor that stabilizes the intermediates from the pyrolyzing bitumen. Advantages are high operability and reliability, low capital and operating costs, high yields and good product quality, feedstock and independence, the use of conventional refinery equipment, and ready availability of high quality donor. Presents a schematic flow sheet of the DRB process showing how bitumen is upgraded sufficiently to allow easy pipelining to a central major upgrading plant. Tables give comparative compositional data on middle distillates; naptha compositions and qualities; and operating costs.

  3. Petroleum Supply Annual, Volume 2

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual, Volume 2 With Data for 2014 | Release Date: September 25, 2015 | Next Release Date: September 2016 Previous Issues Year: 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 Go Volume 2 - Final monthly statistics for the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. Volume 2 Tables All Tables All Tables Detailed Statistics Tables National Statistics 1 U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum

  4. State-of-the-art report summarizing techniques to determine residual oil saturation and recommendations on the requirements for residual oil saturation research and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, M.M.; Maerefat, N.L.

    1986-05-01

    An investigation was conducted on the residual oil saturation (ROS) measurement techniques developed during the last fifteen years. Knowledge of precise ROS measurements is required for EOR project planning. The advantages, limitations, and problems of each one of the techniques are presented in tabulated form. Also, some of the possible improvements in the measurement techniques for the residual oil saturation are summarized. The following residual oil saturation techniques are discussed: core analyses, well logging, backflow tracer tests, material balance and well testing, newly developed gravity log methods, and interwell residual oil saturation measurements. Several aspects left to be improved in both instrumentations and data interpretation on pressure coring, back-flow tracer tests, well logging, material balance calculations, well testing, and interwell ROS measurements are presented. A nuclear magnetism log-inject-log method is proposed in which the need for porosity measurement for determining residual oil saturation is eliminated. 91 refs., 3 tabs.

  5. Releases from the Heating Oil Reserve | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Releases from the Heating Oil Reserve Releases from the Heating Oil Reserve The Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR), a one million barrel supply of ultra low sulfur ...

  6. Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-09-15

    World oil use is projected to grow to 98 million b/d in 2015 and 118 million b/d in 2030. Total world natural gas consumption is projected to rise to 134 Tcf in 2015 and 182 Tcf in 2030. In an era of declining production and increasing demand, economically producing oil and gas from unconventional sources is a key challenge to maintaining global economic growth. Some unconventional hydrocarbon sources are already being developed, including gas shales, tight gas sands, heavy oil, oil sands, and coal bed methane. Roughly 20 years ago, gas production from tight sands, shales, and coals was considered uneconomic. Today, these resources provide 25% of the U.S. gas supply and that number is likely to increase. Venezuela has over 300 billion barrels of unproven extra-heavy oil reserves which would give it the largest reserves of any country in the world. It is currently producing over 550,000 b/d of heavy oil. Unconventional oil is also being produced in Canada from the Athabasca oil sands. 1.6 trillion barrels of oil are locked in the sands of which 175 billion barrels are proven reserves that can be recovered using current technology. Production from 29 companies now operating there exceeds 1 million barrels per day. The report provides an overview of continuous petroleum sources and gives a concise overview of the current status of varying types of unconventional oil and gas resources. Topics covered in the report include: an overview of the history of Oil and Natural Gas; an analysis of the Oil and Natural Gas industries, including current and future production, consumption, and reserves; a detailed description of the different types of unconventional oil and gas resources; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in unconventional resources; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the development of unconventional resources; profiles of key producing regions; and, profiles of key unconventional oil and gas producers.

  7. Oil and gas development in Middle East in 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.; Phillips, C.B.

    1988-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1987 totaled an estimated 4,500,500,000 bbl (an average rate of 12,330,137 b/d), up slightly from the revised 1986 total of 4,478,972,000 bbl. Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Yemen Arab Republic had significant increases; Kuwait and Saudi Arabia had significant decreases. Production was established for the first time in People's Democratic Republic of Yemen. New fields went on production in Iraq, Oman, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, and Syria, and significant oil discoveries were reported in Iraq, Oman, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, Syria, and Yemen Arab Republic. The level of exploration increased in 1987 with new concessions awarded in some countries, drilling and seismic activities on the increase, new regions in mature areas explored for the first time, and significant reserve additions reported in new and old permits. The Iraq-Iran war still had a negative impact in some regions of the Middle East, particularly in and around the Gulf. 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. South America: Growth in E and P opportunities keeps accelerating. [Oil and gas exploration and development in South America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This paper reviews and summarizes the oil and gas developments in Columbia, Argentina, Venezuela, Brazil, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Chile, and other South American oil and gas producing countries during 1992 through 1993 and forecasts the future developments. The expanding exploration in these areas has resulted from the major new oil finds and the need for local countries to help stabilize their currency. The paper discusses exploration and drilling activity, production, and financial expenditures made on developing this regions reserves.

  9. Development of Authorized Limits for Portsmouth Oil Inventory Disposition

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    State | Department of Energy Developing and Enhancing Workforce Training Programs: Number of Projects by State Developing and Enhancing Workforce Training Programs: Number of Projects by State Map of the United States showing the location of Workforce Training Projects, funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Developing and Enhancing Workforce Training Programs: Number of Projects by State (389.21 KB) More Documents & Publications Workforce Development Wind Projects

  10. Pompano subsea development -- TFL well design for deepwater unconsolidated waxy oil reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, J.; Black, J.W.; Meader, A.; Whitehead, N.

    1996-12-31

    BP Exploration`s Pompano subsea development, in 1,865 ft of water uses a subsea production system to produce oil to a host platform 4.5 miles away. This paper describes the well construction and completion design for a template/manifold Through Flowline (TFL) subsea oil production system. Included are an outline of the rig upgrade requirements, casing design, completion design, and simultaneous operations strategy. It will provide a useful guide for drilling staff involved in planning and execution of a subsea development.

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Standard Oil Development Co of NJ - NJ

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    18 Standard Oil Development Co of NJ - NJ 18 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: STANDARD OIL DEVELOPMENT CO. OF NJ (NJ.18) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Exxon Research and Engineering Co. NJ.18-1 NJ.18-4 Location: 1900 Linden Avenue , Linden , New Jersey NJ.18-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1990 - 1991 NJ.18-2 Site Operations: From its Linden, NJ laboratory facilities, provided consulting services to the MED/AEC and acted as a broker in the

  12. GIS-and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Wei; Minnick, Matthew; Geza, Mengistu; Murray, Kyle; Mattson, Earl

    2012-09-30

    The Colorado School of Mines (CSM) was awarded a grant by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct a research project en- titled GIS- and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development in October of 2008. The ultimate goal of this research project is to develop a water resource geo-spatial infrastructure that serves as “baseline data” for creating solutions on water resource management and for supporting decisions making on oil shale resource development. The project came to the end on September 30, 2012. This final project report will report the key findings from the project activity, major accomplishments, and expected impacts of the research. At meantime, the gamma version (also known as Version 4.0) of the geodatabase as well as other various deliverables stored on digital storage media will be send to the program manager at NETL, DOE via express mail. The key findings from the project activity include the quantitative spatial and temporal distribution of the water resource throughout the Piceance Basin, water consumption with respect to oil shale production, and data gaps identified. Major accomplishments of this project include the creation of a relational geodatabase, automated data processing scripts (Matlab) for database link with surface water and geological model, ArcGIS Model for hydrogeologic data processing for groundwater model input, a 3D geological model, surface water/groundwater models, energy resource development systems model, as well as a web-based geo-spatial infrastructure for data exploration, visualization and dissemination. This research will have broad impacts of the devel- opment of the oil shale resources in the US. The geodatabase provides a “baseline” data for fur- ther study of the oil shale development and identification of further data collection needs. The 3D geological model provides better understanding through data interpolation and

  13. Petroleum Supply Annual, Volume 1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum & Other Liquids Reports Petroleum Supply Annual, Volume 1 With Data for 2014 | Release Date: September 25, 2015 | Next Release Date: September 2016 Previous Issues Year: 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 Go Volume 1 - Final annual data for the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. Volume 1 Tables All Tables All Tables Detailed Statistics Tables National Statistics 1 U.S. Supply, Disposition, and

  14. Oil and gas developments in South America, Central America, Caribbean Area, and Mexico in 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deal, C.S.

    1983-10-01

    Petroleum developments in the region in 1982 had a more varied pattern than in 1981 when all aspects were upbeat with varying degrees of increases. In 1982, Brazil, Mexico, and Guatemala had striking increases in oil production; Bolivia, Chile, and Colombia had moderate increases; and Argentina, Trinidad, and Venezuela reported declines. In exploration, Argentina reported several additional offshore Tierra del Fuego discoveries in the Cretaceous Springhill and 2 more encouraging gas discoveries in the Noroeste basin. Bolivia reported an oil discovery from Silurian rocks more generally considered a gas objective. Brazil extended and confirmed the Western Amazonas gas area with 2 discoveries. Colombia added 2 more spectacular oil discoveries in the Llanos basin to follow up 2 similar finds in 1981. Several countries reported that discoveries have increased the national reserves of hydrocarbons. Considering the social, political, and economic problems in several countries, along with the worldwide depression and petroleum surplus, developments in the region have been on the whole favorable.

  15. Development of Improved Oil Field Waste Injection Disposal Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terralog Technologies USA Inc.

    2001-12-17

    The goals of this DOE sponsored project are to: (1) assemble and analyze a comprehensive database of past waste injection operations; (2) develop improved diagnostic techniques for monitoring fracture growth and formation changes; (3) develop operating guidelines to optimize daily operations and ultimate storage capacity of the target formation; and (4) to test these improved models and guidelines in the field.

  16. Development of Improved Oil Field Waste Injection Disposal Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terralog Technologies

    2002-11-25

    The goals of this project have was to: (1) assemble and analyze a comprehensive database of past waste injection operations; (2) develop improved diagnostic techniques for monitoring fracture growth and formation changes; (3) develop operating guidelines to optimize daily operations and ultimate storage capacity of the target formation; and (4) to apply these improved models and guidelines in the field.

  17. We Need to Talk... Developing Communicating Power Supplies to Monitor & Control Miscellaneous Electric Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Andrew; Lanzisera, Steven; Liao, Anna; Meier, Alan

    2014-08-11

    Plug loads represent 30percent of total electricity use in residential buildings. Significant energy savings would result from an accurate understanding of which miscellaneous electric devices are using energy, at what time, and in what quantity. Commercially available plug load monitoring and control solutions replace or limit the attached device's native controls - forcing the user to adapt to a separate set of controls associated with the monitoring and control hardware. A better solution is integration of these capabilities at the power supply level. In this paper, we demonstrate a method achieving this integration. Our solution allows unobtrusive power monitoring and control while retaining native device control features. Further, our prototype enables intelligent behaviors by allowing devices to respond to the state of one another automatically. The CPS enables energy savings while demonstrating an added level of functionality to the user. If CPS technology became widespread in devices, a combination of automated and human interactive solutions would enable high levels of energy savings in buildings.

  18. Unconventional Oil and Gas Projects Help Reduce Environmental Impact of Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory has an unconventional oil and gas program devoted to research in this important area of energy development. The laboratory partners with industry and academia through cost-sharing agreements to develop scientific knowledge and advance technologies that can improve the environmental performance of unconventional resource development. Once the resulting technologies are deployed for commercial use, our nation stands to reap huge benefits.

  19. Apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shishido, T.; Sato, Y.

    1984-02-14

    An apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale comprises: a vertical type distilling furnace which is divided by two vertical partitions each provided with a plurality of vent apertures into an oil shale treating chamber and two gas chambers, said oil shale treating chamber being located between said two gas chambers in said vertical type distilling furnace, said vertical type distilling furnace being further divided by at least one horizontal partition into an oil shale distilling chamber in the lower part thereof and at least one oil shale preheating chamber in the upper part thereof, said oil shale distilling chamber and said oil shale preheating chamber communication with each other through a gap provided at an end of said horizontal partition, an oil shale supplied continuously from an oil shale supply port provided in said oil shale treating chamber at the top thereof into said oil shale treating chamber continuously moving from the oil shale preheating chamber to the oil shale distilling chamber, a high-temperature gas blown into an oil shale distilling chamber passing horizontally through said oil shale in said oil shale treating chamber, thereby said oil shale is preheated in said oil shale preheating chamber, and a gaseous shale oil is distilled from said preheated oil shale in said oil shale distilling chamber; and a separator for separating by liquefaction a gaseous shale oil from a gas containing the gaseous shale oil discharged from the oil shale preheating chamber.

  20. Petroleum supply monthly, March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-30

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. The tables and figures in the Summary Statistics section of the PSM present a time series of selected petroleum data on a US level. Most time series include preliminary estimates for one month based on the Weekly Petroleum Supply Reporting System; statistics based on the most recent data from the Monthly Petroleum Supply Reporting System (MPSRS); and statistics published in prior issues of the PSM and PSA. The Detailed Statistics tables of the PSM present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. In most cases, the statistics are presented for several geographic areas -- the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia), five PAD Districts, and 12 Refining Districts. At the US and PAD District level, the total volume and the daily rate of activities are presented. The statistics are developed from monthly survey forms submitted by respondents to the EIA and from data provided from other sources.

  1. Petroleum supply monthly, June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-28

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. The tables and figures ih the Summary Statistics section of the PSM present a time series of selected petroleum data on a US level. Most time series include preliminary estimates for one month based on the Weekly Petroleum Supply Reporting System; statistics based on the most recent data from the Monthly Petroleum Supply Reporting System (MPSRS); and statistics published in prior issues of the PSM and PSA. The Detailed Statistics tables of the PSM present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. In most cases, the statistics are presented for several geographic areas - - the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia), five PAD Districts, and 12 Refining Districts. At the US and PAD District level, the total volume and the daily rate of activities are presented. The statistics are developed from monthly survey forms submitted by respondents to the EIA and from data provided firom other sources.

  2. Petroleum Supply Annual 1997, Volume 1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 248,959 - - - - 235,269 8,443 10,330 474,643 7,698 0

  3. Petroleum Supply Annual 2014, Volume 1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 2. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, 2014 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 8,719 - - - - 7,344 222 86 15,848 351 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and

  4. Petroleum Supply Annual 2014, Volume 2

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .PDF 1. TABLE1.PDF Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 248,959 - - - - 235,269 8,443 10,330

  5. Heating Oil Reserve | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heating Oil Reserve Heating Oil Reserve The Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve is a one million barrel supply of ultra low sulfur distillate (diesel) that provides protection for homes and businesses in the northeastern United States should a disruption in supplies occur. The Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve is a one million barrel supply of ultra low sulfur distillate (diesel) that provides protection for homes and businesses in the northeastern United States should a disruption in supplies

  6. Flexible riser and mooring system develops small oil fields in the North Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, A.M.; Holmes, G. ); Benstead, P.J. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper reports on the flexible riser and mooring system (FRAMS) which provides a technically straightforward, commercially attractive method of developing small oil fields. A passively moored 60,000-deadweight-ton (60,000-DWT) tanker with deck-mounted equipment provides a swivelless well fluid and injection water path from and to the wellheads. The system can be disconnected rapidly in severe weather.

  7. High-Temperature Nuclear Reactors for In-Situ Recovery of Oil from Oil Shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    2006-07-01

    The world is exhausting its supply of crude oil for the production of liquid fuels (gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel). However, the United States has sufficient oil shale deposits to meet our current oil demands for {approx}100 years. Shell Oil Corporation is developing a new potentially cost-effective in-situ process for oil recovery that involves drilling wells into oil shale, using electric heaters to raise the bulk temperature of the oil shale deposit to {approx}370 deg C to initiate chemical reactions that produce light crude oil, and then pumping the oil to the surface. The primary production cost is the cost of high-temperature electrical heating. Because of the low thermal conductivity of oil shale, high-temperature heat is required at the heater wells to obtain the required medium temperatures in the bulk oil shale within an economically practical two to three years. It is proposed to use high-temperature nuclear reactors to provide high-temperature heat to replace the electricity and avoid the factor-of-2 loss in converting high-temperature heat to electricity that is then used to heat oil shale. Nuclear heat is potentially viable because many oil shale deposits are thick (200 to 700 m) and can yield up to 2.5 million barrels of oil per acre, or about 125 million dollars/acre of oil at $50/barrel. The concentrated characteristics of oil-shale deposits make it practical to transfer high-temperature heat over limited distances from a reactor to the oil shale deposits. (author)

  8. Development and certification of the innovative pioneer oil burner for residential heating appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamath, B.

    1997-09-01

    The Pioneer burner represents another important milestone for the oil heat industry. It is the first practical burner design that is designated for use in small capacity heating appliances matching the needs of modern energy efficient home designs. Firing in the range of 0.3 GPH to 0.65 GPH (40,000-90,000 Btu/hr) it allows for new oil heating appliance designs to compete with the other major fuel choices in the small design load residential market. This market includes energy efficient single family houses, town-houses, condominiums, modular units, and mobile homes. The firing range also is wide enough to cover a large percentage of more conventional heating equipment and home designs as well. Having recently passed Underwriters Laboratory certification tests the burner in now being field tested in several homes and samples are being made available to interested boiler and furnace manufacturers for product development and application testing.

  9. Petroleum Supply Annual 1998, Volume 2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8, Volume 2 Entire . The entire report as a single file. PDF 3.8MB . . Front Matter . Cover Page, Contacts, Preface, and Table of Contents Page PDF . . Monthly Statistics Tables . National Statistics 1 U.S. Petroleum Balance PDF TXT 2 U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF TXT 3 U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Stocks PDF TXT . Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 4 PAD District I PDF TXT 5

  10. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  11. Petroleum supply monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blends, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  12. GIS-based Geospatial Infrastructure of Water Resource Assessment for Supporting Oil Shale Development in Piceance Basin of Northwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Wei; Minnick, Matthew D; Mattson, Earl D; Geza, Mengistu; Murray, Kyle E.

    2015-04-01

    Oil shale deposits of the Green River Formation (GRF) in Northwestern Colorado, Southwestern Wyoming, and Northeastern Utah may become one of the first oil shale deposits to be developed in the U.S. because of their richness, accessibility, and extensive prior characterization. Oil shale is an organic-rich fine-grained sedimentary rock that contains significant amounts of kerogen from which liquid hydrocarbons can be produced. Water is needed to retort or extract oil shale at an approximate rate of three volumes of water for every volume of oil produced. Concerns have been raised over the demand and availability of water to produce oil shale, particularly in semiarid regions where water consumption must be limited and optimized to meet demands from other sectors. The economic benefit of oil shale development in this region may have tradeoffs within the local and regional environment. Due to these potential environmental impacts of oil shale development, water usage issues need to be further studied. A basin-wide baseline for oil shale and water resource data is the foundation of the study. This paper focuses on the design and construction of a centralized geospatial infrastructure for managing a large amount of oil shale and water resource related baseline data, and for setting up the frameworks for analytical and numerical models including but not limited to three-dimensional (3D) geologic, energy resource development systems, and surface water models. Such a centralized geospatial infrastructure made it possible to directly generate model inputs from the same database and to indirectly couple the different models through inputs/outputs. Thus ensures consistency of analyses conducted by researchers from different institutions, and help decision makers to balance water budget based on the spatial distribution of the oil shale and water resources, and the spatial variations of geologic, topographic, and hydrogeological Characterization of the basin. This endeavor

  13. Development of the Write Process for Pipeline-Ready Heavy Oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Brecher; Charles Mones; Frank Guffey

    2009-03-07

    Work completed under this program advances the goal of demonstrating Western Research Institute's (WRI's) WRITE{trademark} process for upgrading heavy oil at field scale. MEG Energy Corporation (MEG) located in Calgary, Alberta, Canada supported efforts at WRI to develop the WRITE{trademark} process as an oil sands, field-upgrading technology through this Task 51 Jointly Sponsored Research project. The project consisted of 6 tasks: (1) optimization of the distillate recovery unit (DRU), (2) demonstration and design of a continuous coker, (3) conceptual design and cost estimate for a commercial facility, (4) design of a WRITE{trademark} pilot plant, (5) hydrotreating studies, and (6) establish a petroleum analysis laboratory. WRITE{trademark} is a heavy oil and bitumen upgrading process that produces residuum-free, pipeline ready oil from heavy material with undiluted density and viscosity that exceed prevailing pipeline specifications. WRITE{trademark} uses two processing stages to achieve low and high temperature conversion of heavy oil or bitumen. The first stage DRU operates at mild thermal cracking conditions, yielding a light overhead product and a heavy residuum or bottoms material. These bottoms flow to the second stage continuous coker that operates at severe pyrolysis conditions, yielding light pyrolyzate and coke. The combined pyrolyzate and mildly cracked overhead streams form WRITE{trademark}'s synthetic crude oil (SCO) production. The main objectives of this project were to (1) complete testing and analysis at bench scale with the DRU and continuous coker reactors and provide results to MEG for process evaluation and scale-up determinations and (2) complete a technical and economic assessment of WRITE{trademark} technology to determine its viability. The DRU test program was completed and a processing envelope developed. These results were used for process assessment and for scaleup. Tests in the continuous coker were intended to determine the

  14. Colorado oil shale development on policy and impact mitigation plan. Final report, March 31, 1980-November 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The impacts of accelerated oil shale development in four northwestern Colorado counties, Moffat, Rio Blanco, Mesa, and Garfield are being monitored and managed through a grant to the Colorado Department of Highways.

  15. The boomerang area: An example of oil and gas fields related to a transfer zone development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, M.; Colletta, B.; Letouzey, J. ); Baby, P. ); Oller, J.; Montemuro, G. ); Guillier, B. )

    1993-02-01

    We present results of a study realized from petroleum data of Yacimientos Petroliferos Fiscales Bolivianos of the most important transfer zone of the Bolivian Andean belt: the Santa Cruz transfer zone. Frontal part of the Bolivian Andean belt consists of a thick series (6 to 8 km) of paleozoic to cenozoic sedimentary rocks thrusted eastwards on a sole thrust located in paleozoic series. The frontal part of the belt, globally N-S oriented, undergoes an important deviation East of Santa Cruz with a left lateral offset of 100 Km. Taking into account the E-W shortening direction, this transfer zone can be interpreted as a lateral ramp. The Santa Cruz transfer zone coincide with a set of small oil and gas fields whereas frontal structures lack hydrocarbon occurrences. We are then faced with a two-fold problem: (1) what is the origin of the transfer zone (2) why are the oil and gas concentrated in the transfer zone Our synthesis shows that the transfer zone is superimposed on the limit of a detached Paleozoic basin whose border direction is oblique to the regional shortening direction. We then interpret the oil and gas formation in two steps: (1) source rock maturation and hydrocarbon migration towards the top of the Paleozoic sedimentary wedge before Andean deformation. (2) hydrocarbon dismigration towards anticlinal structures developed during the lateral ramp propagation. In order to test our interpretation we performed a set of analog model experiments whose 3D visualization was analyzed by computerized X-ray tomography.

  16. Oil and gas developments in New Zealand and southwest Pacific Islands in 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herzer, R.H.; Katz, H.R.

    1987-10-01

    In New Zealand, 5 new licenses were granted in offshore Taranaki and 4 licenses were relinquished in other parts of the country. Seismic survey activity increased, partly due to a dense survey over Maui field. Sniffer surveys were used for the first time in New Zealand in 5 licensees. Onshore seismic totaled 717 line-km, and offshore seismic totaled 3693 line-km. Drilling continued at a high level for New Zealand with 12 onshore and 5 offshore wells totaling 57,147 m. Two gas and condensate discoveries, Tariki-1A and Ahuroa-2A, were made in the overthrust play of eastern Taranaki, and a gas and condensate (possible oil) discovery was made off the south Taranaki coast at Kupe South-1. Total petroleum production increased to 4546 million m/sup 3/ of gas, 1208 thousand m/sup 3/ of condensate, 186.7 thousand m/sup 3/ of LPG, and 501 thousand m/sup 3/ of oil. Early depletion of the D-sand reservoir in Maui-A field led Shell BP Todd to shoot 1598 km of seismic over the field and to drill 3 appraisal wells. Tonga has released a new license map with 119 blocks offered. Significant changes in legislation include increased royalties, a reduction of exploration license duration to 11 years (but 25 years for development of a discovery), and replacement of expenditure commitments by license work programs. In Papua New Guinea, Iagifu-2X discovery was confirmed with the drilling of Iagifu-3X, which established 4 oil pay zones in the field. The Papuan foldbelt is now considered a very attractive oil province, and most of the basin is under license. 4 figures, 6 tables.

  17. Oil and gas developments in New Zealand and southwest Pacific islands in 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahill, J.P.; Katz, H.R.

    1988-10-01

    In New Zealand, 14 new licenses were granted: 6 in the East Coast region, 6 offshore Taranaki, and 2 in the South Island. Two licenses were relinquished, and the onshore Taranaki license held by petrocorp expired. Onshore seismic activity totaled 525 km; offshore seismic activity totaled 3,221 km (reconnaissance seismic surveys by TCPL accounted for much of the offshore activity). Drilling decreased slightly, with 18 wells drilled (13 onshore and 5 offshore) total 55,203 m. The drilling of Kora-1 on a volcanic structure in the North Taranaki basin has led to speculation about a possible oil discovery. Total petroleum production remained steady at 4,360 million m/sup 3/ of gas, 1,127 thousand m/sup 3/ of condensate, 190 thousand m/sup 3/ of LPG, and 509 thousand m/sup 3/ of oil. In Papua New Guinea, further discoveries in the overthrust belt of the Papuan basin have confirmed the highly prospective nature of this area. A major gas and condensate field with 4 pay zones was established in the Hides structure east of Juha field, and early in 1988 gas, condensate, and oil were found in the Hedinia structure south of the Iagifu oil field discovered in 1986. Total drilling amounted to 15,725.55 m during 1987. Seismic surveys covered 858 km onshore and 4,747 km offshore. There are 36 active Petroleum Prospecting Licenses: 32 in the Papuan basin and 4 in the North New Guinea basin. No new developments were reported in Solomon Islands, Tonga, and Vanuatu. 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Petroleum supply monthly, April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographical regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US. The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the US.

  19. Petroleum supply monthly, February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly presents data describing the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US. The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders; operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. Data are divided into two sections: Summary statistics and Detailed statistics.

  20. Development of a Novel Oxygen Supply Process and its Integration with an Oxy-Fuel Coal-Fired Boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-12-31

    BOC, the world's second largest industrial gas company, has developed a novel high temperature sorption based technology referred to as CAR (Cyclic Autothermal Recovery) for oxygen production and supply to oxy-fuel boilers with flue gas recycle. This technology is based on sorption and storage of oxygen in a fixed bed containing mixed ionic and electronic conductor materials. The objective of the proposed work was to construct a CAR PDU that was capable of producing 10-scfm of oxygen, using steam or recycled flue gas as the sweep gas, and install it in the Combustion Test Facility. The unit was designed and fabricated at BOC/The Linde Group, Murray Hill, New Jersey. The unit was then shipped to WRI where the site had been prepared for the unit by installation of air, carbon dioxide, natural gas, nitrogen, computer, electrical and infrastructure systems. Initial experiments with the PDU consisted of flowing air into both sides of the absorption systems and using the air heaters to ramp up the bed temperatures. The two beds were tested individually to operational temperatures up to 900 C in air. The cycling process was tested where gases are flowed alternatively from the top then bottom of the beds. The PDU unit behaved properly with respect to flow, pressure and heat during tests. The PDU was advanced to the point where oxygen production testing could begin and integration to the combustion test facility could occur.

  1. Development of Polymer Gel Systems to Improve Volumetric Sweep and Reduce Producing Water/Oil Ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Paul Willhite; Stan McCool; Don W. Green; Min Cheng; Feiyan Chen

    2005-12-31

    to water to a greater extent than the permeability to oil is reduced. This phenomenon is referred to as disproportionate permeability reduction (DPR). Flow experiments were conducted in sandpacks to determine the effect of polymer and chromium concentrations on DPR. All gels studied reduced the permeability to water by a greater factor than the factor by which the oil permeability was reduced. Greater DPR was observed as the concentrations of polymer and chromium were increased. A conceptual model of the mechanisms responsible for DPR is presented. Primary features of the model are (1) the development of flow channels through the gel by dehydration and displacement of the gel and by re-connection of pre-treatment, residual oil volume and (2) high flow resistance in the channels during water flow is caused by significant saturations of oil remaining in the channels. A similar study of DPR was conducted in Berea sandstone cores. Both oil and water permeabilities were reduced by much smaller factors in Berea sandstone cores than in similar treatments in sandpacks. Poor maturation of the gelant in the Berea rock was thought to be caused by fluid-rock interactions that interfered with the gelation process.

  2. DOE/EIA-0340(98)/2 Distribution Category UC-950 Petroleum Supply

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... foreign or commercial storage agreements. (s) Less ... Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Monthly Petroleum Supply Reporting System. Domestic crude oil ...

  3. Petroleum supply monthly, August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This publication the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. Data presented are divided into Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  4. Feedstock Supply System Design and Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels Conversion Pathway: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-Oil Pathway "The 2017 Design Case"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin L. Kenney; Kara G. Cafferty; Jacob J. Jacobson; Ian J. Bonner; Garold L. Gresham; J. Richard Hess; William A. Smith; David N. Thompson; Vicki S. Thompson; Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Neal Yancey

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy promotes the production of liquid fuels from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks by funding fundamental and applied research that advances the state of technology in biomass sustainable supply, logistics, conversion, and overall system sustainability. As part of its involvement in this program, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) investigates the feedstock logistics economics and sustainability of these fuels. Between 2000 and 2012, INL quantified and the economics and sustainability of moving biomass from the field or stand to the throat of the conversion process using conventional equipment and processes. All previous work to 2012 was designed to improve the efficiency and decrease costs under conventional supply systems. The 2012 programmatic target was to demonstrate a biomass logistics cost of $55/dry Ton for woody biomass delivered to fast pyrolysis conversion facility. The goal was achieved by applying field and process demonstration unit-scale data from harvest, collection, storage, preprocessing, handling, and transportation operations into INL’s biomass logistics model.

  5. WETTABILITY AND PREDICTION OF OIL RECOVERY FROM RESERVOIRS DEVELOPED WITH MODERN DRILLING AND COMPLETION FLUIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of this project are: (1) to improve understanding of the wettability alteration of mixed-wet rocks that results from contact with the components of synthetic oil-based drilling and completion fluids formulated to meet the needs of arctic drilling; (2) to investigate cleaning methods to reverse the wettability alteration of mixed-wet cores caused by contact with these SBM components; and (3) to develop new approaches to restoration of wetting that will permit the use of cores drilled with SBM formulations for valid studies of reservoir properties.

  6. Petroleum Supply Annual 2005, Volume 1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Table 2. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, 2005 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Field Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports...

  7. Proceedings: 1986 fuel supply seminar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prast, W.G.

    1987-09-01

    The sixth annual EPRI Fuel Supply Seminar was held in San Diego, California, from December 3 to 5, 1986. The theme was the impact of lower prices on utility decisions, encompassing heightened competition with electricity and among sources of generation, shifts in new capacity choices, and risks and developments in domestic gas supply and pricing. In addition, key considerations behind world oil and economic projections were discussed. A panel session on bulk power transfers explored emerging trends, case studies, and pivotal fuel considerations. Recent findings on impacts of acid rain legislation on coal markets were discussed. Presentations were made by EPRI research contractors on the results of ongoing research and by speakers from the utility, coal and natural gas industries, as well as independent consultants. The principal purpose of the seminar, as in past years, was to provide utility fuel planners and corporate planners with information and insights into the uncertainties in current fuel markets, and to aid utilities in pursuing flexible fuel strategies.

  8. Automating power supply checkout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laster, J.; Bruno, D.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drozd, J.; Marr, G.; Mi, C.

    2011-03-28

    Power Supply checkout is a necessary, pre-beam, time-critical function. At odds are the desire to decrease the amount of time to perform the checkout while at the same time maximizing the number and types of checks that can be performed and analyzing the results quickly (in case any problems exist that must be addressed). Controls and Power Supply Group personnel have worked together to develop tools to accomplish these goals. Power Supply checkouts are now accomplished in a time-frame of hours rather than days, reducing the number of person-hours needed to accomplish the checkout and making the system available more quickly for beam development. The goal of the Collider-Accelerator Department (CAD) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is to provide experimenters with collisions of heavy-ions and polarized protons. The Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) magnets are controlled by 100's of varying types of power supplies. There is a concentrated effort to perform routine maintenance on the supplies during shutdown periods. There is an effort at RHIC to streamline the time needed for system checkout in order to quickly arrive at a period of beam operations for RHIC. This time-critical period is when the checkout of the power supplies is performed as the RHIC ring becomes cold and the supplies are connected to their physical magnets. The checkout process is used to identify problems in voltage and current regulation by examining data signals related to each for problems in settling and regulation (ripple).

  9. supply chain | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    supply chain

  10. Eco Oil 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brett Earl; Brenda Clark

    2009-10-26

    This article describes the processes, challenges, and achievements of researching and developing a biobased motor oil.