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1

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 119 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze crude oil and natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 8). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule[1], and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2011), (Washington, DC, 2011). The OGSM provides

2

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze crude oil and natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 8). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule[1], and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2011), (Washington, DC, 2011). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum

3

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule1, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description...

4

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of...

5

Crude Oil Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Crude Oil Supply Domestic Production (a) .......................................... 6.22 6.29 6.42 7.02 7.11 7.29 7.61 7.97 8.26 8.45 8.57 8.86 6.49 7.50 8.54 Alaska .................................................................. 0.58 0.53 0.44 0.55 0.54 0.51 0.48 0.52 0.51 0.47 0.42 0.49 0.53 0.51 0.47 Federal Gulf of Mexico (b) .................................... 1.34 1.19 1.18 1.36 1.30 1.22 1.27 1.29 1.34 1.36 1.37 1.45 1.27 1.27 1.38 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ................................ 4.31 4.57 4.80 5.11 5.28 5.56 5.87 6.16 6.41 6.61 6.77 6.91 4.70 5.72 6.68 Crude Oil Net Imports (c) ......................................... 8.55 8.88 8.52 7.89 7.47 7.61 7.94 7.36 6.66 6.78 6.83 6.06 8.46 7.60 6.58 SPR Net Withdrawals ..............................................

6

oil supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

oil supply oil supply Dataset Summary Description CIA: World Factbook assessment of proved reserves of crude oil in barrels (bbl). Proved reserves are those quantities of petroleum which, by analysis of geological and engineering data, can be estimated with a high degree of confidence to be commercially recoverable from a given date forward, from known reservoirs and under current economic conditions. Estimated as of January 1st, 2010. Source CIA Date Released January 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords crude oil energy energy data international oil oil supply Data text/csv icon 2010 Proved Oil Reserves (csv, 4.6 KiB) text/plain icon Original Text Format (txt, 6.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency

7

International Oil Supplies and Demands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--90 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

International Oil Supplies and Demands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Long Term World Oil Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: The following pages summarize a recent EIA presentation on estimates of the world conventional oil resource base and the year when production from it will peak and then begin to decline. A version of this presentation was given by former EIA Administrator Jay Hakes to the April 18, 2000 meeting of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists in New Orleans, Louisiana. Specific information about this presentation may be obtained from John Wood (john.wood@eia.doe.gov), Gary Long (gary.long@eia.doe.gov) or David Morehouse (david.morehouse@eia.doe.gov). Long Term World Oil Supply http://www.eia.doe.gov/pub/oil_gas/petroleum/presentations/2000/long_term_supply/sld001.htm [8/10/2000 4:56:23 PM] Slide 2 of 20 http://www.eia.doe.gov/pub/oil_gas/petroleum/presentations/2000/long_term_supply/sld002.htm [8/10/2000 4:56:24 PM]

10

IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2012 | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2012 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2012 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2012.pdf More Documents &...

11

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale in the United States, or sell U.S. gas to foreign consumers. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes unconventional gas recovery from low permeability formations of sandstone and shale, and coalbeds. Foreign gas transactions may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico) or transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 89 Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Report #:DOE/EIA-0554(2006) Release date: March 2006

12

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 7). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply submodule, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2010), (Washington, DC, 2010). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural

13

IEA Response System for OIL SUPPLY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 IEA Response System for OIL SUPPLY 2 IEA MEMBER COUNTRIES Australia Austria Belgium Canada Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Ireland Italy Japan Korea (Republic of) Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Norway Poland Portugal Slovak Republic Spain Sweden Switzerland Turkey United Kingdom United States These countries are members of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), as the IEA is an autonomous agency linked with the OECD. The European Commission also participates in the work of the IEA. The International Energy Agency (IEA) is the energy forum for 28 industrialised countries. IEA member country governments are committed to taking joint measures to meet oil supply emergencies. They also have agreed to share energy information,

14

Future oil supply scenarios and required investment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The supply of oil, like any other commodity, is sensitive to price changes. However, movements in oil supply are dependent on other additional factors, the most important of which are the geology of the region and the fiscal and contractual regimes. Total world oil supply to meet the current demand is estimated at about 52 mb/d (excluding the former CPEs). Since non-OPEC production has plateaued and is expected to fall in the future, the additional future oil supplies must come from OPEC member countries. This conclusion is borne out if we examine the respective reserves and reserves-to-production ratio of OPEC and non-OPEC producers. Of the world's total proven oil reserves of about 922 billion barrels (excluding the former CPEs), OPEC holds 84 per cent. The reserves-to-production ratio of OPEC member countries presently stands at more than 100 years, and with known reserves regularly being revised upwards. For the rest of the world, excluding the former CPEs, the ratio is only 16 years. During the 1990s, the largest growth in production capacity to meet the increasing demand is expected to come from OPEC member countries, particularly the Middle Eastern ones. Non-OPEC regions, such as North America and the Soviet Union, are expected to continue their decline. whereas the North Sea region will mature and start to fall at the end of the decade. The per barrel investment cost in capacity expansion in OPEC region, particularly in the Middle-East, is the lowest in the world to develop a new capacity and to main current output. This is in line with the present low level of production cost in the region. The application of enhanced recovery techniques to some of the mature fields in OPEC countries would not change the picture in general terms, and the impact of the new technology will be to further reduce the cost of oil production. In order to meet the increasing future oil demand, substantial additional investment, especially in the upstream sector, is required by OPEC member countries. To enhance the investment needed, OPEC producers must be able to predict the oil demand, which means that co-operation measures between all producers, oil companies, the consumers and their governments are urgently needed. The future pattern of energy requirements is expected to stimulate upstream exploratory and development activities as well as other development of infrastructures, such as pipelines in the gas and oil industries. The numerous accidents in recent years in energy production, transport, distribution, refining and conversion have confirmed the need to tighten the environmental regulations, and the need to increase investments in all the energy industries after a decade of under-investment, especially in the oil upstream.

A. Miremadi; I.A.H Ismail

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

International Oil Supplies and Demands. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--90 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world`s dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group`s thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

International Oil Supplies and Demands. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world`s dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group`s thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

An analysis of oil supply disruption scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report brings the results of simulations of some oil supply disruptions on the M.I.T. Energy Laboratory Energy Macro Model. This model has previously been used to study the macroeconomic effects of the 1973-74 and ...

Mork, Knut Anton

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Peak oil supply or oil not for sale?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The restrictions imposed by climate change are inevitable and will be exerted either via precautionary mitigation of (mainly energy-related) CO2 emissions or via irreversible impacts on ecosystems and on human habitats. Either way, oil markets are bound to incur drastic shrinking. Concern over peak oil supply will crumble when the irrevocable peak oil demand is created. Replacing oil in the world's energy economies requires redirected market forces, notably in the form of steadily increasing oil end-use prices. Yet, thus far, crude oil prices have obeyed the market fundamentals of expanding-contracting demand and oligopolistic supply. A hockey stick supply curve supports high sales prices, providing large rents to submarginal sources. Cutting oil demand and maintaining high prices implies reducing the supply hockey stick's length by curtailing some oil producers. In such a scenario, the alliances, goals, and tactics of oil geopolitics are set to change. We identify a distribution over friendly and hostile oil suppliers, with others drifting in between the two sides. Conflicts and warfare are less aimed at conquering oil fields for exploitation than at paralyzing production capabilities of opponents or of unreliable transient sources. Covert warfare and instigation of internal conflicts are likely tactics to exhaust hostile opponents.

Aviel Verbruggen; Thijs Van de Graaf

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

The future of oil supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...substituting non-liquid energy carriers such as gas or electricity...demand for the relevant energy services). Both the...impacts. The recovery and conversion of kerogen oil is extremely...efficiency limits for energy conversion devices. Energy 35...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

The future of oil supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Department of Energy [64] argued...options such as electric vehicles and...prospects of electric vehicles (EVs...cells, and the energy use, driving...diverse urban planning and fuel taxation...Laherrere, J. 2000 Distribution of field sizes...future of oil. Energy Explor. Exploit...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil supply development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

OIL AND GAS SUPPLY MODULE OIL AND GAS SUPPLY MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Lower 48 Onshore and Shallow Offshore Supply Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Deep Water Offshore Supply Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Alaska Oil and Gas Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Enhanced Oil Recovery Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Foreign Natural Gas Supply Submodule The oil and gas supply module (OGSM) consists of a series of process submodules that project the availability of: Domestic crude oil production and dry natural gas production from onshore, offshore, and Alaskan reservoirs Imported pipeline-quality gas from Mexico and Canada Imported liquefied natural gas. The OGSM regions are shown in Figure 12. The driving assumption of the OGSM is that domestic oil and gas exploration and development are undertaken if the discounted present value of the

22

Conference assesses world oil supply scene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that the Offshore Northern Seas conference heard a number of long term outlooks in Stavanger, Norway, last week, all with the same conclusion: the oil and gas industry needs massive investment if it is to match future demand. Norwegian Prime Minister Gro Harlem Bruntland built her scenario on a doubling of world population every 40 years. Mrs. Bruntland emphasized the growing dependence of the world economy on Middle East developments. Two thirds of the world's oil reserves are in the Persian Gulf region, she said, but only 28% of production comes from there. As the rest of the world depletes its reserves, dependence on Persian Gulf oil will grow.

Not Available

1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

Oil prices decline as concerns about supplies lessen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Expectations of shorter oil supplies in the case of a war in the Middle East pushed crude oil prices upwards for many months, but in March prices started to fall significantly even before the war against Iraq had...

Klaus Matthies

24

Who Are the Major Players Supplying the World Oil Market?  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Energy in Brief article on the world supply of oil through ownership of national oil companies and, for some governments, their membership in the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC).

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 IEA Response System for OIL SUPPLY 2 IEA MEMBER COUNTRIES Australia Austria Belgium Canada Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Ireland Italy Japan Korea (Republic of) Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Norway Poland Portugal Slovak Republic Spain Sweden Switzerland Turkey United Kingdom United States These countries are members of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), as the IEA is an autonomous agency linked with the OECD. The European Commission also participates in the work of the IEA. The International Energy Agency (IEA) is the energy forum for 28 industrialised countries. IEA member country governments are committed to taking joint measures to meet oil supply emergencies. They also have agreed to share energy information,

26

Developing sustainable food supply chains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...unavailable, and oil palm estate and cooperative schemes...value from (more) sustainable production, especially...being developed by the Sustainable Agriculture Initiative...achieve separately (Sustainable Food Laboratory 2005...businesses focus on making a real difference and often...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Energy Supply Crude Oil Production (a)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Supply Energy Supply Crude Oil Production (a) (million barrels per day) .............................. 6.22 6.29 6.42 7.02 7.11 7.29 7.61 7.97 8.26 8.45 8.57 8.86 6.49 7.50 8.54 Dry Natural Gas Production (billion cubic feet per day) ........................... 65.40 65.49 65.76 66.34 65.78 66.50 67.11 67.88 67.99 67.74 67.37 67.70 65.75 66.82 67.70 Coal Production (million short tons) ...................................... 266 241 259 250 245 243 264 256 258 249 265 262 1,016 1,008 1,033 Energy Consumption Liquid Fuels (million barrels per day) .............................. 18.36 18.55 18.59 18.45 18.59 18.61 19.08 18.90 18.69 18.67 18.91 18.82 18.49 18.80 18.77 Natural Gas (billion cubic feet per day) ........................... 81.09 62.38 63.72 71.27 88.05 59.49 60.69 74.92 85.76 59.40 60.87 72.53 69.60 70.72 69.58 Coal (b) (million short tons) ......................................

28

Oil supply disruptions in the 1980s: an economic analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The West is concerned that the Persian Gulf nations, which produce about 40% of the noncommunist world's oil, are vulnerable to internal and external destabilization. The author proposes a series of policies to reduce and minimize the effects of any disruption in the Persian Gulf oil supply. After reviewing the historical, political, and economic factors contributing to the region's instability, he analyzes the magnitude and costs of a disruption for several probable scenarios. He recommends countervailing policies for the oil-importing states for the short and medium term and economic integration for the Gulf states for the longer run, a process which would include a rationalization of economic development. 52 references, 3 figures, 30 tables.

Pakravan, K.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Supply, Demand, and Export Outlook for North American Oil and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Supply, Demand, and Export Outlook for North American Oil and Gas For Energy Infrastructure Summit September 15, 2014 | Houston, TX By Adam Sieminski, EIA Administrator 0 20 40 60...

30

Dual use power supply development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Size weight efficiency and reliability define space power systems. Then years ago NASA re?emphasized that missions such as Space Station needed cost effective critical technologies one being power conversion. Thus NASA began to emphasize ‘‘dual?use’’ technology through its center for Commercial Development of Space (mid 1980s). This CCDS program funded research and development efforts needed for future space missions as well as terrestrial applications for commercial markets. Maxwell and Auburn University (Space Power Institute) jointly developed reliable power systems for manned space projects as well as commercial applications of high power high voltage switchmode power supplies. These serve the medical scientific and industrial markets (lasers accelerators and intense light sources). These applications required improvements in power density efficiency regulation reliability and cost effectiveness to be successful. One of NASA’s first programs at Auburn and Maxwell was a high frequency series resonant power converter optimized for commercial applications. It also meets the needs of space missions (additional space flight qualification is needed). This power converter topology demonstrates dual?use technology for power density power?to?weight regulation reliability and cost effectiveness. All goals were exceeded for both space and terrestrial applications. This was the first product of NASA’s CCDS program producing a family of high voltage capacitor charging power supplies. Maxwell’s CCDS capacitor power supplies are achieving greater acceptance demonstrating the value of the CCDS program.

Alan C. Kolb; Bryan E. Strickland

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. Projected production estimates of US crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian/Antrim shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects US domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted profitability to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply Director of the Office for Oil and Gas Global...

33

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil and gas supply module (OGSM) consists of a series of process submodules that project the availability of: oil and gas supply module (OGSM) consists of a series of process submodules that project the availability of: Domestic crude oil production and dry natural gas production from onshore, offshore, and Alaskan reservoirs Imported pipeline-quality gas from Mexico and Canada Imported liquefied natural gas. The OGSM regions are shown in Figure 12. Figure 12. Oil and Gas Supply Module Regions The driving assumption of OGSM is that domestic oil and gas exploration and development are undertaken if the discounted present value of the recovered resources at least covers the present value of taxes and the cost of capital, exploration, development, and production. In contrast, international gas trade is determined in part by scenario-dependent, noneconomic factors. Crude oil is transported to refineries, which are simulated in the petroleum market module, for conversion and blending into refined petroleum products. The individual submodules of the oil and gas supply module are solved independently, with feedbacks achieved through NEMS solution iterations (Figure 13).

34

Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. It is prepared in accordance with the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, Section 57(b)(2)). Projected production estimates of U.S. crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects U.S. domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted drilling expenditures and average drilling costs to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

NONE

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

35

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply on a regional basis (Figure 7). A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2006), (Washington, DC, 2006). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural

36

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Module. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply on a regional basis (Figure 7). A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2007), (Washington, DC, 2007). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural

37

Factors affecting the supply and demand for limes and lime oil in the U.S.: development implications for Veracruz state, Mexico.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The fresh lime industry is an important economic activity in Veracruz, Mexico. In this thesis, the economic potential of the fresh lime and lime oil… (more)

Abarca Orozco, Saul Julian

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2001), (Washington, DC, January 2001). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural gas from domestic fields throughout the United States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale in the United States, or sell U.S. gas to foreign consumers. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both

39

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2002), (Washington, DC, January 2002). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural gas from domestic fields throughout the United States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale in the United States, or sell U.S. gas to foreign consumers. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both

40

Documentation of the oil and gas supply module (OGSM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSK, to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. It is prepared in accordance with the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, Section 57(b)(2). OGSM is a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply potential and related issues. Its primary function is to produce forecast of crude oil, natural gas production, and natural gas imports and exports in response to price data received endogenously (within NEMS) from the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) and the Petroleum Market Model (PMM). To accomplish this task, OGSM does not provide production forecasts per se, but rather parameteres for short-term domestic oil and gas production functions and natural gas import functions that reside in PMM and NGTDM.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil supply development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Dominant Middle East oil reserves critically important to world supply  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that the location production, and transportation of the 60 million bbl of oil consumed in the world each day is of vital importance to relations between nations, as well as to their economic wellbeing. Oil has frequently been a decisive factor in the determination of foreign policy. The war in the Persian Gulf, while a dramatic example of the critical importance of oil, is just the latest of a long line of oil-influenced diplomatic/military incidents, which may be expected to continue. Assuming that the world's remaining oil was evenly distributed and demand did not grow, if exploration and development proceeded as efficiently as they have in the U.S., world oil production could be sustained at around current levels to about the middle of the next century. It then would begin a long decline in response to a depleting resource base. However, the world's remaining oil is very unevenly distributed. It is located primarily in the Eastern Hemisphere, mostly in the Persian Gulf, and much is controlled by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. Scientific resource assessments indicate that about half of the world's remaining conventionally recoverable crude oil resource occurs in the Persian Gulf area. In terms of proved reserves (known recoverable oil), the Persian Gulf portion increase to almost two-thirds.

Riva, J.P. Jr. (Library of Congress, Washington, DC (United States). Congressional Research Service)

1991-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

42

2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available - focusing on stockdraw - and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also demonstrates the continuing need for emergency preparedness, including the growing importance of engaging key transition and emerging economies in dialogue about energy security. 2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies More Documents & Publications IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2012

43

2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 1 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available - focusing on stockdraw - and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also demonstrates the continuing need for emergency preparedness, including the growing importance of engaging key transition and emerging economies in dialogue about energy security. 2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies More Documents & Publications IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2012

44

AEO2011: Oil and Gas Supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supply Supply Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 14, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into production, net imports, consumption by sector and price. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA gas oil Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote

45

Long Term World Oil Supply (A Resource Base/Production Path Analysis)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Long Term World Oil Supply Long Term World Oil Supply (A Resource Base/Production Path Analysis) 07/28/2000 Click here to start Table of Contents Long Term World Oil Supply (A Resource Base/Production Path Analysis) Executive Summary Executive Summary (Continued) Executive Summary (Continued) Overview The Year of Peak Production..When will worldwide conventional oil production peak?... Lower 48 Crude Oil Reserves & Production 1945-2000 Texas Oil and Condensate Production, and Texas First Purchase Price (FPP), 1980-1999 Published Estimates of World Oil Ultimate Recovery Different Interpretations of a Hypothetical 6,000 Billion Barrel World Original Oil-in-Place Resource Base Campbell-Laherrère World Oil Production Estimates, 1930-2050 Laherrere’s Oil Production Forecast, 1930-2150

46

U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development This report seeks to provide an organized, analytical...

47

EIA Data: 2011 United States Oil and Gas Supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil and Gas Supply Oil and Gas Supply Dataset Summary Description This dataset is the 2011 United States Oil and Gas Supply, part of the Annual Energy Outlook that highlights changes in the AEO Reference case projections for key energy topics. Source EIA Date Released December 16th, 2010 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO EIA energy gas oil Supply Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Oil and Gas Supply (xls, 32.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment http://www.eia.gov/abouteia/copyrights_reuse.cfm Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote

48

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Table 50. Crude Oil Technically Recoverable Resources (Billion barrels) Printer Friendly Version Crude Oil Resource Category As of January 1, 2002 Undiscovered 56.02 Onshore 19.33 Northeast 1.47 Gulf Coast 4.76 Midcontinent 1.12 Southwest 3.25 Rocky Moutain 5.73 West Coast 3.00 Offshore 36.69 Deep (>200 meter W.D.) 35.01 Shallow (0-200 meter W.D.) 1.69 Inferred Reserves 49.14 Onshore 37.78 Northeast 0.79 Gulf Coast 0.80 Midcontinent 3.73 Southwest 14.61 Rocky Mountain 9.91 West Coast 7.94

49

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 9.1. Crude Oil Technically Recoverable Resources. Need help, contact the Naitonal Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 9.2. Natural Gas Technically Recoverable Resources. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 9.2. Continued printer-friendly version Table 9.3. Assumed Size and Initial Production year of Major Announced Deepwater Discoveries. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 9.4. Assumed Annual Rates of Technological Progress for Conventional Crude Oil and Natural Gas Sources. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

50

DOE, States Seek Closer Collaboration on Oil and Gas Supply and Delivery,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE, States Seek Closer Collaboration on Oil and Gas Supply and DOE, States Seek Closer Collaboration on Oil and Gas Supply and Delivery, Climate Change Mitigation DOE, States Seek Closer Collaboration on Oil and Gas Supply and Delivery, Climate Change Mitigation October 1, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An agreement aimed at improving cooperation and collaboration in the areas of oil and natural gas supply, delivery, and climate change mitigation, has been signed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC). The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) provides a framework for states and DOE to work more closely on "responsible domestic production of oil and natural gas; carbon capture, transport and geologic storage; and other topics of mutual interest." The document was signed by DOE's Assistant

51

An assessment of oil supply and its implications for future prices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines three issues related to both the U.S. and world oil supply: (1) the nature of the ... be the primary source of U.S. oil imports; and (3) the cyclic behavior of oil prices. it shows that U.S. p...

Danilo J. Santini

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil.gif (4836 bytes) oil.gif (4836 bytes) The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(99), (Washington, DC, January 1999). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural gas from domestic fields throughout the United States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale in the United States, or sell U.S. gas to foreign consumers. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery and unconventional gas recovery from tight gas formations, gas shale, and coalbeds. Foreign gas transactions may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico) or transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG).

53

Fact #859 February 9, 2015 Excess Supply is the Most Recent Event to Affect Crude Oil Prices  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Crude oil prices have been extremely volatile over the past few decades. World events can disrupt the flow of oil to the market or cause uncertainty about future supply or demand for oil, leading...

54

Bureau of Land Management Oil Shale Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bureau of Land Management Oil Shale Development Unconventional Fuels Conference University of Utah May 17, 2011 #12;#12;Domestic Oil Shale Resources Primary oil shale resources in the U.S. are in the Green River Formation in Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. 72 % of this oil shale resource is on Federal

Utah, University of

55

Restraint urged in developing oil shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Restraint urged in developing oil shale ... An oil shale industry producing 400,000 bbl per day could be created by 1990 using existing technologies and without additional leasing of federal land. ... "Utah and Colorado, with most of the nation's oil shale reserves," Hatch says, "are looking at the business end of a very large federal cannon, loaded with billions for synthetic fuels development." ...

1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

AEO2011: Lower 48 Crude Oil Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crude Oil Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply Region Crude Oil Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply Region Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 132, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into Production, lower 48 onshore and lower 48 offshore. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO crude oil EIA prices Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Lower 48 Crude Oil Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply Region- Reference Case (xls, 54.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

57

Oil prices and the developing countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many of the present difficulties of the world economy have been blamed on the two oil-price explosions of the 1970s. Professor Chichilnisky shows ... , at least in the case of the oil-importing developing countri...

Graciela Chichilnisky

58

Product Supplied for Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petro. Feed Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Petroleum Coke - Marketable Petroleum Coke - Catalyst Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

59

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10,433 1,047 18,983 9,592 488 -617 17,890 3,998 19,273 10,433 1,047 18,983 9,592 488 -617 17,890 3,998 19,273 PADD 1 130 25 3,403 1,515 3,374 230 -269 3,374 264 5,307 PADD 2 1,993 892 4,464 2,094 500 -317 -225 4,240 386 5,224 PADD 3 6,249 96 7,346 4,283 -3,758 511 -211 6,723 2,976 5,239 PADD 4 887 14 643 287 -425 -18 51 615 10 713 PADD 5 1,174 20 3,127 1,413 310 82 36 2,939 362 2,789 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Imports at the PAD District level represent the PAD District in which the material entered the U.S. and not necessarily where the crude oil or product is processed and/or consumed. PAD District level net receipts includes implied net receipts for fuel ethanol and oxygenates (excluding fuel ethanol). Implied net receipts are calculated as the sum of stock change, refinery and blender net inputs, and exports minus the sum of renewable fuels and oxygenate plant net production, imports, and adjustments. Adjustments include an adjustment for crude oil, previously referred to as Unaccounted For Crude Oil. Also included is an adjustment for motor gasoline blending components, fuel ethanol, and distillate fuel oil. A negative stock change indicates a decrease in stocks and a positive number indicates an increase in stocks. Total stocks do not include distillate fuel oil stocks located in the Northeast Heating Oil Reserve. Total residual fuel oil stocks include stocks held at pipelines. Residual fuel oil stocks by sulfur content exclude pipeline stocks. Therefore, the sum of residual fuel oil stocks by sulfur content may not equal total residual fuel oil stocks. Exports of distillate fuel oil with sulfur greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm may include distillate fuel oil with sulfur content 15 ppm and under due to product detail limitations in exports data received from the U.S. Census Bureau. LRG = Liquefied Refinery Gas. Data may not add to total due to independent rounding. See Definitions, Sources, and Notes link above for more information on this table.

60

Energy Department Announces $2 Million to Develop Supply Chain...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Announces 2 Million to Develop Supply Chain, Manufacturing Competitiveness Analysis for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Energy Department Announces 2 Million to Develop...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil supply development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

957 15 731 315 -382 -141 33 712 15 735 Crude Oil 614 - - - - 300 -139 -147 -15 638 4 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 342 0 21 11 -304 - - 14 19 9 29...

62

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

848 14 646 310 -422 -51 0 622 15 707 Crude Oil 527 - - - - 296 -183 -57 3 578 2 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 320 0 11 11 -265 - - 1 17 12 48 Pentanes...

63

Bahrain oil and development 1929-1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book describes the economic, political, and social elements of relations between international oil companies and Bahrain. It also provides insights into Middle East regional oil and gas development, oil pricing and production evolution, and relations between Persian Gulf states and such western powers as Great Britain and the U.S.

Clarke, A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23,431 32,462 588,466 297,359 15,122 -19,137 554,586 123,943 23,431 32,462 588,466 297,359 15,122 -19,137 554,586 123,943 597,448 1,812,484 PADD 1 4,022 783 105,480 46,972 104,579 7,133 -8,328 104,584 8,184 164,527 145,574 PADD 2 61,781 27,645 138,371 64,904 15,509 -9,838 -6,968 131,427 11,955 161,957 273,603 PADD 3 193,724 2,967 227,728 132,784 -116,513 15,829 -6,533 208,398 92,256 162,398 1,211,066 PADD 4 27,499 433 19,935 8,906 -13,181 -544 1,567 19,066 310 22,105 38,275 PADD 5 36,406 635 96,952 43,793 9,606 2,542 1,124 91,111 11,237 86,461 143,965 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Imports at the PAD District level represent the PAD District in which the material entered the U.S. and not necessarily where the crude oil or product is processed and/or consumed. PAD District level net receipts includes implied net receipts for fuel ethanol and oxygenates (excluding fuel ethanol). Implied net receipts are calculated as the sum of stock change, refinery and blender net inputs, and exports minus the sum of renewable fuels and oxygenate plant net production, imports, and adjustments. Adjustments include an adjustment for crude oil, previously referred to as Unaccounted For Crude Oil. Also included is an adjustment for motor gasoline blending components, fuel ethanol, and distillate fuel oil. A negative stock change indicates a decrease in stocks and a positive number indicates an increase in stocks. Total stocks do not include distillate fuel oil stocks located in the Northeast Heating Oil Reserve. Total residual fuel oil stocks include stocks held at pipelines. Residual fuel oil stocks by sulfur content exclude pipeline stocks. Therefore, the sum of residual fuel oil stocks by sulfur content may not equal total residual fuel oil stocks. Exports of distillate fuel oil with sulfur greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm may include distillate fuel oil with sulfur content 15 ppm and under due to product detail limitations in exports data received from the U.S. Census Bureau. LRG = Liquefied Refinery Gas. Data may not add to total due to independent rounding. See Definitions, Sources, and Notes link above for more information on this table.

65

"Green" Supply Chains: Using Information Integration for Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Loss of (primary) rain-forests is a major problem for biodiversity [7], water supply and the world"Green" Supply Chains: Using Information Integration for Sustainable Development Alexander Schatten, an approach is introduced that covers the whole supply chain. The core idea is that end-to-end transparency

66

Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Staff Listing - Office for Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply Director of the Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply (Vacant) Natural Gas Regulatory Activities Division John A. Anderson, Director Room 3E-042 Lisa Craig Room 3E-042 Telephone (202)586-9484 FAX (202) 586-6050 Case Management Beverly Howard Room 3E-042 Telephone (202) 586-9387 FAX (202) 586-6050 Lisa Tracy Room 3E-052 Telephone (202) 586-4523 FAX (202) 586-6050 Marc Talbert Room 3E-042 Telephone (202) 586-7991 FAX (202) 586-6050 Office of Natural Gas Docket Room Larine Moore Docket Room Manager Room 3E-042 Telephone (202) 586-9478 FAX (202) 586-6050 International Activities Division Sally Kornfeld, Director Room 3E-042 Telephone (202) 586-3814

67

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,654 457 22,655 9,757 -11,830 -4,359 1,022 22,083 459 22,770 40,249 Crude Oil 19,044 - - - - 9,297 -4,312 -4,561 -451 19,787 132 0 20,405 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied...

68

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,134 78 8,072 4,027 -3,603 366 34 7,401 3,285 5,354 Crude Oil 5,259 - - - - 3,454 -222 227 -164 8,685 198 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 1,875 0 534 1...

69

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,416 250,220 124,827 -111,703 11,357 1,044 229,444 101,831 165,961 1,223,681 Crude Oil 163,028 - - - - 107,081 -6,891 7,037 -5,099 269,223 6,132 0 882,888 Natural Gas Plant...

70

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

6,046 98 7,569 4,450 -3,757 434 -42 6,943 2,694 5,247 Crude Oil 4,384 - - - - 3,691 -391 312 6 7,952 37 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 1,663 0 411 35 165...

71

Determination of GHG contributions by subsystems in the oil palm supply chain using the LCA approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With increasing attention on sustainable development, the environmental and social relevance of palm oil production are now important trade issues. The life cycle assessment (LCA) study of Malaysian oil palm prod...

Yuen May Choo; Halimah Muhamad…

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Urban form and long-term fuel supply decline: A method to investigate the peak oil risks to essential activities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The issue of a peak in world oil supply has become a mainstream concern over the past several years. The petroleum geology models of post-peak oil production indicate supply declines from 1.5% to 6% per year. Travel requires fuel energy, but current transportation planning models do not include the impacts of constrained fuel supply on private travel demand. This research presents a method to assess the risk to activities due to a constrained fuel supply relative to projected unconstrained travel demand. The method assesses the probability of different levels of fuel supply over a given planning horizon, then calculates impact due to the energy supply not meeting the planning expectations. A new travel demand metric which characterizes trips as essential, necessary, and optional to wellbeing is used in the calculation. A case study explores four different urban forms developed from different future growth options for the urban development strategy of Christchurch, New Zealand to 2041. Probable fuel supply availability was calculated, and the risk to transport activities in the 2041 transport model was assessed. The results showed all the urban forms had significantly reduced trip numbers and lower energy mode distributions from the current planning projections, but the risk to activities differed among the planning options. Density is clearly one of the mitigating factors, but density alone does not provide a solution to reduced energy demand. The method clearly shows how risk to participation in activities is lower for an urban form which has a high degree of human powered and public transport access to multiple options between residential and commercial/industrial/service destinations. This analysis has led to new thinking about adaptation and reorganization of urban forms as a strategy for energy demand reduction rather than just densification.

Susan Krumdieck; Shannon Page; André Dantas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Policy Analysis of Water Availability and Use Issues for Domestic Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale and oil sands resources located within the intermountain west represent a vast, and as of yet, commercially untapped source of energy. Development will require water, and demand for scarce water resources stands at the front of a long list of barriers to commercialization. Water requirements and the consequences of commercial development will depend on the number, size, and location of facilities, as well as the technologies employed to develop these unconventional fuels. While the details remain unclear, the implication is not – unconventional fuel development will increase demand for water in an arid region where demand for water often exceeds supply. Water demands in excess of supplies have long been the norm in the west, and for more than a century water has been apportioned on a first-come, first-served basis. Unconventional fuel developers who have not already secured water rights stand at the back of a long line and will need to obtain water from willing water purveyors. However, uncertainty regarding the nature and extent of some senior water claims combine with indeterminate interstate river management to cast a cloud over water resource allocation and management. Quantitative and qualitative water requirements associated with Endangered Species protection also stand as barriers to significant water development, and complex water quality regulations will apply to unconventional fuel development. Legal and political decisions can give shape to an indeterminate landscape. Settlement of Northern Ute reserved rights claims would help clarify the worth of existing water rights and viability of alternative sources of supply. Interstate apportionment of the White River would go a long way towards resolving water availability in downstream Utah. And energy policy clarification will help determine the role oil shale and oil sands will play in our nation’s future.

Ruple, John; Keiter, Robert

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Industry Supply Chain Development (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Industry Supply Chain Development (Ohio) Industry Supply Chain Development (Ohio) Industry Supply Chain Development (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Transportation Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info State Ohio Program Type Grant Program Industry Recruitment/Support Loan Program Provider Ohio Development Services Agency Supply Chain Development programs are focused on targeted industries that have significant growth opportunities for Ohio's existing manufacturing sector from emerging energy resources and technologies. The Office of Energy is currently working on developing the supply chains for the wind,

75

The Differential Effects of Oil Demand and Supply Shocks on the Global Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We employ a set of sign restrictions on the generalized impulse responses of a Global VAR model, estimated for 38 countries/regions over the period 1979Q2.2011Q2, to discriminate between supply-driven and demand-driven oil-price shocks and to study...

Cashin, Paul; Mohaddes, Kamiar; Raissi, Maziar; Raissi, Mehdi

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections Jump to: navigation, search Name Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections Agency/Company /Organization Argonne National Laboratory Sector Energy Topics GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type Software/modeling tools Website http://www.dis.anl.gov/news/Me Country Mexico UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections[1] "CEEESA and the team of experts from Mexico analyzed the country's entire energy supply and demand system using CEEESA's latest version of the popular ENPEP-BALANCE software. The team developed a system representation, a so-called energy network, using ENPEP's powerful graphical user

77

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,980 842 4,204 1,948 672 -339 187 3,995 240 4,886 ,980 842 4,204 1,948 672 -339 187 3,995 240 4,886 Crude Oil 1,472 - - - - 1,839 556 -359 17 3,416 76 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 508 -17 115 63 -14 - - 75 105 71 404 Pentanes Plus 63 -17 - - 0 98 - - -18 37 53 72 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 444 - - 115 63 -112 - - 93 68 18 332 Ethane/Ethylene 163 - - - 0 -100 - - 11 - - 52 Propane/Propylene 186 - - 104 49 -22 - - 66 - 7 244 Normal Butane/Butylene 52 - - 16 5 5 - - 22 17 11 29 Isobutane/Isobutylene 43 - - -4 8 5 - - -6 50 - 7 Other Liquids - - 858 - - 12 -143 127 346 474 40 -6 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 858 - - 5 -547 -8 11 271 26 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 23 - - 23 0 - -

78

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

562 822 4,163 1,839 735 -69 52 3,955 244 4,801 562 822 4,163 1,839 735 -69 52 3,955 244 4,801 Crude Oil 1,116 - - - - 1,730 800 -87 62 3,442 55 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 446 -16 121 74 -25 - - -12 105 111 395 Pentanes Plus 50 -16 - - 1 82 - - -4 31 101 -12 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 396 - - 121 73 -107 - - -8 74 11 407 Ethane/Ethylene 163 - - - 0 -108 - - -2 - - 58 Propane/Propylene 156 - - 108 59 -24 - - -3 - 2 300 Normal Butane/Butylene 48 - - 11 9 10 - - -4 29 9 45 Isobutane/Isobutylene 29 - - 2 6 14 - - 1 46 - 5 Other Liquids - - 838 - - 5 -258 -159 8 408 25 -16 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 838 - - 3 -565 4 1 257 21 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 22 - - 22 0 - -

79

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

124 22 3,585 1,761 3,291 117 -137 3,532 241 5,264 124 22 3,585 1,761 3,291 117 -137 3,532 241 5,264 Crude Oil 34 - - - - 897 1 113 -43 1,084 3 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 90 0 25 32 86 - - 16 27 15 174 Pentanes Plus 15 0 - - - - - - 0 - 10 4 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 75 - - 25 32 86 - - 16 27 5 169 Ethane/Ethylene 1 - - 0 - - - - 0 - - 1 Propane/Propylene 51 - - 36 27 83 - - 24 - 4 168 Normal Butane/Butylene 16 - - -11 3 3 - - -8 17 1 0 Isobutane/Isobutylene 8 - - 0 2 - - - -1 9 - 0 Other Liquids - - 22 - - 555 1,614 193 -31 2,421 5 -10 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 22 - - 25 273 -19 -35 332 5 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 4 - - 4 0 - - Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol)

80

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,164 20 3,171 1,425 308 193 28 2,990 349 2,914 1,164 20 3,171 1,425 308 193 28 2,990 349 2,914 Crude Oil 1,104 - - - - 1,209 - 140 10 2,443 - 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 61 0 66 4 - - - 36 59 13 22 Pentanes Plus 26 0 - - - - - - 5 18 3 -1 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 34 - - 66 4 - - - 30 41 10 23 Ethane/Ethylene 0 - - - - - - - - - - 0 Propane/Propylene 14 - - 49 4 - - - 12 - 10 45 Normal Butane/Butylene 5 - - 15 0 - - - 13 19 0 -11 Isobutane/Isobutylene 15 - - 1 - - - - 5 22 - -12 Other Liquids - - 20 - - 107 252 94 -71 488 13 43 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 20 - - 19 143 37 -2 219 3 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 47 - - 47 0 - - Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil supply development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,173 16 2,988 1,321 324 106 21 2,811 344 2,751 1,173 16 2,988 1,321 324 106 21 2,811 344 2,751 Crude Oil 1,111 - - - - 1,160 2 62 4 2,331 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 61 0 50 5 - - - 1 66 15 35 Pentanes Plus 28 0 - - - - - - 0 21 3 4 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 33 - - 50 5 - - - 1 45 12 31 Ethane/Ethylene 0 - - - - - - - - - - 0 Propane/Propylene 12 - - 46 4 - - - 1 - 10 51 Normal Butane/Butylene 6 - - 6 1 - - - 0 26 1 -14 Isobutane/Isobutylene 15 - - -2 0 - - - 0 20 - -7 Other Liquids - - 16 - - 74 245 103 11 414 13 1 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 16 - - 7 138 37 2 193 3 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 43 - - 43 0 - - Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) - - - - 1 1 0

82

Developments in oil shale in 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale development continued at a slow pace in 1987. The continuing interest in this commodity is demonstrated by the 342 oil shale citations added to the US Department of Energy Energy Database during 1987. The Unocal project in Parachute, Colorado, produced 600,000 bbl of synfuel in 1987. An appreciable amount of 1987's activity was associated with the nonsynfuel uses of oil shale. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Knutson, C.F.; Dana, G.F.; Solti, G.; Qian, J.L.; Ball, F.D.; Hutton, A.C.; Hanna, J.; Russell, P.L.; Piper, E.M.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25,966 7,956 1,280,301 725,573 1,191,766 9,116 -19,377 1,260,324 25,966 7,956 1,280,301 725,573 1,191,766 9,116 -19,377 1,260,324 90,720 1,909,011 152,389 Crude Oil 9,418 - - - - 316,140 4,126 8,405 -1,574 336,230 3,434 0 8,328 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 16,548 -84 14,202 18,043 26,704 - - -1,588 7,264 3,052 66,685 6,377 Pentanes Plus 2,828 -84 - - 185 -19 - - 12 63 315 2,520 43 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 13,720 - - 14,202 17,858 26,723 - - -1,600 7,201 2,737 64,165 6,334 Ethane/Ethylene 174 - - 93 - - - - 0 - - 267 - Propane/Propylene 9,223 - - 12,922 16,074 26,601 - - -793 - 1,230 64,383 5,184 Normal Butane/Butylene 2,091 - - 1,435 616 122 - - -866 3,435 1,507 188 837 Isobutane/Isobutylene 2,232 - - -248 1,168 - - - 59 3,766 - -673 313

84

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3,707 661 107,540 52,842 98,737 3,513 -4,105 105,957 7,218 3,707 661 107,540 52,842 98,737 3,513 -4,105 105,957 7,218 157,931 153,902 Crude Oil 1,020 - - - - 26,908 20 3,378 -1,285 32,517 94 0 10,326 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 2,687 -11 747 945 2,568 - - 471 798 453 5,214 6,541 Pentanes Plus 443 -11 - - - - - - 2 - 300 130 82 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 2,244 - - 747 945 2,568 - - 469 798 153 5,084 6,459 Ethane/Ethylene 27 - - 9 - - - - 6 - - 30 15 Propane/Propylene 1,517 - - 1,078 813 2,483 - - 724 - 126 5,041 4,442 Normal Butane/Butylene 474 - - -333 80 85 - - -246 523 27 2 1,673 Isobutane/Isobutylene 226 - - -7 52 - - - -15 275 - 11 329 Other Liquids - - 672 - - 16,653 48,432 5,798 -936 72,642 156 -307 61,003

85

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

429,215 5,872 1,093,588 483,473 118,666 38,688 7,789 1,028,754 429,215 5,872 1,093,588 483,473 118,666 38,688 7,789 1,028,754 126,026 1,006,933 150,671 Crude Oil 406,791 - - - - 424,639 598 22,523 1,445 853,106 0 0 56,432 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 22,424 -123 18,260 1,933 - - - 404 24,108 5,319 12,663 4,734 Pentanes Plus 10,215 -123 - - - - - - -20 7,565 1,094 1,453 51 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 12,209 - - 18,260 1,933 - - - 424 16,543 4,225 11,210 4,683 Ethane/Ethylene 34 - - - - - - - - - - 34 - Propane/Propylene 4,422 - - 16,669 1,593 - - - 335 - 3,714 18,635 1,915 Normal Butane/Butylene 2,360 - - 2,258 332 - - - 129 9,346 512 -5,037 2,249 Isobutane/Isobutylene 5,393 - - -667 8 - - - -40 7,197 - -2,423 519

86

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

302,630 5,088 230,918 121,366 -164,290 -11,531 4,472 221,774 5,269 302,630 5,088 230,918 121,366 -164,290 -11,531 4,472 221,774 5,269 252,667 39,043 Crude Oil 163,870 - - - - 115,845 -53,264 -13,771 3,101 209,575 5 0 18,928 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 138,760 -110 3,391 3,503 -119,108 - - 94 6,946 4,261 15,135 1,470 Pentanes Plus 18,508 -110 - - - -13,355 - - 14 2,156 3,795 -922 194 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 120,252 - - 3,391 3,503 -105,753 - - 80 4,790 466 16,057 1,276 Ethane/Ethylene 63,265 - - - - -61,214 - - -6 - - 2,057 400 Propane/Propylene 36,541 - - 3,406 3,155 -28,078 - - 7 - 12 15,005 363 Normal Butane/Butylene 15,114 - - 294 255 -9,019 - - 88 2,241 455 3,860 366 Isobutane/Isobutylene 5,332 - - -309 93 -7,442 - - -9 2,549 - -4,866 147

87

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

315,006 29,943 578,101 299,380 14,453 11,088 543,388 108,925 315,006 29,943 578,101 299,380 14,453 11,088 543,388 108,925 573,483 1,831,621 Crude Oil 233,810 - - - - 237,344 8,334 7,688 468,825 2,975 0 1,067,149 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 81,196 -552 19,023 4,020 - - 3,027 16,794 13,937 69,929 189,672 Pentanes Plus 11,167 -552 - - 772 - - -700 5,666 2,989 3,432 18,036 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 70,029 - - 19,023 3,248 - - 3,727 11,128 10,947 66,498 171,636 Ethane/Ethylene 30,015 - - 379 9 - - -414 - - 30,817 34,444 Propane/Propylene 25,545 - - 17,254 2,603 - - 2,582 - 10,040 32,780 67,782 Normal Butane/Butylene 6,893 - - 1,738 333 - - 999 4,711 907 2,347 58,942 Isobutane/Isobutylene 7,576 - - -348 303 - - 560 6,417 - 554 10,468

88

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8,897 964 18,564 10,598 335 158 17,505 3,205 18,490 8,897 964 18,564 10,598 335 158 17,505 3,205 18,490 Crude Oil 6,489 - - - - 8,527 144 93 14,999 67 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 2,408 -18 630 170 - - 65 509 314 2,301 Pentanes Plus 317 -18 - - 29 - - -13 174 118 50 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 2,091 - - 630 141 - - 79 335 196 2,251 Ethane/Ethylene 974 - - 18 0 - - 34 - - 958 Propane/Propylene 712 - - 553 116 - - 36 - 171 1,175 Normal Butane/Butylene 179 - - 56 15 - - 5 143 26 77 Isobutane/Isobutylene 225 - - 3 9 - - 4 192 - 41 Other Liquids - - 981 - - 1,257 53 51 1,997 214 28 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 981 - - 40 151 5 1,050 116 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 190 - - 190 0 - -

89

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

71 22 3,498 1,982 3,256 25 -53 3,444 248 5,216 71 22 3,498 1,982 3,256 25 -53 3,444 248 5,216 Crude Oil 26 - - - - 864 11 23 -4 919 9 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 45 0 39 49 73 - - -4 20 8 182 Pentanes Plus 8 0 - - 1 0 - - 0 0 1 7 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 37 - - 39 49 73 - - -4 20 7 175 Ethane/Ethylene 0 - - 0 - - - - 0 - - 1 Propane/Propylene 25 - - 35 44 73 - - -2 - 3 176 Normal Butane/Butylene 6 - - 4 2 0 - - -2 9 4 1 Isobutane/Isobutylene 6 - - -1 3 - - - 0 10 - -2 Other Liquids - - 22 - - 717 1,611 114 -5 2,505 10 -47 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 22 - - 29 291 -9 3 324 6 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 4 - - 4 0 - - Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) - - - - 0 - 0 0

90

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

34,932 594 95,116 42,741 9,239 5,791 830 89,707 10,470 87,406 34,932 594 95,116 42,741 9,239 5,791 830 89,707 10,470 87,406 142,840 Crude Oil 33,114 - - - - 36,279 - 4,213 311 73,295 - 0 52,719 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 1,818 -8 1,970 134 - - - 1,076 1,782 396 660 8,270 Pentanes Plus 794 -8 - - - - - - 163 552 92 -21 314 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1,024 - - 1,970 134 - - - 913 1,230 304 681 7,956 Ethane/Ethylene 3 - - - - - - - - - - 3 - Propane/Propylene 420 - - 1,475 124 - - - 374 - 299 1,346 2,272 Normal Butane/Butylene 158 - - 451 10 - - - 378 556 5 -320 5,110 Isobutane/Isobutylene 443 - - 44 - - - - 161 674 - -348 574 Other Liquids - - 602 - - 3,200 7,556 2,809 -2,126 14,630 387 1,276 46,625

91

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3,256,148 352,785 6,794,407 3,878,852 122,574 57,691 6,406,693 3,256,148 352,785 6,794,407 3,878,852 122,574 57,691 6,406,693 1,172,965 6,767,418 1,807,777 Crude Oil 2,374,842 - - - - 3,120,755 52,746 34,134 5,489,516 24,693 0 1,060,764 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 881,306 -6,534 230,413 62,192 - - 23,894 186,270 115,054 842,159 153,268 Pentanes Plus 116,002 -6,534 - - 10,680 - - -4,857 63,596 43,136 18,273 12,739 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 765,304 - - 230,413 51,512 - - 28,751 122,674 71,918 823,886 140,529 Ethane/Ethylene 356,592 - - 6,597 115 - - 12,504 - - 350,800 35,396 Propane/Propylene 260,704 - - 202,309 42,460 - - 13,013 - 62,490 429,970 67,991 Normal Butane/Butylene 65,555 - - 20,580 5,567 - - 1,795 52,246 9,428 28,233 28,574

92

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

59,397 25,268 126,131 58,449 20,168 -10,157 5,610 119,848 7,211 59,397 25,268 126,131 58,449 20,168 -10,157 5,610 119,848 7,211 146,586 280,571 Crude Oil 44,167 - - - - 55,181 16,673 -10,758 505 102,476 2,282 0 102,610 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 15,230 -515 3,462 1,887 -432 - - 2,252 3,146 2,129 12,105 58,830 Pentanes Plus 1,896 -515 - - 6 2,928 - - -549 1,119 1,599 2,146 7,743 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 13,334 - - 3,462 1,881 -3,360 - - 2,801 2,027 530 9,959 51,087 Ethane/Ethylene 4,901 - - - 9 -3,013 - - 339 - - 1,558 4,694 Propane/Propylene 5,587 - - 3,111 1,470 -650 - - 1,991 - 199 7,328 24,444 Normal Butane/Butylene 1,561 - - 475 162 156 - - 651 514 331 858 20,078 Isobutane/Isobutylene 1,285 - - -124 240 147 - - -180 1,513 - 215 1,871

93

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

571,552 300,900 1,523,608 673,109 268,869 -25,130 18,853 1,447,490 571,552 300,900 1,523,608 673,109 268,869 -25,130 18,853 1,447,490 89,370 1,757,194 287,201 Crude Oil 408,314 - - - - 633,223 292,624 -31,767 22,602 1,259,826 19,966 0 115,743 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 163,238 -6,037 44,417 27,019 -9,288 - - -4,496 38,476 40,729 144,640 43,693 Pentanes Plus 18,229 -6,037 - - 213 29,889 - - -1,599 11,319 36,827 -4,253 6,686 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 145,009 - - 44,417 26,806 -39,177 - - -2,897 27,157 3,902 148,893 37,007 Ethane/Ethylene 59,649 - - - 115 -39,435 - - -716 - - 21,045 3,590 Propane/Propylene 57,022 - - 39,605 21,464 -8,812 - - -1,114 - 580 109,813 22,020 Normal Butane/Butylene 17,564 - - 4,181 3,156 3,807 - - -1,354 10,449 3,322 16,291

94

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10,500 998 19,270 9,979 482 370 18,113 3,631 19,116 10,500 998 19,270 9,979 482 370 18,113 3,631 19,116 Crude Oil 7,794 - - - - 7,911 278 256 15,628 99 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 2,707 -18 634 134 - - 101 560 465 2,331 Pentanes Plus 372 -18 - - 26 - - -23 189 100 114 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 2,334 - - 634 108 - - 124 371 365 2,217 Ethane/Ethylene 1,001 - - 13 0 - - -14 - - 1,027 Propane/Propylene 852 - - 575 87 - - 86 - 335 1,093 Normal Butane/Butylene 230 - - 58 11 - - 33 157 30 78 Isobutane/Isobutylene 253 - - -12 10 - - 19 214 - 18 Other Liquids - - 1,015 - - 1,337 296 304 1,926 219 199 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 1,015 - - 75 121 -36 1,129 118 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 208 - - 208 0 - -

95

U.S. Crude Oil Supply & Disposition  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Supply Field Production (Commercial) 1,853,122 1,829,897 1,954,021 1,996,787 2,063,138 2,374,842 1859-2012 Alaskan 263,595 249,874 235,491 218,904 204,829 192,368 1981-2012 Lower 48 States 1,589,527 1,580,024 1,718,529 1,777,883 1,858,309 2,182,474 1993-2012 Imports 3,661,404 3,580,694 3,289,675 3,362,856 3,261,422 3,120,755 1910-2012 Commercial 3,658,701 3,573,581 3,269,307 3,362,856 3,261,422 3,120,755 2001-2012 Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) 2,703 7,113 20,368 1977-2009 Adjustments (Commercial) 9,742 5,777 29,077 37,829 63,600 52,746 1981-2012 Disposition Stock Change -17,835 44,617 24,132 8,180 -33,345 34,134 1983-2012 Commercial -26,171 39,735 -661 8,251 -2,751 34,817 1993-2012

96

Product Price Spreads Over Crude Oil Vary With Seasons and Supply/Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Of course, petroleum product prices don't move in lockstep to crude oil prices, for a number of reasons. We find it useful to look at variations in the spread between product and crude oil prices, in this case comparing spot market prices for each. The difference between heating oil and crude oil spot prices tends to vary seasonally; that is, it's generally higher in the winter, when demand for distillate fuels is higher due to heating requirements, and lower in the summer. (Gasoline, as we'll see later, generally does the opposite.) However, other factors affecting supply and demand, including the relative severity of winter weather, can greatly distort these "typical" seasonal trends. As seen on this chart, the winters of 1995-96 and 1996-97 featured

97

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

926,785 32,969 2,665,992 1,875,331 -1,415,011 111,431 45,954 926,785 32,969 2,665,992 1,875,331 -1,415,011 111,431 45,954 2,448,351 861,579 1,841,613 1,178,473 Crude Oil 1,386,449 - - - - 1,630,908 -244,084 67,355 8,560 2,830,779 1,288 0 861,333 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 540,336 -180 150,143 11,694 101,692 - - 29,480 109,476 61,693 603,036 96,994 Pentanes Plus 66,222 -180 - - 10,282 -16,515 - - -3,264 42,493 1,105 19,475 5,765 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 474,114 - - 150,143 1,412 118,207 - - 32,744 66,983 60,588 583,561 91,229 Ethane/Ethylene 233,470 - - 6,504 - 100,649 - - 13,226 - - 327,397 31,406 Propane/Propylene 153,496 - - 129,707 174 10,289 - - 14,578 - 56,954 222,134 38,509 Normal Butane/Butylene 28,426 - - 12,412 1,208 5,090 - - 3,798 26,775 3,633 12,930

98

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Standard Oil Development...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Standard Oil Development Co of NJ - NJ 18 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: STANDARD OIL DEVELOPMENT CO. OF NJ (NJ.18) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not...

99

U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

transferability for entrants inexperienced with other offshore markets (e.g., oil and gas) poses risk to investment should consistent demand fail to develop. (1) See Table 2-3...

100

International oil and gas exploration and development activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of an ongoing series of quarterly publications that monitors discoveries of oil and natural gas in foreign countries and provides an analysis of the reserve additions that result. The report is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program (FESAP). It presents a summary of discoveries and reserve additions that result from recent international exploration and development activities. It is intended for use by petroleum industry analysts, various government agencies, and political leaders in the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy plans, policy, and legislation. 25 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1990-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil supply development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) supply chain collaboration development methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) project during the last five years of work with the U.S. Integrated Textile Complex (retail, apparel, textile, and fiber sectors) has developed an inter-enterprise supply chain collaboration development methodology. The goal of this methodology is to enable a supply chain to work more efficiently and competitively. The outcomes of this methodology include: (1) A definitive description and evaluation of the role of business cultures and supporting business organizational structures in either inhibiting or fostering change to a more competitive supply chain; (2) ``As-Is'' and proposed ``To-Be'' supply chain business process models focusing on information flows and decision-making; and (3) Software tools that enable and support a transition to a more competitive supply chain, which results form a business driven rather than technologically driven approach to software design. This methodology development will continue in FY00 as DAMA engages companies in the soft goods industry in supply chain research and implementation of supply chain collaboration.

PETERSEN,MARJORIE B.; CHAPMAN,LEON D.

2000-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Econometric Modelling of World Oil Supplies: Terminal Price and the Time to Depletion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper develops a novel approach by which to identify the price of oil at the time of depletion; the so-called terminal price of oil. It is shown that while the terminal price is independent of both GDP growth and the price elasticity of energy...

Mohaddes, Kamiar

2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

103

The economics of oil and gas supply in the Former Soviet Union  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Supply costs curves for the Former Soviet Union (FSU) are constructed for conventional petroleum, which is defined as conventional oil, natural gas and natural gas liquids (NGL). The supply figures show how petroleum quantities vary with production costs over time. Five resource quality categories, distinguishable according to production costs, are used in the estimation. The quantities are allocated across the five categories in a fixed proportion in order to generate the supply cost curves. The role of annual productivity gains, i.e., technological progress, to the year 2030 is also included. Results indicate that petroleum in the FSU is abundant and can be produced economically. In addition, production costs are found to decrease further over time as technology advances. With appropriate energy policy, FSU petroleum resources should assist in meeting domestic and international energy demand.

Roberto F. Aguilera

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Oil and Gas CDT Development of a SUNTANS Baroclinic Model for 3D Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil and Gas CDT Development of a SUNTANS Baroclinic Model for 3D Oil Pollution Tracking Heriot) Key Words Oil Spill, HF Radar, Trajectory Forecasting, Hydrodynamic Modelling, Oil Chemistry Overview In an oil spill emergency, an operational system must forecast ocean and weather conditions in addition

Henderson, Gideon

105

Volume 9: A Review of Socioeconomic Impacts of Oil Shale Development WESTERN OIL SHALE DEVELOPMENT: A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of an oil shale industry in northwestern Colorado and northeastern Utah has been forecast at various times since early this century, but the comparatively easy accessibility of other oil sources has forestalled development. Decreasing fuel supplies, increasing energy costs, and the threat of a crippling oil embargo finally may launch a commercial oil shale industry in this region. Concern for the possible impacts on the human environment has been fostered by experiences of rapid population growth in other western towns that have hosted energy resource development. A large number of studies have attempted to evaluate social and economic impacts of energy development and to determine important factors that affect the severity of these impacts. These studies have suggested that successful management of rapid population growth depends on adequate front-end capital for public facilities, availability of housing, attention to human service needs, long-range land use and fiscal planning. This study examines variables that affect the socioeconomic impacts of oil shale development. The study region is composed of four Colorado counties: Mesa, Moffat, Garfield and Rio Blanco. Most of the estimated population of 111 000 resides in a handful of urban areas that are separated by large distances and rugged terrain. We have projected the six largest cities and towns and one planned company town (Battlement Mesa) to be the probable centers for potential population impacts caused by development of an oil shale industry. Local planners expect Battlement Mesa to lessen impacts on small existing communities and indeed may be necessary to prevent severe regional socioeconomic impacts. Section II describes the study region and focuses on the economic trends and present conditions in the area. The population impacts analyzed in this study are contingent on a scenario of oil shale development from 1980-90 provided by the Department of Energy and discussed in Sec. III. We recognize that the rate of development, the magnitude of development, and the technology mix that will actually take place remain uncertain. Although we emphasize that other energy and mineral resources besides oil shale may be developed, the conclusions reached in this study reflect only those impacts that would be felt from the oil shale scenario. Socioeconomic impacts in the region reflect the uneven growth rate implied by the scenario and will be affected by the timing of industry developments, the length and magnitude of the construction phase of development, and the shift in employment profiles predicted in the scenario. The facilities in the southern portion of the oil shale region, those along the Colorado River and Parachute Creek, show a peak in the construction work force in the mid-1980s, whereas those f acil it i es in the Piceance Creek Bas into the north show a construction peak in the late 1980s. Together, the facilities will require a large construction work force throughout the decade, with a total of 4800 construction workers required in 1985. Construction at the northern sites and second phase construction in the south will require 6000 workers in 1988. By 1990, the operation work force will increase to 7950. Two important characteristics of oil shale development emerge from the work force estimates: (1) peak-year construction work forces will be 90-120% the size of the permanent operating work force; and (2) the yearly changes in total work force requirements will be large, as much as 900 in one year at one facility. To estimate population impacts on individual communities, we devised a population distribution method that is described in Sec. IV. Variables associated with the projection of population impacts are discussed and methodologies of previous assessments are compared. Scenario-induced population impacts estimated by the Los Alamos method are compared to projections of a model employed by the Colorado West Area Council of Governments. Oil shale development in the early decade, as defined by the scenario, will produce growth primarily

Rotariu,, G. J.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Biobjective optimization for general oil field development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The optimization of oil field development and production planning typically requires the consideration of multiple, possibly conflicting, objectives. For example, in a waterflooding project, we might seek to maximize oil recovery and minimize water injection. It is therefore important to devise and test optimization procedures that consider two or more objectives in the determination of optimal development and production plans. In this work we present an approach for field development optimization with two objectives. A single-objective product formulation, which systematically combines the two objectives in a sequence of single-objective optimization problems, is applied. The method, called BiPSOMADS, utilizes at its core our recently developed PSO–MADS (Particle Swarm Optimization–Mesh Adaptive Direct Search) hybrid optimization algorithm. This derivative-free procedure has been shown to be effective for the solution of generalized field development and well control problems that include categorical, discrete and continuous variables along with general (nonlinear) constraints. Four biobjective field development and well control examples are solved using BiPSOMADS. These examples include problems that consider the maximization of both net present value and cumulative oil production, and the maximization of both long-term and short-term reservoir performance. An example that highlights the applicability of biobjective optimization for field development under geological uncertainty is also presented. This usage of BiPSOMADS enables us to maximize expected reservoir performance while reducing the risk associated with the worst-case scenario.

Obiajulu J. Isebor; Louis J. Durlofsky

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Review of the energy supply status for sustainable development in the Organization of Islamic Conference  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This review describes the situation and the varying potential of energy supply utilization of countries in the Organization of Islamic Conference (OIC). This exercise reveals that the increase in energy consumption is associated with economic growth and population expansion. The interconnectivity between energy use and national level, as well as the connection between energy utilization and gross domestic product (GDP), which is an indicator of economic development, must be explained to determine the significance of national energy utility in these countries. Therefore, alternative energy source utilization is necessary for the provision of an appreciable constituent of imminent energy requirements in sectors that utilize energy. Alternative energy source utilization is a crucial factor in ensuring the total capacity of energy sources in various growing economies of the world where clean energy is unavailable. Furthermore, some of these countries also possess alternative energy sources such as hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, and biomass. This paper provides details on sustainable energy supply developments in OIC countries. These countries must sustainably develop energy despite their sufficient wealth in crude oil and natural gas. The main purpose of this study is to determine economic growth in relation to energy supply to facilitate sustainable development. In addition, this paper suggests necessary requirements to sustain the energy development processes in OIC countries and as well as some stages that must be adopted to enhance development at a sustainable rate.

Mohamed Gabbasa; Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Zahira Yaakob; M.Reza Faraji Zonooz; Ahmad Fudholi; Nilofar Asim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

A study on lubricant oil supply for positive-displacement expanders in small-scale organic Rankine cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Positive-displacement expanders, which are widely used in small-scale \\{ORCs\\} (Organic Rankine Cycles), need reliable LOS (Lubricant Oil Supply) to get well lubrication and sealing. In the present paper, the characteristics of two traditional LOS schemes are examined. Moreover, a modified one is proposed. Analyses of those elements that lead to work loss of lubricant oil supply have been carried out for all the three LOS schemes. The work loss of lubricant oil supply, which is caused by the employment of lubricant oil pumps, pressure drop in lubricant oil separator and other components contributing to work loss, is evaluated by a definition of WLLS (Work Loss Factor of Lubrication Oil Supply). Based on the thermodynamic model of ORC established, the calculation methods of WLLS are presented. Through analyses of LOS schemes and calculation of WLLS in two typical ORCs, it was found that the traditional LOS schemes either can not work reliably, or might cause up to 11.5% and 9.5% power decrease. The values can be reduced by half in the proposed LOS scheme, which can also work reliably. Accompanied with the advantages, the defects of the new scheme were also investigated.

Biao Lei; Yu-Ting Wu; Wei Wang; Jing-Fu Wang; Chong-Fang Ma

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supply of about 8000 Tonnes of Heavy Fuel Oil per Year over a Period of Three Years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supply of about 8000 Tonnes of Heavy Fuel Oil per Year over a Period of Three Years

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Oil and Natural Gas Market Supply and Renewable Portfolio Standard Impacts of Selected Provisions of H.R. 3221  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Natural Gas Market Supply and Renewable Portfolio Standard Impacts of Selected Provisions of Oil and Natural Gas Market Supply and Renewable Portfolio Standard Impacts of Selected Provisions of H.R. 3221 1 Oil and Natural Gas Market Supply and Renewable Portfolio Standard Impacts of Selected Provisions of H.R. 3221 November 2007 This paper responds to an October 31, 2007, request from Representatives Barton, McCrery, and Young. Their letter, a copy of which is provided as Appendix A, asks the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to assess selected provisions of H.R. 3221, the energy bill adopted by the House of Representatives in early August 2007. EIA was asked to focus on Title VII, dealing with energy on Federal lands; Section 9611, which would establish a Federal renewable portfolio standard (RPS) for certain electricity sellers; and Section 13001, which would eliminate the

111

OPTIMAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING OF OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS FIELD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OPTIMAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING OF OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS FIELD INFRASTRUCTURE UNDER COMPLEX FISCAL Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Abstract The optimal development planning of offshore oil and gas fields has received development planning. Keywords Multiperiod Optimization, Planning, Offshore Oil and Gas, MINLP, MILP, FPSO

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

112

E-Print Network 3.0 - alaskan oil development Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

oil development Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alaskan oil development Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Oil Development & the Arctic...

113

Uinta Basin Oil and Gas Development Air Quality Constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production EASTERN UTAH BLM Proposed Leasing for Oil Shale and Tar Sands Development "Indian Country" ­ Regulatory Authority Controlled by the Tribes and EPA Oil Shale Leasing Tar Sands Leasing "Indian Country

Utah, University of

114

Development of oil formation theories and their importance for peak oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reviews the historical development of both biogenic and non-biogenic petroleum formation. It also examines the recent claim that the so-called “abiotic” oil formation theory undermines the concept of “peak oil,” i.e. the notion that world oil production is destined to reach a maximum that will be followed by an irreversible decline. We show that peak oil is first and foremost a matter of production flows. Consequently, the mechanism of oil formation does not strongly affect depletion. We would need to revise the theory beyond peak oil only for the extreme — and unlikely — hypothesis of abiotic petroleum formation.

Mikael Höök; Ugo Bardi; Lianyong Feng; Xiongqi Pang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Advanced oil burner for residential heating -- development report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of advanced oil burner concepts has long been a part of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) oil heat research program. Generally, goals of this work include: increased system efficiency, reduced emissions of soot and NO{sub x}, and the practical extension of the firing rate range of current burners to lower input rates. The report describes the results of a project at BNL aimed at the development of air atomized burners. Two concepts are discussed. The first is an air atomizer which uses air supplied at pressures ranging from 10 to 20 psi and requiring the integration of an air compressor in the system. The second, more novel, approach involves the use of a low-pressure air atomizing nozzle which requires only 8-14 inches of water air pressure for fuel atomization. This second approach requires the use of a fan in the burner instead of a compressor although the fan pressure is higher than with conventional, pressure atomized retention head burners. In testing the first concept, high pressure air atomization, a conventional retention head burner was modified to accept the new nozzle. In addition, the burner head was modified to reduce the flow area to maintain roughly 1 inch of water pressure drop across the head at a firing rate of 0.25 gallons of oil per hour. The burner ignited easily and could be operated at low excess air levels without smoke. The major disadvantage of this burner approach is the need for the air compressor as part of the system. In evaluating options, a vane-type compressor was selected although the use of a compressor of this type will lead to increased burner maintenance requirements.

Butcher, T.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Australian developments in oil shale processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study gives some background on Australian oil shale deposits, briefly records some history of oil shale processing in the country and looks at the current status of the various proposals being considered to produce syncrudes from Australian oil shales. 5 refs.

Baker, G.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Illustrative ElectricitySupply Scenarios and Sustainable Development in Lithuania.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Lithuania has limited domestic energy resources, and is therefore, heavily dependent on imports of oil products and natural gas. Lithuania imported around 90% of… (more)

Blazeviciute, Lina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Oil Shale Development from the Perspective of NETL's Unconventional Oil Resource Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The history of oil shale development was examined by gathering relevant research literature for an Unconventional Oil Resource Repository. This repository contains over 17,000 entries from over 1,000 different sources. The development of oil shale has been hindered by a number of factors. These technical, political, and economic factors have brought about R&D boom-bust cycles. It is not surprising that these cycles are strongly correlated to market crude oil prices. However, it may be possible to influence some of the other factors through a sustained, yet measured, approach to R&D in both the public and private sectors.

Smith, M.W. (REM Engineering Services, Morgantown, WV); Shadle, L.J.; Hill, D. (REM Engineering Services, Morgantown, WV)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

International Oil and Gas Exploration and Development 1991  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Oil and Gas Exploration and Development 1991 November 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration International Oil and Gas Exploration and Development 1991 iii Contacts International Oil and Gas Exploration and Development 1991 was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Oil and Gas, Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Reserves and Production Branch.

120

Controversy Bubbles Over Offshore Oil Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When Chevron U.S.A. announced last year a major offshore oil discovery on tract 450 in California's Santa Maria Basin, the news didn't come as a surprise to the oil industry. Chevron and Phillips Petroleum, 50% partners in the tract, had bid, after all, a ...

RUDY BAUM

1983-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil supply development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Strategic Planning, Design and Development of the Shale Gas Supply Chain Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Strategic Planning, Design and Development of the Shale Gas Supply Chain Network Diego C. Cafaro1-term planning of the shale gas supply chain is a relevant problem that has not been addressed before Shale gas, supply chain, strategic planning, MINLP, solution algorithm * Corresponding author. Tel.: +1

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

122

Research and information needs for management of oil shale development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents information and analysis to assist BLM in clarifying oil shale research needs. It provides technical guidance on research needs in support of their regulatory responsibilities for onshore mineral activities involving oil shale. It provides an assessment of research needed to support the regulatory and managerial role of the BLM as well as others involved in the development of oil shale resources on public and Indian lands in the western United States.

Not Available

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Abu Dhabi presses oil development program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that Abu Dhabi Co. for Onshore Operations (ADCO), the biggest oil producer in the United Arab Emirates, reports 1991 was a successful year despite the Persian Gulf war. Meantime, Abu Dhabi's Zakum, the second largest oil field in the Persian Gulf, boosted production to more than 300,000 b/d, and officials said production will rise further when a platform complex is recommissioned in 1993.

Not Available

1992-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

124

Sediment Supply and Marsh Development in the San Francisco Estuary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3: 9.1.2003–8.31.2006 Sediment Supply and Marsh Developmentsources of inorganic sediments that maintain the marshes’activities have altered sediment transport in the delta and

Malamud-Roam, Frances

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The Effect of CO2 Pricing on Conventional and Non- Conventional Oil Supply and Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

if conventional oil production was no longer able to satisfy demand? Fuels from non-conventional oil resources would then become the backstop fuel. These resources involve higher CO2 emissions per unit of energy produced than conventional oil as they require... ?EMUC ? GDPgrowth ?POPgrowth? ? (13) r is the consumption discount rate (% per year) EMUC is the elasticity of marginal utility of consumption (no unit) ptp is the pure time preference rate (% per year) GDPgrowth is the growth of GDP (% per year...

Méjean, Aurélie; Hope, Chris

126

Western oil shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 1. Main report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The general goal of this study is to present the prospects of shale oil within the context of (1) environmental constraints, (2) available natural and economic resources, and (3) the characteristics of existing and emerging technology. The objectives are: to review shale oil technologies objectively as a means of supplying domestically produced fuels within environmental, social, economic, and legal/institutional constraints; using available data, analyses, and experienced judgment, to examine the major points of uncertainty regarding potential impacts of oil shale development; to resolve issues where data and analyses are compelling or where conclusions can be reached on judgmental grounds; to specify issues which cannot be resolved on the bases of the data, analyses, and experienced judgment currently available; and when appropriate and feasible, to suggest ways for the removal of existing uncertainties that stand in the way of resolving outstanding issues.

Not Available

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2014 Table 19. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, October 2014 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field...

128

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PAD District 2 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-October 2014 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply...

129

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 21. PAD District 5 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, October 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks...

130

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.PDF Table 10. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

131

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE4.PDF Table 4. PAD District 1 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

132

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE8.PDF Table 8. PAD District 3 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

133

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE6.PDF Table 6. PAD District 2 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

134

The impact of oil revenues on Arab Gulf development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book presents papers on Middle East oil policy. Topics considered include oil production policies in the Gulf States, oil planning, the philosophy of state development planning, prospects for Gulf economic coordination, the philosophy of infrastructural development, industrialization in the Arab Gulf, the agricultural potential of the Arab Gulf states, the future of banking as a Gulf industry, manpower problems and projections in the Gulf, education as an instrument of progress in the Arab Gulf states, and the impact of development on Gulf society.

El Azhary, M.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Building Energy Supply Infrastructures and Urban Sustained Development of Shenyang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plants have only the total volume 596 thousands kilometer watt. 220kV substations are main supply power now, and the total capability of all these substations and their arrange do not meet with the increasing loads. Five of these ones, which... are already beyond their loads or equal to their loads are 41.7 percent of the total substations. Besides four of these ones are running only by one transformer so that the supply of power is not dependable. The total volumes of these substations do...

Feng, G.; Wang, Y.; Gao, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Sequential investment planning for complex oil development projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we consider sequential real investment decisions for the development of discovered oil prospects. Following a decision analysis approach, we propose a methodology to explore the upside of a dynamic drilling ...

Ayd?n, Cevat Onur

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Methods of Managing Water in Oil Shale Development - Energy Innovation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Methods of Managing Water in Oil Shale Development Colorado School of Mines Contact CSM About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryThis invention is a system and method of...

138

343. Document entitled "Develop "Frontier" Resources to Ensure Future Oil and Na  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3. Document entitled "Develop "Frontier" Resources to Ensure Future Oil and Natural Gas 3. Document entitled "Develop "Frontier" Resources to Ensure Future Oil and Natural Gas Supply," dated March 8, 2001. B-5 Exemption - Information withheld (under Exemption 5) consists of deliberative material reflecting comments, recommendations and revisions of draft documents relating to NEPDG. 2 pages. #4139-4140 Withheld 344. Document entitled "The Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve," dated March 7, 2001. B-5 Exemption - Information withheld (under Exemption 5) consists of deliberative material reflecting comments, recommendations and revisions of draft documents relating to NEPDG. 2 pages. #4141-4142 Withheld 345. Document entitled "The Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve," dated March 8, 2001. B- 5 Exemption -

139

DEVELOPMENT OF SHALLOW VISCOUS OIL RESERVES IN NORTH SLOPE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

North Slope of Alaska has huge oil deposits in heavy oil reservoirs such as Ugnu, West Sak and Shrader Bluff etc. The viscosity of the last two reservoir oils vary from {approx}30 cp to {approx}3000 cp and the amount in the range of 10-20 billion barrels. High oil viscosity and low formation strength impose problems to high recovery and well productivity. Water-alternate-gas injection processes can be effective for the lower viscosity end of these deposits in West Sak and Shrader Bluff. Several gas streams are available in the North Slope containing NGL and CO{sub 2} (a greenhouse gas). The goal of this research is to develop tools to find optimum solvent, injection schedule and well-architecture for a WAG process in North Slope shallow sand viscous oil reservoirs. In the last quarter, we added numerical solution along streamline subroutines to our streamline compositional simulator. The WAG injection algorithms are being developed. We studied the wettability of the reservoir oil and formulated a four-phase relative permeability model based on two-phase relative permeabilities. The effect of new relative permeability formulations on a five-spot pattern WAG recovery was evaluated. Effect of horizontal wells on pattern sweep has been initiated. A model quarter five-spot experiment is being designed. Plans for the next quarter includes modeling of WAG injection in streamline based simulation, evaluation of complex well-architecture and design of model quarter five-spot experiment.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A Survey of Inputs to the North Sea Resulting from Oil and Gas Developments [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...annual inputs from the offshore oil and gas exploration and...of fresh, unweathered oil rapidly enters otherwise uncontaminated offshore sediments, producing...remain little affected by offshore oil and gas developments...

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil supply development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Development of miscella refining process for cottonseed oil-isopropyl alcohol system: laboratory-scale evaluations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A technologically feasible cottonseed oil-isopropyl alcohol (IPA) miscella refining process was developed to produce high quality cottonseed oil. Individual steps necessary to refine cottonseed oil-IPA miscella were determined and improved...

Chau, Chi-Fai

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

DEVELOPMENT OF SHALLOW VISCOUS OIL RESERVES IN NORTH SLOPE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

North Slope of Alaska has huge oil deposits in heavy oil reservoirs such as Ugnu, West Sak and Shrader Bluff etc. The viscosity of the last two reservoir oils vary from {approx}30 cp to {approx}3000 cp and the amount in the range of 10-20 billion barrels. High oil viscosity and low formation strength impose problems to high recovery and well productivity. Water-alternate-gas injection processes can be effective for the lower viscosity end of these deposits in West Sak and Shrader Bluff. Several gas streams are available in the North Slope containing NGL and CO{sub 2} (a greenhouse gas). The goal of this research is to develop tools to find optimum solvent, injection schedule and well-architecture for a WAG process in North Slope shallow sand viscous oil reservoirs. In the last quarter, we have developed streamline generation and convection subroutines for miscible gas injection. The WAG injection algorithms are being developed. We formulated a four-phase relative permeability model based on two-phase relative permeabilities. The new relative permeability formulations are being incorporated into the simulator. Wettabilities and relative permeabilities are being measured. Plans for the next quarter includes modeling of WAG injection in streamline based simulation, relative permeability studies with cores, incorporation of complex well-architecture.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Developing a strategic roadmap for supply chain process improvement in a regulated utility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis covers work done at Tracks Energy, a regulated utility, to develop a strategic roadmap for supply chain process improvement. The focus of Tracks Energy has always been on keeping the lights on and the gas flowing ...

Yoder, Brent E. (Brent Edward)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

OGEL (Oil, Gas & Energy Law Intelligence): Focussing on recent developments in the area of oil-gas-energy law,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

About OGEL OGEL (Oil, Gas & Energy Law Intelligence): Focussing on recent developments in the area of oil-gas-energy law, regulation, treaties, judicial and arbitral cases, voluntary guidelines, tax and contracting, including the oil-gas- energy geopolitics. For full Terms & Conditions and subscription rates

Dixon, Juan

145

Oil consumption, pollutant emission, oil proce volatility and economic activities in selected Asian Developing Economies.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??It is now well established in the literature that oil consumption, oil price shocks, and oil price volatility may impact the economic activities negatively. Studies… (more)

Rafiq, Shuddhasattwa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

18,553 18,551 18,724 19,046 19,091 19,116 1963-2013 18,553 18,551 18,724 19,046 19,091 19,116 1963-2013 Crude Oil 0 0 0 0 0 0 1981-2013 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs 2,297 2,086 2,138 2,169 2,159 2,331 1981-2013 Pentanes Plus 52 48 113 -52 15 114 1981-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 2,245 2,038 2,025 2,222 2,144 2,217 1973-2013 Ethane/Ethylene 921 930 894 963 940 1,027 1981-2013 Propane/Propylene 1,148 924 979 1,052 1,036 1,093 1973-2013 Normal Butane/Butylene 130 138 85 141 103 78 1981-2013 Isobutane/Isobutylene 47 45 68 66 64 18 1981-2013 Other Liquids 66 100 24 184 -43 199 1981-2013 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/ Other Hydrocarbons 0 0 0 0 0 0 1991-2013 Unfinished Oils 67 100 24 184 -43 199 1981-2013 Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. 0 0 0 0 0 0 1981-2013

147

Attitudes toward offshore oil development: A summary of current evidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

squarely on offshore oil drilling, but contrary to what manyopposition to offshore oil drilling that would be comparableJE, editor. History of oil well drilling. Houston: Gulf

Gramling, R; Freudenburg, Wm R

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Bioconversion of Heavy oil.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??70 % of world?s oil reservoirs consist of heavy oil, and as the supply of conventional oil decreases, researchers are searching for new technologies to… (more)

Steinbakk, Sandra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Trends in electricity demand and supply in the developing countries, 1980--1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of trends concerning electricity demand and supply in the developing countries in the 1980--1990 period, with special focus on 13 major countries for which we have assembled consistent data series. We describe the linkage between electricity demand and economic growth, the changing sectoral composition of electricity consumption, and changes in the mix of energy sources for electricity generation. We also cover trends in the efficiency of utility electricity supply with respect to power plant efficiency and own-use and delivery losses, and consider the trends in carbon dioxide emissions from electricity supply.

Meyers, S.; Campbell, C.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Development of a shallow heavy-oil deposit in Missouri  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shallow deposits of heavy-oil in western Missouri have become more attractive to exploit recently. Aside from problems of producing the low-gravity, viscous oil, part of the difficulty in successfully developing these deposits has been the geologic nature of the reservoir sandstone. Recognition of the origin of the reservoir sandstone in Eastburn field as a series of point bars in an upper deltaic, fluvial distributary environment has affected the selection of drilling locations, drilling and coring procedures, estimation of reserves, and location of producing facilities. Recognition of the uneven distribution of permeability, the intergranular type of porosity, and the presence of potentially troublesome clays and iron-bearing minerals in this sandstone influenced the methods selected for evaluation, completion, and stimulation of producing wells. This teamwork approach between geologists and engineers is important in maximizing the chances for success of technically difficult enhanced oil recovery projects.

Ebanks, J.W.J.; Weber, J.F.

1982-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

151

Canadian oilsands, heavy oil poised for surge in development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operators in Canada`s oilsands and heavy oil regions are on the brink of a period of growth that could last well into the next century. Several factors are combining in a scenario a National Task Force report on oilsands says could dramatically increase investment and production in the next 25 years. By then, massive oilsands and heavy oil reserves in northern Alberta could account for as much as 50%--perhaps more--of Canada`s oil production. Technological improvements in recovery and processing have slashed production costs and put nonconventional oil on a more competitive footing with declining reserves of conventional crude in western Canada. At the same time, persistent lobbying by industry and a well researched national study have persuaded federal and provincial governments to introduce a new royalty and fiscal regime designed to bolster oilsands investment. New policies give clear incentives to investors to put money into oilsands and heavy oil projects. Policies also will provide a generic tax treatment for all new projects, long a major objective of oilsands promoters. Previously, royalty and tax agreements were negotiated for project case by case. This paper reviews the resource base and the new operational developments resulting from these policies.

NONE

1996-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

152

Estimates of incremental oil recoverable by carbon dioxide flooding and related carbon dioxide supply requirements for flooding major carbonate reservoirs in the Permian, Williston, and other Rocky Mountain basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the work was to build a solid engineering foundation (in) carbonate reservoirs for the purpose of extending the technology base in carbon dioxide miscible flooding. This report presents estimates of incremental oil recovery and related carbon dioxide supply requirements for selected carbonate reservoirs in the Permian, Williston, and Rocky Mountain Basins. The estimates presented here are based on calculations using a volumetric model derived and described in this report. The calculations utilized data developed in previous work. Calculations were made for a total of 279 reservoirs in the Permian, Williston, and several smaller Rocky Mountain Basins. Results show that the carbonate reservoirs of the Permian Basin constitute an order of magnitude larger target for carbon dioxide flooding than do all the carbonate reservoirs of the Williston and Rocky Mountain intermontane basins combined. Review of the calculated data in comparison with information from earlier work indicates that the figures given here are probably optimistic in that incremental oil volumes may be biased toward the high side while carbon dioxide supply requirements may be biased toward the low side. However, the information available would not permit further practical refinement of the calculations. Use of the incremental oil figures given for individual reservoirs as an official estimate is not recommended because of various uncertainties in individual field data. Further study and compilation of data for field projects as they develop appears warranted to better calibrate the calculation procedures and thus to develop more refined estimates of incremental oil potential and carbon dioxide supply requirements. 11 figures, 16 tables.

Goodrich, J.H.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

556,591 575,071 561,721 590,423 591,817 573,483 1981-2013 556,591 575,071 561,721 590,423 591,817 573,483 1981-2013 Crude Oil 0 0 0 0 0 0 1981-2013 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs 68,909 64,655 64,147 67,242 66,924 69,929 1981-2013 Pentanes Plus 1,561 1,486 3,400 -1,627 474 3,432 1981-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 67,349 63,170 60,747 68,869 66,450 66,498 1981-2013 Ethane/Ethylene 27,620 28,821 26,806 29,847 29,153 30,817 1981-2013 Propane/Propylene 34,429 28,651 29,365 32,619 32,108 32,780 1981-2013 Normal Butane/Butylene 3,899 4,288 2,546 4,356 3,201 2,347 1981-2013 Isobutane/Isobutylene 1,400 1,409 2,030 2,047 1,988 554 1981-2013 Other Liquids 1,994 3,096 713 5,708 -1,348 5,977 1981-2013 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/ Other Hydrocarbons 0 0 0 0 0 0 1991-2013

154

Isenberg and Potvin 1 Financing REDD in Developing Countries: A Supply and Demand Analysis.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Isenberg and Potvin 1 Financing REDD in Developing Countries: A Supply and Demand Analysis.1 2 3 4 at the centre of negotiations on a renewed international2 climate regime. Developing countries made it clear Jordan Isenberg was an intern at the Climate Change office of Panama's National22 Authority

Potvin, Catherine

155

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and Development Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Exploratory and Development Wells Exploratory and Development Wells Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Data Series Jul-12 Aug-12 Sep-12 Oct-12 Nov-12 Dec-12 View History Wells Drilled (Number) Exploratory and Development NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Dry Holes NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Exploratory NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Dry Holes NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Development Wells Drilled NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012

156

Paraho oil shale module. Site development plan, Task 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A management plan and schedule which covers all requirements for gaining access to the site and for conducting a Paraho Process demonstration program have been prepared. The oil shale available should represent a regional resource of suitable size and quality for commercial development. Discussed in this report are: proof of ownership; requirements for rights-of-way for access to the site; local zoning restrictions; water rights; site availability verification; and other legal requirements. (DMC)

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

The oil resources of Azerbaijan: Survey and current developments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Azerbaijan, the third-ranking oil-producing former Soviet republic, produced 10.3 million tons of crude in 1993. Output, although slowly dwindling since 1966 as major onshore deposits have been depleted, now accounts for roughly 2.5% of former Soviet production. Reserves, estimated by various sources as ranging from 137 to 960 million tons, have been the focus of considerable interest by Western oil companies, as the government of Azerbaijan has sought foreign expertise and equipment in the development of promising offshore fields in deeper waters of the Caspian Sea. This paper describes the geologic structure of Azerbaijan's major oil- and gas-bearing regions (Caspian-Kuban, Kura, and Apsheron-Balkhan) and outlines the development history of major fields. Major onshore deposits on the Apsheron Peninsula, which yielded over half the world's petroleum in 1900, have now been largely exhausted, with production and exploration activity shifting to offshore deposits along the Apsheron Sill, an anticlinal structure extending from the Peninsula across the Caspian into western Turkmenistan. A prolonged process of negotiations between Western companies and the Azerbaijan government over the rights to explore and develop particular fields is summarized and the status of plans to construct an export pipeline to service outside markets is discussed. 14 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Sagers, M.J. (PlanEcon, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)); Matzko, J.R. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States))

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Summary of Oil and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse September 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary of Oil and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse September 2006 Jeffrey L. Beck Independent Avenue Grand Junction, CO 81505 Please cite as: Beck, J. L. 2006. Summary of oil and natural gas and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse 2 disturbances such as oil and gas development

Beck, Jeffrey L.

159

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BENEFITS OF THE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY IN NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BENEFITS OF THE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY IN NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR Conference Report - September 2007 & The Oil And Gas Development Partnership #12;ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BENEFITS OF THE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY IN NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR May 16, 2007 St. John's Conference Report September

deYoung, Brad

160

EIS-0068: Development Policy Options for the Naval Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves prepared this programmatic statement to examine the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of development projects on the Naval Oil Shale Reserve 1, and examine select alternatives, such as encouraging production from other liquid fuel resources (coal liquefaction, biomass, offshore oil and enhanced oil recovery) or conserving petroleum in lieu of shale oil production.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil supply development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Report on Performance of Prototype Dynatronix Power Supplies Developed Under a Phase I DOE SBIR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prototype power supplies fabricated by Dynatronix, Inc. This project supports the advancement of electroforming capabilities to produce ultra-high purity copper. Ultra-high purity copper is an essential material used for a range of current and future fundamental nuclear physics programs such as the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The Mach 30 power supplies are a new design built to the specifications from the requirements of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with regard to timing, voltage, current output, and the required tolerances. The parameters used in these tests were developed empirically over a number of years based on a combination of thermodynamic and kinetics of the electroplating process. The power supplies were operated in a typical cleanroom environment for the production electroforming at PNNL. The units that were received by PNNL in July, 2010 have performed satisfactorily and have demonstrated short term durability.

Hoppe, Eric W.; Merriman, Jason H.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Progress report to the National Science Foundation for the period July 1, 1980 to December 31, 1981 of the project on cartel behavior and exhaustible resource supply : a case study of the world oil market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The M.I.T. World Oil Project has been developing forecasting methods that integrate the following considerations which influence investment in oil capacity and the level of oil exports: (1) the geology and microeconomics ...

International Energy Studies Program (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES FOR OPTIMIZED MEOR IN SHALLOW HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate an economically viable and sustainable method of producing shallow heavy oil reserves in western Missouri and southeastern Kansas, using an integrated approach including surface geochemical surveys, conventional MEOR treatments, horizontal fracturing in vertical wells, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and reservoir simulation to optimize the recovery process. The objective also includes transferring the knowledge gained from the project to other local landowners, to demonstrate how they may identify and develop their own heavy oil resources with minimal capital investment. In the twelve to eighteen-month project period, three wells were equipped with ERT arrays. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) background measurements were taken in the three ERT equipped wells. Pumping equipment was installed on the two fracture stimulated wells and pumping tests were conducted following the hydraulic fracture treatments. All wells were treated monthly with microbes, by adding a commercially available microbial mixture to wellbore fluids. ERT surveys were taken on a monthly basis, following microbial treatments. Worked performed to date demonstrates that resistivity changes are occurring in the subsurface, with resistivity increasing slightly. Pumping results for the hydraulically fractured wells were disappointing, with only a show of oil recovered and an increase in well shut-in pressure.

Shari Dunn-Norman

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES FOR OPTIMIZED MEOR IN SHALLOW HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate an economically viable and sustainable method of producing shallow heavy oil reserves in western Missouri and southeastern Kansas, using an integrated approach including surface geochemical surveys, conventional MEOR treatments, horizontal fracturing in vertical wells, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and reservoir simulation to optimize the recovery process. The objective also includes transferring the knowledge gained from the project to other local landowners, to demonstrate how they may identify and develop their own heavy oil resources with minimal capital investment. Tasks completed in the first six-month period include soil sampling, geochemical analysis, construction of ERT arrays, collection of background ERT surveys, and analysis of core samples to develop a geomechanical model for designing the hydraulic fracturing treatment. Five wells were to be drilled in phase I. However, weather and funding delays resulted in drilling shifting to the second phase of the project. Work performed to date demonstrates that surface geochemical methods can be used to differentiate between productive and non-productive areas of the Warner Sand and that ERT can be used to successfully image through the Warner Sand.

Shari Dunn-Norman

2003-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

165

WATER USE IN LCA Life cycle consumptive water use for oil shale development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATER USE IN LCA Life cycle consumptive water use for oil shale development and implications Heidelberg 2013 Abstract Purpose Oil shale is an unconventional petroleum source that can be produced domestically in the USA. Oil shale resources are primarily located in Utah, Wyoming, and Colorado, within

Jaramillo, Paulina

166

Measuring and mi-ga-ng impact of offshore oil development on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring and mi-ga-ng impact of offshore oil development on seabirds and other effects are concentrated in the offshore ­ vicinity of the oil field J. 2001. Seabirds at risk around offshore oil pla=orms in the north

Jones, Ian L.

167

Development and application of econometric demand and supply models for selected Chesapeake Bay seafood products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five models were developed to forecast future Chesapeake seafood product prices, harvest quantities, and resulting income. Annual econometric models are documented for oysters, hard and soft blue crabs, and hard and soft clams. To the degree that data permit, these models represent demand and supply at the retail, wholesale, and harvest levels. The resulting models have broad applications in environmental policy issues and regulatory analyses for the Chesapeake Bay. 37 references, 10 figures, 99 tables.

Nieves, L.A.; Moe, R.J.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Attitudes toward offshore oil development: A summary of current evidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gulf of Mexico regions of the US where oil developmentof Mexico, where a number of platforms are producing oil inoil industry’s previous experiences in the Gulf of Mexico.

Gramling, R; Freudenburg, Wm R

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Tax effects upon oil field development in Venezuela  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Important reforms have been made to the oil sector tax code in Venezuela. Given its diversity of oil resources, there was a concern that some resources were not being exploited because of the structure of the tax code. ...

Manzano, Osmel

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Oil sands development contributes elements toxic at low concentrations to the Athabasca River and its tributaries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ERCB) (2009) Alberta's energy reserves 2008 and supply/demand outlook...Oil Sands coke and coke ash . Fuel 58 : 589 – 594 . 17 Jang H Etsell...decay constant indicating the rate that deposition per unit...in aqueous samples from the Florida Everglades. Fresenius J Anal...

Erin N. Kelly; David W. Schindler; Peter V. Hodson; Jeffrey W. Short; Roseanna Radmanovich; Charlene C. Nielsen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Gyrotron and power supply development for upgrading the electron cyclotron heating system on DIII-D  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An upgrade of the electron cyclotron heating system on DIII-D to almost 15 MW is being planned which will expand it from a system with six 1 MW 110 GHz gyrotrons to one with ten gyrotrons. A depressed collector 1.2 MW 110 GHz gyrotron is being commissioned as the seventh gyrotron. A new 117.5 GHz 1.5 MW depressed collector gyrotron has been designed, and the first article will be the eighth gyrotron. Two more are planned, increasing the system to ten total gyrotrons, and the existing 1 MW gyrotrons will subsequently be replaced with 1.5 MW gyrotrons. Communications and Power Industries completed the design of the 117.5 GHz gyrotron, and are now fabricating the first article. The design was optimized for a nominal 1.5 MW at a beam voltage of 105 kV, collector potential depression of 30 kV, and beam current of 50 A, but can achieve 1.8 MW at 60 A. The design of the collector permits modulation above 100 Hz by either the body or the cathode power supply, or both, while modulation below 100 Hz must use only the cathode power supply. General Atomics is developing solid-state power supplies for this upgrade: a solid-state modulator for the cathode power supply and a linear high voltage amplifier for the body power supply. The solid-state modulator has series-connected insulated-gate bipolar transistors that are switched at a fixed frequency by a pulse-width modulation regulator to control the output voltage. The design of the linear high voltage amplifier has series-connected transistors to control the output voltage, which was successfully demonstrated in a proof-of-principle test at 2 kV. The designs of complete power supplies are progressing. The design features of the 117.5 GHz 1.5 MW gyrotron and the solid-state cathode and body power supplies will be described and the current status and plans are presented.

Joseph F. Tooker; Paul Huynh; Kevin Felch; Monica Blank; Philipp Borchardt; Steve Cauffman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Conjunctive Surface and Groundwater Management in Utah: Implications for Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unconventional fuel development will require scarce water resources. In an environment characterized by scarcity, and where most water resources are fully allocated, prospective development will require minimizing water use and seeking to use water resources in the most efficient manner. Conjunctive use of surface and groundwater provides just such an opportunity. Conjunctive use includes two main practices: First, integrating surface water diversions and groundwater withdrawals to maximize efficiency and minimize impacts on other resource users and ecological processes. Second, conjunctive use includes capturing surplus or unused surface water and injecting or infiltrating that water into groundwater aquifers in order to increase recharge rates. Conjunctive management holds promise as a means of addressing some of the West's most intractable problems. Conjunctive management can firm up water supplies by more effectively capturing spring runoff and surplus water, and by integrating its use with groundwater withdrawals; surface and groundwater use can be further integrated with managed aquifer recharge projects. Such integration can maximize water storage and availability, while simultaneously minimizing evaporative loss, reservoir sedimentation, and surface use impacts. Any of these impacts, if left unresolved, could derail commercial-scale unconventional fuel development. Unconventional fuel developers could therefore benefit from incorporating conjunctive use into their development plans. Despite its advantages, conjunctive use is not a panacea. Conjunctive use means using resources in harmony to maximize and stabilize long-term supplies â?? it does not mean maximizing the use of two separate but interrelated resources for unsustainable short-term gains â?? and it cannot resolve all problems or provide water where no unappropriated water exists. Moreover, conjunctive use may pose risks to ecological values forgone when water that would otherwise remain in a stream is diverted for aquifer recharge or other uses. To better understand the rapidly evolving field of conjunctive use, this Topical Report begins with a discussion of Utah water law, with an emphasis on conjunctive use issues. We contrast Utahâ??s approach with efforts undertaken in neighboring states and by the federal government. We then relate conjunctive use to the unconventional fuel industry and discuss how conjunctive use can help address pressing challenges. While conjunctive management cannot create water where none exists, it does hold promise to manage existing resources in a more efficient manner. Moreover, conjunctive management reflects an important trend in western water law that could provide benefit to those contemplating activities that require large-scale water development.

Robert Keiter; John Ruple; Heather Tanana; Rebecca Holt

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Simulation study to investigate development options for a super-heavy oil reservoir.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A reservoir simulation study was performed on a heavy oil reservoir with the main objective of evaluating possible development options beyond the existing cold production… (more)

Diaz Franco, Jose Manuel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Exploration and Development of Oil and Gas on School and Public Lands (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute authorizes the Board of School Lands and Funds to lease school and public lands under its jurisdiction for oil and gas exploration and development purposes.

175

Oil revenue of the Arabian gulf Emirates: patterns of allocation and impact on economic development.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The study aims to analyse the oil revenue, its allocational pattern and impact on economic development in Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar and the UAE from the… (more)

Al-Kuwari, Ali Khalifa

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Oil revenue and economic development case of Libyan economy (1970-2007).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study aims to investigate different aspects of the relationship between oil revenues and economic development for the Libyan economy. To do so this thesis… (more)

Ali, Issa Saleh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

An Institutional Analysis of Oil and Gas Sector Development and Environmental Management in the Yukon Territory.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis investigates the ways in which oil and gas development priorities and concern for the environment are integrated within strategic planning and management frameworks,… (more)

May, Jason C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

China’s domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robertpeak will come around 2020, 24 and that by this point, China’s demand Oil

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Venezuelan projects advance to develop world`s largest heavy oil reserves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of joint venture projects at varying stages of progress promise to greatly increase Venezuela`s production of extra heavy oil. Units of Conoco, Chevron, Total, Arco, and Mobil have either signed agreements or are pursuing negotiations with affiliates of state-owned Petroleos de Venezuela SA on the development of huge reserves of 8--10{degree} gravity crude. Large heavy oil resources are present in the oil producing areas of eastern and western Venezuela, and the largest are in eastern Venezuela`s Orinoco heavy oil belt. The paper discusses the Orinoco heavy oil belt geology and several joint ventures being implemented.

Croft, G.; Stauffer, K. [Pantera Petroleum Inc., San Leandro, CA (United States)

1996-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

180

Microsoft Word - STEO supplement non-OPEC supply Final-2.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

08 08 1 February 2008 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Outlook for Non-OPEC Oil Supply Growth in 2008- 2009 1 Most oil market analysts, including EIA, have pointed to the slow growth in oil supply from countries that are not members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) in recent years as a key cause of the current high oil price environment. The widening gap between growth in world oil consumption and non- OPEC oil supply has led to greater reliance upon production by OPEC and a drawdown in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) commercial inventories. These conditions have contributed to upward pressure on world oil prices in recent years (see Why Are Oil Prices So High?, supplement to the November 2007 Short-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil supply development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Western oil shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 7: an ecosystem simulation of perturbations applied to shale oil development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is outlined on activities leading toward evaluation of ecological and agricultural impacts of shale oil development in the Piceance Creek Basin region of northwestern Colorado. After preliminary review of the problem, it was decided to use a model-based calculation approach in the evaluation. The general rationale and objectives of this approach are discussed. Previous studies were examined to characterize climate, soils, vegetation, animals, and ecosystem response units. System function was methodically defined by developing a master list of variables and flows, structuring a generalized system flow diagram, constructing a flow-effects matrix, and conceptualizing interactive spatial units through spatial matrices. The process of developing individual mathematical functions representing the flow of matter and energy through the various system variables in different submodels is discussed. The system model diagram identified 10 subsystems which separately account for flow of soil temperatures, soil water, herbaceous plant biomass, shrubby plant biomass, tree cover, litter biomass, shrub numbers, animal biomass, animal numbers, and land area. Among these coupled subsystems there are 45 unique kinds of state variables and 150 intra-subsystem flows. The model is generalizeable and canonical so that it can be expanded, if required, by disaggregating some of the system state variables and allowing for multiple ecological response units. It integrates information on climate, surface water, ecology, land reclamation, air quality, and solid waste as it is being developed by several other task groups.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Population enumeration and the effects of oil and gas development on dune-dwelling lizards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abundances of dune-dwelling lizards among sites that varied in oil and gas development. I conducted distance line transects and compared those density estimates to densities obtained from total removal plots. I quantified the amount of oil and gas development...

Smolensky, Nicole Limunga

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

Development Practices for Optimized MEOR in Shallow Heavy Oil Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to demonstrate an economically viable and sustainable method of producing shallow heavy oil reserves in southwest Missouri and southeast Kansas using a combination of microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) and hydraulic fracturing of vertical wells.

Shari Dunn-Norman

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

184

Energy Department Announces $2 Million to Develop Supply Chain, Manufacturing Competitiveness Analysis for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Energy Department today announced up to $2 million to develop the domestic supply chain for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and study the competitiveness of U.S. hydrogen and fuel cell system and component manufacturing.

185

Conceptual development of a continuous burning system for oil spill remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or ocean environment. During the period from 1974 to 1977, an average of four mil- lion gallons of crude oil per year were discharged into open waters and this trend is expected to increase (Buist 1987). The situation where combustion of oil employed... requirement of initiating the burning safely. This is done with a automatic valve which regulates the fuel supply. The valve is operated by a radio signal sway from the zone of burning. 45 C. CHEMISTRY OF LIQUID PETROLEUM GASES In a Liquefied Hydrocarbon...

Venkataramaiah, Ramesh H.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

186

International Energy Outlook 1999 - World Oil Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil.gif (4669 bytes) oil.gif (4669 bytes) A moderate view of future oil market developments is reflected in IEO99. Sustained high levels of oil prices are not expected, whereas continued expansion of the oil resource base is anticipated. The crude oil market was wracked with turbulence during 1998, as prices fell by one-third on average from 1997 levels. Even without adjusting for inflation, the world oil price in 1998 was the lowest since 1973. The declining oil prices were influenced by an unexpected slowdown in the growth of energy demand worldwide—less than any year since 1990—and by increases in oil supply, particularly in 1997. Although the increase in world oil production in 1998 was smaller than in any year since 1993, efforts to bolster prices by imposing further limits on production were

187

The effect of the 2010 Gulf oil spill on public attitudes toward offshore oil drilling and wind development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In April 2010, the Deepwater Horizon oil well exploded, releasing over four million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. This paper presents data from two national mail surveys undertaken in 2008 and 2010 that compare public attitudes to both offshore oil drilling and offshore wind development pre- and post-spill. The results show that while there was a drop in support for expanded drilling (from 66% in 2008 to 59% in 2010) the change was not significant. There was, however, a significant decrease in support for offshore drilling among coastal residents. There was a slight, non-significant increase in support for offshore wind development which remained significantly higher than support for offshore oil (80% in 2008 and 82% in 2010). Despite there being no significant change in overall support levels, there was a shift in the strength of feeling regarding offshore oil, with 80% of Americans either less supportive or more opposed to expanded drilling in 2010 than they were in 2008.

Jonathan Lilley; Jeremy Firestone

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Technologies, markets and challenges for development of the Canadian Oil Sands industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper provides an overview of the current status of development of the Canadian oil sands industry, and considers possible paths of further development. We outline the key technology alternatives, critical resource ...

Lacombe, Romain H.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Development of EU (European Union) energy market agenda and security of supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper critically discusses the reform of the energy sector in the European Union from the beginnings of the liberalisation processes in 1996 until present. Through EU energy policies and relevant legislation the goals to achieve are sustainable development, security of supply and competitiveness, together with focussing on the needs of customers. The paper analyses all three above-mentioned pillars and customer protection requirements from the viewpoint: customers should have high quality energy delivered at affordable prices. We call for competitiveness to be further underlined by the market. Despite some concerns related to market models, with the latest impetus from the European institutions the market will, and is able to, develop and to integrate also renewable sources. Where the market does not deliver sufficiently, regulators have to ensure customer protection, especially for vulnerable customers in a period of increasing prices.

Marko Sencar; Viljem Pozeb; Tina Krope

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Developing and implementing standard logistics solutions for Eastman Kodak Company's inbound supply chain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eastman Kodak Company managed its supply chain operations at a regional level until 2002 when it created the Global Logistics group. Prior to this, there had not been much corporate focus on the inbound supply chain; in ...

Kahl, Brooke (Elaine Brooke)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Petroleum Supply Annual, Volume 2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume 2 - Final monthly statistics for the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. Volume 2 Tables All Tables All Tables Detailed Statistics Tables National...

192

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by this point, China’s demand Oil Demand vs. Domestic Supplycurrent pace of growth in oil demand as staying consistentand predictions of oil supply and demand affected foreign

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Income on Energy and Oil Demand,” Energy Journal 23(1),2006. “China’s Growing Demand for Oil and Its Impact on U.S.in the supply or demand for oil itself could be regarded as

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

5 World Oil Trends WORLD OIL TRENDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5 World Oil Trends Chapter 1 WORLD OIL TRENDS INTRODUCTION In considering the outlook for California's petroleum supplies, it is important to give attention to expecta- tions of what the world oil market. Will world oil demand increase and, if so, by how much? How will world oil prices be affected

195

Energy (Oil and Gas) Exploration (and Development) on the U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy (Oil and Gas) Exploration (and Development) on the U.S. Arctic Continental Shelf Jeff Walker Regional Supervisor, Field Operations Minerals Management Service, Alaska Region Jeffrey.walker@mms.gov 3rd of an Ice-Diminishing Arctic on Exploratory Activities Arctic nations will pursue oil and gas. Offshore

Kuligowski, Bob

196

DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES FOR OPTIMIZED MEOR IN SHALLOW HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate an economically viable and sustainable method of producing shallow heavy oil reserves in western Missouri and southeastern Kansas, using an integrated approach including surface geochemical surveys, conventional MEOR treatments, horizontal fracturing in vertical wells, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and reservoir simulation to optimize the recovery process. The objective also includes transferring the knowledge gained from the project to other local landowners, to demonstrate how they may identify and develop their own heavy oil resources with little capital investment. The first year period was divided into two phases--Phase I and Phase II. Each phase was 6 months in duration. Tasks completed in first six month period included soil sampling, geochemical analysis, construction of ERT arrays, collection of background ERT surveys, and analysis of core samples to develop a geomechanical model for designing the hydraulic fracturing treatment. Five wells were to be drilled in phase I. However, weather and funding delays resulted in drilling shifting to the second phase of the project. During the second six month period, five vertical wells were drilled through the Bluejacket and Warner Sands. These wells were drilled with air and logged openhole. Drilling locations were selected after reviewing results of background ERT and geochemical surveys. Three ERT wells (2,3,4) were arranged in an equilateral triangle, spaced 70 feet apart and these wells were completed open hole. ERT arrays constructed during Phase I, were installed and background surveys were taken. Two wells (1,5) were drilled, cased, cemented and perforated. These wells were located north and south of the three ERT wells. Each well was stimulated with a linear guar gel and 20/40 mesh Brady sand. Tiltmeters were used with one fracture treatment to verify fracture morphology. Work performed during the first year of this research project demonstrates that surface geochemical methods can be used to differentiate between productive and non-productive areas of the Warner Sand and that ERT can be used to successfully image through the Warner Sand. ERT work also provided a background image for future MEOR treatments. Well logs from the five wells drilled were consistent with previous logs from historical coreholes, and the quality of the formation was found to be as expected. Hydraulic fracturing results demonstrated that fluid leakoff is inadequate for tip screenout (TSO) and that a horizontal fracture was generated. At this point it is not clear if the induced fracture remained in the Warner Sand, or propagated into another formation. MEOR treatments were originally expected to commence during Phase II. Due to weather delays, drilling and stimulation work was not completed until September, 2003. Microbial treatments therefore will commence in October, 2003. Phase III, the first 10 months of the second project year, will focus primarily on repeated cycles of MEOR treatments, ERT measurements and well pumping.

Shari Dunn-Norman

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Development of an air-atomized oil burner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new concept for the design of a residential oil burner is presented involving a low pressure, air atomizing nozzle. Advantages of this approach, relative to conventional, pressure atomized burners include: ability to operate at very low excess air levels without smoke, ability to operate at low (and possibly variable) rates, reduced boiler fouling, and low NO{sub x}. The nozzle used is a low pressure, airblast atomizer which can achieve fuel spray drop sizes similar to conventional nozzles and very good combustion performance with air pressure as low as 5 inches of water (1.24 kPa). A burner head has been developed for this nozzle and combustion test results are presented in a wide variety of equipment including cast iron and steel boilers, warm air furnaces, and water heaters over the firing rate range 0.25 gph to 1.0 gph (10 to 41 kW). Beyond the nozzle and combustion head the burner system must be developed and two approaches have been taken. The first involves a small, brushless DC motor/fan combination which uses high fan speed to achieve air pressures from 7 to 9 inches of water (1.74 to 2.24 kPa). Fuel is delivered to the atomizer at less than 1 psig (6.9 kPa) using a solenoid pump and flow metering orifice. At 0.35 gph (14 kW) the electric power draw of this burner is less than 100 watts. In a second configuration a conventional motor is used with a single stage fan which develops 5 to 6 inches of water pressure (1.24 to 1.50 kPa) at similar firing rates. This burner uses a conventional type fuel pump and metering orifice to deliver fuel. The fuel pump is driven by the fan motor, very much like a conventional burner. This second configuration is seen as more attractive to the heating industry and is now being commercialized. Field tests with this burner have been conducted at 0.35 gph (14 kW) with a side-wall vented boiler/water storage tank combination.

Butcher, T.A.; Celebi, Y.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

SOLVENT-BASED ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY PROCESSES TO DEVELOP WEST SAK ALASKA NORTH SLOPE HEAVY OIL RESOURCES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A one-year research program is conducted to evaluate the feasibility of applying solvent-based enhanced oil recovery processes to develop West Sak and Ugnu heavy oil resources found on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). The project objective is to conduct research to develop technology to produce and market the 300-3000 cp oil in the West Sak and Ugnu sands. During the first phase of the research, background information was collected, and experimental and numerical studies of vapor extraction process (VAPEX) in West Sak and Ugnu are conducted. The experimental study is designed to foster understanding of the processes governing vapor chamber formation and growth, and to optimize oil recovery. A specially designed core-holder and a computed tomography (CT) scanner was used to measure the in-situ distribution of phases. Numerical simulation study of VAPEX was initiated during the first year. The numerical work completed during this period includes setting up a numerical model and using the analog data to simulate lab experiments of the VAPEX process. The goal was to understand the mechanisms governing the VAPEX process. Additional work is recommended to expand the VAPEX numerical study using actual field data obtained from Alaska North Slope.

David O. Ogbe; Tao Zhu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Final report to the National Science Foundation for the period July 1, 1978 to June 30, 1980 of project on cartel behavior and exhaustible resource supply : a case study of the world oil market.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The M.I.T. World Oil Project has been developing improved methods and data for analysis of the future course of the world oil market. Any forecast of this market depends on analysis of the likely demand for oil imports by ...

M.I.T. World Oil Project.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The efficiency of using gas turbine technologies in developing small oil-and-gas-condensate deposits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper considers the technical and economic features of using stream-gas and gas-turbine power generators in developing small oil-and-gas-condensate deposits in Irkutsk oblast under conditions of carrying o...

A. M. Karasevich; A. V. Fedyaev; G. G. Lachkov; O. N. Fedyaeva

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil supply development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Optimization of offshore oil and gas field development using mathematical programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OPTIMIZATION OF OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS FIELD DEVELOPMENT USING MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING A Thesis by TODD THATCHER GRIMMETT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A6M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering OPTIMIZATION OF OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS FIELD DEVELOPMENT VSING MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING A Thesis by TODD THATCHER GRIMMETT Approved as to style and content by: R. A. Startzma...

Grimmett, Todd Thatcher

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

202

The Offshore Wind Market Deployment: Forecasts For 2020, 2030 And Impacts On The European Supply Chain Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Almost 4 GW of offshore wind power capacity will be installed in European waters at the end of 2011. The impressive growth of the sector during the last decades continues and by 2020, EWEA expects 40 GW of offshore wind capacity to be installed across Europe and 150 GW by 2030. However, the growth of the offshore wind sector will not happen without a strong supply chain underpinning its development. This paper presents the latest developments of the offshore wind power market and the objectives the supply chain needs to meet to assist the growth of the industry.

Arapogianni Athanasia; Genachte Anne-Bénédicte; Moccia Jacopo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 19. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 393 - - - - 330 -111 -46 4 562 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 406 0 2 15 -333 - - 0 20 9 61 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 58 0 - - - -33 - - 0 6 9 10 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 348 - - 2 15 -299 - -

204

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 23. PAD District 5 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,197 - - - - 1,186 - -47 -4 2,340 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 69 0 14 4 - - - -60 83 20 43 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 32 0 - - - - - - -1 26 2 5 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 37 - - 14 4 - - - -59

205

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 7. PAD District 1 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 24 - - - - 854 -10 42 -28 935 3 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 42 0 27 67 119 - - -30 26 1 259 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 7 0 - - - - - - 0 - 0 7 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 35 - - 27 67 119 - - -30 26

206

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 September 2013 Table 20. PAD District 4 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 511 - - - - 289 -169 -49 4 579 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 316 0 13 11 -264 - - 2 16 15 44 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 50 0 - - 0 -38 - - 0 6 13 -7 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

207

Oil and economic development in OPEC countries, with case studies about Iraq and Algeria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dissertation examines the impact of the increase in oil prices in 1973 and thereafter on economic development in the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) in general, and in Iraq and Algeria in particular. It attempts to investigate the extent to which these countries have succeeded in utilizing oil revenues to achieve their projected goals: diversification of their economies in order to reduce dependence on exporting crude oil which is an exhaustible resource; and acceleration of the rate of growth of the non-oil sector in order to increase its contribution to GDP and foreign-exchange earnings as well as to maintain the growth of the economy in the post-oil age. While the increase in oil revenues greatly reduced the capital constraint to growth, it did not remove all other constraints at the same time. Thus, bottlenecks in transportation, institutions, skilled labor, raw and construction materials remained important obstacles. According to the criteria used by this study to judge the performance of the Iraqi and the Algerian economies after 1973, both countries did quite well. However, one of the findings about Iraq is that while the rate of growth of real per capita GDP accelerated after 1973, the rate of growth of real per capita non-oil GDP did not. Algeria succeeded in diversifying her economy, since the rate of growth of non-oil GDP accelerated after 1973, compared to the earlier period.

Al-Khalil, M.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

No Oil: The coming Utopia/Dystopia and Communal Possibilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supplies of conventional oil, and exploitable supplies of alternative forms of oil and related hydrocarbons, including tar sands and oil shale. Because new supplies of conventional oil are declining steadily, there is quite a lot of activity in the oil... to exploit the huge deposits of oil sands in Canada. Oil sands and oil shale look good because they contain vast amounts of oil. The problem is that of turning the reserves, locked into other geological formations, into useful oil. According to current...

Miller, Timothy

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Overview of sSupply of Chicago/Milwaukee Gasoline This Spring:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Supply of Chicago/Milwaukee Gasoline Spring 20001 Supply of Chicago/Milwaukee Gasoline Spring 20001 Joanne Shore, Petroleum Division Tight Supply at the Beginning of Summer Gasoline Season This summer's run-up in Midwest gasoline prices, like other recent price spikes, stemmed from a number of factors. The stage was set for gasoline volatility as a result of tight crude oil supplies, which led to low crude oil and low product stocks and relatively high crude oil prices. With little stock cushion to absorb unexpected events, Midwest gasoline prices surged when a number of supply problems developed, including pipeline and refinery supply problems, and an unexpectedly difficult transition to summer-grade Phase II reformulated gasoline (RFG). Prior to the current summer driving season, gasoline stocks were low

210

The economic development of oil-exporting countries: The case of Iraq  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study is to measure the response of Iraqi development to the influx of oil-export revenues. The study employs several econometric techniques using data from 1960 to 1980. From 1960 to 1980, Iraq achieved remarkable economic growth, a high rate of investment and employment, more equitable income distribution, a favorable balance of trade, and a stabilized economy. The 1972 government takeover of oil industries and the oil price boom of 1973 brought even more unprecedented growth and prosperity to the nation. Despite this remarkable performance however, the economic structure of Iraq remains dominated by the oil-export sector. In other words, Iraq's ability to reduce its dependence on oil revenues has been constructed because home sectors were not yet developed sufficiently to provide outputs and revenues needed by the country. Recommendations include development of policies designed to link the oil export sector with the rest of the economy, to encourage more investment by the private sector, to expand and improve the productivity of the agricultural and industrial sectors, and to develop inter-nation regional cooperatives capable of expanding the market for locally produced goods.

Khalil, M.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Oil and gas developments in western Canada in 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exploratory drilling in western Canada increased by 21% in 1987 whereas total drilling increased by 32%. The seismic crew count increased 4% to 671 crew-months, and land expenditures increased 166% to $793 million. No major plays broke during 1987 in western Canada. The 2 major plays resulting from 1986 activity - Caroline, Alberta, and Tableland, Saskatchewan - continued to expand in 1987. By year end at Caroline, industry drilled 14 wells, which included 6 Swan Hills gas wells, 3 uphole gas wells, 3 wells standing or suspended, and 2 dry holes. The reserves for this field now are 17 billion m/sup 3/ of sales gas, 32 million m/sup 3/ of condensate, and 20 million MT of sulfur. At Tableland and surrounding areas, industry has drilled 11 oil wells and 16 dry holes. No overall reserve figures have been published for this play. In Alberta, operators had their best exploratory oil success in the Cretaceous Second White Specks and in the Devonian Nisku, Leduc, Gilwood, and Keg River; the best exploratory gas success was in the Cretaceous Viking and Paddy, and Devonian Nisku and Leduc. In British Columbia, gas drilling was successful in the Cretaceous of the Deep Basin, as well as in the Mississippian Kiskatinaw and the Triassic Halfway. In Saskatchewan, both the shallow Cretaceous gas play and the deep Devonian Winnipegosis oil play continued to expand, whereas in Manitoba the main exploration target was the Mississippian carbonates and Bakken Formation. The Northwest Territories, Beaufort Sea, and Arctic Islands had a poor year, with only 4 exploratory wells drilled - all dry holes. 7 figs., 10 tabs.

Portigal, M.H.; Creed, R.M.; Hogg, J.R.; Hewitt, M.D.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1985 totaled 3,837,580,000 bbl (an average rate of 10,513,917 BOPD), down 2.2% from the revised 1984 total of 3,924,034,000 bbl. Iran, Iraq, Dubai, Oman, and Syria had significant increases; Kuwait, Kuwait-Saudi Arabia Divided Neutral Zone, Saudi Arabia, and Qatar had significant decreases. New fields went on production in Iraq, Abu Dhabi, Oman, and Syria. In North Yemen, the first ever oil production in that country was nearing the start-up stage at year end. 9 figures, 9 tables.

Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Oil exploration and development in the North Dakota Williston Basin: 1981 update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article gives recent and historical development of the Williston Basin of North Dakota, along with numerous maps, oil and gas well data, and discoveries. Tabular data gives operators, fields, well depth, production, and producing horizons. The maps show locations of oil fields and new discoveries. Some information on production, taxes, profits and drilling activity is also given in graphical means. 14 figures, 3 tables.

Anderson, S.B.; Bluemle, J.P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

The Esso Energy Award Lecture, 1998. Boosting production from low-pressure oil and gas fields: a revolution in hydrocarbon production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Boosting production from low-pressure oil and gas fields: a revolution in hydrocarbon...major part of the future source of oil and gas supply. Full development...Caledonia Ltd (Wood Group Engineering), Marathon Oil UK Ltd, Mobil North Sea Ltd, Oil...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Tertiary development of heavy oil sands through thermal stimulation in the Wilmington Oil Field, California: A geological perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1995, a DOE cost share project was initiated to extend thermal recovery in the Tar Zone, Fault Block 11 of the West Wilmington Oil Field, California. The project involved the collection of old oil well data and the construction of a modern digital data base in order to develop a deterministic geological model. The plan was to rigorously define the geology such that horizontal wells could be accurately placed within the sands containing heavy oil to facilitate gravity drainage. A detailed deterministic geological model was constructed using a state of the art 3D mapping and modeling package. Beginning in July, 1995, five observation wells were drilled. Data inconsistencies were revealed when core hole OB2-003 was drilled. It was discovered that the data used to make the maps was corrupted; as a result, the predicted coring point was missed by more than 20'. Significant modifications to the data base were required due to inaccurate subsidence corrections in the original data set. Horizontal wells were then laid out based on the revised data and the geological model was completely reconstructed. Detailed cross sections extracted from the model were use for geosteering. These cross sections proved to be highly accurate and five more wells are now planned for the target sands. This detailed deterministic model will be further refined and combined with our geostatistical mode for geological control in an advanced reservoir simulator. If successful, the thermal stimulation project will be expanded to other fault blocks.

Clarke, D.D. (Department of Oil Properties, Long Beach, CA (United States)); Henry, M.J.; Strehle, R.W. (Dept. of Oil Properties, Long Beach, CA (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Tertiary development of heavy oil sands through thermal stimulation in the Wilmington Oil Field, California: A geological perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1995, a DOE cost share project was initiated to extend thermal recovery in the Tar Zone, Fault Block 11 of the West Wilmington Oil Field, California. The project involved the collection of old oil well data and the construction of a modern digital data base in order to develop a deterministic geological model. The plan was to rigorously define the geology such that horizontal wells could be accurately placed within the sands containing heavy oil to facilitate gravity drainage. A detailed deterministic geological model was constructed using a state of the art 3D mapping and modeling package. Beginning in July, 1995, five observation wells were drilled. Data inconsistencies were revealed when core hole OB2-003 was drilled. It was discovered that the data used to make the maps was corrupted; as a result, the predicted coring point was missed by more than 20`. Significant modifications to the data base were required due to inaccurate subsidence corrections in the original data set. Horizontal wells were then laid out based on the revised data and the geological model was completely reconstructed. Detailed cross sections extracted from the model were use for geosteering. These cross sections proved to be highly accurate and five more wells are now planned for the target sands. This detailed deterministic model will be further refined and combined with our geostatistical mode for geological control in an advanced reservoir simulator. If successful, the thermal stimulation project will be expanded to other fault blocks.

Clarke, D.D. [Department of Oil Properties, Long Beach, CA (United States); Henry, M.J.; Strehle, R.W. [Dept. of Oil Properties, Long Beach, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

217

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Decemer 2011 Appendix D Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Information on the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve is available from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Petroleum Reserves web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/reserves/heatingoil/. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR) inventories now classified as ultra-low sulfur distillate (15 parts per million) are not considered to be in the commercial sector and therefore are excluded from distillate fuel oil supply and disposition statistics in Energy

218

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 September 2013 Appendix D Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Information on the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve is available from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Petroleum Reserves web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/reserves/heatingoil/. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR) inventories now classified as ultra-low sulfur distillate (15 parts per million) are not considered to be in the commercial sector and therefore are excluded from distillate fuel oil supply and disposition statistics in Energy

219

Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report describing the evolution of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' from its conceptual stage in 2002 to the field implementation of the developed technology in 2006. This comprehensive report includes all the experimental research, models developments, analyses of results, salient conclusions and the technology transfer efforts. As planned in the original proposal, the project has been conducted in three separate and concurrent tasks: Task 1 involved a physical model study of the new GAGD process, Task 2 was aimed at further developing the vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for gas-oil miscibility determination, and Task 3 was directed at determining multiphase gas-oil drainage and displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks at realistic pressures and temperatures. The project started with the task of recruiting well-qualified graduate research assistants. After collecting and reviewing the literature on different aspects of the project such gas injection EOR, gravity drainage, miscibility characterization, and gas-oil displacement characteristics in porous media, research plans were developed for the experimental work to be conducted under each of the three tasks. Based on the literature review and dimensional analysis, preliminary criteria were developed for the design of the partially-scaled physical model. Additionally, the need for a separate transparent model for visual observation and verification of the displacement and drainage behavior under gas-assisted gravity drainage was identified. Various materials and methods (ceramic porous material, Stucco, Portland cement, sintered glass beads) were attempted in order to fabricate a satisfactory visual model. In addition to proving the effectiveness of the GAGD process (through measured oil recoveries in the range of 65 to 87% IOIP), the visual models demonstrated three possible multiphase mechanisms at work, namely, Darcy-type displacement until gas breakthrough, gravity drainage after breakthrough and film-drainage in gas-invaded zones throughout the duration of the process. The partially-scaled physical model was used in a series of experiments to study the effects of wettability, gas-oil miscibility, secondary versus tertiary mode gas injection, and the presence of fractures on GAGD oil recovery. In addition to yielding recoveries of up to 80% IOIP, even in the immiscible gas injection mode, the partially-scaled physical model confirmed the positive influence of fractures and oil-wet characteristics in enhancing oil recoveries over those measured in the homogeneous (unfractured) water-wet models. An interesting observation was that a single logarithmic relationship between the oil recovery and the gravity number was obeyed by the physical model, the high-pressure corefloods and the field data.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin; Thaer N. N. Mahmoud; Daryl S. Sequeira; Amit P. Sharma

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

220

Petroleum Supply Annual 1997, Volume 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, Volume 1 7, Volume 1 Entire . The entire report as a single file. PDF 1.0MB . . Front Matter . Cover Page, Contacts, Preface, and Table of Contents Page PDF . . Summary Statistics . Summary Statistics Tables S1 Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Overview, 1981-Present PDF S2 Crude Oil Supply and Disposition, 1981-Present PDF S3 Crude Oil and Petroleum Product Imports, 1981-Present PDF S4 Finished Motor Gasoline Supply and Disposition PDF S5 Distillate Fuel Oil Supply and Disposition, 1981-Present PDF S6 Residual Fuel Oil Supply and Disposition, 1981-Present PDF S7 Jet Fuel Supply and Disposition, 1981-Present PDF S8 Propane/Propylene Supply and Disposition, 1981-Present PDF S9 Liquefied Petroleum Gases Supply and Disposition, 1981-Present PDF S10 Other Petroleum Products Supply and Disposition, 1981-Present PDF

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil supply development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Oil shale technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale is undoubtedly an excellent energy source that has great abundance and world-wide distribution. Oil shale industries have seen ups and downs over more than 100 years, depending on the availability and price of conventional petroleum crudes. Market forces as well as environmental factors will greatly affect the interest in development of oil shale. Besides competing with conventional crude oil and natural gas, shale oil will have to compete favorably with coal-derived fuels for similar markets. Crude shale oil is obtained from oil shale by a relatively simple process called retorting. However, the process economics are greatly affected by the thermal efficiencies, the richness of shale, the mass transfer effectiveness, the conversion efficiency, the design of retort, the environmental post-treatment, etc. A great many process ideas and patents related to the oil shale pyrolysis have been developed; however, relatively few field and engineering data have been published. Due to the vast heterogeneity of oil shale and to the complexities of physicochemical process mechanisms, scientific or technological generalization of oil shale retorting is difficult to achieve. Dwindling supplied of worldwide petroleum reserves, as well as the unprecedented appetite of mankind for clean liquid fuel, has made the public concern for future energy market grow rapidly. the clean coal technology and the alternate fuel technology are currently of great significance not only to policy makers, but also to process and chemical researchers. In this book, efforts have been made to make a comprehensive text for the science and technology of oil shale utilization. Therefore, subjects dealing with the terminological definitions, geology and petrology, chemistry, characterization, process engineering, mathematical modeling, chemical reaction engineering, experimental methods, and statistical experimental design, etc. are covered in detail.

Lee, S. (Akron Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Bayesian Networks and Geographical Information Systems for Environmental Risk Assessment for Oil and Gas Site Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this work is to develop a Bayesian Network (BN) model to produce environmental risk maps for oil and gas site developments and to demonstrate the model’s scalability from a point to a collection of points. To reach this objective...

Varela Gonzalez, Patricia Ysolda

2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

223

DEVELOPMENT OF POLYMER GEL SYSTEMS TO IMPROVE VOLUMETRIC SWEEP AND REDUCE PRODUCING WATER/OIL RATIOS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gelled polymer treatments are applied to oil reservoirs to increase oil production and to reduce water production by altering the fluid movement within the reservoir. This report describes the results of the first year of a three-year research program that is aimed at the understanding of the chemistry of gelation and the fundamental mechanisms that alter the flows of oil and water in reservoir rocks after a gel treatment. Work has focused on a widely-applied system in field applications, the partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide-chromium acetate gel. Gelation occurs by network formation through the crosslinking of polyacrylamide molecules as a result of reaction with chromium acetate. The initial reaction between chromium acetate and one polymer is referred to as the uptake reaction. The uptake reaction was studied as functions of chromium and polymer concentrations and pH values. Experimental data were regressed to determine a rate equation that describes the uptake reaction of chromium by polyacrylamide. Pre-gel aggregates form and grow as the reactions between chromium acetate and polyacrylamide proceed. A statistical model that describes the growth of pre-gel aggregates was developed using the theory of branching processes. The model gives molecular weight averages that are expressed as functions of the conversion of the reactive sites on chromium acetate or on the polymer molecule. Results of the application of the model correlate well with experimental data of viscosity and weight-average molecular weight and gives insights into the gelation process. A third study addresses the flow of water and oil in rock material after a gel treatment. Previous works have shown that gel treatments usually reduce the permeability to water to a greater extent than the permeability to oil is reduced. This phenomenon is referred to as disproportionate permeability reduction (DPR). Flow experiments were conducted to determine the effect of polymer and chromium concentrations on DPR. All gels studied reduced the permeability to water by a greater factor than the factor by which the oil permeability was reduced. Greater DPR was observed as the concentrations of polymer and chromium were increased. Increased pressure gradients during oil flow decreased the oil permeability and the water permeability that was measured afterward. Lower pressure gradients that were applied subsequently moderately affected water permeabilities but did not affect oil permeabilities. A conceptual model of the mechanisms responsible for DPR is presented. Primary features of the model are (1) the development of flow channels through the gel by dehydration of the gel and by re-connection of pre-treatment, residual oil volume and (2) high flow resistance in the channels during water flow is caused by significant saturations of oil remaining in the channels.

G. Paul Willhite; Stan McCool; Don W. Green; Min Cheng; Rajeev Jain; Tuan Nguyen

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Petroleum Supply Annual, Volume 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 With Data for 2012 | Release Date: September 27, 2013 | Next Release Date: August 28, 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 Go Re-release of the Petroleum Supply Annual with data for 2011 Volume 1 - Final annual data for the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. Volume 1 Tables All Tables All Tables Detailed Statistics Tables National Statistics 1 U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF CSV 2 U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF CSV Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 3 PAD District 1 PDF CSV 4 Daily Average PAD District 1 PDF CSV

225

Oil and gas development in Middle East in 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1987 totaled an estimated 4,500,500,000 bbl (an average rate of 12,330,137 b/d), up slightly from the revised 1986 total of 4,478,972,000 bbl. Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Yemen Arab Republic had significant increases; Kuwait and Saudi Arabia had significant decreases. Production was established for the first time in People's Democratic Republic of Yemen. New fields went on production in Iraq, Oman, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, and Syria, and significant oil discoveries were reported in Iraq, Oman, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, Syria, and Yemen Arab Republic. The level of exploration increased in 1987 with new concessions awarded in some countries, drilling and seismic activities on the increase, new regions in mature areas explored for the first time, and significant reserve additions reported in new and old permits. The Iraq-Iran war still had a negative impact in some regions of the Middle East, particularly in and around the Gulf. 11 figs., 4 tabs.

Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.; Phillips, C.B.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supply Supply Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 11, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million barrels per day. The data is broken down into crude oil, other petroleum supply, other non petroleum supply and liquid fuel consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO disposition EIA liquid fuels Supply Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Liquid Fuels Supply and Disposition- Reference Case (xls, 117 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License

227

GIS-and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Colorado School of Mines (CSM) was awarded a grant by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct a research project en- titled GIS- and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development in October of 2008. The ultimate goal of this research project is to develop a water resource geo-spatial infrastructure that serves as “baseline data” for creating solutions on water resource management and for supporting decisions making on oil shale resource development. The project came to the end on September 30, 2012. This final project report will report the key findings from the project activity, major accomplishments, and expected impacts of the research. At meantime, the gamma version (also known as Version 4.0) of the geodatabase as well as other various deliverables stored on digital storage media will be send to the program manager at NETL, DOE via express mail. The key findings from the project activity include the quantitative spatial and temporal distribution of the water resource throughout the Piceance Basin, water consumption with respect to oil shale production, and data gaps identified. Major accomplishments of this project include the creation of a relational geodatabase, automated data processing scripts (Matlab) for database link with surface water and geological model, ArcGIS Model for hydrogeologic data processing for groundwater model input, a 3D geological model, surface water/groundwater models, energy resource development systems model, as well as a web-based geo-spatial infrastructure for data exploration, visualization and dissemination. This research will have broad impacts of the devel- opment of the oil shale resources in the US. The geodatabase provides a “baseline” data for fur- ther study of the oil shale development and identification of further data collection needs. The 3D geological model provides better understanding through data interpolation and visualization techniques of the Piceance Basin structure spatial distribution of the oil shale resources. The sur- face water/groundwater models quantify the water shortage and better understanding the spatial distribution of the available water resources. The energy resource development systems model reveals the phase shift of water usage and the oil shale production, which will facilitate better planning for oil shale development. Detailed descriptions about the key findings from the project activity, major accomplishments, and expected impacts of the research will be given in the sec- tion of “ACCOMPLISHMENTS, RESULTS, AND DISCUSSION” of this report.

Zhou, Wei (Wendy) [Wendy; Minnick, Matthew; Geza, Mengistu; Murray, Kyle; Mattson, Earl

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

228

The effect of oil price shocks on the macroeconomy.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The traditional view of oil price movements is that they represent exogenous changes in the supply of oil. In that case, oil price increases will… (more)

Embergenov, Bakhitbay

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Corporate social responsibility in Latin America's petroleum industry: a national oil company's strategy for sustainable development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

National oil companies (NOCs) now control the majority of globally proved oil reserves but formal research into their social and environmental performance is scant. In a region of the world where poverty, environmental degradation, unemployment, poor access to health care and infrastructure services are ongoing realities, corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Latin America offers potential for net positive impact. We examine the particular case of a Latin American NOC's efforts to improve its social licence to operate by engaging communities as part of a broader sustainable development strategy for its last large oil field. Organisational strategic bridging is explored as a vehicle for the NOC to embark on CSR strategies in Latin America. In this emerging field, there is a place for ethically oriented business researchers to act as CSR-sustainable development practitioners going beyond the purely observational role of management academics towards application of participatory action research methods.

David Lertzman; Percy Garcia; Harrie Vredenburg

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Development of Improved Oil Field Waste Injection Disposal Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of this project have was to: (1) assemble and analyze a comprehensive database of past waste injection operations; (2) develop improved diagnostic techniques for monitoring fracture growth and formation changes; (3) develop operating guidelines to optimize daily operations and ultimate storage capacity of the target formation; and (4) to apply these improved models and guidelines in the field.

Terralog Technologies

2002-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

231

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook 8/13/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance OPEC Production Likely To Remain Low U.S. Reflects World Market Crude Oil Outlook Conclusions Distillate Prices Increase With Crude Oil Distillate Stocks on the East Coast Were Very Low Entering Last Winter Distillate Demand Strong Last Winter More Supply Possible This Fall than Forecast Distillate Fuel Oil Imports Could Be Available - For A Price Distillate Supply/Demand Balance Reflected in Spreads Distillate Stocks Expected to Remain Low Winter Crude Oil and Distillate Price Outlook Heating Oil Outlook Conclusion Propane Prices Follow Crude Oil

232

Unconventional Oil and Gas Projects Help Reduce Environmental Impact of Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Fossil Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory has an unconventional oil and gas program devoted to research in this important area of energy development. The laboratory partners with industry and academia through cost-sharing agreements to develop scientific knowledge and advance technologies that can improve the environmental performance of unconventional resource development. Once the resulting technologies are deployed for commercial use, our nation stands to reap huge benefits.

233

Development of Self-Correcting Algorithms for Complete Failure of Supply Air Temperature Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has initiated research (Fernandez et al., 2009a) ? Passive and proactive tests ? Rule-based algorithms ? Tested using virtual sensors ? Self-correction approach for the total failure of supply air... temperature sensors 7 ESL-IC-13-10-47 Proceedings of the 13th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Montreal, Quebec, October 8-11, 2013 Self-correction of HVAC controls ? proposed approach 8 1. Fault Diagnostic ? Constant sensor...

Monfet, D.; Choiniere, D.; Padilla, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Optimal operating strategies coping with uncertainties of world oil prices for China's strategic petroleum reserve  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since 2003, China has begun to establish its own strategic petroleum reserves (SPR) to strengthen its oil supply security. Due to the unpredictable feature of the oil supply interruption or sudden price rising, questions about operating the SPR become an important issue for China's policy makers. This paper analysed the operating strategies for China's SPR by developing a stochastic dynamic programming model, which considered uncertainties of the world oil prices and the construction process of China's SPR sites. Different situations, including normal world oil prices, short-term world oil price rising, continuously high world oil prices and continuously oil price decrease were considered and discussed. Optimal SPR operating strategies coping with uncertainties of world oil prices for China were derived and relevant policy implications were obtained. The influence effects on world oil price caused by the acquisition or drawdown actions of China's SPR were considered, too.

Xin Chen; Hailin Mu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Oil exploration and development in the North Dakota Williston basin: 1986-1987 update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of North Dakota's history of oil and gas discoveries and production includes an analysis of the several exploration cycles the Williston basin has undergone and the development of significant reservoirs there, emphasizing activity in 1986 and 1987. The writers analyze current conditions and offer their best prognosis of future possibilities.

Fischer, D.W.; Bluemle, J.P.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Petroleum Supply Annual 2005, Volume 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tables National Statistics 1 U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF CSV XLS 2 U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of...

237

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: The outlook for heating oil costs this winter, due to high crude oil costs and tight heating oil supplies, breaks down to an expected increase in heating expenditures for a typical oil-heated household of more than $200 this winter, the result of an 18% increase in the average price and an 11% increase in consumption. The consumption increase is due to the colder than normal temperatures experienced so far this winter and our expectations of normal winter weather for the rest of this heating season. Last winter, Northeast heating oil (and diesel fuel) markets experienced an extremely sharp spike in prices when a severe weather situation developed in late January. It is virtually impossible to gauge the probability of a similar (or worse) price shock recurring this winter,

238

Petrophysical Properties of Unconventional Low-Mobility Reservoirs (Shale Gas and Heavy Oil) by Using Newly Developed Adaptive Testing Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPE 159172 Petrophysical Properties of Unconventional Low-Mobility Reservoirs (Shale Gas and Heavy Oil) by Using Newly Developed Adaptive Testing Approach Hamid Hadibeik, The University of Texas the dynamics of water- and oil- base mud-filtrate invasion that produce wellbore supercharging were developed

Torres-VerdĂ­n, Carlos

239

Energy and the Oil-Importing Developing Countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for the transfer of energy technology already...to instructions in energy conservation. But...be consistent with national objectives and with sensi-ble overall energy and development goals...both a problem and a challenge to the worldwide...regional elec-tric grids to enable sharing...

Joy Dunkerley; William Ramsay

1982-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

240

Oil and gas developments in Oklahoma and panhandle of Texas in 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Declining oil prices, curtailed gas sales, and uncertain tax law changes contributed to a 9.1% decrease in drilling, a 25.3% drop in gas production, and a 5% drop in oil production in Oklahoma and the panhandle of Texas (Texas Railroad Commission District 10) in 1985. Exploration focused on development and extension of existing fields, with development wells outnumbering exploratory wells 20 to 1. Operators completed 14.3% fewer exploratory wells and 9.1% fewer development wells. The success rate for exploratory wells declined to 28.9%, and the success rate for development wells dropped to 72.3%. The Cherokee shelf was the most active trend, with 90 exploratory wells completed in 1985. 3 figures, 4 tables.

Fryklund, R.E.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil supply development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Development of Extraction Techniques for the Detection of Signature Lipids from Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

has been shown previously in oil samples (Hallman, 2008)of signature lipids from oil Sharon Borglin, Olivia Mason, were combined with model oil samples and oil/diesel mixtures

Borglin, Sharon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Oil market in international and Norwegian perspectives.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Crude oil is the most important energy source in global perspective. About 35 percent of the world’s primary energy consumption is supplied by oil, followed… (more)

Singsaas, Julia Nazyrova

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale comprises: a vertical type distilling furnace which is divided by two vertical partitions each provided with a plurality of vent apertures into an oil shale treating chamber and two gas chambers, said oil shale treating chamber being located between said two gas chambers in said vertical type distilling furnace, said vertical type distilling furnace being further divided by at least one horizontal partition into an oil shale distilling chamber in the lower part thereof and at least one oil shale preheating chamber in the upper part thereof, said oil shale distilling chamber and said oil shale preheating chamber communication with each other through a gap provided at an end of said horizontal partition, an oil shale supplied continuously from an oil shale supply port provided in said oil shale treating chamber at the top thereof into said oil shale treating chamber continuously moving from the oil shale preheating chamber to the oil shale distilling chamber, a high-temperature gas blown into an oil shale distilling chamber passing horizontally through said oil shale in said oil shale treating chamber, thereby said oil shale is preheated in said oil shale preheating chamber, and a gaseous shale oil is distilled from said preheated oil shale in said oil shale distilling chamber; and a separator for separating by liquefaction a gaseous shale oil from a gas containing the gaseous shale oil discharged from the oil shale preheating chamber.

Shishido, T.; Sato, Y.

1984-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

244

Oil | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oil Oil Oil Oil Prices, 2000-2008 For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. Oil is used for heating and transportation -- most notably, as fuel for gas-powered vehicles. America's dependence on foreign oil has declined in recent years, but oil prices have increased. The Energy Department supports research and policy options to increase our domestic supply of oil while ensuring environmentally sustainable supplies domestically and abroad, and is investing in research, technology and

245

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 September 2013 Table 10. PAD District 2 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 366,285 - - - - 501,418 159,175 -109,633 -12,929 918,349 11,825 0 102,610 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 122,918 -4,579 37,556 21,926 4,444 - - 15,132 24,244 34,819 108,070 58,830 Pentanes Plus ..................................................

246

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20 20 September 2013 Table 14. PAD District 3 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 1,188,751 - - - - 1,015,091 -112,708 94,064 20,399 2,158,191 6,608 0 882,207 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 440,766 -88 123,986 10,625 46,383 - - 16,960 76,972 72,880 454,860 114,138 Pentanes Plus ..................................................

247

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 Table 2. U.S. Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 2,003,948 - - - - 2,123,490 65,265 6,899 4,157,486 28,318 0 1,067,149 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 686,936 -4,909 195,516 47,812 - - 36,219 127,051 118,364 643,721 189,672 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 92,842 -4,909 - - 10,243 - -

248

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.PDF 1.PDF Table 11. PAD District 5 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 36,593 - - - - 31,429 - 4,534 890 71,666 - 0 55,877 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 2,154 -11 1,013 192 - - - -786 2,587 629 918 3,544 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,013 -11 - - - - - - -35 842 110 85 36 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

249

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE7.PDF TABLE7.PDF Table 7. PAD District 3 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 109,919 - - - - 142,073 -20,272 -3,481 6,003 222,236 - 0 858,776 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 43,678 -17 9,648 1,838 7,546 - - -2,299 8,340 4,663 51,989 65,215 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 4,840 -17 - - 1,688 -3,010 - -

250

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 September 2013 Table 8. PAD District 1 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 32 - - - - 843 -1 230 8 1,061 35 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 71 0 45 40 77 - - 1 16 10 205 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 12 0 - - 1 0 - - 0 0 2 9 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

251

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 3. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 5,877 - - - - 8,716 83 -218 14,841 53 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 2,351 -20 372 252 - - -417 566 206 2,600 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 296 -20 - - 78 - - 37 172 71 75 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 2,055 - - 372 174 - - -454 394 135 2,525

252

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 September 2013 Table 22. PAD District 5 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 300,668 - - - - 297,837 - 31,342 -3,713 633,292 267 0 52,719 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 17,739 -73 18,288 1,401 - - - 3,536 17,170 3,791 12,858 8,270 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 7,914

253

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 5. PAD District 1 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 751 - - - - 26,471 -300 1,308 -869 28,999 100 0 9,902 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 1,313 -7 839 2,091 3,702 - - -929 816 33 8,018 7,618 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 225 -7 - - - - - - 3 - 11 204 31 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

254

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 Table 6. PAD District 1 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 8,672 - - - - 230,125 -359 62,824 2,069 289,586 9,606 0 10,326 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 19,329 -83 12,151 10,808 21,118 - - 168 4,287 2,821 56,047 6,541 Pentanes Plus ..................................................

255

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. TABLE1.PDF 1. TABLE1.PDF Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 190,109 - - - - 264,348 6,359 12,794 445,596 2,425 0 1,039,424 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 73,905 -587 13,044 6,935 - - -11,335 15,883 8,313 80,436 118,039 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 8,824 -587 - - 1,699 - - -805 4,946 2,754 3,041 16,791 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

256

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.PDF 2.PDF Table 12. PAD District 5 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,180 - - - - 1,014 - 146 29 2,312 - 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 69 0 33 6 - - - -25 83 20 30 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 33 0 - - - - - - -1 27 4 3 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 37 - - 33 6 - - - -24 56 17 27 Ethane/Ethylene

257

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 233,810 - - - - 237,344 8,334 7,688 468,825 2,975 0 1,067,149 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 81,196 -552 19,023 4,020 - - 3,027 16,794 13,937 69,929 189,672 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 11,167 -552 - - 772 - - -700 5,666 2,989 3,432 18,036 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

258

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 182,188 - - - - 270,188 2,576 -6,767 460,074 1,646 0 1,026,829 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 72,869 -607 11,545 7,801 - - -12,921 17,534 6,391 80,604 128,709 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 9,170 -607 - - 2,421 - - 1,146 5,321 2,200 2,317 17,598 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

259

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 17. PAD District 4 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 12,175 - - - - 10,226 -3,426 -1,436 132 17,407 1 0 15,969 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 12,584 -10 52 460 -10,314 - - -12 611 282 1,891 1,375 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,788 -10 - - - -1,036 - - -15 174 273 310 180 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

260

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 15. PAD District 3 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 3,327 - - - - 4,646 -720 39 -191 7,482 - 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 1,380 -1 304 84 227 - - -113 306 108 1,693 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 155 -1 - - 77 -58 - - 35 106 1 31 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil supply development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 9. PAD District 2 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 29,019 - - - - 52,699 26,041 2,973 12 109,175 1,544 0 93,189 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 14,079 -560 812 2,541 -423 - - -6,605 4,051 2,114 16,889 48,197 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,354 -560 - - 21 2,843 - - 110 1,049

262

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 September 2013 Table 16. PAD District 3 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 4,354 - - - - 3,718 -413 345 75 7,905 24 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 1,615 0 454 39 170 - - 62 282 267 1,666 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 195 0 - - 36 -65 - - 15 113 4 35 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

263

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE9.PDF TABLE9.PDF Table 9. PAD District 4 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 12,961 - - - - 10,783 -3,879 896 2,868 17,893 0 0 18,695 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 12,770 -9 127 502 -11,116 - - -50 621 280 1,423 1,326 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,484 -9 - - - -1,152 - - 7 122 264 -70 187 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

264

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.PDF .PDF Table 3. PAD District 1 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 734 - - - - 26,368 419 -1,209 627 25,554 130 0 10,529 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 1,314 -6 923 1,606 2,621 - - -1,556 707 53 7,254 6,409 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 213 -6 - - - - - - 3 5 6 193 34 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

265

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE5.PDF TABLE5.PDF Table 5. PAD District 2 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 29,902 - - - - 53,695 23,732 5,619 2,406 108,247 2,295 0 95,547 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 13,989 -544 1,333 2,797 949 - - -6,644 3,628 2,687 18,853 41,545 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,274 -544 - - 11 4,162 - - 233 966

266

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 Table 4. U.S. Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 7,340 - - - - 7,778 239 25 15,229 104 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 2,516 -18 716 175 - - 133 465 434 2,358 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 340 -18 - - 38 - - 20 168 134 38 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 2,176 - - 716

267

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 September 2013 Table 18. PAD District 4 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 139,573 - - - - 79,019 -46,108 -13,333 1,073 158,068 10 0 19,287 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 86,184 -86 3,535 3,052 -71,945 - - 423 4,378 4,054 11,885 1,893 Pentanes Plus ..................................................

268

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

30 30 September 2013 Table 24. PAD District 5 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,101 - - - - 1,091 - 115 -14 2,320 1 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 65 0 67 5 - - - 13 63 14 47 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 29 0 - - - - - - 1 21 4 3 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

269

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.PDF .PDF Table 2. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 6,133 - - - - 8,527 205 413 14,374 78 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 2,384 -19 421 224 - - -366 512 268 2,595 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 285 -19 - - 55 - - -26 160 89 98 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 2,099 - - 421 169 - - -340 353 179 2,497 Ethane/Ethylene

270

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that controls demand for oil. ” 6.6 Hedging behavior inauthors model demand and all three phases in oil supply –future supply and demand for US crude oil resources. A

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides results from the second year of this three-year project to develop dilution measurement technology for characterizing PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers) and precursor emissions from stationary combustion sources used in oil, gas and power generation operation. Detailed emission rate and chemical speciation tests results for a gas turbine, a process heater, and a commercial oil/gas fired boiler are presented. Tests were performed using a research dilution sampling apparatus and traditional EPA methods. A series of pilot tests were conducted to identify the constraints to reduce the size of current research dilution sampler for future stack emission tests. Based on the test results, a bench prototype compact dilution sampler developed and characterized in GE EER in August 2002.

Glenn England; Oliver Chang; Stephanie Wien

2002-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

272

Oil and gas developments in central and southern Africa in 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil industry activity in central and southern Africa appears to have stabilized in the last few years, but some activities (such as field development and exploration acreage acquisition) are still declining. Several countries have advertised open concessions and invited bids. Only in a very few cases have the offers stimulated the interest of oil companies. An exceptional increase in exploration concession acquisition took place in the East Africa rift area. Land seismic acquisition increased mostly in Nigeria, but 1985 marine seismic activity was half the 1984 activity. Exploration drilling was higher than in 1984, but development drilling was considerably lower. Significant discoveries were made in Gabon and Angola. Production increased 8%, with the largest and most significant increase in Angola, followed by Gabon. The production share of non-OPEC versus OPEC countries remained stable at 33%. 33 figures, 6 tables.

Petracca, A.N.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Development of a comprehensive supply chain performance measurement system : a case study in the grocery retail industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While companies are looking for a single solution or a set of metrics that they can apply to measure their supply chain performance, it is clear that such a single solution does not exist. An effective supply chain performance ...

Chou, Chih-Fen, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

SERVANTS OF OIL: HISTORY AND IMPLICATIONS OF AMERICAN OIL DEVELOPMENT IN THE PERSIAN GULF, 1928-1960.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This work examines the entrĂ©e of American oil companies in the Persian Gulf in the late 1920s and early 1930s up to the formation of… (more)

English, James Edward

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Long range planning of biologics process development and clinical trial material supply process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis investigates the feasibility of using a complex model with a Monte Carlo simulation model to forecast the financial, personnel, and manufacturing capacity resources needed for biologic drug development. Accurate ...

Edwards, Emily (Emily Rose)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Oil and gas developments in central and southern Africa in 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exploratory activity in central and southern Africa continued to be strong during 1982. Seismic operations decreased, but there was a marked increase in the amount of aeromagnetic control obtained. Oil production continued the drop which began in 1981 due to the world oversupply. There were few new concessions taken by the international oil companies. Several small projects required the acquisition of relatively small amounts of land. A notable exception was in Gabon where Tenneco and Amoco have gained strong land positions. The east African countries are preparing for increased land acquisition. Seismic activity declined from 365 party-months in 1981 to 296 party-months in 1982. The amount of control obtained, however, increased substantially to 127,518 km. The acquisition of 3-D control increased by about 50% during the year as this technique was being used more commonly to delineate structures prior to development drilling. Forty-eight new-field wildcats resulted in discoveries, compared with 44 the previous year. There were 281 development wells. In all, 464 wells were drilled to account for 3.6 million ft of hole. Oil production was 662,871,768 bbl, a decrease of 5.8% from 1981. Cumulative production has now exceeded 11 billion bbl.

McGrew, H.J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

High-Temperature Nuclear Reactors for In-Situ Recovery of Oil from Oil Shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The world is exhausting its supply of crude oil for the production of liquid fuels (gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel). However, the United States has sufficient oil shale deposits to meet our current oil demands for {approx}100 years. Shell Oil Corporation is developing a new potentially cost-effective in-situ process for oil recovery that involves drilling wells into oil shale, using electric heaters to raise the bulk temperature of the oil shale deposit to {approx}370 deg C to initiate chemical reactions that produce light crude oil, and then pumping the oil to the surface. The primary production cost is the cost of high-temperature electrical heating. Because of the low thermal conductivity of oil shale, high-temperature heat is required at the heater wells to obtain the required medium temperatures in the bulk oil shale within an economically practical two to three years. It is proposed to use high-temperature nuclear reactors to provide high-temperature heat to replace the electricity and avoid the factor-of-2 loss in converting high-temperature heat to electricity that is then used to heat oil shale. Nuclear heat is potentially viable because many oil shale deposits are thick (200 to 700 m) and can yield up to 2.5 million barrels of oil per acre, or about 125 million dollars/acre of oil at $50/barrel. The concentrated characteristics of oil-shale deposits make it practical to transfer high-temperature heat over limited distances from a reactor to the oil shale deposits. (author)

Forsberg, Charles W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6165 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Development of the Write Process for Pipeline-Ready Heavy Oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work completed under this program advances the goal of demonstrating Western Research Institute's (WRI's) WRITE{trademark} process for upgrading heavy oil at field scale. MEG Energy Corporation (MEG) located in Calgary, Alberta, Canada supported efforts at WRI to develop the WRITE{trademark} process as an oil sands, field-upgrading technology through this Task 51 Jointly Sponsored Research project. The project consisted of 6 tasks: (1) optimization of the distillate recovery unit (DRU), (2) demonstration and design of a continuous coker, (3) conceptual design and cost estimate for a commercial facility, (4) design of a WRITE{trademark} pilot plant, (5) hydrotreating studies, and (6) establish a petroleum analysis laboratory. WRITE{trademark} is a heavy oil and bitumen upgrading process that produces residuum-free, pipeline ready oil from heavy material with undiluted density and viscosity that exceed prevailing pipeline specifications. WRITE{trademark} uses two processing stages to achieve low and high temperature conversion of heavy oil or bitumen. The first stage DRU operates at mild thermal cracking conditions, yielding a light overhead product and a heavy residuum or bottoms material. These bottoms flow to the second stage continuous coker that operates at severe pyrolysis conditions, yielding light pyrolyzate and coke. The combined pyrolyzate and mildly cracked overhead streams form WRITE{trademark}'s synthetic crude oil (SCO) production. The main objectives of this project were to (1) complete testing and analysis at bench scale with the DRU and continuous coker reactors and provide results to MEG for process evaluation and scale-up determinations and (2) complete a technical and economic assessment of WRITE{trademark} technology to determine its viability. The DRU test program was completed and a processing envelope developed. These results were used for process assessment and for scaleup. Tests in the continuous coker were intended to determine the throughput capability of the coker so a scaled design could be developed that maximized feed rate for a given size of reactor. These tests were only partially successful because of equipment problems. A redesigned coker, which addressed the problems, has been build but not operated. A preliminary economic analysis conducted by MEG and an their engineering consultant concluded that the WRITE{trademark} process is a technically feasible method for upgrading bitumen and that it produces SCO that meets pipeline specifications for density. When compared to delayed coking, the industry benchmark for thermal upgrading of bitumen, WRITE{trademark} produced more SCO, less coke, less CO{sub 2} per barrel of bitumen fed, and had lower capital and operating costs. On the other hand, WRITE{trademark}'s lower processing severity yielded crude with higher density and a different product distribution for naphtha, light gas oil and vacuum oil that, taken together, might reduce the value of the SCO. These issues plus the completion of more detailed process evaluation and economics need to be resolved before WRITE{trademark} is deployed as a field-scale pilot.

Lee Brecher; Charles Mones; Frank Guffey

2009-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

279

Sustainable Development of the Shale Gas Supply Chain and the Optimal Drilling Strategy for Nonconventional Wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We present a long-term MINLP planning model for the development of shale gas fields. A key decision is the drilling/fracturing strategy yielding the freshwater consumption profile, which is critical in waterscarce regions with high cumulative demand for water. Results show that the model can help companies to reduce freshwater consumption by optimally planning drilling operations, at the expense of small reductions in the net present value of the projects.

Diego C. Cafaro; Ignacio E. Grossmann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data by Tammy G. Heppner and Carol L. French Overview Petroleum supply data collected by the Petroleum Division (PD) in the Office of Oil and Gas (OOG) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) showed an improvement in the accuracy of the 2005 data from initial estimates, to interim values, to final values. These data were presented in a series of PD products: the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), This Week in Petroleum (TWIP), the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM), and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Weekly estimates in the WPSR and TWIP were the first values available. Figure FE1 illustrates that as reporting and review time passes from the weekly estimates to the interim monthly values to the final petroleum supply values, the EIA is able to produce more accurate petroleum supply data. For the monthly-from-weekly (MFW) data, respondents

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil supply development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Development of gas turbine combustor fed with bio-fuel oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Considering the increasing interest in the utilization of biofuels derived from biomass pyrolysis, ENEL/CRT carried out some experimental investigations on feasibility of biofuels utilization in the electricity production systems. The paper considers the experimental activity for the development and the design optimization of a gas turbine combustor suitable to be fed with biofuel oil, on the basis of the pressurized combustion performance obtained in a small gas turbine combustor fed with bio-fuel oil and ethanol/bio-fuel oil mixtures. Combustion tests were performed using the combustion chamber of a 40 kWe gas turbine. A small pressurized rig has been constructed including a nozzle for pressurization and a heat recovering combustion air preheating system, together with a proper injection system consisting of two dual fuel atomizers. Compressed air allowed a good spray quality and a satisfactory flame instability, without the need of a pilot frame, also when firing crude bio-fuel only. A parametric investigation on the combustion performance has been performed in order to evaluate the effect of fuel properties, operating conditions and injection system geometry, especially as regards CO and NO{sub x} emissions and smoke index.

Ardy, P.L.; Barbucci, P.; Benelli, G. [ENEL SpA R& D Dept., Pisa (Italy)] [and others

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Oil and gas developments in Oklahoma and Panhandle of Texas in 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1986, a 46% drop in the price of oil and a 10% drop in the price of gas, coupled with a decrease in demand, forced a 40.4% decrease in drilling, a 67% drop in gas production, and an 11% drop in oil production in Oklahoma and the Panhandle of Texas (Texas Railroad Commission District 10). Exploration focused on development and extension of existing fields, with development wells outnumbering exploratory wells 18 to 1. Operators completed 58.6% fewer exploratory wells and 59.2% fewer development wells in 1986 than in 1985. The 1986 success rate for exploratory wells dropped 0.8%, and the success rate for development wells increased 0.9%. The Cherokee shelf was the most active trend, with 53 exploratory wells completed in 1986. The dominant plays were the Marrow-Springer and granite wash in the Anadarko basin, Misener on the Sedgwick shelf, Viola and Hunton in the Gold Trend along the Pauls Valley uplift, and Wapanucka, Cromwell, and Atoka in the Arkoma basin. 3 figures, 4 tables.

Fryklund, R.E.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Development of Polymer Gel Systems to Improve Volumetric Sweep and Reduce Producing Water/Oil Ratios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gelled polymer treatments are applied to oil reservoirs to increase oil production and to reduce water production by altering the fluid movement within the reservoir. This report describes the results of a 42-month research program that focused on the understanding of gelation chemistry and the fundamental mechanisms that alter the flows of oil and water in reservoir rocks after a gel treatment. Work was conducted on a widely applied system in the field, the partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide-chromium acetate gel. Gelation occurs by network formation through the crosslinking of polyacrylamide molecules as a result of reaction with chromium acetate. Pre-gel aggregates form and grow as reactions between chromium acetate and polyacrylamide proceed. A rate equation that describes the reaction between chromium acetate and polymer molecules was regressed from experimental data. A mathematical model that describes the crosslinking reaction between two polymer molecules as a function of time was derived. The model was based on probability concepts and provides molecular-weight averages and molecular-weight distributions of the pre-gel aggregates as a function of time and initial system conditions. Average molecular weights of pre-gel aggregates were measured as a function of time and were comparable to model simulations. Experimental methods to determine molecular weight distributions of pre-gel aggregates were unsuccessful. Dissolution of carbonate minerals during the injection of gelants causes the pH of the gelant to increase. Chromium precipitates from solution at the higher pH values robbing the gelant of crosslinker. Experimental data on the transport of chromium acetate solutions through dolomite cores were obtained. A mathematical model that describes the transport of brine and chromium acetate solutions through rocks containing carbonate minerals was used to simulate the experimental results and data from literature. Gel treatments usually reduce the permeability to water to a greater extent than the permeability to oil is reduced. This phenomenon is referred to as disproportionate permeability reduction (DPR). Flow experiments were conducted in sandpacks to determine the effect of polymer and chromium concentrations on DPR. All gels studied reduced the permeability to water by a greater factor than the factor by which the oil permeability was reduced. Greater DPR was observed as the concentrations of polymer and chromium were increased. A conceptual model of the mechanisms responsible for DPR is presented. Primary features of the model are (1) the development of flow channels through the gel by dehydration and displacement of the gel and by re-connection of pre-treatment, residual oil volume and (2) high flow resistance in the channels during water flow is caused by significant saturations of oil remaining in the channels. A similar study of DPR was conducted in Berea sandstone cores. Both oil and water permeabilities were reduced by much smaller factors in Berea sandstone cores than in similar treatments in sandpacks. Poor maturation of the gelant in the Berea rock was thought to be caused by fluid-rock interactions that interfered with the gelation process.

G. Paul Willhite; Stan McCool; Don W. Green; Min Cheng; Feiyan Chen

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

WETTABILITY AND PREDICTION OF OIL RECOVERY FROM RESERVOIRS DEVELOPED WITH MODERN DRILLING AND COMPLETION FLUIDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are: (1) to improve understanding of the wettability alteration of mixed-wet rocks that results from contact with the components of synthetic oil-based drilling and completion fluids formulated to meet the needs of arctic drilling; (2) to investigate cleaning methods to reverse the wettability alteration of mixed-wet cores caused by contact with these SBM components; and (3) to develop new approaches to restoration of wetting that will permit the use of cores drilled with SBM formulations for valid studies of reservoir properties.

Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

New technological developments in oil well fire fighting equipment and methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since Drake`s first oil well in 1859, well fires have been frequent and disastrous. Hardly a year has passed in over a century without a well fire somewhere in the world. In the 1920`s the classic method of fire fighting using explosives to starve the fire of oxygen was developed and it has been used extensively ever since. While explosives are still one of the most frequently used methods today, several other methods are used to supplement it where special conditions exist. Tunneling at an angle from a safe distance is used in some cases, especially where the fire is too hot for a close approach on the ground surface. Pumping drilling muds into a well to plug it is another method that has been used successfully for some time. Diverter wells are occasionally used, and sometimes simply pumping enough water on a well fire is sufficient to extinguish it. Of course, prevention is always the best solution. Many advances in blow-out prevention devices have been developed in the last 50 years and the number of fires has been substantially reduced compared to the number of wells drilled. However, very little in new technology has been applied to oil well fire fighting in the 1960s, 1970s, or 1980s. Overall technological progress has accelerated tremendously in this period, of course, but new materials and equipment were not applied to this field for some reason. Saddam Hussein`s environmental holocaust in Kuwait changed that by causing many people throughout the world to focus their creative energy on more efficient oil well fire fighting methods.

Matthews, B.; Matthews, R.T.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

286

Petroleum Supply Monthly Archives  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Supply Monthly Petroleum Supply Monthly Petroleum Supply Monthly Archives With Data for December 2011 | Release Date: February 29, 2012 Changes to Table 26. "Production of Crude Oil by PAD District and State": Current State-level data are now included in Table 26, in addition to current U.S. and PAD District sums. State offshore production for Louisiana, Texas, Alaska, and California, which are included in the State totals, are no longer reported separately in a "State Offshore Production" category. Previously, State-level values lagged 2 months behind the U.S. and PAD District values. Beginning with this publication, they will be on the same cycle. Also included in this publication are two additional pages for Table 26 that provide October and November data. With the release of

287

Risks of the oil transition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy system is in the early stages of a transition from conventionally produced oil to a variety of substitutes, bringing economic, strategic, and environmental risks. We argue that these three challenges are inherently interconnected, and that as we act to manage one we cannot avoid affecting our prospects in dealing with the others. We further argue that without appropriate policies, tradeoffs between these risks are likely to be made so as to allow increased environmental disruption in return for increased economic and energy security. Responsible solutions involve developing and deploying environmentally acceptable energy technologies (both supply and demand) rapidly enough to replace dwindling conventional oil production and meet growing demand for transportation while diversifying supply to improve energy security.

A E Farrell; A R Brandt

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Development of Polymer Gel Systems to Improve Volumetric Sweep and Reduce Producing Water/Oil Ratios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gelled polymer treatments are applied to oil reservoirs to increase oil production and to reduce water production by altering the fluid movement within the reservoir. This report describes the results of the third year of a 42 month research program that is aimed at an understanding of gelation chemistry and the fundamental mechanisms that alter the flows of oil and water in reservoir rocks after a gel treatment. Work focused on a widely applied system in the field, the partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide-chromium acetate gel. Gelation occurs by network formation through the crosslinking of polyacrylamide molecules as a result of reaction with chromium acetate. Pre-gel aggregates form and grow as reactions between chromium acetate and polyacrylamide proceed. A mathematical model that describes uptake and crosslinking reactions as a function of time was derived. The model was probability based and provides molecular-weight averages and molecular-weight distributions of the pre-gel aggregates as a function of time and initial system conditions. A liquid chromatography apparatus to experimentally measure the size and molecular weight distributions of polymer samples was developed. The method worked well for polymer samples without the chromium crosslinker. Sample retention observed during measurements of gelant samples during the gelation process compromised the results. Other methods will be tested to measure size distributions of the pre-gel aggregates. Dissolution of carbonate minerals during the injection of gelants causes the pH of the gelant to increase. Chromium precipitates from solution at the higher pH values robbing the gelant of crosslinker. Experimental data on the transport of chromium acetate solutions through dolomite cores were obtained. A mathematical model that describes the transport of brine and chromium acetate solutions through rocks containing carbonate minerals was used to simulate the experimental results.

G. Paul Willhite; Stan McCool; Don W. Green; Min Cheng; Feiyan Chen

2005-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

289

DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' for the duration of the second project year (October 1, 2003--September 30, 2004). There are three main tasks in this research project. Task 1 is scaled physical model study of GAGD process. Task 2 is further development of vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 is determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. In Section I, preliminary design of the scaled physical model using the dimensional similarity approach has been presented. Scaled experiments on the current physical model have been designed to investigate the effect of Bond and capillary numbers on GAGD oil recovery. Experimental plan to study the effect of spreading coefficient and reservoir heterogeneity has been presented. Results from the GAGD experiments to study the effect of operating mode, Bond number and capillary number on GAGD oil recovery have been reported. These experiments suggest that the type of the gas does not affect the performance of GAGD in immiscible mode. The cumulative oil recovery has been observed to vary exponentially with Bond and capillary numbers, for the experiments presented in this report. A predictive model using the bundle of capillary tube approach has been developed to predict the performance of free gravity drainage process. In Section II, a mechanistic Parachor model has been proposed for improved prediction of IFT as well as to characterize the mass transfer effects for miscibility development in reservoir crude oil-solvent systems. Sensitivity studies on model results indicate that provision of a single IFT measurement in the proposed model is sufficient for reasonable IFT predictions. An attempt has been made to correlate the exponent (n) in the mechanistic model with normalized solute compositions present in both fluid phases. IFT measurements were carried out in a standard ternary liquid system of benzene, ethanol and water using drop shape analysis and capillary rise techniques. The experimental results indicate strong correlation among the three thermodynamic properties solubility, miscibility and IFT. The miscibility determined from IFT measurements for this ternary liquid system is in good agreement with phase diagram and solubility data, which clearly indicates the sound conceptual basis of VIT technique to determine fluid-fluid miscibility. Model fluid systems have been identified for VIT experimentation at elevated pressures and temperatures. Section III comprises of the experimental study aimed at evaluating the multiphase displacement characteristics of the various gas injection EOR process performances using Berea sandstone cores. During this reporting period, extensive literature review was completed to: (1) study the gravity drainage concepts, (2) identify the various factors influencing gravity stable gas injection processes, (3) identify various multiphase mechanisms and fluid dynamics operative during the GAGD process, and (4) identify important dimensionless groups governing the GAGD process performance. Furthermore, the dimensional analysis of the GAGD process, using Buckingham-Pi theorem to isolate the various dimensionless groups, as well as experimental design based on these dimensionless quantities have been completed in this reporting period. On the experimental front, recommendations from previous WAG and CGI have been used to modify the experimental protocol. This report also includes results from scaled preliminary GAGD displacements as well as the details of the planned GAGD corefloods for the next quarter. The technology transfer activities have mainly consisted of preparing technical papers, progress reports and discussions with industry personnel for possible GAGD field tests.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Amit P. Sharma

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Technology Solutions for Mitigating Environmental Impacts of Oil and Gas E&P Activity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology Solutions for Mitigating Technology Solutions for Mitigating Environmental Impacts of Oil and Gas E&P Activity The mission of the Environmental Program is to promote a reliable, affordable, and secure supply of domestic oil and clean-burning natural gas, by providing cost-effective environmental regulatory compliance technologies, enhancing environmental protections during oil and gas E&P operations, and facilitating the development and use of scientific, risk-based environmental regulatory frameworks.

291

Georgia Oil and Gas Deep Drilling act of 1975 (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Georgia's Oil and Gas and Deep Drilling Act regulates oil and gas drilling activities to provide protection of underground freshwater supplies and certain "environmentally sensitive" areas. The...

292

enhanced_oil_recovery | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

that have unconventional characteristics (such as oil in fractured shales, kerogen in oil shale, or bitumen in tar sands) constitute an enormous potential domestic supply of...

293

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects: Alaska North Slope Oil and Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alaska North Slope Oil and Gas Transportation Support System Last Reviewed 12/23/2013 Alaska North Slope Oil and Gas Transportation Support System Last Reviewed 12/23/2013 DE-FE0001240 Goal The primary objectives of this project are to develop analysis and management tools related to Arctic transportation networks (e.g., ice and snow road networks) that are critical to North Slope, Alaska oil and gas development. Performers Geo-Watersheds Scientific, Fairbanks, AK 99708 University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775 Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 Background Oil and gas development on the North Slope is critical for maintaining U.S. energy supplies and is facing a period of new growth to meet the increasing energy needs of the nation. A majority of all exploration and development activities, pipeline maintenance, and other field support projects take

294

National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal years 1988 and 1989 (Public Law 100-180): A report to the Congress: Contingency plans to deal wih disruptions in Persian Gulf crude oil supply  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The free world obtains a significant amount of oil from the Persian Gulf. The United States and other OECD countries cooperate under the aegis of the IEA to administer response programs and devise strategies to mitigate the economic and social impacts of future petroleum disruptions arising from any source. Chief among these strategies has been the development of government-owned and -controlled petroleum stocks. In addition to the United States' 545 million barrel SPR, other IEA member governments own or control strategic stocks amonting to over 390 million barrels of oil. The IEA members have developed and tested procedures for coordinating their response strategies, including drawdown of these stocks. Efforts by the United States and other countries to decontrol oil prices and dismantle cumbersome national allocation schemes have made economies more flexible and responsive to any future disruptions. While the existing authorities allow for adequate responses in an emergency, the US Government supports the proposed five-year extension of the International Energy Program authorities. The Administration has also propsoed the development of a ten million barrel Defense Petroleum Inventory, financed by the scale of the Naval Petroleum Reserves. Our overall energy security can be strengthened by diversifying our energy sources through decontrolling the natural gas market, reforming nuclear power licensing, removing barries to free energy trade, encouraging new energy technologies and conservation, fostering full and efficient developemnt of domestic oil reserves, and the clean use of our domestic coal resources.

Not Available

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Evaluation of Development Options for Alaska North Slope Viscous and Heavy Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current estimates of discovered viscous and heavy oil in Alaska’s North Slope are 12 billion barrels of oil-in-place and 12–18 billion barrels of oil-in-place, respectively (see Appendix 1 for conversion to SI un...

Emil D. Attanasi; Philip A. Freeman

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Development of a Novel Oxygen Supply Process and its Integration with an Oxy-Fuel Coal-Fired Boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BOC, the world's second largest industrial gas company, has developed a novel high temperature sorption based technology referred to as CAR (Cyclic Autothermal Recovery) for oxygen production and supply to oxy-fuel boilers with flue gas recycle. This technology is based on sorption and storage of oxygen in a fixed bed containing mixed ionic and electronic conductor materials. The objective of the proposed work was to construct a CAR PDU that was capable of producing 10-scfm of oxygen, using steam or recycled flue gas as the sweep gas, and install it in the Combustion Test Facility. The unit was designed and fabricated at BOC/The Linde Group, Murray Hill, New Jersey. The unit was then shipped to WRI where the site had been prepared for the unit by installation of air, carbon dioxide, natural gas, nitrogen, computer, electrical and infrastructure systems. Initial experiments with the PDU consisted of flowing air into both sides of the absorption systems and using the air heaters to ramp up the bed temperatures. The two beds were tested individually to operational temperatures up to 900 C in air. The cycling process was tested where gases are flowed alternatively from the top then bottom of the beds. The PDU unit behaved properly with respect to flow, pressure and heat during tests. The PDU was advanced to the point where oxygen production testing could begin and integration to the combustion test facility could occur.

None

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of the project ''Development And Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' for the duration of the thirteenth project quarter (Oct 1, 2005 to Dec 30, 2005). There are three main tasks in this research project. Task 1 is a scaled physical model study of the GAGD process. Task 2 is further development of a vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 is determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. Section I reports experimental work designed to investigate wettability effects of porous medium, on secondary and tertiary mode GAGD performance. The experiments showed a significant improvement of oil recovery in the oil-wet experiments versus the water-wet runs, both in secondary as well as tertiary mode. When comparing experiments conducted in secondary mode to those run in tertiary mode an improvement in oil recovery was also evident. Additionally, this section summarizes progress made with regard to the scaled physical model construction and experimentation. The purpose of building a scaled physical model, which attempts to include various multiphase mechanics and fluid dynamic parameters operational in the field scale, was to incorporate visual verification of the gas front for viscous instabilities, capillary fingering, and stable displacement. Preliminary experimentation suggested that construction of the 2-D model from sintered glass beads was a feasible alternative. During this reporting quarter, several sintered glass mini-models were prepared and some preliminary experiments designed to visualize gas bubble development were completed. In Section II, the gas-oil interfacial tensions measured in decane-CO{sub 2} system at 100 F and live decane consisting of 25 mole% methane, 30 mole% n-butane and 45 mole% n-decane against CO{sub 2} gas at 160 F have been modeled using the Parachor and newly proposed mechanistic Parachor models. In the decane-CO{sub 2} binary system, Parachor model was found to be sufficient for interfacial tension calculations. The predicted miscibility from the Parachor model deviated only by about 2.5% from the measured VIT miscibility. However, in multicomponent live decane-CO{sub 2} system, the performance of the Parachor model was poor, while good match of interfacial tension predictions has been obtained experimentally using the proposed mechanistic Parachor model. The predicted miscibility from the mechanistic Parachor model accurately matched with the measured VIT miscibility in live decane-CO2 system, which indicates the suitability of this model to predict miscibility in complex multicomponent hydrocarbon systems. In the previous reports to the DOE (15323R07, Oct 2004; 15323R08, Jan 2005; 15323R09, Apr 2005; 15323R10, July 2005 and 154323, Oct 2005), the 1-D experimental results from dimensionally scaled GAGD and WAG corefloods were reported for Section III. Additionally, since Section I reports the experimental results from 2-D physical model experiments; this section attempts to extend this 2-D GAGD study to 3-D (4-phase) flow through porous media and evaluate the performance of these processes using reservoir simulation. Section IV includes the technology transfer efforts undertaken during the quarter. This research work resulted in one international paper presentation in Tulsa, OK; one journal publication; three pending abstracts for SCA 2006 Annual Conference and an invitation to present at the Independents Day session at the IOR Symposium 2006.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Thaer N.N. Mahmoud; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Hydrotreating of oil from eastern oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale provides one of the major fossil energy reserves for the United States. The quantity of reserves in oil shale is less than the quantity in coal, but is much greater (by at least an order of magnitude) than the quantity of crude oil reserves. With so much oil potentially available from oil shale, efforts have been made to develop techniques for its utilization. In these efforts, hydrotreating has proved to be an acceptable technique for upgrading raw shale oil to make usuable products. The present work demonstrated the use of the hydrotreating technique for upgrading an oil from Indiana New Albany oil shale.

Scinta, J.; Garner, J.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Balancing oil and environment... responsibly.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Balancing Oil and Environment…Responsibly As the price of oil continues to skyrocket and global oil production nears the brink, pursuing unconventional oil supplies, such as oil shale, oil sands, heavy oils, and oils from biomass and coal has become increasingly attractive. Of particular significance to the American way is that our continent has significant quantities of these resources. Tapping into these new resources, however, requires cutting-edge technologies for identification, production, processing and environmental management. This job needs a super hero or two for a job of this size and proportion…

Weimer, Walter C.; Teske, Lisa

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

300

On the creation and development of future underwater power supply during reclamation of continental shelf and World Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A description is given of an environmentally friendly electric motor and transformer that operate in seawater and have no analogs in the world, as well as of the future underwater power supply during the developm...

V. I. Vetokhin

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil supply development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

U. S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Supply Annual...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

in Energy Information Administration publications, such as the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and This Week In Petroleum. Northeast Heating Oil...

302

Economic vulnerability to Peak Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Peak Oil, which refers to the maximum possible global oil production rate, is increasingly gaining attention in both science and policy discourses. However, little is known about how this phenomenon will impact economies, despite its apparent imminence and potential dangers. In this paper, we construct a vulnerability map of the U.S. economy, combining two approaches for analyzing economic systems, i.e. input–output analysis and social network analysis (applied to economic data). Our approach reveals the relative importance of individual economic sectors, and how vulnerable they are to oil price shocks. As such, our dual-analysis helps identify which sectors, due to their strategic position, could put the entire U.S. economy at risk from Peak Oil. For the U.S., such sectors would include Iron Mills, Fertilizer Production and Transport by Air. Our findings thus provide early warnings to downstream companies about potential ‘trouble’ in their supply chain, and inform policy action for Peak Oil. Although our analysis is embedded in a Peak Oil narrative, it is just as valid and useful in the context of developing a climate roadmap toward a low carbon economy.

Christian Kerschner; Christina Prell; Kuishuang Feng; Klaus Hubacek

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Conventional Energy (Oil, Gas, and Coal) Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development Best Practices in Indian Country  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CONVENTIONAL ENERGY (OIL, GAS & COAL) FORUM & CONVENTIONAL ENERGY (OIL, GAS & COAL) FORUM & ASSOCIATED VERTICAL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT BEST PRACTICES IN INDIAN COUNTRY March 1, 2012 MANDALAY BAY RESORT AND CASINO NORTH CONVENTION CENTER 3950 Las Vegas Blvd. South, Las Vegas, NV 89119 The dynamic world of conventional energy (focusing on oil, gas and coal energy) is a critical piece of the American energy portfolio. This strategic energy forum will focus on recent trends, existing successful partnerships, and perspectives on the future of conventional energy and how tribal business interests are evolving to meet the interests and needs of new tribal energy economies. The third of a series of planned DOE Office of Indian Energy-sponsored strategic energy development & investment forums, this forum will provide an opportunity for Tribal leaders, federal

304

Petroleum Supply Annual 2005, Volume 1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Table 2. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, 2005 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Field Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports...

305

Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utah?s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utah?s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water ? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary in the subsurface of the Uinta Basin using a combination of water chemistry data collected from various sources and by analyzing geophysical well logs. By re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer using more robust data and more sophisticated computer-based mapping techniques, regulators now have the information needed to more expeditiously grant water disposal permits while still protecting freshwater resources. Part 2: Eastern Uinta Basin gas producers have identified the Birds Nest aquifer, located in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation, as the most promising reservoir suitable for large-volume saline water disposal. This aquifer formed from the dissolution of saline minerals that left behind large open cavities and fractured rock. This new and complete understanding the aquifer?s areal extent, thickness, water chemistry, and relationship to Utah?s vast oil shale resource will help operators and regulators determine safe saline water disposal practices, directly impacting the success of increased hydrocarbon production in the region, while protecting potential future oil shale production. Part 3: In order to establish a baseline of water quality on lands identified by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as having oil shale development potential in the southeastern Uinta Basin, the UGS collected biannual water samples over a three-year period from near-surface aquifers and surface sites. The near-surface and relatively shallow groundwater quality information will help in the development of environmentally sound water-management solutions for a possible future oil shale and oil sands industry and help assess the sensitivity of the alluvial and near-surface bedrock aquifers. This multifaceted study will provide a better understanding of the aquifers in Utah?s Uinta Basin, giving regulators the tools needed to protect precious freshwater resources while still allowing for increased hydrocarbon production.

Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace; Craig Morgan; Stephanie Carney

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

306

Petroleum supply monthly, August 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. Data presented are divided into Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Development, Application and Performance of Venturi Register L. E. A. Burner System for Firing Oil and Gas Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT, APPLICATION AND PERFORMANCE OF VENTURI REGISTER L. E. A. BURNER SYSTEM FOR FIRING OIL AND GAS FUELS A. D. Cawte CEA Combustion, Inc. Stamford, Connecticut INTRODUCTION The effect of reducing excess air as a means of curtailing..., extensive investigation work was undertaken us ing the water analog model techniques developed by Associated British Combustion for burner design. The development work resulted in the burner design known today as the Venturi Register, LEA (low excess air...

Cawte, A. D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Petroleum Supply Monthly - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Supply Monthly Petroleum Supply Monthly With Data for September 2013 | Release Date: November 27, 2013 | Next Release Date: December 30, 2013 Previous Issues Month: November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 prior issues Go Supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products on a national and regional level. The data series describe production, imports and exports, movements and inventories. PDF and CSV files are released first and Petroleum Data Tables are released later on the same day. Tables All Tables All Tables Detailed Statistics Tables National Statistics 1 U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF CSV 2 U.S. Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF CSV

309

'Building on our own abilities' : Suriname's State Oil Company as a development agent.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??abstractThis paper analyses the conditions under which the Surinamese State Oil Company (Staatsolie) has been consolidated, not only as a firm oriented at the production… (more)

W. Hout (Wil)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Development of an integrated decision support system for supporting offshore oil spill response in harsh environments.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Offshore oil spills can lead to significantly negative impacts on socio-economy and constitute a direct hazard to the marine environment and human health. The response… (more)

Li, Pu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Development Of Reclamation Substrates For Alberta Oil Sands Using Mature Fine Tailings And Coke.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Mature fine tailings and coke are waste products of the oil sands industry with potential for reclamation. A greenhouse study assessed whether substrates of various… (more)

Luna-Wolter, Gabriela L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Development of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model for Combustion of Fast Pyrolysis Liquid (Bio-oil).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A study was carried out into the computational fluid dynamic simulation of bio-oil combustion. Measurements were taken in an empirical burner to obtain information regarding… (more)

McGrath, Arran Thomas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Development of Multifunctional Coatings for Protection against Erosion and Corrosion in Qatar Oil and Gas Production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis investigates some of the possible components of a multifunctional coating system to peotectagainst erosion and corrosion for the pipelines in Qatar oil and… (more)

Dizvay, Isin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Retail Diesel Fuel Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Along with heating oil prices, the distillate supply squeeze has Along with heating oil prices, the distillate supply squeeze has severely impacted diesel fuel prices, especially in the Northeast. Diesel fuel is bascially the same product as home heating oil. The primary difference is that diesel has a lower sulfur content. When heating oil is in short supply, low sulfur diesel fuel can be diverted to heating oil supply. Thus, diesel fuel prices rise with heating heating oil prices. Retail diesel fuel prices nationally, along with those of most other petroleum prices, increased steadily through most of 1999. But prices in the Northeast jumped dramatically in the third week of January. Diesel fuel prices in New England rose nearly 68 cents per gallon, or 47 percent, between January 17 and February 7. While EIA does not have

315

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

January 2012 January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 190,109 - - - - 264,348 6,359 12,794 445,596 2,425 0 1,039,424 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 73,905 -587 13,044 6,935 - - -11,335 15,883 8,313 80,436 118,039 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 8,824 -587 - - 1,699 - - -805 4,946 2,754 3,041 16,791 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 65,081 - - 13,044 5,236 - - -10,530 10,937 5,559 77,395 101,248 Ethane/Ethylene

316

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.PDF 3.PDF Table 13. Crude Oil Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks by PAD District, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Process PAD Districts U.S. Total 1 2 3 4 5 Total Daily Average Supply Field Production .................................................... 734 29,902 109,919 12,961 36,593 190,109 6,133 Alaskan ............................................................. - - - - - - - - - 18,374 593 Lower 48 States ................................................ - - - - - 171,734 5,540 Imports (PAD District of Entry) ............................. 26,368 53,695 142,073 10,783 31,429 264,348 8,527 Commercial ...................................................... 26,368 53,695 142,073 10,783 31,429 264,348 8,527 Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) ................. - - - - - - - Net Receipts .........................................................

317

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2012 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 2,374,021 - - - - 3,120,755 53,567 34,134 5,489,516 24,693 0 1,060,764 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 881,306 -6,534 230,413 62,192 - - 23,894 186,270 115,054 842,159 153,268 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 116,002 -6,534 - - 10,680 - - -4,857 63,596 43,136 18,273 12,739 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 765,304 - - 230,413 51,512 - - 28,751 122,674 71,918

318

Economic effects of peak oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assuming that global oil production peaked, this paper uses scenario analysis to show the economic effects of a possible supply shortage and corresponding rise in oil prices in the next decade on different sectors in Germany and other major economies such as the US, Japan, China, the OPEC or Russia. Due to the price-inelasticity of oil demand the supply shortage leads to a sharp increase in oil prices in the second scenario, with high effects on GDP comparable to the magnitude of the global financial crises in 2008/09. Oil exporting countries benefit from high oil prices, whereas oil importing countries are negatively affected. Generally, the effects in the third scenario are significantly smaller than in the second, showing that energy efficiency measures and the switch to renewable energy sources decreases the countries' dependence on oil imports and hence reduces their vulnerability to oil price shocks on the world market.

Christian Lutz; Ulrike Lehr; Kirsten S. Wiebe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Perform research in process development for hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales: Volume 2, Expansion of the Moving-Bed Hydroretorting Data Base for Eastern oil shales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive data base was developed for six Eastern oil shales: Alabama Chattanooga, Indiana New Albany, Kentucky Sunbury, Michigan Antrim, Ohio Cleveland, and Tennessee Chattanooga shales. The data base included the hydroretorting characteristics of the six shales, as well as the retorting characteristics in the presence of synthesis gas and ionized gas. Shale gasification was also successfully demonstrated. Shale fines (20%) can produce enough hydrogen for the hydroretorting of the remaining 80% of the shale. The amount of fines tolerable in a moving bed was also determined. 16 refs., 59 figs., 43 tabs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Oil, economic growth and strategic petroleum stocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An examination of over 40 years of data reveals that oil price shocks are invariably followed by 2–3 years of weak economic growth and weak economic growth is almost always preceded by an oil price shock. This paper reviews why the price-inelastic demand and supply of oil cause oil price shocks and why oil price shocks reduce economic growth through dislocations of labor and capital. This paper also reviews the current state of oil-supply security noting that previous episodes of supply instability appear to have become chronic conditions. While new unconventional oil production technologies have revitalized North American oil production, there are significant barriers to a world-wide uptake of these technologies. Strategic petroleum stocks could provide a large measure of protection to the world economy during an oil supply disruption if they are used promptly and in sufficient volume to prevent large oil-price spikes. Despite the large volume of world-wide emergency reserves, their effectiveness in protecting world economies is not assured. Strategic oil stocks have not been used in sufficient quantity or soon enough to avoid the economic downturns that followed past oil supply outages. In addition, the growth of U.S. oil production has reduced the ability of the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve to protect the economy following a future oil supply disruption. The policy implications of these findings are discussed.

Carmine Difiglio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil supply development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Oil sands development contributes polycyclic aromatic compounds to the Athabasca River and its tributaries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...QA/QC, contamination by diesel fuel, PAC source identification...2009 ) Crude Oil Forecast, Markets and Pipeline Expansions...samples were contam-inated by diesel oil, as indicated by PAC distributions...from brief exposure to high diesel concentrations caused by...

Erin N. Kelly; Jeffrey W. Short; David W. Schindler; Peter V. Hodson; Mingsheng Ma; Alvin K. Kwan; Barbra L. Fortin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Fish Embryos Exposed to Oil From BP Spill Develop Deformities, a Study Finds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

24, 2014 Embryos of tuna and amberjack that were exposed to crude oil collected from the Deepwater of Mexico when the disaster occurred. An explosion and fire nearly four years ago spewed roughly 4.1 million and Australia, affirmed recent studies showing that components of crude oil deformed the embryos of herring

Grosell, Martin

323

Linkages between the markets for crude oil and the markets for refined products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To understand the crude oil price determination process it is necessary to extend the analysis beyond the markets for petroleum. Crude oil prices are determined in two closely related markets: the markets for crude oil and the markets for refined products. An econometric-linear programming model was developed to capture the linkages between the markets for crude oil and refined products. In the LP refiners maximize profits given crude oil supplies, refining capacities, and prices of refined products. The objective function is profit maximization net of crude oil prices. The shadow price on crude oil gives the netback price. Refined product prices are obtained from the econometric models. The model covers the free world divided in five regions. The model is used to analyze the impacts on the markets of policies that affect crude oil supplies, the demands for refined products, and the refining industry. For each scenario analyzed the demand for crude oil is derived from the equilibrium conditions in the markets for products. The demand curve is confronted with a supply curve which maximizes revenues providing an equilibrium solution for both crude oil and product markets. The model also captures crude oil price differentials by quality. The results show that the demands for crude oil are different across regions due to the structure of the refining industries and the characteristics of the demands for refined products. Changes in the demands for products have a larger impact on the markets than changes in the refining industry. Since markets for refined products and crude oil are interrelated they can't be analyzed individually if an accurate and complete assessment of a policy is to be made. Changes in only one product market in one region affect the other product markets and the prices of crude oil.

Didziulis, V.S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Metabolic Engineering and Synthetic Biology in Strain Development Every year, we consume about 27 billion barrels of fossil oil.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

billion barrels of fossil oil. This enormous amount of oil is used for fueling our cars and airplanes

325

Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

playing key role in peak-oil debate, future energy supply.of di?ering views of peak oil, including Yergin’s, isHubbert’s Peak: The Impending World Oil Shortage. Princeton

Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Impact of feeding flaxseed oil on delaying the development of osteoporosis in ovariectomised diabetic rats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work is aimed to study the effect of diabetes on bone health and to evaluate the impact of feeding flaxseed oil on delaying osteoporosis. About 70 female albino rats were included; 30 were ovariectomised (ovx). Experimental diabetes was induced. Rats were classified in groups as control, sham, diabetic, diabetic received flaxseed oil in the diet, ovx, ovx-diabetic and ovx-diabetic received flaxseed oil in the diet. After two months, urine and blood samples were collected. Serum IGF-1 and osteocalcin were increased in ovx and diabetic ovx groups; their lowest levels were detected in the diabetic group. Upon adding flaxseed oil, their mean values were normalised. Urinary deoxypyridinoline was increased in diabetic group; the level was decreased as rats received flaxseed oil. Bone mineral density and content in diabetic group were reduced and normalised after receiving flaxseed oil. So, diabetes has more pronounced effect on bone health than ovariectomy, and flaxseed oil has beneficial effect on the prevention of osteoporosis.

M. Elwassef; M. Anwar; M. Harvi; M.M. Abd El-Moneim; G.S. EL-Saeed; S.I. Salem; H. Wafay

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6, 2013 6, 2013 Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Washington, D.C. - In a project supported and managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), researchers at the University of Alaska Fairbanks have demonstrated that the use of artificial barriers-snow fences-can significantly increase the amount of fresh water supplies in Arctic lakes at a fraction of the cost of bringing in water from nearby lakes. The results promise to enhance environmentally sound development of Alaska's natural resources, lowering the costs of building ice roads used for exploring for oil and natural gas in Alaska. They could also be used to help augment fresh water supplies at remote villages. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the snow drift.

328

Developing safety indicators for preventing offshore oil and gas deepwater drilling blowouts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An important question with respect to the Macondo blowout is whether the accident is a symptom of systemic safety problems in the deepwater drilling industry. An answer to such a question is hard to obtain unless the risk level of the oil and gas (O&G) industry is monitored and evaluated over time. This article presents information and indicators from the Risk Level Project (RNNP) in the Norwegian O&G industry related to safety climate, barriers and undesired incidents, and discusses the relevance for deepwater drilling. The main focus of the major hazard indicators in RNNP is on production installations, whereas only a limited number of incident indicators and barrier indicators are related to mobile drilling units. The number of kicks is an important indicator for the whole drilling industry, because it is an incident with the potential to cause a blowout. Currently, the development and monitoring of safety indicators in the O&G industry seems to be limited to a short list of “accepted” indicators, but there is a need for more extensive monitoring and understanding. This article suggests areas of extensions of the indicators in RNNP for drilling based on experience from the Macondo blowout. The areas are related to schedule and cost, well planning, operational aspects, well incidents, operators’ well response, operational aspects and status of safety critical equipment. Indicators are suggested for some of the areas. For other areas, more research is needed to identify the indicators and their relevance and validity.

Jon Espen Skogdalen; Ingrid B. Utne; Jan Erik Vinnem

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Offered by the Department of Finance and the Center for Executive and Professional Development in the Spears School of Business at Oklahoma State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Houston, TX 9 a.m. Developing Domestic Crude Oil and Refined Products Infrastructure Domestic production oil and refined petroleum products. Michael N. Mears, Chairman, President & CEO, Magellan Midstream supplies of oil and natural gas and the markets that are ready to put those resources to the highest

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

330

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

331

Geology of the Athabasca Oil Sands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...only when reservoir condi-tions...geological at-rocks, cap rocks, oil migration...subsurface reservoir and supplying...reservoir quality of the sands. Porosity. High-grade...reservoir sandstones (5 to 20...the oil. Permeability. The permeability...

Grant D. Mossop

1980-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

332

An energy-economic oil production model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......for more advanced energy-economic models...efficient (less energy intensive) than...hand, Germany's GDP per capita is much larger than...assumption that 100% of energy supply stems from oil. When oil demand is inelastic, this......

Peter Berg; Paul Hanz; Ian Milton

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Development and applications of solids-free oil-in-water drilling fluids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The increasing application of near balanced drilling technology to low-pressure and depleted fractured reservoirs requires the use of low-density drilling fluids to avoid formation damage. Solids-free oil-in-wate...

Qiansheng Yue; Baoguo Ma

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Sustainable development through beneficial use of produced water for the oil and gas industry.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large… (more)

Siddiqui, Mustafa Ashique

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Oil sands development contributes polycyclic aromatic compounds to the Athabasca River and its tributaries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...excessive water withdrawals, pipeline and road crossings that increase erosion and sedimentation...docu-mented. In June 1970, an oil pipeline leak to the Athabasca River...impacts and stated that the program design could not assess cumulative impacts...

Erin N. Kelly; Jeffrey W. Short; David W. Schindler; Peter V. Hodson; Mingsheng Ma; Alvin K. Kwan; Barbra L. Fortin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

STEO October 2012 - home heating supplies  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural gas, propane, and electricity supplies seen plentiful Natural gas, propane, and electricity supplies seen plentiful this winter for U.S. home heating Supplies of the major heating fuels used by most U.S. households are expected to be plentiful this winter, with the possible exception of heating oil, which is consumed mostly by households in the Northeast. Heating oil stocks are expected to be low in the East Coast and Gulf Coast states. And with New York state requiring heating oil with lower sulfur levels for the first time, the heating oil market is expected to be tighter this winter, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's new winter fuels forecast. However, U.S. inventories of natural gas, the most common primary heating fuel used by households and a key fuel for electricity generation, is expected to reach 3.9 trillion cubic feet by

337

Biofuels development in Maine: Using trees to oil the wheels of sustainability -Maine news, sports, obituaries, weather -Bangor Daily News http://bangordailynews.com/2013/03/12/opinion/biofuels-development-in-maine-using-trees-to-oil-the-wheels-of-sustain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biofuels development in Maine: Using trees to oil the wheels of sustainability - Maine news, sports, obituaries, weather - Bangor Daily News http://bangordailynews.com/2013/03/12/opinion/biofuels-development-in-maine-using-trees-to-oil-the-wheels-of-sustainability/print/[3/13/2013 1:54:43 PM] Biofuels development

Thomas, Andrew

338

Development of CFD-Based Simulation Tools for In-Situ Thermal Processing of Oil Shale/Sands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In our research, we are taking the novel approach of developing and applying high performance computing, computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based simulation tools to a modified in-situ process for production of oil from oil shale. The simulation tools being developed capture the relevant physical processes and data from a large-scale system. The modified in-situ application is a pilot-scale heat transfer process inside Red Leaf Resourcesâ?? EcoShale capsule. We demonstrate the need to understand fluid flow behavior in the convective channels of the rubblized shale bed as convective heating greatly decreases the time required to heat the oil shale to the production temperature when compared with conductive heating alone. We have developed and implemented a geometry creation strategy for a representative section of the EcoShale capsule, developed a meshing approach to deal with the complicated geometry and produce a well-behaved mesh, analyzed the effects of boundary conditions on the simulation results, and devised a new operator splitting solution algorithm that reduces computational costs by taking advantage of the differing convective and conductive time scales occurring in the simulation. These simulation tools can be applied to a wide range of processes involving convective fluid flow heating in rubblized beds.

None

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

In an international collaboration, Drs Thomas Roscoe and Ljerka Kunst are developing powerful genetic approaches to identify the mechanisms involved in regulating oil production in seeds. Their  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

genetic approaches to identify the mechanisms involved in regulating oil production in seeds in the regulation of seed oil production in the embryo by the French team; third, the discovery of new information. Their exciting work will lead to the development of new crops for biofuel production As joint project

340

Development of a System for Rapid Detection of Contaminants in Water Supplies Using Magnetic Resonance and Nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To keep the water supply safe and to ensure a swift and accurate response to a water supply contamination event, rapid and robust methods for microbial testing are necessary. Current technologies are complex, lengthy and costly and there is a need for rapid, reliable, and precise approaches that can readily address this fundamental security and safety issue. T2 Biosystems is focused on providing solutions to this problem by making breakthroughs in nanotechnology and biosensor techniques that address the current technical restrictions facing rapid, molecular analysis in complex samples. In order to apply the T2 Biosystems nucleic acid detection procedure to the analysis of nucleic acid targets in unprocessed water samples, Bacillus thuringeinsis was selected as a model organism and local river water was selected as the sample matrix. The initial assay reagent formulation was conceived with a manual magnetic resonance reader, was optimized using a high throughput system, and transferred back to the MR reader for potential field use. The final assay employing the designed and manufactured instruments was capable of detecting 10 CFU/mL of B. thuringiensis directly within the environmental water sample within 90 minutes. Further, discrimination of two closely related species of Bacilli was accomplished using the methods of this project; greater than 3-fold discrimination between B. cereus and B. thuringiensis at a concentrations spanning 10 CFU/mL to 10{sup 5} CFU/mL was observed.

Lowery, Thomas J; Neely, Lori; Chepin, James; Wellman, Parris; Toso, Ken; Murray, Paul; Audeh, Mark; Demas, Vasiliki; Palazzolo, Robert; Min, Michael; Phung, Nu; Blanco, Matt; Raphel, Jordan; O'Neil, Troy

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil supply development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Hydration and strength development of binder based on high-calcium oil shale fly ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash, which are produced in Israeli power stations, were investigated. High-calcium oil shale fly ash was found to contain a great amount of CaO{sub free} and SO{sub 3} in the form of lime and anhydrite. Mixtures of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash, termed fly ash binder, were shown to cure and have improved strength. The influence of the composition and curing conditions on the compressive strength of fly ash binders was examined. The microstructure and the composition of fly ash binder after curing and long-term exposure in moist air, water and open air conditions were studied. It was determined that ettringite is the main variable in the strength and durability of cured systems. The positive effect of calcium silicate hydrates, CSH, which are formed by interaction of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash components, on the carbonation and dehydration resistance of fly ash binder in open air is pronounced. It was concluded that high-calcium oil shale fly ash with high CaO{sub free} and SO{sub 3} content can be used as a binder for building products.

Freidin, C. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede-Boqer (Israel)] [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede-Boqer (Israel)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

OIl Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investor Investor Flows and the 2008 Boom/Bust in Oil Prices Kenneth J. Singleton 1 August 10, 2011 1 Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, kenneths@stanford.edu. This research is the outgrowth of a survey paper I prepared for the Air Transport Association of America. I am grateful to Kristoffer Laursen for research assistance and to Kristoffer and Stefan Nagel for their comments. Abstract This paper explores the impact of investor flows and financial market conditions on returns in crude-oil futures markets. I begin by arguing that informational frictions and the associated speculative activity may induce prices to drift away from "fundamental" values and show increased volatility. This is followed by a discussion of the interplay between imperfect infor- mation about real economic activity, including supply, demand, and inventory accumulation, and speculative

343

DEVELOPMENT OF A VIRTUAL INTELLIGENCE TECHNIQUE FOR THE UPSTREAM OIL INDUSTRY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the research and development work reported in this document was to develop a Virtual Intelligence Technique for optimization of the Preferred Upstream Management Practices (PUMP) for the upstream oil industry. The work included the development of a software tool for identification and optimization of the most influential parameters in upstream common practices as well as geological, geophysical and reservoir engineering studies. The work was performed in cooperation with three independent producing companies--Newfield Exploration, Chesapeake Energy, and Triad Energy--operating in the Golden Trend, Oklahoma. In order to protect data confidentiality, these companies are referred to as Company One, Two, Three in a randomly selected order. These producing companies provided geological, completion, and production data on 320 wells and participated in frequent technical discussions throughout the project. Research and development work was performed by Gas Technology Institute (GTI), West Virginia University (WVU), and Intelligent Solutions Inc. (ISI). Oklahoma Independent Petroleum Association (OIPA) participated in technology transfer and data acquisition efforts. Deliverables from the project are the present final report and a user-friendly software package (Appendix D) with two distinct functions: a characterization tool that identifies the most influential parameters in the upstream operations, and an optimization tool that seeks optimization by varying a number of influential parameters and investigating the coupled effects of these variations. The electronic version of this report is also included in Appendix D. The Golden Trend data were used for the first cut optimization of completion procedures. In the subsequent step, results from soft computing runs were used as the guide for detailed geophysical and reservoir engineering studies that characterize the cause-and-effect relationships between various parameters. The general workflow and the main performing units were as follows: (1) Data acquisition. (GTI, OIPA, Participating producers.) (2) Development of the virtual intelligence software. (WVU, ISI); (3) Application of the software on the acquired data. (GTI, ISI); (4) Detailed production analysis using conventional engineering techniques and the DECICE neural network software. (GTI) and (5) Detailed seismic analysis using Inspect spectral decomposition package and Hapmson-Russell's EMERGE inversion package. (GTI) Technology transfer took place through several workshops held at offices of the participating companies, at OIPA offices, and presentations at the SPE panel on soft computing applications and at the 2003 annual meeting of Texas Independent Producers and Royalty Owners Association (TIPRO). In addition, results were exhibited at the SPE annual meeting, published in GasTips, and placed on the GTI web page. Results from the research and development work were presented to the producing companies as a list of recommended recompletion wells and the corresponding optimized operations parameters. By the end of the project, 16 of the recommendations have been implemented the majority of which resulted in increased production rates to several folds. This constituted a comprehensive field demonstration with positive results.

Iraj A. Salehi; Shahab D. Mohaghegh; Samuel Ameri

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Africa: Unrest and restrictive terms limit abundant potential. [Oil and gas exploration and development in Africa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the drilling and exploration activity of the oil and gas industries of Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, Nigeria, Cameroon, Gabon, the Congo, Angola, and South Africa. Information is provided on current and predicted trends in well drilling activities (both onshore and offshore), numbers of new wells, footage information, production statistics and what fields accounted for this production, and planned new exploration activities. The paper also describes the current status of government policies and political problems affecting the oil and gas industry.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Framing and Identity in the Gwich’in Campaign against Oil Development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1995). Time to permit oil drilling in the Arctic Refuge (campaign against oil drilling in the Arctic National case.   Although oil exploration and drilling has, to this 

Graybeal, Pam M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Deepwater Horizon crude oil impacts the developing hearts of large predatory pelagic fish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Although subsurface application of dispersant near the wellhead resulted in retention of a considerable portion...634 . 2 Kujawinski EB ( 2011 ) Fate of dispersants associated with the Deepwater Horizon oil spill . Environ...receptor/aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator pathway causes developmental...

John P. Incardona; Luke D. Gardner; Tiffany L. Linbo; Tanya L. Brown; Andrew J. Esbaugh; Edward M. Mager; John D. Stieglitz; Barbara L. French; Jana S. Labenia; Cathy A. Laetz; Mark Tagal; Catherine A. Sloan; Abigail Elizur; Daniel D. Benetti; Martin Grosell; Barbara A. Block; Nathaniel L. Scholz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

21, 2008. Ying, Wang. “ China, Venezuela firms to co-developApril 21, “China and Venezuela sign oil agreements. ” Chinaaccessed April 21, “Venezuela and China sign oil deal. ” BBC

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Investigation and development of alternative methods for shale oil processing and analysis. Final technical report, October 1979--April 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale, a carbonaceous rock which occurs abundantly in the earth`s crust, has been investigated for many years as an alternate source of fuel oil. The insoluble organic matter contained in such shales is termed {open_quotes}Kerogen{close_quotes} from the Greek meaning oil or oil forming. The kerogen in oil shale breaks down into oil-like products when subjected to conditions simulating destructive distillation. These products have been the subject of extensive investigations by several researchers and many of the constituents of shale oil have been identified. (1) Forsman (2) estimates that the kerogen content of the earth is roughly 3 {times} 10{sup 15} tons as compared to total coal reserves of about 5 {times} 10{sup 12}. Although the current cost per barrel estimate for commercial production of shale oil is higher than that of fossil oil, as our oil reserves continue to dwindle, shale oil technology will become more and more important. When oil shale is heated, kerogen is said to undergo chemical transformation to usable oil in two steps (3): Kerogen (in oil shale) 300-500{degrees}C bitumen. Crude shale oil and other products. The crude shale oil so obtained differs from fossil oil in that: (1) kerogen is thought to have been produced from the aging of plant matter over many years; (2) shale oil has a higher nitrogen content than fossil oil; (3) non-hydrocarbons are present to a much greater extent in shale oil; and (4) the hydrocarbons in shale oil are much more unsaturated than those in fossil oil (petroleum).

Evans, R.A.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Oil Price Volatility  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Speculation and Oil Price Volatility Speculation and Oil Price Volatility Robert J. Weiner Robert J. Weiner Professor of International Business, Public Policy & Professor of International Business, Public Policy & Public Administration, and International Affairs Public Administration, and International Affairs George Washington University; George Washington University; Membre Associ Membre Associ Ă© Ă© , GREEN, Universit , GREEN, Universit Ă© Ă© Laval Laval EIA Annual Conference Washington Washington 7 April 2009 7 April 2009 1 FACTORS DRIVNG OIL PRICE VOLATILITY FACTORS DRIVNG OIL PRICE VOLATILITY â–ş â–ş Market fundamentals Market fundamentals . . Fluctuations in supply, Fluctuations in supply, demand, and market power demand, and market power Some fundamentals related to expectations of Some fundamentals related to expectations of

350

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

in in the Office of Oil and Gas (OOG) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) showed an improvement in the accuracy of the 2006 data from initial estimates, to interim values, to final values. These data were presented in a series of PD products: the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), This Week in Petroleum (TWIP), the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM), and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Weekly estimates in the WPSR and TWIP were the first values available. Figure FE1 illustrates that just as there was an improvement in gas mileage over time, there was an improvement in petroleum supply data accuracy with increasing review time. For the monthly-from-weekly (MFW) data, respondents have the shortest reporting time, analysts have the shortest review time, and the data are least accurate. For the PSM data, respondents have a longer reporting time than the weekly, analysts have

351

Petroleum supply monthly, August 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

Not Available

1994-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

352

Oil & Gas Research | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Research Research Oil & Gas Research Section 999 Report to Congress DOE issues the 2013 annual plan for the ultra-deepwater and unconventional fuels program. Read more DOE Signs MOU with Alaska New accord to help develop Alaska's potentially vast and important unconventional energy resources. Read more Methane Hydrate R&D DOE is conducting groundbreaking research to unlock the energy potential of gas hydrates. Read more LNG Safety Research Report This Report to Congress summarizes the progress of DOE's LNG safety research Read more FE's Office of Oil & Natural Gas supports research and policy options to ensure environmentally sustainable domestic and global supplies of oil and natural gas. Resource/Safety R&D Hydraulic Fracturing & Shale Gas Research. Natural gas from shales has the

353

Petroleum Supply Annual 1998, Volume 2  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, Volume 2 8, Volume 2 Entire . The entire report as a single file. PDF 3.8MB . . Front Matter . Cover Page, Contacts, Preface, and Table of Contents Page PDF . . Monthly Statistics Tables . National Statistics 1 U.S. Petroleum Balance PDF TXT 2 U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF TXT 3 U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Stocks PDF TXT . Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 4 PAD District I PDF TXT 5 Daily Average PAD District I PDF TXT 6 PAD District II PDF TXT 7 Daily Average PAD District II PDF TXT 8 PAD District III PDF TXT 9 Daily Average PAD District III PDF TXT 10 PAD District IV PDF TXT 11 Daily Average PAD District IV PDF TXT 12 PAD District V PDF TXT

354

China's new oil import status underpins world's most dynamic petroleum scene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

China is poised to become a net importer of oil in 1994--95. That sets the stage for China importing more than 1 million b/d of crude oil and refined products on a net basis by the turn of the century. That development underpins a bigger story -- arguably the biggest story on the petroleum scene today. The turnabout that is seeing the world's fifth biggest oil producer go from significant oil exporter in recent years to major oil importer by the turn of the century points to several other truisms in the petroleum industry: That an oil demand surge in the Asia-Pacific region led by China will fuel overall world oil demand growth for years to come; that a refining and petrochemical boom in a country that accounts for about one fifth of the world's population has dramatic implications for those two industries; that privatization has gathered so much momentum in the global petroleum industry that even Communist China has embraced some form of it; that China's domestic crude supply shortfall is creating unprecedented opportunities for foreign upstream investors in one of the world's most prospective yet underexplored and underexploited regions; and that the same new openness that is distinguishing China's petroleum industry today is turning some of its state owned companies into major competitors to be reckoned with on the international scene, upstream and downstream. The paper discusses China's oil export/import balance, supply/demand outlook, policy changes, and new regulations governing export of crude oil and products.

Not Available

1994-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

355

Oil and development in the Arabian Gulf: A selected annotated bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This past decade has witnessed a vast proliferation of literature on the Arabian Gulf region. In this book the author provides a systematic guide to the literature in order to assist those conducting research on the area. The author is primarily concerned with the national, regional and international role of Arabian Gulf oil between 1973 and 1983. He includes more general sources, however, if they are partly devoted to the subject or if they provide information essential to the understanding of the particular economic systems or the place of Arabian Gulf oil within the world energy situation. Sources of a technical nature have been excluded, such as those dealing with the science and technology of Arab oil. The main languages of the material selected for inclusion are English and Arabic, with French, German, Italian, and Spanish sources in smaller number. The Arabic sources are appended separately after the Western language sections in each chapter. The sources of information cited include books, monographs, articles, journals, theses, annual reports, directories, government documents, and various unpublished papers and documents.

Sharif, W.I.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Table A14. Oil and gas supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

price: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Petroleum Marketing Monthly, DOEEIA- 0380(201308) (Washington, DC, August 2013). 2011 and 2012 lower 48 onshore, lower...

357

Supply Chain Management Faculty Brian Fugate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relationships, strategy and sustainability in the supply chain, and she won the College of Business Excellence involvement in new product development, and sustainability practices in supply chain management. He has

358

Development of an Energy System Model in Jiangsu Region with MARKAL: An Analysis of the Supply Side  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Research, conducted in collaboration with Department of Mechanical Engineer of Southeast University of Nanjing situated in the Jangsu Region, has been developed over a period of three years in the ambit of Sc...

Vincenzo Naso; Flavio Rottenberg

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Impacts of Sedimentation from Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds of the Allegheny National Forest of Northwestern Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fritz, Kelley'*, Steven Harris', Harry Edenborn2, and James Sams2. 'Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA 16214, 2National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236. Impacts a/Sedimentation/rom Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds a/the Allegheny National Forest a/Northwestern Pennsylvania - The Allegheny National Forest (ANF), located in northwestern Pennsy Ivania, is a multiuse forest combining commercial development with recreational and conservation activities. As such, portions of the ANF have been heavily logged and are now the subject of widespread oil and gas development. This rapid increase in oil and gas development has led to concerns about sediment runoff from the dirt and gravel roads associated with development and the potential impact on the aquatic biota of the receiving streams. We examined and compared the benthic macroinvertebrate communities in two adjacent watersheds of similar size and topography in the ANF; the Hedgehog Run watershed has no oil and gas development, while the adjacent Grunder Run watershed has extensive oil and gas development. In Hedgehog and Grunder Run, we collected monthly kicknet samples from riffles and glides at two sites from April to October 2010. At the same intervals, we measured standard water quality parameters, including conductivity and turbidity. Preliminary results have indicated much higher turbidity in Grunder Run, but little difference in the diversity and abundance of benthic macro invertebrates inhabiting the two streams.

Fritz, K.; Harris, S.; Edenborn, H.M.; Sams, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Information on the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve is available from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Petroleum Reserves web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/reserves/heatingoil/. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR) inventories now classified as ultra-low sulfur distillate (15 parts per million) are not considered to be in the commercial sector and therefore are excluded from distillate fuel oil supply and disposition statistics in Energy Information Administration publications, such as the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and This Week In Petroleum. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Terminal Operator Location (Thousand Barrels) Hess Corp. Groton, CT 500*

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil supply development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Soybean Oil as Diesel Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soybean Oil as Diesel Fuel ... TESTS are reported from Japan on the use of soybean oil as Diesel fuel in a 12-horsepower engine of 150-mm. ... This trouble was overcome by passing through some of the Diesel cooling water to heat the fuel tank and supply line. ...

C.H.S. TUPHOLME

1940-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

362

Petroleum supply monthly, September 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administrations for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics. 65 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

363

Petroleum supply monthly, October 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

Not Available

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

364

Petroleum Supply Monthly, August 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) district movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics.

Not Available

1990-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

365

The world energy supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The pattern of the world's energy supply has undergone dramatic changes over the last century, and particularly over the last twenty years. The growth in the world's population and the ever-greater demand for energy will lead to the global environment being subjected to considerable strain. The world will require a new type of energy system, one that is technically feasible, but which will face many difficulties in gaining social and economic acceptance. The world's future energy supply will depend upon the rational exploitation of resources and the development of high technical standards in the fields of reliability and safety. The required social changes will include a change to more energy-conserving life styles and a strengthening of international co-operation in long-term energy and environmental research and development.

L.H.Th. Rietjens

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

STEO September 2012 - oil production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

oil production forecast to rise almost 700,000 bpd this oil production forecast to rise almost 700,000 bpd this year, help cut U.S. petroleum imports U.S. crude oil production is expected to average 6.3 million barrels per day in 2012. That's up nearly 700,000 barrels per day from last year and the highest annual oil output since 1997 says the U.S. Energy Information Administration in its new monthly short-term energy outlook for September. EIA analyst Sam Gorgen explains: "Higher oil supplies, especially from North Dakota and Texas, boosted U.S. oil production. The number of on-shore drilling rigs targeting oil nationwide has increased by around 200 so far this year to just under 1,400 rigs." Higher domestic oil production will help cut U.S. petroleum imports. The share of total U.S.

367

Regional Residential Heating Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

One of the first places where consumers are feeling the impact of One of the first places where consumers are feeling the impact of this winter's market pressures is in home heating oil prices. This chart shows prices through February 28, the most recent EIA data available. The general level of heating oil prices each year is largely a function of crude oil prices, and the price range over the course of the heating season is typically about 10 cents per gallon. Exceptions occur in unusual circumstances, such as very cold weather, large changes in crude oil prices, or supply problems. Heating oil prices for East Coast consumers started this winter at just over $1 per gallon, but rising crude oil prices drove them up nearly 21 cents through mid-January. With the continuing upward pressure from crude oil markets, magnified by a regional shortfall of heating oil

368

The Supply Chain as a Dynamical System CAPD EWO Seminar, Feb. 28 3, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

balancing and self-optimization 4. The Adaptive Enterprise 5. Current problems Oil and gas field management tank tank mixer reactor column column column product product waste supply supply recycle stream #12

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

369

Water supply and demand in an energy supply model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a tool for water and energy-related policy analysis, the development of a water supply and demand sector in a linear programming model of energy supply in the United States. The model allows adjustments in the input mix and plant siting in response to water scarcity. Thus, on the demand side energy conversion facilities can substitute more costly dry cooling systems for conventional evaporative systems. On the supply side groundwater and water purchased from irrigators are available as more costly alternatives to unappropriated surface water. Water supply data is developed for 30 regions in 10 Western states. Preliminary results for a 1990 energy demand scenario suggest that, at this level of spatial analysis, water availability plays a minor role in plant siting. Future policy applications of the modeling system are discussed including the evaluation of alternative patterns of synthetic fuels development.

Abbey, D; Loose, V

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Perform research in process development for hydroretorting of eastern oil shales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Six bulk samples of eastern oil shale were taken from the Clegg Creek Member of the New Albany Shale in northwestern Kentucky, the Chattanooga Shale in northern Alabama, the Gassaway Member of the Chattanooga Shale in central Tennessee, the Antrim Shale in northeastern Michigan, the Cleveland Member of the Ohio Shale in central Ohio, and the Sunbury Shale in eastern Kentucky. A seventh sample of Clegg Creek from southern Indiana had been sampled earlier. The stratigraphic position of all bulk samples was documented using both outcrops and subsurface control; at five sites stratigraphic test holes were cored and logged. Surface gamma was run on the cores before slabbing. The representative character of the Tennessee sample was assured by recovering the required weight in four cores. Obtaining representative bulk samples at other sites often required adapting channel sampling techniques to earth moving equipment, reducing an initial sample by hand methods, and minimizing contamination throughout the sampling operation. Cores were assayed for carbon and Fischer Assay oil yield both on a selected per foot basis as composites. 29 refs., 25 figs., 7 tabs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Challenge # 2 Logistics and Compatibility with Existing Infrastructure Throughout Supply Chain  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation on Challenge # 2 Logistics and Compatibility with Existing Infrastructure Throughout Supply Chain on May 9, 2012, at the Pyrolysis Oil Workshop.

372

Total OECD Oil Stocks*  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low levels. EIA expects inventories to remain low through the coming year. This increases the potential for price volatility through the rest of the winter, and into the next gasoline season. Inventories are a good measure of the supply/demand balance that affects prices. A large over-supply (production greater than demand) will put downward pressure on prices, while under-supply will push prices upward. As global oil production changed relative to demand, the world moved from a period of over-supply in 1998 to one of under-supply in 1999 and 2000. OECD inventories illustrate the changes in the world petroleum balance. OECD inventories rose to high levels during 1997 and 1998 when production exceeded demand and prices dropped to around $10 per barrel in

373

Total OECD Oil Stocks*  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low levels. EIA expects inventories to remain low through the coming year. This increases the potential for price volatility through the winter, and even extending to the next gasoline season. Inventories are a good measure of the supply/demand balance that effects prices. A large over-supply (production greater than demand) will put downward pressure on prices, while under-supply will push prices upward. As global oil production changed relative to demand, the world moved from a period of over-supply in 1998 to one of under-supply in 1999 and 2000. OECD inventories illustrate the changes in the world petroleum balance. OECD inventories rose to high levels during 1997 and 1998 when production exceeded demand and prices dropped to around $10 per barrel in

374

Total OECD Oil Stocks*  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low levels. EIA expects inventories to remain low through the coming year. This increases the potential for price volatility through the winter, and even extending to the next gasoline season. Inventories are a good measure of the supply/demand balance that effects prices. A large over-supply (production greater than demand) will put downward pressure on prices, while under-supply will push prices upward. As global oil production changed relative to demand, the world moved from a period of over-supply in 1998 to one of under-supply in 1999 and 2000. OECD inventories illustrate the changes in the world petroleum balance. OECD inventories rose to high levels during 1997 and 1998 when production exceeded demand and prices dropped to around $10 per barrel in

375

Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market. Draft final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (``OPA``) and an even more problematic array of State pollution laws have raised the cost, and risk, of carrying oil into and out of the US. This report, prepared under contract to the US Department of energy`s Office of Domestic and International Policy, examines the impact of Federal and State oil spill legislation on the tanker market. It reviews the role of marine transportation in US oil supply, explores the OPA and State oil spill laws, studies reactions to OPA in the tanker and tank barge industries and in related industries such as insurance and ship finance, and finally, discusses the likely developments in the years ahead. US waterborne oil imports amounted to 6.5 million B/D in 1991, three-quarters of which was crude oil. Imports will rise by almost 3 million B/D by 2000 according to US Department of energy forecasts, with most of the crude oil growth after 1995. Tanker demand will grow even faster: most of the US imports and the increased traffic to other world consuming regions will be on long-haul trades. Both the number of US port calls by tankers and the volume of offshore lightering will grow. Every aspect of the tanker industry`s behavior is affected by OPA and a variety of State pollution laws.

Rowland, P.J. [Rowland (P.) Associates (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Petroleum supply annual 1993. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1993 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1993, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Distributed Reforming of Biomass Pyrolysis Oils: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-06-00192  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is for Chevron and NREL to collaborate in determining the effect of bio-oil composition variability on autothermal reforming performance including bio-oil volatilization, homogeneous oxidative cracking, and catalytic reforming.

Czernik, S.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Natural Oils - The Next Generation of Diesel Engine Lubricants...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Aftertreatment with a Oil Conditioning Filter Effect of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on Diesel Engine Oil - Impact on Wear Development of High Performance Heavy Duty Engine Oils...

379

ARCHIVE MAP CASE Inventory DRAWER 1 Archive supplies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARCHIVE MAP CASE Inventory DRAWER 1 Archive supplies DRAWER 2 Empty DRAWER 3 Empty DRAWER 4 Cyrus Road Cars Oil Man #12;DRAWER 9 Michael Wallis papers oversize Promotional posters and banners for Cars

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

380

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for for IEA Bilateral Meetings March 14, 2013 | Paris, France by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski, IEA Bilateral Meetings, March 14, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil supply development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Association of Money Managers Washington Association of Money Managers April 18, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays has steep decline curves Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin - production grows with continued drilling Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013

382

Analytical questions for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

For For Consumer Energy Alliance February 21, 2013 | Washington, D.C. By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski February 21, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

383

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Council on Foreign Relations Council on Foreign Relations April 11, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , CFR, April 11, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , CFR, April 11, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: Drilling Info history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

384

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

IFRI IFRI March 14, 2013 | Paris, France by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski , IFRI March 14, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 U.S. primary energy consumption quadrillion Btu Adam Sieminski , IFRI March 14, 2013 History Projections 2011 36% 20%

385

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

FLAME Natural Gas & LNG Conference FLAME Natural Gas & LNG Conference March 13, 2013 | Amsterdam, Netherlands by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski , FLAME March 13, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

386

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Baltimore Chartered Financial Analyst Society Baltimore Chartered Financial Analyst Society April 08, 2013 | Baltimore, MD By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski, Baltimore CFA Society April 08, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

387

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

American Petroleum Institute American Petroleum Institute April 04, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , API, April 04, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , API, April 04, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: DrillingInfo history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

388

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

CERAWEEK 2013, North American Energy CERAWEEK 2013, North American Energy March 06, 2013 | Houston, TX by Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , CERAWEEK, March 06, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , CERAWEEK, March 06, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: DrillingInfo history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

389

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Platts - North American Crude Marketing Conference Platts - North American Crude Marketing Conference March 01, 2013 | Houston, TX by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 Adam Sieminski , Platts, March 01, 2013 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 U.S. primary energy consumption quadrillion Btu

390

DEVELOPMENT OF MICROORGANISMS WITH IMPROVED TRANSPORT AND BIOSURFACTANT ACTIVITY FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biosurfactants enhance hydrocarbon biodegradation by increasing apparent aqueous solubility or affecting the association of the cell with poorly soluble hydrocarbon. Here, we show that a lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Bacillus mojavensis strain JF-2 mobilized substantial amounts of residual hydrocarbon from sand-packed columns when a viscosifying agent and a low molecular weight alcohol were present. The amount of residual hydrocarbon mobilized depended on the biosurfactant concentration. One pore volume of cell-free culture fluid with 900 mg/l of the biosurfactant, 10 mM 2,3-butanediol and 1000 mg/l of partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide polymer mobilized 82% of the residual hydrocarbon. Consistent with the high residual oil recoveries, we found that the bio-surfactant lowered the interfacial tension (IFT) between oil and water by nearly 2 orders of magnitude compared to typical IFT values of 28-29 mN/m. Increasing the salinity increased the IFT with or without 2,3-butanediol present. The lowest interfacial tension observed was 0.1 mN/m. The lipopeptide biosurfactant system may be effective in removing hydrocarbon contamination sources in soils and aquifers and for the recovery of entrapped oil from low production oil reservoirs. Previously, we reported that Proteose peptone was necessary for anaerobic growth and biosurfactant production by B. mojavensis JF-2. The data gathered from crude purification of the growth-enhancing factor in Proteose peptone suggested that it consisted of nucleic acids; however, nucleic acid bases, nucleotides or nucleosides did not replace the requirement for Proteose Peptone. Further studies revealed that salmon sperm DNA, herring sperm DNA, Echerichia coli DNA and synthetic DNA replaced the requirement for Proteose peptone. In addition to DNA, amino acids and nitrate were required for anaerobic growth and vitamins further improved growth. We now have a defined medium that can be used to manipulate growth and biosurfactant production. As an initial step in the search for a better biosurfactant-producing microorganism, 157 bacterial strains were screened for biosurfactant production under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. A hundred and forty seven strains produced either equal or higher amounts of biosurfactant compared to B. mojavensis JF-2 and the 10 best strains were chosen for further study. In an attempt to increase biosurfactant production, a genetic recombination experiment was conducted by mixing germinating spores of four of the best strains with B. mojavensis JF-2. Biosurfactant production was higher with the mixed spore culture than in the cocultures containing B. mojavensis JF-2 and each of the other 4 strains or in a mixed culture containing all five strains that had not undergone genetic exchange. Four isolates were obtained from the mixed spores culture that gave higher biosurfactant production than any of the original strains. Repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction analysis showed differences in the band pattern for these strains compared to the parent strains, suggesting the occurrence of genetic recombination. We have a large collection of biosurfactant-producing microorganisms and a natural mechanism to improve biosurfactant production in these organisms.

M.J. McInerney; R.M. Knapp; D.P. Nagle, Jr.; Kathleen Duncan; N. Youssef; M.J. Folmsbee; S. Maudgakya

2003-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

391

Projects Selected to Boost Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Projects Selected to Boost Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources Projects Selected to Boost Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources Projects Selected to Boost Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources September 27, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Ten projects focused on two technical areas aimed at increasing the nation's supply of "unconventional" fossil energy, reducing potential environmental impacts, and expanding carbon dioxide (CO2) storage options have been selected for further development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The projects include four that would develop advanced computer simulation and visualization capabilities to enhance understanding of ways to improve production and minimize environmental impacts associated with unconventional energy development; and six seeking to further next

392

Utah Heavy Oil Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

393

Water issues associated with heavy oil production.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

394

Petroleum supply annual 1993. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1993 through annual and monthly surveys. This second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1993.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Development of neural network models for the prediction of dewpoint pressure of retrograde gases and saturated oil viscosity of black oil systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Initial Reservoir Conditionst c pt Pat ol Prodo lion E ~ I 0 e o epItr Conditions rrem pereture Fig. 2. 1 A schematic phase diagram for a gas condensate reservoir Several studies have been camed out to evaluate the phenomena of retrograde.... pressure. This correlation is applicable only for gas/oil ratio of 15, 000-40, 000 sfc/STB, for temperature of 100-220 'F, and for API oil gravity in the range of 52" ? 64". Organick and Golding' (1952) presented a simple correlation for the prediction...

Gonzalez Zambrano, Alfredo Antonio

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

396

OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seyitömer, Himmeto?lu and Hat?lda? oil shale deposits. The results demonstrate that these oil shales are

Fields (in-situ Combustion Approach; M. V. Kök; G. Guner; S. Bagci?

398

Middle East fuel supply & gas exports for power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Middle East countries that border on, or are near, the Persian Gulf hold over 65% of the world`s estimated proven crude oil reserves and 32% of the world`s estimated proven natural gas reserves. In fact, approximately 5% of the world`s total proven gas reserves are located in Qatar`s offshore North Field. This large natural gas/condensate field is currently under development to supply three LNG export projects, as well as a sub-sea pipeline proposal to export gas to Pakistan. The Middle East will continue to be a major source of crude oil and oil products to world petroleum markets, including fuel for existing and future base load, intermediate cycling and peaking electric generation plants. In addition, as the Persian Gulf countries turn their attention to exploiting their natural gas resources, the fast-growing need for electricity in the Asia-Pacific and east Africa areas offers a potential market for both pipeline and LNG export opportunities to fuel high efficiency, gas-fired combustion turbine power plants. Mr. Mitchell`s portion of this paper will discuss the background, status and timing of several Middle Eastern gas export projects that have been proposed. These large gas export projects are difficult and costly to develop and finance. Consequently, any IPP developers that are considering gas-fired projects which require Mid-East LNG as a fuel source, should understand the numerous sources and timing to securing project debt, loan terms and conditions, and, restrictions/credit rating issues associated with securing financing for these gas export projects. Mr. Newendorp`s section of the paper will cover the financing aspects of these projects, providing IPP developers with additional considerations in selecting the primary fuel supply for an Asian-Pacific or east African electric generation project.

Mitchell, G.K. [Merrimack Energy Co., LTD, Lowell, MA (United States); Newendorp, T. [Taylor-DeJongh, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

The impact of oil prices on income and energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The major determinant of real income growth in Korea is real oil prices, followed by money supply, exchange rates, ... longer horizon, the effects of exchange rates, oil prices, government spending, and money sup...

Young U. Glasure; Aie-Rie Lee

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

How international oil and gas companies respond to local content policies in petroleum-producing developing countries: A narrative enquiry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper uses narrative analysis to critically examine the business practices used by five international oil and gas companies (IOCs) (Chevron, ExxonMobil, Shell, BP and Total) to respond to local content policies in petroleum-producing developing countries (Nigeria, Angola, Venezuela, Kazakhstan, Brazil, Indonesia, Yemen and Indonesia) during the period 2000–2012. The business practices include the formulation of local content strategies that are implemented through programmes and initiatives aimed at developing and using host country suppliers and workforce. Such practices and the narratives used to communicate them implicitly reflect the context in which the effectiveness of local content policies on economic development can be assessed. By comparing and contrasting the narratives across the five \\{IOCs\\} in relation to the wider literature, four emergent narrative strategies justifying the business practices of \\{IOCs\\} are identified and discussed. They include: (1) direct engagement to renegotiate local content requirements with governments, (2) legal compliance framework, (3) the business case for local content strategies, and (4) corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives. The conclusion considers the policy implications of these findings for local content development in petroleum-producing developing countries.

Michael Zisuh Ngoasong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil supply development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Vertical pump turbine oil environmental evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Oregon low-temperature geothermal injection well construction, siting and receiving formations requires approval by the Water Resources Department (OWRD). In addition, the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) has regulations concerning injection. Conversations with the OWRD and ODEQ representatives indicated they were very concerned about the potential for contamination of the geothermal (and cooler but hydraulically connected) aquifers by oils and grease. Their primary concern was over the practice of putting paraffin, motor oils and other hydrocarbons in downhole heat exchanger (DHE) wells to prevent corrosion. They also expressed considerable concern about the use of oil in production well pumps since the fluids pumped would be injected. Oregon (and Idaho) prohibit the use of oil-lubricated pumps for public water supplies except in certain situations where non-toxic food-grade lubricants are used. Since enclosed-lineshaft oil-lubricated pumps are the mainstay of direct-use pumping equipment, the potential for restricting their use became a concern to the Geo-Heat Center staff. An investigation into alternative pump lubrication schemes and development of rebuttals to potential restrictions was proposed and approved as a contract task. (SM)

Culver, G.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Petroluem Supply Monthly, May 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

Not Available

1993-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

403

Petroleum Supply Monthly, July 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

Not Available

1990-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

404

NETL: News Release - DOE's Oil and Gas Produced-Water Program Logs Key  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

July 20, 2007 July 20, 2007 DOE's Oil and Gas Produced-Water Program Logs Key Milestones Cost-Effectively Treating Coproduced Water Boosts U.S. Energy, Water Supplies MORGANTOWN, WV - A research program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is making significant progress in developing new ways to treat and use water coproduced with oil and natural gas. The ultimate benefit is a two-for-one solution that expects to boost domestic energy supplies while enhancing the Nation's water supply. Coproduced water-some of which occurs naturally in subsurface formations, and some that is recovered following injection of water into an oil or gas reservoir to boost production-accounts for 98 percent of all waste generated by U.S. oil and natural gas operations. Produced-water volumes average nine barrels for each barrel of oil produced. Handling, treating, and safely disposing of this produced water has been a tough, costly challenge for oil and natural gas producers for decades. Much of the produced water has high concentrations of minerals or salts that make it unsuitable for beneficial use or surface discharge. An oilfield operator often must reinject such produced water into deep formations, sometimes resorting to costly trucking of the water to deep-injection well sites specially designated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

405

Propylene feedstock: supply and demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reasons for the global shortage in propylene in 1981-82 are discussed. The low running rates of ethylene production and refinery operation of which propylene is a byproduct accounts for the reduced propylene supplies. Low prices of the NCL have also shifted incentive from propylene to gas liquids. This situation will continue, with naptha/gas oil becoming the prefered feedstock for ethylene production. The speculative economics for propylene dehydrogenation are not sufficiently attractive for commercialization. But if a country has an internal market for propylene derivatives, production could have a positive influence on the economy. Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Mexico are suggested as examples.

Steinbaum, C.A.; Pickover, B.H.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Measuring Dependence on Imported Oil  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dependence on Imported Oil Dependence on Imported Oil by C. William Skinner* U.S. dependence on imported oil** can be measured in at least two ways. The differences hinge largely on whether oil imports are defined as net imports (total imports minus exports) or as total imports. EIA believes that the net-imports definition gives a clearer indication of the fraction of oil consumed that could not have been supplied from domestic sources and is thus the most appropriate measure. With this issue of the Monthly Energy Review, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) introduces a revised table that expresses depend- ence on imports in terms of both measures. How dependent is the United States on foreign oil? How dependent are we on oil from the Persian Gulf or other sensitive areas? Do we import more than we produce domes-

407

Regional Residential Heating Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Slide 2 of 11 Notes: One of the first places where consumers are feeling the impact of this winterÂ’s market pressures is in home heating oil prices. This chart shows prices through February 7, the most recent EIA data available. The general level of heating oil prices each year is largely a function of crude oil prices, and the price range over the course of the heating season is typically about 10 cents per gallon. Exceptions occur in unusual circumstances, such as very cold weather, large changes in crude oil prices, or supply problems. Heating oil prices for East Coast consumers started this winter at just over $1 per gallon, but rising crude oil prices drove them up nearly 21 cents per gallon through mid-January. With the continuing upward pressure from crude oil markets, magnified by a regional shortfall of

408

DEMOCRACY OVER A BARREL: OIL, REGIME CHANGE AND WAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wars and where the security of oil supplies could once beoil. Once thriving and self-supporting villages have been made completely unlivable, security

Karl, Terry

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Oil and gas developments in central and southern Africa in 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fewer wells and less footage were drilled in 1986 compared to 1985. Total drilling decreased by 23% as 217 wells were completed compared to 289 in 1985. Footage drilled during 1986 declined by 52%; about 1.3 million ft were drilled compared to about 2.7 million feet in 1985. The success rate for exploration wells of 34% during 1986 is due to considerably higher success rates in Nigeria and Gabon compared to 1985. Significant discoveries were made in Nigeria, Angola, Congo, and Gabon. Seismic acquisition was the major geophysical activity during 1986. Seismic activity (2-D and 3-D) decreased by 12% to about 230 crew-months. Total 2-D seismic kilometers recorded increased by 26% to about 82,000 km due to significant 2-D marine seismic activity in Nigeria and Angola. Surface geology, photogeology, geochemistry, gravimetry, and aeromagnetic surveys decreased compared to 1985. Total oil production in 1986 was 834 million bbl (about 2.2 million BOPD), an increase of 2%, with the most significant increased in Cameroon and Angola. The production share of OPEC countries (Nigeria and Gabon) versus non-OPEC countries increased to 72% in 1986 compared to 67% in 1985. 32 figures, 5 tables.

Hartman, J.B.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

11 California Petroleum Supply, Transportation, Refining and Marketing Trends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11 California Petroleum Supply, Transportation, Refining and Marketing Trends Chapter 2 CALIFORNIA PETROLEUM SUPPLY, TRANSPORTATION, REFINING AND MARKETING TRENDS INTRODUCTION California is an integral part of the world oil market as a world-scale petroleum consumer. Historically, about 50 percent of this petroleum

411

Instrumental Variables and the Search for Identification: From Supply and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and demand for flaxseed, the source of linseed oil.2 Wright noted the difficulty of obtaining estimatesInstrumental Variables and the Search for Identification: From Supply and Demand to Natural variables involved attempts to estimate demand and supply curves.1 Economists such as P.G. Wright, Henry

Ahmad, Sajjad

412

Oil Shale Research in the United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Profiles of Oil Shale Research and Development Activities In Universities, National Laboratories, and Public Agencies

413

Developing sustainable food supply chains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...consumers to buy green. For those food businesses dependent on hedonistic...environment. No time or energy for strategy vision long-term business vision no long-term...66-67. In How green is my kitchen...that affect our business, 70 pp. See www...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Releasing Oil from the SPR | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Releasing Oil from the SPR Releasing Oil from the SPR Releasing Oil from the SPR The Strategic Petroleum Reserve exists, first and foremost, as an emergency response tool the President can use should the United States be confronted with an economically-threatening disruption in oil supplies. Statutory Authority for an SPR Drawdown Standard Sales Provisions Historical Oil Sales and Exchanges SPR Crude Oil Assays 2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies A Presidentially-directed release has occurred three times under these conditions. First, in 1991, at the beginning of Operation Desert Storm, the United States joined its allies in assuring the adequacy of global oil supplies when war broke out in the Persian Gulf. An emergency sale of SPR crude oil was announced the day the war began.

415

The future of oil: Geology versus technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We discuss and reconcile the geological and economic/technological views concerning the future of world oil production and prices, and present a nonlinear econometric model of the world oil market that encompasses both views. The model performs far better than existing empirical models in forecasting oil prices and oil output out-of-sample. Its point forecast is for a near doubling of the real price of oil over the coming decade, though the error bands are wide, reflecting sharply differing judgments on the ultimately recoverable reserves, and on future price elasticities of oil demand and supply.

Jaromir Benes; Marcelle Chauvet; Ondra Kamenik; Michael Kumhof; Douglas Laxton; Susanna Mursula; Jack Selody

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Winter Crude Oil and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: While the relatively low stock forecast (although not as low as last winter) adds some extra pressure to prices, the price of crude oil could be the major factor affecting heating oil prices this winter. The current EIA forecast shows residential prices averaging $1.29 this winter, assuming no volatility. The average retail price is about 7 cents less than last winter, but last winter included the price spike in November 2000, December 2000, and January 2001. Underlying crude oil prices are currently expected to be at or below those seen last winter. WTI averaged over $30 per barrel last winter, and is currently forecast to average about $27.50 per barrel this winter. As those of you who watch the markets know, there is tremendous uncertainty in the amount of crude oil supply that will be available this winter. Less

417

Oil Market Assessment  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Logo Oil Market Assessment - September Logo Oil Market Assessment - September 12, 2001 EIA Home Page Based on Energy Information Administration (EIA) contacts and trade press reports, overall U.S. and global oil supplies appear to have been minimally impacted by yesterday's terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Rumors of scattered closures of U.S. refineries, pipelines, and terminals were reported, and Louisiana Offshore Oil Port operations were partially suspended. While the NYMEX and New York Harbor were temporarily closed, operations are expected to resume soon. Most, if not all petroleum industry infrastructure is expected to resume normal operations today or in the very near term. Prices at all levels (where markets were open) posted increases yesterday, but many prices fell today, as initial reactions

418

Marine Fuel Oil on a Mixed Base  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three grades of high–viscosity marine fuel oil are manufactured according to TU 38. ... developing the composition and technology for production of marine fuel oils [1– 4].

S. V. Kotov; A. G. Oltyrev; I. N. Kankaeva…

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Oil and Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Oil and Gas Supply Module The oil and gas supply module (OGSM) consists of a series of process submodules that project the availability of: Domestic crude oil production and dry natural gas production from onshore, offshore, and Alaskan reservoirs Imported pipeline–quality gas from Mexico and Canada Imported liquefied natural gas. Figure 12. Oil and Gas Supply Module Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-202-586-8800. Figure 13. Oil and Gas Suppply Module Structure. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Oil and Gas Supply Module Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

420

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas - Energy Infrastructure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oil and Natural Gas Supply Oil and Natural Gas Supply Energy Infrastructure NETL's Energy Infrastructure and Security Research Group (EISRG) has a key supporting role in emergency preparedness and response. The EISRG develops high-level analytical visualizations that are used to study critical U.S. energy infrastructures and their inter-relationships during natural and manmade emergencies. By deploying resources and providing vital information in a timely manner, EISRG improves the ability of government agencies and the energy sector to prevent, prepare for, and respond to hazards, emergencies, natural disasters, or any other threat to the nation's energy supply. NETL coordinated and provided information on an ongoing basis during every major landfall event of the 2005 hurricane season , including Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, as well as during Hurricanes Charley, Frances, and Ivan in 2004. NETL also has participated in exercises to prepare for events with varying degrees of impact, such as pipeline disruptions, local power outages, and transportation interruptions, such as the 2005 Powder River Basin rail service suspension, which resulted in curtailment of coal deliveries to major customers over a six-month period.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil supply development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Development of artificial neural networks for steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) recovery method in heavy oil reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??As no alternative energy source has been introduced to efficiently replace fossil fuels yet, the demand for oil and gas is still increasing in the… (more)

Sengel, Ayhan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Oil and gas developments in Oklahoma and Panhandle of Texas in 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exploration in 1987 focused on development and extension of existing fields, with development wells out-numbering exploratory wells 13 to 1. Operators completed 4.3% more exploratory wells and 25.7% fewer development wells than in 1986. The success rate for exploratory wells increased 7.7%; the success rate for development wells remained constant. The Cherokee shelf was the most active trend, with 53 exploratory wells completed in 1987. The dominant plays were the Atoka, Morrow, Springer, and Marchand in the Anadarko basin; the Misener in Grant County, Oklahoma, on the Sedgwick shelf; the Viola in the Golden Trend along the Pauls Valley uplift; and the Wapanucka, Cromwell, and Atoka in the Arkoma basin. Nineteen eight-seven was a year of major sales and acquisition of Oklahoma and Panhandle of Texas reserves and leases with more than 20 companies buying or selling out. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Fryklund, R.E.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Development of photo-patterned composite structures in microchannels for oil reservoir research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Starting from unstructured glass microchannels, we develop a new method of micromodel fabrication. We build composite structures in a bottom-up manner with ultraviolet projection lithography where the composite structures ...

Lee, Hyundo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

An efficient and user friendly investment optimization system for large scale oil field development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

amount of capital required for offshore field and environmental restricted on-shore field development (swamp, farming land etc. ), reducing even a, small fraction of the total investment could mean large capital savings. Therefore, the minimization... for this research. In this research, four problems are addressed. First, a general model for both on-shore and off-shore facility location and well location problems is developed. Second, a preprocessing stage is added to the revised 0-1 Balas algorithm...

Ding, Zixuan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

425

Chapter 10 - The Transformation of the German Gas Supply Industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Natural gas is the second largest energy source in Germany, and its market share will continue to increase. This chapter describes the historical development of the German gas industry, discusses current issues of importance in German gas policy, and outlines the industrial organization and profiles of the major gas utilities. Today, the German gas industry can be divided into two groups: the gas supply industry and the rest of the gas industry. The gas market in Germany has developed on three levels: natural gas production and import, pipeline business and distribution, and end user supply. Germany's energy policy, as a part of economic policy, is oriented to free market principles. The future of the German gas market is very promising. The share of natural gas is growing as a part of primary energy supply, as well as in power generation, substituting coal and oil, and electricity in the heat market. With regard to the effects of liberalization, it can be said that a one-to-one transposition of international experience to the German gas industry will not be possible, due to the different historical, economical, and political factors at work.

Lutz Mez

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

NETL Gas Migration Study to Advance Understanding of Responsible Oil and Natural Gas Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

President Obama’s “All-of-the-Above” energy strategy focuses on safely and efficiently developing America’s natural resources, and emphasizes that energy must be produced in a responsible and sustainable manner. Today, a study released by the Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory provides further clarity on responsible development that both furthers America’s energy security and environmental stewardship. It does not speak broadly to all cases of hydraulic fracturing, and is a limited study focused around specific wells in Pennsylvania.

427

Sublethal exposure to crude oil during embryonic development alters cardiac morphology and reduces aerobic capacity in adult fish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to three times daily. System water was pumped continuously through both the oiled...transferred to methanol plus 10% DMSO for storage. Primary antibodies used were monoclonal anti-CYP1A C10-7 (Cayman Chemical...crude oil, tissues, sediments, and seawater collected for the natural resources damage...

Corinne E. Hicken; Tiffany L. Linbo; David H. Baldwin; Maryjean L. Willis; Mark S. Myers; Larry Holland; Marie Larsen; Michael S. Stekoll; Stanley D. Rice; Tracy K. Collier; Nathaniel L. Scholz; John P. Incardona

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Unconventional oil market assessment: ex situ oil shale.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis focused on exploring the economic limitations for the development of western oil shale. The analysis was developed by scaling a known process and… (more)

Castro-Dominguez, Bernardo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Development of palm oil-based UV-curable epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins for wood coating application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The trend of using renewable sources such as palm oil as raw material in radiation curing is growing due to the demand from the market to produce a more environmental friendly product. In this study, the radiation curable process was done using epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins which are known as epoxidised palm olein acrylate (EPOLA) and palm oil based urethane acrylate (POBUA), respectively. The purpose of the study was to investigate curing properties and the application of this UV-curable palm oil resins for wood coating. Furthermore, the properties of palm oil based coatings are compared with the petrochemical-based compound such as ebecryl (EB) i.e. EB264 and EB830. From the experiment done, the resins from petrochemical-based compounds resulted higher degree of crosslinking (up to 80%) than the palm oil based compounds (up to 70%), where the different is around 10-15%. The hardness property from this two type coatings can reached until 50% at the lower percentage of the oligomer. However, the coatings from petrochemical-based have a high scratch resistance as it can withstand at least up to 3.0 Newtons (N) compared to the palm oil-based compounds which are difficult to withstand the load up to 1.0 N. Finally, the test on the rubber wood substrate showed that the coatings containing benzophenone photoinitiator give higher adhesion property and their also showed a higher glosiness property on the glass substrate compared to the coatings containing irgacure-819 photoinitiator. This study showed that the palm oil coatings can be a suitable for the replacement of petrochemicals compound for wood coating. The palm oil coatings can be more competitive in the market if the problems of using high percentage palm oil oligomer can be overcome as the palm oil price is cheap enough.

Tajau, Rida; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Salleh, Mek Zah; Salleh, Nik Ghazali Nik [Radiation Processing Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Ibrahim, Mohammad Izzat [Faculty of Science, University of Malaya (UM), 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Yunus, Nurulhuda Mohd [Faculty of Science and Technology, National University Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

430

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

or pipeline. Tertiary inventories are held by end users and include fuel in vehicle tanks, heating oil in residential tanks, fuel oil held by utilities, jet fuel stored in...

431

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

October 2011 Table 55. Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD District, October 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD Districts U.S. Total 1 2 3 4 5 Crude Oil...

432

H.R. 817: A Bill to authorize the Secretary of Energy to lease lands within the naval oil shale reserves to private entities for the development and production of oil and natural gas. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bill would give the Secretary of Energy authority to lease lands within the Naval oil shale reserves to private entities for the purpose of surveying for and developing oil and gas resources from the land (other than oil shale). It also allows the Bureau of Land Management to be used as a leasing agent, establishes rules on royalties, and the sharing of royalties with the state, and covers the transfer of existing equipment.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

433

„Peak Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wissenschaftliche Voraussagen deuten auf „Peak Oil“, das Maximum globaler Erdölförderung, in unserer ... der demokratischen Systeme führen. Psychoanalytische Betrachtung darf „Peak Oil“ für die Zivilisation als e...

Dr. Manuel Haus; Dr. med. Christoph Biermann

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Supply Systems Analyst  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In this position you will serve as a Supply Systems Analyst for Supply Chain Services. The incumbent is responsible for managing and supporting multiple electronic database systems, including Asset...

435

Ecological Risks of Shale Oil and Gas Development to Wildlife, Aquatic Resources and their Habitats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

injecting water mixed with sand and chemicals into a well under high pressure to open fractures in shale and release gas; use of 11–30 million liters of water per well, impoundments or tanks to store water, heavy truck traffic to transport water, sand extraction, trucks to transport sand, trucks with chemicals for fracking, frac control van, lights to enable activity 24 h per day, temporary storage for flowback water ... This will require an understanding of how development will impact ecosystems and a willingness to invest in the research, monitoring and management to reduce negative impacts. ... This case study identifies the need for further research to help understand the nature and the environmental impacts of hydrofracturing fluids to devise optimal, safe disposal strategies. ...

Margaret C. Brittingham; Kelly O. Maloney; Aďda M. Farag; David D. Harper; Zachary H. Bowen

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

436

Page 1 of 21 Vertical integration in a growing industry: security of supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to secure supply and mitigate risks of price volatility. Oil and gas firms move upstream to enhance securityPage 1 of 21 Vertical integration in a growing industry: security of supply and market access of the industry boundaries, (ii) security of supply and (iii) access to market. The permeability of industry

Aickelin, Uwe

437

A Traceability Service to Facilitate RFID Adoption in the Retail Supply Chain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Traceability Service to Facilitate RFID Adoption in the Retail Supply Chain Gabriel Hermosillo concerns in the retail supply chain. We propose a service named TRASER (TRAceability SErvice for the Retail,7], construction and maintenance of oil facilities [8], retail and supply chain management [9,10,11] and anti

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

438

Fossil Energy Research Benefits Enhanced Oil Recovery  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Research Benefits Energy Research Benefits Enhanced Oil Recovery EOR helps increase domestic oil supplies while also providing a way to safely and permanently store CO 2 underground. Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) is a way to squeeze out additional, hard- to-recover barrels of oil remaining in older fields following conventional production operations. It can also be used to permanently store carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) underground. Thanks in part to innovations supported by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) over the past 30 years, the United States is a world leader in the number of EOR projects (200) and volume of oil production (over

439

Enhanced oil recovery from heavy oil reservoirs utilizing a displacement agent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An oil displacement agent consisting of nonionic and anionic surfactants and emulsion stabilizers has been developed to enhance oil recovery from heavy oil reservoirs. The experimental results show that the pr...

Fusheng Zhang; Jian Ouyang; Xintong Ma…

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Enhanced Oil Recovery and Other Oil Resources projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enhanced Oil Recovery and Other Oil Resources Enhanced Oil Recovery and Other Oil Resources Enhanced Oil Recovery and Other Oil Resources CO2 EOR | Other EOR & Oil Resources | Environmental | Completed Oil Projects Project Number Project Name Primary Performer DE-FE0013723 Development of Nanoparticle-Stabilized Foams To Improve Performance of Water-less Hydraulic Fracturing The University of Texas at Austin DE-FE0010799 Small Molecular Associative Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Thickeners for Improved Mobility Control University of Pittsburgh DE-FE0006011 Development of Real Time Semi-autonomous Geophysical Data Acquisition and Processing System to Monitor Flood Performance White River Technologies DE-FE0005979 Nanoparticle-stabilized CO2 Foam for CO2 EOR Application New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil supply development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS-FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1997, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated new National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for particulate matter, including for the first time particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers ({micro}m) referred to as PM2.5. PM2.5 in the atmosphere also contributes to reduced atmospheric visibility, which is the subject of existing rules for siting emission sources near Class 1 areas and new Regional Haze rules. There are few existing data regarding emissions and characteristics of fine aerosols from oil, gas and power generation industry combustion sources, and the information that is available is generally outdated and incomplete. Traditional stationary source air emission sampling methods tend to underestimate or overestimate the contribution of the source to ambient aerosols because they do not properly account for primary aerosol formation, which occurs after the gases leave the stack. Primary aerosol includes both filterable particles that are solid or liquid aerosols at stack temperature plus those that form as the stack gases cool through mixing and dilution processes in the plume downwind of the source. These deficiencies in the current methods can have significant impacts on regulatory decision-making. PM2.5 measurement issues were extensively reviewed by the American Petroleum Institute (API) (England et al., 1998), and it was concluded that dilution sampling techniques are more appropriate for obtaining a representative particulate matter sample from combustion systems for determining PM2.5 emission rate and chemical speciation. Dilution sampling is intended to collect aerosols including those that condense and/or react to form solid or liquid aerosols as the exhaust plume mixes and cools to near-ambient temperature immediately after the stack discharge. These techniques have been widely used in recent research studies. For example, Hildemann et al. (1994) and McDonald et al. (1998) used filtered ambient air to dilute the stack gas sample followed by 80-90 seconds residence time to allow aerosol formation and growth to stabilize prior to sample collection and analysis. More accurate and complete emissions data generated using the methods developed in this program will enable more accurate source-receptor and source apportionment analysis for PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) implementation and streamline the environmental assessment of oil, gas and power production facilities. The overall goals of this program were to: (1) Develop improved dilution sampling technology and test methods for PM2.5 mass emissions and speciation measurements, and compare results obtained with dilution and traditional stationary source sampling methods. (2) Develop emission factors and speciation profiles for emissions of fine particulate matter, especially organic aerosols, for use in source-receptor and source apportionment analyses. (3) Identify and characterize PM2.5 precursor compound emissions that can be used in source-receptor and source apportionment analyses.

Glenn C. England

2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

442

Groundwater and surface water supplies in the Williston and Powder River structural basins are necessary for future development in these regions. To help determine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;i Abstract Groundwater and surface water supplies in the Williston and Powder River structural of streams, and quantify reservoir interaction in the Williston and Powder River structural basins the loss to underlying aquifers was 7790 ft3 /s. Both the Powder River and Williston basins contain gaining

Torgersen, Christian

443

Low NOx burner retrofits and enhancements for a 518 MW oil and gas fired boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low NOx oil/gas burners originally supplied to Jacksonville Electric Authority, Northside No. 3 .500 MW unit, were based on a duplex air register design with lobed spray oil atomizers providing additional fuel staging. Although the burners could meet the targeted NOx levels of 0.3 and 0.2 lbs/10{sup 6} BTU on oil and gas respectively. There was insufficient margin on these NOx levels to enable continuous low NOx operation to be achieved. Further burner development was undertaken based on improved aerodynamic control within the burner design to give an approximate 25% improvement in NOx emission reduction thus providing an adequate operating margin. This `RoBTAS` (Round Burner with Tilted Air Supply) burner design based on techniques developed successfully for front wall coal firing applications achieved the required NOx reductions in full scale firing demonstrations on both heavy fuel oil and natural gas firing. The paper describes the development work and the subsequent application of the `RoBTAS` burners to the Northside No. 3 boiler. The burner will also be test fired on Orimulsion fuel and thus the comparison between heavy fuel oil firing and Orimulsion firing under ultra low NOx conditions will be made.

King, J.J. [Jacksonville Electric Authority, FL (United States); Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R. [International Combustion Ltd., Derby (United Kingdom). Rolls-Royce Industrial Power Group

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

444

Geology of the Athabasca Oil Sands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...geological at-rocks, cap rocks, oil migration...subsurface reservoir and supplying...the sands. Porosity. High-grade...the oil. Permeability. The permeability...Ath-abasca reservoir is the distribution...ofpri-mary porosity and permeability in the McMurray...

Grant D. Mossop

1980-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

445

Unconventional Oil and Gas Projects Help Reduce Environmental...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Unconventional Oil and Gas Projects Help Reduce Environmental Impact of Development Unconventional Oil and Gas Projects Help Reduce Environmental Impact of Development April 17,...

446

Development and verification of simplified prediction models for enhanced oil recovery applications. CO/sub 2/ (miscible flood) predictive model. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A screening model for CO/sub 2/ miscible flooding has been developed consisting of a reservoir model for oil rate and recovery and an economic model. The reservoir model includes the effects of viscous fingering, reservoir heterogeneity, gravity segregation and areal sweep. The economic model includes methods to calculate various profitability indices, the windfall profits tax, and provides for CO/sub 2/ recycle. The model is applicable to secondary or tertiary floods, and to solvent slug or WAG processes. The model does not require detailed oil-CO/sub 2/ PVT data for execution, and is limited to five-spot patterns. A pattern schedule may be specified to allow economic calculations for an entire project to be made. Models of similar architecture have been developed for steam drive, in-situ combustion, surfactant-polymer flooding, polymer flooding and waterflooding. 36 references, 41 figures, 4 tables.

Paul, G.W.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Petroleum supply annual 1995: Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1995 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and selected Refinery Statistics each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1995, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Petroleum supply annual 1996: Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1996 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Capacity; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1996, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 September 2013 Table 42. PAD District 2 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 1,083 - - - - - - - - - Algeria ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Angola ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Ecuador .............................. - - - - - - - - - - Iran ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Iraq ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Kuwait ................................. - - - - - - - - - - Libya ................................... - - - - - - - - - - Nigeria ................................

450

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 September 2013 Table 46. PAD District 2 - Year-to-Date Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 11,451 - - - - - - - - - Algeria ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Angola ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Ecuador .............................. - - - - - - - - - - Iran ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Iraq ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Kuwait ................................. 949 - - - - - - - - - Libya ...................................

451

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 December 2011 Table 59. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to 2 3 5 1 3 5 Crude Oil ................................................................. 374 533 - 294 1,445 - Petroleum Products ............................................... 143 6 0 1,165 3,822 0 Liquified Petroleum Gases ................................... - - - - - - Unfinished Oils ..................................................... 65 0 - 0 317 - Motor Gasoline Blending Components ................. 41 0 - 643 183 - Reformulated - RBOB ....................................... - - - - - - Conventional ..................................................... 41 0 - 643 183 - CBOB ...........................................................

452

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

58 58 September 2013 Table 41. PAD District 1 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 12,102 - - - - - - - 2,112 2,112 Algeria ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Angola ................................ 3,271 - - - - - - - - - Ecuador .............................. - - - - - - - - 160 160 Iran ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Iraq ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Kuwait ................................. - - - - - - - - - - Libya ................................... 1,046

453

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 September 2013 Table 44. PAD District 4 and 5 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total PAD District 4 OPEC ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Algeria ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Angola ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Ecuador .............................. - - - - - - - - - - Iran ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Iraq ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Kuwait ................................. - - - - - - - - - - Libya ................................... - - -

454

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8.PDF 8.PDF Table 28. PAD District 2 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 1,764 - - - - - - - - - Algeria ................................ 1,043 - - - - - - - - - Angola ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Ecuador .............................. - - - - - - - - - - Iran ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Iraq ..................................... - - - - - - - - - - Kuwait ................................. - - - - - - - - - - Libya ................................... - - - - - - - - - - Nigeria ................................

455

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.PDF Table 22. Refinery Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining Districts, January 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD District 1 - East Coast PAD...

456

Oil shale: Technology status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the status of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Oil Shale Program as of the end of FY 86. The report consists of (1) a status of oil shale development, (2) a description of the DOE Oil Shale Program, (3) an FY 86 oil shale research summary, and (4) a summary of FY 86 accomplishments. Discoveries were made in FY 86 about the physical and chemical properties and behavior of oil shales, process chemistry and kinetics, in situ retorting, advanced processes, and the environmental behavior and fate of wastes. The DOE Oil Shale Program shows an increasing emphasis on eastern US oil shales and in the development of advanced oil shale processing concepts. With the award to Foster Wheeler for the design of oil shale conceptual plants, the first step in the development of a systems analysis capability for the complete oil shale process has been taken. Unocal's Parachute Creek project, the only commercial oil shale plant operating in the United States, is operating at about 4000 bbl/day. The shale oil is upgraded at Parachute Creek for input to a conventional refinery. 67 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Fuel oil and kerosene sales 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication contains the 1995 survey results of the ``Annual Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales Report`` (Form EIA-821). This is the seventh year that the survey data have appeared in a separate publication. Except for the kerosene and on-highway diesel information, data presented in Tables 1 through 12 (Sales of Fuel Oil and Kerosene) present results of the EIA-821 survey. Tables 13 through 24 (Adjusted Sales of Fuel Oil and Kerosene) include volumes that are based on the EIA-821 survey but have been adjusted to equal the product supplied volumes published in the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). 24 tabs.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Magnets and Power Supplies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bibliography Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Longitudinal Bibliography Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Longitudinal bunch profile and Magnets and Power Supplies Dipole Magnets and Power Supplies Value Dipole Number 80+1 No. of power supplies 1 Magnetic length 3.06 m Core length 3.00 m Bending radius 38.9611 m Power supply limit 500.0 A Field at 7 GeV 0.599 T Dipole trim coils Number 80+1 No. of power supplies 80 Magnetic length 3.06 m Core length 3.00 m Power supply limit 20.0 A Maximum field 0.04 T Horizontal Correction Dipoles Number 317 No. of power supplies 317 Magnetic length 0.160 m Core length 0.07 m Power supply limit 150.0 A Maximum field 0.16 T Max. deflection at 7 GeV 1.1 mrad Vertical Corrector Dipoles Number 317 No. of power supplies 317

459

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Procurement of Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment This Guidance provides a description of the types of requirements to be included in an employer's workplace charging request for...

460

AEO2011: Liquid Fuels Supply and Disposition | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Liquid Fuels Supply and Disposition Liquid Fuels Supply and Disposition Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 11, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million barrels per day. The data is broken down into crude oil, other petroleum supply, other non petroleum supply and liquid fuel consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO disposition EIA liquid fuels Supply Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Liquid Fuels Supply and Disposition- Reference Case (xls, 117 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil supply development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Annotated Bibliography: Fisheries Species and Oil/Gas Platforms Offshore California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

which associate with oil and gas platforms offshoredamaging consequence of oil and gas development. The studycollection was done by oil and gas company personnel who

MBC Applied Environmental Sciences

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Production of Shale Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intensive pre-project feasibility and engineering studies begun in 1979 have produced an outline plan for development of a major project for production of shale oil from private lands in the Piceance Basin in western Colorado. This outline plan...

Loper, R. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Oil price shocks and stock market returns: New evidence from the United States and China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study examines the time-varying correlations between oil prices shocks of different types (supply-side, aggregate demand and oil-market specific demand as per Kilian (2009) who highlighted that “Not all oil shocks are alike”) and stock market returns, using a Scalar-BEKK model. For this study we consider the aggregate stock market indices from two countries, China and the US, reflecting the most important developing and developed financial markets in the world. In addition to the whole market, we also consider correlations from key selected industrial sectors, namely Metals & Mining, Oil & Gas, Retail, Technology and Banking. The sample period runs from 1995 until 2013. We highlight several key points: (i) correlations between oil price shocks and stock returns are clearly and systematically time-varying; (ii) oil shocks of different types show substantial variation in their impact upon stock market returns; (iii) these effects differ widely across industrial sectors; and finally (iv) China is seemingly more resilient to oil price shocks than the US.

David C. Broadstock; George Filis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Effects of the terra nova offshore oil development on benthic macro-invertebrates over 10 Years of development drilling on the grand Banks of Newfoundland, Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper describes effects of drilling with water and synthetic-based drilling muds on benthic invertebrates over 10 years at the Terra Nova offshore oil development. As such, the paper provides insight on the effects of relatively new synthetic-based drilling muds (SBMs), and makes an important contribution to our understanding of the long-term chronic effects of drilling on benthic communities. The Terra Nova Field is located approximately 350 km offshore on the Grand Banks of Newfoundland (Canada). Sediment and invertebrate samples were collected in 1997 (baseline) prior to drilling, and subsequently in 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008 and 2010. Approximately 50 stations were sampled in each year at distances of less than 1 to approximately 20 km from drill centres. Summary benthic invertebrate community measures examined were total abundance, biomass, richness, diversity and multivariate measures of community composition based on non-Metric Dimensional Scaling (nMDS). Decreases in abundance, biomass and richness were noted at one station located nearest (0.14 km) to a drill centre in some EEM (environmental effects monitoring) years. These decreases coincided with higher levels of tracers of drill muds in sediments (barium and >C10-C21 hydrocarbons). Abundances of selected individual taxa were also examined to help interpret responses when project-related effects on summary measures occurred. Enrichment effects on some tolerant taxa (e.g., the polychaete family Phyllodocidae and the bivalve family Tellinidae) and decreased abundances of sensitive taxa (e.g., the polychaete families Orbiniidae and Paraonidae) were detected to within approximately 1 to 2 km from discharge source. Lagged responses three to five years after drilling started were noted for Phyllodocidae and Tellinidae, suggesting chronic or indirect effects. Overall, results of benthic community analyses at Terra Nova indicate that effects on summary measures of community composition were spatially limited but, as seen elsewhere, some taxa were more sensitive to drilling discharges.

Michael D. Paine; Elisabeth M. DeBlois; Bruce W. Kilgour; Ellen Tracy; Patricia Pocklington; Roger D. Crowley; Urban P. Williams; G. Gregory Janes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

NETL: News Release - Projects Selected to Boost Unconventional Oil and Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7, 2010 7, 2010 Projects Selected to Boost Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources Simulation and Visualization Tools, CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Targeted for Advancement Washington, D.C. - Ten projects focused on two technical areas aimed at increasing the nation's supply of "unconventional" fossil energy, reducing potential environmental impacts, and expanding carbon dioxide (CO2) storage options have been selected for further development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The projects include four that would develop advanced computer simulation and visualization capabilities to enhance understanding of ways to improve production and minimize environmental impacts associated with unconventional energy development; and six seeking to further next generation CO2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR) to the point where it is ready for pilot (small) scale testing.

466

A toolbox for simulation-based optimization of supply chains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present a general framework for simulating and optimizing the operational decisions in a supply chain network. We developed a supply chain network library for the simulation software AnyLogic (© XJ Technologies) and a linearized ...

Christian Almeder; Margaretha Preusser

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Distributed simulation for interoperability testing along the supply chain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The need for interoperability of information systems among supply chain partners has been recognized. A number of standards have been or are being developed to ensure interoperability of applications used along the supply chain. An associated need for ...

Sanjay Jain; Frank Riddick; Andreas Craens; Deogratias Kibira

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Oil/Liquids | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil/Liquids Oil/Liquids < Oil Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report Full figure data for Figure 93. Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Table 11. Liquid Fuels Supply and Disposition Table 12. Petroleum Product Prices Table 14. Oil and Gas Supply Table 21. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - New England Table 22. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source- Middle Atlantic Table 23. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East North Central Table 24. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West North Central Table 25. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - South Atlantic Table 26. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East South

469

Retail Diesel Fuel Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Along with heating oil prices, the distillate supply squeeze has Along with heating oil prices, the distillate supply squeeze has severely impacted diesel fuel prices, especially in the Northeast. Retail diesel price data are available sooner than residential heating oil data. This graph shows that diesel prices turned the corner sometime after February 7 and are heading down. Retail diesel fuel prices nationally, along with those of most other petroleum prices, increased steadily through most of 1999. Prices jumped dramatically (by over 11 cents per gallon) in the third week of January, and rose 2 or more cents a week through February 7. The increases were much more rapid in the Northeast. From January 17 through February 7, diesel fuel prices in New England rose nearly 68 cents per gallon, or 47 percent. Prices in the Mid-Atlantic region rose about 58

470

The development of a wax layer on the interior wall of a circular pipe transporting heated oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......of oil in long subsea pipelines is a common occurrence...formation of a paraffinic wax deposit on the inside...Striegler, Studies of wax deposition in the trans Alaska pipeline, Journal of Petroleum...review of the modeling of wax deposition mechanisms......

D. J. Needham; B. T. Johansson; T. Reeve

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Peak Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At the start of the new millennium, the expression “Peak Oil” was unknown. Nevertheless, a discussion about when the world’s rate of oil production would reach its maximum had already ... . King Hubbert presented...

Kjell Aleklett

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Peak Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Between 2000 and 2010, world oil prices advanced from approximately $25 per barrel to more than $100 per barrel. The price appreciation of oil over the decade was around ten times the rate of inflation.

Robert Rapier

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

NUFinancials Supply Chain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUFinancials Supply Chain FMS801 & 803 Purchasing Glossary 03/31/2010 © 2010 Northwestern University FMS801 & 803 1 Purchasing Glossary Guide to terms used in iBuy