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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Oil Shale Reserves...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Oil Shale Reserves Site - 013 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Naval Oil Shale Reserves Site (013 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site...

2

The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves To ensure sufficient fuel for the fleet, the Government began withdrawing probable oil-bearing...

3

EIS-0068: Development Policy Options for the Naval Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves prepared this programmatic statement to examine the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of development projects on the Naval Oil Shale Reserve 1, and examine select alternatives, such as encouraging production from other liquid fuel resources (coal liquefaction, biomass, offshore oil and enhanced oil recovery) or conserving petroleum in lieu of shale oil production.

4

OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seyitömer, Himmeto?lu and Hat?lda? oil shale deposits. The results demonstrate that these oil shales are

Fields (in-situ Combustion Approach; M. V. Kök; G. Guner; S. Bagci?

5

Oil Shale and Other Unconventional Fuels Activities | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Naval Reserves Oil Shale and Other Unconventional Fuels Activities Oil Shale and Other Unconventional Fuels Activities The Fossil Energy program in oil shale focuses on...

6

Hydrotreating of oil from eastern oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale provides one of the major fossil energy reserves for the United States. The quantity of reserves in oil shale is less than the quantity in coal, but is much greater (by at least an order of magnitude) than the quantity of crude oil reserves. With so much oil potentially available from oil shale, efforts have been made to develop techniques for its utilization. In these efforts, hydrotreating has proved to be an acceptable technique for upgrading raw shale oil to make usuable products. The present work demonstrated the use of the hydrotreating technique for upgrading an oil from Indiana New Albany oil shale.

Scinta, J.; Garner, J.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves. Annual report of operations, Fiscal year 1993  

SciTech Connect

During fiscal year 1993, the reserves generated $440 million in revenues, a $33 million decrease from the fiscal year 1992 revenues, primarily due to significant decreases in oil and natural gas prices. Total costs were $207 million, resulting in net cash flow of $233 million, compared with $273 million in fiscal year 1992. From 1976 through fiscal year 1993, the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves generated $15.7 billion in revenues for the US Treasury, with expenses of $2.9 billion. The net revenues of $12.8 billion represent a return on costs of 441 percent. See figures 2, 3, and 4. In fiscal year 1993, production at the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves at maximum efficient rates yielded 25 million barrels of crude oil, 123 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 158 million gallons of natural gas liquids. The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves has embarked on an effort to identify additional hydrocarbon resources on the reserves for future production. In 1993, in cooperation with the US Geological Survey, the Department initiated a project to assess the oil and gas potential of the program`s oil shale reserves, which remain largely unexplored. These reserves, which total a land area of more than 145,000 acres and are located in Colorado and Utah, are favorably situated in oil and gas producing regions and are likely to contain significant hydrocarbon deposits. Alternatively the producing assets may be sold or leased if that will produce the most value. This task will continue through the first quarter of fiscal year 1994.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

Tiger Team Assessment of the Navel Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the Naval Petroleum Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming (NPOSR-CUW). NPOSR-CUW consists of Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 located near Casper, Wyoming; Naval Oil Shale Reserve Number I and Naval Oil Shale Reserve Number 3 located near Rifle, Colorado; and Naval Oil Shale Reserve Number 2 located near Vernal, Utah, which was not examined as part of this assessment. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing environment, safety, and health (ES H) and quality assurance (QA) disciplines; site remediation; facilities management; and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable Federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal NPOSR-CUW requirements was assessed. The NPOSR-CUW Tiger Team Assessment is part of a larger, comprehensive DOE Tiger Team Independent Assessment Program planned for DOE facilities. The objective of the initiative is to provide the Secretary with information on the compliance status of DOE facilities with regard to ES H requirements, root causes for noncompliance, adequacy of DOE and contractor ES H management programs, response actions to address the identified problem areas, and DOE-wide ES H compliance trends and root causes.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Strategic Significance of Americas Oil Shale Resource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II Oil Shale Resources Technology and Economics Office of Deputy Assistant Secretary for Petroleum Reserves Office of Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves U.S. Department of...

10

Oil shale technology  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale is undoubtedly an excellent energy source that has great abundance and world-wide distribution. Oil shale industries have seen ups and downs over more than 100 years, depending on the availability and price of conventional petroleum crudes. Market forces as well as environmental factors will greatly affect the interest in development of oil shale. Besides competing with conventional crude oil and natural gas, shale oil will have to compete favorably with coal-derived fuels for similar markets. Crude shale oil is obtained from oil shale by a relatively simple process called retorting. However, the process economics are greatly affected by the thermal efficiencies, the richness of shale, the mass transfer effectiveness, the conversion efficiency, the design of retort, the environmental post-treatment, etc. A great many process ideas and patents related to the oil shale pyrolysis have been developed; however, relatively few field and engineering data have been published. Due to the vast heterogeneity of oil shale and to the complexities of physicochemical process mechanisms, scientific or technological generalization of oil shale retorting is difficult to achieve. Dwindling supplied of worldwide petroleum reserves, as well as the unprecedented appetite of mankind for clean liquid fuel, has made the public concern for future energy market grow rapidly. the clean coal technology and the alternate fuel technology are currently of great significance not only to policy makers, but also to process and chemical researchers. In this book, efforts have been made to make a comprehensive text for the science and technology of oil shale utilization. Therefore, subjects dealing with the terminological definitions, geology and petrology, chemistry, characterization, process engineering, mathematical modeling, chemical reaction engineering, experimental methods, and statistical experimental design, etc. are covered in detail.

Lee, S. (Akron Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

U.S. Department of Energy Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves combined financial statements, September 30, 1996 and 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves (NPOSR) produces crude oil and associated hydrocarbons from the Naval Petroleum Reserves (NPR) numbered 1, 2, and 3, and the Naval Oil Shale Reserves (NOSR) numbered 1, 2, and 3 in a manner to achieve the greatest value and benefits to the US taxpayer. NPOSR consists of the Naval Petroleum Reserve in California (NPRC or Elk Hills), which is responsible for operations of NPR-1 and NPR-2; the Naval Petroleum Oil Shale Reserve in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming (NPOSR-CUW), which is responsible for operations of NPR-3, NOSR-1, 2, and 3 and the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC); and NPOSR Headquarters in Washington, DC, which is responsible for overall program direction. Each participant shares in the unit costs and production of hydrocarbons in proportion to the weighted acre-feet of commercially productive oil and gas formations (zones) underlying the respective surface lands as of 1942. The participating shares of NPR-1 as of September 30, 1996 for the US Government and Chevron USA, Inc., are listed. This report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants` audit of the Department of Energy`s (Department) Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves (NPOSR) financial statements as of September 30, 1996.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Restraint urged in developing oil shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Restraint urged in developing oil shale ... An oil shale industry producing 400,000 bbl per day could be created by 1990 using existing technologies and without additional leasing of federal land. ... "Utah and Colorado, with most of the nation's oil shale reserves," Hatch says, "are looking at the business end of a very large federal cannon, loaded with billions for synthetic fuels development." ...

1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

13

Department of Energy, Office of Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Request for Records Disposition Authority Leave Blank (NARA Use Only) (See Instructions on reverse) Job Number I / {£. 0- _~ To. National Archives and Records Administration (NIR) NI-'-r 3 7- 6 6 J Washington, DC 20408 Date Received 1 From (Agencyor establishment) Department of Energy Notification to Agency 2 MajorSubdivrsion In accordance with the provisions of 44 Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy USC 3303a. the disposition request. In- cluding amendments. ISapproved except for 3 Minorsubcrvrsron Items that may be marked "disposrtron not Office of Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves approved" or "withdrawn" In column 10 4 Nameof Personwith whom to confer 5 Telephone (Includearea code) [ Pamela Gentel 301-903-1856 6 Agency Certification

14

Apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale comprises: a vertical type distilling furnace which is divided by two vertical partitions each provided with a plurality of vent apertures into an oil shale treating chamber and two gas chambers, said oil shale treating chamber being located between said two gas chambers in said vertical type distilling furnace, said vertical type distilling furnace being further divided by at least one horizontal partition into an oil shale distilling chamber in the lower part thereof and at least one oil shale preheating chamber in the upper part thereof, said oil shale distilling chamber and said oil shale preheating chamber communication with each other through a gap provided at an end of said horizontal partition, an oil shale supplied continuously from an oil shale supply port provided in said oil shale treating chamber at the top thereof into said oil shale treating chamber continuously moving from the oil shale preheating chamber to the oil shale distilling chamber, a high-temperature gas blown into an oil shale distilling chamber passing horizontally through said oil shale in said oil shale treating chamber, thereby said oil shale is preheated in said oil shale preheating chamber, and a gaseous shale oil is distilled from said preheated oil shale in said oil shale distilling chamber; and a separator for separating by liquefaction a gaseous shale oil from a gas containing the gaseous shale oil discharged from the oil shale preheating chamber.

Shishido, T.; Sato, Y.

1984-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

15

Report to the President on agreements and programs relating to the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy monitors commercial natural gas production activities along the boundaries of Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 1 and Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 3, which are located in Garfield County, Colorado, and were created in the early part of this century to provide a future source of shale oil for the military. In response to the private sector`s drilling of natural gas wells along the south and southwest boundaries of the Reserves, which began in the early 1980`s, the Department developed a Natural Gas Protection Program to protect the Government`s resources from drainage due to the increasing number of commercial gas wells contiguous to Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 3. This report provides an update of the Gas Protection Program being implemented and the agreements that have been placed in effect since December 19, 1991, and also includes the one communitized well containing Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 lands. The Protection Program employs two methods to protect the Government`s resources: (1) sharing with the private sector in the costs and production of wells by entering into ``communitization`` agreements; and (2) drilling wholly-owned Government wells to ``offset`` commercial wells that threaten to drain natural gas from the Reserves. The methods designed to protect the Government`s resources are achieving their objective of abating gas drainage and migration. As a result of the Protection Program, the Department of Energy is able to produce natural gas and either sell its share on the open market or transfer it for use at Government facilities. The Natural Gas Protection Program is a reactive, ongoing program that is continually revised as natural gas transportation constraints, market conditions, and nearby commercial production activities change.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Strategic Significance of Americas Oil Shale Resource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Deputy Assistant Secretary for Petroleum Reserves Office of Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. March 2004 Strategic...

17

Oil shale retorted underground  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oil shale retorted underground ... Low-temperature underground retorting of oil shale produces a crude oil with many attractive properties, Dr. George R. Hill of the University of Utah told a meeting of the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers last week in Los Angeles. ... Typical above-ground retorting of oil shale uses temperatures of 900° to 1100° F. because of the economic need ... ...

1967-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

18

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, Casper, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary environmental findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming (NPOSR-CUW) conducted June 6 through 17, 1988. NPOSR consists of the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) in Wyoming, the Naval Oil Shale Reserves No. 1 and 3 (NOSR-1 and NOSR-3) in Colorado and the Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 2 (NOSR-2) in Utah. NOSR-2 was not included in the Survey because it had not been actively exploited at the time of the on-site Survey. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, lead and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team specialists are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with NPOSR. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at NPOSR and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team has developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing specific environmental problems identified at NOSR-3 during the on-site Survey. There were no findings associated with either NPR-3 or NOSR-1 that required Survey-related sampling and Analysis. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Summary report. The Summary Report will reflect the final determinations of the NPOSR-CUW Survey and the other DOE site-specific Surveys. 110 refs., 38 figs., 24 tabs.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temperature, type of shale and oil content of shale iscontent of the shale, and shale oil content of the rock cantemperatures. Lean and Rich Shale Oil shales vary in their

Bellman Jr., R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Using oil shale ash waste as a modifier for asphalt binders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oil shale rocks represent one of the most available ... Jordan land contains about 50 billion tons of oil shale, which makes Jordan the third in the ... world of the reserve of this material. Oil shale ash is a b...

Khalid Ghuzlan; Ghazi Al-Khateeb…

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Carcinogenicity Studies of Estonian Oil Shale Soots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

determine the carcinogenicity of Estonian oil shale soot as well as the soot from oil shale fuel oil. All

A. Vosamae

22

Oil shale research in China  

SciTech Connect

There have been continued efforts and new emergence in oil shale research in Chine since 1980. In this paper, the studies carried out in universities, academic, research and industrial laboratories in recent years are summarized. The research areas cover the chemical structure of kerogen; thermal behavior of oil shale; drying, pyrolysis and combustion of oil shale; shale oil upgrading; chemical utilization of oil shale; retorting waste water treatment and economic assessment.

Jianqiu, W.; Jialin, Q. (Beijing Graduate School, Petroleum Univ., Beijing (CN))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Production of Shale Oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intensive pre-project feasibility and engineering studies begun in 1979 have produced an outline plan for development of a major project for production of shale oil from private lands in the Piceance Basin in western Colorado. This outline plan...

Loper, R. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during oil shale retorting: retort water and gas condensate.commercial oil shale plant, retort water and gas condensateunique to an oil shale retort water, gas condensate, and

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Experimental studies in a bottom-burning oil shale combustion retort.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As the domestic demand for oil continues to increase, it is expected that the enormous worldwide oil shale reserves will eventually be tapped. Oil from… (more)

Udell, Kent S.

1905-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Nineteenth oil shale symposium proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This book contains 23 selections. Some of the titles are: Effects of maturation on hydrocarbon recoveries from Canadian oil shale deposits; Dust and pressure generated during commercial oil shale mine blasting: Part II; The petrosix project in Brazil - An update; Pathway of some trace elements during fluidized-bed combustion of Israeli Oil Shale; and Decommissioning of the U.S. Department of Energy Anvil Points Oil Shale Research Facility.

Gary, J.H.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Oil shale: Technology status report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the status of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Oil Shale Program as of the end of FY 86. The report consists of (1) a status of oil shale development, (2) a description of the DOE Oil Shale Program, (3) an FY 86 oil shale research summary, and (4) a summary of FY 86 accomplishments. Discoveries were made in FY 86 about the physical and chemical properties and behavior of oil shales, process chemistry and kinetics, in situ retorting, advanced processes, and the environmental behavior and fate of wastes. The DOE Oil Shale Program shows an increasing emphasis on eastern US oil shales and in the development of advanced oil shale processing concepts. With the award to Foster Wheeler for the design of oil shale conceptual plants, the first step in the development of a systems analysis capability for the complete oil shale process has been taken. Unocal's Parachute Creek project, the only commercial oil shale plant operating in the United States, is operating at about 4000 bbl/day. The shale oil is upgraded at Parachute Creek for input to a conventional refinery. 67 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Study of alternatives for future operations of the naval petroleum and oil shale reserves, NOSR-2, Uintah and Carbon Counties, Utah. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has asked Gustavson Associates, Inc. to serve as an Independent Petroleum Consultant and authorized a study and recommendations regarding future development of Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 2 (NOSR-2) in Uintah and Carbon Counties, Utah. The US owns 100% of the mineral rights and about 60% of the surface rights in NOSR-2. The Ute Indian Tribe owns the other 40% of the surface. This 88,890-acre tract was set aside as an oil shale reserve for the US Navy by an Executive Order of President Wilson in 1916. Management of NOSR-2 is the responsibility of DOE. No drilling for oil and gas has occurred on the property and no production has been established. No reserves are present, although the area is hypothesized to overlay gas resources. Mapping by the US Geological Survey and others has resulted in speculative seismic leads for structures that may or may not hold conventional oil and gas. All of the mineral rights (including oil shale) must be considered exploratory and the mineral rights must be valued accordingly. The opinion recommended to maximize value to the US is Option 4, sale of the interest of the US of all or part of NOSR-2. Evaluation of this option results in an estimated value which is more than three times greater than the next highest estimated value, for Option 2, transfer to the Department of the Interior for leasing.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Assessment of Eagle Ford Shale Oil and Gas Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and to assess Eagle Ford shale oil and gas reserves, contingent resources, and prospective resources. I first developed a Bayesian methodology to generate probabilistic decline curves using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) that can quantify the reserves...

Gong, Xinglai

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

Oil shale retort apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A retorting apparatus including a vertical kiln and a plurality of tubes for delivering rock to the top of the kiln and removal of processed rock from the bottom of the kiln so that the rock descends through the kiln as a moving bed. Distributors are provided for delivering gas to the kiln to effect heating of the rock and to disturb the rock particles during their descent. The distributors are constructed and disposed to deliver gas uniformly to the kiln and to withstand and overcome adverse conditions resulting from heat and from the descending rock. The rock delivery tubes are geometrically sized, spaced and positioned so as to deliver the shale uniformly into the kiln and form symmetrically disposed generally vertical paths, or "rock chimneys", through the descending shale which offer least resistance to upward flow of gas. When retorting oil shale, a delineated collection chamber near the top of the kiln collects gas and entrained oil mist rising through the kiln.

Reeves, Adam A. (Grand Junction, CO); Mast, Earl L. (Norman, OK); Greaves, Melvin J. (Littleton, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Proposed natural gas protection program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3, Garfield County, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

As a result of US Department of Energy (DOE) monitoring activities, it was determined in 1983 that the potential existed for natural gas resources underlying the Naval Oil Shales Reserves Nos. 1 and 3 (NOSrs-1 3) to be drained by privately-owned gas wells that were being drilled along the Reserves borders. In 1985, DOE initiated a limited number of projects to protect the Government's interest in the gas resources by drilling its own offset production'' wells just inside the boundaries, and by formally sharing in the production, revenues and costs of private wells that are drilled near the boundaries ( communitize'' the privately-drilled wells). The scope of these protection efforts must be expanded. DOE is therefore proposing a Natural Gas Protection Program for NOSRs-1 3 which would be implemented over a five-year period that would encompass a total of 200 wells (including the wells drilled and/or communitized since 1985). Of these, 111 would be offset wells drilled by DOE on Government land inside the NOSRs' boundaries and would be owned either entirely by the Government or communitized with adjacent private land owners or lessees. The remainder would be wells drilled by private operators in an area one half-mile wide extending around the NOSRs boundaries and communitized with the Government. 23 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserve. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Preparedness of the Committee on Armed Services, United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session on S. 1810, September 29, 1983  

SciTech Connect

Captain Myron E. Smith, Jr., Director of the DOE Office of Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves, testified at a hearing on S. 1810, which authorizes funds relating to the petroleum and oil shale reserves. Smith reviewed revenues and expenditures since legislation was passed in 1976, noting that production at Elk Hills and Teapot Dome are at peak levels, in his justification of the budget request of $266.1 million. Questions from the committee and Smith's responses follow his formal testimony.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Process for oil shale retorting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Particulate oil shale is subjected to a pyrolysis with a hot, non-oxygenous gas in a pyrolysis vessel, with the products of the pyrolysis of the shale contained kerogen being withdrawn as an entrained mist of shale oil droplets in a gas for a separation of the liquid from the gas. Hot retorted shale withdrawn from the pyrolysis vessel is treated in a separate container with an oxygenous gas so as to provide combustion of residual carbon retained on the shale, producing a high temperature gas for the production of some steam and for heating the non-oxygenous gas used in the oil shale retorting process in the first vessel. The net energy recovery includes essentially complete recovery of the organic hydrocarbon material in the oil shale as a liquid shale oil, a high BTU gas, and high temperature steam.

Jones, John B. (300 Enterprise Bldg., Grand Junction, CO 80501); Kunchal, S. Kumar (300 Enterprise Bldg., Grand Junction, CO 80501)

1981-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

34

,"Louisiana Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

35

,"Kentucky Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2012,"6302007"...

36

,"West Virginia Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2012,"6302007"...

37

Solar retorting of oil shale  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for retorting oil shale using solar radiation. Oil shale is introduced into a first retorting chamber having a solar focus zone. There the oil shale is exposed to solar radiation and rapidly brought to a predetermined retorting temperature. Once the shale has reached this temperature, it is removed from the solar focus zone and transferred to a second retorting chamber where it is heated. In a second chamber, the oil shale is maintained at the retorting temperature, without direct exposure to solar radiation, until the retorting is complete.

Gregg, David W. (Morago, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Optimising the Use of Spent Oil Shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Worldwide deposits of oil shales are thought to represent ~3 trillion barrels of oil. Jordanian oil shale deposits are extensive and high quality, and could… (more)

FOSTER, HELEN,JANE

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

The twentieth oil shale symposium proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This book contains 20 selections. Some of the titles are: The technical contributions of John Ward Smith in oil shale research; Oil shale rubble fires: ignition and extinguishment; Fragmentation of eastern oil shale for in situ recovery; A study of thermal properties of Chinese oil shale; and Natural invasion of native plants on retorted oil shale.

Gary, J.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

products, percent: Oil Gas Spent Shale TOTAL Average tracecontent of the gases for the lean shale exceeded that for

Bellman Jr., R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Shale oil recovery process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of producing within a subterranean oil shale deposit a retort chamber containing permeable fragmented material wherein a series of explosive charges are emplaced in the deposit in a particular configuration comprising an initiating round which functions to produce an upward flexure of the overburden and to initiate fragmentation of the oil shale within the area of the retort chamber to be formed, the initiating round being followed in a predetermined time sequence by retreating lines of emplaced charges developing further fragmentation within the retort zone and continued lateral upward flexure of the overburden. The initiating round is characterized by a plurality of 5-spot patterns and the retreating lines of charges are positioned and fired along zigzag lines generally forming retreating rows of W's. Particular time delays in the firing of successive charges are disclosed.

Zerga, Daniel P. (Concord, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Combustion heater for oil shale  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combustion heater for oil shale heats particles of spent oil shale containing unburned char by burning the char. A delayed fall is produced by flowing the shale particles down through a stack of downwardly sloped overlapping baffles alternately extending from opposite sides of a vertical column. The delayed fall and flow reversal occurring in passing from each baffle to the next increase the residence time and increase the contact of the oil shale particles with combustion supporting gas flowed across the column to heat the shale to about 650 to 700/sup 0/C for use as a process heat source.

Mallon, R.; Walton, O.; Lewis, A.E.; Braun, R.

1983-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

43

Combustion heater for oil shale  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combustion heater for oil shale heats particles of spent oil shale containing unburned char by burning the char. A delayed fall is produced by flowing the shale particles down through a stack of downwardly sloped overlapping baffles alternately extending from opposite sides of a vertical column. The delayed fall and flow reversal occurring in passing from each baffle to the next increase the residence time and increase the contact of the oil shale particles with combustion supporting gas flowed across the column to heat the shale to about 650.degree.-700.degree. C. for use as a process heat source.

Mallon, Richard G. (Livermore, CA); Walton, Otis R. (Livermore, CA); Lewis, Arthur E. (Los Altos, CA); Braun, Robert L. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is in intimate contact with oil and shale during In in-situin contact with the oil and shale. These methods and othersWaters from Green River Oil Shale," Chem. and Ind. , 1. ,

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waters from Green River Oil Shale," Chem. and Ind. , 1. ,Effluents from In-Situ oil Shale Processing," in Proceedingsin the Treatment of Oil Shale Retort Waters," in Proceedings

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS A. Levy and R.of Metals in In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts," NACE Corrosion 80,Elevated Temperature Corrosion of Oil Shale Retort Component

Bellman Jr., R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

III, "Method of Breaking Shale Oil-Water Emulsion," U. S.and Biological Treatment of Shale Oil Retort Water, DraftPA (1979). H. H. Peters, Shale Oil Waste Water Recovery by

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Oil shale as an energy source in Israel  

SciTech Connect

Reserves, characteristics, energetics, chemistry, and technology of Israeli oil shales are described. Oil shale is the only source of energy and the only organic natural resource in Israel. Its reserves of about 12 billion tons will be enough to meet Israel`s requirements for about 80 years. The heating value of the oil shale is 1,150 kcal/kg, oil yield is 6%, and sulfur content of the oil is 5--7%. A method of oil shale processing, providing exhaustive utilization of its energy and chemical potential, developed in the Technion, is described. The principal feature of the method is a two-stage pyrolysis of the oil shale. As a result, gas and aromatic liquids are obtained. The gas may be used for energy production in a high-efficiency power unit, or as a source for chemical synthesis. The liquid products can be an excellent source for production of chemicals.

Fainberg, V.; Hetsroni, G. [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Oil shale - Heir to the petroleum kingdom  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oil shale - Heir to the petroleum kingdom ... A discussion of oil shale provides students with real-world problems that require chemical literacy. ...

Y. Schachter

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Combined Financial Statements September 30, 1994 and 1993 and Management Overview and Supplemental Financial and Management Information  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the independent certified public accountant`s audit of the Department of Energy`s (Department) Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves (NPOSR) financial statements as of September 30, 1994. The auditors have expressed an unqualified opinion on the 1994 statements. Their reports on the NPOSR internal control structure and on compliance with laws and regulations, and management letter on addressing needed improvements are also provided. NPOSR consists of petroleum reserves in California and Wyoming, and oil shale reserves in Colorado and Utah. The Government`s interests in NPOSR are managed by the Department through its headquarters office in Washington, D.C. In addition, the Department has site offices in both California and Wyoming that are responsible for contractor oversight functions. Daily operations are conducted under contract by two management and operating contractors. By law, NPOSR was authorized to produce crude oil at the maximum efficient rate for six years. The law allowed production to be extended for three year periods, provided that the President of the United States certified that continued maximum production was in the best interest of the nation. The current three year period ends on April 5, 1997. Additional information about NPOSR is provided in the overview and notes to the financial statements.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Oil shale: The environmental challenges III  

SciTech Connect

This book presents the papers of a symposium whose purpose was to discuss the environmental and socio-economic aspects of oil shale development. Topics considered include oil shale solid waste disposal, modeling spent shale disposal, water management, assessing the effects of oil shale facilities on water quality, wastewater treatment and use at oil shale facilities, potential air emissions from oil shale retorting, the control of air pollutant emissions from oil shale facilities, oil shale air emission control, socioeconomic research, a framework for mitigation agreements, the Garfield County approach to impact mitigation, the relationship of applied industrial hygiene programs and experimental toxicology programs, and industrial hygiene programs.

Petersen, K.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Oil Shale Research in the United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Profiles of Oil Shale Research and Development Activities In Universities, National Laboratories, and Public Agencies

53

Favorable conditions noted for Australia shale oil  

SciTech Connect

After brief descriptions of the Rundle, Condor, and Stuart/Kerosene Creek oil shale projects in Queensland, the competitive advantages of oil shale development and the state and federal governments' attitudes towards an oil shale industry in Australia are discussed. It is concluded that Australia is the ideal country in which to start an oil shale industry.

Not Available

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Bureau of Land Management Oil Shale Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bureau of Land Management Oil Shale Development Unconventional Fuels Conference University of Utah May 17, 2011 #12;#12;Domestic Oil Shale Resources Primary oil shale resources in the U.S. are in the Green River Formation in Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. 72 % of this oil shale resource is on Federal

Utah, University of

55

Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The US Bureau of Mines publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil shale rocks and dust. Three areas have been examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles. 10 refs., 54 figs., 29 tabs.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

THERMAL PROCESSING OF OIL SHALE/SANDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

)-based simulation tools to a modified in-situ process for production of oil from oil shale. The simulation tools

Michal Hradisky; Philip J. Smith; Doe Award; No. De-fe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Oil shale, tar sands, and related materials  

SciTech Connect

This sixteen-chapter book focuses on the many problems and the new methodology associated with the commercialization of the oil shale and tar sand industry. Topics discussed include: an overview of the Department of Energy's oil shale R, D, and D program; computer simulation of explosive fracture of oil shale; fracturing of oil shale by treatment with liquid sulfur dioxide; chemistry of shale oil cracking; hydrogen sulfide evolution from Colorado oil shale; a possible mechanism of alkene/alkane production in oil shale retorting; oil shale retorting kinetics; kinetics of oil shale char gasification; a comparison of asphaltenes from naturally occurring shale bitumen and retorted shale oils: the influence of temperature on asphaltene structure; beneficiation of Green River oil shale by density methods; beneficiation of Green River oil shale pelletization; shell pellet heat exchange retorting: the SPHER energy-efficient process for retorting oil shale; retorted oil shale disposal research; an investigation into the potential economics of large-scale shale oil production; commercial scale refining of Paraho crude shale oil into military specification fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition; chemical characterization/physical properties of US Navy shale-II fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition: stability of oil shale-derived jet fuel; pyrolysis of shale oil residual fractions; synfuel stability: degradation mechanisms and actual findings; the chemistry of shale oil and its refined products; the reactivity of Cold Lake asphaltenes; influence of thermal processing on the properties of Cold Lake asphaltenes: the effect of distillation; thermal recovery of oil from tar sands by an energy-efficient process; and hydropyrolysis: the potential for primary upgrading of tar sand bitumen.

Stauffer, H.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Spent Shale Grouting of Abandoned In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mineral Reactions in Colorado Oil Shale," Lawrence Livermore1978. of Decomposition of Colorado Oil Shale: II. LivermoreEffects Lawrence of Steam on Oil Shale Retorting: Livermore

Fox, J.P.; Persoff, P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Interior acts on oil shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Interior acts on oil shale ... The Interior Department has taken the first step to open up the vast oil-shale deposits on public lands. ... According to Secretary of the Interior Stewart L. Udall, the new program is designed to encourage competition in developing oil-shale resources, prevent speculation and windfall profits, promote mining operation and production practices that are consistent with good conservation management, encourage the fullest use of the resources, and provide reasonable revenues to the states and to the Federal Government. ...

1967-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

60

Oil shale retorting method and apparatus  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed is an improved method and apparatus for the retorting of oil shale and the formation of spent oil shale having improved cementation properties. The improved method comprises passing feed comprising oil shale to a contacting zone wherein the feed oil shale is contacted with heat transfer medium to heat said shale to retorting temperature. The feed oil shale is substantially retorted to form fluid material having heating value and forming partially spent oil shale containing carbonaceous material. At least a portion of the partially spent oil shale is passed to a combustion zone wherein the partially spent oil shale is contacted with oxidizing gas comprising oxygen and steam to substantially combust carbonaceous material forming spent oil shale having improved cementation properties.

York, E.D.

1983-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Design of Bulk Railway Terminals for the Shale Oil and Gas Industry C. Tyler Dick1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 1 Design of Bulk Railway Terminals for the Shale Oil and Gas Industry C. Tyler Dick1 , P.E., M: Railway transportation is playing a key role in the development of many new shale oil and gas reserves in North America. In the rush to develop new shale oil and gas plays, sites for railway transload terminals

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

62

North Dakota and Texas help boost U.S. oil reserves to highest...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in total U.S. oil reserves, driven by the continued development of North Dakota's Bakken shale formation. North Dakota's proved oil reserves now exceeds the oil reserves in the...

63

Carbon sequestration in depleted oil shale deposits  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus are described for sequestering carbon dioxide underground by mineralizing the carbon dioxide with coinjected fluids and minerals remaining from the extraction shale oil. In one embodiment, the oil shale of an illite-rich oil shale is heated to pyrolyze the shale underground, and carbon dioxide is provided to the remaining depleted oil shale while at an elevated temperature. Conditions are sufficient to mineralize the carbon dioxide.

Burnham, Alan K; Carroll, Susan A

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

64

Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Acquisitions ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

65

CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ABANDONED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recovery Vent gas '\\Raw shale oil Recycled gas compressorThis process produces shale oil, a low BTU gas, and char,Oil Shale Process" in Oil Shale and Tar Sands, J. W. Smith

Persoff, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

POLYVINYLCHLORIDE WASTE WITH OIL SHALE ASH TO CAPTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alkaline oil shale ash. Solid heat carrier (Galoter process)-type oil shale retorting units, where the

V. Oja; A. Elenurm; I. Rohtla; E. Tearo; E. Tali

67

61. Nelson, D. C. Oil Shale: New Technologies Defining New Opportunities. Presented at the Platts Rockies Gas & Oil Conference, Denver, CO, April  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

61. Nelson, D. C. Oil Shale: New Technologies Defining New Opportunities. Presented at the Platts I, II Modeling of the In-Situ Production of Oil from .',1 l ',".1" Oil Shale ilil 'I' 'I~ :' l of conventional oil reserves amidst increasing liquid fuel demand in the world have renewed interest in oil shale

Kulp, Mark

68

H.R. 817: A Bill to authorize the Secretary of Energy to lease lands within the naval oil shale reserves to private entities for the development and production of oil and natural gas. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session  

SciTech Connect

This bill would give the Secretary of Energy authority to lease lands within the Naval oil shale reserves to private entities for the purpose of surveying for and developing oil and gas resources from the land (other than oil shale). It also allows the Bureau of Land Management to be used as a leasing agent, establishes rules on royalties, and the sharing of royalties with the state, and covers the transfer of existing equipment.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Spent Shale Grouting of Abandoned In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the grout. SPENT SHALE Oil shale, which is a low-gradeMineral Reactions in Colorado Oil Shale," Lawrence Livermore1978. of Decomposition of Colorado Oil Shale: II. Livermore

Fox, J.P.; Persoff, P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Ammonia evolution during oil shale pyrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ammonia evolution during oil shale pyrolysis ... Parallel pyrolytic studies were carried out on an immature, ultralaminae-rich, type I kerogen (Göynük oil shale kerogen) and a related algaenan (isolated from the extant green microalga Scenedesmus communis). ...

Myongsook S. Oh; Robert W. Taylor; Thomas T. Coburn; Richard W. Crawford

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Oil shale technology. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This collaborative project with industrial participants studied oil shale retorting through an integrated program of fundamental research, mathematical model development and operation of a 4-tonne-per-day solid recirculation oil shale test unit. Quarterly, project personnel presented progress and findings to a Project Guidance Committee consisting of company representatives and DOE program management. We successfully operated the test unit, developed the oil shale process (OSP) mathematical model, evaluated technical plans for process scale up and determined economics for a successful small scale commercial deployment, producing premium motor fuel, specility chemicals along with electricity co-production. In budget negotiations, DOE funding for this three year CRADA was terminated, 17 months prematurely, as of October 1993. Funds to restore the project and continue the partnership have not been secured.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Heat Requirements for Retorting Oil Shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heat Requirements for Retorting Oil Shale ... Converting Oil Shale to Liquid Fuels: Energy Inputs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of the Shell in Situ Conversion Process ... Converting Oil Shale to Liquid Fuels: Energy Inputs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of the Shell in Situ Conversion Process ...

H. W. Sohns; L. E. Mitchell; R. J. Cox; W. I. Barnet; W. I. R. Murphy

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Oil shale technology and evironmental aspects  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale processes are a combination of mining, retorting, and upgrading facilities. This work outlines the processing steps and some design considerations required in an oil shale facility. A brief overview of above ground and in situ retorts is presented; 6 retorts are described. The development aspects which the oil shale industry is addressing to protect the environment are presented.

Scinta, J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Australian developments in oil shale processing  

SciTech Connect

This study gives some background on Australian oil shale deposits, briefly records some history of oil shale processing in the country and looks at the current status of the various proposals being considered to produce syncrudes from Australian oil shales. 5 refs.

Baker, G.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ABANDONED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the carbon, oil, and gas from the shale are combusted; andceases •t II Burner gas and shale heat shale ll>" ~Air AirFigure 2. Oil recovery Vent gas '\\Raw shale oil Recycled gas

Persoff, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Oil Reserves and Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Oil Reserves and Production Eric Drake The growth of world energy requirements over the last...remaining proved recoverable reserves will probably decline continuously...to grow. The declining reserves will be insufficient to...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Chapter 2: BACKGROUND (I) Description of the coal Conversion and Oil Shale Retorting Fuel Cycles 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil shale 2.2 Coal and Oil Shale Resources energy systems retorting. Coal and oil shale resources are

unknown authors

78

Petroleum Reserves | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of gasoline for consumers in the northeastern United States. Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserve (NPOSR) has a storied history...

79

Shale oil processes ready for commercialization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shale oil processes ready for commercialization ... However, Lurgi has been in the shale processing business by itself since the 1930s, and hopes to capitalize on this experience. ... Lurgi developed the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (LR) process in concert with Ruhrgas with an eye on the U.S. shale oil markets of the future. ...

1982-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

80

Shale Oil Value Enhancement Research  

SciTech Connect

Raw kerogen oil is rich in heteroatom-containing compounds. Heteroatoms, N, S & O, are undesirable as components of a refinery feedstock, but are the basis for product value in agrochemicals, pharmaceuticals, surfactants, solvents, polymers, and a host of industrial materials. An economically viable, technologically feasible process scheme was developed in this research that promises to enhance the economics of oil shale development, both in the US and elsewhere in the world, in particular Estonia. Products will compete in existing markets for products now manufactured by costly synthesis routes. A premium petroleum refinery feedstock is also produced. The technology is now ready for pilot plant engineering studies and is likely to play an important role in developing a US oil shale industry.

James W. Bunger

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM A SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minor elements in oil shale and oil~shale products, LERCmercury to the oil shale, shale oil, and retort water. Thesemercury to spent shale, shale oil, retort water and offgas

Fox, J. P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources: An Assessment of 137 Shale Formations in 41 Countries Outside the United States June 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 June 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources 1 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or

83

I. Canada EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment I. CANADA SUMMARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by this resource study. Figure I-1 illustrates certain of the major shale gas and shale oil basins in

unknown authors

84

Jordan ships oil shale to China  

SciTech Connect

Jordan and China have signed an agreement to develop oil shale processing technology that could lead to a 200 ton/day oil shale plant in Jordan. China will process 1200 tons of Jordanian oil shale at its Fu Shun refinery. If tests are successful, China could build the demonstration plant in Jordan's Lajjun region, where the oil shale resource is estimated at 1.3 billion tons. China plans to send a team to Jordan to conduct a plant design study. A Lajjun oil shale complex could produce as much as 50,000 b/d of shale oil. An earlier 500 ton shipment of shale is said to have yielded promising results.

Not Available

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Separation and Purification Technology 40 (2004) 251257 Copper and zinc sorption by treated oil shale ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jordanian oil shale ash was used as an adsorbent for the removal of copper and zinc from aqueous solution.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Oil shale; Ash; Adsorption; Copper and zinc removal 1. IntroductionSeparation and Purification Technology 40 (2004) 251­257 Copper and zinc sorption by treated oil

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

86

Technology experience and economics of oil shale mining in Estonia  

SciTech Connect

The exhaustion of fuel-energy resources became an evident problem of the European continent in the 1960s. Careful utilization of their own reserves of coal, oil, and gas (Germany, France, Spain) and assigned shares of imports of these resources make up the strategy of economic development of the European countries. The expansion of oil shale utilization is the most topical problem. The experience of mining oil shale deposits in Estonia and Russia, in terms of the practice and the economic results, is reviewed in this article. The room-and-pillar method of underground mining and the open-cut technology of clearing the ground ensure the fertility of a soil. The economics of underground and open pit oil shale mines is analyzed in terms of natural, organizational, and technical factors. These analyses are used in the planning and management of oil shale mining enterprises. The perspectives of the oil shale mining industry of Estonia and the economic expediency of multiproduction are examined. Recommendations and guidelines for future industrial utilization of oil shale are given in the summary.

Fraiman, J.; Kuzmiv, I. [Estonian Oil Shale State Co., Jyhvi (Estonia). Scientific Research Center

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

POTENTIAL USES OF SPENT SHALE IN THE TREATMENT OF OIL SHALE RETORT WATERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pore-volume study of retorted oil shale," Lawrence Livermoreits contact with the oil and shale. The gas condensate, onkinetics between and oil-shale residual carbon. 1. co Effect

Fox, J.P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

POTENTIAL USES OF SPENT SHALE IN THE TREATMENT OF OIL SHALE RETORT WATERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pore-volume study of retorted oil shale," Lawrence Livermorekinetics between and oil-shale residual carbon. 1. co Effectkinetics between and oil-shale residual carbon. 2. co 2

Fox, J.P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

POTENTIAL USES OF SPENT SHALE IN THE TREATMENT OF OIL SHALE RETORT WATERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pore-volume study of retorted oil shale," Lawrence LivermoreReaction kinetics between and oil-shale residual carbon. 1.Reaction kinetics between and oil-shale residual carbon. 2.

Fox, J.P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Exploiting heavy oil reserves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

North Sea investment potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Beneath the waves in 3D Aberdeen the potential of heavy oil 8/9 Taking the legal lessons learned in the north Sea to a global audience 10 potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Aberdeen: A community of science AT WORK FOR THE ENERGY SECTOR ISSUE

Levi, Ran

91

Developments in oil shale in 1987  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale development continued at a slow pace in 1987. The continuing interest in this commodity is demonstrated by the 342 oil shale citations added to the US Department of Energy Energy Database during 1987. The Unocal project in Parachute, Colorado, produced 600,000 bbl of synfuel in 1987. An appreciable amount of 1987's activity was associated with the nonsynfuel uses of oil shale. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Knutson, C.F.; Dana, G.F.; Solti, G.; Qian, J.L.; Ball, F.D.; Hutton, A.C.; Hanna, J.; Russell, P.L.; Piper, E.M.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHIC ANALYSIS AND FACIES ARCHITECTURE OF THE CRETACEOUS MANCOS SHALE ON AND NEAR THE JICARILLA APACHE INDIAN RESERVATION, NEW MEXICO-THEIR RELATION TO SITES OF OIL ACCUMULATION  

SciTech Connect

Oil distribution in the lower part of the Mancos Shale seems to be mainly controlled by fractures and by sandier facies that are dolomite-cemented. Structure in the area of the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation consists of the broad northwest- to southeast-trending Chaco slope, the deep central basin, and the monocline that forms the eastern boundary of the San Juan Basin. Superimposed on the regional structure are broad low-amplitude folds. Fractures seem best developed in the areas of these folds. Using sequence stratigraphic principals, the lower part of the Mancos Shale has been subdivided into four main regressive and transgressive components. These include facies that are the basinal time equivalents to the Gallup Sandstone, an overlying interbedded sandstone and shale sequence time equivalent to the transgressive Mulatto Tongue of the Mancos Shale, the El Vado Sandstone Member which is time equivalent to part of the Dalton Sandstone, and an unnamed interbedded sandstone and shale succession time equivalent to the regressive Dalton Sandstone and transgressive Hosta Tongue of the Mesaverde Group. Facies time equivalent to the Gallup Sandstone underlie an unconformity of regional extent. These facies are gradually truncated from south to north across the Reservation. The best potential for additional oil resources in these facies is in the southern part of the Reservation where the top sandier part of these facies is preserved. The overlying unnamed wedge of transgressive rocks produces some oil but is underexplored, except for sandstones equivalent to the Tocito Sandstone. This wedge of rocks is divided into from two to five units. The highest sand content in this wedge occurs where each of the four subdivisions above the Tocito terminates to the south and is overstepped by the next youngest unit. These terminal areas should offer the best targets for future oil exploration. The El Vado Sandstone Member overlies the transgressive wedge. It produces most of the oil (except for the Tocito Sandstone) from the lower Mancos. In the central and southern part of the Reservation, large areas, currently not productive or not tested, have the potential to contain oil in the El Vado simply based on the trend of the facies and structure. There has been little oil or gas production from the overlying regressive-transgressive wedge of rock and much of this interval is untested. Thus, large areas of the Reservation could contain hydrocarbon resources in these strata. Most of the Reservation lies within the oil generation window based on new Rock-Eval data from the Mancos Shale just south of the southern part of the Reservation. If these observations are valid then oil could have been generated locally and would only have needed to migrate short distances in to sandy reservoirs and fractures. This does not rule out long distance migration of oil from the deeper, more thermally mature part of the basin to the north. However, low porosity and permeability characterize sandier rocks in the Mancos, with the exception of Tocito-like sandstones. These factors could retard long distance oil migration through the sediment package, except through fracture or fault conduits. Thus, it is suggested that future oil and gas explorations in the Mancos treat the accumulations and reservoirs as unconventional and consider whether the source and reservoir are in closer proximity than has previously been assumed.

Jennie Ridgley

2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Method for retorting oil shale  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The recovery of oil from oil shale is provided in a fluidized bed by using a fluidizing medium of a binary mixture of carbon dioxide and 5 steam. The mixture with a steam concentration in the range of about 20 to 75 volume percent steam provides an increase in oil yield over that achievable by using a fluidizing gas of carbon dioxide or steam alone when the mixture contains higher steam concentrations. The operating parameters for the fluidized bed retorted are essentially the same as those utilized with other gaseous fluidizing mediums with the significant gain being in the oil yield recovered which is attributable solely to the use of the binary mixture of carbon dioxide and steam. 2 figs.

Shang, Jer-Yu; Lui, A.P.

1985-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

94

Decline Curve Analysis of Shale Oil Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Production of oil and gas from shale is often described as a revolution to energyproduction in North America. Since the beginning of this century… (more)

Lund, Linnea

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Production of hydrogen from oil shale  

SciTech Connect

A process for production of hydrogen from oil shale fines by direct introduction of the oil shale fines into a fluidized bed at temperatures about 1200/sup 0/ to about 2000/sup 0/ F. to obtain rapid heating of the oil shale. The bed is fluidized by upward passage of steam and oxygen, the steam introduced in the weight ratio of about 0.1 to about 10 on the basis of the organic carbon content of the oil shale and the oxygen introduced in less than the stoichiometric quantity for complete combustion of the organic carbonaceous kerogen content of the oil shale. Embodiments are disclosed for heat recovery from the spent shale and heat recovery from the spent shale and product gas wherein the complete process and heat recovery is carried out in a single reaction vessel. The process of this invention provides high conversion of organic carbon component of oil shale and high production of hydrogen from shale fines which when used in combination with a conventional oil shale hydroconversion process results in increased overall process efficiency of greater than 15 percent.

Schora, F. C.; Feldkirchner, H. L.; Janka, J. C.

1985-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

96

Heat of combustion of Green River oil shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heat of combustion of Green River oil shale ... AMSO’s Novel Approach to In-Situ Oil Shale Recovery ... AMSO’s Novel Approach to In-Situ Oil Shale Recovery ...

Michael J. Muehlbauer; Alan K. Burnham

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Control Strategies for Abandoned in situ Oil Shale Retorts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presented elt the TUJelfth Oil Shale Synlposittnz, Golden,for Abandoned In Situ Oil Shale Retorts P. Persoll and ]. P.Water Pollution of Spent Oil Shale Residues, EDB Lea,

Persoff, P.; Fox, J.P.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ABANDONED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Controls for a Commercial Oil Shale In~try, Vol. I, An En~in Second Briefing on In-Situ Oil Shale Technology, LawrenceReactions in Colorado Oil Shale, Lawrence Report UCRL-

Persoff, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P.K. Mehta and P. Persoff AprilCement Manufacture from Oil Shale, U.S. Patent 2,904,445,CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P, K, Mehta Civil Engineering

Mehta, P.K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

20 to 40% of the oil shale, and explosively rubblizing andCEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P.K. Mehta and P. Persoff AprilCement Manufacture from Oil Shale, U.S. Patent 2,904,445,

Mehta, P.K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

ORGANIC GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND MINERALOGIC PROPERTIES OF MENGEN OIL SHALE (LUTETIAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, lignite, and oil shale sequences. Oil shale deposit has been accumulated in shallow restricted back

unknown authors

102

Microsoft Word - Oil Shale Research in the United States 2011_Draft2.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil Shale Research in the United States Oil Shale Research in the United States ______________________________________________________________________________ Profiles of Oil Shale Research and Development Activities In Universities, National Laboratories, and Public Agencies Prepared by INTEK, Inc. For the U.S. Department of Energy * Office of Petroleum Reserves Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Third Edition: September 2011 3 rd Edition Acknowledgements This report was prepared by INTEK, Inc. for the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves (DOE/NPOSR) as a part of the AOC Petroleum Support Services, LLC (AOC-PSS) Contract Number DE-FE0000175 (Task 30). Mr. James C. Killen of DOE served as Technical Monitor and Mr. Khosrow Biglarbigi of INTEK, Inc. served as the Project Manager.

103

Method for forming an in-situ oil shale retort in differing grades of oil shale  

SciTech Connect

An in-situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The formation comprises at least one region of relatively richer oil shale and another region of relatively leaner oil shale. According to one embodiment, formation is excavated from within a retort site for forming at least one void extending horizontally across the retort site, leaving a portion of unfragmented formation including the regions of richer and leaner oil shale adjacent such a void space. A first array of vertical blast holes are drilled in the regions of richer and leaner oil shale, and a second array of blast holes are drilled at least in the region of richer oil shale. Explosive charges are placed in portions of the blast holes in the first and second arrays which extend into the richer oil shale, and separate explosive charges are placed in portions of the blast holes in the first array which extend into the leaner oil shale. This provides an array with a smaller scaled depth of burial (sdob) and closer spacing distance between explosive charges in the richer oil shale than the sdob and spacing distance of the array of explosive charges in the leaner oil shale. The explosive charges are detonated for explosively expanding the regions of richer and leaner oil shale toward the horizontal void for forming a fragmented mass of particles. Upon detonation of the explosive, greater explosive energy is provided collectively by the explosive charges in the richer oil shale, compared with the explosive energy produced by the explosive charges in the leaner oil shale, resulting in comparable fragmentation in both grades of oil shale.

Ricketts, T.E.

1984-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

104

TREATMENT OF MULTIVARIATE ENVIRONMENTAL AND HEALTH PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH OIL SHALE TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemicals Identified in Oil Shale and Shale Oil. list." 1.of Trace Contaminants in Oil Shale Retort Wa- ters", Am.Trace Contaminants in Oil Shale Retort Waters", in Oil Shale

Kland, M.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

INTERLABORATORY, MULTIMETHOD STUDY OF AN IN SITU PRODUCED OIL SHALE PROCESS WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minor Elements in Oil Shale and Oil Shale Products. LERCfor Use 1n Oil Shale and Shale Oil. OSRD-32, 1945. Jeris, J.Water coproduced with shale oil and decanted from it is

Farrier, D.S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

TREATMENT OF MULTIVARIATE ENVIRONMENTAL AND HEALTH PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH OIL SHALE TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identified in Oil Shale and Shale Oil. list." 1. Preliminaryrisks of large scale shale oil production are sufficient tofound in oil shale and shale oil by EMIC and ETIC, has

Kland, M.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

EA-0531: Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31: Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil 31: Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3, Garfield County, Colorado EA-0531: Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3, Garfield County, Colorado SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for a Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3 which would be implemented over a five-year period that would encompass a total of 200 wells in Garfield County, Colorado. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 9, 1991 EA-0531: Final Environmental Assessment Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3 August 9, 1991 EA-0531: Finding of No Significant Impact

108

Conversion characteristics of 10 selected oil shales  

SciTech Connect

The conversion behavior of 10 oil shale from seven foreign and three domestic deposits has been studied by combining solid- and liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements with material balance Fischer assay conversion data. The extent of aromatization of aliphatic carbons was determined. Between zero and 42% of the raw shale aliphatic carbon formed aromatic carbon during Fischer assay. For three of the shales, there was more aromatic carbon in the residue after Fisher assay than in the raw shale. Between 10 and 20% of the raw shale aliphatic carbons ended up as aliphatic carbons on the spent shale. Good correlations were found between the raw shale aliphatic carbon and carbon in the oil and between the raw shale aromatic carbon and aromatic carbon on the spent shale. Simulated distillations and molecular weight determinations were performed on the shale oils. Greater than 50% of the oil consisted of the atmospheric and vacuum gas oil boiling fractions. 14 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

Miknis, F.P.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Chemical kinetics and oil shale process design  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale processes are reviewed with the goal of showing how chemical kinetics influences the design and operation of different processes for different types of oil shale. Reaction kinetics are presented for organic pyrolysis, carbon combustion, carbonate decomposition, and sulfur and nitrogen reactions.

Burnham, A.K.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Nitrogen chemistry during oil shale pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect

Real time evolution of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN), two major nitrogen-containing volatiles evolved during oil shale pyrolysis, was measured by means of a mass spectrometer using chemical ionization and by infrared spectroscopy. While the on-line monitoring of NH{sub 3} in oil shale pyrolysis games was possible by both techniques, HCN measurements were only possible by IR. We studied one Green River Formation oil shale and one New Albany oil shale. The ammonia from the Green River oil shale showed one broad NH{sub 3} peak maximizing at a high temperature. For both oil shales, most NH{sub 3} evolves at temperatures above oil-evolving temperature. The important factors governing ammonia salts such as Buddingtonite in Green River oil shales, the distribution of nitrogen functional groups in kerogen, and the retorting conditions. The gas phase reactions, such as NH{sub 3} decomposition and HCN conversion reactions, also play an important role in the distribution of nitrogen volatiles, especially at high temperatures. Although pyrolysis studies of model compounds suggests the primary nitrogen product from kerogen pyrolysis to be HCN at high temperatures, we found only a trace amount of HCN at oil-evolving temperatures and none at high temperatures (T {gt} 600{degree}C). 24 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Oh, Myongsook S.; Crawford, R.W.; Foster, K.G.; Alcaraz, A.

1990-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

111

,"Alaska (with Total Offshore) Shale Proved Reserves (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska (with Total Offshore) Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","124...

112

,"Texas--State Offshore Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas--State Offshore Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2010 ,"Release Date:","124...

113

,"Alabama (with State Offshore) Shale Proved Reserves (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama (with State Offshore) Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2010 ,"Release Date:","124...

114

,"Louisiana (with State Offshore) Shale Proved Reserves (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana (with State Offshore) Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","124...

115

,"Texas (with State Offshore) Shale Proved Reserves (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas (with State Offshore) Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","124...

116

Expansion of the commercial output of Estonian oil shale mining and processing  

SciTech Connect

Economic and ecological preconditions are considered for the transition from monoproduct oil shale mining to polyproduct Estonian oil shale deposits. Underground water, limestone, and underground heat found in oil shale mines with small reserves can be operated for a long time using chambers left after oil shale extraction. The adjacent fields of the closed mines can be connected to the operations of the mines that are still working. Complex usage of natural resources of Estonian oil shale deposits is made possible owing to the unique features of its geology and technology. Oil shale seam development is carried out at shallow depths (40--70 m) in stable limestones and does not require expensive maintenance. Such natural resources as underground water, carbonate rocks, heat of rock mass, and underground chambers are opened by mining and are ready for utilization. Room-and-pillar mining does not disturb the surface, and worked oil shale and greenery waste heaps do not breach its ecology. Technical decisions and economic evaluation are presented for the complex utilization of natural resources in the boundaries of mine take of the ``Tammiku`` underground mine and the adjacent closed mine N2. Ten countries have already experienced industrial utilization of oil shale in small volumes for many years. Usually oil shale deposits are not notable for complex geology of the strata and are not deeply bedded. Thus complex utilization of quite extensive natural resources of Estonian oil shale deposits is of both scientific and practical interest.

Fraiman, J.; Kuzmiv, I. [Estonian Oil Shale State Co., Jyhvi (Estonia). Scientific Research Center

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Table 15: Shale natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, w  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Shale natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011" : Shale natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011" "billion cubic feet" ,,"Changes in Reserves During 2011" ,"Published",,,,,,,,"New Reservoir" ,"Proved",,"Revision","Revision",,,,"New Field","Discoveries","Estimated","Proved" ,"Reserves","Adjustments","Increases","Decreases","Sales","Acquisitions","Extensions","Discoveries","in Old Fields","Production","Reserves" "State and Subdivision",40543,"(+,-)","(+)","(-)","(-)","(+)","(+)","(+)","(+)","(-)",40908

118

Investigation and development of alternative methods for shale oil processing and analysis. Final technical report, October 1979--April 1983  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale, a carbonaceous rock which occurs abundantly in the earth`s crust, has been investigated for many years as an alternate source of fuel oil. The insoluble organic matter contained in such shales is termed {open_quotes}Kerogen{close_quotes} from the Greek meaning oil or oil forming. The kerogen in oil shale breaks down into oil-like products when subjected to conditions simulating destructive distillation. These products have been the subject of extensive investigations by several researchers and many of the constituents of shale oil have been identified. (1) Forsman (2) estimates that the kerogen content of the earth is roughly 3 {times} 10{sup 15} tons as compared to total coal reserves of about 5 {times} 10{sup 12}. Although the current cost per barrel estimate for commercial production of shale oil is higher than that of fossil oil, as our oil reserves continue to dwindle, shale oil technology will become more and more important. When oil shale is heated, kerogen is said to undergo chemical transformation to usable oil in two steps (3): Kerogen (in oil shale) 300-500{degrees}C bitumen. Crude shale oil and other products. The crude shale oil so obtained differs from fossil oil in that: (1) kerogen is thought to have been produced from the aging of plant matter over many years; (2) shale oil has a higher nitrogen content than fossil oil; (3) non-hydrocarbons are present to a much greater extent in shale oil; and (4) the hydrocarbons in shale oil are much more unsaturated than those in fossil oil (petroleum).

Evans, R.A.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Secure Fuels from Domestic Resources- Oil Shale and Tar Sands  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Profiles of Companies Engaged in Domestic Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource and Technology Development

120

Morphological Investigations of Fibrogenic Action of Estonian Oil Shale Dust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dust produced in the mining and processing of Estonian oil shale is given. Histological examination of

V. A. Kung

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

LLNL oil shale project review: METC third annual oil shale contractors meeting  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory combines laboratory and pilot-scale experimental measurements with mathematical modeling of fundamental chemistry and physics to provide a technical base for evaluating oil shale retorting alternatives. Presented herein are results of four research areas of interest in oil shale process development: Recent Progress in Solid-Recycle Retorting and Related Laboratory and Modeling Studies; Water Generation During Pyrolysis of Oil Shale; Improved Analytical Methods and Measurements of Rapid Pyrolysis Kinetics for Western and Eastern Oil Shale; and Rate of Cracking or Degradation of Oil Vapor In Contact with Oxidized Shale. We describe operating results of a 1 tonne-per-day, continuous-loop, solid-recycle, retort processing both Western And Eastern oil shale. Sulfur chemistry, solid mixing limits, shale cooling tests and catalyst addition are all discussed. Using a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer, we measure individual species evolution with greater sensitivity and selectivity. Herein we discuss our measurements of water evolution during ramped heating of Western and Eastern oil shale. Using improved analytical techniques, we determine isothermal pyrolysis kinetics for Western and Eastern oil shale, during rapid heating, which are faster than previously thought. Finally, we discuss the rate of cracking of oil vapor in contact with oxidized shale, qualitatively using a sand fluidized bed and quantitatively using a vapor cracking apparatus. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Cena, R.J.; Coburn, T.T.; Taylor, R.W.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Fluidized bed retorting of eastern oil shale  

SciTech Connect

This topical report summarizes the conceptual design of an integrated oil shale processing plant based on fluidized bed retorting of eastern New Albany oil shale. This is the fourth design study conducted by Foster Wheeler; previous design cases employed the following technologies: Fluidized bed rotating/combustion of Colorado Mahogany zone shale. An FCC concept of fluidized bed retorting/combustion of Colorado Mahogany zone shale. Directly heated moving vertical-bed process using Colorado Mahogany zone shale. The conceptual design encompasses a grassroots facility which processes run-of-mine oil shale into a syncrude oil product and dispose of the spent shale solids. The plant has a nominal capacity of 50,000 barrels per day of syncrude product, produced from oil shale feed having a Fischer Assay of 15 gallons per ton. Design of the processing units was based on non-confidential published information and supplemental data from process licensors. Maximum use of process and cost information developed in the previous Foster Wheeler studies was employed. The integrated plant design is described in terms of the individual process units and plant support systems. The estimated total plant investment is detailed by plant section and estimates of the annual operating requirements and costs are provided. In addition, process design assumptions and uncertainties are documented and recommendations for process alternatives, which could improve the overall plant economics, are discussed. 12 refs., 17 figs., 52 tabs.

Gaire, R.J.; Mazzella, G.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Unconventional oil market assessment: ex situ oil shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis focused on exploring the economic limitations for the development of western oil shale. The analysis was developed by scaling a known process and… (more)

Castro-Dominguez, Bernardo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

In situ retorting or oil shale  

SciTech Connect

An improved method of in situ retorting of oil shale wherein a cavern of crushed shale is created within an oil shale deposit, preferably by igniting a powerful explosion within the oil shale deposit, thereby creating a localized area or cavern of rubblized oil shale. Combustion gases are injected into the bottom of this cavern and particulate material, preferably a cracking catalyst, is deposited into a void at the top of the cavern and allowed to trickle down and fill the voids in the rubblized cavern. The oil shale is ignited at the bottom of the cavern and a combustion zone proceeds upwardly while the particulate material is caused by gas flow to percolate downwardly. A fluidized bed of particulate material is thereby formed at the combustion zone providing a controlled, evelny advancing combustion zone. This, in turn, efficiently retorts oil shale, provides increased recovery of hydrocarbon while ismultaneously producing a catalytically cracked volatile, high octane gasoline exiting from the top of the retort.

Hettinger, W.P. Jr.

1984-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

125

Gasification characteristics of eastern oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is evaluating the gasification characteristics of Eastern oil shales as a part of a cooperative agreement between the US Department of Energy and HYCRUDE Corporation to expand the data base on moving-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales. Gasification of shale fines will improve the overall resource utilization by producing synthesis gas or hydrogen needed for the hydroretorting of oil shale and the upgrading of shale oil. Gasification characteristics of an Indiana New Albany oil shale have been determined over temperature and pressure ranges of 1600 to 1900/sup 0/F and 15 to 500 psig, respectively. Carbon conversion of over 95% was achieved within 30 minutes at gasification conditions of 1800/sup 0/F and 15 psig in a hydrogen/steam gas mixture for the Indiana New Albany oil shale. This paper presents the results of the tests conducted in a laboratory-scale batch reactor to obtain reaction rate data and in a continuous mini-bench-scale unit to obtain product yield data. 2 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Lau, F.S.; Rue, D.M.; Punwani, D.V.; Rex, R.C. Jr.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Insulated dipole antennas for heating oil shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Insulated dipole antennas in the HF band are potentially useful in heating shale i n s i t u to extract oil. To help evaluate the efficiency of such antennas the spatial distribution of the power absorbed per unit volume in the shale is computed.

John P. Casey; Rajeev Bansal

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Differential thermal analysis of the reaction properties of raw and retorted oil shale with air  

SciTech Connect

The results of a study to determine the kinetics of combustion of oil shale and its char by using differential thermal analysis are reported. The study indicates that Colorado oil shale and its char combustion rate is the fastest while Fushun oil shale and its char combustion rate is the slowest among the six oil shales used in this work. Oil shale samples used were Fushun oil shale, Maoming oil shale, Huang county oil shale, and Colorado oil shale.

Wang, T.F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Adsorption of pyridine by combusted oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Large volumes of solid waste material will be produced during the commercial production of shale oil. An alternative to the disposal of the solid waste product is utilization. One potential use of spent oil shale is for the stabilization of hazardous organic compounds. The objective of this study was to examine the adsorption of pyridine, commonly found in oil shale process water, by spent oil shale. The adsorption of pyridine by fresh and weathered samples of combusted New Albany Shale and Green River Formation oil shale was examined. In general, pyridine adsorption can be classified as L-type and the isotherms modeled with the Langmuir and Freundlich equations. For the combusted New Albany Shale, weathering reduced the predicted pyridine adsorption maximum and increased the amount of pyridine adsorption maximum. The pyridine adsorption isotherms were similar to those mathematically described by empirical models, the reduction in solution concentrations of pyridine was generally less than 10 mg L{sup {minus}1} at an initial concentration of 100 mg L{sup {minus}1}. 31 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Essington, M.E.; Hart, B.K.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Mycorrhizal Species Dominate the Soil-Fungal Community in Estonian Oil Shale-Ash Hills Charles Cowden, Sam Willis, and Richard Shefferson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mycorrhizal Species Dominate the Soil-Fungal Community in Estonian Oil Shale-Ash Hills Charles 30602 Introduction Estonia relies on vast reserves of oil shale to produce electricity. The mining and burning of oil shale is extremely inefficient and produces large quantities of tailings and ash (Vallner

Shefferson, Richard P.

130

Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale Julien Ston Supervisors : Prof. Karen properties. SCMs can be by-products from various industries or of natural origin, such as shale. Oil shale correctly, give a material with some cementitious properties known as burned oil shale (BOS). This study

Dalang, Robert C.

131

Pyrolysis of shale oil vacuum distillate fractions  

SciTech Connect

The freezing point of US Navy jet fuel (JP-5) has been related to the amounts of large n-alkanes present in the fuel. This behavior applies to jet fuels derived from alternate fossil fuel resources, such as shale oil, coal, and tar sands, as well as those derived from petroleum. In general, jet fuels from shale oil have the highest and those from coal the lowest n-alkane content. The origin of these n-alkanes in the amounts observed, especially in shale-derived fuels, is not readily explained on the basis of literature information. Studies of the processes, particularly the ones involving thermal stress, used to produce these fuels are needed to define how the n-alkanes form from larger molecules. The information developed will significantly contribute to the selection of processes and refining techniques for future fuel production from shale oil. Carbon-13 nmr studies indicate that oil shale rock contains many long unbranched straight chain hydrocarbon groups. The shale oil derived from the rock also gives indication of considerable straight chain material with large peaks at 14, 23, 30, and 32 ppM in the C-13 nmr spectrum. Previous pyrolysis studies stressed fractions of shale crude oil residua, measured the yields of JP-5, and determined the content of potential n-alkanes in the JP-5 distillation range (4). In this work, a shale crude oil vacuum distillate (Paraho) was separated into three chemical fractions. The fractions were then subjected to nmr analysis to estimate the potential for n-alkane production and to pyrolysis studies to determine an experimental n-alkane yield.

Hazlett, R.N.; Beal, E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Pyrolysis of shale oil vacuum distillate fractions  

SciTech Connect

The freezing point of U.S. Navy jet fuel (JP-5) has been related to the amounts of large nalkanes present in the fuel. This behavior applies to jet fuels derived from alternate fossil fuel resources, such as shale oil, coal, and tar sands, as well as those derived from petroleum. In general, jet fuels from shale oil have the highest and those from coal the lowest n-alkane content. The origin of these n-alkanes in the amounts observed, especially in shale-derived fuels, is not readily explained on the basis of literature information. Studies of the processes, particularly the ones involving thermal stress, used to produce these fuels are needed to define how th n-alkanes form from larger molecules. The information developed will significantly contribute to the selection of processes and refining techniques for future fuel production from shale oil. Carbon-13 nmr studies indicate that oil shale rock contains many long unbranched straight chain hydrocarbon groups. The shale oil derived from the rock also gives indication of considerable straight chain material with large peaks at 14, 23, 30 and 32 ppm in the C-13 nmr spectrum. Previous pyrolysis studies stressed fractions of shale crude oil residua, measured the yields of JP-5, and determined the content of potential n-alkanes in the JP-5 distillation range (4). In this work, a shale crude oil vacuum distillate (Paraho) was separated into three chemical fractions. The fractions were then subjected to nmr analysis to estimate the potential for n-alkane production and to pyrolysis studies to determine an experimental n-alkane yield.

Hazlett, R.N.; Beal, E.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Apparatus for oil shale retorting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cascading bed retorting process and apparatus in which cold raw crushed shale enters at the middle of a retort column into a mixer stage where it is rapidly mixed with hot recycled shale and thereby heated to pyrolysis temperature. The heated mixture then passes through a pyrolyzer stage where it resides for a sufficient time for complete pyrolysis to occur. The spent shale from the pyrolyzer is recirculated through a burner stage where the residual char is burned to heat the shale which then enters the mixer stage.

Lewis, Arthur E. (Los Altos, CA); Braun, Robert L. (Livermore, CA); Mallon, Richard G. (Livermore, CA); Walton, Otis R. (Livermore, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Isothermal kinetics of new Albany oil shale  

SciTech Connect

From the development of technologies for the utilization of eastern U.S. oil shales, fluidized bed pyrolysis technology is emerging as one of the most promising in terms of oil yield, operating cost, and capital investment. Bench-scale testing of eastern shales has reached a level where scale-up represents the next logical step in the evolution of this technology. A major consideration in this development and an essential part of any fluidized bed reactor scale-up effort--isothermal kinetics-- has largely been ignored for eastern US shale with the exception of a recent study conducted by Richardson et al. with a Cleveland shale. The method of Richardson et al. was used previously by Wallman et al. with western shale and has been used most recently by Forgac, also with western shale. This method, adopted for the present study, entails injecting a charge of shale into a fluidized bed and monitoring the hydrocarbon products with a flame ionization detector (FID). Advantages of this procedure are that fluidized bed heat-up effects are simulated exactly and real-time kinetics are obtained due to the on-line FID. Other isothermal methods have suffered from heat-up and cool-down effects making it impossible to observe the kinetics at realistic operating temperatures. A major drawback of the FID approach, however, is that no differentiation between oil and gas is possible.

Carter, S.D.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Management of resources and reserves for increase the use oil shale and increase of recovery of your organic matter in form of oil and gas derivatives.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work is about the use of mineral reserves through of the concepts of complete extraction and appropriate use of the ore, and considers these… (more)

Leandro Carlos dos Santos

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

USE OF ZEEMAN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF MERCURY IN OIL SHALE GASES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minor Elements in Oil Shale and Oil-Shale Products. LERC RIChemistry of Tar Sands and Oil Shale, ACS, New Orleans.Constituent Analysis of Oil Shale and Solvent-Refined Coal

Girvin, D.G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

INTERCOMPARISON STUDY OF ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES IN RAW AND SPENT OIL SHALES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minor Elements ~n Oil Shale and Oil-Shale Products. LERC RI-Analytical Chemistry of Oil Shale and Tar Sands. Advan. inH. Meglen. The Analysis of Oil-Shale Materials for Element

Fox, J.P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Oil shale mining studies and analyses of some potential unconventional uses for oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Engineering studies and literature review performed under this contract have resulted in improved understanding of oil shale mining costs, spent shale disposal costs, and potential unconventional uses for oil shale. Topics discussed include: costs of conventional mining of oil shale; a mining scenario in which a minimal-scale mine, consistent with a niche market industry, was incorporated into a mine design; a discussion on the benefits of mine opening on an accelerated schedule and quantified through discounted cash flow return on investment (DCFROI) modelling; an estimate of the costs of disposal of spent shale underground and on the surface; tabulation of potential increases in resource recovery in conjunction with underground spent shale disposal; the potential uses of oil shale as a sulfur absorbent in electric power generation; the possible use of spent shale as a soil stabilizer for road bases, quantified and evaluated for potential economic impact upon representative oil shale projects; and the feasibility of co-production of electricity and the effect of project-owned and utility-owned power generation facilities were evaluated. 24 refs., 5 figs., 19 tabs.

McCarthy, H.E.; Clayson, R.L.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Kerogen extraction from subterranean oil shale resources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to methods for extracting a kerogen-based product from subsurface (oil) shale formations, wherein such methods rely on fracturing and/or rubblizing portions of said formations so as to enhance their fluid permeability, and wherein such methods further rely on chemically modifying the shale-bound kerogen so as to render it mobile. The present invention is also directed at systems for implementing at least some of the foregoing methods. Additionally, the present invention is also directed to methods of fracturing and/or rubblizing subsurface shale formations and to methods of chemically modifying kerogen in situ so as to render it mobile.

Looney, Mark Dean (Houston, TX); Lestz, Robert Steven (Missouri City, TX); Hollis, Kirk (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig (Los Alamos, NM); Kinkead, Scott (Los Alamos, NM); Wigand, Marcus (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

140

Method for maximizing shale oil recovery from an underground formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for maximizing shale oil recovery from an underground oil shale formation which has previously been processed by in situ retorting such that there is provided in the formation a column of substantially intact oil shale intervening between adjacent spent retorts, which method includes the steps of back filling the spent retorts with an aqueous slurry of spent shale. The slurry is permitted to harden into a cement-like substance which stabilizes the spent retorts. Shale oil is then recovered from the intervening column of intact oil shale by retorting the column in situ, the stabilized spent retorts providing support for the newly developed retorts.

Sisemore, Clyde J. (Livermore, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Failure surface model for oil shale  

SciTech Connect

One promising means of recovering oil from oil shale is to retort the shale in situ. Currently, modified in situ technology requires the construction of extensive underground openings or retorts. The remaining media (structure left around these retorts must support the overburden and contain the retorting shale. A failure criterion for oil shale, which is presented in this paper, was developed so that regions in the retort structure where the shale may be approaching failure can be identified. This criterion, adapted from composite materials applications, is essentially a closed surface in six-dimensional stress space and makes it possible to describe the anisotropic nature of failure in layered materials. The failure surface can be defined by five parameters which are determined from five simple laboratory tests. The surface is developed for a 80 ml/kg kerogen content shale and its features are discussed in detail. The predictions of the model are found to be in agreement with the results of a large number of laboratory tests, including uniaxial and triaxial compression tests. One unique (for rocks) test series is discussed which involves the failure of thin-walled tubes under combined compression and torsion. Finally, it is shown how the model can be extended to include the variation of material properties with kerogen content and temperature.

Costin, L.S.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Revision Decreases...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

143

Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Sales (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

144

Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

145

Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Revision Increases...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

146

Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

147

Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

148

Characterization of DOE reference oil shales: Mahogany Zone, Parachute Creek Member, Green River Formation Oil Shale, and Clegg Creek Member, New Albany Shale  

SciTech Connect

Measurements have been made on the chemical and physical properties of two oil shales designated as reference oil shales by the Department of Energy. One oil shale is a Green River Formation, Parachute Creek Member, Mahogany Zone Colorado oil shale from the Exxon Colony mine and the other is a Clegg Creek Member, New Albany shale from Kentucky. Material balance Fischer assays, carbon aromaticities, thermal properties, and bulk mineralogic properties have been determined for the oil shales. Kerogen concentrates were prepared from both shales. The measured properties of the reference shales are comparable to results obtained from previous studies on similar shales. The western reference shale has a low carbon aromaticity, high Fischer assay conversion to oil, and a dominant carbonate mineralogy. The eastern reference shale has a high carbon aromaticity, low Fischer assay conversion to oil, and a dominant silicate mineralogy. Chemical and physical properties, including ASTM distillations, have been determined for shale oils produced from the reference shales. The distillation data were used in conjunction with API correlations to calculate a large number of shale oil properties that are required for computer models such as ASPEN. There was poor agreement between measured and calculated molecular weights for the total shale oil produced from each shale. However, measured and calculated molecular weights agreed reasonably well for true boiling point distillate fractions in the temperature range of 204 to 399/sup 0/C (400 to 750/sup 0/F). Similarly, measured and calculated viscosities of the total shale oils were in disagreement, whereas good agreement was obtained on distillate fractions for a boiling range up to 315/sup 0/C (600/sup 0/F). Thermal and dielectric properties were determined for the shales and shale oils. The dielectric properties of the reference shales and shale oils decreased with increasing frequency of the applied frequency. 42 refs., 34 figs., 24 tabs.

Miknis, F. P.; Robertson, R. E.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

A Computational Model for Explosive Fracture of Oil Shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Successful in-situ retorting of subsurface oil shale beds may depend on the ability to ... develop a mathematical model for dynamic fracture of oil shale that could be used as a subroutine...

D. A. Shockey; W. J. Murri; R. E. Tokheim; C. Young…

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Burngrange Nos.1 and 2 (oil Shale) Mine, Midlothian   

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BURNGRANGE Nos. I AND 2 (Oil Shale) MINE, MIDLOTHIAN REPORT On the Causes of, and Circumstances attending, the Explosion and Fire which occurred on the 10th January, 1947, at the Burngrange Nos. I and 2 (Oil Shale) ...

Bryan, A. M.

1947-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

1 Pore Scale Analysis of Oil Shale/Sands Pyrolysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quality and volume of pore space that is created when oil shale is pyrolyzed for the purpose of producing

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

ON OIL SHALE MINING IN THE ESTONIA DEPOSIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

age) cut the Estonian oil shale-kukersite deposits. Two younger groups of structures are typical fault

K. Sokman; V. Kattai; R. Vaher; Y. J. Systra

153

Process evaluation of the gasification of leningrad oil shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of experiments on the thermal processing of Leningrad oil shale in a laboratory reactor under the conditions...

Yu. A. Strizhakova; N. Ch. Movsum-Zade; T. A. Avakyan; T. V. Usova

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Shale Oil and Gas, Frac Sand, and Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Bakken Oil Shale scope · Light, Sweet crude ­ ideal for automotive fuels and mid-size refineries (Midwest

Minnesota, University of

155

THE SHALE OIL BOOM: A U.S. PHENOMENON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

June 2013 THE SHALE OIL BOOM: A U.S. PHENOMENON LEONARDO MAUGERI The Geopolitics of Energy Project material clearly cite the full source: Leonardo Maugeri. "The Shale Oil Boom: A U.S. Phenomenon" Discussion and International Affairs. #12;June 2013 THE SHALE OIL BOOM: A U.S. PHENOMENON LEONARDO MAUGERI The Geopolitics

156

A Century of Oil-Shale Patents (1845 to 1945)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Century of Oil-Shale Patents (1845 to 1945) ... Oil Shale Research and Demonstration Plant Division, Bureau of Mines, Department of the Interior, Washington 25, D. C. ... THE research and development program of the Bureau of Mines relating to synthetic liquid fuels includes a project for the compilation and study of all patents concerned with the treatment of oil shale and its products. ...

SIMON KLOSKY

1946-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

157

Red Leaf Resources and the Commercialization of Oil Shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Red Leaf Resources and the Commercialization of Oil Shale #12;About Red Leaf Resources 2006 Company commercial development field activities #12;Highlights Proven, Revolutionary Oil Shale Extraction Process Technology Significant Owned Oil Shale Resource #12;· The executive management team of Red Leaf Resources

Utah, University of

158

Change of Pore Structure of Oil Shale Particles during Combustion. 2. Pore Structure of Oil-Shale Ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Change of Pore Structure of Oil Shale Particles during Combustion. ... 2. Pore Structure of Oil-Shale Ash ... At present, there is a growing tendency to use low cost, commercially available oil-shale ash as a building material, a chemical filling material, an adsorbent, and so forth. ...

Xiangxin Han; Xiumin Jiang; Zhigang Cui

2008-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

159

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Information on the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve is available from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Petroleum Reserves web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/reserves/heatingoil/. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR) inventories now classified as ultra-low sulfur distillate (15 parts per million) are not considered to be in the commercial sector and therefore are excluded from distillate fuel oil supply and disposition statistics in Energy Information Administration publications, such as the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and This Week In Petroleum. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Terminal Operator Location (Thousand Barrels) Hess Corp. Groton, CT 500*

160

Oil shale retorting and combustion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to the extraction of energy values from l shale containing considerable concentrations of calcium carbonate in an efficient manner. The volatiles are separated from the oil shale in a retorting zone of a fluidized bed where the temperature and the concentration of oxygen are maintained at sufficiently low levels so that the volatiles are extracted from the oil shale with minimal combustion of the volatiles and with minimal calcination of the calcium carbonate. These gaseous volatiles and the calcium carbonate flow from the retorting zone into a freeboard combustion zone where the volatiles are burned in the presence of excess air. In this zone the calcination of the calcium carbonate occurs but at the expense of less BTU's than would be required by the calcination reaction in the event both the retorting and combustion steps took place simultaneously. The heat values in the products of combustion are satisfactorily recovered in a suitable heat exchange system.

Pitrolo, Augustine A. (Fairmont, WV); Mei, Joseph S. (Morgantown, WV); Shang, Jerry Y. (Fairfax, VA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

PARTITIONING OF MAJOR, MINOR, AND TRACE ELEMENTS DURING SIMULATED IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING IN A CONTROLLED-STATE RETORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or by refin- ing and using shale Oil Mass balances and oil.shale retorting produces shale oil, mobility factors wereand retort operating shale, shale oil, retorting (LETC) con-

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Water mist injection in oil shale retorting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Water mist is utilized to control the maximum temperature in an oil shale retort during processing. A mist of water droplets is generated and entrained in the combustion supporting gas flowing into the retort in order to distribute the liquid water droplets throughout the retort. The water droplets are vaporized in the retort in order to provide an efficient coolant for temperature control.

Galloway, T.R.; Lyczkowski, R.W.; Burnham, A.K.

1980-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

163

Boomtown blues; Oil shale and Exxon's exit  

SciTech Connect

This paper chronicles the social and cultural effects of the recent oil shale boom on the Colorado communities of Rifle, Silt, Parachute, and Grand Junction. The paper is based upon research and oral history interviews conducted throughout Colorado and in Houston and Washington, DC.

Gulliford, A. (Western New Mexico Univ., Silver City, NM (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Western oil shale conversion using the ROPE copyright process  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) is continuing to develop the Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) process to recover liquid hydrocarbon products from oil shale, tar sand, and other solid hydrocarbonaceous materials. The process consists of three major steps: (1) pyrolyzing the hydrocarbonaceous material at a low temperature (T {le} 400{degrees}C) with recycled product oil, (2) completing the pyrolysis of the residue at a higher temperature (T > 400{degrees}C) in the absence of product oil, and (3) combusting the solid residue and pyrolysis gas in an inclined fluidized-bed reactor to produce process heat. Many conventional processes, such as the Paraho and Union processes, do not use oil shale fines (particles smaller than 1.27 cm in diameter). The amount of shale discarded as fines from these processes can be as high as 20% of the total oil shale mined. Research conducted to date suggests that the ROPE process can significantly improve the overall oil recovery from western oil shale by processing the oil shale fines typically discarded by conventional processes. Also, if the oil shale fines are co-processed with shale oil used as the heavy recycle oil, a better quality oil will be produced that can be blended with the original shale oil to make an overall produce that is more acceptable to the refineries and easier to pipeline. Results from tests conducted in a 2-inch process development unit (PDU) and a 6-inch bench-scale unit (BSU) with western oil shale demonstrated a maximum oil yield at temperatures between 700 and 750{degrees}F (371 and 399{degrees}C). Test results also suggest that the ROPE process has a strong potential for recovering oil from oil shale fines, upgrading shale oil, and separating high-nitrogen-content oil for use as an asphalt additive. 6 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

Cha, C.Y.; Fahy, L.J.; Grimes, R.W.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

System for utilizing oil shale fines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is provided for utilizing fines of carbonaceous materials such as particles or pieces of oil shale of about one-half inch or less diameter which are rejected for use in some conventional or prior surface retorting process, which obtains maximum utilization of the energy content of the fines and which produces a waste which is relatively inert and of a size to facilitate disposal. The system includes a cyclone retort (20) which pyrolyzes the fines in the presence of heated gaseous combustion products, the cyclone retort having a first outlet (30) through which vapors can exit that can be cooled to provide oil, and having a second outlet (32) through which spent shale fines are removed. A burner (36) connected to the spent shale outlet of the cyclone retort, burns the spent shale with air, to provide hot combustion products (24) that are carried back to the cyclone retort to supply gaseous combustion products utilized therein. The burner heats the spent shale to a temperature which forms a molten slag, and the molten slag is removed from the burner into a quencher (48) that suddenly cools the molten slag to form granules that are relatively inert and of a size that is convenient to handle for disposal in the ground or in industrial processes.

Harak, Arnold E. (Laramie, WY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Microbial desulfurization of Eastern oil shale: Bioreactor studies  

SciTech Connect

The removal of sulfur from Eastern oil shale (40 microns particle size) slurries in bioreactors by mixed microbial cultures was examined. A mixed culture that is able to remove the organic sulfur from model sulfur compounds presenting coal as well as a mixed culture isolated from oil shale enrichments were evaluated. The cultures were grown in aerobic fed-batch bioreactors where the oil shale served as the source of all nutrients except organic carbon. Glucose was added as an auxiliary carbon source. Microbial growth was monitored by plate counts, the pH was checked periodically, and oil shale samples were analyzed for sulfur content. Results show a 24% reduction in the sulfur content of the oil shale after 14 days. The settling characteristics of the oil shale in the bioreactors were examined in the presence of the microbes. Also, the mixing characteristics of the oil shale in the bioreactors were examined. 10 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

Maka, A.; Akin, C.; Punwani, D.V.; Lau, F.S.; Srivastava, V.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

depleted underground oil shale for the permanent storage of carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depleted underground oil shale for the permanent storage of carbon depleted underground oil shale for the permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) generated during the oil shale extraction process. AMSO, which holds a research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) lease from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management for a 160-acre parcel of Federal land in northwest Colorado's oil-shale rich Piceance Basin, will provide technical assistance and oil shale core samples. If AMSO can demonstrate an economically viable and environmentally acceptable extraction process, it retains the right to acquire a 5,120-acre commercial lease. When subject to high temperatures and high pressures, oil shale (a sedimentary rock that is rich in hydrocarbons) can be converted into oil. Through mineralization, the CO 2 could be stored in the shale

168

FINGERPRINTING INORGANIC ARSENIC AND ORGANOARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORT AND PROCESS VOTERS USING A LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPH COUPLED WITH AN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER AS A DETECTOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

viable is the recovery of shale oil from our substantialdeposits of oil shale (1). Shale oil is recovered from oilproduce~ along with the shale oil, considerable amounts of

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Evaluation of EOR Potential by Gas and Water Flooding in Shale Oil Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The demand for oil and natural gas will continue to increase for the foreseeable future; unconventional resources such as tight oil, shale gas, shale oil… (more)

Chen, Ke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Shale Oil Production Performance from a Stimulated Reservoir Volume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The horizontal well with multiple transverse fractures has proven to be an effective strategy for shale gas reservoir exploitation. Some operators are successfully producing shale oil using the same strategy. Due to its higher viscosity and eventual...

Chaudhary, Anish Singh

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

171

Petrochemicals: Dow Chemical and oil company YPF explore shale gas in Argentina  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With eyes on what could be the first shale gas project in Argentina, Dow Chemical has signed a memorandum of understanding with the Argentinian oil company YPF to develop a gas-rich area of the country. ... According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration and consulting firm Advanced Resources International, Argentina has 774 trillion cu ft of recoverable shale gas reserves, the third-largest amount after the U.S. and China. ...

ALEX TULLO

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

172

A study of ignition of oil shale and char  

SciTech Connect

The ignition characteristics of Fushun, Maoming and Jordan oil shale samples have been determined experimentally by using thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and CO/CO{sub 2} analyzer. Their chars have been investigated, too. Two ignition mechanisms for oil shale and shale char are suggested. One is called heterogeneous, according to which, the ignition takes place on the surface of the oil shale and/or shale char sample. Another is called homogeneous, the ignition occurring in the gas phase surrounding the particles. The ignition mechanism occurred mainly depends on the condition of the combustion, physical properties of samples and the rate of volatile release. The experimental equations of ignition for three kinds of oil shale and their char particles (Fushun, Maoming and Jordan) are given. The difference of ignition temperatures for these oil shale and their char particles are compared in terms of chemical compositions and physical properties.

Min, L.; Changshan, L. (Fushun Research Institute of Petroleum and Petrochemicals, Sinopec (CN))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Soil stabilization using oil-shale solid waste  

SciTech Connect

Oil-shale solid wastes are evaluated for use as soil stabilizers. A laboratory study consisted of the following tests on compacted samples of soil treated with water and spent oil shale: unconfined compressive strength, moisture-density relationships, wet-dry and freeze-thaw durability, and resilient modulus. Significant increases in strength, durability, and resilient modulus were obtained by treating a silty sand with combusted western oil shale. Moderate increases in durability and resilient modulus were obtained by treating a highly plastic clay with combusted western oil shale. Solid waste from eastern oil shale appears to be feasible for soil stabilization only if limestone is added during combustion. Testing methods, results, and recommendations for mix design of spent shale-stabilized pavement subgrades are presented and the mechanisms of spent-shale cementation are discussed.

Turner, J.P. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Civil and Archeological Engineering)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Component-Type Analysis of Shale Oil by Liquid and Thin-Layer Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......shale oil produced from New Brunswick oil shale in a pilot scale retort is initially...shale oil produced from New Brunswick oil shale in a pilot scale retort is initially...study was produced from New Brunswick oil shale by the New Brunswick Research & Produc......

B.J. Fuhr; L.R. Holloway; C. Reichert; S.K. Barua

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Two-level, horizontal free face mining system for in situ oil shale retorts  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for forming an in-situ oil shale retort within a retort site in a subterranean formation containing oil shale, such an in-situ oil shale retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale formed within upper, lower and side boundaries of an in-situ oil shale retort site.

Cha, C.Y.; Ricketts, T.E.

1986-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

176

A feasibility study of oil shale fired pulse combustors with applications to oil shale retorting  

SciTech Connect

The results of the experimental investigation performed to determine the feasibility of using pulverized Colorado oil shale to fuel a bench scale pulse combustor reveal that oil shale cannot sustain pulsations when used alone as fuel. Trace amounts of propane mixed with the oil shale enabled the pulsations, however. Up to 80% of the organic material in the oil shale was consumed when it was mixed with propane in the combustor. Beyond the feasibility objectives, the operating conditions of the combustor fuel with propane and mixtures of oil shale and propane were characterized with respect to pulsation amplitude and frequency and the internal combustor wall temperature over fuel lean and fuel rich stoichiometries. Maximum pressure excursions of 12.5 kPa were experienced in the combustor. Pulsation frequencies ranged from 50 to nearly 80 Hz. Cycle resolved laser Doppler anemometry velocities were measured at the tail pipe exit plane. Injecting inert mineral matter (limestone) into the pulse combustor while using propane fuel had only a slight effect on the pulsation frequency for the feed rates tested.

Morris, G.J.; Johnson, E.K.; Zhang, G.Q.; Roach, R.A.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Bakken Shale Oil Production Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) database and in the format of monthly production for oil, water and gas. Additional 95 well data including daily production rate, completion, Pressure Volume Temperature (PVT), pressure data are given from companies who sponsor for this research study...

Tran, Tan

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

178

STUDY COMMISSIONED BY WEST LOTHIAN COUNCIL OIL-SHALE BINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;STUDY COMMISSIONED BY WEST LOTHIAN COUNCIL OIL-SHALE BINGS Dr Barbra Harvie School of Geo.....................................................................................................3 The birth of the oil industry ...........................................................................................................................3 The impact of oil on society

179

Plan for addressing issues relating to oil shale plant siting  

SciTech Connect

The Western Research Institute plan for addressing oil shale plant siting methodology calls for identifying the available resources such as oil shale, water, topography and transportation, and human resources. Restrictions on development are addressed: land ownership, land use, water rights, environment, socioeconomics, culture, health and safety, and other institutional restrictions. Descriptions of the technologies for development of oil shale resources are included. The impacts of oil shale development on the environment, socioeconomic structure, water availability, and other conditions are discussed. Finally, the Western Research Institute plan proposes to integrate these topics to develop a flow chart for oil shale plant siting. Western Research Institute has (1) identified relative topics for shale oil plant siting, (2) surveyed both published and unpublished information, and (3) identified data gaps and research needs. 910 refs., 3 figs., 30 tabs.

Noridin, J. S.; Donovan, R.; Trudell, L.; Dean, J.; Blevins, A.; Harrington, L. W.; James, R.; Berdan, G.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Heat of combustion of retorted and burnt Colorado oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Heats of combustion were measured for 12 samples of retorted and 21 samples of burnt Colorado oil shale originating from raw shales with grades that ranged from 13 to 255 cm/sup 3/ of shale oil/kg of oil shale. For the retorted shales, the authors resolve the heat of combustion into exothermic contributions from combustion of carbon residue and iron sulfides and endothermic contributions from carbonate decomposition and glass formation. Eight samples reported in the literature were included in this analysis. Variations in the first three constituents account for over 99% of the variation in the heats of combustion. For the burnt shales, account must also be taken of the partial conversion of iron sulfides to sulfates. Equations are developed for calculating the heat of combustion of retorted and burnt oil shale with a standard error of about 60 J/g. 13 refs.

Burnham, A.K.; Crawford, P.C.; Carley, J.F.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Heat of combustion of retorted and burnt Colorado oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Heats of combustion were measured for 12 samples of retorted and 21 samples of burnt Colorado oil shale originating from raw shales with grades that ranged from 13 to 255 cm/sup 3/ of shale oil/kg of oil shale. For the retorted shales, the heat of combustion was resolved into exothermic contributions from combustion of carbon residue and iron sulfides and endothermic contributions from carbonate decomposition and glass formation. Eight samples reported in the literature were included in this analysis. Variations in the first three constituents account for over 99% of the variation in the heats of combustion. For the burnt shales, account must also be taken of the partial conversion of iron sulfides to sulfates. Equations are developed for calculating the heat of combustion of retorted and burnt oil shale with a standard error of about 60 J/g.

Burnham, A.K.; Carley, J.F.; Crawford, P.C.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Beneficiation and hydroretorting of low grade oil shale  

SciTech Connect

A new approach to oil recovery from low grade oil shales has been developed jointly by the Mineral Resources Institute (MRI) of The University of Alabama and the HYCRUDE Corporation. The approach is based on the HYTORT process, which utilized hydrogen gas during the retorting process to enhance oil yields from many types of oil shales. The performance of the HYTORT process is further improved by combining it with MRI's froth flotation process. Taking advantage of differences in the surface properties of the kerogen and the inorganic mineral constituents of the oil shales, the MRI process can reject up to three quarters by weight of relatively kerogen-free inorganic fractions of the oil shale before HYTORT processing. The HYTORT and MRI processes are discussed. Results of tests by each process on oil shales of low to moderate inherent kerogen content are presented. Also discussed are the results of the combined processes on an Indiana New Albany oil shale. By combining the two processes, the raw shale which yielded 12 gallons of oil per ton by Fischer Assay was upgraded by flotation to a product yielding 27 gallons of Fischer Assay oil per ton. HYTORT processing of the beneficiated product recovered 54 gallons of oil per ton, an improvement in oil yield by a factor of 4.5 over the raw shale Fischer Assay.

Tippin, R.B.; Hanna, J.; Janka, J.C.; Rex, R.C. Jr.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Research and information needs for management of oil shale development  

SciTech Connect

This report presents information and analysis to assist BLM in clarifying oil shale research needs. It provides technical guidance on research needs in support of their regulatory responsibilities for onshore mineral activities involving oil shale. It provides an assessment of research needed to support the regulatory and managerial role of the BLM as well as others involved in the development of oil shale resources on public and Indian lands in the western United States.

Not Available

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Determination of stress levels for dynamic fracture of oil shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dynamic tensile-stress amplitudes necessary to cause complete spall in unconfined oil-shale samples were experimentally determined in the laboratory...

Michael P. Felix

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Experimental study of mechanisms of improving oil recovery in Shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ABSTRACT Extensive laboratory work was done to investigate some of the important mechanisms of improving oil recovery in Shale formations. The objective of this research… (more)

Onyenwere, Emmanuel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Oil shale pyrolysis: benchscale experimental studies and modeling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Oil shale is a complex material that is composed of organic matter, mineral matrix and trace amount of bound and/or unbound water. The endothermic decomposition… (more)

Tiwari, Pankaj

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Texas--State Offshore Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas--State Offshore Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 2010's 0 - No Data...

188

WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF LEACHATES FROM AN IN SITU OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stabilization of Spent Oil Shales, EPA-600/'7-'78- 021, Feb.Impact Analysis for an Oil Shale Complex at Parachute Creek,from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort, Proceedings of

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

TREATMENT OF MULTIVARIATE ENVIRONMENTAL AND HEALTH PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH OIL SHALE TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Trace Contaminants in Oil Shale Retort Wa- ters", Am.LBL-10850. b. and , "Trace Contaminants in Oil Shale RetortWaters", in Oil Shale Research: Characteriza- tion Studies,

Kland, M.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

OIL SHALE RESEARCH. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from In-Situ Retorting of Oil Shale," Energy and Environmentintimate contact ~lith the oil and shale, Retort waters area Control Technology for Oil Shale Retort Water J. P. Fox,

,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

ANAEROBIC FERMENTATION OF SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water from Green River Oil Shale, Chemistry and Industry,for an In-Situ Produced Oil-Shale Processin g Water, LERCOf Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Water B.A. Ossio, J.P.

Ossio, E.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF LEACHATES FROM AN IN SITU OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort, Proceedingsof the 11th Oil Shale Symposium, 1978. J. W.MB_terial in Green River Oil Shale, U.S. Bur. lvlines Rept.

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

A Strategy for the Abandonment of Modified In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of steam on oil shale ing: a preliminary laboratoryInstitute to Rio Blanco Oil Shale Project, May 1977. 1~OF MODIFIED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS J. P. Fox and P.

Fox, J.P.; Persoff, P.; Moody, M.M.; Sisemore, C.J.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presented at the 13th Oil Shale Symposium, Golden, CO, April~1ETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS Richard H.compounds in the seven oil shale process waters. These

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

OIL SHALE RESEARCH. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from In-Situ Retorting of Oil Shale," Energy and EnvironmentTrace Contaminants in Oil Shale Retort Water M. J. Kland, A.Organic Arsenic Compounds 1n Oil Shale Process Waters R. H.

,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM A SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale J. P. Fox, J. J. Duvall,of elements in rich oil shales of the Green River Formation,V. E . • 1977; Mercury in Oil Shale from the Mahogany Zone

Fox, J. P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

A Strategy for the Abandonment of Modified In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of steam on oil shale ing: a preliminary laboratoryInstitute to Rio Blanco Oil Shale Project, May 1977. 1~Cement, pozzolan and oil shale chemistry The chemistry of

Fox, J.P.; Persoff, P.; Moody, M.M.; Sisemore, C.J.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

ANAEROBIC FERMENTATION OF SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water co produced with shale oil and decanted from it isWater from Green River Oil Shale, Chemistry and Industry,for an In-Situ Produced Oil-Shale Processin g Water, LERC

Ossio, E.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

OIL SHALE RESEARCH. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

each of retort water and shale oil, about 10 1 000 standardfrom In-Situ Retorting of Oil Shale," Energy and Environmentanic species present in shale oils process waters, gases,

,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF LEACHATES FROM AN IN SITU OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4, 19'70, p. 89. 24. C-b Shale Oil Venture: Hydrology, MinePiles Solid wastes from the shale-oil recovery process alsofrom a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort, Proceedings of

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

OIL SHALE RESEARCH. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil, water, spent shale, and gas. These data were enteredtoxic trace elements in oil shale gases and is using thisin the raw oil shale and input gases that is accounted for

,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

OIL SHALE RESEARCH. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from In-Situ Retorting of Oil Shale," Energy and EnvironmentStudies Trace Contaminants in Oil Shale Retort Water M. J.Organic Arsenic Compounds 1n Oil Shale Process Waters R. H.

,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Eastern oil shale research involving the generation of retorted and combusted oil shale solid waste, shale oil collection, and process stream sampling and characterization: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 518 tons of New Albany oil shale were obtained from the McRae quarry in Clark County, Indiana and shipped to Golden, CO. A portion of the material was processed through a TOSCO II pilot plant retort. About 273 tons of crushed raw shale, 136 tons of retorted shale, 1500 gallons of shale oil, and 10 drums of retort water were shipped to US Department of Energy, Laramie, WY. Process conditions were documented, process streams were sampled and subjected to chemical analysis, and material balance calculations were made. 6 refs., 12 figs., 14 tabs.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Utilization of Estonian oil shale at power plants  

SciTech Connect

Estonian oil shale belongs to the carbonate class and is characterized as a solid fuel with very high mineral matter content (60--70% in dry mass), moderate moisture content (9--12%) and low heating value (LHV 8--10 MJ/kg). Estonian oil shale deposits lie in layers interlacing mineral stratas. The main constituent in mineral stratas is limestone. Organic matter is joined with sandy-clay minerals in shale layers. Estonian oil shale at power plants with total capacity of 3060 MW{sub e} is utilized in pulverized form. Oil shale utilization as fuel, with high calcium oxide and alkali metal content, at power plants is connected with intensive fouling, high temperature corrosion and wear of steam boiler`s heat transfer surfaces. Utilization of Estonian oil shale is also associated with ash residue use in national economy and as absorbent for flue gas desulfurization system.

Ots, A. [Tallin Technical Univ. (Estonia). Thermal Engineering Department

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

205

Microbial Communities in Oil Shales, Biodegraded and Heavy Oil Reservoirs, and Bitumen Deposits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Subsurface hydrocarbon and oil shale deposits, once thought sterile, are being re-evaluated as habitats for ancient and contemporary microbial activity. Although oil shales have not been rigorously examined mi...

J. Foght

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Oil shale retorting with steam and produced gas  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for retorting oil shale in a vertical retort. It comprises introducing particles of oil shale into the retort, the particles of oil shale having a minimum size such that the particles are retained on a screen having openings 1/4 inch in size; contacting the particles of oil shale with hot gas to heat the particles of oil shale to a state of pyrolysis, thereby producing retort off-gas; removing the off-gas from the retort; cooling the off-gas; removing oil from the cooled off-gas; separating recycle gas from the off-gas, the recycle gas comprising steam and produced gas, the steam being present in amount, by volume, of at least 50% of the recycle gas so as to increase the yield of sand oil; and heating the recycle gas to form the hot gas.

Merrill, L.S. Jr.; Wheaton, L.D.

1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

207

A nuclear wind/solar oil-shale system for variable electricity and liquid fuels production  

SciTech Connect

The recoverable reserves of oil shale in the United States exceed the total quantity of oil produced to date worldwide. Oil shale contains no oil, rather it contains kerogen which when heated decomposes into oil, gases, and a carbon char. The energy required to heat the kerogen-containing rock to produce the oil is about a quarter of the energy value of the recovered products. If fossil fuels are burned to supply this energy, the greenhouse gas releases are large relative to producing gasoline and diesel from crude oil. The oil shale can be heated underground with steam from nuclear reactors leaving the carbon char underground - a form of carbon sequestration. Because the thermal conductivity of the oil shale is low, the heating process takes months to years. This process characteristic in a system where the reactor dominates the capital costs creates the option to operate the nuclear reactor at base load while providing variable electricity to meet peak electricity demand and heat for the shale oil at times of low electricity demand. This, in turn, may enable the large scale use of renewables such as wind and solar for electricity production because the base-load nuclear plants can provide lower-cost variable backup electricity. Nuclear shale oil may reduce the greenhouse gas releases from using gasoline and diesel in half relative to gasoline and diesel produced from conventional oil. The variable electricity replaces electricity that would have been produced by fossil plants. The carbon credits from replacing fossil fuels for variable electricity production, if assigned to shale oil production, results in a carbon footprint from burning gasoline or diesel from shale oil that may half that of conventional crude oil. The U.S. imports about 10 million barrels of oil per day at a cost of a billion dollars per day. It would require about 200 GW of high-temperature nuclear heat to recover this quantity of shale oil - about two-thirds the thermal output of existing nuclear reactors in the United States. With the added variable electricity production to enable renewables, additional nuclear capacity would be required. (authors)

Forsberg, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 012139 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Physical and mechanical properties of bituminous mixtures containing oil shales  

SciTech Connect

Rutting of bituminous surfaces on the Jordanian highways is a recurring problem. Highway authorities are exploring the use of extracted shale oil and oil shale fillers, which are abundant in Jordan. The main objectives of this research are to investigate the rheological properties of shale oil binders (conventional binder with various percentages of shale oil), in comparison with a conventional binder, and to investigate the ability of mixes to resist deformation. The latter is done by considering three wearing course mixes containing three different samples of oil shale fillers--which contained three different oil percentages--together with a standard mixture containing limestone filler. The Marshall design method and the immersion wheel tracking machine were adopted. It was concluded that the shale oil binders displayed inconsistent physical properties and therefore should be treated before being used. The oil shale fillers have provided mixes with higher ability to resist deformation than the standard mix, as measured by the Marshall quotients and the wheel tracking machine. The higher the percentages of oil in the oil shale fillers, the lower the ability of the mixes to resist deformation.

Katamine, N.M.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

TURKISH OIL SHALES POTENTIAL FOR SYNTHETIC CRUDE OIL and CARBON MATERIALS PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research activities on solid fuels. In order to make a new start, research work on Turkish oil shales that

Ekrem Ekinci

210

Oil shale ash-layer thickness and char combustion kinetics  

SciTech Connect

A Hot-Recycled-Solids (HRS) oil shale retort is being studied at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In the HRS process, raw shale is heated by mixing it with burnt retorted shale. Retorted shale is oil shale which has been heated in an oxygen deficient atmosphere to pyrolyze organic carbon, as kerogen into oil, gas, and a nonvolatile carbon rich residue, char. In the HRS retort process, the char in the spent shale is subsequently exposed to an oxygen environment. Some of the char, starting on the outer surface of the shale particle, is burned, liberating heat. In the HRS retort, the endothermic pyrolysis step is supported by heat from the exothermic char combustion step. The rate of char combustion is controlled by three resistances; the resistance of oxygen mass transfer through the gas film surrounding the solid particle, resistance to mass transfer through a ash layer which forms on the outside of the solid particles as the char is oxidized and the resistance due to the intrinsic chemical reaction rate of char and oxygen. In order to estimate the rate of combustion of the char in a typical oil shale particle, each of these resistances must be accurately estimated. We begin by modeling the influence of ash layer thickness on the over all combustion rate of oil shale char. We then present our experimental measurements of the ash layer thickness of oil shale which has been processed in the HRS retort.

Aldis, D.F.; Singleton, M.F.; Watkins, B.E.; Thorsness, C.B.; Cena, R.J.

1992-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Retorting of oil shale followed by solvent extraction of spent shale: Experiment and kinetic analysis  

SciTech Connect

Samples of El-Lajjun oil shale were thermally decomposed in a laboratory retort system under a slow heating rate (0.07 K/s) up to a maximum temperature of 698--773 K. After decomposition, 0.02 kg of spent shale was extracted by chloroform in a Soxhlet extraction unit for 2 h to investigate the ultimate amount of shale oil that could be produced. The retorting results indicate an increase in the oil yields from 3.24% to 9.77% of oil shale feed with retorting temperature, while the extraction results show a decrease in oil yields from 8.10% to 3.32% of spent shale. The analysis of the data according to the global first-order model for isothermal and nonisothermal conditions shows kinetic parameters close to those reported in literature.

Khraisha, Y.H.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

An Application of Sequence Stratigraphy in Modelling Oil Yield Distribution: The Stuart Oil Shale Deposit, Queensland, Australia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Stuart Oil Shale Deposit is a major oil shale resource located near Gladstone on the central Queensland coast. It contains an estimated 3.0 billion… (more)

Pope, Graham John

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Study of the combustion mechanism of oil shale semicoke in a thermogravimetric analyzer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oil shale semicoke, formed in retort furnaces, is ... solid waste. For the industrial application of oil shale semicoke in combustion, this present work focused...

X. X. Han; X. M. Jiang; Z. G. Cui

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

SciTech Connect: Documentation of INL's In Situ Oil Shale Retorting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Documentation of INL's In Situ Oil Shale Retorting Water Usage System Dynamics Model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Documentation of INL's In Situ Oil Shale Retorting...

215

The technology of the New South Wales torbanite : including an introduction on oil shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Although the nature of the products of thermal decomposition of oil shale has attracted the attention of both scientist and industrialist, oil shale possibly ranks… (more)

Cane, Reginald Frank

1946-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Effects of low temperature preheating on the pyrolysis products from blocks of oil shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Oil shale is a sedimentary rock composed of inorganic and organic fractions. The inorganic minerals contained in oil shale include: dolomite, calcite, quartz, i1 lite,… (more)

Alston, David W.

1905-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Beginning of an oil shale industry in Australia  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses how preparations are being made for the construction and operation of a semi commercial plant to process Australian oil shale. This plant is primarily designed to demonstrate the technical feasibility of processing these shales at low cost. Nevertheless it is expected to generate modest profits even at this demonstration level. This will be the first step in a three staged development of one of the major Australian oil shale deposits which may ultimately provide nearly 10% of Australia's anticipated oil requirements by the end of the century. In turn this development should provide the basis for a full scale oil shale industry in Australia based upon the advantageously disposed oil shale deposits there. New sources of oil are becoming critical since Australian production is declining rapidly while consumption is accelerating.

Wright, B. (Southern Pacific Petroleum NL, 143 Macquarie Street, Sydney (AU))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Attrition and abrasion models for oil shale process modeling  

SciTech Connect

As oil shale is processed, fine particles, much smaller than the original shale are created. This process is called attrition or more accurately abrasion. In this paper, models of abrasion are presented for oil shale being processed in several unit operations. Two of these unit operations, a fluidized bed and a lift pipe are used in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hot-Recycle-Solid (HRS) process being developed for the above ground processing of oil shale. In two reports, studies were conducted on the attrition of oil shale in unit operations which are used in the HRS process. Carley reported results for attrition in a lift pipe for oil shale which had been pre-processed either by retorting or by retorting then burning. The second paper, by Taylor and Beavers, reported results for a fluidized bed processing of oil shale. Taylor and Beavers studied raw, retorted, and shale which had been retorted and then burned. In this paper, empirical models are derived, from the experimental studies conducted on oil shale for the process occurring in the HRS process. The derived models are presented along with comparisons with experimental results.

Aldis, D.F.

1991-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

219

U.S. Shale Gas and Shale Oil Plays Review of Emerging Resources:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Shale Gas and Shale Oil Plays Shale Gas and Shale Oil Plays Review of Emerging Resources: July 2011 www.eia.gov U.S. Depa rtment of Energy W ashington, DC 20585 This page inTenTionally lefT blank The information presented in this overview is based on the report Review of Emerging Resources: U.S. Shale Gas and Shale Oil Plays, which was prepared by INTEK, Inc. for the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The full report is attached. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

220

Multistep pyrolysis kinetics of North Korean oil shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, multistep pyrolysis kinetics of North Korean oil shale was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. All the...?1...from room temperature to 873 K under nitrogen atmosphere. The main oil-producin...

Wei Wang; Shuyuan Li; Changtao Yue; Yue Ma

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Retorting Oil Shale by a Self-Heating Route  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Retorting is a frequently used method for producing shale oil from oil shale. During retorting, heat is usually supplied to the retort by heat-carrier gas of high temperature, such as 700 °C, until retorting ends. In this work, a low-energy-input ...

Hongfan Guo; Siyuan Peng; Jiadong Lin; Jiang Chang; Shan Lei; Tianbo Fan; Yunyi Liu

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

222

Adsorption of copper and zinc by oil shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?Oil shale is able to remove appreciable amounts of...2+ and Zn2+. The results showed that oil shale could be used for the adsorption of...2+ and Zn2+ with higher affinity toward Zn2+ ions. Addition of sodium sal...

S. Al-Asheh; Fawzi Banat

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Removal of nitrogen and sulfur from oil-shale  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for enhancing the removal of nitrogen and sulfur from oil-shale. The process consists of: (a) contacting the oil-shale with a sufficient amount of an aqueous base solution comprised of at least a stoichiometric amount of one or more alkali metal or alkaline-earth metal hydroxides based on the total amount of nitrogen and sulfur present in the oil-shale. Also necessary is an amount sufficient to form a two-phase liquid, solid system, a temperature from about 50/sup 0/C to about 350/sup 0/C., and pressures sufficient to maintain the solution in liquid form; (b) separating the effluents from the treated oil-shale, wherein the resulting liquid effluent contains nitrogen moieties and sulfur moieties from the oil-shale and any resulting gaseous effluent contains nitrogen moieties from the oil-shale, and (c) converting organic material of the treated oil-shale to shale-oil at a temperature from about 450/sup 0/C to about 550/sup 0/C.

Olmstead, W.N.

1986-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

224

Expectations for Oil Shale Production (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Oil shales are fine-grained sedimentary rocks that contain relatively large amounts of kerogen, which can be converted into liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons (petroleum liquids, natural gas liquids, and methane) by heating the rock, usually in the absence of oxygen, to 650 to 700 degrees Fahrenheit (in situ retorting) or 900 to 950 degrees Fahrenheit (surface retorting). (Oil shale is, strictly speaking, a misnomer in that the rock is not necessarily a shale and contains no crude oil.) The richest U.S. oil shale deposits are located in Northwest Colorado, Northeast Utah, and Southwest Wyoming. Currently, those deposits are the focus of petroleum industry research and potential future production. Among the three states, the richest oil shale deposits are on federal lands in northwest Colorado.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Ion chromatographic analysis of oil shale leachates  

SciTech Connect

In the present work an investigation of the use of ion chromatography to determine environmentally significant anions present in oil shale leachates was undertaken. Nadkarni et al. have used ion chromatography to separate and quantify halogen, sulfur and nitrogen species in oil shales after combustion in a Parr bomb. Potts and Potas used ion chromatography to monitor inorganic ions in cooling tower wastewater from coal gasification. Wallace and coworkers have used ion chromatography to determine anions encountered in retort wastewaters. The ions of interest in this work were the ions of sulfur oxides including sulfite (SO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}), sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}), thiosulfate (S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}), dithionite (S{sub 2}O{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}), dithionate (S{sub 2}O{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}}), peroxyodisulfate (S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2{minus}}), and tetrathionate (S{sub 4}O{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}}), and thiocyanate (SCN{sup {minus}}), sulfide (S{sup 2{minus}}) hydrosulfide (HS{sup {minus}}), cyanide (CN{sup {minus}}), thiocyanate (SCN{sup {minus}}), and cyanate (OCN{sup {minus}}). A literature search was completed and a leaching procedure developed. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Butler, N.L.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating Oil Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release The Energy Policy and Conservation...

227

EIS-0070: Mining, Construction and Operation for a Full-size Module at the Anvil Points Oil Shale Facility, Rifle, Garfield County, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this environmental impact statement to assess the environmental and socioeconomic implications of its proposal to mine 11 million tons of oil shale from the Naval Oil Shale Reserves (NOSR) at Anvil Points, Colorado; to construct an experimental full-size shale retort module on a 365-acre lease tract having a 4700 bbl/day production capacity; and to consider extension, modification or new leasing of the facility.

228

Raw shale dissolution as an aid in determining oil shale mineralogy  

SciTech Connect

With an accurate oil shale mineralogy, one can begin to unravel the inorganic and organic aspects of retorting and combustion chemistry. We evaluated three modern elemental analysis procedures (ICP-AES, XRF, and PIXE) with the aim of improving our knowledge of the mineral matrix. A New Albany Shale (Clegg Creek Member) specimen (NA13) and a Mahogany Zone Green River Formation oil shale from Anvil Points (AP24) were the two materials analyzed. These were oil shales that we had used in our pilot retort. We set a modest goal: determination of those materials present at greater than a 1% level with a relative accuracy of {plus_minus}10%. Various total dissolution methods and pre-treatement procedures were examined. The routine ICP-AES method that we adopted had precision and accuracy that exceeded our initial goals. Partial dissolution of carbonate minerals in acetic acid was slow but highly selective. The clay mineral content of both shales was deduced from the time dependence of dissolution in 6N HCl. An Al:K ratio of 3 indicated selective HCl solubility of the clay, illite. Our eastern oil shale from Kentucky was remarkably similar in mineral composition to high-grade-zone New Albany Shale samples from Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois that others had subjected to careful mineral analysis. A Mahogany Zone Green River Formation oil shale from the Colony Mine had slightly different minor mineral components (relative to AP24) as shown by its gas evolution profile.

Duewer, T.I.; Foster, K.G.; Coburn, T.T.

1991-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

229

Raw shale dissolution as an aid in determining oil shale mineralogy  

SciTech Connect

With an accurate oil shale mineralogy, one can begin to unravel the inorganic and organic aspects of retorting and combustion chemistry. We evaluated three modern elemental analysis procedures (ICP-AES, XRF, and PIXE) with the aim of improving our knowledge of the mineral matrix. A New Albany Shale (Clegg Creek Member) specimen (NA13) and a Mahogany Zone Green River Formation oil shale from Anvil Points (AP24) were the two materials analyzed. These were oil shales that we had used in our pilot retort. We set a modest goal: determination of those materials present at greater than a 1% level with a relative accuracy of {plus minus}10%. Various total dissolution methods and pre-treatement procedures were examined. The routine ICP-AES method that we adopted had precision and accuracy that exceeded our initial goals. Partial dissolution of carbonate minerals in acetic acid was slow but highly selective. The clay mineral content of both shales was deduced from the time dependence of dissolution in 6N HCl. An Al:K ratio of 3 indicated selective HCl solubility of the clay, illite. Our eastern oil shale from Kentucky was remarkably similar in mineral composition to high-grade-zone New Albany Shale samples from Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois that others had subjected to careful mineral analysis. A Mahogany Zone Green River Formation oil shale from the Colony Mine had slightly different minor mineral components (relative to AP24) as shown by its gas evolution profile.

Duewer, T.I.; Foster, K.G.; Coburn, T.T.

1991-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

230

SPENT SHALE AS A CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR OIL SHALE RETORT WATER. ANNUAL REPORT FOR PERIOD OCTOBER 1, 1978 - SEPTEMBER 30, 1979.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of its contact with the oil and shale, this water can beWater from Green River Oil Shale, 11 Chem. Ind. 1, 485 (Effluents from In-Situ Oil Shale Processing," in Proceedings

Fox, J.P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

SPENT SHALE AS A CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR OIL SHALE RETORT WATER. ANNUAL REPORT FOR PERIOD OCTOBER 1, 1978 - SEPTEMBER 30, 1979.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water from Green River Oil Shale, 11 Chem. Ind. 1, 485 (Effluents from In-Situ Oil Shale Processing," in ProceedingsControl Technology for Oil Shale Retort Water," August 1978.

Fox, J.P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

SPENT SHALE AS A CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR OIL SHALE RETORT WATER. ANNUAL REPORT FOR PERIOD OCTOBER 1, 1978 - SEPTEMBER 30, 1979.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Control Technology for Shale Oil Wastewaters,~~ inpyrolysized to produce shale oil, gas, a solid referred towaters are co-produced with shale oil and separated from it

Fox, J.P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

SciTech Connect

A process for making hydraulic cements from spent oil shale is described in this paper. Inexpensive cement is needed to grout abandoned in-situ retorts of spent shale for subsidence control, mitigation of leaching, and strengthening the retorted mass in order to recover oil from adjacent pillars of raw shale. A hydraulic cement was produced by heating a 1:1 mixture of Lurgi spent shale and CaCO{sub 3} at 1000 C for one hour. This cement would be less expensive than ordinary portland cement and is expected to fulfill the above requirements.

Mehta, P.K.; Persoff, P.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Reactive gases evolved during pyrolysis of Devonian oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Computer modeling of oil shale pyrolysis is an important part of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Oil Shale Program. Models containing detailed chemistry have been derived from an investigation of Colorado oil shale. We are currently attempting to use models to treat more completely reactions of nitrogen and sulfur compounds in the retort to better understand emissions. Batch retorting work on Devonian oil shale is proving particularly useful for this study of nitrogen/sulfur chemistry. Improved analytical methods have been developed to quantitatively determine reactive volatiles at the parts-per-million level. For example, the triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (TQMS) is used in the chemical ionization (CI) mode to provide real-time analytical data on ammonia evolution as the shale is pyrolyzed. A heated transfer line and inlet ensure rapid and complete introduction of ammonia to the instrument by preventing water condensation. Ammonia and water release data suitable for calculating kinetic parameters have been obtained from a New Albany Shale sample. An MS/MS technique with the TQMS in the electron ionization (EI) mode allows hydrogen sulfide, carbonyl sulfide, and certain trace organic sulfur compounds to be monitored during oil shale pyrolysis. Sensitivity and selectivity for these compounds have been increased by applying artificial intelligence techniques to tuning of the spectrometer. Gas evolution profiles (100 to 900/sup 0/C) are reported for hydrogen sulfide, water, ammonia, and trace sulfur species formed during pyrolysis of Devonian oil shale. Implications for retorting chemistry are discussed. 18 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Coburn, T.T.; Crawford, R.W.; Gregg, H.R.; Oh, M.S.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

History and some potentials of oil shale cement  

SciTech Connect

The utilization of oil shale as a cement component is discussed. It was investigated in America and Europe during World War I. Additional development occurred in Western Europe, Russia, and China during the 1920s and 1930s. World War II provided further development incentives and a relatively mature technology was in place in Germany, Russia, and China prior to 1980. The utilization of oil shale in cement has taken a number of different paths. One approach has been to utilize the energy in the oil shale as the principal source for the cement plant and to use the combusted shale as a minor constituent of the plant's cement product. A second approach has been to use the combusted shale as a class C or cementitious fly-ash component in portland cement concrete. Other approaches utilizing eastern oil shale have been to use the combusted oil shale with additives as a specialty cement, or to cocombust the oil shale with coal and utilize the sulfur-rich combustion product.

Knutson, C.F.; Smith, R.P.; Russell, B.F. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Trace elements in oil shale. Progress report, 1979-1980  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research program is to understand the potential impact of an oil shale industry on environmental levels of trace contaminants in the region. The program involves a comprehensive study of the sources, release mechanisms, transport, fate, and effects of toxic trace chemicals, principally the trace elements, in an oil shale industry. The overall objective of the program is to evaluate the environmental and health consequences of the release of toxic trace elements by shale and oil production and use. The baseline geochemical survey shows that stable trace elements maps can be constructed for numerous elements and that the trends observed are related to geologic and climatic factors. Shale retorted by above-ground processes tends to be very homogeneous (both in space and in time) in trace element content. Leachate studies show that significant amounts of B, F, and Mo are released from retorted shales and while B and Mo are rapidly flushed out, F is not. On the other hand, As, Se, and most other trace elements are not present in significant quantities. Significant amounts of F and B are also found in leachates of raw shales. Very large concentrations of reduced sulfur species are found in leachates of processed shale. Very high levels of B and Mo are taken up in some plants growing on processed shale with and without soil cover. There is a tendency for some trace elements to associate with specific organic fractions, indicating that organic chelation or complexation may play an important role. Many of the so-called standard methods for analyzing trace elements in oil shale-related materials are inadequate. A sampling manual is being written for the environmental scientist and practicing engineer. A new combination of methods is developed for separating the minerals in oil shale into different density fractions. Microbial investigations have tentatively identified the existence of thiobacilli in oil shale materials such as leachates. (DC)

Chappell, W R

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Study on the pyrolysis of Moroccan oil shale with poly (ethylene terephthalate)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigations into the pyrolytic behaviours of oil shale, poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and...

A. Aboulkas; K. El Harfi; A. El Bouadili…

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

EXPERIMENT AND NEURAL NETWORK MODEL OF PRIMARY FRAGMENTATION OF OIL SHALE IN FLUIDIZED BED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the fluidized bed temperature is an important factor of primary fragmentation of oil shale, and

Zhigang Cui; Xiangxin Han; Xiumin Jiang; Jianguo Liu

239

Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale. Report of Investigations/1989  

SciTech Connect

This publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil-shale rocks and dust. Three areas were examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil-shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil-shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Outlook for U.S. shale oil and gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

shale oil and gas shale oil and gas IAEE/AEA Meeting January 4, 2014 | Philadelphia, PA By Adam Sieminski, EIA Administrator Key insights on drilling productivity and production trends Adam Sieminski, IAEE/AEA January 4, 2014 2 * The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas and oil production from shale and other tight resources * Six tight oil and shale gas plays taken together account for nearly 90% of domestic oil production growth and virtually all domestic natural gas production growth over the last 2 years * Higher drilling efficiency and new well productivity, rather than an increase in the rig count, have been the main drivers of recent production growth * Steep legacy production decline rates are being offset by growing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Oil shale and coal in intermontane basins of Thailand  

SciTech Connect

The Mae Tip intermontane basin contains Cenozoic oil shales in beds up to 1 m (3.3 ft) thick interbedded with coal and mudstone. The oil shales contain lamosite-type alginite, and give a maximum oil yield of 122 L/MT (29.3 gal/ton). The beds are laterally continuous for at least 1.5 km (1.0 mi), but pass into mudstones toward the basin margin. The oil shales originated when peat swamps close to a steep basin margin were flooded by shallow lakes, allowing algae to replace rooted vegetation. This distinctive oil shale-coal assemblage is known from many small intermontane basins in Thailand, where locally high geothermal gradients suggest potential for hydrocarbons.

Gibling, M.R.; Srisuk, S.; Ukakimaphan, Y.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Pyrolysis of shale oil residual fractions  

SciTech Connect

The freezing point of JP-5, the Navy jet fuel, has been related to the n-alkane content, specifically n-hexadecane. In general, jet fuels from shale oil have the highest n-alkanes. The formation of n-alkanes in the jet fuel distillation range can be explained if large n-alkanes are present in the crude oil source. Quantities of large n-alkanes are insufficient, however, to explain the amounts found - up to 37% n-alkanes in the jet fuel range. Other possible precursors to small straight chain molecules are substituted cyclic compounds. Attack in the side chain obviously afford a path to an n-alkane. Aromatic hydrocarbons, esters, acids, amines, and ethers also have the potential to form n-alkanes if an unbranched alkyl chain is present in the molecule. Investigations showed that the best yield of the JP-5 cut comes at different times for the various fractions, but a time in the 60 to 120 min range would appear to be the optimum time for good yield at 450/sup 0/C. The longer time would be preferred with respect to lower potential n-alkane yield. None of the fractions gave n-alkane yields approaching the 37% amount found in the Shale-I JP-5. A temperature different than the 450/sup 0/C used here might affect the conversion percentage. Further the combined saturate, aromatic, and polar fractions may interact under pyrolysis conditions to give higher potential n-alkane yields than the fractions stressed independently.

Hazlett, R.N.; Beal, E.; Vetter, T.; Sonntag, R.; Moniz, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Status of LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid oil shale retort  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated the technical and economic barriers facing the introduction of an oil shale industry and we have chosen Hot-Recycled-Solid (HRS) oil shale retorting as the primary advanced technology of interest. We are investigating this approach through fundamental research, operation of a 4 tonne-per-day, HRS pilot plant and development of an Oil Shale Process (OSP) mathematical model. Over the last three years, from June 1991 to June 1993, we completed a series of runs (H10--H27) using the 4-TPD pilot plant to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the HRS process and answer key scale-up questions. With our CRADA partners, we seek to further develop the HRS technology, maintain and enhance the knowledge base gained over the past two decades through research and development by Government and industry and determine the follow on steps needed to advance the technology towards commercialization. The LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid process has the potential to improve existing oil shale technology. It processes oil shale in minutes instead of hours, reducing plant size. It processes all oil shale, including fines rejected by other processes. It provides controls to optimize product quality for different applications. It co-generates electricity to maximize useful energy output. And, it produces negligible SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions, a non-hazardous waste shale and uses minimal water.

Baldwin, D.E.; Cena, R.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

Stretched Exponential Decline Model as a Probabilistic and Deterministic Tool for Production Forecasting and Reserve Estimation in Oil and Gas Shales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the United States. Estimation of P50 and P10 reserves that meet SPE/WPC/AAPG/SPEE Petroleum Resources Management System (PRMS) criteria is important for internal resource inventories for most companies. In this work a systematic methodology was developed...

Akbarnejad Nesheli, Babak

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

245

Characteristics of North Sea oil reserve appreciation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In many petroleum basins, and especially in more mature areas, most reserve additions consist of the growth over time of prior discoveries, a phenomenon termed reserve appreciation. This paper concerns crude oil reserve ...

Watkins, G. C.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Devonian-Mississippian oil shale resources of Kentucky: a summary  

SciTech Connect

Assessment of the oil shale resources in Kentucky has continued with 75 NX cores available where the oil shale crops out or is overlain by relatively thin cover in the area from Estill County westward to Bullitt County. In this 14 county area, the total black shale section thins across the crest of the Cincinnati arch and changes stratigraphically from that characteristic of the Ohio Shale in Estill County to that of the New Albany Shale in Bullitt County. Despite this stratigraphic transition the two high-carbon zones (greater than 8.0% carbon) can be traced across the arch. As the traverse is followed from the east, the intervening low-carbon zones thin such that at the crest of the arch, there are areas where the entire section of black shale contains more than 8% carbon. Then upon leaving the crest the two high-carbon zones separate again with one remaining at the very top of the section and one in the lower part. In the 14 county area, there are approximately 3.8 x 10/sup 5/ acres of oil shale outcrop and approximately 7.8 x 10/sup 5/ acres underlain by oil shale at relatively shallow depths.

Barron, L.S.; Robl, T.L.; Kung, J.; Obley, J.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin The purpose of this paper is to provide the public and policy makers accurate estimates of energy efficiencies, water requirements, water availability, and CO2 emissions associated with the development of the 60 percent portion of the Piceance Basin where economic potential is the greatest, and where environmental conditions and societal concerns and controversy are the most challenging: i.e., the portion of the Piceance where very high quality oil shale resources and useful ground water co-exist. Evaluation of Energy Efficiency, Water Requirements and Availability, and CO2 Emissions Associated With the Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in

248

Los Alamos environmental activities/oil shale effluents  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this research are to determine the nature, magnitude, and time dependence of the major and trace element releases as functions of the raw shale mineralogy, retorting conditions, and spent shale mineral assemblages. These experimental studies will focus on retorting variable regimes characteristic of most retorting processes. As an adjunct objective, the relation of laboratory results to those obtained from both bench-scale and pilot-scale retorts, when both have been operated under similar retorting conditions, will be defined. The goal is to develop a predictive capability for spent shale chemistry as a function of the raw material feedstock and process parameters. Key accomplishments follow: completed an overview of health, environmental effects, and potential ''show stoppers'' in oil shale development; elucidated the importance of both raw material and process in the identity and behavior of spent shale wastes (Occidental raw and spent shales from the Logan Wash site); completed a balanced factorial design experiment to investigate the influence of shale type, temperature, and atmosphere on spent shale behavior; compared the behavior of spent shales from laboratory experiments with shales generated from MIS retorting by OOSI at Logan Wash, Colorado; completed a study of the partitioning of minerals, inorganics, and organics as a function of particle size in a raw shale from Anvil Points, Colorado; evaluated the application of the Los Alamos nuclear microprobe to the characterization of trace element residences in shale materials; established the use of chemometrics as a major tool for evaluating large data bases in oil shale research and for relating field and laboratory results; conceptualized and evaluated experimentally a multistaged leaching control for abandonment of underground retorts; and coordinated activities with other DOE laboratories, industry laboratories, and universities. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Peterson, E.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Co-pyrolysis of oil shale and High density polyethylene: Structural characterization of the oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study describes a detailed characterization of the oil obtained by co-pyrolysis of Tarfaya oil shale (Morocco) and high density polyethylene (HDPE) and by pyrolysis of oil shale and HDPE individually. The oil (obtained under the most suitable conditions, temperature of 500–525 °C and heating rate of 10 °C/min) was characterised by elemental analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). In addition, column chromatography was used group composition of oil was determined. Gas chromatography was achieved on n-hexane fractions. Adding HDPE to the oil shale results in increased oil yields, which indicates synergetic effect between the oil shale and HDPE. The addition of HDPE to oil shale improved fuel properties of shale oil leading to a decrease in the oxygen content of shale oil. The results show that the oil obtained by co-pyrolysis has similar properties with commercial gasoline. HDPE acts as a hydrogenation medium for the oil shale product as revealed by FTIR results.

A. Aboulkas; T. Makayssi; L. Bilali; K. El harfi; M. Nadifiyine; M. Benchanaa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Thermal Effects by Firing Oil Shale Fuel in CFB Boilers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is well known that during firing of oil shale fuel the amount of heat released during its combustion per kg of fuel is significantly affected by the endothermic and exothermic processes taking place in mine...

D. Neshumayev; A. Ots; T. Parve; T Pihu…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Oil Shale: A Huge Resource of Low-Grade Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...barrel of oil. With coal, only about 0...the technology for coal liquefaction were...shale would require mining, transporting...same condition as Appalachia. There is no doubt...cornered for surface coal mining. One would think...

William D. Metz

1974-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

252

Operating Parameters in the Column Flotation of Alabama Oil Shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A factionally designed experiment performed in a one meter column flotation cell identified the important factors affecting the flotation of eastern oil shales. These initial tests were performed in a...

C. W. Schultz; John B. Bates

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Methods of Managing Water in Oil Shale Development - Energy Innovation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methods of Managing Water in Oil Shale Development Colorado School of Mines Contact CSM About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryThis invention is a system and method of...

254

West Lothian Biodiversity Action Plan: Oil Shale Bings   

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report establishes the importance of the West Lothian oil-shale bings at both a national (UK) and local (West Lothian) scale, for their contribution to local biodiversity, their historical importance, their education ...

Harvie, Barbra

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Raman/FTIR spectroscopy of oil shale retort gases  

SciTech Connect

A Raman facility was assembled in order to aid in the evaluation of the feasibility of using Raman or FTIR spectroscopy for analyzing gas mixtures of interest in oil shale. Applications considered in oil shale research included both retort monitoring and laboratory kinetic studies. Both techniques gave limits of detection between 10 and 1000 ppM for ten representative pertinent gases. Both techniques are inferior as a general analytical technique for oil shale gas analysis in comparison with mass spectroscopy, which had detection limits between 1 and 50 ppM for the same gases. The conclusion of the feasibility study was to recommend that mass spectroscopic techniques be used for analyzing gases of interest to oil shale.

Richardson, J H; Monaco, S B; Sanborn, R H; Hirschfeld, T B; Taylor, J R

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Conversion of oil shale ash into zeolite for cadmium and lead removal from wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversion of oil shale ash into zeolite for cadmium and lead removal from wastewater Reyad; available online 29 October 2003 Abstract A by-product fly ash from oil shale processing was converted shale; Ash; Zeolite; Cadmium and lead removal 1. Introduction Oil shale exists in Jordan with large

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

257

USE OF ZEEMAN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF MERCURY IN OIL SHALE GASES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W. A. Robb, and T. J. Spedding. Minor Elements in Oil Shaleand Oil-Shale Products. LERC RI 77-1, 1977. Bertine, K. K.From A Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort. In: Procedings of

Girvin, D.G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

INTERLABORATORY, MULTIMETHOD STUDY OF AN IN SITU PRODUCED OIL SHALE PROCESS WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W. A. Robb, and T. J. Spedding. Minor Elements in Oil Shaleand Oil Shale Products. LERC Rept. of Invest. 77-1, 1977.Significant to In Situ Oil Shale Processing. Quart. Colo.

Farrier, D.S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Oil shale quarterly report, August--December 1990  

SciTech Connect

This paper contains four status reports on the following oil shale research projects: (1) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 4-tonne-per-day pilot plant; (2) chemistry and kinetics of New Albany shale flash pyrolysis under Hot-Recycled-Solid (HRS) conditions; (3) modeling of shale oil cracking and coking in the HRS process; and (4) modeling and analysis of particle slip and drag in a lift pipe of the retort for the HRS process. Each project report has been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base. (CK)

Cena, R.

1991-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) More Documents & Publications PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application PIA - GovTrip (DOE data) PIA - WEB Unclassified...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Western states enhanced oil shale recovery program: Shale oil production facilities conceptual design studies report  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes the economics of producing syncrude from oil shale combining underground and surface processing using Occidental's Modified-In-Situ (MIS) technology and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Hot Recycled Solids (HRS) retort. These retorts form the basic technology employed for oil extraction from oil shale in this study. Results are presented for both Commercial and Pre-commercial programs. Also analyzed are Pre-commercialization cost of Demonstration and Pilot programs which will confirm the HRS and MIS concepts and their mechanical designs. These programs will provide experience with the circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor (CFBC), the MIS retort, the HRS retort and establish environmental control parameters. Four cases are considered: commercial size plant, demonstration size plant, demonstration size plant minimum CFBC, and a pilot size plant. Budget cost estimates and schedules are determined. Process flow schemes and basic heat and material balances are determined for the HRS system. Results consist of summaries of major equipment sizes, capital cost estimates, operating cost estimates and economic analyses. 35 figs., 35 tabs.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Strengthening the applicability of self-heating retorting process to oil shale via co-retorting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recently a facile low-energy-input retorting route but without marked loss in the shale-oil yield is developed, which is achieved by a self-heating effect, that is, spontaneously increasing retorting temperature in the absence of external heat provision (Guo et al., 2013, 2014). In this work, the applicability of self-heating retorting (SHR) process to three Chinese oil shales from different places (i.e., Longkou, Huadian and Fushun) is studied. Of these three oil shales, Fushun oil shale is associated with coal and was previously abandoned during coal mining due to its not high kerogen or oil content. The results show that it’s hard for Fushun oil shale to obtain satisfying self-heating effect, while Longkou or Huadian oil shale with higher kerogen or oil content shows satisfactory SHR. However, by adding suitable amounts of Longkou or Huadian oil shale into Fushun oil shale, a satisfying self-heating effect can be obtained as well. Thus, the relatively low-grade Fushun oil shale can also be well utilized to produce shale oil via this facile SHR route. Moreover, to utilize Fushun oil shale with a greener SHR process, the process can be performed by co-retorting Fushun oil shale with pine needles, a kind of renewable biomass. This finding also provides a new starting point for exploring plentiful biomass resources to utilize low-grade oil shale to produce oil in the future work.

Hongfan Guo; Yindong Yang; Kuikui Wang; Yansong Pei; Qicheng Wu; Yunyi Liu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

High-Temperature Nuclear Reactors for In-Situ Recovery of Oil from Oil Shale  

SciTech Connect

The world is exhausting its supply of crude oil for the production of liquid fuels (gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel). However, the United States has sufficient oil shale deposits to meet our current oil demands for {approx}100 years. Shell Oil Corporation is developing a new potentially cost-effective in-situ process for oil recovery that involves drilling wells into oil shale, using electric heaters to raise the bulk temperature of the oil shale deposit to {approx}370 deg C to initiate chemical reactions that produce light crude oil, and then pumping the oil to the surface. The primary production cost is the cost of high-temperature electrical heating. Because of the low thermal conductivity of oil shale, high-temperature heat is required at the heater wells to obtain the required medium temperatures in the bulk oil shale within an economically practical two to three years. It is proposed to use high-temperature nuclear reactors to provide high-temperature heat to replace the electricity and avoid the factor-of-2 loss in converting high-temperature heat to electricity that is then used to heat oil shale. Nuclear heat is potentially viable because many oil shale deposits are thick (200 to 700 m) and can yield up to 2.5 million barrels of oil per acre, or about 125 million dollars/acre of oil at $50/barrel. The concentrated characteristics of oil-shale deposits make it practical to transfer high-temperature heat over limited distances from a reactor to the oil shale deposits. (author)

Forsberg, Charles W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6165 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Thermal decomposition of Colorado and Kentucky reference oil shales  

SciTech Connect

Isothermal pyrolysis studies have been conducted on a Green River Formation oil shale from Colorado and a New Albany oil shale from Kentucky. The conversion of kerogen to bitumen, oil, gas, and residue products was obtained for different isothermal reaction times in the temperature range of 375/degree/C to 440/degree/C (707/degree/ to 824/degree/F) using a heated sand bath reactor system. Particular attention was paid to the formation of the bitumen intermediate during decomposition of the two shales. The maximum amount of extractable bitumen in the New Albany shale was 14% or less of the original kerogen at any given temperature, indicating that direct conversion of kerogen to oil, gas, and residue products is a major pathway of conversion of this shale during pyrolysis. In contrast, a significant fraction of the Colorado oil shale kerogen was converted to the intermediate bitumen during pyrolysis. The bitumen data imply that the formation of soluble intermediates may depend on original kerogen structure and may be necessary for producing high yields by pyrolysis. 24 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs.

Miknis, F.P.; Turner, T.F.; Ennen, L.W.; Chong, S.L.; Glaser, R.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Table 15. Shale natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Shale natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011 : Shale natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011 billion cubic feet Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries Estimated Proved Reserves Adjustments Increases Decreases Sales Acquisitions Extensions Discoveries in Old FieldsProduction Reserves State and Subdivision 12/31/10 (+,-) (+) (-) (-) (+) (+) (+) (+) (-) 12/31/11 Alaska 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Lower 48 States 97,449 1,584 25,993 23,455 22,694 27,038 32,764 232 699 7,994 131,616 Alabama 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Arkansas 12,526 655 502 141 6,087 6,220 2,073 0 0 940 14,808 California 0 1 912 0 0 0 43 0 0 101 855 Colorado 4 0 4 0 0 0 5 0 0 3 10 Florida 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kansas 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kentucky 10 0 44 11 45 45 2 0 0 4 41 Louisiana 20,070 -172 2,002 3,882 3,782 4,291 5,367 0 140 2,084 21,950 North Onshore 20,070 -172 2,002 3,882 3,782 4,291 5,367

266

PARTITIONING OF MAJOR, MINOR, AND TRACE ELEMENTS DURING SIMULATED IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING IN A CONTROLLED-STATE RETORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

retorted and wet with oil, and shale sections 18 through 24V. , 1979, Analysis of oil shale of products and effluents:In- Situ Retorting of Oil Shale in a Controlled- State

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

PARTITIONING OF MAJOR, MINOR, AND TRACE ELEMENTS DURING SIMULATED IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING IN A CONTROLLED-STATE RETORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V. , 1979, Analysis of oil shale of products and effluents:In- Situ Retorting of Oil Shale in a Controlled- Stateactivation: Archaeometry, oil-shale analysis v. 11, p.

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

PARTITIONING OF MAJOR, MINOR, AND TRACE ELEMENTS DURING SIMULATED IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING IN A CONTROLLED-STATE RETORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

elements. Over 25% of the raw shale gas five groups productsthe oil, in the raw oil shale gas, consequence of retorting„good product raw oil shale and input gases that is accounted

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Concentration of oil shale by froth flotation. Monthly technical letter report, May 1-31, 1983  

SciTech Connect

Highlights of findings during May 1983, are briefly summarized. Batches of shale were ground in a 14-inch ball mill. Froth flotation of the ground shales were carried out using pine oil as a frother. Shale used was a high grade eastern shale (New Albany shale). (DMC)

Krishnan, G.

1983-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

270

Cyclone oil shale retorting concept. [Use it all retorting process  

SciTech Connect

A new concept for above-ground retorting of oil shale was disclosed by A.E. Harak in US Patent No. 4,340,463, dated July 20, 1982, and assigned to the US Department of Energy. This patent titled System for Utilizing Oil Shale Fines, describes a process wherein oil shale fines of one-half inch diameter and less are pyrolyzed in an entrained-flow reactor using hot gas from a cyclone combustor. Spent shale and supplemental fuel are burned at slagging conditions in this combustor. Because of fines utilization, the designation Use It All Retorting Process (UIARP) has been adopted. A preliminary process engineering design of the UIARP, analytical tests on six samples of raw oil shale, and a preliminary technical and economic evaluation of the process were performed. The results of these investigations are summarized in this report. The patent description is included. It was concluded that such changes as deleting air preheating in the slag quench and replacing the condenser with a quench-oil scrubber are recognized as being essential. The addition of an entrained flow raw shale preheater ahead of the cyclone retort is probably required, but final acceptance is felt to be contingent on some verification that adequate reaction time cannot be obtained with only the cyclone, or possibly some other twin-cyclone configuration. Sufficient raw shale preheating could probably be done more simply in another manner, perhaps in a screw conveyor shale transporting system. Results of the technical and economic evaluations of Jacobs Engineering indicate that further investigation of the UIARP is definitely worthwhile. The projected capital and operating costs are competitive with costs of other processes as long as electric power generation and sales are part of the processing facility.

Harak, A.E.; Little, W.E.; Faulders, C.R.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Minerals and potentially hazardous trace elements in marine oil shale: new insights from the Shengli River North surface mine, northern Tibet, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Shengli River–Changshe Mountain oil shale zone, including the Changliang Mountain–Shengli River oil shale, the Shengli River North oil shale, and the Changshe Mountain oil shale, represents potentially the la...

Xiugen Fu; Jian Wang; Fuwen Tan; Xinglei Feng…

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Sulfur distribution in the oil fractions obtained by thermal cracking of Jordanian El-Lajjun oil Shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the thermal cracking process of the El-Lujjan oil shale showed that the yield of oil was around 12 wt of the boiling point for different distillate fractions. Sulfur in Jordanian oil shale was found to be mainly the dominant phases in these fractions. q 2005 Published by Elsevier Ltd. 1. Introduction Oil shale

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

273

Effect of demineralization of El-lajjun Jordanian oil shale on oil yield  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of demineralization on oil yield and mineral composition of Jordanian oil shale was investigated. A standard digestion procedure using a range of inorganic and organic acids including HCl, HNO3, HF, and CH3COOH was used to enhance the oil recovery of oil shale samples collected from the El-lajjun area. The total yield of the digested samples, as determined by Fischer Assay, has shown a maximum value (two folds the untreated sample) obtained when using CH3COOH. The kaolin in the treated oil shale with a high concentration of CH3COOH is believed to have transformed to illite as found in the XRD analysis. The treatment of oil shale using \\{HCl\\} has shown an increased ratio of oil to gas as a result of the digestion of calcite in the oil shale. At higher concentrations of HNO3, the acid is believed to react with the kerogen in the oil shale resulting in high levels of low molecular weight compounds. Therefore, the amount of non-condensable gases produced by Fischer assay after treatment with a high concentration of HNO3 is relatively high. HF is believed to drive off water from the oil shale by dissolving the clay minerals leading to increased oil to gas ratio.

Adnan Al-Harahsheh; Mohammad Al-Harahsheh; Awni Al-Otoom; Mamdoh Allawzi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Study of Dielectric Properties of Dry and Saturated Green River Oil Shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Study of Dielectric Properties of Dry and Saturated Green River Oil Shale ... We measured the dielectric permittivity of dry and fluid saturated Green River oil shale samples over a frequency range of 1 MHz to 1.8 GHz. ... Implications of these observations for the in situ electromagnetic or radio frequency heating of oil shale to produce oil and gas are discussed. ...

Jerry J. Sweeney; Jeffery J. Roberts; Philip E. Harben

2007-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

275

Fluidized-bed gasification of an eastern oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The current conceptual HYTORT process design for the hydroretorting of oil shales employs moving-bed retorts that utilize shale particles larger than 3 mm. Work at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is in progress to investigate the potential of high-temperature (1100 to 1300 K) fluidized-bed gasification of shale fines (<3 mm size) using steam and oxygen as a technique for more complete utilization of the resource. Synthesis gas produced from fines gasification can be used for making some of the hydrogen needed in the HYTORT process. After completing laboratory-scale batch and continuous gasification tests with several Eastern oil shales, two tests with Indiana New Albany shale were conducted in a 0.2 m diameter fluidized-bed gasification process development unit (PDU). A conceptual gasifier design for 95% carbon conversion was completed. Gasification of 20% of the mined shale can produce the hydrogen required by the HYTORT reactor to retort 80% of the remaining shale. 12 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Lau, F.S.; Rue, D.M.; Punwani, D.V.; Rex, R.C. Jr.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A study on the Jordanian oil shale resources and utilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jordan has significant oil shale deposits occurring in 26 known localities. Geological surveys indicate that the existing deposits underlie more than 60% of Jordan's territory. The resource consists of 40 to 70 billion tones of oil shale which may be equivalent to more than 5 million tones of shale oil. Since the 1960s Jordan has been investigating economical and environmental methods for utilizing oil shale. Due to its high organic content is considered a suitable source of energy. This paper introduces a circulating fluidized bed combustor that simulates the behavior of full scale municipal oil shale combustors. The inside diameter of the combustor is 500 mm the height is 3000 mm. The design of the CFB is presented. The main parameters which affect the combustion process are elucidated in the paper. The size of the laboratory scale fluidized bed reactor is 3 kW which corresponds to a fuel-feeding rate of approximately 1.5 kg/h.

Ahmad Sakhrieh; Mohammed Hamdan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Gasification characteristics and kinetics for an Eastern oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Gasification reactivity of an Eastern oil shale was studied in a three-year research project under a cooperative agreement between the Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, and HYCRUDE Corp. to expand the data base on the hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales. Gasification tests were conducted with the Indiana New Albany oil shale during the first year of the program. A total of six Eastern oil shales are planned to be tested during the program. A laboratory thermobalance and a 2-inch diameter fluidized bed were used to conduct gasification tests with Indiana New Albany oil shale. Temperature and pressure ranges used were 1600 to 1900/sup 0/F and 15 to 500 psig, respectively. Fifteen thermobalance tests were made in hydrogen/steam and synthesis gas/steam mixtures. Six fluidized-bed tests were made in the same synthesis gas/steam mixture. Carbon conversions as high as 95% were achieved. Thermobalance test results and a kinetic description of weight loss during hydrogen/steam gasification are presented. 14 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Lau, F.S.; Rue, D.M.; Punwani, D.V.; Rex, R.C. Jr.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Slow Radio-Frequency Processing of Large Oil Shale Volumes to Produce Petroleum-Like Shale Oil  

SciTech Connect

A process is proposed to convert oil shale by radio frequency heating over a period of months to years to create a product similar to natural petroleum. Electrodes would be placed in drill holes, either vertical or horizontal, and a radio frequency chosen so that the penetration depth of the radio waves is of the order of tens to hundreds of meters. A combination of excess volume production and overburden compaction drives the oil and gas from the shale into the drill holes, where it is pumped to the surface. Electrical energy for the process could be provided initially by excess regional capacity, especially off-peak power, which would generate {approx}3 x 10{sup 5} bbl/day of synthetic crude oil, depending on shale grade. The electricity cost, using conservative efficiency assumptions, is $4.70 to $6.30/bbl, depending on grade and heating rate. At steady state, co-produced gas can generate more than half the electric power needed for the process, with the fraction depending on oil shale grade. This would increase production to 7.3 x 10{sup 5} bbl/day for 104 l/Mg shale and 1.6 x 10{sup 6} bbl/day for 146 l/Mg shale using a combination of off-peak power and power from co-produced gas.

Burnham, A K

2003-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

279

Beneficiation-hydroretort processing of US oil shales, engineering study  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a beneficiation facility designed to process 1620 tons per day of run-of-mine Alabama oil shale containing 12.7 gallons of kerogen per ton of ore (based on Fischer Assay). The beneficiation facility will produce briquettes of oil shale concentrate containing 34.1 gallons of kerogen per ton (based on Fischer Assay). The beneficiation facility will produce briquettes of oil shale concentrate containing 34.1 gallons of kerogen per ton (based on Fischer Assay) suitable for feed to a hydroretort oil extraction facility of nominally 20,000 barrels per day capacity. The beneficiation plant design prepared includes the operations of crushing, grinding, flotation, thickening, filtering, drying, briquetting, conveying and tailings empoundment. A complete oil shale beneficiation plant is described including all anticipated ancillary facilities. For purposes of determining capital and operating costs, the beneficiation facility is assumed to be located on a generic site in the state of Alabama. The facility is described in terms of the individual unit operations with the capital costs being itemized in a similar manner. Additionally, the beneficiation facility estimated operating costs are presented to show operating costs per ton of concentrate produced, cost per barrel of oil contained in concentrate and beneficiation cost per barrel of oil extracted from concentrate by hydroretorting. All costs are presented in fourth quarter of 1988 dollars.

Johnson, L.R.; Riley, R.H.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Studies of the effect of retorting factors on the yield of shale oil for a new comprehensive utilization technology of oil shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The comprehensive utilization of oil shale is a new promising technology achieving high utilization-factors for both oil shale’s chemical and energy potentials, and avoiding serious environmental impacts. For this technology, it is an urgent issue how to obtain shale oil with a high yield and as well as treat shale char efficiently and economically. In this present work, retorting experiments of three type I oil shales were performed using an aluminum retort, and the effect of retorting temperature, residence time, particle size and heating rate on the yield of shale oil was studied at low retorting temperatures ranging from 400 °C to 520 °C, respectively, at which shale char obtained has good combustion properties. The experimental data show that an increase in the retorting temperature, the residence time and the heating time has positive significant effect on improving the yield of shale oil, and a middle particle size is helpful for increasing the oil yield as well. The grey system method was applied to evaluate the effect of retorting factors on the yield of shale oil, showing that the retorting temperature is the most marked factor influencing the yield of shale oil.

X.X. Han; X.M. Jiang; Z.G. Cui

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Supercritical fluid extraction of Chinese Maoming oil shale with water and toluene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chinese Maoming (Guangdong Province) oil shale was subjected to supercritical fluid extraction with ... water, although the weight losses of the oil shale with toluene and water were almost the...n-alkanes were a...

T Funazukuri; N Wakao

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Reaction mechanism and kinetics of pressurized pyrolysis of Chinese oil shale in the presence of water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study of reaction mechanisms and chemical kinetics of pressurized pyrolysis of Chinese Liushuhe oil shale in the presence of water were conducted ... thermal degradation. It was found that the oil shale was fir...

Chaohe Fang; Shuyuan Li; Guili Ma; Hongyan Wang; Zhilong Huang

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Trace element mineral transformations associated with hydration and recarbonation of retorted oil shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the influence of hydration and recarbonation on the solidphase distribution of trace elements in retorted oil shale. The oil shale samples were retorted by the Paraho ...

M. E. Essington

284

Separation of oil shale phenols by capillary zone electrophoresis and micellar electrokinetic chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relatively high oxygen content and specific structure of the organic matter of Estonian oil shale leads to the phenomenon that its thermal ... is the case with other fuels. These oil shale phenols are also qu...

A. Ebber

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Kinetics and Equilibrium Sorption Studies of 4-Nitrophenol on pyrolyzed and activated oil shale residue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sorption of the organic pollutant 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) by pyrolyzed and activated Jordanian oil-shale was studied. Pyrolyzed oil shale was prepared using a fluidized bed reactor ... activation was carried out by ...

Sameer Al-Asheh; Fawzi Banat; Asmahan Masad

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

SciTech Connect: Water Usage for In-Situ Oil Shale Retorting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Usage for In-Situ Oil Shale Retorting - A Systems Dynamics Model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Water Usage for In-Situ Oil Shale Retorting - A Systems Dynamics...

287

Examination of eastern oil shale disposal problems - the Hope Creek field study  

SciTech Connect

A field-based study of problems associated with the disposal of processed Eastern oil shale was initiated in mid-1983 at a private research site in Montgomery County, Kentucky. The study (known as the Hope Creek Spent Oil Shale Disposal Project) is designed to provide information on the geotechnical, revegetation/reclamation, and leachate generation and composition characteristics of processed Kentucky oil shales. The study utilizes processed oil shale materials (retorted oil shale and reject raw oil shale fines) obtained from a pilot plant run of Kentucky oil shale using the travelling grate retort technology. Approximately 1000 tons of processed oil shale were returned to Kentucky for the purpose of the study. The study, composed of three components, is described. The effort to date has concentrated on site preparation and the construction and implementation of the field study research facilities. These endeavors are described and the project direction in the future years is defined.

Koppenaal, D.W.; Kruspe, R.R.; Robl, T.L.; Cisler, K.; Allen, D.L.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

E-Print Network 3.0 - afforested oil-shale mining Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

oil-shale mining Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: afforested oil-shale mining Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The chemistry of minerals...

289

A feasibility study of oil shale fired pulse combustors with applications to oil shale retorting. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The results of the experimental investigation performed to determine the feasibility of using pulverized Colorado oil shale to fuel a bench scale pulse combustor reveal that oil shale cannot sustain pulsations when used alone as fuel. Trace amounts of propane mixed with the oil shale enabled the pulsations, however. Up to 80% of the organic material in the oil shale was consumed when it was mixed with propane in the combustor. Beyond the feasibility objectives, the operating conditions of the combustor fuel with propane and mixtures of oil shale and propane were characterized with respect to pulsation amplitude and frequency and the internal combustor wall temperature over fuel lean and fuel rich stoichiometries. Maximum pressure excursions of 12.5 kPa were experienced in the combustor. Pulsation frequencies ranged from 50 to nearly 80 Hz. Cycle resolved laser Doppler anemometry velocities were measured at the tail pipe exit plane. Injecting inert mineral matter (limestone) into the pulse combustor while using propane fuel had only a slight effect on the pulsation frequency for the feed rates tested.

Morris, G.J.; Johnson, E.K.; Zhang, G.Q.; Roach, R.A.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Property description and fact-finding report for NPR-3 Natrona County, Wyoming. Addendum to 22 August 1996 study of alternatives for future operations of the naval petroleum and oil shale reserves NPR-3  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy has asked Gustavson Associates, Inc. to serve as an Independent Petroleum Consultant under contract DE-AC01-96FE64202. This authorizes a study and recommendations regarding future development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) in Natrona County, Wyoming. The report that follows is the Phase I fact-finding and property description for that study. The United States of America owns 100 percent of the mineral rights and surface rights in 9,321-acre NPR-3. This property comprises the Teapot Dome oil field and related production, processing and other facilities. Discovered in 1914, this field has 632 wells producing 1,807 barrels of oil per day. Production revenues are about $9.5 million per year. Remaining recoverable reserves are approximately 1.3 million barrels of oil. Significant plugging and abandonment (P&A) and environmental liabilities are present.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

The Identification of Organic Compounds in Oil Shale Retort Water by GC and GC-MS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A separation scheme is presented for the analysis of oil shale retort water by gas chromatography (GC)...

D. H. Stuermer; D. J. Ng; C. J. Morris…

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Cancer Patterns in the Oil Shale Area of the Estonian S.S.R.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Kohtla-Jarve district (oil shale area) there was an excess of stomach and lung cancer. High rates

Maret Purde; Mati Rahu

293

Secure Fuels from Domestic Resources The Continuing Evolution of America’s Oil Shale and Tar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

domestic oil shale and tar sands industries since the first release and to include profiles of additional

Sands Industries

294

comment period. STATEMENT OF BASIS RED LEAF RESOURCES SOUTHWEST #1 OIL SHALE MINE Ground Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

extraction of kerogen from oil shale ore using heat. This represents a new technology for extraction of

unknown authors

295

Multilayer Perceptron Neural Network (MLPs) For Analyzing the Properties of Jordan Oil Shale 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

properties of Jordan Oil Shale. After constructing such a MLP and changing the number of hidden layers, we

Jamal M. Nazzal; Ibrahim M. El-emary; Salam A. Najim

296

Conductivity heating a subterranean oil shale to create permeability and subsequently produce oil  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an improvement in a process in which oil is produced from a subterranean oil shale deposit by extending at least one each of heat-injecting and fluid-producing wells into the deposit, establishing a heat-conductive fluid-impermeable barrier between the interior of each heat-injecting well and the adjacent deposit, and then heating the interior of each heat-injecting well at a temperature sufficient to conductively heat oil shale kerogen and cause pyrolysis products to form fractures within the oil shale deposit through which the pyrolysis products are displaced into at least one production well. The improvement is for enhancing the uniformity of the heat fronts moving through the oil shale deposit. Also described is a process for exploiting a target oil shale interval, by progressively expanding a heated treatment zone band from about a geometric center of the target oil shale interval outward, such that the formation or extension of vertical fractures from the heated treatment zone band to the periphery of the target oil shale interval is minimized.

Van Meurs, P.; DeRouffignac, E.P.; Vinegar, H.J.; Lucid, M.F.

1989-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

297

Policy Analysis of Water Availability and Use Issues for Domestic Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale and oil sands resources located within the intermountain west represent a vast, and as of yet, commercially untapped source of energy. Development will require water, and demand for scarce water resources stands at the front of a long list of barriers to commercialization. Water requirements and the consequences of commercial development will depend on the number, size, and location of facilities, as well as the technologies employed to develop these unconventional fuels. While the details remain unclear, the implication is not – unconventional fuel development will increase demand for water in an arid region where demand for water often exceeds supply. Water demands in excess of supplies have long been the norm in the west, and for more than a century water has been apportioned on a first-come, first-served basis. Unconventional fuel developers who have not already secured water rights stand at the back of a long line and will need to obtain water from willing water purveyors. However, uncertainty regarding the nature and extent of some senior water claims combine with indeterminate interstate river management to cast a cloud over water resource allocation and management. Quantitative and qualitative water requirements associated with Endangered Species protection also stand as barriers to significant water development, and complex water quality regulations will apply to unconventional fuel development. Legal and political decisions can give shape to an indeterminate landscape. Settlement of Northern Ute reserved rights claims would help clarify the worth of existing water rights and viability of alternative sources of supply. Interstate apportionment of the White River would go a long way towards resolving water availability in downstream Utah. And energy policy clarification will help determine the role oil shale and oil sands will play in our nation’s future.

Ruple, John; Keiter, Robert

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

SciTech Connect: "oil shale"  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

oil shale" Find oil shale" Find How should I search Scitech Connect ... Basic or Advanced? Basic Search Advanced × Advanced Search Options Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator / Author: Name Name ORCID Title: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX (United States) Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States) Argonne National Laboratory-Advanced Photon Source (United States) Atlanta Regional Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

299

Oil shale research and coordination. Progress report, 1980-1981  

SciTech Connect

Purpose is to evaluate the environmental and health consequences of the release of toxic trace elements by an oil shale industry. Emphasis is on the five elements As, Mo, F, Se, and B. Results of four years' research are summarized and the research results over the past year are reported in this document. Reports by the task force are included as appendices, together with individual papers on various aspects of the subject topic. Separate abstracts were prepared for the eleven individual papers. A progress report on the IWG oil shale risk analysis is included at the end of this document. (DLC)

Chappell, W R

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

WATER USE IN LCA Life cycle consumptive water use for oil shale development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WATER USE IN LCA Life cycle consumptive water use for oil shale development and implications Heidelberg 2013 Abstract Purpose Oil shale is an unconventional petroleum source that can be produced domestically in the USA. Oil shale resources are primarily located in Utah, Wyoming, and Colorado, within

Jaramillo, Paulina

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Synthesis and characterization of activated carbo-aluminosilicate material from oil shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synthesis and characterization of activated carbo-aluminosilicate material from oil shale Reyad activated carbo-aluminosilicate materials were prepared from oil shale by chemical activation. The chemical Published by Elsevier Inc. Keywords: Synthesis; Activated carbo-aluminosilicate; Adsorption; Oil shale

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

302

Lake Level Controlled Sedimentological I Heterogenity of Oil Shale, Upper Green River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 3 Lake Level Controlled Sedimentological 1:'_i 'I I Heterogenity of Oil Shale, Upper Green email: mgani@uno.edu t",. The Green River Formation comprises the world's largest deposit of oil-shale characterization of these lacustrine oil-shale deposits in the subsurface is lacking. This study analyzed ~300 m

Gani, M. Royhan

303

Comparison of the Acceptability of Various Oil Shale Processes  

SciTech Connect

While oil shale has the potential to provide a substantial fraction of our nation's liquid fuels for many decades, cost and environmental acceptability are significant issues to be addressed. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) examined a variety of oil shale processes between the mid 1960s and the mid 1990s, starting with retorting of rubble chimneys created from nuclear explosions [1] and ending with in-situ retorting of deep, large volumes of oil shale [2]. In between, it examined modified-in-situ combustion retorting of rubble blocks created by conventional mining and blasting [3,4], in-situ retorting by radio-frequency energy [5], aboveground combustion retorting [6], and aboveground processing by hot-solids recycle (HRS) [7,8]. This paper reviews various types of processes in both generic and specific forms and outlines some of the tradeoffs for large-scale development activities. Particular attention is given to hot-recycled-solids processes that maximize yield and minimize oil shale residence time during processing and true in-situ processes that generate oil over several years that is more similar to natural petroleum.

Burnham, A K; McConaghy, J R

2006-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

304

Evaluation of the EOR potential in shale oil reservoirs by cyclic gas injection.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Abstract The current available technique to produce shale oil is through primary depletion using horizontal wells with multiple transverse fractures. The oil recovery factor is… (more)

Wan, Tao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Evaluation of the EOR Potential in Shale Oil Reservoirs by Cyclic Gas Injection.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Abstract The current available technique to produce shale oil is through primary depletion using horizontal wells with multiple transverse fractures. The oil recovery factor is… (more)

Wan, Tao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Horizontal low-void retorting of eastern and western oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Horizontal in situ retorting processes have been developed to recover oil from thin, shallow oil shale deposits. To date the most successful field tests have been conducted in Green River oil shale located in Utah. Consideration is being given to applying this technology to the New Albany oil shales in Indiana. Western Research Institute (WRI) conducted two horizontal in situ oil shale experiments using eastern oil shale and the results are compared with results obtained from a similar experiment using Green River oil shale. The objectives of the three experiments were to simulate the horizontal retorting process and determine oil yield, retorting zone profiles and product characteristics using alternative operating conditions for eastern and western oil shales. The tests proved that horizontal retorting could be simulated in the laboratory. However, air bypass problems occurred in the experiments, which probably reduced oil recovery compared with recovery from field tests. During the eastern oil shale tests plugging was encountered in the gas recovery system because of the production of a solid material containing sulfur compounds. This plugging could be a potential problem for future laboratory and field experimentation. The oil produced from eastern oil shale has different properties from western shale oil. The oil is highly aromatic and when hydrogenated may yield a prototype high density jet fuel. 10 refs., 8 figs., 11 tabs.

Fahy, L.J.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Shale oil players struggle to make gamble pay off  

SciTech Connect

The Green River shale formation, which covers 16,500 square miles in Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah, contains the richest shale deposits in the US, eighty percent of which is on federal lands. By far the richest deposits are in Colorado's Piceance Creek Basin and most of the mining rights there are owned by the major oil companies. A few projects are moving ahead and new developers, local citizens, and state and federal entities are struggling to strike a bargain that protects all players' interests. At stake is a resource equal to 1.8 trillion barrels of petroleum. Carving out the huge underground mines and building the retorts to cook the kerogen will require imposing support facilities for thousands of workers on open range country where the population of towns is counted in the hundreds. Compounding the problems, the shale is under environmentally fragile canyons that states want to protect. The federal government is also a major player, leasing some of the richest shale deposits and stimulating the market by offering loan guarantees and other aid through the Synthetic Fuels Corp. Many oil companies are undecided whether to undertake commercial-sized projects. To soften the impact of shale-oil related growth, some developers have agreed to a host of arrangements, including prepaying taxes, building schools and housing, even expanding local police force. There are at least 13 projects planned or under way on private land and another three on the federal tracts. Of the nonfederal land projects Clear Creek Shale Oil Project and Paraho-Ute Project are moving ahead. On federal lease tracts, progress has been mixed. (DP).

Not Available

1982-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

308

Federal Offshore--California Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Federal Offshore--California Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

309

Louisiana--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Louisiana--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

310

Texas State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

311

Federal Offshore--Louisiana and Alabama Crude Oil Reserves in...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Federal Offshore--Louisiana and Alabama Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade...

312

Texas--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Texas--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

313

California--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) California--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

314

DOE to Resume Filling Strategic Petroleum Reserve: Oil Acquisition...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

to Resume Filling Strategic Petroleum Reserve: Oil Acquisition Slated for 2009 DOE to Resume Filling Strategic Petroleum Reserve: Oil Acquisition Slated for 2009 January 2, 2009 -...

315

The geochemistry of platinum group elements in marine oil shale—A case study from the Bilong Co oil shale, northern Tibet, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Bilong Co oil shale zone is located in the South Qiangtang depression. This zone, together with the Shengli River-Changshe Mountain oil shale zone in the North Qiangtang depression, northern Tibet plateau, represents the potentially largest marine oil shale resource in China. Seventeen samples including oil shale and micritic limestone were collected from the Bilong Co oil shale area to determine the concentrations, distribution patterns, occurrences and origins of platinum group elements (PGEs) in marine oil shale. The oil shale samples from the Bilong Co area exhibit very low total PGE contents ranging from 1.04 to 2.96 ng/g with a weighted mean value of 1.686 ng/g, while the micritic limestone samples from the Bilong Co area exhibit a little lower PGE value ranging from 0.413 to 1.11 ng/g. \\{PGEs\\} in oil shale samples are characterized by high contents in Pd (average 0.79 ng/g), Os (average 0.123 ng/g) and Pt (average 0.644 ng/g) compared with Ru (average 0.068 ng/g), Rh (average 0.033 ng/g) and Ir (average 0.026 ng/g). The highest values for individual \\{PGEs\\} are not uniformly distributed in the section. Clearly, the \\{PGEs\\} are generally enriched in the oil shale samples near the boundary between micritic limestone and oil shale. The individual \\{PGEs\\} in oil shale samples from the Bilong Co area exhibit various modes of occurrence. Ruthenium and Pt occur mainly in pyrite, while Pd is associated mainly with organic matter and Mg-minerals. Rhodium and Os are controlled mainly by pyrite and organic matter. Iridium is present mainly in other Fe-bearing minerals, rather than pyrite. The \\{PGEs\\} in the Bilong Co oil shale are mainly of seawater origin and possibly influenced by terrigenous supply.

Xiugen Fu; Jian Wang; Yuhong Zeng; Fuwen Tan; Chen Wenbing; Xinglei Feng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Effect of severity on catalytic hydroprocessed shale oil jet fuels  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic hydroprocessed shale oil jet fuels in the USA were characterized and compared with petroleum jet fuel to demonstrate their possibility as a conventional jet fuel substitute. The shale oils (Geokinetics, Occidental, Paraho and Tosco II) were hydrotreated in a 0.0508m ID by K1.524m long reactor containing Ni/Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst. The fractionated hydrogenated shale oils at jet fuel ranges (120-300/degree/C) were analyzed for composition and physical properties. The increasing hydroprocessing severity proportionally decreased nitrogen, sulfur, olefins, aromatics and increased hydrogen content. The nitrogen content was considerable higher even at high severity conditions. Sulfur and olefin contents were lower at all severities. The heat of combustion and the physical properties, except the freezing point, were comparable to petroleum jet fuels. The yields of jet fuels increased proportionally to increased severity. The study showed that high severity hydroprocessing gave better performance in processing shale oils to jet fuels.

Mukherjee, N.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Behavior of shale oil jet fuels at variable severities  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic hydroprocessed shale oil jet fuels in the USA were characterized and compared with petroleum jet fuel to demonstrate their possibility as a conventional jet fuel substitute. The shale oils (Geokinetics, Occidental, Paraho and Tosco II) were hydrotreated in a 0.058m ID by 1.52m long reactor containing Ni/MO/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst. The fractionated hydrogenated shale oils at jet fuel ranges (120-300/sup 0/C) were analyzed for composition and physical properties. The increasing hydroprocessing severity proportionally decreased nitrogen, sulfur, olefins, and aromatics, and increased hydrogen content. The nitrogen content even at high severity conditions was considerably higher than that of conventional jet fuel. Sulfur and olefin contents were lower at all severities. The heat of combustion and the physical properties, except the freezing point, were comparable to petroleum jet fuels. The yields of jet fuels increased proportionally to increased severity. The study showed that high severity hydroprocessing gave better performance in processing shale oils to jet fuels.

Mukherjee, N.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Isothermal pyrolysis and char combustion of oil shales  

SciTech Connect

Yields and rates of hydrocarbons evolved during pyrolysis of oil shales have been measured with improved accuracy. Green River and New Albany oil shales were heated in a fluidized sand bed, and volatile pyrolysis products were transferred to a combustion tube and burned. Resulting H/sub 2/O and CO/sub 2 were detected in real time by mass spectrometry. Residual char was subsequently burned to allow complete C and H balances. Good closure was obtained. Proportions of organic C and H released as pyrolysis products and retained as char were determined. Shale oil loss due to the presence of oxidized shale in the fluidized bed was measured accurately. We find that all of the experimental apparatus that the pyrolysis gas contacts must be near pyrolysis temperature to avoid condensation of heavy oil which subsequently forms coke and secondary products. We observe a faster release of products with all transfer lines 450/degree/C than when they are at 300/degree/C. The current uncertainty in pyrolysis rates is due in part to such difficulties with experimental techniques. 12 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Coburn, T.T.; Taylor, R.W.; Morris, C.J.; Duval, V.

1988-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

319

Synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons from the gasification products of oil shale from the Leningrad and Kashpir deposits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The experimental results of the gasification of oil shale from the Leningrad and Kashpir deposits and...

T. A. Avakyan; Yu. A. Strizhakova; A. S. Malinovskii; A. L. Lapidus

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Volume 9: A Review of Socioeconomic Impacts of Oil Shale Development WESTERN OIL SHALE DEVELOPMENT: A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect

The development of an oil shale industry in northwestern Colorado and northeastern Utah has been forecast at various times since early this century, but the comparatively easy accessibility of other oil sources has forestalled development. Decreasing fuel supplies, increasing energy costs, and the threat of a crippling oil embargo finally may launch a commercial oil shale industry in this region. Concern for the possible impacts on the human environment has been fostered by experiences of rapid population growth in other western towns that have hosted energy resource development. A large number of studies have attempted to evaluate social and economic impacts of energy development and to determine important factors that affect the severity of these impacts. These studies have suggested that successful management of rapid population growth depends on adequate front-end capital for public facilities, availability of housing, attention to human service needs, long-range land use and fiscal planning. This study examines variables that affect the socioeconomic impacts of oil shale development. The study region is composed of four Colorado counties: Mesa, Moffat, Garfield and Rio Blanco. Most of the estimated population of 111 000 resides in a handful of urban areas that are separated by large distances and rugged terrain. We have projected the six largest cities and towns and one planned company town (Battlement Mesa) to be the probable centers for potential population impacts caused by development of an oil shale industry. Local planners expect Battlement Mesa to lessen impacts on small existing communities and indeed may be necessary to prevent severe regional socioeconomic impacts. Section II describes the study region and focuses on the economic trends and present conditions in the area. The population impacts analyzed in this study are contingent on a scenario of oil shale development from 1980-90 provided by the Department of Energy and discussed in Sec. III. We recognize that the rate of development, the magnitude of development, and the technology mix that will actually take place remain uncertain. Although we emphasize that other energy and mineral resources besides oil shale may be developed, the conclusions reached in this study reflect only those impacts that would be felt from the oil shale scenario. Socioeconomic impacts in the region reflect the uneven growth rate implied by the scenario and will be affected by the timing of industry developments, the length and magnitude of the construction phase of development, and the shift in employment profiles predicted in the scenario. The facilities in the southern portion of the oil shale region, those along the Colorado River and Parachute Creek, show a peak in the construction work force in the mid-1980s, whereas those f acil it i es in the Piceance Creek Bas into the north show a construction peak in the late 1980s. Together, the facilities will require a large construction work force throughout the decade, with a total of 4800 construction workers required in 1985. Construction at the northern sites and second phase construction in the south will require 6000 workers in 1988. By 1990, the operation work force will increase to 7950. Two important characteristics of oil shale development emerge from the work force estimates: (1) peak-year construction work forces will be 90-120% the size of the permanent operating work force; and (2) the yearly changes in total work force requirements will be large, as much as 900 in one year at one facility. To estimate population impacts on individual communities, we devised a population distribution method that is described in Sec. IV. Variables associated with the projection of population impacts are discussed and methodologies of previous assessments are compared. Scenario-induced population impacts estimated by the Los Alamos method are compared to projections of a model employed by the Colorado West Area Council of Governments. Oil shale development in the early decade, as defined by the scenario, will produce growth primarily

Rotariu,, G. J.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Table 4. Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2010-2011" Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2010-2011" "trillion cubic feet" ,,, 2010,, 2011,," Change 2011-2010" "Basin","Shale Play","State(s)","Production","Reserves","Production","Reserves","Production","Reserves" "Fort Worth","Barnett","TX",1.9,31,2,32.6,0.1,1.6 "Appalachian","Marcellus","PA, WV, KY, TN, NY, OH",0.5,13.2,1.4,31.9,0.9,18.7 "Texas-Louisiana Salt","Haynesville/Bossier","TX, LA",1.5,24.5,2.5,29.5,1,5 "Arkoma","Fayetteville","AR",0.8,12.5,0.9,14.8,0.1,2.3

322

Table 7: Crude oil proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Crude oil proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, 2011" : Crude oil proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, 2011" "million barrels" ,,"Changes in Reserves During 2011" ,"Published",,,,,,,,"New Reservoir" ,"Proved",,"Revision","Revision",,,,"New Field","Discoveries","Estimated","Proved" ,"Reserves","Adjustments","Increases","Decreases","Sales","Acquisitions","Extensions","Discoveries","in Old Fields","Production","Reserves" "State and Subdivision",40543,"(+,-)","(+)","(-)","(-)","(+)","(+)","(+)","(+)","(-)",40908

323

Perform research in process development for hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales: Volume 2, Expansion of the Moving-Bed Hydroretorting Data Base for Eastern oil shales  

SciTech Connect

An extensive data base was developed for six Eastern oil shales: Alabama Chattanooga, Indiana New Albany, Kentucky Sunbury, Michigan Antrim, Ohio Cleveland, and Tennessee Chattanooga shales. The data base included the hydroretorting characteristics of the six shales, as well as the retorting characteristics in the presence of synthesis gas and ionized gas. Shale gasification was also successfully demonstrated. Shale fines (20%) can produce enough hydrogen for the hydroretorting of the remaining 80% of the shale. The amount of fines tolerable in a moving bed was also determined. 16 refs., 59 figs., 43 tabs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Millimeter wave analysis of the dielectric properties of oil shales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural sedimentation processes give rise to fine layers in shales. If these layers alternate between organic-rich and organic-poor sediments, then the contrast in dielectric properties gives rise to an effective birefringence as the presence of hydrocarbons suppresses the dielectric constant of the host rock. We have measured these effects with a quasioptical millimeter wave setup that is rapid and noncontacting. We find that the strength of this birefringence and the overall dielectric permittivity provide two useful diagnostic of the organic content of oil shales.

John A. Scales; Michael Batzle

2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

325

Millimeter wave analysis of the dielectric properties of oil shales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural sedimentation processes give rise to fine layers in shales. If these layers alternate between organic-rich and organic-poor sediments then the contrast in dielectric properties gives rise to an effective birefringence as the presence of hydrocarbons suppresses the dielectric constant of the host rock. We have measured these effects with a quasioptical millimeter wave setup that is rapid and noncontacting. We find that the strength of this birefringence and the overall dielectricpermittivity provide two useful diagnostics of the organic content of oil shales.

John A. Scales; Michael Batzle

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Pore Scale Analysis of Oil Shale/Sands Pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect

There are important questions concerning the quality and volume of pore space that is created when oil shale is pyrolyzed for the purpose of producing shale oil. In this report, 1.9 cm diameter cores of Mahogany oil shale were pyrolyzed at different temperatures and heating rates. Detailed 3D imaging of core samples was done using multiscale X-ray computed tomography (CT) before and after pyrolysis to establish the pore structure. The pore structure of the unreacted material was not clear. Selected images of a core pyrolyzed at 400oC were obtained at voxel resolutions from 39 microns (?m) to 60 nanometers (nm). Some of the pore space created during pyrolysis was clearly visible at these resolutions and it was possible to distinguish between the reaction products and the host shale rock. The pore structure deduced from the images was used in Lattice Boltzmann simulations to calculate the permeability in the pore space. The permeabilities of the pyrolyzed samples of the silicate-rich zone were on the order of millidarcies, while the permeabilities of the kerogen-rich zone after pyrolysis were very anisotropic and about four orders of magnitude higher.

Lin, Chen-Luh; Miller, Jan

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Adsorption of phenol from aqueous systems onto spent oil shale  

SciTech Connect

To evaluate its ability to remove phenol from aqueous solution, Jordanian {open_quotes}spent{close_quotes} oil shale, an abundant natural resource, has been used in an experimental adsorption study. Equilibrium of the system has been determined at three temperatures: 30, 40, and 55{degrees}C. The resulting experimental equilibrium isotherms are well represented by Frendlich, Langmuir, and Redlich-Peterson isotherms. The relevant parameters for these isotherms, as regressed from the experimental equilibrium data, are presented. Effects of solution pH (in the range of 3-11), in addition to effects of three inorganic salts (Kl, KCl, and NaCl), on the equilibrium isotherms were also investigated. The effects of pH in the presence of KI and NaCl were also investigated for a possible interaction between salts and solution pH. The initial concentration of phenol in the aqueous system studied ranges from 10 to 200 ppm. Experimental results show that while an acidic solution has no effect on the adsorption capacity of spent oil shale to phenol, a highly basic solution reduces its adsorbability. No sound effect was observed for the inorganic salts studied on the adsorption of phenol on spent oil shale. The experimental results show that there is no interaction between the pH of solution and the presence of salts. In spite of its ability to remove phenol, spent oil shale showed a very low equilibrium capacity (of an order of magnitude of 1 mg/g). Should the adsorption capacity of the shale be improved (by different treatment processes, such as grafting, surface conditioning), results of this study will find a direct practical implication in serving as {open_quotes}raw{close_quotes} reference data for comparison purposes.

Darwish, N.A.; Halhouli, K.A.; Al-Dhoon, N.M. [Jordan Univ. of Science and Technology, Irbid (Jordan)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Laboratory weathering and solubility relationships of fluorine and molybdenum in combusted oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Proper management of large volumes of spent oil shale requires an understanding of the mineralogy and the disposal environment chemistry. Simulated laboratory weathering is one method to rapidly and inexpensively assess the long-term potential for spent oil shales to degrade the environment. The objectives of this study were to assess the solubility relationships of fluorine (F) and molybdenum (Mo) in Green River Formation spent oil shale, to examine the mineralogy and leachate chemistry of three combusted oil shales in a laboratory weathering environment using the humidity cell technique, and to examine the data from spent oil shale literature. Combusted oil shales from the Green River Formation and New Albany Shale were used in the examination of the leachate chemistry and mineralogy.

Essington, M.E.; Wills, R.A.; Brown, M.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Gasification characteristics and kinetics for an eastern oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Gasification tests of Indiana New Albany oil shale fines have been conducted. Thermobalance test results indicate that over 95% of the organic carbon in the shale can be gasified at 1700{degree}F and 135 psig with 30 minutes residence time under a synthesis gas atmosphere and at 1800{degree}F and 15 psig with 30 minutes residence time under a hydrogen/steam atmosphere. A simple kinetic expression for hydrogen/steam gasification weight loss has been developed. Weight loss has been described as the sum of the weight loss from two independent, simultaneous reaction paths: a rapid (<2 minutes) first order reaction and a slower gasification reaction that can be expressed in terms of the steam/carbon reaction. Work is in progress to study the gasification of other Eastern shales and improve the kinetic description of weight loss.

Lau, F.S.; Rue, D.M.; Punwani, D.V.; Rex, R.C. Jr.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Assessment of the Mexican Eagle Ford Shale Oil and Gas Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-rich zone. Accurate estimation of the resource size and future production, as well as the uncertainties associated with them, is critical for the decision-making process of developing shale oil and gas resources. The complexity of the shale reservoirs...

Morales Velasco, Carlos Armando

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

331

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory oil shale project. Quarterly report, April-June 1982  

SciTech Connect

The effect of the proportion of oxidized shale to raw shale, on the heat of combustion of retort product was studied in a fluidized sand bed at 500/sup 0/C. Results show a significant increase in the heat of combustion, produced by the activity of the oxidized shale. The functionality of organic sulfur in various oil shale types is being investigated. An oil shale pyrolyzer for aboveground retorting is being studied in an engineering facility. Thermochemical and experimental equations were developed for the heat of combustion of raw shale. A heat balance was calculated for 24.6 gal/ton Colorado oil shale. The rapid-pyrolysis data was analyzed to determine the best kinetic scheme for retort modeling. Incipient fluidization velocity measurements were made for various crushed oil shale mixtures of different particle sizes. 10 figures, 1 table. (DLC)

Carley, J.F. (ed.)

1982-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

332

Oil Shale Development from the Perspective of NETL's Unconventional Oil Resource Repository  

SciTech Connect

The history of oil shale development was examined by gathering relevant research literature for an Unconventional Oil Resource Repository. This repository contains over 17,000 entries from over 1,000 different sources. The development of oil shale has been hindered by a number of factors. These technical, political, and economic factors have brought about R&D boom-bust cycles. It is not surprising that these cycles are strongly correlated to market crude oil prices. However, it may be possible to influence some of the other factors through a sustained, yet measured, approach to R&D in both the public and private sectors.

Smith, M.W. (REM Engineering Services, Morgantown, WV); Shadle, L.J.; Hill, D. (REM Engineering Services, Morgantown, WV)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

The use of Devonian oil shales in the production of portland cement  

SciTech Connect

The Lafarge Corporation operates a cement plant at Alpena, Michigan in which Antrim shale, a Devonian oil shale, is used as part of the raw material mix. Using this precedent the authors examine the conditions and extent to which spent shale might be utilized in cement production. They conclude that the potential is limited in size and location but could provide substantial benefit to an oil shale operation meeting these criteria.

Schultz, C.W.; Lamont, W.E. [Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States); Daniel, J. [Lafarge Corp., Alpena, MI (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

The use of oil shale ash in the production of biodiesel from waste vegetable oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oil shale ash obtained from combustion of local oil shale deposits was used in this study as a heterogeneous catalyst to produce biodiesel from waste vegetable oil (WVO). Two alcohols with high and low boiling points ethanol and ethylene glycol were used for oil shale catalytic esterification of the WVO. Results show that the esterification of wastes of oil utilizing wastes of oil shale combustion can be used to produce biodiesel. Additionally it was found that in order to make the oil shale ash an effective catalyst for transesterification high reaction temperature is required. Therefore the results have indicated that high biodiesel yield is obtained when using ethylene glycol at high temperature while the yield is low when solid catalytic reaction is performed using ethanol at low temperature. The maximum obtained yield was 75?wt. % utilizing ethylene glycol at 150?°C whereas this yield decreased to 69.9?wt. % as the operating temperature was reduced to 100?°C. On the other hand when using ethanol the yield of biodiesel was relatively low (11?wt. % at 60?°C and 9?wt. % at 80?°C).

A. Al-Otoom; M. Allawzi; A. Ajlouni; F. Abu-Alrub; M. Kandah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Soil stabilization using oil shale solid wastes: Laboratory evaluation of engineering properties  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale solid wastes were evaluated for possible use as soil stabilizers. A laboratory study was conducted and consisted of the following tests on compacted samples of soil treated with water and spent oil shale: unconfined compressive strength, moisture-density relationships, wet-dry and freeze-thaw durability, and resilient modulus. Significant increases in strength, durability, and resilient modulus were obtained by treating a silty sand with combusted western oil shale. Moderate increases in strength, durability, and resilient modulus were obtained by treating a highly plastic clay with combusted western oil shale. Solid waste from eastern shale can be used for soil stabilization if limestone is added during combustion. Without limestone, eastern oil shale waste exhibits little or no cementation. The testing methods, results, and recommendations for mix design of spent shale-stabilized pavement subgrades are presented. 11 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

Turner, J.P.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

U.S. oil reserves highest since 1975, natural gas reserves set...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. oil reserves highest since 1975, natural gas reserves set new record U.S. proved oil reserves have topped 36 billion barrels for the first time in nearly four decades, while...

337

Ignition technique for an in situ oil shale retort  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generally flat combustion zone is formed across the entire horizontal cross-section of a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles formed in an in situ oil shale retort. The flat combustion zone is formed by either sequentially igniting regions of the surface of the fragmented permeable mass at successively lower elevations or by igniting the entire surface of the fragmented permeable mass and controlling the rate of advance of various portions of the combustion zone.

Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Production of valuable hydrocarbons by flash pyrolysis of oil shale  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the production of gas and liquid hydrocarbons from particulated oil shale by reaction with a pyrolysis gas at a temperature of from about 700/sup 0/C to about 1100/sup 0/C, at a pressure of from about 400 psi to about 600 psi, for a period of about 0.2 second to about 20 seconds. Such a pyrolysis gas includes methane, helium, or hydrogen. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Paraho oil shale module. Site development plan, Task 4  

SciTech Connect

A management plan and schedule which covers all requirements for gaining access to the site and for conducting a Paraho Process demonstration program have been prepared. The oil shale available should represent a regional resource of suitable size and quality for commercial development. Discussed in this report are: proof of ownership; requirements for rights-of-way for access to the site; local zoning restrictions; water rights; site availability verification; and other legal requirements. (DMC)

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Proof-of-Concept Oil Shale Facility Environmental Analysis Program  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the Project are to demonstrate: (1) the Modified In- Situ (MIS) shale oil extraction process and (2) the application of CFBC technology using oil shale, coal and waste gas streams as fuels. The project will focus on evaluating and improving the efficiency and environmental performance of these technologies. The project will be modest by commercial standards. A 17-retort MIS system is planned in which two retorts will be processed simultaneously. Production of 1206-barrels per calendar day of raw shale oil and 46-megawatts of electricity is anticipated. West Virginia University coordinated an Environmental Analysis Program for the Project. Experts from around the country were retained by WVU to prepare individual sections of the report. These experts were exposed to all of OOSI`s archives and toured Tract C-b and Logan Wash. Their findings were incorporated into this report. In summary, no environmental obstacles were revealed that would preclude proceeding with the Project. One of the most important objectives of the Project was to verify the environmental acceptability of the technologies being employed. Consequently, special attention will be given to monitoring environmental factors and providing state of the art mitigation measures. Extensive environmental and socioeconomic background information has been compiled for the Tract over the last 15 years and permits were obtained for the large scale operations contemplated in the late 1970`s and early 1980`s. Those permits have been reviewed and are being modified so that all required permits can be obtained in a timely manner.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Proof-of-Concept Oil Shale Facility Environmental Analysis Program  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the Project are to demonstrate: (1) the Modified In- Situ (MIS) shale oil extraction process and (2) the application of CFBC technology using oil shale, coal and waste gas streams as fuels. The project will focus on evaluating and improving the efficiency and environmental performance of these technologies. The project will be modest by commercial standards. A 17-retort MIS system is planned in which two retorts will be processed simultaneously. Production of 1206-barrels per calendar day of raw shale oil and 46-megawatts of electricity is anticipated. West Virginia University coordinated an Environmental Analysis Program for the Project. Experts from around the country were retained by WVU to prepare individual sections of the report. These experts were exposed to all of OOSI's archives and toured Tract C-b and Logan Wash. Their findings were incorporated into this report. In summary, no environmental obstacles were revealed that would preclude proceeding with the Project. One of the most important objectives of the Project was to verify the environmental acceptability of the technologies being employed. Consequently, special attention will be given to monitoring environmental factors and providing state of the art mitigation measures. Extensive environmental and socioeconomic background information has been compiled for the Tract over the last 15 years and permits were obtained for the large scale operations contemplated in the late 1970's and early 1980's. Those permits have been reviewed and are being modified so that all required permits can be obtained in a timely manner.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

In the OSTI Collections: Oil Shales | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Oil Shales Oil Shales Extraction Water Use History References Additional References Research Organizations Reports Available through OSTI's SciTech Connect Petroleum is commonly extracted from pores in rock formations below the earth's surface. Different kinds of rock have petroleum in their pores, but the petroleum is not part of the rock itself. Kerogen, another hydrocarbon material, is a constituent material of a type of rock called oil shale. While oil shales can be burned directly as a fuel, it's possible to extract a liquid substitute for petroleum from kerogen by heating the oil shale to a high temperature, thus producing a vapor, which is then cooled. Some of the cooled vapor remains gaseous (and is called "combustible oil-shale gas"), while the rest condenses

343

DOE Science Showcase - Oil Shale Research | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Oil Shale Research Oil Shale Research Oil shale has been recognized as a potentially valuable U.S. energy resource for a century. Obstacles to its use have included the expense of current shale-oil production technologies and their effects on our environment. The energy landscape is evolving. Technology has advanced, global economic, political, and market conditions have changed and the regulatory landscape has matured. Recent efforts to realize the potential of this vast resource is a major focus of DOE's Fossil Energy program research. Read more about recent developments in fuel extraction, water management and efforts to advance the use of oil shales for energy In the OSTI Collections: Oil Shales, by Dr. William Watson, Physicist, OSTI staff. Image Credit: Argonne National Laboratory

344

In situ method for recovering hydrocarbon from subterranean oil shale deposits  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes in situ method for recovering hydrocarbons from subterranean oil shale deposits, the deposits comprising mineral rock and kerogen, comprising (a) penetrating the oil shale deposit with at least one well; (b) forming a zone of fractured and/or rubbilized oil shale material adjacent the well by hydraulic or explosive fracturing; (c) introducing a hydrogen donor solvent including tetralin into the portion of the oil shale formation treated in step (b) in a volume sufficient to fill substantially all of the void space created by the fracturing and rubbilizing treatment; (d) applying hydrogen to the tetralin and maintaining a predetermined pressure for a predetermined period of time sufficient to cause disintegration of the oil shale material; (e) thereafter introducing an oxidative environment into the portion of the oil shale deposit (f) producing the solvent in organic fragments to the surface of the earth, and (g) separating the organic fragments from the solvent.

Friedman, R.H.

1987-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

345

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of raw and beneficiated Eastern oil shales  

SciTech Connect

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) with US Department of Energy (DOE) support has developed a pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for Eastern oil shales. Bench-scale tests have been conducted with raw and beneficiated shales in an advanced multipurpose research reactor (AMRR). Raw Alabama shale and raw and beneficiated Indiana shales were retorted at 515{degrees}C using hydrogen pressures of 4 and 7 MPa. Shale feed rates to the AMRR were 15 to 34 kg/h. High oils yields and carbon conversions were achieved in all tests. Oil yield from Alabama shale hydroretorted at 7 MPa was 200% of Fischer Assay. Raw and beneficiated Indiana shales hydroretorted at 7 MPa produced oil yields of 170% to 195% of Fischer Assay, respectively. Total carbon conversions were greater than 70% for all tests conducted at 7 MPa.

Roberts, M.J.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of raw and beneficiated Eastern oil shales  

SciTech Connect

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) with US Department of Energy (DOE) support has developed a pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for Eastern oil shales. Bench-scale tests have been conducted with raw and beneficiated shales in an advanced multipurpose research reactor (AMRR). Raw Alabama shale and raw and beneficiated Indiana shales were retorted at 515{degrees}C using hydrogen pressures of 4 and 7 MPa. Shale feed rates to the AMRR were 15 to 34 kg/h. High oils yields and carbon conversions were achieved in all tests. Oil yield from Alabama shale hydroretorted at 7 MPa was 200% of Fischer Assay. Raw and beneficiated Indiana shales hydroretorted at 7 MPa produced oil yields of 170% to 195% of Fischer Assay, respectively. Total carbon conversions were greater than 70% for all tests conducted at 7 MPa.

Roberts, M.J.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Central Pacific Minerals and Southern Pacific Petroleum detail oil shale activities  

SciTech Connect

These two affiliated companies have their major assets in Queensland. Brief summaries are given of the activities of the Rundle, Condor, and Yaamba oil shale projects and brief descriptions are given of the resources found in the Stuart, Nagoorin, Nagoorin South, Lowmead, and Duaringa oil shale deposits of Queensland. The companies also have, or are planning, oil shale projects in the US, Luxembourg, France, and the Federal Republic of Germany, and these are briefly described.

Not Available

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Electrical installations in oil shale mines. Open file report 21 Sep 81-13 Aug 83  

SciTech Connect

This report presents recommended guidelines and regulatory changes applicable to electrical installations in underground oil shale mines. These recommendations are based on information gathered from oil shale operators, government agencies, and other knowledgeable sources familiar with existing plans for mining systems and electrical installations, and on present understanding of the problems and hazards associated with oil shale mining. Additional discussions of specific electrical problems related to oil shale mining include ground fault current levels, permissible electric wheel motors, permissible batteries and electric starting systems, intrinsically safe instrumentation, and applicability of existing test standards.

Gillenwater, B.B.; Kline, R.J.; Paas, N.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Pyrolysis Kinetics and Chemical Structure Considerations of a Green River Oil Shale and Its Derivatives.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work had the objective of determining both the kinetic parameters for the pyrolysis of oil shale and kerogen as well as using analytical techniques… (more)

Hillier, James L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Influence of Oil Shale on Intertidal Organisms: Isolation and Characterization of Metalloporphyrins that Induce the Settlement of Balanus balanoides and Elminius modestus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1985 research-article Influence of Oil Shale on Intertidal Organisms: Isolation...Holland Extracts of Blackstone oil shale from Kimmeridge, Dorset, were fractionated...fraction and the crude unfractionated oil shale extract promoted barnacle settlement...

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

FINGERPRINTING INORGANIC ARSENIC AND ORGANOARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORT AND PROCESS VOTERS USING A LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPH COUPLED WITH AN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER AS A DETECTOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Process for Recovery of Oil Shale, Nov. 1976-0ct. 1977,M. A. , Proc. 12th Oil Shale Sympos. , Colorado School ofCOMPOUNDS IN IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORT ~~D PROCESS WATERS

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

A CONTINUOUS FLOW BIOASSAY TECHNIQUE FOR ASSESSING THE TOXICITY OF OIL-SHALE-RELATED EFFLUENTS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS WITH TWO SPECIES OF CADDISFLY LARVAE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Derived from In Situ Oil Shale Processing. In: ProceedingsConsiderations for an In-Situ Oil Shale Process Water. LETC/Presented at the Oil Shale Sampling, Analysis and Quality

Russell, Peter P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

A CONTINUOUS FLOW BIOASSAY TECHNIQUE FOR ASSESSING THE TOXICITY OF OIL-SHALE-RELATED EFFLUENTS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS WITH TWO SPECIES OF CADDISFLY LARVAE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large~scale commercial shale oil production has yet to takeDerived from In Situ Oil Shale Processing. In: ProceedingsConsiderations for an In-Situ Oil Shale Process Water. LETC/

Russell, Peter P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Colorado Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Colorado Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

355

Utah Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Utah Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

356

Ohio Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Ohio Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

357

Evaluation of western and eastern shale oil residua as asphalt pavement recycling agents  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this investigation was to perform a preliminary evaluation of the utility of residual materials prepared from Green River Formation (western) and New Albany Shale (eastern) shale oils as recycling agents for aged asphalt pavement. Four petroleum asphalts were first aged by a thin-film accelerated-aging test, which simulates long service life of asphalt in pavement. The aged asphalts were mixed (recycled) with Green River Formation shale oil distillation residua to restore the original viscosities. Separately, for comparison, a commercial recycling agent was used to recycle the aged asphalts under the same circumstances. The recycled asphalts were reaged and the properties of both binder and asphalt-aggregate mixtures studied. Originally, the same study was intended for an eastern shale residua. However, the eastern shale oil distillation residua with the required flash point specification also had the properties of a viscosity builder; therefore, it was studied as such with asphalts that do not achieve sufficient viscosity during processing to serve as usable binders. Results show that Green River Formation shale oil residuum can be used to restore the original asphalt properties with favorable rheological properties, the shale oil residuum has a beneficial effect on resistance to moisture damage, the low-temperature properties of the shale oil residuum recycled asphalts are not adversely affected, and the low-temperature properties of the shale oil residuum recycled asphalts are dependent upon the chemistry of the mixture. The eastern shale oil residua was blended with soft petroleum asphalts. Results show the products have higher viscosities than the starting materials, the rheological properties of the soft asphalt-eastern shale oil residue blends are acceptable, and the eastern shale oil residue has dispersant properties despite its high viscosity. 11 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs.

Harnsberger, P.M.; Robertson, R.E.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

,"U.S. Total Crude Oil Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Crude Oil Proved Reserves",1,"Annual",2013,"6301899" ,"Data 2","Changes in Reserves During...

359

Table 6: Crude oil and lease condensate proved reserves, reserves changes, and p  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Crude oil and lease condensate proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, 2011" : Crude oil and lease condensate proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, 2011" "million barrels" ,,"Changes in Reserves During 2011" ,"Published",,,,,,,,"New Reservoir" ,"Proved",,"Revision","Revision",,,,"New Field","Discoveries","Estimated","Proved" ,"Reserves","Adjustments","Increases","Decreases","Sales","Acquisitions","Extensions","Discoveries","in Old Fields","Production","Reserves" "State and Subdivision",40543,"(+,-)","(+)","(-)","(-)","(+)","(+)","(+)","(+)","(-)",40908

360

DOE-Funded Project Shows Promise for Tapping Vast U.S. Oil Shale Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Funded Project Shows Promise for Tapping Vast U.S. Oil Shale Funded Project Shows Promise for Tapping Vast U.S. Oil Shale Resources DOE-Funded Project Shows Promise for Tapping Vast U.S. Oil Shale Resources March 31, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A technology as simple as an advanced heater cable may hold the secret for tapping into the nation's largest source of oil, which is contained in vast amounts of shale in the American West. In a recently completed project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the Office of Fossil Energy's Oil and Natural Gas Program, Composite Technology Development (CTD) Inc. successfully demonstrated the application of a ceramic-composite insulated heater cable for oil shale recovery deep underground. The Small Business Innovation Research project provided employment for 25 professionals and resulted in two patent

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Effect of the concentration of organic matter on the yield of thermal bitumen from the baltic oil shale kukersite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The low-temperature (360°C) autoclave pyrolysis of the oil shale kukersite, which has carbonatetype mineral matter, ... was found that, in the pyrolysis of oil shale in an autoclave, the extract yield on ... basi...

L. Tiikma; Yu. Sokolova; N. Vink

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Removal of selected heavy metals from aqueous solutions using a solid by-product from the Jordanian oil shale refining  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...?The potential use of treated solid by-product of oil shale to treat aqueous solutions containing several heavy ... Results indicate that the solid by-product of oil shale removes Cd(II), Cu(II),...

W. Y. Abu-El-Sha'r; S. H. Gharaibeh; M. M. Al-Kofahi

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Assessment of oil-shale technology in Brazil. Final technical report, October 27, 1980-July 27, 1981  

SciTech Connect

The development of an oil shale industry in the United States will require the solution of a variety of technical, economic, environmental, and health and safety problems. This assessment investigates whether US oil shale developers might benefit from the experience gained by the Brazilians in the operation of their Usina Prototipo do Irati oil shale demonstration plant at Sao Mateus do Sul, and from the data generated from their oil shale research and development programs. A chapter providing background information on Brazil and the Brazilian oil shale deposits is followed by an examination of the potential recovery processes applicable to Brazilian oil shale. The evolution of the Brazilian retorting system is reviewed and compared with the mining and retorting proposed for US shales. Factors impacting on the economics of shale oil production in Brazil are reviewed and compared to economic analyses of oil shale production in the US. Chapters examining the consequences of shale development in terms of impact on the physical environment and the oil shale worker complete the report. Throughout the report, where data permits, similarities and differences are drawn between the oil shale programs underway in Brazil and the US. In addition, research areas in which technology or information transfer could benefit either or both countries' oil shale programs are identified.

Not Available

1981-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

364

The chemistry of minerals obtained from the combustion of Jordanian oil shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas compared to its neighboring countries. However, oil shale is an important and unutilized energyThe chemistry of minerals obtained from the combustion of Jordanian oil shale Awni Y. Al University, P.O. Box 78, Karak 61710, Jordan Received 21 November 2003 Abstract A characterization study

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

365

Oil and Gas CDT Structural and depositional controls on shale gas resources in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil and Gas CDT Structural and depositional controls on shale gas resources in the UK, #12;environmental geoscience for oil and gas) are all possibles. References & Further Reading https), http://www.bgs.ac.uk/staff/profiles/0688.html · Laura Banfield (BP) Key Words Shale gas, Bowland

Henderson, Gideon

366

Chemical Composition of the Organic Matter of Oil Shale (Kerogen-70) from Leningrad Oblast (Benzene-Ethanol Extract)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Detailed data are reported on the chemical composition of the benzene-ethanol extract of oil shale (kerogen-70).

V. V. Platonov; V. A. Proskuryakov; A. V. Glybina

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Unconventional Hydrocarbons: Oil Shales, Heavy Oil, Tar Sands, Shale Gas and Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For many decades conventional oil which could be produced at low cost was present in abundance. A low oil price gave no incentive to look for other types of resources. It is now clear, however, that we are gra...

Knut Bjørlykke

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Oil Shale RD&D Leases in the United States | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil Shale RD&D Leases in the United States Oil Shale RD&D Leases in the United States Oil Shale RD&D Leases in the United States This paper describes the original plans, progress and accomplishments, and future plans for nine oil shale research, development and demonstration (RD&D) projects on six existing RD&D leases awarded in 2006 and 2007 by the United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to Shell, Chevron, EGL (now AMSO), and OSEC (now Enefit American, respectively); as well as three pending leases to Exxon, Natural Soda, and AuraSource, that were offered in 2010. The outcomes associated with these projects are expected to have global applicability. Assessment of Plans and Progress on BLM Oil Shale RD&D Leases in the United States More Documents & Publications

369

Feasibility of establishing and operating a generic oil shale test facility  

SciTech Connect

The December 19, 1985, Conference Report on House Joint Resolution 465, Further continuing appropriations for Fiscal Year 1986, included instruction to DOE to conduct a feasibility study for a generic oil shale test facility. The study was completed, as directed, and its findings are documented in this report. To determine the feasibility of establishing and operating such a facility, the following approach was used: examine the nature of the resource, and establish and basic functions associated with recovery of the resource; review the history of oil shale development to help put the present discussion in perspective; describe a typical oil shale process; define the relationship between each oil shale system component (mining, retorting, upgrading, environmental) and its cost. Analyze how research could reduce costs; and determine the scope of potential research for each oil shale system component.

Not Available

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Table 4. Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2010-1011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2010-2011 Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2010-2011 trillion cubic feet Basin Shale Play State(s) Production Reserves Production Reserves Production Reserves Fort Worth Barnett TX 1.9 31.0 2.0 32.6 0.1 1.6 Appalachian Marcellus PA, WV, KY, TN, NY, OH 0.5 13.2 1.4 31.9 0.9 18.7 Texas-Louisiana Salt Haynesville/Bossier TX, LA 1.5 24.5 2.5 29.5 1.0 5.0 Arkoma Fayetteville AR 0.8 12.5 0.9 14.8 0.1 2.3 Anadarko Woodford TX, OK 0.4 9.7 0.5 10.8 0.1 1.1 Western Gulf Eagle Ford TX 0.1 2.5 0.4 8.4 0.3 5.9 Sub-total 5.2 93.4 7.7 128.0 2.5 34.6 Other shale gas plays 0.2 4.0 0.3 3.6 0.1 -0.4 All U.S. Shale Plays 5.4 97.4 8.0 131.6 2.6 34.2 Change 2011-2010 2010 2011 Notes: Some columns may not add up to its subtotal because of independent rounding. Natural gas is wet after lease separation. The above table is

371

DOE oil shale reference sample bank: Quarterly report, July-September 1987  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Oil Shale Program was restructured in FY84 to implement a 5-year period of basic and applied research in the study of the phenomena involved in oil shale pyrolysis/retorting. The program calls for the study of two reference shales per year for a period of 5 years. Consequently, the program calls for the identification, acquisition, processing, characterization, storage, disbursement, and record keeping for ten reference shales in a period of 5 years. Two FY86 and one FY87 reference shales have been acquired, processed and stored under inert gas. The Eastern shale, designated E86, was obtained from the Clegg Creek Member of the New Albany Shale at a quarry near Louisville, Kentucky in the first quarter of FY86. The FY86 Western Shale was obtained from the Exxon Colony Mine, located near Parachute, Colorado, during the first quarter of FY86. The FY87 Western Shale was obtained from the Tipton Member of the Green River Formation near Rock Springs, Wyoming during the fourth quarter of FY87. Partial distributions of the FY86 shale have been made to DOE and non-DOE contractors. Complete descriptions of the FY87 Western reference shale locale, shale processing procedures and analytical characterization are provided in this report. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Owen, L.B.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Status of LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid oil shale retort, January 1991--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Our objective, together with our CRADA partners, is to demonstrate advanced technology that could lead to an economic and environmentally acceptable commercialization of oil shale. We have investigated the technical and economic barriers facing the introduction of an oil shale industry and we have chosen Hot-Recycled-Solid (HRS) oil shale retorting as the primary advanced technology of interest. We are investigating this approach through fundamental research, operation of a 4 tonne-per-day HRS pilot plant and development of an Oil Shale Process (OSP) mathematical model. The LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid process has the potential to improve existing oil shale technology. It processes oil shale in minutes instead of hours, reducing plant size. It processes all oil shale, including fines rejected by other processes. It provides controls to optimize product quality for different applications. It co-generates electricity to maximize useful energy output. And, it produces negligible SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions, a non-hazardous waste shale and uses minimal water.

Cena, R.J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Solvent extraction of oil shale or tar sands  

SciTech Connect

Oil shales or tar sands are extracted under non-thermally destructive conditions with a solvent liquid containing a compound having the general formula: R(N)-M(=O)(-R1)-N(-R2)-R3 where M is a carbon, sulfur or phosphorus atom, R/sup 2/ and R/sup 3/ are each a hydrogen atom or a lowe alkyl group, R and R/sup 1/ are each a lower alkyl group, another -N(-R2)-R3 group, a monocyclic arom group, or R/sup 1/ can be another -N(-R3)-M(=O)(-R1)-R(N) group or R/sup 1/ and R/sup 2/ together can represent the atoms necessary to close a heterocyclic ring, and n=1 where M=phosphorus and is otherwise 0, to substantially remove the non-fixed carbon content of the oil shale or tar sands, leaving a solid residue of fixed carbon, ash minerals, and non-extractable matter.

Stiller, A.H.; Hammack, R.W.; Sears, J.T.

1983-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

374

Characterization of in situ oil shale retorts prior to ignition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and system for characterizing a vertical modified in situ oil shale retort prior to ignition of the retort. The retort is formed by mining a void at the bottom of a proposed retort in an oil shale deposit. The deposit is then sequentially blasted into the void to form a plurality of layers of rubble. A plurality of units each including a tracer gas cannister are installed at the upper level of each rubble layer prior to blasting to form the next layer. Each of the units includes a receiver that is responsive to a coded electromagnetic (EM) signal to release gas from the associated cannister into the rubble. Coded EM signals are transmitted to the receivers to selectively release gas from the cannisters. The released gas flows through the retort to an outlet line connected to the floor of the retort. The time of arrival of the gas at a detector unit in the outlet line relative to the time of release of gas from the cannisters is monitored. This information enables the retort to be characterized prior to ignition.

Turner, Thomas F. (Laramie, WY); Moore, Dennis F. (Laramie, WY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Table 14: Shale natural gas proved reserves and production, 2008 - 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Shale natural gas proved reserves and production, 2008 - 2011" : Shale natural gas proved reserves and production, 2008 - 2011" "billion cubic feet" ,,"Reserves",,,,,"Production" "State and Subdivision",,2008,2009,2010,2011,,2008,2009,2010,2011 "Alaska",,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0 "Lower 48 States",,34428,60644,97449,131616,,2116,3110,5336,7994 "Alabama",,2,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0 "Arkansas",,3833,9070,12526,14808,,279,527,794,940 "California",,0,0,0,855,,0,0,0,101 "Colorado",,0,4,4,10,,0,1,1,3 "Florida",,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0 "Kansas",,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0 "Kentucky",,20,55,10,41,,2,5,4,4 "Louisiana",,858,9307,20070,21950,,23,293,1232,2084 " North",,858,9307,20070,21950,,23,293,1232,2084 " South",,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0

376

Application of the HYTORT process to oil shales throughout the world  

SciTech Connect

The HYTORT /sup R/ process is a unique oil shale retorting process which uses an atmosphere of hydrogen gas at elevated pressure to produce higher yields of oil than are possible using conventional thermal retorting techniques. In the U.S., HYTORT process development efforts have played a key role in recognition of the significance of the Devonian oil shales as a major fossil energy resource. The results presented in this paper show that application of the HYTORT process to oil shales of countries such as Sweden, Italy, Jordan, and Canada may yield equally significant results.

Janaka, J.C.; Rex, R.C.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Analysis of horizontal and vertical in-situ oil-shale retorting: comparison of field experiments  

SciTech Connect

Currently two different processing techniques are utilized for in situ oil shale retorting. Horizontal In Situ (HIS), in which the retort front moves parallel to the shale bedding planes, is being utilized on relatively thin, near-surface oil shale. Vertical Modified In Situ (VMIS), in which the retort front moves perpendicular to the shale bedding planes, is being utilized for thicker deposits of shale at greater depths. While chemical effects in the two processes should be similar, physical phenomena (such as fluid product flow and heat transfer) can be substantially different due to gravity and anisotropic shale properties associated with the shale bedding planes. To illustrate both similarities between the processes and some striking differences, we present thermal data (detailing movement of the steam and retorting fronts) and offgas and oil analysis data (allowing material and energy balance closures) from two recent field experiments, Sandia/Geokinetics Retort 23 (HIS) and Occidental Retort 8 (VMIS). These data show, for example, a broader combustion front in the horizontal process, resulting in a lower thermal efficiency. However, because of a lower shale grade in the VMIS experiment, local oil yield (50 to 60% of Fischer Assay) was similar in the two experiments, with roughly two-thirds of the loss to oil combustion and one-third to oil coking and cracking reactions.

Tyner, C.E.; Bickel, T.C.; Stevens, A.L.; Lekas, J.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Oil Shale, 2012, Vol. 29, No. 1, pp. 1835 ISSN 0208-189X doi: 10.3176/oil.2012.1.03 2012 Estonian Academy Publishers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil Shale, 2012, Vol. 29, No. 1, pp. 18­35 ISSN 0208-189X doi: 10.3176/oil.2012.1.03 © 2012 have attracted attention because of its organic-rich matter and oil seepage in the rock series that of an average in marine shales. Inter-element correlations suggest that the shale-normalized REE patterns

Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

379

Post Retort, Pre Hydro-treat Upgrading of Shale Oil  

SciTech Connect

Various oil feedstocks, including oil from oil shale, bitumen from tar sands, heavy oil, and refin- ery streams were reacted with the alkali metals lithium or sodium in the presence of hydrogen or methane at elevated temperature and pressure in a reactor. The products were liquids with sub- stantially reduced metals, sulfur and nitrogen content. The API gravity typically increased. Sodi- um was found to be more effective than lithium in effectiveness. The solids formed when sodium was utilized contained sodium sulfide which could be regenerated electrochemically back to so- dium and a sulfur product using a "Nasicon", sodium ion conducting membrane. In addition, the process was found to be effective reducing total acid number (TAN) to zero, dramatically reduc- ing the asphaltene content and vacuum residual fraction in the product liquid. The process has promise as a means of eliminating sulfur oxide and carbon monoxide emissions. The process al- so opens the possibility of eliminating the coking process from upgrading schemes and upgrad- ing without using hydrogen.

Gordon, John

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

INTEGRATION OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS REACTORS WITH IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING  

SciTech Connect

This paper evaluates the integration of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to an in situ oil shale retort operation producing 7950 m3/D (50,000 bbl/day). The large amount of heat required to pyrolyze the oil shale and produce oil would typically be provided by combustion of fossil fuels, but can also be delivered by an HTGR. Two cases were considered: a base case which includes no nuclear integration, and an HTGR-integrated case.

Eric P. Robertson; Michael G. McKellar; Lee O. Nelson

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Technology-Based Oil and Natural Gas Plays: Shale Shock! Could There Be Billions in the Bakken?  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Technology-Based Technology-Based Oil and Natural Gas Plays: Shale Shock! Could There Be Billions in the Bakken? Through the use of technology, U.S. oil and natural gas operators are converting previously uneconomic oil and natural gas resources into proved reserves and production. The Bakken Formation of the Williston Basin is a success story of horizontal drilling, fracturing, and completion technologies. The recent, highly productive oil field discoveries within the Bakken Formation did not come from venturing out into deep uncharted waters heretofore untapped by man, nor from blazing a trail into pristine environs never open to drilling before. Instead, success came from analysis of geologic data on a decades-old producing area, identification of uptapped resources, and application of the new drilling and completion technology necessary to exploit them. In short, it came from using technology

382

Using Decline Curve Analysis, Volumetric Analysis, and Bayesian Methodology to Quantify Uncertainty in Shale Gas Reserve Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Probabilistic decline curve analysis (PDCA) methods have been developed to quantify uncertainty in production forecasts and reserves estimates. However, the application of PDCA in shale gas reservoirs is relatively new. Limited work has been done...

Gonzalez Jimenez, Raul 1988-

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

383

Method for closing a drift between adjacent in-situ oil shale retorts  

SciTech Connect

A row of horizontally spaced-apart in situ oil shale retorts is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. Each row of retorts is formed by excavating development drifts at different elevations through opposite side boundaries of a plurality of retorts in the row of retorts. Each retort is formed by explosively expanding formation toward one or more voids within the boundaries of the retort site to form a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in each retort. Following formation of each retort, the retort development drifts on the advancing side of the retort are closed off by covering formation particles within the development drift with a layer of crushed oil shale particles having a particle size smaller than the average particle size of oil shale particles in the adjacent retort. In one embodiment, the crushed oil shale particles are pneumatically loaded into the development drift to pack the particles tightly all the way to the top of the drift and throughout the entire cross section of the drift. The closure between adjacent retorts provided by the finely divided oil shale provides sufficient resistance to gas flow through the development drift to effectively inhibit gas flow through the drift during subsequent retorting operations.

Hines, A.E.

1984-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

384

Method for closing a drift between adjacent in situ oil shale retorts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A row of horizontally spaced-apart in situ oil shale retorts is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. Each row of retorts is formed by excavating development drifts at different elevations through opposite side boundaries of a plurality of retorts in the row of retorts. Each retort is formed by explosively expanding formation toward one or more voids within the boundaries of the retort site to form a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in each retort. Following formation of each retort, the retort development drifts on the advancing side of the retort are closed off by covering formation particles within the development drift with a layer of crushed oil shale particles having a particle size smaller than the average particle size of oil shale particles in the adjacent retort. In one embodiment, the crushed oil shale particles are pneumatically loaded into the development drift to pack the particles tightly all the way to the top of the drift and throughout the entire cross section of the drift. The closure between adjacent retorts provided by the finely divided oil shale provides sufficient resistance to gas flow through the development drift to effectively inhibit gas flow through the drift during subsequent retorting operations.

Hines, Alex E. (Grand Junction, CO)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Rapid pyrolysis of Green River and New Albany oil shales in solid-recycle systems  

SciTech Connect

We are studying second generation oil shale retorting by a combined laboratory and modeling program coupled with operation of a 1 tonne-per-day solid-recycle pilot retorting facility. In the retort, we have measured oil yields equal to Fischer assay for Western, Green River shale and Eastern, New Albany shale. Laboratory experiments have measured yields of 125% of Fischer assay under ideal conditions in sand fluidized beds. However, when oxidized (or spent) shale is present in the bed, a decline in yield is observed along with increased coke formation. Recycling clay catalysts may improve oil yield by olefin absorption on active sites, preventing coke formation on these sites and allowing olefin incorporation into the oil. We studied the solid mixing limits in solid-recycle systems and conclude that nearly intimate mixing is required for adequate heat transfer and to minimize oil coke formation. Recycling oxidized shale has shown to self-scrub H/sub 2/S and SO/sub 2/ when processing Western shale. Cooling of spent shale with water from 500/degree/C releases H/sub 2/S. We describe an apparatus which uses solid-recycle to reduce the temperature before water spray to cool the shale without H/sub 2/S release. 6 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Cena, R.J.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Preparation of grout for stabilization of abandoned in-situ oil shale retorts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the preparation of grout from burned shale by treating the burned shale in steam at approximately 700.degree. C. to maximize the production of the materials alite and larnite. Oil shale removed to the surface during the preparation of an in-situ retort is first retorted on the surface and then the carbon is burned off, leaving burned shale. The burned shale is treated in steam at approximately 700.degree. C. for about 70 minutes. The treated shale is then ground and mixed with water to produce a grout which is pumped into an abandoned, processed in-situ retort, flowing into the void spaces and then bonding up to form a rigid, solidified mass which prevents surface subsidence and leaching of the spent shale by ground water.

Mallon, Richard G. (Livermore, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Extractors manual for Oil Shale Data Base System: Major Plants Data Base  

SciTech Connect

To date, persons working in the development of oil shale technology have found limited amounts of reference data. If data from research and development could be made publicly available, however, several functions could be served. The duplication of work could be avoided, documented test material could serve as a basis to promote further developments, and research costs could possibly be reduced. To satisfy the engineering public's need for experimental data and to assist in the study of technical uncertainties in oil shale technology, the Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated the development of a data system to store the results of Government-sponsored research. A technology-specific data system consists of data that are stored for that technology in each of the specialized data bases that make up the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) data system. The Oil Shale Data System consists of oil shale data stored in the Major Plants Data Base (MPDB), Test Data Data Base (TDDB), Resource Extraction Data Base (REDB), and Math Modeling Data Base (MMDB). To capture the results of Government-sponsored oil shale research programs, documents have been written to specify the data that contractors need to report and the procedures for reporting them. The documents identify and define the data from oil shale projects to be entered into the MPDB, TDDB, REDB, and MMDB, which will meet the needs of users of the Oil Shale Data System. This document addresses what information is needed and how it must be formatted for entry to the MPDB for oil shale. The data that are most relevant to potential Oil Shale Data System users have been divided into four categories: project tracking needs; economic/commercialization needs; critical performance needs; and modeling and research and development needs. 2 figs., 31 tabs.

Not Available

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Sulfur capture by oil shale ashes under atmospheric and pressurized FBC conditions  

SciTech Connect

When oil shale contains large quantities of limestone, a significant auto-absorption of sulfur is possible under suitable conditions. The sulfur capture by oil shale ashes has been studied using a pressurized thermogravimetric apparatus. The chosen experimental conditions were typical for atmospheric and pressurized fluidized bed combustion. The Ca/S molar ratios in the two oil shales studied were 8 (Estonian) and 10 (Israeli). The samples were first burned in a gas atmosphere containing O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} (and CO{sub 2} if pressurized). After the combustion step, SO{sub 2} was added and sulfation started. The results with the oil shales were compared to those obtained with an oil shale cyclone ash from the Narva power plant in Estonia. In general, the results from the sulfur capture experiments under both atmospheric and pressurized conditions showed that the oil shale cannot only capture its own sulfur but also significant amounts of additional sulfur of another fuel if the fuels are mixed together. For example from the runs at atmospheric pressure, the conversion of CaO to CaSO{sub 4} was about 70% for Israeli oil shale and about 55% for Estonian oil shale (850 C). For the cyclone ash the corresponding conversion was about 20%. In comparison it could be mentioned that under the same conditions the conversions of natural limestones are about 30%. The reason the cyclone ash was a poor sulfur absorbent was probably due to its temperature history. In Narva the oil shale was burned at a significantly higher temperature (1,400 C) than was used in the experiments (750 C and 850 C). This caused the ash to sinter and the reactive surface area of the cyclone ash was therefore decreased.

Yrjas, K.P.; Hupa, M. [Aabo Akademi Univ., Turku (Finland). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Kuelaots, I.; Ots, A. [Tallinn Technical Univ. (Estonia). Thermal Engineering Dept.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Chapter 28 - Combustion Mineralogy and Petrology of Oil-Shale Slags in Lapanouse, Sévérac-le-Château, Aveyron, France: Analogies with Hydrocarbon Fires  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In 1942, an industrial complex was created at Lapanouse, in Aveyron, southern France, to excavate oil shale by open-pit mining and to process hydrocarbons on site. Only two dumps of processed shales have survived from the industrial complex, which closed in 1951. Mineralogical interest of the slags began with the research of Jean-Robert and Christiane Eytier, members of' the Association Française de Microminéralogie (French Association of Micromineralogy, AFM). Subsequently a mineralogical study was undertaken by AFM in cooperation with several research organizations. Mineral and whole rock analyses of oil shales before and after processing, revealed that pyrometamorphism (combustion metamorphism) was primarily a consequence of self ignition. Prograde and retrograde mineral assemblages are recognized. Their diversity is compared to assemblages associated with anthropogenic and natural pyrometamorphism of sedimentary rocks containing calcium carbonate and organic matter. The cooperation between amateurs and professionals has led to the discovery of new and rare minerals in France. This chapter is based on two articles about the Lapanouse oil-shale deposits, published in French in the Bulletin of AFM (Eytier et al., 2004; Gatel, 2012) and translated here with modifications. The eastern slag dump (?30 m high) at Lapanouse, Sévérac-le-Château, Aveyron, France, has served as the disposal site for all processed oil-shale waste from 1942 to present. Along with the western slag dump, these dumps are one of the only vestiges of industrial hydrocarbon complexes in France. The complex included an oil-shale quarry and a processing plant built in 1942; these closed in 1951 and the plant was recently demolished. The overall production of bitumen was less than 80,000 tons, or about 1% of the oil-shale reserves in Lapanouse. The pond in the photo marks the location of the former quarry. From Eytier et al., 2004.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Distribution of pentacyclic triterpenoids in Green River oil shale kerogen  

SciTech Connect

Pentacyclic triterpenoids released by the Na{sub 2}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}/AcOH stepwise oxidation of Green River kerogen were examined by high resolution gas chromatography and computerized gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Three series of stereoisomeric hopanic acids (C{sub 30}-C{sub 33}) were identified based on the {alpha}{beta}, {beta}{beta}, and {beta}{alpha} configurations. In addition, the following compounds were tentatively identified: 29,30-bisnorhopanoic acid, 30-norhop-22-one, 22,29,30-trinorhopan-21-one, 3-hopanone, and 3-gammacerone. The distribution of isomeric hopanoic acids supports previous suggestions of an extremely mild thermal history of the Green River kerogen. The results also provide further evidence in favor of the microbiological origin of at least part of the organic matter in Green River oil shale.

Barakat, A.O.; Yen, T.F. (Jordan Univ. of Science and Technology, Irbid (Jordan) Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (USA))

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Naval Petroleum Reserves | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Naval Petroleum Reserves For much of the 20th century, the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves served as a contingency source of fuel for the Nation's military. All that...

392

Results of rapid pyrolysis experiments using eastern US oil shale in the Livermore solid-recycle retort  

SciTech Connect

Over the past several years Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has operated a 2-ton/day pilot-scale solid-recycle system for the study of oil shale retorting under rapid-pyrolysis conditions. Results of processing eastern US New Albany oil shale are presented and compared with results obtained previously using two western US Green River oil shales. The retort consists of a cascading mixer and plug-flow soak-tank pyrolyzer with an air lift pipe and cascading-bed combustor. In the solid-recycle system, spent shale leaving the pyrolyzer is burned in the lift and cascading-bed combustor and then returned to the retort to heat the incoming raw shale. In laboratory experiments, when raw shale is rapidly heated in a fluidized bed of sand, oil yields above those of Fischer assay are obtained. In the present experiments, hot-recycled shale is used as the heat-carrying media, resulting in oil yields comparable to those obtained from Fischer assay. The distribution and composition of solid, oil, and gas throughout the recycle system is reported for the three shales studied. The distribution of sulfur and nitrogen during processing Green River oil shale has been the focus of environmental studies at LLNL. Eastern oil shale contains 5 to 10 times more sulfur and approximately the same amount of nitrogen as western oil shale. The high sulfur content coupled with low carbonate mineral concentrations results in significant sulfur releases in the combustor-gas, compared with trace releases for western shale. Iron oxide in the recycled solid was found to effectively scrub H/sub 2/S from the pyrolysis gas for both western and eastern shales. From 0.4 to 3% of the raw shale nitrogen is released as NO/sub x/ in the combustor-gas for western shale. Releases for New Albany shale are one-tenth these levels. 8 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

Cena, R.J.; Taylor, R.W.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Devonian oil shale of the eastern United States: a major American energy resource  

SciTech Connect

The eastern Devonian oil shale resource can yield 400 billion (400 X 10/sup 9/) bbl of synthetic oil, if all surface and near-surface shales were strip or deep mined for above-ground hydroretorting. Experimental work, in equipment capable of processing up to 1 ton/h of shale, has confirmed the technical and economic feasibility of aboveground hydroretorting of oil shales. Work done to date on nearly 500 samples from 12 states indicates that the HYTORT Process can give organic carbon recoveries from 2 to 2.5 times those of conventional retorting of the Devonian shales, so that the HYTORT Process yields 25 to 30 gallons per ton on syncrude at many localities, compared with 10 to 15 gallons per ton using Fischer Assay retort methods. Criteria for inclusion of shale in estimates of recoverable resources for the HYTORT Process are: (1) organic carbon of at least 10% by weight; (2) overburden of less than 200 feet (59 meters); (3) volumetric stripping ratios of less than 2.5 to 1; and (4) stratigraphic thickness of 10 feet (3 meters) or more. Resource estimates include: Kentucky (Ohio, New Albany, and Sunbury shales), 190 billion (190 X 10/sup 9/) barrels (bbl); Ohio (Ohio and Sunbury shales), 140 billion bbl; Tennessee (Chattanooga shale), 44 billion bbl; Indiana (New Albany shale), 40 billion bbl; Michigan (Antrim shale), 5 billion bbl; and Alabama (Chattanooga shale), 4 billion bbl. Recoverable resources have not been identified in West Virginia, Georgia, Oklahoma, Illinois, Arkansas, or Missouri outcrops. Co-production of uranium and metals is a possibility in the areas favorable for syncrude production.

Matthews, R.D.; Janka, J.C.; Dennison, J.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Barnett Shale Municipal Oil and Gas Ordinance Dynamics: A Spatial Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the recent optimization of horizontal drilling, has substantially increased United States oil and gas production. Hydrocarbon firms perfected and use hydraulic fracturing on the Barnett Shale in North Texas; due to the nature of the formation, gas companies...

Murphy, Trey Daniel-Aaron

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

395

Microsoft Word - TEV-1091_ExSituOilShaleRetort.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Evaluation Study Project No. 23843 Integration of HTGRs and an Ex Situ Oil Shale Retort 121310 Form 412.09 (Rev. 10) Idaho National Laboratory INTEGRATION OF HTGRS...

396

Gas seal for an in situ oil shale retort and method of forming thermal barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas seal is provided in an access drift excavated in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The access drift is adjacent an in situ oil shale retort and is in gas communication with the fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale formed in the in situ oil shale retort. The mass of formation particles extends into the access drift, forming a rubble pile of formation particles having a face approximately at the angle of repose of fragmented formation. The gas seal includes a temperature barrier which includes a layer of heat insulating material disposed on the face of the rubble pile of formation particles and additionally includes a gas barrier. The gas barrier is a gas-tight bulkhead installed across the access drift at a location in the access drift spaced apart from the temperature barrier.

Burton, III, Robert S. (Mesa, CO)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Comparison of Heating Methods for In-Situ Oil Shale Extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil shales are lamellar, non-porous, impermeable hydrocarbon bearing rocks that contain organic matter called kerogen which, when heated at pyrolysis temperature of approximately 600-800 ?, thermo-chemically decomposes to liberate hydrocarbons...

Hazra, Kaushik Gaurav

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

398

In situ oil shale retort with a generally T-shaped vertical cross section  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale and has a production level drift in communication with a lower portion of the fragmented mass for withdrawing liquid and gaseous products of retorting during retorting of oil shale in the fragmented mass. The principal portion of the fragmented mass is spaced vertically above a lower production level portion having a generally T-shaped vertical cross section. The lower portion of the fragmented mass has a horizontal cross sectional area smaller than the horizontal cross sectional area of the upper principal portion of the fragmented mass above the production level.

Ricketts, Thomas E. (Grand Junction, CO)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Oil and Gas CDT Are non-marine organic-rich shales suitable exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil and Gas CDT Are non-marine organic-rich shales suitable exploration targets? The University will receive 20 weeks residential training of broad relevance to the oil and gas industry: 10 weeks in Year 1 and also experienced oil and gas industry professionals. The supervisors at Oxford and Exeter have

Henderson, Gideon

400

Assessment of Long-Term Research Needs for Shale-Oil Recovery (FERWG-III)  

SciTech Connect

The Fossil Energy Research Working Group (FERWG), at the request of E. Frieman (Director, Office of Energy Research) and G. Fumich, Jr. (Assistant Secretary for Fossil Fuels), has reviewed and evaluated the U.S. programs on shale-oil recovery. These studies were performed in order to provide an independent assessment of critical research areas that affect the long-term prospects for shale-oil availability. This report summarizes the findings and research recommendations of FERWG.

Penner, S.S.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Colorado Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

+ Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Colorado Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

402

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Online Bidding System | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Petroleum Reserves » Heating Oil Reserve » Northeast Services » Petroleum Reserves » Heating Oil Reserve » Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Online Bidding System Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Online Bidding System The U.S. Department of Energy has developed an on-line bidding system - an anonymous auction program - for the sale of product from the one million barrel Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. We invite prospective bidders and other interested parties to try out this system and give us your views. You must register to use the system to practice or to participate in an actual emergency sale. Registration assures that you will receive e-mail alerts of sales or other pertinent news. You will also have the opportunity to establish a user ID and password to submit bids. If you establish a user ID, you will receive a temporary password by

403

Effects of scale-up on oil and gas yields in a solid-recycle bed oil shale retorting process  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized bed pyrolysis of oil shale in a non-hydrogen atmosphere has been shown to significantly increase oil yield in laboratory-scale reactors compared to the Fischer assay by many workers. The enhancement in oil yield by this relatively simple and efficient thermal technique has led to the development of several oil shale retorting processes based on fluidized bed and related technologies over the past fifteen years. Since 1986, the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) has been developing one such process, KENTORT II, which is mainly tailored for the Devonian oil shales that occur in the eastern U.S. The process contains three main fluidized bed zones to pyrolyze, gasify, and combust the oil shale. A fourth fluidized bed zone serves to cool the spent shale prior to exiting the system. The autothermal process utilizes processed shale recirculation to transfer heat from the combustion to the gasification and pyrolysis zones. The CAER is currently testing the KENTORT II process in a 22.7-kg/hr process-development unit (PDU).

Carter, S.D.; Taulbee, D.N.; Vego, A. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Acid mine drainage potential of raw, retorted, and combusted Eastern oil shale: Final report  

SciTech Connect

In order to manage the oxidation of pyritic materials effectively, it is necessary to understand the chemistry of both the waste and its disposal environment. The objective of this two-year study was to characterize the acid production of Eastern oil shale waste products as a function of process conditions, waste properties, and disposal practice. Two Eastern oil shales were selected, a high pyrite shale (unweathered 4.6% pyrite) and a low pyrite shale (weathered 1.5% pyrite). Each shale was retorted and combusted to produce waste products representative of potential mining and energy conversion processes. By using the standard EPA leaching tests (TCLP), each waste was characterized by determining (1) mineralogy, (2) trace element residency, and (3) acid-base account. Characterizing the acid producing potential of each waste and potential trace element hazards was completed with laboratory weathering studies. 32 refs., 21 figs., 12 tabs.

Sullivan, P.J.; Yelton, J.L.; Reddy, K.J.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Influence of chemical characterization of oil shale solids on understanding water quality impacts  

SciTech Connect

Synfuels technologies will yield products and effluents that are a function of the raw material being processed and the process variables. Chemical and mineralogic characterization of solids generated in synfuels production provide valuable insight into health and environmental impacts associated with synfuels processing (coal liquefaction or gasification and shale oil extraction). This report deals with considerations relating to leachate generation from solid wastes, but the suggested research approach is applicable to understanding the nature and extent of all effluents from synfuels operations. Solid characterization studies of one raw shale core and two spent shale cores from Occidental Oil Shale, Inc.'s Logan Wash site are described. These data are used to determine the effect of processing on the shale solids and also to evaluate a variety of water quality issues associated with in situ processing. The importance of solid characterization studies in developing an understanding of effluent composition and behavior and subsequently defining environmental impacts is described.

Peterson, E.J.; Wagner, P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Evaluation of residual shale oils as feedstocks for valuable carbon materials  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale represents one of the largest fossil fuel resources in the US and in other pans of the world. Beginning in the 1970s until recently, there was considerable research and development activity directed primarily to technologies for the production of transportation fuels from oil shale. Due to the low cost of petroleum, as with other alternate fuel strategies, oil shale processing is not economically viable at present. However, future scenarios can be envisaged in which non-petroleum resources may be expected to contribute to the demand for hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals, with the expectation that process technologies can be rendered economically attractive. There is potential to improve the economics of oil shale utilization through broadening the spectrum of products that can be derived from this resource, and producing added-value materials that are either unavailable or more difficult to produce from other sources. This concept is by no means original. The history of oil shale development shows that most attempts to commercialize oil shale technology have relied upon the marketing of by-products. Results are presented on carbonization and the potential for generating a pitch that could serve as a precursur material.

Fei, You Qing; Derbyshire, F. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

DOE Seeks Commercial Storage for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE Seeks Commercial Storage for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve March 14, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy, through its agent, DLA Energy, has issued a solicitation for new contracts to store two million barrels of ultra low sulfur distillate for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve in New York Harbor and New England. Offers are due no later than 9:00 a.m. EDT on March 29, 2011. Of the U.S. households that use heating oil to heat their homes, 69% reside in the Northeast. The Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve was established by the Energy Policy Act of 2000 to provide an emergency buffer that can supplement commercial fuel supplies in the event of an actual or imminent severe supply disruption. The Reserve can provide supplemental supplies for

408

A naphthenic jet fuel produced from an Australian marine oil shale  

SciTech Connect

CSR Limited holds title to an Authority to Prospect covering the Cretaceous Julia Creek oil shale deposit, located in Queensland, Australia, approximately 600 km inland from the eastern seaboard. The shale is of marine origin, having been deposited as an anaerobic sediment in a restricted epicontinental sea. Algae are the predominant source of organic matter. Resources are estimated at 20 billion barrels of oil, approximately half in shale deposits suitable for open cut mining. Typical oil shale analyses are given. Average oil yields are 70 liters per ton. The oil has several deleterious characteristics which necessitate its upgrading at higher severity than is conventional at existing refineries. Heteroatom levels are in total significantly higher than values for petroleum crudes and the aromaticity and metal content of the oil add to its complexity and unusual nature. Two processing routes have been proposed for this oil - either the production of a syncrude by hydrostabilization of the whole oil, or alternatively, upgrading separate fractions to marketable fuels. Pilot plant studies were carried out to simulate refinery processes options. During these investigations, they were successful in the first Australian production of shale-derived jet and diesel synfuels which met all specifications. In this paper, they present details of the jet fuel production and describe its unusual naphthenic character.

Stephenson, L.C.; Muradian, A. (CSR Ltd., Sydney (Australia)); Fookes, C.J.R.; Atkins, A.R. (CSIRO Div. of Energy Chemistry, Sutherland (Australia)); Batts, B.D. (Macquarie Univ., North Ryde (Australia))

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Shale Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Adjustments Revision Increases Revision Decreases Sales Acquisitions Extensions New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Period: Data Series: Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Adjustments Revision Increases Revision Decreases Sales Acquisitions Extensions New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 View History U.S. 23,304 34,428 60,644 97,449 131,616 2007-2011 Alaska 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2011 Lower 48 States 23,304 34,428 60,644 97,449 131,616 2007-2011 Alabama 1 2 0 0 2007-2010 Arkansas 1,460 3,833 9,070 12,526 14,808 2007-2011 California 855 2011-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 855 2011-2011 Colorado 0 0 4 4 10 2007-2011 Kentucky

410

EIS-0020: Crude Oil Transport Alternate From Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 Elk Hills/SOHIO Pipeline Connection Conveyance System, Terminal Tank Farm Relocation to Rialto, California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves developed this supplemental statement to evaluate the environmental impacts associated with a modified design of a proposed 250,000 barrels per day crude oil conveyance system from Navel Petroleum Reserve No. 1 to connect to the proposed SOHIO West Coast to Midcontinent Pipeline at Rialto, California. This SEIS is a supplement to DOE/EIS-0020, Crude Oil Transport Alternate From Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 Elk Hills/SOHIO Pipeline Connection Conveyance System, Terminal Tank Farm Relocation to Rialto, California.

411

Application of the HYTORT process to oil shales throughout the world  

SciTech Connect

A deficiency of hydrogen relative to carbon in oil shale reduces the amount of kerogen that can be converted to hydrocarbon products by conventional retorting methods. HYTORT Process utilizes a hydrogen-rich gas to maximize this oil yield. A plant flowsheet and process economics are described. A hydroretorting assay using only a small sample of feed material has been developed to provide a measurement of the potential oil yield possible with the HYTORT Process. Details are given for results of this test on oil shale deposits of Sweden, Jordan, Brazil, South Africa, Sicily, Canada, and USA. 29 references.

Janka, J.C.; Rex, R.C. Jr.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

,"Colorado Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2013...

413

,"New Mexico Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2012,"6302009"...

414

California Federal Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Million Barrels) California Federal Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Acquisitions (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

415

Texas State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Extensions...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4102014 Next Release Date: 4302015 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Reserves Extensions...

416

Texas State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Sales...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4102014 Next Release Date: 4302015 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Reserves Sales...

417

California State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Million Barrels) California State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Revision Decreases (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

418

Louisiana State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Million Barrels) Louisiana State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Revision Decreases (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

419

California Federal Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Million Barrels) California Federal Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Adjustments (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

420

California State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Million Barrels) California State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Acquisitions (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

California Federal Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4102014 Next Release Date: 4302015 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Reserves Sales...

422

,"CA, State Offshore Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","CA, State Offshore Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2012,"6302009"...

423

California Federal Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Million Barrels) California Federal Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Revision Decreases (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

424

,"LA, State Offshore Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","LA, State Offshore Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2012,"6302009"...

425

California Federal Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Million Barrels) California Federal Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Revision Increases (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

426

Louisiana State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Million Barrels) Louisiana State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Revision Increases (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

427

California State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Million Barrels) California State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Revision Increases (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

428

,"New York Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2013...

429

Table 18: Reported proved nonproducing reserves of crude oil...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

: Reported proved nonproducing reserves of crude oil, lease condensate, nonassociated gas, associated-dissolved gas, and total gas (wet after lease separation), 2012 Lease...

430

Table 18: Reported proved nonproducing reserves of crude oil...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Reported proved nonproducing reserves of crude oil, lease condensate, " "nonassociated gas, associated-dissolved gas, and total gas (wet after lease separation), 2012"...

431

,"California--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2013...

432

,"Texas--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2013...

433

,"Texas State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2013...

434

,"Federal Offshore--California Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore--California Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...

435

,"Louisiana--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2013...

436

,"California Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2012,"6302009"...

437

Paleontological overview of oil shale and tar sands areas in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming.  

SciTech Connect

In August 2005, the U.S. Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. In Section 369 of this Act, also known as the ''Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005,'' Congress declared that oil shale and tar sands (and other unconventional fuels) are strategically important domestic energy resources that should be developed to reduce the nation's growing dependence on oil from politically and economically unstable foreign sources. In addition, Congress declared that both research- and commercial-scale development of oil shale and tar sands should (1) be conducted in an environmentally sound manner using management practices that will minimize potential impacts, (2) occur with an emphasis on sustainability, and (3) benefit the United States while taking into account concerns of the affected states and communities. To support this declaration of policy, Congress directed the Secretary of the Interior to undertake a series of steps, several of which are directly related to the development of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands. One of these steps was the completion of a programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) to analyze the impacts of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands resources on public lands, with an emphasis on the most geologically prospective lands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. For oil shale, the scope of the PEIS analysis includes public lands within the Green River, Washakie, Uinta, and Piceance Creek Basins. For tar sands, the scope includes Special Tar Sand Areas (STSAs) located in Utah. This paleontological resources overview report was prepared in support of the Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource Management Plan Amendments to Address Land Use Allocations in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming and PEIS, and it is intended to be used by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) regional paleontologists and field office staff to support future projectspecific analyses. Additional information about the PEIS can be found at http://ostseis.anl.gov.

Murphey, P. C.; Daitch, D.; Environmental Science Division

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

438

Oil shale mining processing, uses, and environmental impacts. (Latest citations from the EI compendex*plus database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning oil shale mining and retorting, uses, and related environmental aspects. References discuss pyrolyzed, gasified, and combusted oil shales. Product yields and oil quality, socioeconomic impacts, exploration, reclamation of mined lands, and waste disposal are covered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

DXRD (Dynamic X-Ray Diffraction) studies of oil shale mineral reactions  

SciTech Connect

With the advent of second generation, above-ground oil shale processes, retorted shale is likely to be combusted at temperatures between 1000{degree}K and 1200{degree}K. At these temperatures the mineral matrix of the shale will undergo a variety of chemical reactions including carbonate decomposition, sulfation and recombination reactions to form silicates. This complex set of reactions can be very important to the optimum design of a retorted shale combustor. For example the net heat of combustion is very dependent on these reactions since the carbonate mineral decomposition reactions are highly endothermic and some of the silication reactions only mildly endothermic. In addition, the combusted shale (ash) will have to be disposed and revegetated and the environmental consequences of this process will be highly dependent on the mineral composition of the ash. The degree to which the mineral reactions influence these considerations will depend on the time-temperature history to which the shale is exposed. Thus it is important to have a knowledge of the kinetics of these reactions. Previous attempts to study these kinetics have been made at Lawrence Livermore Laboratories and in our own laboratory. However, these studies all employed TGA techniques and, since there is usually more than one reaction occurring simultaneously, there is no way to distinguish between competing reactions. What is described here is the application of a new technique - Dynamic X-Ray Diffraction (DXRD), which has been successfully applied to studies of oil shale mineral reactions under typical retorted shale combustion conditions.

Helling, K.A.; Thomson, W.J.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Drugs and oil flow through the Eagle Ford Shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This report is a work of original reporting which investigates the proliferation of drug use and drug trafficking in the Eagle Ford Shale, a region… (more)

Marks, Michael Perry

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Semi-Open Pyrolysis of Oil Shale from the Garden Gulch Member of the Green River Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Semi-Open Pyrolysis of Oil Shale from the Garden Gulch Member of the Green River Formation ... Energy Fuels, Article ASAP ...

Alan K. Burnham; James R. McConaghy

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

442

An assessment of using oil shale for power production in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the oil shale-for-power-production option in Jordan. Under consideration are 20- and 50-MW demonstration units and a 400-MW, commercial-scale plant with, at the 400-MW scale, a mining operation capable of supplying 7.8 million tonnes per year of shale fuel and also capable of disposal of up to 6.1 million tonnes per year of wetted ash. The plant would be a direct combustion facility, burning crushed oil shale through use of circulating fluidized bed combustion technology. The report emphasizes four areas: (1) the need for power in Jordan, (2) environmental aspects of the proposed oil shale-for-power plant(s), (3) the engineering feasibility of using Jordan's oil shale in circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) boiler, and (4) the economic feasibility of the proposed plant(s). A sensitivity study was conducted to determine the economic feasibility of the proposed plant(s) under different cost assumptions and revenue flows over the plant's lifetime. The sensitivity results are extended to include the major extra-firm benefits of the shale-for-power option: (1) foreign exchange savings from using domestic energy resources, (2) aggregate income effects of using Jordan's indigenous labor force, and (3) a higher level of energy security. 14 figs., 47 tabs.

Hill, L.J.; Holcomb, R.S.; Petrich, C.H.; Roop, R.D.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Western oil shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 7: an ecosystem simulation of perturbations applied to shale oil development  

SciTech Connect

Progress is outlined on activities leading toward evaluation of ecological and agricultural impacts of shale oil development in the Piceance Creek Basin region of northwestern Colorado. After preliminary review of the problem, it was decided to use a model-based calculation approach in the evaluation. The general rationale and objectives of this approach are discussed. Previous studies were examined to characterize climate, soils, vegetation, animals, and ecosystem response units. System function was methodically defined by developing a master list of variables and flows, structuring a generalized system flow diagram, constructing a flow-effects matrix, and conceptualizing interactive spatial units through spatial matrices. The process of developing individual mathematical functions representing the flow of matter and energy through the various system variables in different submodels is discussed. The system model diagram identified 10 subsystems which separately account for flow of soil temperatures, soil water, herbaceous plant biomass, shrubby plant biomass, tree cover, litter biomass, shrub numbers, animal biomass, animal numbers, and land area. Among these coupled subsystems there are 45 unique kinds of state variables and 150 intra-subsystem flows. The model is generalizeable and canonical so that it can be expanded, if required, by disaggregating some of the system state variables and allowing for multiple ecological response units. It integrates information on climate, surface water, ecology, land reclamation, air quality, and solid waste as it is being developed by several other task groups.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Estonia`s oil shale industry - meeting environmental standards of the future  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale is Estonia`s greatest mineral resource. In the 1930s, it was used as a source of gasoline and fuel oil, but now it is mined primarily for thermal generation of electricity. With the loss of its primary market for electricity in the early 1990s and in the absence of another domestic source of fuel Estonia once again is considering the use of a larger proportion of its shale for oil production. However, existing retorting operations in Estonia may not attain western European environmental standards and desired conversion efficiencies. As a reference point, the Estonian authorities have documented existing environmental impacts. It is evaluating technologies to reduce the impacts and is setting a direction for the industry that will serve domestic needs. This paper provides a description of the existing oil shale industry in Estonia and options for the future.

Tanner, T. [Jaakko Poyry International, Helsinki (Finland); Bird, G.; Wallace, D. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton (Canada)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

Fact #578: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumptio...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2007 Fact 578: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2007 The United States was...

446

Environmental analysis of an Eastern U. S. oil shale hydroretorting data base  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the results of a preliminary environmental analysis of the HYTORT data base on eastern oil shale which identifies the potential types and quantities of pollutants emanating directly from hydroretorting. Trace constituents in the product gas and retort sour water are identified and the distribution of raw shale sulfur and nitrogen in the retorting products is determined. Bench scale unit runs performed in a recent HYTORT feasibility study form the data base primarily used for this study. The bench scale unit runs are a comprehensive series of tests which were designed to optimize the operating conditions on Indiana New Albany shale. The results of this study provide an indication of the pollutants which may potentially be produced during commercial operation of a HYTORT plant utilizing eastern oil shale, and subsequently, the types of control technologies which would be necessary.

Rex, R.C.; Lynch, P.A.; Hartstein, A.M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Perform research in process development for hydroretorting of eastern oil shales  

SciTech Connect

Six bulk samples of eastern oil shale were taken from the Clegg Creek Member of the New Albany Shale in northwestern Kentucky, the Chattanooga Shale in northern Alabama, the Gassaway Member of the Chattanooga Shale in central Tennessee, the Antrim Shale in northeastern Michigan, the Cleveland Member of the Ohio Shale in central Ohio, and the Sunbury Shale in eastern Kentucky. A seventh sample of Clegg Creek from southern Indiana had been sampled earlier. The stratigraphic position of all bulk samples was documented using both outcrops and subsurface control; at five sites stratigraphic test holes were cored and logged. Surface gamma was run on the cores before slabbing. The representative character of the Tennessee sample was assured by recovering the required weight in four cores. Obtaining representative bulk samples at other sites often required adapting channel sampling techniques to earth moving equipment, reducing an initial sample by hand methods, and minimizing contamination throughout the sampling operation. Cores were assayed for carbon and Fischer Assay oil yield both on a selected per foot basis as composites. 29 refs., 25 figs., 7 tabs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

DOE Announces Loans of Oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loans of Oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Loans of Oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve DOE Announces Loans of Oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve June 28, 2006 - 2:38pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman announced today that DOE has approved two loan requests totaling 750,000 barrels of crude oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) to two Louisiana refineries. The refineries were not receiving scheduled shipments of crude oil because of the closure of the Calcasieu Ship Channel. "The Strategic Petroleum Reserve is a national asset that can be used in times of supply disruption. This loan will allow these two refineries to continue operations and help us maintain our nation's supply of gasoline leading into the holiday weekend," Secretary Bodman said.

449

Hydration and strength development of binder based on high-calcium oil shale fly ash  

SciTech Connect

The properties of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash, which are produced in Israeli power stations, were investigated. High-calcium oil shale fly ash was found to contain a great amount of CaO{sub free} and SO{sub 3} in the form of lime and anhydrite. Mixtures of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash, termed fly ash binder, were shown to cure and have improved strength. The influence of the composition and curing conditions on the compressive strength of fly ash binders was examined. The microstructure and the composition of fly ash binder after curing and long-term exposure in moist air, water and open air conditions were studied. It was determined that ettringite is the main variable in the strength and durability of cured systems. The positive effect of calcium silicate hydrates, CSH, which are formed by interaction of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash components, on the carbonation and dehydration resistance of fly ash binder in open air is pronounced. It was concluded that high-calcium oil shale fly ash with high CaO{sub free} and SO{sub 3} content can be used as a binder for building products.

Freidin, C. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede-Boqer (Israel)] [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede-Boqer (Israel)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting of Eastern Oil Shales. Progress report, July--September 1989  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian oil shales of the Eastern United States are a significant domestic energy resource. The overall objective of the 3-year program, initiated in October 1987 is to perform the research necessary to develop the pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for producing oil from Eastern oil shales. The program also incorporates research on technologies in areas such as raw shale preparation, beneficiation, product separation, and waste disposal that have the potential of improving the economics and/or environmental acceptability of recovering oil from oil shales using the PFH process. The program is divided into the following eight tasks: Task 1, PFH Scoping Studies; Task 2, PFH Optimization Tests; Task 3, Testing of Process Improvement Concepts; Task 4, Beneficiation Research; Task 5, Operation of PFH on Beneficiated Shale; Task 6, Environmental Data and Mitigation Analyses; Task 7, Sample Procurement, Preparation, and Characterization; Task 8, Project Management and Reporting. In order to accomplish all the program objectives, the Institute of Gas Technology, the prime contractor, is working with seven other institutions; the University of Alabama/Mineral Resources Institute, Illinois Institute of Technology, the University of Michigan, the University of Nevada, Ohio State University, Tennessee Technological University and the University of Pittsburgh. This report presents the work performed during the eighth program quarter from July 1 through September 30, 1989.

Punwani, D.V.; Lau, F.S.; Knowlton, T.M. [and others

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting of Eastern Oil Shales. Progress report, October--December 1988  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian oil shales of the Eastern United States are a significant domestic energy resource. The overall objective of the 3-year program, initiated in October 1987 is to perform the research necessary to develop the pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for producing oil from Eastern oil shales. The program also incorporates research on technologies in areas such as raw shale preparation, beneficiation, product separation, and waste disposal that have the potential of improving the economics and/or environmental acceptability of recovering oil from oil shales using the PFH process. The program is divided into the following eight tasks: Task 1, PFH Scoping Studies; Task 2, PFH Optimization Tests; Task 3, Testing of Process Improvement Concepts; Task 4, Beneficiation Research; Task 5, Operation of PFH on Beneficiated Shale; Task 6, Environmental Data and Mitigation Analyses; Task 7, Sample Procurement, Preparation, and Characterization; Task 8, Project Management and Reporting. In order to accomplish all the program objectives, the Institute of Gas Technology, the prime contractor, is working with seven other institutions; the University of Alabama/Mineral Resources Institute, Illinois Institute of Technology, the University of Michigan, the University of Nevada, Ohio State University, Tennessee Technological University and the University of Pittsburgh. This report presents the work performed during the fifth program quarter from October 1 through December 31, 1988.

Punwani, D.V.; Lau, F.S.; Knowlton, T.M. [and others

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

AEO2011: Oil and Gas End-of-Year Reserves and Annual Reserve Additions |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

End-of-Year Reserves and Annual Reserve Additions End-of-Year Reserves and Annual Reserve Additions Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 134, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into Crude oil, dry natural gas. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA end-of-year reserves gas oil Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Oil and Gas End-of-Year Reserves and Annual Reserve Additions- Reference Case (xls, 58.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

453

DOE to Resume Filling Strategic Petroleum Reserve: Oil Acquisition Slated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resume Filling Strategic Petroleum Reserve: Oil Acquisition Resume Filling Strategic Petroleum Reserve: Oil Acquisition Slated for 2009 DOE to Resume Filling Strategic Petroleum Reserve: Oil Acquisition Slated for 2009 January 2, 2009 - 9:27am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -- The U.S. Department of Energy today announced that it plans to take advantage of the recent large decline in crude oil prices, and has issued a solicitation to purchase approximately 12 million barrels of crude oil for the nation's Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) to replenish SPR supplies sold following hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005. In addition, DOE is also moving forward with three other SPR acquisition and/or fill activities in order to fill the SPR as Congress directed in the 2005 Energy Policy Act (EPAct): refiner repayments of SPR emergency oil

454

January 20, 2011 Marcellus Shale 101  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Will oil shale be viable as well? Oil shale will not be economically viable anytime in the near future

Hardy, Christopher R.

455

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

°C, large quantities of akermanite, CazMgSiz07, were formed.to be converted to akermanite ( which is not cementitious)shale, the formation of akermanite (the non-cementitious

Mehta, P.K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

No Oil: The coming Utopia/Dystopia and Communal Possibilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supplies of conventional oil, and exploitable supplies of alternative forms of oil and related hydrocarbons, including tar sands and oil shale. Because new supplies of conventional oil are declining steadily, there is quite a lot of activity in the oil... to exploit the huge deposits of oil sands in Canada. Oil sands and oil shale look good because they contain vast amounts of oil. The problem is that of turning the reserves, locked into other geological formations, into useful oil. According to current...

Miller, Timothy

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

DOE to Purchase Heating Oil for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Purchase Heating Oil for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Purchase Heating Oil for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE to Purchase Heating Oil for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve June 23, 2008 - 1:29pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a solicitation seeking to purchase heating oil for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR) using $3 million in appropriated funds. The Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve provides an important safety cushion for millions of Americans residing in the Northeast region of the country. Due to the modest volume of heating oil expected to be purchased with the available funds, no impact on market prices is expected. In 2007 a 35,000 barrel sale was conducted to raise funds necessary to award new long-term storage contracts to fill NEHHOR to its authorized

458

Peak Oil and REMI PI+: State Fiscal Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, nation, and states) · Shale oil not included ­ Shale oil reserve estimates 2.0 Trillion bbls in USPeak Oil and REMI PI+: State Fiscal Implications Jim Peach Arrowhead Center Prosper Project is peak oil? · Why peak oil (and gas) matters ­ (In energy and non-energy states) ­ National Real GDP

Johnson, Eric E.

459

Oil Shale RD&D Leases in the United States | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RD&D Leases in the United States RD&D Leases in the United States Oil Shale RD&D Leases in the United States This paper describes the original plans, progress and accomplishments, and future plans for nine oil shale research, development and demonstration (RD&D) projects on six existing RD&D leases awarded in 2006 and 2007 by the United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to Shell, Chevron, EGL (now AMSO), and OSEC (now Enefit American, respectively); as well as three pending leases to Exxon, Natural Soda, and AuraSource, that were offered in 2010. The outcomes associated with these projects are expected to have global applicability. Assessment of Plans and Progress on BLM Oil Shale RD&D Leases in the United States More Documents & Publications

460

Method for forming an in situ oil shale retort with horizontal free faces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles in an in situ oil shale retort is provided. A horizontally extending void is excavated in unfragmented formation containing oil shale and a zone of unfragmented formation is left adjacent the void. An array of explosive charges is formed in the zone of unfragmented formation. The array of explosive charges comprises rows of central explosive charges surrounded by a band of outer explosive charges which are adjacent side boundaries of the retort being formed. The powder factor of each outer explosive charge is made about equal to the powder factor of each central explosive charge. The explosive charges are detonated for explosively expanding the zone of unfragmented formation toward the void for forming the fragmented permeable mass of formation particles having a reasonably uniformly distributed void fraction in the in situ oil shale retort.

Ricketts, Thomas E. (Grand Junction, CO); Fernandes, Robert J. (Bakersfield, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Western oil shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 1. Main report  

SciTech Connect

The general goal of this study is to present the prospects of shale oil within the context of (1) environmental constraints, (2) available natural and economic resources, and (3) the characteristics of existing and emerging technology. The objectives are: to review shale oil technologies objectively as a means of supplying domestically produced fuels within environmental, social, economic, and legal/institutional constraints; using available data, analyses, and experienced judgment, to examine the major points of uncertainty regarding potential impacts of oil shale development; to resolve issues where data and analyses are compelling or where conclusions can be reached on judgmental grounds; to specify issues which cannot be resolved on the bases of the data, analyses, and experienced judgment currently available; and when appropriate and feasible, to suggest ways for the removal of existing uncertainties that stand in the way of resolving outstanding issues.

Not Available

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Characterization of contaminants in oil shale residuals and the potential for their management to meet environmental quality standards. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Some general aspects of various oil shale processes developed for scale-up to commercial size modular units are described. The overall magnitude of an envisioned commercial shale oil operation and the magnitude of resulting potentially polluting residues in particular solid residues from retorting oil shale and associated operations and wastewater from retort streams and other sources are considered. The potential problems ensuing from self-oxidation of stockpiles of oil shale and from residual carbonaceous retorted oil shale disposed above ground and/or from in situ retorting operations are examined. Some methods for managing self-heating processes are suggested. The most plausible method of avoiding potential self-heating for retorted oil shale is to oxidize as much as possible of the organic carbon present by utilizing a process that will produce low carbon or carbon-free retorted oil shale residues. In the case of unretorted oil shale, the dimensions and shapes of the stockpiles should be designed such that heat build-up is eliminated or kept to a minimum.

Schmidt-Collerus, J.J.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

High efficiency shale oil recovery. Fourth quarterly report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The overall project objective is to demonstrate the high efficiency of the Adams Counter-Current shale oil recovery process. The efficiency will first be demonstrated on a small scale, in the current phase, after which the demonstration will be extended to the operation of a small pilot plant. Thus the immediate project objective is to obtain data on oil shale retorting operations in a small batch rotary kiln that will be representative of operations in the proposed continuous process pilot plant. Although an oil shale batch sample is sealed in the batch kiln from the start until the end of the run, the process conditions for the batch are the same as the conditions that an element of oil shale would encounter in a continuous process kiln. Similar chemical and physical (heating, mixing) conditions exist in both systems. The two most important data objectives in this phase of the project are to demonstrate (1) that the heat recovery projected for this project is reasonable and (2) that an oil shale kiln will run well and not plug up due to sticking and agglomeration. The following was completed and is reported on this quarter: (1) A software routine was written to eliminate intermittently inaccurate temperature readings. (2) We completed the quartz sand calibration runs, resolving calibration questions from the 3rd quarter. (3) We also made low temperature retorting runs to identify the need for certain kiln modifications and kiln modifications were completed. (4) Heat Conductance data on two Pyrolysis runs were completed on two samples of Occidental oil shale.

Adams, D.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

466

The enrichment behavior of natural radionuclides in pulverized oil shale-fired power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The oil shale industry is the largest producer of NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material) waste in Estonia. Approximately 11–12 million tons of oil shale containing various amounts of natural radionuclides is burned annually in the Narva oil shale-fired power plants, which accounts for approximately 90% of Estonian electricity production. The radionuclide behavior characteristics change during the fuel combustion process, which redistributes the radionuclides between different ash fractions. Out of 24 operational boilers in the power plants, four use circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology and twenty use pulverized fuel (PF) technology. Over the past decade, the PF boilers have been renovated, with the main objective to increase the efficiency of the filter systems. Between 2009 and 2012, electrostatic precipitators (ESP) in four PF energy blocks were replaced with novel integrated desulphurization technology (NID) for the efficient removal of fly ash and SO2 from flue gases. Using gamma spectrometry, activity concentrations and enrichment factors for the 238U (238U, 226Ra, 210Pb) and 232Th (232Th, 228Ra) family radionuclides as well as 40K were measured and analyzed in different PF boiler ash fractions. The radionuclide activity concentrations in the ash samples increased from the furnace toward the back end of the flue gas duct. The highest values in different PF boiler ash fractions were in the last field of the ESP and in the NID ash, where radionuclide enrichment factors were up to 4.2 and 3.3, respectively. The acquired and analyzed data on radionuclide activity concentrations in different PF boiler ashes (operating with an ESP and a NID system) compared to CFB boiler ashes provides an indication that changes in the fuel (oil shale) composition and boiler working parameters, as well as technological enhancements in Estonian oil shale fired power plants, have had a combined effect on the distribution patterns of natural radionuclides in the oil shale combustion products.

Taavi Vaasma; Madis Kiisk; Tõnis Meriste; Alan Henry Tkaczyk

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Decaking of coal or oil shale during pyrolysis in the presence of iron oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing a fuel from the pyrolysis of coal or oil shale in the presence of iron oxide in an inert gas atmosphere is described. The method includes the steps of pulverizing feed coal or oil shale, pulverizing iron oxide, mixing the pulverized feed and iron oxide, and heating the mixture in a gas atmosphere which is substantially inert to the mixture so as to form a product fuel, which may be gaseous, liquid and/or solid. The method of the invention reduces the swelling of coals, such as bituminous coal and the like, which are otherwise known to swell during pyrolysis. 4 figs., 8 tabs.

Rashid Khan, M.

1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

468

GIS-and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development  

SciTech Connect

The Colorado School of Mines (CSM) was awarded a grant by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct a research project en- titled GIS- and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development in October of 2008. The ultimate goal of this research project is to develop a water resource geo-spatial infrastructure that serves as “baseline data” for creating solutions on water resource management and for supporting decisions making on oil shale resource development. The project came to the end on September 30, 2012. This final project report will report the key findings from the project activity, major accomplishments, and expected impacts of the research. At meantime, the gamma version (also known as Version 4.0) of the geodatabase as well as other various deliverables stored on digital storage media will be send to the program manager at NETL, DOE via express mail. The key findings from the project activity include the quantitative spatial and temporal distribution of the water resource throughout the Piceance Basin, water consumption with respect to oil shale production, and data gaps identified. Major accomplishments of this project include the creation of a relational geodatabase, automated data processing scripts (Matlab) for database link with surface water and geological model, ArcGIS Model for hydrogeologic data processing for groundwater model input, a 3D geological model, surface water/groundwater models, energy resource development systems model, as well as a web-based geo-spatial infrastructure for data exploration, visualization and dissemination. This research will have broad impacts of the devel- opment of the oil shale resources in the US. The geodatabase provides a “baseline” data for fur- ther study of the oil shale development and identification of further data collection needs. The 3D geological model provides better understanding through data interpolation and visualization techniques of the Piceance Basin structure spatial distribution of the oil shale resources. The sur- face water/groundwater models quantify the water shortage and better understanding the spatial distribution of the available water resources. The energy resource development systems model reveals the phase shift of water usage and the oil shale production, which will facilitate better planning for oil shale development. Detailed descriptions about the key findings from the project activity, major accomplishments, and expected impacts of the research will be given in the sec- tion of “ACCOMPLISHMENTS, RESULTS, AND DISCUSSION” of this report.

Zhou, Wei (Wendy) [Wendy; Minnick, Matthew; Geza, Mengistu; Murray, Kyle; Mattson, Earl

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

469

Decaking of coal or oil shale during pyrolysis in the presence of iron oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing a fuel from the pyrolysis of coal or oil shale in the presence of iron oxide in an inert gas atmosphere. The method includes the steps of pulverizing feed coal or oil shale, pulverizing iron oxide, mixing the pulverized feed and iron oxide, and heating the mixture in a gas atmosphere which is substantially inert to the mixture so as to form a product fuel, which may be gaseous, liquid and/or solid. The method of the invention reduces the swelling of coals, such as bituminous coal and the like, which are otherwise known to swell during pyrolysis.

Khan, M. Rashid (Morgantown, WV)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Isotope compositions (C, O, Sr, Nd) of vertebrate fossils from the Middle Eocene oil shale of Messel, Germany: Implications for their taphonomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isotope compositions (C, O, Sr, Nd) of vertebrate fossils from the Middle Eocene oil shale isotopes Diagenesis Enamel Messel Propalaeotherium The Middle Eocene oil shale deposits of Messel (~0.706) due to diagenetic Sr uptake from the lake water/oil shale. Enamel 18 Op values (~18 ± 0

Schöne, Bernd R.

471

DOE oil shale reference sample bank: Quarterly report, January-March 1987. [Samples from Kentucky and Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Oil Shale Program was restructured in FY84 to implement a 5-year period of basic and applied research in the study of the phenomena involved in oil shale pyrolysis/retorting. The program calls for the study of two reference shales per year for a period of 5 years. Consequently, the program calls for the identification, acquisition, processing, characterization, storage, disbursement, and record keeping for ten reference shales in a period of 5 years. Terra Tek, Inc. received the DOE Reference Shale Sample Bank contract in October, 1985. Two FY86 reference shales have been acquired, processed and stored under inert gas. The Eastern shale, designated E86, was obtained from the Clegg Creek Member of the New Albany Shale at a quarry near Louisville, Kentucky in the first quarter of FY86. The Western shale was obtained from the Exxon Colony Mine, located near Parachute, Colorado, during the first quarter of FY86. Partial distributions of both shales have been made to DOE contractors. Complete descriptions of the reference shale locales, shale processing procedures and analytical characterization are provided in this report. 7 refs., 40 figs.

Owen, L.B.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Description and selection of soils at two oil shale disposal sites  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents geologic soil descriptions of two oil shale areas selected for soil sampling. Soil samples are to be collected specifically from areas designated for spent shale disposal. One shale disposal site is the Colorado Rio Blanco lease tract C-a, 84 Mesa. The other area is adjacent to the Clegg Creek Member of the New Albany shale in southeast Indiana. Site descriptions are considered to be fundamental before sampling in order to collect samples that are representative of the major parent material. The dominant parent materials found near Rio Blanco are basalt, sandstone, and marlstone. The dominant parent material in southeast Indiana is glacial till. The soils weathered from these materials have different physical and chemical characteristics. Collected samples will be representative of these characteristics. 6 refs., 3 figs.

McGowan, L.J.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting of eastern oil shales. Final report, June 1992--January 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian oil shales of the Eastern United States are a significant domestic energy resource. The overall objective of the multi-year program, initiated in September 1987 by the US Department of Energy was to perform the research necessary to develop the pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for producing oil from Eastern oil shales. The program also incorporates research on technologies in areas such as raw shale preparation, beneficiation, product separation and upgrading, and waste disposal that have the potential of improving the economics and/or environmental acceptability of recovering oil from oil shales using the PFH process. The program was divided into the following active tasks: Task 3 -- Testing of Process Improvement Concepts; Task 4 -- Beneficiation Research; Task 6 -- Environmental Data and Mitigation Analyses; and Task 9 -- Information Required for the National Environmental Policy Act. In order to accomplish all of the program objectives, tho Institute of Gas Technology (ICT), the prime contractor, worked with four other institutions: The University of Alabama/Mineral Resources Institute (MRI), the University of Alabama College of Engineering (UA), University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), and Tennessee Technological University (TTU). This report presents the work performed by IGT from June 1, 1992 through January 31, 1993.

Roberts, M.J.; Mensinger, M.C.; Erekson, E.J.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Schultz, C.W.; Hatcher, W.E. [Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States). Mineral Resources Inst.; Parekh, B.K. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Bonner, W.P. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Heat of combustion of Green River oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The authors derive simple equations for estimating the heat of combustion of raw shale by thermochemical estimates and by linear regression of experimental data. They find that the heat can be estimated well by an exothermic term that accounts for the combustion of organic matter and a constant that accounts for pyrite combustion, carbonate decomposition, and glass formation. The net contribution of reactions included in the constant is endothermic for the standard state products of bomb calorimetry. As a sample application, the authors perform an energy balance on a modified Fischer assay of average Green River shale by using one of our formulas for raw shale along with previously derived formulas for pyrolysis products.

Muehlbauer, M.J.; Burnham, A.K.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research  

SciTech Connect

Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical definition of oil-shale facies in the lower Parachute Creek Member of Green River Formation, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of two drill cores penetrating the lower Saline zone of the Parachute Creek Member (middle L-4 oil-shale zone through upper R-2 zone) of the Green River Formation in north-central Piceance Creek basin, Colorado, indicate the presence of two distinct oil-shale facies. The most abundant facies has laminated stratification and frequently occurs in the L-4, L-3 and L-2 oil-shale zones. The second, and subordinate facies, has ''streaked and blebby'' stratification and is most abundant in the R-4, R-3 and R-2 zones. Laminated oil shale originated by slow, regular sedimentation during meromictic phases of ancient Lake Uinta, whereas streaked and blebby oil shale was deposited by episodic, non-channelized turbidity currents. Laminated oil shale has higher contents of nahcolite, dawsonite, quartz, K-feldspar and calcite, but less dolomite/ankerite and albite than streaked and blebby oil shale. Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate minerals in laminated oil shale have more variable compositions than those in streaked and blebby shales. Streaked and blebby oil shale has more kerogen and a greater diversity of kerogen particles than laminated oil shale. Such variations may produce different pyrolysis reactions when each shale type is retorted.

Cole, R.D.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

DOE Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve August 18, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that new contracts have been awarded for commercial storage of 650,000 barrels of ultra low sulfur distillate (ULSD) for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). Awards were made to two companies for storage in New England--Hess Corporation in Groton, CT for 400,000 barrels, and Global Companies LLC in Revere, MA for 250,000 barrels. The procurement was conducted by the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA Energy), acting as the agent for DOE. Acquisition of storage services for an additional 350,000 barrels is planned to complete the establishment of a

478

California Federal Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Million Barrels) California Federal Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Extensions (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

479

Louisiana State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Million Barrels) Louisiana State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Sales (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

480

Louisiana State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Million Barrels) Louisiana State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Acquisitions (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil shale reserves" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Texas State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Revision...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Million Barrels) Texas State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Revision Decreases (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

482

Texas State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Acquisition...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Million Barrels) Texas State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Acquisitions (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

483

Texas State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Revision...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Million Barrels) Texas State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Revision Increases (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

484

California State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Million Barrels) California State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Adjustments (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

485

California State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Million Barrels) California State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Sales (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

486

California State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Million Barrels) California State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Extensions (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

487

Louisiana State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Million Barrels) Louisiana State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Extensions (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

488

Texas State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Adjustments...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Million Barrels) Texas State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Adjustments (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

489