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1

STEO January 2013 - oil production increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

oil production to increase in 2013 and 2014 oil production to increase in 2013 and 2014 U.S. crude oil production is expected to keep rising over the next two years. America's oil output will jump nearly 900,000 barrels per day in 2013 to an average 7.3 million barrels a day, according to the latest monthly forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This would mark the biggest one-year increase in output since U.S. commercial crude oil production began in 1859. U.S. daily oil production is expected to rise by another 600,000 barrels in 2014 to nearly 8 million barrels a day, the highest level since 1988. Most of America's oil production growth over the next two years will come from more drilling activity in tight shale rock formations located in North Dakota and Texas

2

Implications of Increasing U.S. Crude Oil Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Implications of Increasing U.S. Crude Implications of Increasing U.S. Crude Oil Production By John Powell June 18, 2013 U.S. crude oil production is up dramatically since 2010 and will continue to grow rapidly; this has implications for: John Powell June 18, 2013 2 * Refinery operations * Refinery investment * Logistics infrastructure investment * Exports of petroleum products * Exports of crude oil Increased U.S. crude oil production has resulted in: John Powell June 18, 2013 3 * Declines in U.S. crude imports * Changes to refinery operations * Logistical constraints in moving crude from production areas to refining areas * Discounted prices for domestic "landlocked" crude vs. international seaborne crude

3

Gel conformance treatments increase oil production in Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromic-carboxylate acrylamide-polymer gels have been applied successfully as conformance treatments in a number of fields in Wyoming's Big Horn basin. This paper reports that as a result of these treatments, significant amounts of incremental oil will be recovered in a profitable manner. The gels were applied to naturally fractured reservoirs of intermediate fracture intensity. The gel treatments improved sweep efficiency of oil-recovery drive fluids in fields that were under either primary production, waterflooding, or polymer-augmented waterflooding. Ultimate incremental oil production from the 29 gel treatments is projected to be 3.72 million st-tk bbl, or on average, 128,000 bbl/treatment. An average 13 bbl of incremental production are projected to be recovered for every 1 lb of polymer injected.

Sydansk, R.D.; Moore, P.E. (Marathon Oil Co., Littleton, CO (US))

1992-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

4

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It was hoped that the successful application of these technologies would result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

5

Heavy oil exposure increases viral production in natural marine bacterial populations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examined whether heavy oil (HO) increases viral production and how that change may affect the marine bacterial community. The addition of a relatively low concentration (10 ?g/mL) of HO to seawater ...

Mitsuhiro Yoshida; Satoru Suzuki

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies would result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

7

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies will result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs.

Scott Hara

2001-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

8

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The hope is that successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs, including: (1) Development of three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic reservoir simulation models--thermal or otherwise--to aid in reservoir management of the steamflood and post-steamflood phases and subsequent development work. (2) Development of computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid reservoir surveillance and operations. (3) Perform detailed studies of the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (4) Testing and proposed application of a novel alkaline-steam well completion technique for the containment of the unconsolidated formation sands and control of fluid entry and injection profiles. (5) Installation of a 2100 ft, 14 inch insulated, steam line beneath a harbor channel to supply steam to an island location. (6) Testing and proposed application of thermal recovery technologies to increase oil production and reserves: (a) Performing pilot tests of cyclic steam injection and production on new horizontal wells. (b) Performing pilot tests of hot water-alternating-steam (WAS) drive in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Perform a pilot steamflood with the four horizontal injectors and producers using a pseudo steam-assisted gravity-drainage (SAGD) process. (8) Advanced reservoir management, through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring and evaluation.

Unknown

2001-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

9

Increasing Oil Productivity Through Electromagnetic Induction Heat Generation of Salt Water as a Stimulant for Heavy Oil Recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Brine is usually exist in the oil reservoir. Varying salinity brine are used as stimulants for heavy oil recovery processes using electromagnetic induction heating. The heated heavy oil is floating on top of the brine since it becomes less viscous and lighter. As the temperature increased more heavy oil is “produced/recovered”. An increasing salinity of brine will result in more recovery of heavy oil.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2004-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

11

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2003-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

12

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2003-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

13

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. Summary of Technical Progress

Scott Hara

1997-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

14

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

15

Increasing Heavy Oil Reservers in the Wilmington Oil field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) 11-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Hara, Scott [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)

1997-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

16

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through June 2002, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V post-steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the Third Quarter 2002, the project team essentially completed implementing the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project developed in March 2002 and is proceeding with additional related work. The project team has completed developing laboratory research procedures to analyze the sand consolidation well completion technique and will initiate work in the fourth quarter. The Tar V pilot steamflood project terminated hot water injection and converted to post-steamflood cold water injection on April 19, 2002. Proposals have been approved to repair two sand consolidated horizontal wells that sanded up, Tar II-A well UP-955 and Tar V well J-205, with gravel-packed inner liner jobs to be performed next quarter. Other well work to be performed next quarter is to convert well L-337 to a Tar V water injector and to recomplete vertical well A-194 as a Tar V interior steamflood pattern producer. Plans have been approved to drill and complete well A-605 in Tar V in the first quarter 2003. Plans have been approved to update the Tar II-A 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and run sensitivity cases to evaluate the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Well work related to the Tar II-A accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan began in March 2002 with oil production increasing from 1009 BOPD in the first quarter to 1145 BOPD in the third quarter. Reservoir pressures have been increased during the quarter from 88% to 91% hydrostatic levels in the ''T'' sands and from 91% to 94% hydrostatic levels in the ''D'' sands. Well work during the quarter is described in the Reservoir Management section. The post-steamflood production performance in the Tar V pilot project has been below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations and the loss of a horizontal producer a second time to sand inflow that are being addressed in the fourth quarter. As the fluid production temperatures exceeded 350 F, our self-imposed temperature limit, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001 and converted to cold water injection on April 19, 2002.

Scott Hara

2002-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

17

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through September 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Fourth Quarter 2001 performing routine well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood and Tar V pilot steamflood projects. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. The project team ramped up well work activity from October 2000 through November 2001 to increase production and injection. In December, water injection well FW-88 was plug and abandoned and replaced by new well FW-295 into the ''D'' sands to accommodate the Port of Long Beach at their expense. Well workovers are planned for 2002 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The steamflood operation in the Tar V pilot project is mature and profitable. Recent production performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that were being addressed in 2001. As the fluid production is hot, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001.

Scott Hara

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through June 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Third Quarter 2001 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. The project team ramped up well work activity from October 2000 to September 2001 to increase production and injection. This work will continue through 2001 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current steamflood operations in the Tar V pilot are economical, but recent performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that are being addressed in 2001.

Scott Hara

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through March 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Second Quarter 2001 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project. The Tar II-A steamflood reservoirs have been operated over fifteen months at relatively stable pressures, due in large part to the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase in January 1999. Starting in the Fourth Quarter 2000, the project team has ramped up activity to increase production and injection. This work will continue through 2001 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current steamflood operations in the Tar V pilot are economical, but recent performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that are being addressed in 2001. Much of the second quarter was spent writing DOE annual and quarterly reports to stay current with contract requirements.

Scott Hara

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

20

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through December 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the First Quarter 2002, the project team developed an accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and began implementing the associated well work in March. The Tar V pilot steamflood project will be converted to post-steamflood cold water injection in April 2002. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Most of the 2001 well work resulted in maintaining oil and gross fluid production and water injection rates. Reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are at 88% and 91% hydrostatic levels, respectively. Well work during the first quarter and plans for 2002 are described in the Reservoir Management section. The steamflood operation in the Tar V pilot project is mature and profitable. Recent production performance has been below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that have been addressed during this quarter. As the fluid production temperatures were beginning to exceed 350 F, our self-imposed temperature limit, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001 and will be converted to cold water injection next quarter.

Scott Hara

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil production increased" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through September 2000, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on improving core analysis techniques, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post steamflood projects. Work was discontinued on the stochastic geologic model and developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Tar II-A Zone so the project team could use the 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model to provide alternatives for the Tar II-A post steamflood operations and shale compaction studies. The project team spent the fourth quarter 2000 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and the Tar V horizontal well steamflood pilot. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current steamflood operations in the Tar V pilot are economical, but recent performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that are being evaluated.

Scott Hara

2001-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

22

Corn oil exposure increases inflammatory cytokine production in human white preadipocytes but canola oil exposure does not  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Prevention and Epidemiology Dietary Fish Oil Alters T Lymphocyte Cell Populations and...East Lansing, Michigan Findings that fish oil enriched with DHA can promote colitis and...docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is present in fish oil and has potent anti-inflammatory properties...

Gabriela Ion and W. Elaine Hardman

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through March 1999, project work has been completed related to data preparation, basic reservoir engineering, developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model, and a rock-log model, well drilling and completions, and surface facilities. Work is continuing on the stochastic geologic model, developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Fault Block IIA Tar (Tar II-A) Zone, and operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction. Thermal-related formation compaction is a concern of the project team due to observed surface subsidence in the local area above the steamflood project. Last quarter on January 12, the steamflood project lost its inexpensive steam source from the Harbor Cogeneration Plant as a result of the recent deregulation of electrical power rates in California. An operational plan was developed and implemented to mitigate the effects of the two situations. Seven water injection wells were placed in service in November and December 1998 on the flanks of the Phase 1 steamflood area to pressure up the reservoir to fill up the existing steam chest. Intensive reservoir engineering and geomechanics studies are continuing to determine the best ways to shut down the steamflood operations in Fault Block II while minimizing any future surface subsidence. The new 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulator model is being used to provide sensitivity cases to optimize production, steam injection, future flank cold water injection and reservoir temperature and pressure. According to the model, reservoir fill up of the steam chest at the current injection rate of 28,000 BPD and gross and net oil production rates of 7,700 BPD and 750 BOPD (injection to production ratio of 4) will occur in October 1999. At that time, the reservoir should act more like a waterflood and production and cold water injection can be operated at lower net injection rates to be determined. Modeling runs developed this quarter found that varying individual well injection rates to meet added production and local pressure problems by sub-zone could reduce steam chest fill-up by up to one month.

Scott Hara

2000-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

24

Residential heating oil prices increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

heating oil prices increase The average retail price for home heating oil rose 3.9 cents last week to 3.96 per gallon. That's down 2.6 cents from a year ago, based on the...

25

Residential heating oil prices increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5, 2014 Residential heating oil prices increase The average retail price for home heating oil rose 6.5 cents from a week ago to 4.24 per gallon. That's up 14.9 cents from a year...

26

Residential heating oil prices increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

heating oil prices increase The average retail price for home heating oil rose 5.4 cents from a week ago to 4.04 per gallon. That's up 4.9 cents from a year ago, based on the...

27

Residential heating oil prices increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

heating oil prices increase The average retail price for home heating oil rose 2.9 cents from a week ago to 3.98 per gallon. That's up 6-tenths of a penny from a year ago, based...

28

Residential heating oil prices increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3, 2014 Residential heating oil prices increase The average retail price for home heating oil rose 4.4 cents from a week ago to 4.06 per gallon. That's up 4.1 cents from a year...

29

Residential heating oil prices increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

heating oil prices increase The average retail price for home heating oil rose 12 cents from a week ago to 4.18 per gallon. That's up 13 cents from a year ago, based on the...

30

Crude Oil Domestic Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Crude Oil Domestic Production Refinery Crude Oil Inputs Refinery Gross Inputs Refinery Operable Capacity (Calendar Day) Refinery Percent Operable Utilization Net...

31

STEO September 2012 - oil production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

oil production forecast to rise almost 700,000 bpd this oil production forecast to rise almost 700,000 bpd this year, help cut U.S. petroleum imports U.S. crude oil production is expected to average 6.3 million barrels per day in 2012. That's up nearly 700,000 barrels per day from last year and the highest annual oil output since 1997 says the U.S. Energy Information Administration in its new monthly short-term energy outlook for September. EIA analyst Sam Gorgen explains: "Higher oil supplies, especially from North Dakota and Texas, boosted U.S. oil production. The number of on-shore drilling rigs targeting oil nationwide has increased by around 200 so far this year to just under 1,400 rigs." Higher domestic oil production will help cut U.S. petroleum imports. The share of total U.S.

32

Class III Mid-Term Project, "Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involved improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective has been to transfer technology that can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The first budget period addressed several producibility problems in the Tar II-A and Tar V thermal recovery operations that are common in SBC reservoirs. A few of the advanced technologies developed include a three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic geologic model, a 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulation model to aid in reservoir management and subsequent post-steamflood development work, and a detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rocks and fluids. State of the art operational work included drilling and performing a pilot steam injection and production project via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors), implementing a hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steamflood area to improve thermal efficiency, installing a 2400-foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location, testing a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems, and starting on an advanced reservoir management system through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. The second budget period phase (BP2) continued to implement state-of-the-art operational work to optimize thermal recovery processes, improve well drilling and completion practices, and evaluate the geomechanical characteristics of the producing formations. The objectives were to further improve reservoir characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, test the proficiency of the three-dimensional geologic and thermal reservoir simulation models, identify the high permeability thief zones to reduce water breakthrough and cycling, and analyze the nonuniform distribution of the remaining oil in place. This work resulted in the redevelopment of the Tar II-A and Tar V post-steamflood projects by drilling several new wells and converting idle wells to improve injection sweep efficiency and more effectively drain the remaining oil reserves. Reservoir management work included reducing water cuts, maintaining or increasing oil production, and evaluating and minimizing further thermal-related formation compaction. The BP2 project utilized all the tools and knowledge gained throughout the DOE project to maximize recovery of the oil in place.

Scott Hara

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

STEO December 2012 - oil production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rise in 2012 U.S. oil production largest since 1859, output in 2013 seen Rise in 2012 U.S. oil production largest since 1859, output in 2013 seen topping 7 million bpd U.S. crude oil production is now expected to rise by about 760,000 barrels per day in 2012, the biggest annual increase in oil output since U.S. commercial crude oil production began in 1859. American oil producers are expected to pump a daily average of 6.4 million barrels of crude oil this year, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administrator's new monthly energy forecast. The annual increase in oil output tops the previous record set in 1951 and marks the largest yearly production increase ever. Most of the increase in crude oil production is driven by drilling activity in shale formations located in Texas, North Dakota and Montana. U.S. crude oil production next year is expected to top 7 million barrels per day for the first time

34

Increasing heavy oil reservers in the Wilmington oil Field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies, technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) 11-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Hara, S. [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)], Casteel, J. [USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States)

1997-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

35

Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington Oil field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Quarterly report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., California using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The technologies include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Hara, S.

1996-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

36

Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington oil field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., California using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. This is the third quarterly technical progress report for the project. Significant technical achievements accomplished include the drilling of four horizontal wells (two producers and two steam injectors) utilizing a new and lower cost drilling program, the drilling of five observation wells to monitor the horizontal steamflood pilot, the installation of a subsurface harbor channel crossing for delivering steam to an island location, and a geochemical study of the scale minerals being created in the wellbore. Cyclic steam injection into the two horizontal injection wells began in mid-December 1995 utilizing the new 2400 ft steam line under the Cerritos channel and the wells will be placed on production in May. Cyclic steam injection into the two horizontal producers will start in May. Work on the basic reservoir engineering is expected to be completed in March 1996. The deterministic geologic model was improved to add eight layers to the previous ten.

Hara, S.

1996-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

37

Production of Shale Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intensive pre-project feasibility and engineering studies begun in 1979 have produced an outline plan for development of a major project for production of shale oil from private lands in the Piceance Basin in western Colorado. This outline plan...

Loper, R. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Oil Reserves and Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Oil Reserves and Production Eric Drake The growth of world energy requirements over the last...remaining proved recoverable reserves will probably decline continuously...to grow. The declining reserves will be insufficient to...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

“Petroleum Gas Oil?Ethanol” Blends Used as Feeds: Increased Production of Ethylene and Propylene over Catalytic Steam-Cracking (CSC) Hybrid Catalysts. Different Behavior of Methanol in Blends with Petroleum Gas Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

“Petroleum Gas Oil?Ethanol” Blends Used as Feeds: Increased Production of Ethylene and Propylene over Catalytic Steam-Cracking (CSC) Hybrid Catalysts. ... Recently developed hybrid catalysts used in the catalytic steam cracking (CSC, formerly called selective deep catalytic cracking or SDCC(1, 2) and also thermal catalytic cracking or TCC(3, 4)) of hydrocarbon heavy feedstocks (naphthas and gas oils) are very efficient in the production of light olefins, particularly ethylene and propylene with a product propylene-to-ethylene ratio close to 1.0. ...

A. Muntasar; R. Le Van Mao; H. T. Yan

2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

40

Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington oil field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. This is the sixth quarterly technical progress report for the project. Through September 1996, the project continues to make good progress but is slightly behind schedule. Estimated costs are on budget for the work performed to date. Technical achievements accomplished during the quarter include placing the first two horizontal wells on production following cyclic steam stimulation, completing several draft technical reports and preparing presentations on the deterministic geologic model, steam channel crossing and horizontal well drilling for technical transfer. Cyclic steam injection into the first two horizontal wells was completed in June 1996 and initial oil production from the project began the same month. Work has commenced on the stochastic geologic and reservoir simulation models. High temperature core work and reservoir tracer work will commence in the First Quarter 1997.

Hara, S. [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil production increased" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Bachaquero-01 reservoir, Venezuela-increasing oil production by switching from cyclic steam injection to steamflooding using horizontal wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, existing and two new vertical producers): schematic diagrams showing grid dimensions, well locations and completion intervals. . . . . 106 XVI F1GURE Page 5. 20 Area LL3343, Case 4 (cyclic steaming ? horizontal well producer, existing and two new... and contains an OOIP of 7. 037 BSTB. The oil has an oil gravity of 11. 7 degrees API with a viscosity of 635 cp at initial reservoir conditions of 1, 360 psia and 128'F. Currently the reservoir produces 36 MSTB/D oil. Structurally, the reservoir is a simple...

Rodriguez, Manuel Gregorio

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

42

Heavy oil production from Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

North Slope of Alaska has an estimated 40 billion barrels of heavy oil and bitumen in the shallow formations of West Sak and Ugnu. Recovering this resource economically is a technical challenge for two reasons: (1) the geophysical environment is unique, and (2) the expected recovery is a low percentage of the oil in place. The optimum advanced recovery process is still undetermined. Thermal methods would be applicable if the risks of thawing the permafrost can be minimized and the enormous heat losses reduced. Use of enriched natural gas is a probable recovery process for West Sak. Nearby Prudhoe Bay field is using its huge natural gas resources for pressure maintenance and enriched gas improved oil recovery (IOR). Use of carbon dioxide is unlikely because of dynamic miscibility problems. Major concerns for any IOR include close well spacing and its impact on the environment, asphaltene precipitation, sand production, and fines migration, in addition to other more common production problems. Studies have indicated that recovering West Sak and Lower Ugnu heavy oil is technically feasible, but its development has not been economically viable so far. Remoteness from markets and harsh Arctic climate increase production costs relative to California heavy oil or Central/South American heavy crude delivered to the U.S. Gulf Coast. A positive change in any of the key economic factors could provide the impetus for future development. Cooperation between the federal government, state of Alaska, and industry on taxation, leasing, and permitting, and an aggressive support for development of technology to improve economics is needed for these heavy oil resources to be developed.

Mahmood, S.M.; Olsen, D.K. [NIPER/BDM-Oklahoma, Inc., Bartlesville, OK (United States); Thomas, C.P. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

Predicting the Peak in World Oil Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) recently predicted that world oil production could continue to increase for more than three decades, based on the recent US Geological Surv...

Alfred J. Cavallo

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Do increases in oil prices precede U.S. recessions?.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This thesis examines the relationship between oil prices and economic activity, and it attempts to address the question: do increases in oil prices (oil… (more)

Suthijindawong, Thanyalak

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project was to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and transfer of horizontal drilling technology in the Paradox basin, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, then the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 25 to 50 million barrels (40-80 million m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize several shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvania (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation, choose the best candidate(s) for a pilot demonstration project to drill horizontally from existing vertical wells, monitor well performances, and report associated validation activities.

Chidsey, Thomas C. Jr.; Eby, David E.; Wray, Laura L.

2001-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

46

Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project's primary objective was to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and transfer of horizontal drilling technology in the Paradox Basin, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, then the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox Basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 25 to 50 million barrels (4-8 million m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize several shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation, choose the best candidate(s) for a pilot demonstration project to drill horizontally from existing vertical wells, monitor well performance(s), and report associated validation activities.

Chidsey, Jr., Thomas C.; Eby, David E.; Wray, Laural L.

2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

47

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical progress report describes work performed from April 1 through June 30, 2002, for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms.'' We investigate a broad spectrum of topics related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. Significant results were obtained in the areas of multiphase flow and rock properties, hot-fluid injection, improved primary heavy oil recovery, and reservoir definition. The research tools and techniques used are varied and span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history-matching techniques. Briefly, experiments were conducted to image at the pore level matrix-to-fracture production of oil from a fractured porous medium. This project is ongoing. A simulation studied was completed in the area of recovery processes during steam injection into fractured porous media. We continued to study experimentally heavy-oil production mechanisms from relatively low permeability rocks under conditions of high pressure and high temperature. High temperature significantly increased oil recovery rate and decreased residual oil saturation. Also in the area of imaging production processes in laboratory-scale cores, we use CT to study the process of gas-phase formation during solution gas drive in viscous oils. Results from recent experiments are reported here. Finally, a project was completed that uses the producing water-oil ratio to define reservoir heterogeneity and integrate production history into a reservoir model using streamline properties.

Anthony R. Kovscek

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Bakken Shale Oil Production Trends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) database and in the format of monthly production for oil, water and gas. Additional 95 well data including daily production rate, completion, Pressure Volume Temperature (PVT), pressure data are given from companies who sponsor for this research study...

Tran, Tan

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

49

Increasing CO2 Storage in Oil Recovery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Increasing CO Increasing CO 2 Storage in Oil Recovery Kristian Jessen (krisj@pangea.stanford.edu, 650-723-6348) Linda C. Sam-Olibale (chizoba@pangea.stanford.edu, 650-725-0831) Anthony R. Kovscek (kovscek@pangea.stanford.edu, 650-723-1218) Franklin M. Orr, Jr. (fmorr@pangea.stanford.edu, 650-723-2750) Department of Petroleum Engineering, Stanford University 65 Green Earth Sciences Building 367 Panama Street Stanford, CA 94305-2220 Introduction Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) injection has been used as a commercial process for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) since the 1970's. Because the cost of oil recovered is closely linked to the purchase cost of the CO 2 injected, considerable reservoir engineering design effort has gone into reducing the total amount of CO 2 required to recover each barrel of oil. If,

50

Review of EIA Oil Production Outlooks  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Review of EIA oil production outlooks For 2014 EIA Energy Conference July 15, 2014 | Washington, DC By Samuel Gorgen, Upstream Analyst Overview Gorgen, Tight Oil Production Trends...

51

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and...

52

Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington oil field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. [Quarterly report], October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., California using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. This is the third quarterly technical progress report for the project. Through December 1995, the project is on schedule and on budget. Several significant technical achievements have already been successfully accomplished including the drilling of four horizontal wells (two producers and two steam injectors) utilizing a new and lower cost drilling program, the drilling of five observation wells to monitor the horizontal steamflood pilot, the installation of a subsurface harbor channel crossing for delivering steam to an island location, and a geochemical study of the scale minerals being created in the wellbore. Steam injection into the two horizontal injection wells began in mid-December 1995 utilizing the new 2400 ft steam line under the Cerritos Channel. Work on the basic reservoir engineering is expected to be completed in March 1996. A working deterministic geologic model was completed which allowed work to commence on the stochastic geologic and reservoir simulation models.

Hara, S. [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)

1996-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Western Hemisphere Oil Products Balance  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Western Hemisphere Oil Products Balance Ramn Espinasa, Ph.D. Lead Specialist July 2014 The Energy Innovation Center Energy Division 3 The views expressed by the author do not...

54

OPEC Crude Oil Production 1999-2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 of 17 3 of 17 Notes: After declining in 1999 due to a series of announced production cuts, OPEC 10 (OPEC countries excluding Iraq) production has been increasing during 2000. EIA's projected OPEC production levels for fourth quarter 2000 have been lowered by 300,000 barrels per day from the previous Outlook. Most of this decrease is in OPEC 10 production, which is estimated to be 26.5 million barrels per day. EIA still believes that only Saudi Arabia, and to a lesser degree, the United Arab Emirates, will have significant short-term capacity to expand production. EIA's forecast assumes that OPEC 10 crude oil production will decline by 400,000 barrels per day to 26.1 million barrels per day by mid-2001. Iraqi crude oil production is estimated to have increased from 2.3 million

55

OPEC Crude Oil Production 1999-2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

EIA assumes in its base case that OPEC 10 production averages about EIA assumes in its base case that OPEC 10 production averages about 0.6 million barrels per day less in the 1st quarter of 2001 than was produced in the 4th quarter of 2000. This is based on the assumption that beginning in February 2001, OPEC 10 production is 1 million barrels per day less than the estimate for December 2000. Over the course of the past year, worldwide oil production has increased by about 3.7 million barrels per day to a level of 77.8 million barrels per day in the last months of 2000. After being nearly completely curtailed in December 2000, EIA's base case assumes that Iraqi oil exports only partially return in January. By February, EIA assumes Iraqi crude oil production reaches 3 million barrels per day, roughly the peak levels reached last year.

56

EIA - Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In three  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production in Three Cases (1990-2030) Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production in Three Cases (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2006 Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In Three Cases Data Tables (1990-2030) Formats Table Data Titles (1 to 6 complete) Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In Three Cases Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In Three Cases Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table E1 World Oil Production Capacity by Region and Country, Reference Case Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In Three Cases Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

57

An innovative concept for deep water oil production platform design.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??As more oil and gas are discovered in deep water, the offshore industry has become increasingly interested in the design of deep water offshore production… (more)

Racine, Florian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Production of hydrogen from oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for production of hydrogen from oil shale fines by direct introduction of the oil shale fines into a fluidized bed at temperatures about 1200/sup 0/ to about 2000/sup 0/ F. to obtain rapid heating of the oil shale. The bed is fluidized by upward passage of steam and oxygen, the steam introduced in the weight ratio of about 0.1 to about 10 on the basis of the organic carbon content of the oil shale and the oxygen introduced in less than the stoichiometric quantity for complete combustion of the organic carbonaceous kerogen content of the oil shale. Embodiments are disclosed for heat recovery from the spent shale and heat recovery from the spent shale and product gas wherein the complete process and heat recovery is carried out in a single reaction vessel. The process of this invention provides high conversion of organic carbon component of oil shale and high production of hydrogen from shale fines which when used in combination with a conventional oil shale hydroconversion process results in increased overall process efficiency of greater than 15 percent.

Schora, F. C.; Feldkirchner, H. L.; Janka, J. C.

1985-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

59

OPEC Crude Oil Production 1999-2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: EIA assumes in its base case that OPEC 10 production averages about 0.6 million barrels per day less in the 1st quarter of 2001 than was produced in the 4th quarter of 2000. This is based on the assumption that beginning in February 2001, OPEC 10 production is 1 million barrels per day less than the estimate for December 2000. From the fourth quarter of 1999 to the 4th quarter of 2000, worldwide oil production increased by about 3.7 million barrels per day to a level of 77.8 million barrels per day. After being sharply curtailed in December 2000, EIA's base case assumes that Iraqi oil exports only partially return in January. By February, EIA assumes Iraqi crude oil production reaches 3 million barrels per day, roughly the peak levels reached last year.

60

OPEC Crude Oil Production 1998-2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: EIA assumes in its base case that OPEC 10 production averages about 0.6 million barrels per day less in the 1st quarter of 2001 than was produced in the 4th quarter of 2000. This is based on the assumption that beginning in February 2001, OPEC 10 production is 1 million barrels per day less than the estimate for December 2000. From the fourth quarter of 1999 to the 4th quarter of 2000, worldwide oil production increased by about 3.8 million barrels per day to a level of 77.9 million barrels per day. After being sharply curtailed in December and January, EIA's base case assumes that Iraqi oil exports return closer to more normal levels in February. By the second half of 2001, EIA assumes Iraqi crude oil production reaches 3 million barrels per day, roughly the peak levels

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil production increased" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

OPEC agrees to lower oil prices, production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

OPEC agrees to lower oil prices, production ... The attempt to stabilize prices and salvage some of OPEC's eroding control of the world oil market forced the cartel to make the first price cut in its history. ... U.S. government officials, predicting that the price ultimately would fall to between $25 and $27 per barrel from the new benchmark level of $29, said the new price would increase domestic production of goods and services 0.4% and cut consumer prices in the U.S. nearly 1.0%. ...

1983-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

62

Biodiesel production using waste frying oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research highlights: {yields} Waste sunflower frying oil is successfully converted to biodiesel using lipase as catalyst. {yields} Various process parameters that affects the conversion of transesterification reaction such as temperature, enzyme concentration, methanol: oil ratio and solvent are optimized. {yields} Inhibitory effect of methanol on lipase is reduced by adding methanol in three stages. {yields} Polar solvents like n-hexane and n-heptane increases the conversion of tranesterification reaction. - Abstract: Waste sunflower frying oil is used in biodiesel production by transesterification using an enzyme as a catalyst in a batch reactor. Various microbial lipases have been used in transesterification reaction to select an optimum lipase. The effects of various parameters such as temperature, methanol:oil ratio, enzyme concentration and solvent on the conversion of methyl ester have been studied. The Pseudomonas fluorescens enzyme yielded the highest conversion. Using the P. fluorescens enzyme, the optimum conditions included a temperature of 45 deg. C, an enzyme concentration of 5% and a methanol:oil molar ratio 3:1. To avoid an inhibitory effect, the addition of methanol was performed in three stages. The conversion obtained after 24 h of reaction increased from 55.8% to 63.84% because of the stage-wise addition of methanol. The addition of a non-polar solvent result in a higher conversion compared to polar solvents. Transesterification of waste sunflower frying oil under the optimum conditions and single-stage methanol addition was compared to the refined sunflower oil.

Charpe, Trupti W. [Chemical Engineering Department, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai 400 019 (India); Rathod, Virendra K., E-mail: vk.rathod@ictmumbai.edu.in [Chemical Engineering Department, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai 400 019 (India)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Impacts of the Venezuelan Crude Oil Production Loss  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impacts of the Venezuelan Crude Oil Production Loss Impacts of the Venezuelan Crude Oil Production Loss EIA Home > Petroleum > Petroleum Feature Articles Impacts of the Venezuelan Crude Oil Production Loss Printer-Friendly PDF Impacts of the Venezuelan Crude Oil Production Loss By Joanne Shore and John Hackworth1 Introduction The loss of almost 3 million barrels per day of crude oil production in Venezuela following a strike in December 2002 resulted in an increase in the world price of crude oil. However, in the short term, the volume loss probably affected the United States more than most other areas. This country receives more than half of Venezuela's crude and product exports, and replacing the lost volumes proved difficult. U.S. imports of Venezuelan crude oil dropped significantly in December 2002 relative to other years

64

Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the fourth project year (April 6 through October 5, 2003). The work included (1) analysis of well-test data and oil production from Cherokee and Bug fields, San Juan County, Utah, and (2) diagenetic evaluation of stable isotopes from the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Production ''sweet spots'' and potential horizontal drilling candidates were identified for Cherokee and Bug fields. In Cherokee field, the most productive wells are located in the thickest part of the mound facies of the upper Ismay zone, where microporosity is well developed. In Bug field, the most productive wells are located structurally downdip from the updip porosity pinch out in the dolomitized lower Desert Creek zone, where micro-box-work porosity is well developed. Microporosity and micro-box-work porosity have the greatest hydrocarbon storage and flow capacity, and potential horizontal drilling target in these fields. Diagenesis is the main control on the quality of Ismay and Desert Creek reservoirs. Most of the carbonates present within the lower Desert Creek and Ismay have retained a marine-influenced carbon isotope geochemistry throughout marine cementation as well as through post-burial recycling of marine carbonate components during dolomitization, stylolitization, dissolution, and late cementation. Meteoric waters do not appear to have had any effect on the composition of the dolomites in these zones. Light oxygen values obtained from reservoir samples for wells located along the margins or flanks of Bug field may be indicative of exposure to higher temperatures, to fluids depleted in {sup 18}O relative to sea water, or to hypersaline waters during burial diagenesis. The samples from Bug field with the lightest oxygen isotope compositions are from wells that have produced significantly greater amounts of hydrocarbons. There is no significant difference between the oxygen isotope compositions from lower Desert Creek dolomite samples in Bug field and the upper Ismay limestones and dolomites from Cherokee field. Carbon isotopic compositions for samples from Patterson Canyon field can be divided into two populations: isotopically heavier mound cement and isotopically lighter oolite and banded cement. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the annual national convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation, a core workshop, and publications. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

2003-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

65

HETEROGENEOUS SHALLOW-SHELF CARBONATE BUILDUPS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH AND COLORADO: TARGETS FOR INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES USING HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNIQUES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing, vertical, field wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the third project year (April 6 through October 5, 2002). This work included capillary pressure/mercury injection analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and pore casting on selected samples from Cherokee and Bug fields, Utah. The diagenetic fabrics and porosity types found at these fields are indicators of reservoir flow capacity, storage capacity, and potential for enhanced oil recovery via horizontal drilling. The reservoir quality of Cherokee and Bug fields has been affected by multiple generations of dissolution, anhydrite plugging, and various types of cementation which act as barriers or baffles to fluid flow. The most significant diagenetic characteristics are microporosity (Cherokee field) and micro-boxwork porosity (Bug field), as shown from porethroat radii histograms, and saturation profiles generated from the capillary pressure/mercury injection analysis, and identified by scanning electron microscopy and pore casting. These porosity types represent important sites for untapped hydrocarbons and primary targets for horizontal drilling. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the Rocky Mountain Section meeting of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation, and publications. The project home page was updated for the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical progress report describes work performed from July 1 through September, 2003 for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms,'' DE-FC26-00BC15311. In this project, a broad spectrum of research is undertaken related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. The research tools and techniques span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history-matching techniques. During this period, work focused on completing project tasks in the area of multiphase flow and rock properties. The area of interest is the production mechanisms of oil from porous media at high temperature. Temperature has a beneficial effect on oil recovery and reduces residual oil saturation. Work continued to delineate how the wettability of reservoir rock shifts from mixed and intermediate wet conditions to more water-wet conditions as temperature increases. One mechanism for the shift toward water-wet conditions is the release of fines coated with oil-wet material from pore walls. New experiments and theory illustrate the role of temperature on fines release.

Anthony R. Kovscek; Louis M. Castanier

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Water issues associated with heavy oil production.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

68

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical progress report describes work performed from October 1 through December 31, 2002 , for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms.'' In this project, a broad spectrum of research is undertaken related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. The research tools and techniques used are varied and span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history-matching techniques. During this period, experimental data regarding multidimensional imbibition was analyzed to obtain shape factors appropriate for dual-porosity simulation. It is shown that the usual assumption of constant, time-independent shape factors is incorrect. In other work, we continued to study the mechanisms by which oil is produced from fractured media at high pressure and high temperature. High temperature significantly increased the apparent wettability and affected water relative permeability of cores used in previous experiments. A phenomenological and mechanistic cause for this behavior is sought. Our work in the area of primary production of heavy oil continues with field cores and crude oil. On the topic of reservoir definition, work continued on developing techniques that integrate production history into reservoir models using streamline-based properties.

Anthony R. Kovscek

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Mississippi Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Mississippi Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

70

California Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) California Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

71

Pennsylvania Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Pennsylvania Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

72

Increased oil recovery from mature oil fields using gelled polymer treatments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gelled polymer treatments are applied to oil reservoirs to increase oil production to reduce water production by altering the fluid movement within the reservoir. This research program is aimed at reducing barriers to the widespread use of these treatments by developing methods to predict gel behavior during placement in matrix rock and fractures, determining the persistence of permeability reduction after gel placement, and by developing methods to design production well treatments to control water production. This report describes the progress of the research during the first six months of work. A Dawn EOS multi-angle laser light scattering detector was purchased, installed and calibrated. Experiments were conducted to determine the permeabilities of a bulk gel and of a filter cake which forms when a gel is dehydrated. The pressure at which a gel in a tube is ruptured was measured and was correlated to the length and diameter of the gel.

Willhite, G. Paul; Green, Down W.; McCool, Stan

2000-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

73

EIA - New Iraqi oil production: How much; how fast?  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

New Iraqi oil production: How much; how fast? New Iraqi oil production: How much; how fast? International Energy Outlook 2010 New Iraqi oil production: How much; how fast? Iraq holds a considerable portion of the world's conventional oil reserves, but has been unable to increase oil production substantially in recent years due to conflict and geopolitical constraints. As violence in Iraq has lessened, there has been a concerted effort to increase the country's oil production, both to bolster government revenues and to support wider economic development. Recently, Iraq offered prequalified foreign oil companies two opportunities to bid on designated fields under specific terms of investment. The success of the bidding rounds and the level of interest from foreign companies have raised hopes that oil production could increase substantially over a short period of time, with some Iraqi government officials stating that the country could increase its production to 12 million barrels per day by 2017.[a] Although Iraq has the reserves to support such growth, it will need to overcome numerous challenges in order to raise production to even a fraction of that goal.

74

Oil exploration and production in Scotland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...production, 34 oil production platforms are in operation...FARROW FIG. 4. The semi-submersible exploration rig...EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION 559 3 E Area shows...through four steel production platforms, in a water depth...

D. Hallett; G. P. Durant; G. E. Farrow

75

Biodiesel Production from Greenseed Canola Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biodiesel Production from Greenseed Canola Oil† ... Biodiesel properties are comparable to those of fossil-based diesel fuel, and biodiesels can be produced from animal fats or vegetable oils; thus, they are renewable. ...

Titipong Issariyakul; Ajay K. Dalai

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

76

A Decade of Increased Oil Recovery in Virtual Reality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the early '90s, VR was still in its infancy, but the Norwegian oil company Norsk Hydro saw the technology's potential. Still, there was no framework for developing VR for exploration and production. Working with the Norwegian research institute Christian ... Keywords: virtual reality, petroleum industry, oil exploration and production

Endre M. Lidal; Tor Langeland; Christopher Giertsen; Jens Grimsgaard; Rolf Helland

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Decline Curve Analysis of Shale Oil Production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Production of oil and gas from shale is often described as a revolution to energyproduction in North America. Since the beginning of this century… (more)

Lund, Linnea

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Foamy Oil Flow and its Role in Heavy Oil Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two?phase oil?gas flow in porous media is often encountered during oil production from oil bearing sedimentary rocks. Traditionally such flow is modeled by extending the Darcy’s law to two?phase flow by employing the concept of saturation dependent relative permeability. This model is remarkably successful as long as the fluid distribution within the porous medium is controlled by capillary forces. Under this condition the two fluids appear to flow in their own continuous flow channels. This flow description is applicable to most reservoir flow scenarios encountered in light oil production. However in primary production of heavy oil under solution?gas drive this flow model often fails to provide a satisfactory match of the observed behaviour.

Brij B. Maini; Bashir Busahmin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Strategic implications for US - Persian Gulf relations on domestic and worldwide oil production for future US oil demand. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. dependence on oil imports is examined in light of current U.S. oil production, its potential for future discoveries, and the availability of oil products form Venezuela, Mexico, and other South American countries. There is no geologic reason why the U.S. cannot continue to replace its reserves consumed annually, continue conservation efforts reducing its import dependence, and shift its foreign oil supply closer to home, i.e., Mexico and South America. Increasing the price of oil domestically ensures continued exploration, and shifting the source of imports reduces the length of SLOC'S carrying critical oil products.

Kaplan, S.S.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Oil exploration and production in Scotland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...34 oil production platforms are in operation, and...onto a broad Palaeozoic platform. Further north a complex...FARROW FIG. 4. The semi-submersible exploration rig Bendoran...four steel production platforms, in a water depth of...

D. Hallett; G. P. Durant; G. E. Farrow

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil production increased" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Future world oil production: Growth, plateau, or peak?1 Larry Hughes and Jacinda Rudolph  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Systems 2010 #12;Future world oil production: Growth, plateau, or peak? Larry Hughes2 and Jacinda governments to reduce their energy intensity (6), the growth in oil production resumed in the mid-1980s World Energy Outlook, production is projected to increase to 103.8 million barrels of oil a day by 2030

Hughes, Larry

82

US Crude Oil Production Surpasses Net Imports | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

US Crude Oil Production Surpasses Net Imports US Crude Oil Production Surpasses Net Imports Source: Energy Information Administration Short Term Energy Outlook. Chart by Daniel...

83

Common Products Made from Oil and Natural Gas | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Common Products Made from Oil and Natural Gas Common Products Made from Oil and Natural Gas Educational poster developed by the Office of Fossil Energy that graphically displays...

84

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the...

85

US Crude Oil Production Surpasses Net Imports | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

US Crude Oil Production Surpasses Net Imports US Crude Oil Production Surpasses Net Imports Source: Energy Information Administration Short Term Energy Outlook. Chart by...

86

Steep increase in oil prices as gulf crisis lingers on  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Following a brief interruption, the recovery in world commodity prices witnessed during the first months of the year has continued. Crude oil prices reached their highest level for 16 months. The increase in prices

Klaus Matthies

87

Increased oil production and reserves from improved completion techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah. Annual report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bluebell field produces from the Tertiary lower Green River and Wasatch Formations of the Uinta Basin, Utah. The productive interval consists of thousands of feet of interbedded fractured clastic and carbonate beds deposited in a fluvial-dominated deltaic lacustrine environment. Wells in the Bluebell field are typically completed by perforating 40 or more beds over 1,000 to 3,000 vertical feet (300-900 m), then applying an acid-fracture stimulation treatment to the entire interval. This completion technique is believed to leave many potentially productive beds damaged and/or untreated, while allowing water-bearing and low-pressure (thief) zones to communicate with the wellbore. Geologic and engineering characterization has been used to define improved completion techniques. The study identified reservoir characteristics of beds that have the greatest long-term production potential.

Allison, M.L.; Morgan, C.D.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Oil exploration and production in Scotland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...high return on investment, the additional...oil production platforms are in operation...FIG. 4. The semi-submersible exploration rig...API 38.5 4 platforms 154 wells 10000...return on their investment is very limited...

D. Hallett; G. P. Durant; G. E. Farrow

89

INCREASED OIL RECOVERY FROM MATURE OIL FIELDS USING GELLED POLYMER TREATMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gelled polymer treatments are applied to oil reservoirs to increase oil production and to reduce water production by altering the fluid movement within the reservoir. This report describes the results of a three-year research program aimed at reducing barriers to the widespread use of gelled polymer treatments by (1) developing methods to predict gel behavior during placement in matrix rock and fractures, (2) determining the persistence of permeability reduction after gel placement, and (3) developing methods to design production well treatments to control water production. The work focused on the gel system composed of polyacrylamide and chromium acetate. The molar mass of the polymer was about six million. Chromium(III) acetate reacted and formed crosslinks between polymer molecules. The crosslinked polymer molecules, or pre-gel aggregates, combine and grow to eventually form a 3-dimensional gel. A fundamental study to characterize the formation and growth of pre-gel aggregates was conducted. Two methods, flow field-flow fractionation (FFFF) and multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) were used. Studies using FFFF were inconclusive. Data taken using MALLS showed that at the gel time the average molar mass of gel aggregates increased by a factor of about three while the average size increase was approximately 50%. Increased acetate concentration in the gelant increases the gel time. The in situ performance of an added-acetate system was investigated to determine the applicability for in-depth treatments. Increased acetate concentrations delayed the development of increased flow resistance during gelant injection in short sandpacks. The development of increased flow resistance (in situ gelation) was extended from 2 to 34 days by increasing the acetate-to-chromium ratio from 38 to 153. In situ gelation occurred at a time that was approximately 22% of the bulk gelation time. When carbonate rocks are treated with gel, chromium retention in the rock may limit in-depth treatment. Chromium retention due to precipitation was investigated by flowing chromium acetate solutions through carbonate rock. Chromium precipitated faster in the rocks than in beaker experiments at similar conditions. A mathematical model previously developed fit the precipitation data reasonably well. The stability of gels when subjected to stress was investigated by experiments with gels placed in tubes and in laboratory-scale fractures. Rupture pressures for gels placed in small diameter tubes were correlated with the ratio of tube length to tube ID. In fractures, fluid leakoff from the fracture to adjacent matrix rock affected gel formation and gel stability in a positive way. Disproportionate permeability reduction (DPR) was studied in unconsolidated sandpacks and in Berea sandstone cores. A conceptual model was developed to explain the presence of DPR. The effect of a pressure gradient, imposed by injection of oil or brine, on the permeability of gel-treated cores was investigated. DPR increased significantly as the pressure gradient was decreased. The magnitude of the pressure gradient had a much larger effect on water permeability than on oil permeability.

G.P. Willhite; D.W. Green; C.S. McCool

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Peaking of World Oil Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nonrenewable and renewable energy sources make up the two major energy categories of interest to our industrial civilization. Nonrenewable energy includes different fossil fuels (coal, oil, natural gas) th...

J. Edward Gates

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

IPAA; U. S. oil production to resume long slide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that although production rose slightly in 1991 in response to the Persian Gulf War, U.S. oil flow will resume its decline this year in downward trend that will persist at least until 2000. The independent Petroleum Association of America's supply/demand committee pegs crude oil production at less than 7.2 million b/d, down 2.9% from 1991 and the lowest level in 30 years. Crude oil production will continue sliding to 5.8 million b/d by 2000, the smallest volume since 1950. U.S. natural gas production will increase to 20.3 tcf by 2000 for a growth rate of almost 2%/year. Natural gas trade will increase, too, with imports rising to 2.7 tcf by 2000, an average of nearly 6%/year. U.S. natural gas exports to northern Mexico also are expected to grow.

Not Available

1992-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

92

Simulation-Based Optimization of Multistage Separation Process in Offshore Oil and Gas Production Facilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simulation-Based Optimization of Multistage Separation Process in Offshore Oil and Gas Production Facilities ... As the demand for offshore oil platforms and eco-friendly oil production has increased, it is necessary to determine the optimal conditions of offshore oil production platforms to increase profits and reduce costs as well as to prevent environmental pollution. ... To achieve a practical design for an offshore platform, it is necessary to consider environmental specifications based on an integrated model describing all units concerned with oil and gas production. ...

Ik Hyun Kim; Seungkyu Dan; Hosoo Kim; Hung Rae Rim; Jong Min Lee; En Sup Yoon

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

93

Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Correlation and Regression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Topic 4 Correlation and Regression Transformed Variables 1 / 13 #12;Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Outline Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Lineweaver-Burke double reciprocal plot 2 / 13 #12;Worldwide Oil Production

Watkins, Joseph C.

94

Production of higher quality bio-oils by in-line esterification of pyrolysis vapor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure encompasses in-line reactive condensation processes via vapor phase esterification of bio-oil to decease reactive species concentration and water content in the oily phase of a two-phase oil, thereby increasing storage stability and heating value. Esterification of the bio-oil vapor occurs via the vapor phase contact and subsequent reaction of organic acids with ethanol during condensation results in the production of water and esters. The pyrolysis oil product can have an increased ester content and an increased stability when compared to a condensed pyrolysis oil product not treated with an atomized alcohol.

Hilten, Roger Norris; Das, Keshav; Kastner, James R; Bibens, Brian P

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

95

Oil spills - increasing US dependence on oil imports heightens risks to environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calamitous oil spills in recent years have focused attention on the devastation the world`s leading energy source can wreak on the environment. In Alaska, the 1989 grounding of the supertanker Exxon Valdez in Prince William Sound caused the worst U.S. oil spill ever and promoted Congress to pass stringent oil-pollution legislation. In the Persian Gulf, {open_quotes}eco-terroism{close_quotes} committed by Iraqi forces during the gulf war left hundreds of wells burning and oil free-flowing out of Kuwait`s refineries and oil-shipping terminals. With the United States and much of the global community increasingly dependent on petroleum moved by supertankers, oil spills will continue to threaten the environment for the foreseeable future.

NONE

1992-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

96

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Exports Exports Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Biomass-Based Diesel Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils Petro. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

97

Kuwait pressing toward preinvasion oil production capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil field reconstruction is shifting focus in Kuwait as the country races toward prewar production capacity of 2 million b/d. Oil flow last month reached 1.7 million b/d, thanks largely to a massive workover program that has accomplished about as much as it can. By midyear, most of the 19 rigs in Kuwait will be drilling rather than working over wells vandalized by retreating Iraqi troops in February 1991. Seventeen gathering centers are at work, with capacities totaling 2.4 million b/d, according to state-owned Kuwait Oil Co. (KOC). This article describes current work, the production infrastructure, facilities strategy, oil recovery, well repairs, a horizontal pilot project, the drilling program, the constant reminders of war, and heightened tensions.

Tippee, B.

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

A model of peak production in oil fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We developed a model for oil production on the basis of simple physical considerations. The model provides a basic understanding of Hubbert’s empirical observation that the production rate for an oil-producing region reaches its maximum when approximately half the recoverable oil has been produced. According to the model the oil production rate at a large field must peak before drilling peaks. We use the model to investigate the effects of several drilling strategies on oil production. Despite the model’s simplicity predictions for the timing and magnitude of peak production match data on oil production from major oil fields throughout the world.

Daniel M. Abrams; Richard J. Wiener

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports January 26, 2012 - 11:14am Addthis Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Over the next 33 years, the Energy Information Administration expect domestic natural gas production to increase to 28 trillion cubic feet per year, contributing to a decline in U.S. reliance on imported crude oil. During the State of the Union speech Tuesday night, President Obama spoke of the importance of reducing our reliance on imported oil by increasing domestic energy production. As the U.S. has only 2 percent of the world's oil reserves, natural gas and renewable energy production will play an important role in reducing our net oil imports.

100

Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports January 26, 2012 - 11:14am Addthis Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Over the next 33 years, the Energy Information Administration expect domestic natural gas production to increase to 28 trillion cubic feet per year, contributing to a decline in U.S. reliance on imported crude oil. During the State of the Union speech Tuesday night, President Obama spoke of the importance of reducing our reliance on imported oil by increasing domestic energy production. As the U.S. has only 2 percent of the world's oil reserves, natural gas and renewable energy production will play an important role in reducing our net oil imports.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil production increased" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Microbial petroleum degradation enhancement by oil spill bioremediation products.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Biodegradation of an artificially weathered crude oil (Alaska North Slope) was compared using 13 different oil spill bioremediation agents. All products were evaluated under identical… (more)

Lee, Salvador Aldrett

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical progress report describes work performed from January 1 through March 31, 2003 for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms,'' DE-FC26-00BC15311. In this project, a broad spectrum of research is undertaken related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. The research tools and techniques span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history matching techniques. During this period, previous analysis of experimental data regarding multidimensional imbibition to obtain shape factors appropriate for dual-porosity simulation was verified by comparison among analytic, dual-porosity simulation, and fine-grid simulation. We continued to study the mechanisms by which oil is produced from fractured porous media at high pressure and high temperature. Temperature has a beneficial effect on recovery and reduces residual oil saturation. A new experiment was conducted on diatomite core. Significantly, we show that elevated temperature induces fines release in sandstone cores and this behavior may be linked to wettability. Our work in the area of primary production of heavy oil continues with field cores and crude oil. On the topic of reservoir definition, work continued on developing techniques that integrate production history into reservoir models using streamline-based properties.

Anthony R. Kovscek

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Asymmetries in the response of economic activity to oil price increases and decreases?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract It has been common to assume that the relationship between economic activity and oil prices is asymmetric. Theoretical underpinnings for this asymmetry include costly sectoral reallocation, partial equilibrium models of irreversible investment, and some version of precautionary savings. Yet, recent studies that use new methodologies to test for asymmetries in U.S. data have cast some doubts on that premise. In this paper, we use state-of-the-art techniques to evaluate the presence of asymmetries for a set of OECD countries containing both oil exporters and oil importers. We find very little support for the hypothesis that the response of industrial production to oil price increases and decreases is asymmetric. Our results have important implications for theoretical models of the transmission of oil price shocks: they point towards the importance of direct-supply and direct-demand transmission channels, as well as indirect transmission channels that imply a symmetric response.

Ana María Herrera; Latika Gupta Lagalo; Tatsuma Wada

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Dynamic analysis in productivity, oil shock, and recession  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Declining E?ects of Oil-price Shocks . . . . . . . . . . .of IRFs to a 10% Increase in the Oil Price: Case 3 and Caseof IRFs to a 10% Increase in the Oil Price: Before and After

Katayama, Munechika

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Scientific Visualization Applications in Oil & Gas Exploration and Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scientific Visualization Applications in Oil & Gas Exploration and Production SIBGRAPI 2009 #12 Property cross plots #12;Oil and gas production analysis and optimization SIBGRAPI 2009 Structural maps with property distributions Well schematics Production network Gas injection optimization Reservoir slices #12

Lewiner, Thomas (Thomas Lewiner)

106

Spare Capacity (2003) and Peak Production in World Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reliable estimates of minimum spare capacity for world oil production can be obtained by comparing production ... before and following the collapse of the Iraqi oil industry in March 2003. Spare production was .....

Alfred J. Cavallo

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Product Supplied for Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petro. Feed Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Petroleum Coke - Marketable Petroleum Coke - Catalyst Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

108

Canadian operators boost heavy oil production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent technological advances in slurry pipelining, horizontal wells, and thermal recovery techniques have made recovery of Canadian heavy oil resources more economical. In addition, reduced government royalties have made investment in these difficult reservoirs more attractive. As a result, activity has increased in heavy-oil fields in Alberta and Saskatchewan. This paper review the various oil sand recovery projects under development in the area and the current government policies which are helping to develop them. The paper also provides brief descriptions of the equipment and technologies that have allowed a reduced cost in the development. Items discussed include surface mining techniques, horizontal drilling, reservoir engineering techniques, separation processes, and thermal recovery.

Perdue, J.M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007). The world will reach peak oil production rates, atenergy security costs, and peak oil as emergencies, we willwhen oil price is high, then the first peak in drilling cost

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy security costs, and peak oil as emergencies, we will2007). The world will reach peak oil production rates, atwhen oil price is high, then the first peak in drilling cost

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Table 7: Crude oil proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Crude oil proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, 2011" : Crude oil proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, 2011" "million barrels" ,,"Changes in Reserves During 2011" ,"Published",,,,,,,,"New Reservoir" ,"Proved",,"Revision","Revision",,,,"New Field","Discoveries","Estimated","Proved" ,"Reserves","Adjustments","Increases","Decreases","Sales","Acquisitions","Extensions","Discoveries","in Old Fields","Production","Reserves" "State and Subdivision",40543,"(+,-)","(+)","(-)","(-)","(+)","(+)","(+)","(+)","(-)",40908

112

COMPARING ALASKA'S OIL PRODUCTION TAXES: INCENTIVES AND ASSUMPTIONS1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COMPARING ALASKA'S OIL PRODUCTION TAXES: INCENTIVES AND ASSUMPTIONS1 Matthew Berman In a recent analysis comparing the current oil production tax, More Alaska Production Act (MAPA, also known as SB 21 oil prices, production rates, and costs. He noted that comparative revenues are highly sensitive

Pantaleone, Jim

113

Prudhoe Bay Oil Production Optimization: Using Virtual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

77659, Mohaghegh, Hutchins, Sisk BACKGROUND Fuel gas supply (at the flow stations and gathering centers total field oil production by optimizing the gas discharge rates and pressures at the separation wells flowing to eight remote, three-phase separation facilities (flow stations and gathering centers

Mohaghegh, Shahab

114

Oil exploration and production in Scotland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the end of 1973 it was obvious...million barrels per day during 1973 at a cost to...Israeli War of 1973 and the resultant OPEC oil embargo...EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION 559 3 E Area...to $11-65 per barrel. The...Government of the day attempted to...

D. Hallett; G. P. Durant; G. E. Farrow

115

Superior Energy Performance: Certifying Increased Energy Productivity...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Superior Energy Performance(tm) Certifyin g Increased Energy Productivity under ISO 50001 Overview September 2014 ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Contents Energy management and...

116

The Peak of the Oil Age – Analyzing the world oil production Reference Scenario in World Energy Outlook 2008  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The assessment of future global oil production presented in the IEA’s World Energy Outlook 2008 (WEO 2008) is divided into 6 fractions; four relate to crude oil, one to non-conventional oil, and the final fraction is natural-gas-liquids (NGL). Using the production parameter, depletion-rate-of-recoverable-resources, we have analyzed the four crude oil fractions and found that the 75 Mb/d of crude oil production forecast for year 2030 appears significantly overstated, and is more likely to be in the region of 55 Mb/d. Moreover, analysis of the other fractions strongly suggests lower than expected production levels. In total, our analysis points to a world oil supply in 2030 of 75 Mb/d, some 26 Mb/d lower than the IEA predicts. The connection between economic growth and energy use is fundamental in the IEA’s present modelling approach. Since our forecast sees little chance of a significant increase in global oil production, our findings suggest that the “policy makers, investors and end users” to whom WEO 2008 is addressed should rethink their future plans for economic growth. The fact that global oil production has very probably passed its maximum implies that we have reached the Peak of the Oil Age.

Kjell Aleklett; Mikael Höök; Kristofer Jakobsson; Michael Lardelli; Simon Snowden; Bengt Söderbergh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Production Will Meet Demand Increase This Summer  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Production must meet increases in demand this year. Last year, increased imports met most of the summer demand increase, and increases in stock draws met almost all of the remainder. Production did not increase much. But this year, inventories will not be available, and increased imports seem unlikely. Thus, increases in production will be needed to meet increased demand. Imports availability is uncertain this summer. Imports in 1999 were high, and with Phase II RFG product requirements, maintaining this level could be challenging since not all refineries exporting to the U.S. will be able to meet the new gasoline specifications. Stocks will also contribute little supply this summer. Last year's high gasoline stocks allowed for a stock draw that was 58 MB/D higher than

118

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10,433 1,047 18,983 9,592 488 -617 17,890 3,998 19,273 10,433 1,047 18,983 9,592 488 -617 17,890 3,998 19,273 PADD 1 130 25 3,403 1,515 3,374 230 -269 3,374 264 5,307 PADD 2 1,993 892 4,464 2,094 500 -317 -225 4,240 386 5,224 PADD 3 6,249 96 7,346 4,283 -3,758 511 -211 6,723 2,976 5,239 PADD 4 887 14 643 287 -425 -18 51 615 10 713 PADD 5 1,174 20 3,127 1,413 310 82 36 2,939 362 2,789 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Imports at the PAD District level represent the PAD District in which the material entered the U.S. and not necessarily where the crude oil or product is processed and/or consumed. PAD District level net receipts includes implied net receipts for fuel ethanol and oxygenates (excluding fuel ethanol). Implied net receipts are calculated as the sum of stock change, refinery and blender net inputs, and exports minus the sum of renewable fuels and oxygenate plant net production, imports, and adjustments. Adjustments include an adjustment for crude oil, previously referred to as Unaccounted For Crude Oil. Also included is an adjustment for motor gasoline blending components, fuel ethanol, and distillate fuel oil. A negative stock change indicates a decrease in stocks and a positive number indicates an increase in stocks. Total stocks do not include distillate fuel oil stocks located in the Northeast Heating Oil Reserve. Total residual fuel oil stocks include stocks held at pipelines. Residual fuel oil stocks by sulfur content exclude pipeline stocks. Therefore, the sum of residual fuel oil stocks by sulfur content may not equal total residual fuel oil stocks. Exports of distillate fuel oil with sulfur greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm may include distillate fuel oil with sulfur content 15 ppm and under due to product detail limitations in exports data received from the U.S. Census Bureau. LRG = Liquefied Refinery Gas. Data may not add to total due to independent rounding. See Definitions, Sources, and Notes link above for more information on this table.

119

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil Simulator, 1995) to simulate the effects of water injection rates, the cumulative production of the field,

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels – Bio-Oil Production  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

RTI International report-out at the CTAB webinar on Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels – Bio-Oil Production.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil production increased" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

RFID BASED GRAIN AND OIL PRODUCTS TRACEABILITY1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RFID BASED GRAIN AND OIL PRODUCTS TRACEABILITY1 AND ITS COMPUTER IMPLEMENTATION Haiyan Hu ,*2 the study of the traceability of grain and oil products. Include the study contents, and a system we developed for traceability of grain and oil products, and the demonstration of the study. The system we

Boyer, Edmond

122

Hierarchical Economic Optimization of Oil Production from Petroleum Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hierarchical Economic Optimization of Oil Production from Petroleum Reservoirs Gijs M. van Essen-dirk.jansen@shell.com). Abstract: In oil production waterflooding is a popular recovery technology, which involves the injection, the oil-water front may not move uniformly towards the production wells, but has a rather irregular shape

Van den Hof, Paul

123

Oil and Gas Production Optimization; Lost Potential due to Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil and Gas Production Optimization; Lost Potential due to Uncertainty Steinar M. Elgsaeter Olav.ntnu.no) Abstract: The information content in measurements of offshore oil and gas production is often low, and when in the context of offshore oil and gas fields, can be considered the total output of production wells, a mass

Johansen, Tor Arne

124

Louisiana - North Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Louisiana - North Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

125

Nebraska Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Nebraska Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

126

Florida Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Florida Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

127

Alabama Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Alabama Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

128

New Mexico - West Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) New Mexico - West Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

129

Utah Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Utah Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

130

Texas Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

131

Wyoming Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Wyoming Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

132

Indiana Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Indiana Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

133

Arkansas Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Arkansas Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

134

Ohio Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Ohio Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

135

Kansas Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Kansas Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

136

Alaska Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Alaska Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

137

New Mexico - East Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) New Mexico - East Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

138

Colorado Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Colorado Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

139

Miscellaneous States Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Miscellaneous States Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

140

Oklahoma Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Oklahoma Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil production increased" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Texas State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

142

Louisiana Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Louisiana Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

143

Michigan Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Michigan Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

144

New Mexico Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) New Mexico Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

145

Montana Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Montana Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

146

Illinois Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Illinois Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

147

Lower 48 States Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Lower 48 States Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

148

North Dakota Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) North Dakota Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

149

West Virginia Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) West Virginia Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

150

Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin The purpose of this paper is to provide the public and policy makers accurate estimates of energy efficiencies, water requirements, water availability, and CO2 emissions associated with the development of the 60 percent portion of the Piceance Basin where economic potential is the greatest, and where environmental conditions and societal concerns and controversy are the most challenging: i.e., the portion of the Piceance where very high quality oil shale resources and useful ground water co-exist. Evaluation of Energy Efficiency, Water Requirements and Availability, and CO2 Emissions Associated With the Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in

151

CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says August 31, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The feasibility of using carbon dioxide (CO2) injection for recovering between 250 million and 500 million additional barrels of oil from Kansas oilfields has been established in a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The University of Kansas Center for Research studied the possibility of near-miscible CO2 flooding for extending the life of mature oilfields in the Arbuckle Formation while simultaneously providing permanent geologic storage of carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas.

152

CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says August 31, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The feasibility of using carbon dioxide (CO2) injection for recovering between 250 million and 500 million additional barrels of oil from Kansas oilfields has been established in a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The University of Kansas Center for Research studied the possibility of near-miscible CO2 flooding for extending the life of mature oilfields in the Arbuckle Formation while simultaneously providing permanent geologic storage of carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas.

153

Process for the production of refrigerator oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for producing a high quality refrigerator oil from an oil fraction boiling at a temperature within boiling point of lubricating oil by contacting said oil fraction with a solvent to extract undesirable components thereby lowering % C..cap alpha.. of said oil fraction, hydrogenating said solvent extracted fraction under the specific conditions, and then contacting said hydrogenated oil with a solid absorbant to remove impurities; said oil fraction being obtained from a low grade naphthenic crude oil.

Kunihiro, T.; Tsuchiya, K.

1985-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

154

Analysis of stress sensitivity and its influence on oil production from tight reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indicate that low-permeability tight oil reservoirs arepermeability cores Effect of Stress Sensitivity on Oil Production During oil production from tight

Lei, Qun; Xiong, Wei; Yuan, Cui; Wu, Yu-Shu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Oil production models with normal rate curves Dudley Stark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil production models with normal rate curves Dudley Stark School of Mathematical Sciences Queen;Abstract The normal curve has been used to fit the rate of both world and U.S.A. oil production. In this paper we give the first theoretical basis for these curve fittings. It is well known that oil field

Stark, Dudley

156

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Author U.S. Department of Energy Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Citation U.S. Department of Energy. Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies [Internet]. [cited 2013/10/15]. Available from: http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Petroleum/projects/EP/Explor_Tech/P225.htm Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Oil_%26_Natural_Gas_Projects_Exploration_and_Production_Technologies&oldid=688583

157

Prediction of prices for oil products in the internal market  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper considers the Russian market of oil products and provides a model of this ... of which suggests approaches to forecasting the internal prices of oil producers within one scenario of economic development...

Yu. A. Bakman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

The Evolution of Giant Oil Field Production Behavior  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The data for this study have been taken from the giant oil field database compiled by Robelius (2007...). AAPG was the main source for information about discovery year, year of first oil production, URR and cumulative

Mikael Höök; Bengt Söderbergh; Kristofer Jakobsson…

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Increasing Scientific Productivity by Tracking Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data Tracking Data Tracking Increases Scientific Productivity Data Tracking Increases Scientific Productivity July 20, 2011 | Tags: HPSS, NERSC Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 2402 HPSS Storage New supercomputers and networks are contributing to record levels of scientific productivity. In fact, every new system installed at NERSC over the last 10 years has generated about 50 percent more data than its predecessor. To effectively meet the increasing scientific demand for storage systems and services, the center's staff must first understand how data moves within the facility. Until recently, the process of obtaining these insights was extremely tedious because the statistics came from multiple sources, including network router statistics, client and server transfer logs, storage and accounting reports-all saved as very

160

Total Refinery Net Input of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Input Product: Total Crude Oil & Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Normal Butane Isobutane Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Hydrogen Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils (net) Unfinished Oils, Naphthas and Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) (net) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Ether MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components (net) Alaskan Crude Oil Receipts Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil production increased" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Total Stocks Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Butylene Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) MTBE Other Oxygenates Renewables (including Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils Unfinished Oils, Naphthas & Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene & Light Gas Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Comp. Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Gasoline, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petro. Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

162

Refinery Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending with Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending with Ether* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Reformulated Blended with Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended with Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended with Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil, 15 ppm and Under Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Less than 0.31 Percent Sulfur 0.31 to 1.00 Percent Sulfur Greater than 1.00 Percent Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Marketable Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Units: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

163

Gradient-based Methods for Production Optimization of Oil Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gradient-based Methods for Production Optimization of Oil Reservoirs Eka Suwartadi Doctoral Thesis oil reservoirs. Gradient- based optimization, which utilizes adjoint-based gradient computation optimization for water flooding in the secondary phase of oil recovery is the main topic in this thesis

Foss, Bjarne A.

164

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Imports by Processing Area  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Total Products Other Liquids Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Total Products Other Liquids Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History East Coast (PADD 1) 62,196 60,122 54,018 52,671 54,668 52,999 1981-2013 Midwest (PADD 2) 54,439 53,849 53,638 60,984 63,482 56,972 1981-2013 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 141,142 150,846 138,204 149,059 141,421 138,656 1981-2013

165

Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics - Pacific  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pacific Pacific Energy Data Apps Maps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Energy Beta You are here Data.gov » Communities » Energy » Data Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics - Pacific Dataset Summary Description Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics for the Pacific by month and summarized annually. Tags {"Minerals Management Service",MMS,Production,"natural gas",gas,condensate,"crude oil",oil,"OCS production","Outer Continental Shelf",OSC,EIA,"Energy Information Agency",federal,DOE,"Department of Energy",DOI,"Department of the Interior","Pacific "} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness

166

Production of Biofuels from High-Acid-Value Waste Oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Production of Biofuels from High-Acid-Value Waste Oils ... (1) Biofuel is derived from a renewable, domestic resource, thereby relieving reliance on petroleum fuel imports. ...

Junming Xu; Guomin Xiao; Yonghong Zhou; Jianchun Jiang

2011-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

167

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent...

168

Oil and Gas Production (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Production (Missouri) Production (Missouri) Oil and Gas Production (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Missouri Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Missouri Department of Natural Resources A State Oil and Gas Council regulates and oversees oil and gas production in Missouri, and conducts a biennial review of relevant rules and regulations. The waste of oil and gas is prohibited. This legislation contains additional information about the permitting, establishment, and operation of oil and gas wells, while additional regulations address oil and gas drilling and production and well spacing and unitization

169

Oil production from thin oil columns subject to water and gas coning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OIL PRODUCTION FROM THIN OIL COLUMNS SUBJECT TO MATER AND GAS CONING A Thesis by KMOK KIT CHAI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1981... Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering OIL PRODUCTION FROM THIN OIL COLUMNS SUBJECT TO WATER AND GAS CONING A Thesis by KWOK KIT CHAI Approved as to style and content by airman of o t ee Member Member Head o Department May 1981 ABSTRACT Oil...

Chai, Kwok Kit

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

170

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23,431 32,462 588,466 297,359 15,122 -19,137 554,586 123,943 23,431 32,462 588,466 297,359 15,122 -19,137 554,586 123,943 597,448 1,812,484 PADD 1 4,022 783 105,480 46,972 104,579 7,133 -8,328 104,584 8,184 164,527 145,574 PADD 2 61,781 27,645 138,371 64,904 15,509 -9,838 -6,968 131,427 11,955 161,957 273,603 PADD 3 193,724 2,967 227,728 132,784 -116,513 15,829 -6,533 208,398 92,256 162,398 1,211,066 PADD 4 27,499 433 19,935 8,906 -13,181 -544 1,567 19,066 310 22,105 38,275 PADD 5 36,406 635 96,952 43,793 9,606 2,542 1,124 91,111 11,237 86,461 143,965 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Imports at the PAD District level represent the PAD District in which the material entered the U.S. and not necessarily where the crude oil or product is processed and/or consumed. PAD District level net receipts includes implied net receipts for fuel ethanol and oxygenates (excluding fuel ethanol). Implied net receipts are calculated as the sum of stock change, refinery and blender net inputs, and exports minus the sum of renewable fuels and oxygenate plant net production, imports, and adjustments. Adjustments include an adjustment for crude oil, previously referred to as Unaccounted For Crude Oil. Also included is an adjustment for motor gasoline blending components, fuel ethanol, and distillate fuel oil. A negative stock change indicates a decrease in stocks and a positive number indicates an increase in stocks. Total stocks do not include distillate fuel oil stocks located in the Northeast Heating Oil Reserve. Total residual fuel oil stocks include stocks held at pipelines. Residual fuel oil stocks by sulfur content exclude pipeline stocks. Therefore, the sum of residual fuel oil stocks by sulfur content may not equal total residual fuel oil stocks. Exports of distillate fuel oil with sulfur greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm may include distillate fuel oil with sulfur content 15 ppm and under due to product detail limitations in exports data received from the U.S. Census Bureau. LRG = Liquefied Refinery Gas. Data may not add to total due to independent rounding. See Definitions, Sources, and Notes link above for more information on this table.

171

Remote control of off-shore oil field production equipment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REMOTE CONTROL OF OFF-SHORE OIL FIELD PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT A Thesis Alton W. Sissom 1949 Approve as to style and on n by Cha1rman of omm1ttee REMOTE CONTROL OF OFFSHORE OIL FIELD PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT A Thesis Alton W. Oissom 1949 REMOTE...-Carrier Channel 26 PZNOTE CONTROL OF OFF-SHORE OIL FIELD PRODUCTION K, 'UIPMENT I GENERAL IiPOPPUi TION Since the beginning of the exploitation of the under-sea oil deposits in the Gulf' of qexico, most, of the territory off the shores of Texas and Louisiana...

Sissom, Alton Wayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

172

Higher U.S. oil production in 2013 and 2014 means lower oil imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Higher U.S. oil production in 2013 and 2014 means lower oil Higher U.S. oil production in 2013 and 2014 means lower oil imports U.S. crude oil production topped 7 million barrels per day in November and December for the first time in 20 years, and production is expected to keep rising over the next two years. The U.S. Energy Information Administration's new monthly forecast sees domestic crude oil output averaging 7.3 million barrels per day this year and climbing to 7.9 million barrels next year. Higher crude oil production means America will need less imported oil. U.S. net imports of crude oil and liquid fuels are forecast to drop to 6.0 million barrels per day in 2014, less than half the 12.5 million barrels per day level in 2005. That will push U.S. imports down to just 32 percent of domestic oil consumption, the lowest

173

Energy Supply Crude Oil Production (a)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Supply Energy Supply Crude Oil Production (a) (million barrels per day) .............................. 6.22 6.29 6.42 7.02 7.11 7.29 7.61 7.97 8.26 8.45 8.57 8.86 6.49 7.50 8.54 Dry Natural Gas Production (billion cubic feet per day) ........................... 65.40 65.49 65.76 66.34 65.78 66.50 67.11 67.88 67.99 67.74 67.37 67.70 65.75 66.82 67.70 Coal Production (million short tons) ...................................... 266 241 259 250 245 243 264 256 258 249 265 262 1,016 1,008 1,033 Energy Consumption Liquid Fuels (million barrels per day) .............................. 18.36 18.55 18.59 18.45 18.59 18.61 19.08 18.90 18.69 18.67 18.91 18.82 18.49 18.80 18.77 Natural Gas (billion cubic feet per day) ........................... 81.09 62.38 63.72 71.27 88.05 59.49 60.69 74.92 85.76 59.40 60.87 72.53 69.60 70.72 69.58 Coal (b) (million short tons) ......................................

174

Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. [Jurassic Smackover Formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains maps, well logging correlated to porosity and permeability, structural cross section, graph of production history, porosity vs. natural log permeability plot, detailed core log, paragenetic sequence and reservoir characterization sheet of the following fields in southwest Alabama: Appleton oil field; Barnett oil field; Barrytown oil field; Big Escambia Creek gas and condensate field; Blacksher oil field; Broken Leg Creed oil field; Bucatunna Creed oil field; Chappell Hill oil field; Chatom gas and condensate field; Choctaw Ridge oil field; Chunchula gas and condensate field; Cold Creek oil field; Copeland gas and condensate field; Crosbys Creed gas and condensate field; and East Barnett oil field. (AT)

Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Moore, H.E. Jr.; Mann, S.D.; Hall, D.R.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. Appendix 1, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains maps, well logging correlated to porosity and permeability, structural cross section, graph of production history, porosity vs. natural log permeability plot, detailed core log, paragenetic sequence and reservoir characterization sheet of the following fields in southwest Alabama: Appleton oil field; Barnett oil field; Barrytown oil field; Big Escambia Creek gas and condensate field; Blacksher oil field; Broken Leg Creed oil field; Bucatunna Creed oil field; Chappell Hill oil field; Chatom gas and condensate field; Choctaw Ridge oil field; Chunchula gas and condensate field; Cold Creek oil field; Copeland gas and condensate field; Crosbys Creed gas and condensate field; and East Barnett oil field. (AT)

Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Moore, H.E. Jr.; Mann, S.D.; Hall, D.R.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Production cuts to support oil prices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most commodity quotations have continued to fall in recent months as a result of the weaker global economy. Crude oil prices, on the other hand, had been ... to fall. Is the success of the oil exporters' change i...

Klaus Matthies

177

An energy-economic oil production model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......for more advanced energy-economic models...efficient (less energy intensive) than...hand, Germany's GDP per capita is much larger than...assumption that 100% of energy supply stems from oil. When oil demand is inelastic, this......

Peter Berg; Paul Hanz; Ian Milton

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Reproducibility of LCA Models of Crude Oil Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reproducibility of LCA Models of Crude Oil Production ... We examine LCA greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions models to test the reproducibility of their estimates for well-to-refinery inlet gate (WTR) GHG emissions. ... We use the Oil Production Greenhouse gas Emissions Estimator (OPGEE), an open source engineering-based life cycle assessment (LCA) model, as the reference model for this analysis. ...

Kourosh Vafi; Adam R. Brandt

2014-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

179

Enhancing Biodiesel Production from Soybean Oil Using Ultrasonics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Enhancing Biodiesel Production from Soybean Oil Using Ultrasonics ... Our objective was to determine the effect of ultrasonics on biodiesel production from soybean oil. ... The reaction was monitored for biodiesel yield by stopping the reaction at selected time intervals and analyzing the biodiesel content by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). ...

Priyanka Chand; Venkat Reddy Chintareddy; John G. Verkade; David Grewell

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

180

INCREASING WATERFLOOD RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH IMPROVED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project increased recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs. Transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington Field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project. This project used advanced reservoir characterization tools, including the pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool, geologic three-dimensional (3-D) modeling software, and commercially available reservoir management software to identify sands with remaining high oil saturation following waterflood. Production from the identified high oil saturated sands was stimulated by recompleting existing production and injection wells in these sands using conventional means as well as a short radius redrill candidate. Although these reservoirs have been waterflooded over 40 years, researchers have found areas of remaining oil saturation. Areas such as the top sand in the Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the western fault slivers of Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the bottom sands of the Tar Zone Fault Block V, and the eastern edge of Fault Block IV in both the Upper Terminal and Lower Terminal Zones all show significant remaining oil saturation. Each area of interest was uncovered emphasizing a different type of reservoir characterization technique or practice. This was not the original strategy but was necessitated by the different levels of progress in each of the project activities.

Scott Walker; Chris Phillips; Roy Koerner; Don Clarke; Dan Moos; Kwasi Tagbor

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil production increased" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

U.S. crude oil production expected to exceed oil imports later this year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

crude oil production expected to exceed oil imports later crude oil production expected to exceed oil imports later this year U.S. crude oil production is expected to surpass U.S. crude oil imports by the fourth quarter of this year. That would mark the first time since February 1995 that domestic crude oil output exceeds imports, according to the latest monthly energy outlook from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The United States will still need to import crude oil to help meet domestic demand. However, total crude oil imports this year are on track to fall to their lowest level since 1997. U.S. oil production is expected to continue to rise over the next two years as imports fall. As a result, the share of total U.S. petroleum consumption met by net imports is forecast to fall to 32 percent next year, the lowest level since 1985 and nearly half the peak level of 60 percent seen in

182

Regression and Time Series Analysis of the World Oil Peak of Production: Another Look  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper analyzes world oil production data as a population/resource growth model. Both US and world oil production data are analyzed in terms of ... , is not a suitable model for world oil production. A flexib...

Peter Caithamer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Fact #652: December 6, 2010 U.S. Crude Oil Production Rises ...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

2: December 6, 2010 U.S. Crude Oil Production Rises Fact 652: December 6, 2010 U.S. Crude Oil Production Rises The production of crude oil in the U.S., including lease...

184

Paraffin deposition in offshore oil production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The extreme environmental conditions typically encountered in offshore oil operations lead to a number of problems. Cool deep sea temperatures promote particle formation and deposition… (more)

Elphingstone, Gerald Mason

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Forecasting World Crude Oil Production Using Multicyclic Hubbert Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

OPEC’s actual production was mainly unrestricted until the 1973 Arab oil embargo. ... On the basis of the analysis of all 47 investigated oil producing countries, the results of our study estimated that the world ultimate reserve of crude oil is around 2140 BSTB and that 1161 BSTB are remaining to be produced as of 2005 year end. ... MSTB/D = thousand stock tank barrels per day ...

Ibrahim Sami Nashawi; Adel Malallah; Mohammed Al-Bisharah

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

186

Economic Cost Analysis of Biodiesel Production: Case in Soybean Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1) Combustion of petroleum diesel is a major source for emitting greenhouse gas (GHG). ... An economic analysis model using ASPEN PLUS software suggested that the production costs of soapstock and soybean oil biodiesel would be approximately 0.41 and 0.53 USD L?1, respectively, a 25% reduction relative to the estimated cost of biodiesel produced from soybean oil. ... The use of waste cooking oil to produce biodiesel reduced the raw material cost. ...

Yii-Der You; Je-Lueng Shie; Ching-Yuan Chang; Sheng-Hsuan Huang; Cheng-Yu Pai; Yue-Hwa Yu; Chungfang Ho Chang

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

187

Three Percent Dietary Fish Oil Concentrate Increased Efficacy of Doxorubicin Against MDA-MB 231 Breast Cancer Xenografts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...described previously (38) . Fields containing a single layer of...6% explanation for a total cumulative explanation of 96% of the...FOC diet by increasing the production of GPX and CAT resulting in...of mice fed 19% w/w fish oil for 6 months. Our results...

W. Elaine Hardman; C. P. Reddy Avula; Gabriel Fernandes; and Ivan L. Cameron

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Fact #578: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumptio...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2007 Fact 578: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2007 The United States was...

189

Waxy crude oil production in the South China Sea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Phillips Petroleum International Corporation Asia (PPICA) Xijiang Field Development Project is a unique project resulting in the production of a waxy crude oil. The crude oil is produced on two platforms feeding a final production unit located on an FPSO (Floating Production, Storage and Off-loading) vessel located between the platforms. The crude from these two fields contains a high concentration of wax and has a relatively high pour point temperature. The crude composition and oil properties are listed in two tables. Special consideration was needed with respect to operating temperatures, start-up and shutdown procedures.

Low, W.R.; Gerber, E.J.; Simek, L.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South Carolina) Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control This legislation prohibits the waste of oil or gas and the pollution of water, air, or land. The Department of Health and Environmental Control is authorized to implement regulations designed to prevent the waste of oil and gas, promote environmental stewardship, and regulate the exploration,

191

The peak of oil production—Timings and market recognition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy is essential for present societies. In particular, transportation systems depend on petroleum-based fuels. That world oil production is set to pass a peak is now a reasonably accepted concept, although its date is far from consensual. In this work, we analyze the true expectations of the oil market participants about the future availability of this fundamental energy source. We study the evolution through time of the curves of crude oil futures prices, and we conclude that the market participants, among them the crude oil producers, already expect a near-term peak of oil production. This agrees with many technical predictions for the date of peak production, including our own, that point to peak dates around the end of the present decade. If this scenario is confirmed, it can cause serious social and economical problems because societies will have little time to perform the necessary adjustments.

Pedro de Almeida; Pedro D. Silva

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State Release date: January 7, 2011 | Next Release Date: To be determined Distribution tables of oil and gas wells by production rate for all wells, including marginal wells, are now available for most states for the years 1995 to 2009. Graphs displaying historical behavior of well production rate are also available. To download data for all states and all years, including years prior to 1995, in an Excel spreadsheet XLS (4,000 KB). The quality and completeness of data is dependent on update lag times and the quality of individual state and commercial source databases. Undercounting of the number of wells occurs in states where data is sometimes not available at the well level but only at the lease level. States not listed below will be added later as data becomes available.

193

Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . . . .Oil Production and Productivity in Venezuela and

CAKIR, NIDA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Estimates of future regional heavy oil production at three production rates--background information for assessing effects in the US refining industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of a series of publications from a project considering the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil (10{degree} to 20{degree} API gravity inclusive) production being conducted for the US Department of Energy. The report includes projections of future heavy oil production at three production levels: 900,000; 500,000; and 300,000 BOPD above the current 1992 heavy oil production level of 750,000 BOPD. These free market scenario projections include time frames and locations. Production projections through a second scenario were developed to examine which heavy oil areas would be developed if significant changes in the US petroleum industry occurred. The production data helps to define the possible constraints (impact) of increased heavy oil production on the US refining industry (the subject of a future report). Constraints include a low oil price and low rate of return. Heavy oil has high production, transportation, and refining cost per barrel as compared to light oil. The resource is known, but the right mix of technology and investment is required to bring about significant expansion of heavy oil production in the US.

Olsen, D.K.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Retail Product Prices Are Driven By Crude Oil  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Retail prices for both gasoline and diesel fuel have risen strongly over the past two years, driven mostly by the rise in world crude oil prices to their highest levels since the Persian Gulf War. Of course, there are a number of other significant factors that impact retail product prices, the most important of which is the supply/demand balance for each product. But the point of this slide is to show that generally speaking, as world crude oil prices rise and fall, so do retail product prices. Because of the critical importance of crude oil price levels, my presentation today will look first at global oil supply and demand, and then at the factors that differentiate the markets for each product. I'll also talk briefly about natural gas, and the impact that gas

196

Montana Oil and Natural Gas Production Tax Act (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The State of Montana imposes a quarterly tax on the gross taxable value of oil and natural gas production. This tax replaces several previous taxes, simplifying fees and rates as well as compliance...

197

The U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Production Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Natural Gas Production Outlook for PRG Energy Outlook Conference September 22, 2014 by Adam Sieminski, Administrator 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005...

198

Oil production response to in situ electrical resistance heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OIL PRODUCTION RESPONSE TO I? SITU ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE HEATING A Thesis by FRED WILLIAM MCDOUGAL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1987 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering OIL PRODUCTION RESPONSE TO IN SITV ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE HEATING A Thesis by FRED WILLIAM MCDOUGAL Approved to style and content by: R. A. Wattenbar (Chair of Commi ee) L. D. Piper (Member) D. D. Van...

McDougal, Fred William

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Regulated water production to control water coning in oil wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REGULATED WATER PRODUCTION TO CONTROL WATER CONING IN OIL WELLS A Thesis by ISHWAR SINGH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1975 Major... Subject: Petroleum Engineering REGULATED WATER PRODUCTION TO CONTROL WATER CONING IN OIL WELLS A Thesis by ISHWAR SINGH Approved as to style and content by (Chairman of Committee) (Membe ) (Head of Departmen lVlemb ) May 1975 ( I ABST RACT...

Sim?ha, I?s?vara

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Business Evaluation of a Green Microalgae Botryococcus Braunii Oil Production System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Business feasibility of oil production using the green alga Botryococcus braunii has been studied for a conceptually designed, 19-hectare (ha) semi-open pond type oil producing plant. B. braunii is known to produce triterpenic hydrocarbons, such as C34H58, with high purity. The construction cost was estimated to be 200M¥ (2.35M$) and the operation cost was 200M¥ (2.35M$), or 10.5 M¥/ha year (=124,000$/ha year). The plant achieved a net energy gain in operation with an energy consumption ratio (ECR) of 2.80. Based on the total sales of the hydrocarbon oil produced and the operation cost balance considerations, the breakeven point oil price was 107 ¥/L. By utilizing corporate financial analyses methods, the capital value of the oil producing company was estimated. The analysis methods described in the present study can also be applied to other oil production companies that use microalgae. We found that the initially invested capital increases approximately three times through successive business years when the oil price is 130 ¥/L. In conclusion, several considerations introduced in the present study suggest that the algal oil production business will become strongly competitive in the fuel market by mid-twenty-first century.

Makoto Shiho; Masayuki Kawachi; Kazuhiko Horioka; Yosuke Nishita; Kazuhiko Ohashi; Kunimitsu Kaya; Makoto M. Watanabe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil production increased" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

TR/0606 TR/0606 Distribution Category UC-950 Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs For The Persian Gulf January 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf iii Preface Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf provides estimates of development and operating costs for various size fields in countries surrounding the Persian

202

An example of using oil-production induced microseismicity in characterizing a naturally fractured reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microseismic monitoring was conducted using downhole geophone tools deployed in the Seventy-Six oil field, Clinton County, Kentucky. Over a 7-month monitoring period, 3237 microearthquakes were detected during primary oil production; no injection operations were conducted. Gross changes in production rate correlate with microearthquake event rate with event rate lagging production-rate changes by about 2 weeks. Hypocenters and first-motion data have revealed low-angle, thrust fracture zones above and below the currently drained depth interval. Production history, well logs and drill tests indicate the seismically-active fractures are previously drained intervals that have subsequently recovered to hydrostatic pressure via brine invasion. The microseismic data have revealed, for the first time, the importance of the low-angle fractures in the storage and production of oil in the study area. The seismic behavior is consistent with poroelastic models that predict slight increases in compressive stress above and below currently drained volumes.

Rutledge, J.T.; Phillips, W.S. [Nambe Geophysical, Inc., Santa Fe, NM (United States); Schuessler, B.K.; Anderson, D.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

The impact of water depth on safety and environmental performance in offshore oil and gas production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports on an empirical analysis of company-reported incidents on oil and gas production platforms in the Gulf of Mexico between 1996 and 2010. During these years, there was a dramatic increase in the water depths at which offshore oil and gas is extracted. Controlling for platform characteristics such as age, quantity of oil and gas produced, and number of producing wells, we find that incidents (such as blowouts, injuries, and oil spills) are positively correlated with deeper water. Controlling for these and other characteristics, for an average platform, each 100 feet of added depth increases the probability of a company-reported incident by 8.5%. While further research into the causal connections between water depth and platform risks is warranted, this study highlights the potential value of increased monitoring of deeper water platforms.

Lucija Muehlenbachs; Mark A. Cohen; Todd Gerarden

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Assessment of opportunities to increase the recovery and recycling rates of waste oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste oil represents an important energy resource that, if properly managed and reused, would reduce US dependence on imported fuels. Literature and current practice regarding waste oil generation, regulations, collection, and reuse were reviewed to identify research needs and approaches to increase the recovery and recycling of this resource. The review revealed the need for research to address the following three waste oil challenges: (1) recover and recycle waste oil that is currently disposed of or misused; (2) identify and implement lubricating oil source and loss reduction opportunities; and (3) develop and foster an effective waste oil recycling infrastructure that is based on energy savings, reduced environment at impacts, and competitive economics. The United States could save an estimated 140 {times} 1012 Btu/yr in energy by meeting these challenges.

Graziano, D.J.; Daniels, E.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Expectations for Oil Shale Production (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Oil shales are fine-grained sedimentary rocks that contain relatively large amounts of kerogen, which can be converted into liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons (petroleum liquids, natural gas liquids, and methane) by heating the rock, usually in the absence of oxygen, to 650 to 700 degrees Fahrenheit (in situ retorting) or 900 to 950 degrees Fahrenheit (surface retorting). (Oil shale is, strictly speaking, a misnomer in that the rock is not necessarily a shale and contains no crude oil.) The richest U.S. oil shale deposits are located in Northwest Colorado, Northeast Utah, and Southwest Wyoming. Currently, those deposits are the focus of petroleum industry research and potential future production. Among the three states, the richest oil shale deposits are on federal lands in northwest Colorado.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

An energy-economic oil production model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......underlying economic factors such as labour or capital investment into oil infrastructure...L, Res), (1.4) where K denotes capital; L, labour and Res, natural resources...including other energy sources such as natural gas, coal, hydro and nuclear power, and......

Peter Berg; Paul Hanz; Ian Milton

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

An energy-economic oil production model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......such as natural gas, coal, hydro and nuclear power...perspective, this energy-economic model offers an opportunity...Testimony before the Joint Economic Committee of the US Congress...HOEOEK, M. (2010) Coal and oil: the dark monarchs...2001) Introduction to Economic Growth, 2nd edn. New......

Peter Berg; Paul Hanz; Ian Milton

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Understanding foamy oil mechanisms for heavy oil reservoirs during primary production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A set of experiments in porous media was performed to determine oil recovery factor during natural depletion for a heavy oil reservoir. Results on {open_quotes}critical or mobile{close_quotes} gas saturation, produced fluid characterization, residual oil saturation, production profile and effective viscosity versus pressure are presented. In order to characterize the ability of the heavy oil to trap the released gas, conventional and non conventional PVT tests were carried out. By comparing the experimental results during differential liberation tests, a gas trapping factor for the oil was obtained. It accounts for the amount of solution gas that has been thermodynamically released but does not form instantaneously a free gas cap. The so called pseudo-bubble pressure was obtained. In this work the hypothesis involved in the {open_quotes}Low Viscosity Model{close_quotes} was also tested.

Huerta, M.; Otero, C.; Rico, A.; Jimenez, I.; Mirabal, M. de; Rojas, G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

209

Opportunities to improve oil productivity in unstructured deltaic reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains presentations presented at a technical symposium on oil production. Chapter 1 contains summaries of the presentations given at the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored symposium and key points of the discussions that followed. Chapter 2 characterizes the light oil resource from fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoirs in the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS). An analysis of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and advanced secondary recovery (ASR) potential for fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoirs based on recovery performance and economic modeling as well as the potential resource loss due to well abandonments is presented. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the general reservoir characteristics and properties within deltaic deposits. It is not exhaustive treatise, rather it is intended to provide some basic information about geologic, reservoir, and production characteristics of deltaic reservoirs, and the resulting recovery problems.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Method for creating high carbon content products from biomass oil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a method for producing high carbon content products from biomass, a biomass oil is added to a cracking reactor vessel. The biomass oil is heated to a temperature ranging from about 100.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to crack the biomass oil. Tar is separated from the cracked biomass oil. The tar is heated to a temperature ranging from about 200.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to reduce the tar to a high carbon content product containing at least about 50% carbon by weight.

Parker, Reginald; Seames, Wayne

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

211

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Pipeline between PAD  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline between PAD Districts Pipeline between PAD Districts Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Renewable Diesel Fuel Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

212

Shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Millions of barrels of oil exist in the Bartlesville formation throughout Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri. In an attempt to demonstrate that these shallow heavy oil deposits can be recovered, a field project was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of enhanced oil recovery techniques (EOR) employing horizontal wells. Process screening results suggested that thermal EOR processes were best suited for the recovery of this heavy oil. Screening criteria suggested that in situ combustion was a viable technique for the production of these reserves. Laboratory combustion tube tests confirmed that sufficient amounts of fuel could be deposited. The results of the in situ combustion field pilot were disappointing. A total overall recovery efficiency of only 16.0 percent was achieved. Results suggest that the combustion front might have moved past the horizontal well, however elevated temperatures or crude upgrading were not observed. Factors contributing to the lack of production are also discussed.

Satchwell, R.M.; Johnson, L.A. Jr. [Western Research Institute, Laramie, WY (United States); Trent, R. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Increasing Crop Production Through More Controlled Photosynthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...harvested organ (such as the seed, root, or fruit) are related...converted to the glucose moiety as starch, a major storage product in...6-phosphate (G6P) and then to starch, or it can be exported from...plant such as the growing tip, seeds, roots, or other sinks. Alternative-ly...

James A. Bassham

1977-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

214

NATCOR -Xpress case study Margaret Oil produces three products: gasoline, jet fuel, and heating oil. The average  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATCOR - Xpress case study Margaret Oil produces three products: gasoline, jet fuel, and heating oil. The average octane levels must be at least 8.5 for gasoline, 7 for jet fuel, and 4.5 for heating to produce gasoline or jet fuel. Distilled oil can be used to produce all three products. The octane level

Hall, Julian

215

Evaluation and application of highly alloyed materials for corrosive oil production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Selection of materials for production of oil from the Brae Field, operated by Marathon Oil Company, in the North Sea required extensive...

B. D. Craig

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

San Antonio spurs increase in solar energy production | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

San Antonio spurs increase in solar energy production San Antonio spurs increase in solar energy production January 13, 2010 - 4:54pm Addthis San Antonio is using these unique...

217

Long Term World Oil Supply (A Resource Base/Production Path Analysis)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Long Term World Oil Supply Long Term World Oil Supply (A Resource Base/Production Path Analysis) 07/28/2000 Click here to start Table of Contents Long Term World Oil Supply (A Resource Base/Production Path Analysis) Executive Summary Executive Summary (Continued) Executive Summary (Continued) Overview The Year of Peak Production..When will worldwide conventional oil production peak?... Lower 48 Crude Oil Reserves & Production 1945-2000 Texas Oil and Condensate Production, and Texas First Purchase Price (FPP), 1980-1999 Published Estimates of World Oil Ultimate Recovery Different Interpretations of a Hypothetical 6,000 Billion Barrel World Original Oil-in-Place Resource Base Campbell-Laherrère World Oil Production Estimates, 1930-2050 Laherrere’s Oil Production Forecast, 1930-2150

218

Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to augment the National Reservoir Database (TORIS database) and to increase our understanding of geologic heterogeneities that affect the recoveries of oil and gas from carbonate reservoirs in the State of Alabama and to identify those resources that are producible at moderate cost. These objectives will be achieved through detailed geological, engineering, and geostatistical characterization of typical Jurassic Smackover Formation hydrocarbon reservoirs in selected productive fields in the State of Alabama. The results of these studies will be used to develop and test mathematical models for prediction of the effects of reservoir heterogeneities in hydrocarbon production. Work to date has focused on the completion of Subtasks 1, 2, and 3. Subtask 1 included the survey and tabulation of available reservoir engineering and geological data relevant to the Smackover reservoir in southwestern Alabama. Subtask 2 comprises the geological and engineering characterization of Smackover reservoir lithofacies. This has been accomplished through detailed examination and analysis of geophysical well logs, core material, well cuttings, and well-test data from wells penetrating Smackover reservoirs in southwestern Alabama. From these data, reservoir heterogeneities, such as lateral and vertical changes in lithology, porosity, permeability, and diagenetic overprint, have been recognized and used to produce maps, cross sections, graphs, and other graphic representations to aid in interpretation of the geologic parameters that affect these reservoirs. Subtask 3 includes the geologic modeling of reservoir heterogeneities for Smackover reservoirs. This research has been based primarily on the evaluation of key geologic and engineering data from selected Smackover fields. 1 fig.

Mancini, E.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Midwest (PADD 2) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel (Renewable) Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

220

Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from All Countries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil production increased" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MTBE (Oxygenate) Other Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel (Renewable) Other Renewable Diesel Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

222

Midwest (PADD 2) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel (Renewable) Other Renewable Diesel Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

223

East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MTBE (Oxygenate) Other Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel (Renewable) Other Renewable Diesel Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

224

Water alternating enriched gas injection to enhance oil production and recovery from San Francisco Field, Colombia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main objectives of this study are to determine the most suitable type of gas for a water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection scheme, the WAG cycle time, and gas injection rate to increase oil production rate and recovery from the San Francisco field...

Rueda Silva, Carlos Fernando

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

225

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1994 through 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1997. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (compliance costs and lease availability) have a significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas equipment and production operations.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1990 through 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimated costs and indice for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations for 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993. The costs of all equipment and serives were those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of oil wells to gas wells. The body of the report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (costs and lease availability) have significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas production equipment and operations.

Not Available

1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

227

Evaluating oil quality and monitoring production from heavy oil reservoirs using geochemical methods: Application to the Boscan Field, Venezuela  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many oil fields worldwide contain heavy oil in one or more reservoir units. The low gravity of these oils is most frequently due to biodegradation and/or low maturity. The challenge is to find ways to economically recover this oil. Methods which reduce the operating costs of producing heavy oil add significant value to such projects. Geochemical techniques which use the composition of the reservoir fluids as natural tracers offer cost effective methods to assist with reservoir management. The low viscosity and gravity of heavy oil, combined with frequent high water cuts, low flow rates, and the presence of downhole artificial lift equipment, make many conventional production logging methods difficult to apply. Therefore, monitoring production, especially if the produced oil is commingled from multiple reservoirs, can be difficult. Geochemical methods can be used to identify oil/water contacts, tubing string leaks and to allocate production to individual zones from commingled production. An example of a giant heavy oil field where geochemical methods may be applicable is the Boscan Field in Venezuela. Low maturity oil, averaging 10{degrees} API gravity, is produced from the Eocene Upper and Lower Boscan (Miosa) Sands. Geochemical, stratigraphic and engineering data have helped to better define the controls on oil quality within the field, identified new reservoir compartments and defined unique characteristics of the Upper and Lower Boscan oils. This information can be used to identify existing wells in need of workovers due to mechanical problems and to monitor production from new infill wells.

Kaufman, R.L.; Noguera, V.H.; Bantz, D.M. [Chevron Overseas Petroleum, San Ramon, CA (United States); Rodriguez, R. [Maraven, S.A., Caracas (Venezuela)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Using simple models to describe oil production from unconventional reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Shale oil (tight oil) is oil trapped in low permeability shale or sandstone. Shale oil is a resource with great potential as it is heavily… (more)

Song, Dong Hee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels June 11, 2008 - 1:30pm Addthis Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Secretary of Agriculture Edward T. Schafer sent a letter on June 11, 2008 to Senator Jeff Bingaman addressing a number of questions related to biofuels, food, and gasoline and diesel prices. Read the letter. Without Biofuels, Gas Prices Would Increase $.20 to $.35 per Gallon. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that gasoline prices would be between 20 cents to 35 cents per gallon higher without ethanol1, a first-generation biofuel. For a typical household, that means saving about $150 to $300 per year. For the U.S. overall, this saves gas expenditures of $28 billion to

230

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels June 11, 2008 - 1:30pm Addthis Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Secretary of Agriculture Edward T. Schafer sent a letter on June 11, 2008 to Senator Jeff Bingaman addressing a number of questions related to biofuels, food, and gasoline and diesel prices. Read the letter. Without Biofuels, Gas Prices Would Increase $.20 to $.35 per Gallon. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that gasoline prices would be between 20 cents to 35 cents per gallon higher without ethanol1, a first-generation biofuel. For a typical household, that means saving about $150 to $300 per year. For the U.S. overall, this saves gas expenditures of $28 billion to

231

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-degradable, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.; Potas, T.A.; DeWall, R.A.; Musich, M.A.

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

232

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-decrepitating, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

Knudson, Curtis L. (Grand Forks, ND); Timpe, Ronald C. (Grand Forks, ND); Potas, Todd A. (Plymouth, MN); DeWall, Raymond A. (Grand Forks, ND); Musich, Mark A. (Grand Forks, ND)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

NATCOR -Xpress case study (advanced) Margaret Oil produces three products: gasoline, jet fuel, and heating oil. The average  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATCOR - Xpress case study (advanced) Margaret Oil produces three products: gasoline, jet fuel, and heating oil. The average octane levels must be at least 8.5 for gasoline, 7 for jet fuel, and 4. Distilled naphtha can be used only to produce gasoline or jet fuel. Distilled oil can be used to produce

Hall, Julian

234

Oil production triggered by crisis stays on stream throughout '91  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on worldwide production of crude oil and lease condensate that declined slightly in 1991 due to sagging demand. With Kuwait and Iraq still producing negligible volumes, there was little spare production capacity. But the replacement capacity pressed into use during the Persian Gulf crisis proved its durability by remaining on stream throughout the year. Reserves declined marginally. Most reserves changes reflected estimates by governments of some producing countries.

Not Available

1991-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

235

The relative effects of crude oil price and exchange rate on petroleum product prices: Evidence from a set of Northern Mediterranean countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper provides a set of empirical evidence from five Northern Mediterranean countries that are subject to similar refinery reference prices regarding the relative sensitivity of crude oil prices and exchange rate on (pre-tax) petroleum product prices. The empirical evidence reveals that a one percent increase in exchange rate (depreciation) increases petroleum product prices less than a one percent increase in crude oil prices does in the long run. In the short run, however, a one percent increase in exchange rate increases petroleum product prices more than a one percent increase in crude oil prices does.

M. Hakan Berument; Afsin Sahin; Serkan Sahin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

U.S. monthly oil production tops 8 million barrels per day for the first time since 1988  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. crude oil production expected to hit four-decade high during 2015 U.S. crude oil production expected to hit four-decade high during 2015 U.S. crude oil production over the next two years is expected to grow to its highest level since the early 1970s. Oil output increased by 1 million barrels per day in 2013...and is expected to repeat that growth rate during 2014....according to the new forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. U.S. crude oil production is forecast to average 8.5 million barrels per day this year and then rise to 9.3 million barrels per day in 2015. That would be the highest yearly oil output since 1972, and just 300,000 barrels per day below the all-time production high of 9.6 million barrels per day set in 1970. Most of the oil production growth will come from increased drilling in the shale formations in

237

President Truman Increases Production of Uranium and Plutonium | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Increases Production of Uranium and Plutonium | National Increases Production of Uranium and Plutonium | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > President Truman Increases Production of Uranium and Plutonium President Truman Increases Production of Uranium and Plutonium October 09, 1950

238

Maximizing the Productive Uses of Electricity to Increase the...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maximizing the Productive Uses of Electricity to Increase the Impact of Rural Electrification Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Maximizing the...

239

Four products from Escherichia coli pseudogenes increase hydrogen production q  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Article history: Received 26 August 2013 Available online 8 September 2013 Keywords: Biohydrogen hydrogen deficiency in minimal media which suggested that the role of YlcE is associated with cell growth, and production of hydrogen as a renewable fuel is important as a means to address the problems associated

Wood, Thomas K.

240

Increased Oil Recovery from Mature Oil Fields Using Gelled Polymer Treatments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of the first year of a three-year research program. This program is aimed at reducing barriers to the widespread use of gelled polymer treatments by (1) developing methods to predict gel behavior during placement in matrix rock and fractures, (2) determining the persistence of permeability reduction after gel placement, and (3) developing methods to design production well treatments to control water production.

Willhite, G.P.; Green, D.W.; McCool, C.S.

2001-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil production increased" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Lexicographic Optimization of Multiple Economic Objectives in Oil Production from Petroleum Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lexicographic Optimization of Multiple Economic Objectives in Oil Production from Petroleum compromising optimality of the primary objective. I. INTRODUCTION Oil is produced from subsurface petroleum Systems Approach to Petroleum Production (ISAPP) knowledge centre. ISAPP is a joint project between Delft

Van den Hof, Paul

242

U.S. net oil and petroleum product imports expected to fall to...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

net oil and petroleum product imports expected to fall to just 29 percent of demand in 2014 With rising domestic crude oil production, the United States will rely less on imports...

243

Determination of Asphaltenes in Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by the on Column Precipitation Method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Determination of Asphaltenes in Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by the on Column Precipitation Method ... An improved analytical method for the determination of asphaltene content in crude oils and petroleum products was developed. ... Composition of heavy petroleums. ...

Estrella Rogel; Cesar Ovalles; Michael E. Moir; John F. Schabron

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

244

Analysis of oil-pipeline distribution of multiple products subject to delivery time-windows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation defines the operational problems of, and develops solution methodologies for, a distribution of multiple products into oil pipeline subject to delivery time-windows constraints. A multiple-product oil pipeline is a pipeline system...

Jittamai, Phongchai

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

245

Bioenergy Production via Microbial Conversion of Residual Oil to Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Microbiology May 15, 2008 ARTICLE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY Bioenergy Production via Microbial Conversion of Residual Oil to Natural...alkanes by anaerobic microorganisms. Nature 401: 266-269. Bioenergy production via microbial conversion of residual oil to natural...

Lisa M. Gieg; Kathleen E. Duncan; Joseph M. Suflita

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

Fact #758: December 17, 2012 U.S. Production of Crude Oil by...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

8: December 17, 2012 U.S. Production of Crude Oil by State, 2011 Fact 758: December 17, 2012 U.S. Production of Crude Oil by State, 2011 Texas is by far the State that produces...

247

Emerging Risks in the Biodiesel Production by Transesterification of Virgin and Renewable Oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emerging Risks in the Biodiesel Production by Transesterification of Virgin and Renewable Oils ... Energy Fuels, 2010, 24 (11), ... Cuiaba, Brazil ...

E. Salzano; M. Di Serio; E. Santacesaria

2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

248

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conventional Gasoline Blend. Comp. Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

249

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conventional Gasoline Blend. Comp. Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

250

Hydrogen Production From Crude Bio-oil and Biomass Char by Electrochemical Catalytic Reforming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We reports an efficient approach for production of hydrogen from crude bio-oil and biomass char in the dual fixed-bed system by using the electrochemical catalytic reforming method. The maximal absolute hydrogen yield reached 110.9 g H2/kg dry biomass. The product gas was a mixed gas containing 72%H2, 26%CO2, 1.9%CO, and a trace amount of CH4. It was observed that adding biomass char (a by-product of pyrolysis of biomass) could remarkably increase the absolute H2 yield (about 20%-50%). The higher reforming temperature could enhance the steam reforming reaction of organic compounds in crude bio-oil and the reaction of CO and H2O. In addition, the CuZn-Al2O3 catalyst in the water-gas shift bed could also increase the absolute H2 yield via shifting CO to CO2.

Xing-long Li; Shen Ning; Li-xia Yuan; Quan-xin Li

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Simplified dynamic models for control of riser slugging in offshore oil production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ForReview Only Simplified dynamic models for control of riser slugging in offshore oil production, Department of Chemical Engineering Keywords: oil production, two-phase flow, severe slugging, riser slugging for control of riser slugging in offshore oil production Esmaeil Jahanshahi, Sigurd Skogestad Department

Skogestad, Sigurd

252

Production of Fish Oil UNITED STATES DEPART MENT OF THE INTERIOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production of Fish Oil UNITED STATES DEPART MENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU. Crowther, Director Production of Fish Oil By GEORGE M. PIGOTT Assistant Professor, Food Science Departm RENDERING METHOD The relationship between the tmee basic products (meal, oil, and stick water) from

253

Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 2508 2373 2256 2161 2088 2022 1953 1891 1851 1825 1799 1781 1767 1759 1778 1789 1807 1862 AEO 1995 2402 2307 2205 2095 2037 1967 1953 1924 1916 1905 1894 1883 1887 1887 1920 1945 1967 AEO 1996 2387 2310 2248 2172 2113 2062 2011 1978 1953 1938 1916 1920 1927 1949 1971 1986 2000 AEO 1997 2362 2307 2245 2197 2143 2091 2055 2033 2015 2004 1997 1989 1982 1975 1967 1949 AEO 1998 2340 2332 2291 2252 2220 2192 2169 2145 2125 2104 2087 2068 2050 2033 2016 AEO 1999 2340 2309 2296 2265 2207 2171 2141 2122 2114 2092 2074 2057 2040 2025 AEO 2000 2193 2181 2122 2063 2016 1980 1957 1939 1920 1904 1894 1889 1889

254

Dual gas and oil dispersions in water: production and stability of foamulsion Anniina Salonen,*a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dual gas and oil dispersions in water: production and stability of foamulsion Anniina Salonen of oil droplets and gas bubbles and show that the oil can have two very different roles, either suppressing foaming or stabilising the foam. We have foamed emulsions made from two different oils (rapeseed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

255

Production of valuable hydrocarbons by flash pyrolysis of oil shale  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the production of gas and liquid hydrocarbons from particulated oil shale by reaction with a pyrolysis gas at a temperature of from about 700/sup 0/C to about 1100/sup 0/C, at a pressure of from about 400 psi to about 600 psi, for a period of about 0.2 second to about 20 seconds. Such a pyrolysis gas includes methane, helium, or hydrogen. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Quantitation of microbial products and their effectiveness in enhanced oil recovery. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A three-dimensional, three-phase, multiple-component numerical simulator was developed to investigate transport and growth of microorganisms in porous media and the impacts of microbial activities on oil recovery. The microbial activities modeled in this study included: (1) growth, retention, chemotaxis, and end product inhibition of growth, (2) the formation of metabolic products, and (3) the consumption of nutrients. Major mechanisms for microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) processes were modeled as follows: (1) improvement in sweep efficiency of a displacement process due to in situ plugging of highly-permeable production zones by cell mass or due to improved mobility control achieved by increasing the viscosity of the displacing fluid with a biopolymer, and (2) solubilization and mobilization of residual oil in porous media due to the reduction of the interfacial tension between oleic and aqueous phases by the production of a biosurfactant. The numerical solutions for mathematical models involved two steps. The distributions of pressure and phase saturations were solved from continuity equations and Darcy flow velocities for the aqueous phase were computed. This was followed by the solution of convection-dispersion equations for individual components. Numerical solutions from the proposed model were compared to results obtained from analytical equations, commercial simulators, and laboratory experiments. The comparison indicated that the model accurately quantified microbial transport and metabolism in porous media, and predicted additional crude oil recovery due to microbial processes. 50 refs., 41 figs., 26 tabs.

Zhang, X.; Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Weimer, D.L. (1984) Oil prices shock, market response,OPEC behavior and world oil prices (pp. 175-185) London:many decades. Recent high oil prices have caused oil-holding

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Floating oil production unit slated in small field off Gabon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the first U.S. tanker converted to a floating production, storage, and offloading (FPSO) unit which takes up station in Gombe-Beta field off Gabon by Dec. 1. FPSO Ocean Producer will work under a 3 year, day rate contract let late in 1990 by Amoco-Gabon Bombe Marin co., a unit of Amoco Production Co. (OGJ, Dec. 24, 1990, p. 27). Gombe-Beta field is in the Atlantic Ocean about 70 miles south of Port Gentil, Gabon. Ocean Producer will be moored in 50 ft of water 3.7 miles off Gabon, with Bombe-Beta's unmanned production platform about 820 ft astern. The vessel will be held in position by a disconnectable, asymmetric, six point, spread mooring system, It is owned and operated by Oceaneering International Services Ltd. (OISL). Affiliate Oceaneering Production Systems (OPS) converted the 78,061 dwt oil tanker MT Baltimore Sea at a capital cost of $25 million at Gulf Copper Manufacturing Corp.'s Port Arthur, Tex., shipyard. Both companies are units of Oceaneering International Inc., Houston. OPS the Ocean Producer's use in Gombe-Beta field is the shallowest water FPSO application in the world. Amoco-Gabon chose an FPSO production system for Gombe-Beta because it expects the remote field to have a short economic life, and the oil requires extensive processing.

Not Available

1991-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

259

Abstract 3691: Fish oil increases immune cell infiltration of tumors and reduces the incidence of mammary carcinogenesis in Her2neu mice.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pattern on fatty acid composition of edible oil in Bangladesh: From preclinical studies...essential commodities, including edible oils, because of insufficient local production...million, and its improving economy. Edible oil is an energy-dense food nutrient providing...

William J. Turbitt; Shawntawnee D. Collins; Haifang Xu; Sharlene Washington; Cesar Aliaga; Karam El-Bayoumy; Andrea Manni; Connie J. Rogers

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION OF MULTIPHASE FLOW NETWORKS IN OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION OF MULTIPHASE FLOW NETWORKS IN OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION SYSTEMS MSc. Hans in an oil production system is developed. Each well may be manipulated by injecting lift gas and adjusting in the maximum oil flow rate, water flow rate, liquid flow rate, and gas flow rate. The wells may also

Johansen, Tor Arne

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil production increased" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

An investigation of productivity increases from hydraulic fracturing treatments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN INVESTIGATION OF PRODUCTIVITY INCREASES FROM HYDRAULIC FRACTURING TREATMENTS A Thesis b7 Robert Joe Boriskie Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1963 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering AN INVESTIGATION OF PRODUCTIVITY INCREASES FROM HYDRAULIC FRACTURING TREATMENTS A Thesis Robert Joe Boriskie Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee...

Boriskie, Robert Joe

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

262

Research Strategies for Increasing Productivity of Intensively Managed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fiber production from a smaller land base and provides market incentives to keep these lands under, plantation forestry, intensive silviculture, biomass T raditional and emerging markets for wood products and bioenergy are likely to increase pressure on forests and create incentives for enhancing their pro

263

Spot Prices for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Spot Prices Spot Prices (Crude Oil in Dollars per Barrel, Products in Dollars per Gallon) Period: Daily Weekly Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Product by Area 12/09/13 12/10/13 12/11/13 12/12/13 12/13/13 12/16/13 View History Crude Oil WTI - Cushing, Oklahoma 97.1 98.32 97.25 97.21 96.27 97.18 1986-2013 Brent - Europe 110.07 108.91 109.47 108.99 108.08 110.3 1987-2013 Conventional Gasoline New York Harbor, Regular 2.677 2.698 2.670 2.643 2.639 2.650 1986-2013 U.S. Gulf Coast, Regular 2.459 2.481 2.429 2.398 2.377 2.422 1986-2013 RBOB Regular Gasoline Los Angeles 2.639 2.661 2.569 2.543 2.514 2.527 2003-2013 No. 2 Heating Oil New York Harbor

264

U.S. Crude Oil Production Forecast-Analysis of Crude Types  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil production by crude type as it would be delivered from well-site or lease storage tanks. Once the oil enters transportation and distribution systems, it may be commingled...

265

U.S. monthly oil production tops 8 million barrels per day for...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2014 hurricane season could lead to offshore oil, gas production shut-ins The government's weather experts are predicting a relatively mild hurricane season, but U.S. oil and...

266

U.S. monthly oil production tops 8 million barrels per day for...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

the U.S. Energy Information Administration said it expects world oil production to rise by 1.3 million barrels per day next year....with U.S. daily oil output alone...

267

Linkages between the markets for crude oil and the markets for refined products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To understand the crude oil price determination process it is necessary to extend the analysis beyond the markets for petroleum. Crude oil prices are determined in two closely related markets: the markets for crude oil and the markets for refined products. An econometric-linear programming model was developed to capture the linkages between the markets for crude oil and refined products. In the LP refiners maximize profits given crude oil supplies, refining capacities, and prices of refined products. The objective function is profit maximization net of crude oil prices. The shadow price on crude oil gives the netback price. Refined product prices are obtained from the econometric models. The model covers the free world divided in five regions. The model is used to analyze the impacts on the markets of policies that affect crude oil supplies, the demands for refined products, and the refining industry. For each scenario analyzed the demand for crude oil is derived from the equilibrium conditions in the markets for products. The demand curve is confronted with a supply curve which maximizes revenues providing an equilibrium solution for both crude oil and product markets. The model also captures crude oil price differentials by quality. The results show that the demands for crude oil are different across regions due to the structure of the refining industries and the characteristics of the demands for refined products. Changes in the demands for products have a larger impact on the markets than changes in the refining industry. Since markets for refined products and crude oil are interrelated they can't be analyzed individually if an accurate and complete assessment of a policy is to be made. Changes in only one product market in one region affect the other product markets and the prices of crude oil.

Didziulis, V.S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Peak Oil Demand: The Role of Fuel Efficiency and Alternative Fuels in a Global Oil Production Decline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Peak Oil Demand: The Role of Fuel Efficiency and Alternative Fuels in a Global Oil Production Decline ... (11) Another analysis suggests that a transition to hydrogen- and natural-gas-fueled vehicles—and the associated climate benefits—will partly be driven by dwindling oil supplies. ... Within each class, we do not attempt to predict the exact substitute that will dominate (for example, whether electricity, hydrogen fuel cells, or natural gas will prevail in the passenger car market), but rather model the aggregate contribution of alternatives to conventional oil. ...

Adam R. Brandt; Adam Millard-Ball; Matthew Ganser; Steven M. Gorelick

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

269

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM APPROACH FOR PLAY PORTFOLIOS TO IMPROVE OIL PRODUCTION IN THE ILLINOIS BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil and gas have been commercially produced in Illinois for over 100 years. Existing commercial production is from more than fifty-two named pay horizons in Paleozoic rocks ranging in age from Middle Ordovician to Pennsylvanian. Over 3.2 billion barrels of oil have been produced. Recent calculations indicate that remaining mobile resources in the Illinois Basin may be on the order of several billion barrels. Thus, large quantities of oil, potentially recoverable using current technology, remain in Illinois oil fields despite a century of development. Many opportunities for increased production may have been missed due to complex development histories, multiple stacked pays, and commingled production which makes thorough exploitation of pays and the application of secondary or improved/enhanced recovery strategies difficult. Access to data, and the techniques required to evaluate and manage large amounts of diverse data are major barriers to increased production of critical reserves in the Illinois Basin. These constraints are being alleviated by the development of a database access system using a Geographic Information System (GIS) approach for evaluation and identification of underdeveloped pays. The Illinois State Geological Survey has developed a methodology that is being used by industry to identify underdeveloped areas (UDAs) in and around petroleum reservoirs in Illinois using a GIS approach. This project utilizes a statewide oil and gas Oracle{reg_sign} database to develop a series of Oil and Gas Base Maps with well location symbols that are color-coded by producing horizon. Producing horizons are displayed as layers and can be selected as separate or combined layers that can be turned on and off. Map views can be customized to serve individual needs and page size maps can be printed. A core analysis database with over 168,000 entries has been compiled and assimilated into the ISGS Enterprise Oracle database. Maps of wells with core data have been generated. Data from over 1,700 Illinois waterflood units and waterflood areas have been entered into an Access{reg_sign} database. The waterflood area data has also been assimilated into the ISGS Oracle database for mapping and dissemination on the ArcIMS website. Formation depths for the Beech Creek Limestone, Ste. Genevieve Limestone and New Albany Shale in all of the oil producing region of Illinois have been calculated and entered into a digital database. Digital contoured structure maps have been constructed, edited and added to the ILoil website as map layers. This technology/methodology addresses the long-standing constraints related to information access and data management in Illinois by significantly simplifying the laborious process that industry presently must use to identify underdeveloped pay zones in Illinois.

Beverly Seyler; John Grube

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

270

Design and techno-economic evaluation of microbial oil production as a renewable resource for biodiesel and oleochemical production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Experimental results from the open literature have been employed for the design and techno-economic evaluation of four process flowsheets for the production of microbial oil or biodiesel. The fermentation of glucose-based media using the yeast strain Rhodosporidium toruloides has been considered. Biodiesel production was based on the exploitation of either direct transesterification (without extraction of lipids from microbial biomass) or indirect transesterifaction of extracted microbial oil. When glucose-based renewable resources are used as carbon source for an annual production capacity of 10,000 t microbial oil and zero cost of glucose (assuming development of integrated biorefineries in existing industries utilising waste or by-product streams) the estimated unitary cost of purified microbial oil is $3.4/kg. Biodiesel production via indirect transesterification of extracted microbial oil proved more cost-competitive process compared to the direct conversion of dried yeast cells. For a price of glucose of $400/t  oil production cost and biodiesel production cost are estimated to be $5.5/kg oil and $5.9/kg biodiesel, correspondingly. Industrial implementation of microbial oil production from oleaginous yeast is strongly dependent on the feedstock used and on the fermentation stage where significantly higher productivities and final microbial oil concentrations should be achieved.

Apostolis A. Koutinas; Afroditi Chatzifragkou; Nikolaos Kopsahelis; Seraphim Papanikolaou; Ioannis K. Kookos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Increasing Distillate Production at U.S. Refineries Â… Past Changes and Future Potential  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Increasing Distillate Production at U.S. Refineries - Past Changes and Future Increasing Distillate Production at U.S. Refineries - Past Changes and Future Potential U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuels Analysis Department of Energy Office of Policy and International Affairs October 2010 Summary World consumption growth for middle distillate fuels (diesel fuel, heating oil, kerosene, and jet fuel) has exceeded the consumption growth for gasoline for some time, and the United States is no exception. Although the decrease in the ratio of total gasoline consumption to consumption for middle distillate fuels has been small in the United States, recent legislation requiring increased use of renewable fuels has resulted in forecasts that project a decline in consumption for petroleum-based gasoline from refineries, which would accelerate the decline in the

272

Dynamic analysis in productivity, oil shock, and recession  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use of oil in the US economy weakens the peak responses ofpeak under other factors considered, less persistence in the oil-the same size of the oil-price shock. The peak response of

Katayama, Munechika

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of papers on the Gulf of Mexico oil industry is perhaps theof offshore oil and gas activities in the Gulf of Mexico:in oil exploration and development in the Gulf of Mexico.

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the green light for drilling when oil price is high, thenthe U.S. Oil and Gas Producing Industry, Section 1: Drillingwell) Well Drilling Costs Alaska onshore oil wells and dry

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of papers on the Gulf of Mexico oil industry is perhaps theof offshore oil and gas activities in the Gulf of Mexico:oil and gas activities by water depth in the Gulf of Mexico

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Dynamic analysis in productivity, oil shock, and recession  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use of oil in the US economy weakens the peak responses ofin the oil-price process shifts the timing of the peak by 2the same size of the oil-price shock. The peak response of

Katayama, Munechika

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that controls demand for oil. ” 6.6 Hedging behavior inauthors model demand and all three phases in oil supply –future supply and demand for US crude oil resources. A

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economics of Undiscovered Oil and Gas in the Central North1993) Mathematical theory of oil and gas recovery: withapplications to ex-USSR oil and gas fields, Boston: Kluwer

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations, 1992--1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1992, 1993, 1994, and 1995. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sum (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measured do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

The Breakthrough Behind a 300% Increase in Photosynthesis Productivity |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Breakthrough Behind a 300% Increase in Photosynthesis The Breakthrough Behind a 300% Increase in Photosynthesis Productivity The Breakthrough Behind a 300% Increase in Photosynthesis Productivity January 31, 2011 - 3:29pm Addthis Sunita Satyapal Program Manager, Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Technology Program What does this mean for me? Could lead to cheaper renewable energy sources. Recently, the Department of Energy hosted Dr. Tasios Melis, the UC Berkeley scientist behind a Department of Energy funded innovation that promises to triple the productivity of photosynthesis in plants and algae. If you remember from high school biology class, photosynthesis is the process used by plants and many other organisms to convert sunlight into chemical energy. A molecule called chlorophyll serves to absorb sunlight for use in photosynthesis. Chlorophyll molecules can be stacked in arrays

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil production increased" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Quantifying Energy Savings from Lean Manufacturing Productivity Increases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying Energy Savings from Lean Manufacturing Productivity Increases John Seryak Gary Epstein Mark D’Antonio Engineer jseryak@ers-inc.com President gepstein@ers-inc.com Vice President mdantonio@ers-inc.com Energy & Resource Solutions..., Inc. Haverhill, MA ABSTRACT A number of energy efficiency programs seek a reduction in the energy intensity of manufacturing processes. However, promoting energy efficiency through productivity improvements is not a widely accepted...

Seryak, J.; Epstein, G.; D'Antonio, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Net Imports of Total Crude Oil and Products into the U.S. by Country  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Conventional Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reformulated Gasoline Blend. Comp. Conventional Gasoline Blend. Comp. MTBE (Oxygenate) Other Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 500 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

283

Assessing the operations of the bulk oil storage and Transportation Company Limited in petroleum products delivery to Northern Ghana.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The government of Ghana realising the importance of petroleum products, established the Tema Oil Refinery (TOR) in 1961 in order to process crude oil into… (more)

Moses Oswald Avoyingah Amoah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",2507.55,2372.5,2255.7,2160.8,2087.8,2022.1,1952.75,1890.7,1850.55,1825,1799.45,1781.2,1766.6,1759.3,1777.55,1788.5,1806.75,1861.5 "AEO 1995",,2401.7,2306.8,2204.6,2095.1,2036.7,1967.35,1952.75,1923.55,1916.25,1905.3,1894.35,1883.4,1887.05,1887.05,1919.9,1945.45,1967.35 "AEO 1996",,,2387.1,2310.45,2248.4,2171.75,2113.35,2062.25,2011.15,1978.3,1952.75,1938.15,1916.25,1919.9,1927.2,1949.1,1971,1985.6,2000.2 "AEO 1997",,,,2361.55,2306.8,2244.75,2197.3,2142.55,2091.45,2054.95,2033.05,2014.8,2003.85,1996.55,1989.25,1981.95,1974.65,1967.35,1949.1

285

World oil and gas resources-future production realities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Welcome to uncertainty was the phrase Jack Schanz used to introduce both layman and professionals to the maze of petroleum energy data that must be comprehended to achieve understanding of this critical commodity. Schanz was referring to the variables as he and his colleagues with Resources for the Future saw them in those years soon after the energy-awakening oil embargo of 1973. In some respects, the authors have made progress in removing uncertainty from energy data, but in general, we simply must accept that there are many points of view and many ways for the blindman to describe the elephant. There can be definitive listing of all uncertainties, but for this paper the authors try to underscore those traits of petroleum occurrence and supply that the author's believe bear most heavily on the understanding of production and resource availability. Because oil and gas exist in nature under such variable conditions and because the products themselves are variable in their properties, the authors must first recognize classification divisions of the resource substances, so that the reader might always have a clear perception of just what we are talking about and how it relates to other components of the commodity in question.

Masters, C.D.; Root, D.H.; Attanasi, E.D. (U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Short-term production optimization of offshore oil and gas production using nonlinear model predictive control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The topic of this paper is the application of nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) for optimizing control of an offshore oil and gas production facility. Of particular interest is the use of NMPC for direct short-term production optimization, where two methods for (one-layer) production optimization in NMPC are investigated. The first method is the unreachable setpoints method where an unreachable setpoint is used in order to maximize oil production. The ideas from this method are combined with the exact penalty function for soft constraints in a second method, named infeasible soft-constraints. Both methods can be implemented within standard NMPC software tools. The case-study first looks into the use of NMPC for ‘conventional’ pressure control, where disturbance rejection of time-varying disturbances (caused, e.g., by the ‘slugging’ phenomenon) is an issue. Then the above two methods for production optimization are employed, where both methods find the economically optimal operating point. Two different types of reservoir models are studied, using rate-independent and rate-dependent gas/oil ratios. These models lead to different types of optimums. The relative merits of the two methods for production optimization, and advantages of the two one-layer approaches compared to a two-layer structure, are discussed.

Anders Willersrud; Lars Imsland; Svein Olav Hauger; Pål Kittilsen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Increased olefins production via recovery of refinery gas hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the process of catalytically cracking heavy petroleum fractions to make gasoline and light fuel oil, by-product waste gases are also generated. The waste gases, normally used as fuel, are themselves rich sources of ethylene, propylene and other light hydrocarbons which can be recovered inexpensively via a cryogenic dephlegmator process. This gas separation technique is exploited in a system, in operation since spring of 1987, which reclaims C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons from a refinery gas. The reclamation process bolsters production in a nearby ethylene plant. Causing no disruption of ethylene plant operations, the cryogenic hydrocarbon recovery system functions smoothly with existing systems. The dephlegmation unit operation melds distillation and heat transfer processes in a single easily-controlled step which boosts the hydrocarbon purity and recovery above the levels profitably achievable with conventional cryogenic separation techniques. Very attractive operating economics follow from high purity, high recovery, and high energy efficiency. This paper discusses process concepts, economic benefits, plant operation, and early performance results.

Bernhard, D.P.; Rowles, H.C.; Moss, J.A.; Pickering, J.L. Jr.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

U.S. Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Ethylene Propane/Propylene Propylene (Nonfuel Use) Normal Butane/Butylene Refinery Grade Butane Isobutane/Butylene Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) MTBE Other Oxygenates Renewables (including Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils Unfinished Oils, Naphthas & Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene & Light Gas Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Comp. Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Gasoline, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petro. Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products

289

Parameter identification in large-scale models for oil and gas production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parameter identification in large-scale models for oil and gas production Jorn F.M. Van Doren: Models used for model-based (long-term) operations as monitoring, control and optimization of oil and gas information to the identification problem. These options are illustrated with examples taken from oil and gas

Van den Hof, Paul

290

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

disruptions, and the peak in U.S. oil production account foroil increased 81.1% (logarithmically) between January 1979 and the peak

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Method of increasing anhydrosugars, pyroligneous fractions and esterified bio-oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The device and method are provided to increase anhydrosugars yield during pyrolysis of biomass. This increase is achieved by injection of a liquid or gas into the vapor stream of any pyrolysis reactor prior to the reactor condensers. A second feature of our technology is the utilization of sonication, microwave excitation, or shear mixing of the biomass to increase the acid catalyst rate for demineralization or removal of hemicellulose prior to pyrolysis. The increased reactivity of these treatments reduces reaction time as well as the required amount of catalyst to less than half of that otherwise required. A fractional condensation system employed by our pyrolysis reactor is another feature of our technology. This system condenses bio-oil pyrolysis vapors to various desired fractions by differential temperature manipulation of individual condensers comprising a condenser chain.

Steele, Philip H; Yu, Fei; Li, Qi; Mitchell, Brian

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

292

Oil | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oil Oil Oil Oil Prices, 2000-2008 For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. Oil is used for heating and transportation -- most notably, as fuel for gas-powered vehicles. America's dependence on foreign oil has declined in recent years, but oil prices have increased. The Energy Department supports research and policy options to increase our domestic supply of oil while ensuring environmentally sustainable supplies domestically and abroad, and is investing in research, technology and

293

Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Oil Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .in the Venezuelan Oil Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . .and Productivity: Evidence from the Oil Industry . .

CAKIR, NIDA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Teamwork Plus Technology Equals Reduced Emissions, Reduced Energy Usage, and Improved Productivity for an Oil Production Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Teamwork plus Technology Equals Reduced Emissions, Reduced Energy Usage, and Improved Productivity for an Oil Production Facility Garth Booker P Eng Extraction Energy Engineer Suncor Energy Company Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada ABSTRACT...Teamwork plus Technology Equals Reduced Emissions, Reduced Energy Usage, and Improved Productivity for an Oil Production Facility Garth Booker P Eng Extraction Energy Engineer Suncor Energy Company Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada ABSTRACT...

Booker, G.; Robinson, J.

295

Offshore oil: Investigating production parameters of fields of varying size, location and water depth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper derives empirical estimates of field depletion level, depletion rate, decline rate and characteristic time intervals in offshore oil production based on a global field-by-field database containing 603 offshore oil fields. Statistical distributions as well as arithmetic and weighted averages of production parameters are derived for different categories of fields specified by size, location and water depth. A significant tendency of small fields having higher depletion and decline rates is found. Similarly, OECD countries generally have higher rates compared to non-OECD countries. Trends related to water depth are not clearly distinguishable and require additional investigation of time related aspects. Resulting spreads in derived parameter estimates are found to be well described by positively skewed probability distributions. Also, in line with theory, a strong correlation between depletion and decline rate is found. According to the study, the net share of global offshore production from smaller and deeper fields is increasing. A continuation of these trends would likely have implications for future aggregate offshore production behaviour, most notably, increasing global aggregate decline rates.

David Sällh; Henrik Wachtmeister; Xu Tang; Mikael Höök

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Design of an optimal process for enhanced production of bioethanol and biodiesel from algae oil via glycerol fermentation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, we optimize a process that integrates the use of glycerol to produce ethanol via fermentation within the simultaneous production of biodiesel and bioethanol from algae. The process consists of growing the algae, determining the optimal fraction of oil vs. starch, followed by oil extraction, starch liquefaction and saccharification, to sugars, oil transesterification, for which we consider two transesterification technologies (enzymes and alkali) and the fermentation of sugars and glycerol. The advantage of this process is that the dehydration technologies are common for the products of the glucose and glycerol fermentation. Simultaneous optimization and heat integration is performed using Duran and Grossmann’s model. The fermentation of glycerol to ethanol increases the production of bioethanol by at least 50%. The energy and water consumptions are competitive with other processes that either sell the glycerol or use it to obtain methanol. However, the price for the biofuels is only competitive if glycerol cannot be sold to the market.

Mariano Martín; Ignacio E. Grossmann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Decline and depletion rates of oil production: a comprehensive investigation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...volume via swelling. Nitrogen, or even flue gas, is an alternative...oil-[23]. These gases are usually rather...perspective-[11]. Nitrogen has poor solubility in oil and requires...conditions favourable for water flooding as it is...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Volatility Relationship between Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper utilizes calculated historical volatility and GARCH models to compare the historical price volatility behavior of crude oil, motor gasoline and heating oil in U.S. markets since 1990. ... GARCH/TARCH m...

Thomas K. Lee; John Zyren

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Balancing oil and environment... responsibly.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Balancing Oil and Environment…Responsibly As the price of oil continues to skyrocket and global oil production nears the brink, pursuing unconventional oil supplies, such as oil shale, oil sands, heavy oils, and oils from biomass and coal has become increasingly attractive. Of particular significance to the American way is that our continent has significant quantities of these resources. Tapping into these new resources, however, requires cutting-edge technologies for identification, production, processing and environmental management. This job needs a super hero or two for a job of this size and proportion…

Weimer, Walter C.; Teske, Lisa

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

300

INSTITUTE OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC RESEARCH Last year the Alaska Legislature made a controversial change in the oil production tax, the state's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

change in the oil production tax, the state's largest source of oil revenue. The old tax, known as ACES much money the production tax brings in is a big issue: oil revenues pay for most state government will stimulate North Slope oil investment, leading to more oil production--and so to higher oil revenues and new

Pantaleone, Jim

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil production increased" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Life Cycle Assessment of Biodiesel Production from Microalgae Oil: Effect of Algae Species and Cultivation System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Different microalgae are widely studied as alternative sources for biodiesel production. They show higher oil productivity values (per area) than oilseed crops and are not used for food industry. For the evalu...

Javier Dufour; Jovita Moreno…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

TURKISH OIL SHALES POTENTIAL FOR SYNTHETIC CRUDE OIL and CARBON MATERIALS PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research activities on solid fuels. In order to make a new start, research work on Turkish oil shales that

Ekrem Ekinci

303

Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, and Venezuela) account for roughly 77% of the world’s proven oil

O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Microsoft Word - Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

For Immediate Release For Immediate Release June 11, 2008 202-586-4940 Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Secretary of Agriculture Edward T. Schafer sent a letter on June 11, 2008 to Senator Jeff Bingaman addressing a number of questions related to biofuels, food, and gasoline and diesel prices. The letter is available at http://www.energy.gov Without Biofuels, Gas Prices Would Increase $.20 to $.35 per Gallon. * The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that gasoline prices would be between 20 cents to 35 cents per gallon higher without ethanol 1 , a first-generation biofuel. * For a typical household, that means saving about $150 to $300 per year. * For the U.S. overall, this saves gas expenditures of $28 billion to $49 billion based on annual

305

Productivity evaluation and influential factor analysis for Sarvak reservoir in South Azadegan oil field, Iran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Production pattern of oil wells and influential factors on productivity for the massive carbonate reservoir in the Middle East were researched by productivity evaluation on Sarvak and analysis of properties impact on production. Based on dynamic performance of Sarvak production test, the relationship between daily oil production, tubing pressure, cumulative oil production and choke size was analyzed and reasonable productivity prediction model was established by applying Poettman model, and the effect of physical properties and fluid parameters on productivity were analyzed further by numerical simulation. The study shows that daily oil production is linearly correlated with oil pressure under certain working regime, and daily oil production is power law correlated with choke sizes before and after working regime adjustment. The average designed single well productivity should be about 270 m3/d by depletion to ensure a three-year plateau period. Sarvak is a blocky carbonate reservoir, when developed with horizontal wells, interbeds distributed between layers and permeability property have the strongest impact on production of horizontal wells. So, highly deviated wells should be used to reduce the effect of interbeds and acidizing should be considered to improve the reservoir physical properties.

Hui LIU; Rui GUO; Junchang DONG; Li LIU; Yang LIU; Yingjie YI

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Calculating single layer production contribution of heavy oil commingled wells by analysis of aromatic parameters in whole-oil GC-MS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Traditional fluid production profile logging is not usually suitable for heavy-viscous crude oil wells. Biodegradation of heavy oil can lead to the loss of n-ahkanes, and the use of chromatogram fingerprint techn...

Yaohui Xu; Li Ma; Linxiang Li; Wenfu Cui; Xiaowei Cheng; Xiaoping Wang

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

EIA - AEO2010 - World oil prices and production trends in AEO2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World oil prices and production trends in AEO2010 World oil prices and production trends in AEO2010 Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 World oil prices and production trends in AEO2010 In AEO2010, the price of light, low-sulfur (or “sweet”) crude oil delivered at Cushing, Oklahoma, is tracked to represent movements in world oil prices. EIA makes projections of future supply and demand for “total liquids,” which includes conventional petroleum liquids—such as conventional crude oil, natural gas plant liquids, and refinery gain—in addition to unconventional liquids, which include biofuels, bitumen, coal-to-liquids (CTL), gas-to-liquids (GTL), extra-heavy oils, and shale oil. World oil prices can be influenced by a multitude of factors. Some tend to be short term, such as movements in exchange rates, financial markets, and weather, and some are longer term, such as expectations concerning future demand and production decisions by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). In 2009, the interaction of market factors led prompt month contracts (contracts for the nearest traded month) for crude oil to rise relatively steadily from a January average of $41.68 per barrel to a December average of $74.47 per barrel [38].

308

An Investigation into the Derived Demand for Land in Palm Oil Production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Over the years, the world industry of oil palm has been rapidly increasing in the tropical areas of Asia, Africa and America. One of the… (more)

Lau, Jia Li

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Projections of the impact of expansion of domestic heavy oil production on the U.S. refining industry from 1990 to 2010. Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production. This report provides a compendium of the United States refining industry and analyzes the industry by Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD) and by ten smaller refining areas. The refining capacity, oil source and oil quality are analyzed, and projections are made for the U.S. refining industry for the years 1990 to 2010. The study used publicly available data as background. A linear program model of the U.S. refining industry was constructed and validated using 1990 U.S. refinery performance. Projections of domestic oil production (decline) and import of crude oil (increases) were balanced to meet anticipated demand to establish a base case for years 1990 through 2010. The impact of additional domestic heavy oil production, (300 MB/D to 900 MB/D, originating in select areas of the U.S.) on the U.S. refining complex was evaluated. This heavy oil could reduce the import rate and the balance of payments by displacing some imported, principally Mid-east, medium crude. The construction cost for refining units to accommodate this additional domestic heavy oil production in both the low and high volume scenarios is about 7 billion dollars for bottoms conversion capacity (delayed coking) with about 50% of the cost attributed to compliance with the Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990.

Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Strycker, A.R. [National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States). ITT Research Institute] [National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States). ITT Research Institute; Guariguata, G.; Salmen, F.G. [Bonner and Moore Management Science, Houston, TX (United States)] [Bonner and Moore Management Science, Houston, TX (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Removal of selected heavy metals from aqueous solutions using a solid by-product from the Jordanian oil shale refining  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...?The potential use of treated solid by-product of oil shale to treat aqueous solutions containing several heavy ... Results indicate that the solid by-product of oil shale removes Cd(II), Cu(II),...

W. Y. Abu-El-Sha'r; S. H. Gharaibeh; M. M. Al-Kofahi

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Characteristics of Baku and eastern crudes as raw materials for lube oil production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article presents data to show that the lube cuts from the Baku medium-wax crudes, in contrast to the eastern medium-wax crudes, will not give oils with viscosity indexes above 90 even when severly treated. The medium-wax Baku crudes have higher contents of naphthenic-paraffinic hydrocarbons, and their aromatic hydrocarbons are present in smaller amounts and have poorer viscosity-temperature properties. The Baku refineries have become the principal suppliers of lube oils in the USSR because of their use of low-wax crudes and relatively simple manufacturing processes. In recent years, the resources of low-wax crudes have declined while the medium-wax crudes have increased. The Baku medium-wax crudes are distinguished by higher contents of oils, including residual oils. It is concluded that the Baku medium-wax crudes should be processed to produce oils that are in short supply, such as transformer oils, turbine oils, compressor oils, high-viscosity oils of the P-28 type, and special-purpose oils (e.g., white oils, naphthenic oils) for which a high viscosity index is not a requirement. The medium-wax crudes from the eastern districts should be used to produce oils with viscosity indexes above 90. Includes 5 tables.

Samedova, F.I.; Kasumova, A.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

NETL: News Release - DOE Project Revives Oil Production in Abandoned Fields  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 , 2006 4 , 2006 DOE Project Revives Oil Production in Abandoned Fields on Osage Tribal Lands Novel Oil Recovery Technique Developed Under DOE's Native American Initiative WASHINGTON, DC - A technology developed with U.S. Department of Energy funding has revived oil production in two abandoned oilfields on Osage Indian tribal lands in northeastern Oklahoma, and demonstrated a technology that could add billions of barrels of additional domestic oil production in declining fields. Production has jumped from zero to more than 100 barrels of oil per day in the two Osage County, Okla., fields, one of which is more than 100 years old. The technology was successfully pilot-tested in the century-old field, and using the knowledge gained, the technology was applied to a neighboring field with comparable success. This suggests that such approaches could revitalize thousands of other seemingly depleted oilfields across America's Midcontinent region.

313

Table 6. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual (million barrels per day) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 8.79 8.85 8.84 8.80 8.66 8.21 AEO 1983 8.67 8.71 8.66 8.72 8.80 8.63 8.11 AEO 1984 8.86 8.70 8.59 8.45 8.28 8.25 7.19 AEO 1985 8.92 8.96 9.01 8.78 8.38 8.05 7.64 7.27 6.89 6.68 6.53 AEO 1986 8.80 8.63 8.30 7.90 7.43 6.95 6.60 6.36 6.20 5.99 5.80 5.66 5.54 5.45 5.43 AEO 1987 8.31 8.18 8.00 7.63 7.34 7.09 6.86 6.64 6.54 6.03 AEO 1989* 8.18 7.97 7.64 7.25 6.87 6.59 6.37 6.17 6.05 6.00 5.94 5.90 5.89 AEO 1990 7.67 7.37 6.40 5.86 5.35 AEO 1991 7.23 6.98 7.10 7.11 7.01 6.79 6.48 6.22 5.92 5.64 5.36 5.11 4.90 4.73 4.62 4.59 4.58 4.53 4.46 4.42 AEO 1992 7.37 7.17 6.99 6.89 6.68 6.45 6.28 6.16 6.06 5.91 5.79 5.71 5.66 5.64 5.62 5.63 5.62 5.55 5.52 AEO 1993 7.20 6.94 6.79 6.52 6.22 6.00 5.84 5.72

314

Tax policy can change the production path: A model of optimal oil extraction in Alaska  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We model the economically optimal dynamic oil production decisions for seven production units (fields) on Alaska's North Slope. We use adjustment cost and discount rate to calibrate the model against historical production data, and use the calibrated model to simulate the impact of tax policy on production rate. We construct field-specific cost functions from average cost data and an estimated inverse production function, which incorporates engineering aspects of oil production into our economic modeling. Producers appear to have approximated dynamic optimality. Consistent with prior research, we find that changing the tax rate alone does not change the economically optimal oil production path, except for marginal fields that may cease production. Contrary to prior research, we find that the structure of tax policy can be designed to affect the economically optimal production path, but at a cost in net social benefit.

Wayne Leighty; C.-Y. Cynthia Lin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD OF THE SAN JUAN BASIN REGION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses: (1) being able to resume marginal oil production operations in the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in McKinley County, New Mexico by installing a cable suspended electric submersible pumping system (HDESP); (2) determining if this system can reduce life costs making it a more cost effective production system for similar oil fields within the region, and if warranted, drill additional wells to improve the economics. In April 2003, a cooperative 50% cost share agreement between Enerdyne and the DOE was executed to investigate the feasibility of using cable suspended electric submersible pumps to reduce the life costs and increase the ultimate oil recovery of the Red Mountain Oil Field, located on the Chaco Slope of the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. The field was discovered in 1934 and has produced approximately 55,650 cubic meters (m{sup 3}), (350,000 barrels, 42 gallons) of oil. Prior to April 2003, the field was producing only a few cubic meters of oil each month; however, the reservoir characteristics suggest that the field retains ample oil to be economic. This field is unique, in that, the oil accumulations, above fresh water, occur at depths from 88-305 meters, (290 feet to 1000 feet), and serves as a relatively good test area for this experiment.

Don L. Hanosh

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Open-Source LCA Tool for Estimating Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Crude Oil Production Using Field Characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Open-Source LCA Tool for Estimating Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Crude Oil Production Using Field Characteristics ... OPGEE models oil production emissions in more detail than previous transport LCA models. ... El-Houjeiri, H. and Brandt, A.Exploring the variation of GHG emissions from conventional oil production using an engineering-based LCA model. ...

Hassan M. El-Houjeiri; Adam R. Brandt; James E. Duffy

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

A nuclear wind/solar oil-shale system for variable electricity and liquid fuels production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recoverable reserves of oil shale in the United States exceed the total quantity of oil produced to date worldwide. Oil shale contains no oil, rather it contains kerogen which when heated decomposes into oil, gases, and a carbon char. The energy required to heat the kerogen-containing rock to produce the oil is about a quarter of the energy value of the recovered products. If fossil fuels are burned to supply this energy, the greenhouse gas releases are large relative to producing gasoline and diesel from crude oil. The oil shale can be heated underground with steam from nuclear reactors leaving the carbon char underground - a form of carbon sequestration. Because the thermal conductivity of the oil shale is low, the heating process takes months to years. This process characteristic in a system where the reactor dominates the capital costs creates the option to operate the nuclear reactor at base load while providing variable electricity to meet peak electricity demand and heat for the shale oil at times of low electricity demand. This, in turn, may enable the large scale use of renewables such as wind and solar for electricity production because the base-load nuclear plants can provide lower-cost variable backup electricity. Nuclear shale oil may reduce the greenhouse gas releases from using gasoline and diesel in half relative to gasoline and diesel produced from conventional oil. The variable electricity replaces electricity that would have been produced by fossil plants. The carbon credits from replacing fossil fuels for variable electricity production, if assigned to shale oil production, results in a carbon footprint from burning gasoline or diesel from shale oil that may half that of conventional crude oil. The U.S. imports about 10 million barrels of oil per day at a cost of a billion dollars per day. It would require about 200 GW of high-temperature nuclear heat to recover this quantity of shale oil - about two-thirds the thermal output of existing nuclear reactors in the United States. With the added variable electricity production to enable renewables, additional nuclear capacity would be required. (authors)

Forsberg, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 012139 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Effects of increasing filing fees for noncompetitive onshore oil and gas leases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Government Accounting Office (GAO) examined the impact of increasing the fee charged to applicants for noncompetitive onshore oil and gas leases from $25.00 to $75.00. Interior believes the increased filing fee will: (1) reduce casual speculation and multiple filings, thereby reducing fraud potential, development delays caused by assignments, and administrative burden; and (2) generate significant additional revenue. Interior's analysis is, of necessity, based largely on conjecture, but the possibility that the positive results foreseen may not materialize to the degree projected cannot be ruled out. For example, while it is likely that the $75 fee will generate additional revenue over what was obtainable under either the $10 or $25 rate, Interior's projections of at least a million filings annually and $150 million in revenues are far from certain. GAO was also unable in the time available to determine the degree to which the problems the Department desires to overcome exist, or that they will be resolved through a fee increase. Results suggest that: reducing the number of filings is not necessarily the total or only solution to reducing the administrative burden; the casual speculator is not having that great an adverse effect on development, and in fact has certain positive aspects; and the true extent of fraud in the SOG may not be as great as initially supposed. In addition, there are possible adverse effects that may not have been fully considered. For example, the increased filing fee, when coupled with the increased rental, could adversely affect industry's exploration activities, particularly that of the smaller independent. GAO suggests, now that the increase is in effect, that the Interior Department and the Congress closely watch the results, and be prepared to take remedial action if deemed necessary.

Not Available

1982-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

319

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook 8/13/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance OPEC Production Likely To Remain Low U.S. Reflects World Market Crude Oil Outlook Conclusions Distillate Prices Increase With Crude Oil Distillate Stocks on the East Coast Were Very Low Entering Last Winter Distillate Demand Strong Last Winter More Supply Possible This Fall than Forecast Distillate Fuel Oil Imports Could Be Available - For A Price Distillate Supply/Demand Balance Reflected in Spreads Distillate Stocks Expected to Remain Low Winter Crude Oil and Distillate Price Outlook Heating Oil Outlook Conclusion Propane Prices Follow Crude Oil

320

Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . . . .Oil Production and Productivity in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . .2.6: Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico 350 Productivity

CAKIR, NIDA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil production increased" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

U.S. Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Years |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 U.S. Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Years U.S. Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Years November 15, 2013 - 3:47pm Addthis Source: Energy Information Administration Short Term Energy Outlook Allison Lantero Allison Lantero Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs In February 1995, The Brady Bunch Movie and Billy Madison were in movie theaters, "Creep" by TLC was at the top of the Billboard charts, and the Yahoo! search engine had not yet been unveiled. It was also the last month the U.S. produced more oil than it imported. Until last month. During remarks in Cleveland yesterday, President Obama noted this historic milestone: in October, America produced more oil here at home than we imported from overseas.

322

U.S. Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Years |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Years U.S. Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Years November 15, 2013 - 3:47pm Addthis Source: Energy Information Administration Short Term Energy Outlook Allison Lantero Allison Lantero Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs In February 1995, The Brady Bunch Movie and Billy Madison were in movie theaters, "Creep" by TLC was at the top of the Billboard charts, and the Yahoo! search engine had not yet been unveiled. It was also the last month the U.S. produced more oil than it imported. Until last month. During remarks in Cleveland yesterday, President Obama noted this historic milestone: in October, America produced more oil here at home than we imported from overseas.

323

Active hurricane season expected to shut-in higher amount of oil and natural gas production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Active hurricane season expected to shut-in higher amount of Active hurricane season expected to shut-in higher amount of oil and natural gas production An above-normal 2013 hurricane season is expected to cause a median production loss of about 19 million barrels of U.S. crude oil and 46 billion cubic feet of natural gas production in the Gulf of Mexico, according to the new forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. That's about one-third more than the amount of oil and gas production knocked offline during last year's hurricane season. Government weather forecasts predict 13 to 20 named storms will form between June and the end of November, with 7 to 11 of those turning into hurricanes. Production outages in previous hurricane seasons were as high as 107 million barrels of crude oil

324

Acetate Production from Oil under Sulfate-Reducing Conditions in Bioreactors Injected with Sulfate and Nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sulfate- and nitrate- reducing bacteria from an oil field in Argentina. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 74 :4324-4335. 34. Callbeck...6908-6917. 41. Gieg, LM , KE Duncan and JM Suflita. 2008. Bioenergy production via microbial conversion of residual oil to natural...

Cameron M. Callbeck; Akhil Agrawal; Gerrit Voordouw

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

325

Dobson Butte field, Williston basin, Stark County, North Dakota: nontypical oil production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Dobson Butte field (T139N, R96W), Stark County, North Dakota, was discovered in 1982 following a detailed seismic program. Production is primarily from a structural trap in the Interlake Formation of Silurian age. Three oil wells are presently producing from a dolomite reservoir at about 11,000 ft in depth. Primary recoverable reserves of these three producing wells is calculated to be about 2 million bbl of oil. Additional reserves will come from further development of the Interlake reservoir as well as from the deeper Red River (Ordovician) Formation. The Dobson Butte field is a nontypical oil field within the Williston basin as to its high pour point oil (90/sup 0/F), high production water cuts (85-95%), lack of good oil shows in samples, unpredictable noncontinuous oil-producing reservoirs throughout the entire 600-ft Interlake Formation, difficulty in log interpretations, and difficulty in determining the source bed. The interpretation of these nontypical characteristics of Interlake oil production in the Dobson Butte field compared to other Interlake oil production within the Williston basin will have a profound effect upon future Interlake exploration.

Guy, W.J.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

EIS-0016: Cumulative Production/Consumption Effects of the Crude Oil Price Incentive Rulemakings, Programmatic  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this Final Statement to FEA-FES-77-7 to assess the environmental and socioeconomic implications of a rulemaking on crude oil pricing incentives as pertains to the full range of oil production technologies (present as well as anticipated.)

327

The Esso Energy Award Lecture, 1998. Boosting production from low-pressure oil and gas fields: a revolution in hydrocarbon production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Boosting production from low-pressure oil and gas fields: a revolution in hydrocarbon...major part of the future source of oil and gas supply. Full development...Caledonia Ltd (Wood Group Engineering), Marathon Oil UK Ltd, Mobil North Sea Ltd, Oil...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

The use of oil shale ash in the production of biodiesel from waste vegetable oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oil shale ash obtained from combustion of local oil shale deposits was used in this study as a heterogeneous catalyst to produce biodiesel from waste vegetable oil (WVO). Two alcohols with high and low boiling points ethanol and ethylene glycol were used for oil shale catalytic esterification of the WVO. Results show that the esterification of wastes of oil utilizing wastes of oil shale combustion can be used to produce biodiesel. Additionally it was found that in order to make the oil shale ash an effective catalyst for transesterification high reaction temperature is required. Therefore the results have indicated that high biodiesel yield is obtained when using ethylene glycol at high temperature while the yield is low when solid catalytic reaction is performed using ethanol at low temperature. The maximum obtained yield was 75?wt. % utilizing ethylene glycol at 150?°C whereas this yield decreased to 69.9?wt. % as the operating temperature was reduced to 100?°C. On the other hand when using ethanol the yield of biodiesel was relatively low (11?wt. % at 60?°C and 9?wt. % at 80?°C).

A. Al-Otoom; M. Allawzi; A. Ajlouni; F. Abu-Alrub; M. Kandah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Process analysis and optimization of biodiesel production from vegetable oils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Table (2.2) (OTM, 1999). Crude oils are composed of 80 to 90% hydrogen saturated aliphatic alkanes (paraffins) and cycloalkanes (naphthenes). Aromatic hydrocarbons and alkenes (olefins) comprise 10- 20% and 1%, respectively, of crude oil composition....2 Hydrocarbon Contents in Crude Oil (ATSDR, 1995; OTM, 1999) HYDROCARBONS GENERAL FORMULA CHAIN TYPE STATE (Room temp) EXAMPLES Paraffins (Aliphatic) CnH2n+2 (n:1 to20) Linear or Branched Gas or Liquid Methane, Propane Hexane Aromatic C6H5-Y...

Myint, Lay L.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

AEO2011: Lower 48 Crude Oil Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crude Oil Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply Region Crude Oil Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply Region Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 132, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into Production, lower 48 onshore and lower 48 offshore. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO crude oil EIA prices Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Lower 48 Crude Oil Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply Region- Reference Case (xls, 54.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

331

Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics - Gulf of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gulf of Gulf of Mexico Energy Data Apps Maps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Energy Beta You are here Data.gov » Communities » Energy » Data Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics - Gulf of Mexico Dataset Summary Description Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics for the Gulf of Mexico by month and summarized annually. Tags {"Minerals Management Service",MMS,Production,"natural gas",gas,condensate,"crude oil",oil,"OCS production","Outer Continental Shelf",OSC,EIA,"Energy Information Agency",federal,DOE,"Department of Energy",DOI,"Department of the Interior","Gulf of Mexico"} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility

332

Oil, Gas, and Minerals, Exploration and Production, Lease of Public Land (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The state, counties and cities and other political subdivisions may lease publicly owned lands for the purpose of oil or gas or metallic minerals exploration and production.  Any such leases shall...

333

Synthesis of super plasticizer NF-30 from coal coking by product washing oil and performance analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Super plasticizer was synthesized by using coal coking by product washing oil and industrial naphthalene....2 in exhaust (20%). Compared with NF, NF-30 have some advantages in lower cost, high water reducing rate...

Zifang Xu ???; Mingxu Zhang; Wenpei Hu

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Large-Scale Pyrolysis Oil Production: A Technology Assessment and Economic Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A broad perspective of pyrolysis technology as it relates to converting biomass substrates to a liquid bio-oil product and a detailed technical and economic assessment of a fast pyrolysis plant.

Ringer, M.; Putsche, V.; Scahill, J.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

A review of Oil production capacity expansion costs for the Persian Gulf  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The U.S. Energy Information Agency has recently published a report prepared by Petroconsultants, Inc. that addresses the cost of expanding crude oil production capacity in the Persian Gulf. A study on this subject is much ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Fact #578: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2007  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The United States was responsible for 8% of the world's petroleum production, held 2% of the world's crude oil reserves, and consumed 24% of the world's petroleum consumption in 2007. The...

337

Paraffin problems in crude oil production and transportation: A review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Problems related to crystallization and deposition of paraffin waxes during production and transportation of crude oil cause losses of billions of dollars yearly to petroleum industry. The goal of this paper is to present the knowledge on such problems in a systematic and comprehensive form. The fundamental aspects of these problems are defined, and characterization of paraffins and their solubility tendencies have been discussed. It has been established conclusively that n-paraffins are predominantly responsible for this problem. Comprehensive discussion on the mechanism of crystallization of paraffins has been included. Compounds other than n-paraffins, especially asphaltenes and resins, have profound effects on solubility of n-paraffins. In evaluations of the wax potential of a crude, the climate of the area concerned should be considered. Under the most favorable conditions, n-paraffins form clearly defined orthorhombic crystals, but unfavorable conditions and the presence of impurities lead to hexagonal and/or amorphous crystallization.The gelation characteristics are also affected the same way. An attempt was made to classify the paraffin problems into those resulting from high pipeline pressure, high restarting pressure, and deposition on pipe surfaces. Fundamental aspects and mechanism of these dimensions are described. Wax deposition depends on flow rate, the temperature differential between crude and pipe surface, the cooling rate, and surface properties. Finally, methods available in the literature for predicting these problems and evaluating their mitigatory techniques are reviewed. The available methods present a very diversified picture; hence, using them to evaluate these problems becomes taxing. A top priority is standardizing these methods for the benefit of the industry. 56 refs.

Misra, S.; Baruah, S.; Singh, K. (Oil and Natural Gas Corp., Ltd., Jorhat (India))

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Production and Properties of Biodiesel from Algal Oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biodiesel is defined as the mono-alkyl esters of vegetable oils or animal fats or other materials composed of triacylglycerols. This chapter discusses the potential fuel properties of biodiesel derived from al...

Gerhard Knothe

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Shale Oil Production Performance from a Stimulated Reservoir Volume  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The horizontal well with multiple transverse fractures has proven to be an effective strategy for shale gas reservoir exploitation. Some operators are successfully producing shale oil using the same strategy. Due to its higher viscosity and eventual...

Chaudhary, Anish Singh

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

340

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

957 15 731 315 -382 -141 33 712 15 735 Crude Oil 614 - - - - 300 -139 -147 -15 638 4 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 342 0 21 11 -304 - - 14 19 9 29...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil production increased" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

848 14 646 310 -422 -51 0 622 15 707 Crude Oil 527 - - - - 296 -183 -57 3 578 2 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 320 0 11 11 -265 - - 1 17 12 48 Pentanes...

342

Prognosis for Expanded U.S. Production of Crude Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...truLe extent of the reservoir, its 334 form...completed to drain the reservoir efficiently. The...and thickness), rock properties (porosity and permeability), and fluid content...the oil from the reservoir into wells. These...

R. R. Berg; J. C. Calhoun Jr.; R. L. Whiting

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

343

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TCF) of proven natural gas reserves and over 100 TCF ofTCF) of known natural gas reserves on the North Slope tothe oil reserve while others are above the gas cap. For

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

The effects of production rate and gravitational segregation on gas injection performance of oil reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF PRODUCTION RATE AND GRAVITATIONAL SEGREGATION ON GAS INJECTION PERFORMANCE OF OIL RESERVOIRS A Thesis by ED MARTIN FERGUSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1972 Major Subject: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING THE EFFECTS OF PRODUCTION RATE AND GRAVITATIONAL SEGREGATION ON GAS INJECTION PERFORMANCE OF OIL RESERVOIRS A Thesis by ED MARTIN FERGUSON Approved as. to style...

Ferguson, Ed Martin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

345

Forecasting future oil production in Norway and the UK: a general improved methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new Monte-Carlo methodology to forecast the crude oil production of Norway and the U.K. based on a two-step process, (i) the nonlinear extrapolation of the current/past performances of individual oil fields and (ii) a stochastic model of the frequency of future oil field discoveries. Compared with the standard methodology that tends to underestimate remaining oil reserves, our method gives a better description of future oil production, as validated by our back-tests starting in 2008. Specifically, we predict remaining reserves extractable until 2030 to be 188 +/- 10 million barrels for Norway and 98 +/- 10 million barrels for the UK, which are respectively 45% and 66% above the predictions using the standard methodology.

Fievet, Lucas; Cauwels, Peter; Sornette, Didier

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Report Title: Oil and Gas Production and Economic Growth In New Mexico Type of Report: Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report Title: Oil and Gas Production and Economic Growth In New Mexico Type of Report: Technical agency thereof. #12;Page | ii Oil and Gas Production and Economic Growth in New Mexico James Peach and C Mexico's marketed value of oil and gas was $19.2 billion (24.0 percent of state GDP). This paper

Johnson, Eric E.

347

Increasing transcurium production efficiency through direct resonance shielding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is the world s leader in production of 252Cf. This and other heavy actinides are produced by irradiation of mixed curium/americium targets in the High Flux Isotope Reactor. Due to the strong dependence of isotopic cross sections upon incoming neutron energy, the efficiency with which an isotope is transmuted is highly dependent upon the neutron flux energy spectrum and intensities. There are certain energy ranges in which the rate of fissions in feedstock materials can be minimized relative to the rate of (n, ) absorptions. It is shown that by perturbing the flux spectrum, it is possible to alter the net consumption of curium feedstock, as well as the yields of key isotopes for the heavy element research program, such as 249Bk and 252Cf. This flux spectrum perturbation is accomplished by means of focused resonance shielding through the use of filter materials. It is further shown that these perturbations can alter the target yields in a significant way, increasing the amount of 252Cf produced per unit curium consumption by over 40%.

Hogle, Susan L [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Alexander, Charles W [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

349

East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55 Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products

350

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, and Barge  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Components (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

351

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker and Barge between PAD  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tanker and Barge between PAD Districts Tanker and Barge between PAD Districts Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blending Components MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Residual FO - Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual FO - 0.31 to 1.00% Sulfur Residual FO - Greater than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

352

Heating of heavy oil by circulating hot water in closed double casing in ultra-deep wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In heavy oil production, the loss of energy to ambient surroundings decreases the temperature of the heavy oil flowing upwards in a vertical wellbore, which increases the oil viscosity and the oil may not flow...

Riyi Lin; Fangzheng Wang; Xinwei Wang

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RR-08-26 Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaskarapid or gradual energy production in the future? • Doesnet social benefit from energy production and achieving a

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Known Challenges Associated with the Production, Transportation, Storage and Usage of Pyrolysis Oil in Residential and Industrial Settings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Dr. Jani Lehto presentation at the May 9 Pyrolysis Oil Workshop on Known Challenges Associated with the Production, Transportation, Storage and Usage of Pyrolysis Oil in Residential and Industrial Settings.

355

Impacts of different diameter combinations on the temperature of a crude oil pipeline when colocating with a products pipeline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to show the effects of different diameter combinations on crude oil temperature when a crude oil pipeline and a products pipeline are laid in one trench, four typical ... temperature difference of the cr...

Bo Yu; Yue Shi; Xin Liu; Jinjun Zhang…

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Mining and Gas and Oil Production (North Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mining and Gas and Oil Production (North Dakota) Mining and Gas and Oil Production (North Dakota) Mining and Gas and Oil Production (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting This chapter of the North Dakota Code contains provisions for oil, gas, and coal mining and the development of geothermal resources. This chapter

357

Regional Balanced Growth in Italy and the Increase in Oil Prices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The recent rise in fuel prices has had many diverse consequences both for ... while to enquire into the effect that the oil price rise may have on regional development within ... precisely that, namely, to determ...

Murray Brown; Maurizio Di Palma…

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

DOE-Sponsored Project Tests Novel Method to Increase Oil Recovery  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Successful laboratory tests at the Energy Department’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have verified that the use of a brine-soluble ionic surfactant could improve the efficiency of carbon dioxide enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR).

359

The Geopolitics of Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reduce their production by a similar...barrels ofoil a day. Although the...barrels of oil per day. It is likely...Virtually all the OPEC producers, particularly...their oil. In 1973, 90 percent...increase indigenous production, and ac-celerate...

1980-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

360

Oil production by entrained pyrolysis of biomass and processing of oil and char  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Entrained pyrolysis of lignocellulosic material proceeds from a controlled pyrolysis-initiating temperature to completion of an oxygen free environment at atmospheric pressure and controlled residence time to provide a high yield recovery of pyrolysis oil together with char and non-condensable, combustible gases. The residence time is a function of gas flow rate and the initiating temperature is likewise a function of the gas flow rate, varying therewith. A controlled initiating temperature range of about 400.degree. C. to 550.degree. C. with corresponding gas flow rates to maximize oil yield is disclosed.

Knight, James A. (Atlanta, GA); Gorton, Charles W. (Atlanta, GA)

1990-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil production increased" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Operator Trainer System for the Petrobras P-26 Semi-Submersible Oil and Gas Production Unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Operator trainer systems aim to improve operator performance, by simulating scenarios such as emergency conditions, thus reducing accidents and increasing processes economical results. In this paper, we present PETROBRAS' Oil & Gas Production Process and Utilities Simulator Environment called AMBTREI (Training Environment) that mimics the actual Control Room of an E&P semi-submersible Platform at a very high fidelity level. This training environment was created utilizing Soteica's Operator Training System solution (S-OTS). The dynamic process model will be described as well as the Process Control Interface that was implemented. The software used will be explained in detail and the conclusions that have been reached in almost 2 years of use will be presented.

A.C. Pereira; A. Riera; G. Padilla; E. Musulin; N.J. Nakamura

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Numerical Simulation of Low Salinity Water Flooding Assisted with Chemical Flooding for Enhanced Oil Recovery.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? World proved oil reserve gradually decreases due to the increase production but decrease new field discovery. The focus on enhance oil recovery from the… (more)

Atthawutthisin, Natthaporn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

U.S. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

9,240 9,584 9,380 8,815 9,472 9,309 1973-2014 Crude Oil 7,264 7,547 7,165 7,054 7,623 7,471 1920-2014 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 166 141 99 116 86 90...

364

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,654 457 22,655 9,757 -11,830 -4,359 1,022 22,083 459 22,770 40,249 Crude Oil 19,044 - - - - 9,297 -4,312 -4,561 -451 19,787 132 0 20,405 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied...

365

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,134 78 8,072 4,027 -3,603 366 34 7,401 3,285 5,354 Crude Oil 5,259 - - - - 3,454 -222 227 -164 8,685 198 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 1,875 0 534 1...

366

U.S. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

3,858 3,966 4,121 4,156 4,479 4,533 1973-2014 Crude Oil 246 268 288 396 401 389 1920-2014 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 581 697 727 683 765 743 1981-2014...

367

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,416 250,220 124,827 -111,703 11,357 1,044 229,444 101,831 165,961 1,223,681 Crude Oil 163,028 - - - - 107,081 -6,891 7,037 -5,099 269,223 6,132 0 882,888 Natural Gas Plant...

368

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

6,046 98 7,569 4,450 -3,757 434 -42 6,943 2,694 5,247 Crude Oil 4,384 - - - - 3,691 -391 312 6 7,952 37 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 1,663 0 411 35 165...

369

Decline and depletion rates of oil production: a comprehensive investigation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...microscopic pores within the rock, and the term porosity refers to the fraction...volume. The larger the porosity, the better the rock is at storing fluids...in the case of oil reservoirs) to permit fluid flow, its permeability, and the degree of...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Diversity increases biomass production for trematode parasites in snails  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...helminth parasites across vertebrate hosts, Poulin et al. (2003) considered whether productivity...complementarity among parasite species (Poulin et al. 2003). However, complementarity...parasite biomass supportable by a host (Poulin George-Nascimento 2007). This is because...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Zymomonas mobilis Mutants with an Increased Rate of Alcohol Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 Received...retention of higher rates of ethanol production...beverages and fuel, variations...maintenance of higher rates of glycolysis...Department of Energy, Office of...Agriculture, Alcohol Fuels Program. We...

Y. A. Osman; L. O. Ingram

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Evaluation of Wax Deposition and its Control during Production of Alaska North Slope Oils  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-01NT41248 Evaluation of Wax Deposition and Its Control During Production of Alaska North Slope Oils Petroleum Development Laboratory Institute of Northern Engineering University of Alaska Fairbanks P.O. Box 755880 Fairbanks, Alaska 99775-5880 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory December 2008 Office of Fossil Energy Evaluation of Wax Deposition and Its Control During Production of Alaskan North Slope Oils Final Report Reporting Period: October 1, 2005-September 30, 2008 Principal Investigator: Tao Zhu University of Alaska Fairbanks P.O. Box 755880 Fairbanks, AK 99775-5880 fftz@uaf.edu, 907-474-5141 External Principal Investigator: Jack A. Walker

373

Product Price Spreads Over Crude Oil Vary With Seasons and Supply/Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Of course, petroleum product prices don't move in lockstep to crude oil prices, for a number of reasons. We find it useful to look at variations in the spread between product and crude oil prices, in this case comparing spot market prices for each. The difference between heating oil and crude oil spot prices tends to vary seasonally; that is, it's generally higher in the winter, when demand for distillate fuels is higher due to heating requirements, and lower in the summer. (Gasoline, as we'll see later, generally does the opposite.) However, other factors affecting supply and demand, including the relative severity of winter weather, can greatly distort these "typical" seasonal trends. As seen on this chart, the winters of 1995-96 and 1996-97 featured

374

Oil and Gas Gross Production Tax (North Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oil and Gas Gross Production Tax (North Dakota) Oil and Gas Gross Production Tax (North Dakota) Oil and Gas Gross Production Tax (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Fees A gross production tax applies to most gas produced in North Dakota. Gas burned at the well site to power an electrical generator that consumes at least 75 percent of the gas is exempt from taxation under this chapter.

375

U.S. Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells Dataset Summary Description Distribution tables of oil and gas wells by production rate for all wells, including marginal wells, are available from the EIA for most states for the years 1919 to 2009. Graphs displaying historical behavior of well production rate are also available. The quality and completeness of data is dependent on update lag times and the quality of individual state and commercial source databases. Undercounting of the number of wells occurs in states where data is sometimes not available at the well level but only at the lease level. States not listed below will be added later as data becomes available. Source EIA Date Released January 07th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords

376

Predicted and actual productions of horizontal wells in heavy-oil fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses the comparison of predicted and actual cumulative and daily oil production. The predicted results were obtained from the use of Joshi's equation, wherein, the effects of anisotropy and eccentricity were included. The cumulative production obtained from the use of equations developed by Borisov, Giger, Renard and Dupuy resulted in errors in excess of 100%, thus, they were not considered applicable for predicting cumulative and daily flows of heavy oils in horizontal wells. The wells considered in this analysis varied from 537 to 1201 metres with corresponding well bores of 0.089 to. 0.110 m. Using Joshi's equation, the predicted cumulative oil-production was within a 20% difference for up to 12 months of production for long wells and up to 24 months for short wells. Short wells were defined as those being under 1000 m.

Peter Catania

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Modification of chemical and physical factors in steamflood to increase heavy oil recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the work performed in the various physicochemical factors for the improvement of oil recovery efficiency. In this context the following general areas were studied: (1) The understanding of vapor-liquid flows in porous media, including processes in steam injection; (2) The effect of reservoir heterogeneity in a variety of foams, from pore scale to macroscopic scale; (3) The flow properties of additives for improvement of recovery efficiency, particularly foams and other non-Newtonian fluids; and (4) The development of optimization methods to maximize various measures of oil recovery.

Yortsos, Yanis C.

2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

378

The use of Devonian oil shales in the production of portland cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lafarge Corporation operates a cement plant at Alpena, Michigan in which Antrim shale, a Devonian oil shale, is used as part of the raw material mix. Using this precedent the authors examine the conditions and extent to which spent shale might be utilized in cement production. They conclude that the potential is limited in size and location but could provide substantial benefit to an oil shale operation meeting these criteria.

Schultz, C.W.; Lamont, W.E. [Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States); Daniel, J. [Lafarge Corp., Alpena, MI (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

natural gas will be the low cost hydrogen production methodGas Production .12 A DYNAMIC MODEL OF UNIT PRODUCTION .14 The Multi-Stage Investment Timing Game .16 DATA, COSTgas production decisions results in a more or less optimal system. the pipeline cost

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Model methodology and data description of the Production of Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the methodology and data used in the Production of Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas (PROLOG) model. The model forecasts annual oil and natural gas production on a regional basis. Natural gas is modeled by gas category, generally conforming to categories defined by the Natural Gas Policy Act (NGPA) of 1978, as well as a category representing gas priced by way of a spot market (referred to as ''spot'' gas). A linear program is used to select developmental drilling activities for conventional oil and gas and exploratory drilling activities for deep gas on the basis of their economic merit, subject to constraints on available rotary rigs and constraints based on historical drilling patterns. Using exogenously specified price paths for oil and gas, net present values are computed for fixed amounts of drilling activity for oil and gas development and deep gas exploration in each of six onshore regions. Through maximizing total net present value, the linear program provides forecasts of drilling activities, reserve additions, and production. Oil and shallow gas exploratory drilling activities are forecast on the basis of econometrically derived equations, which are dependent on specified price paths for the two fuels. 10 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

Not Available

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil production increased" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Types of Oil Shale Ash and Methods for Increasing their Reactivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the Republic of Estonia, electricity is produced by high-temperature (1200-1400°C) combustion of powdered oil shale, which contains 20-25% organic matter...Table 1)[1]. It has a heating value of 8-10 MJ/kg. Be...

R. Kuusik; T. Kaljuvee

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Dietary fish oil increases UVB-induced neutrophil infiltration and activation in the skin but inhibits edema  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fish oil/omega-3 fatty acids relative to corn oil/omega-6 fatty acids. Methods: Female...mice were fed semi-purifed diets with 25 energy as menhaden fish oil or corn oil x 29 weeks or corn oil x 19 weeks then fish oil x 10 weeks. Mammary...

Jennifer L. Hatton; Wei Zhou; Kelly Nye; Gayle Shrode; Martha A. Belury; Tatiana M. Oberyszyn; Anne M. Van Buskirk; and Lisa D. Yee

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Western states enhanced oil shale recovery program: Shale oil production facilities conceptual design studies report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report analyzes the economics of producing syncrude from oil shale combining underground and surface processing using Occidental's Modified-In-Situ (MIS) technology and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Hot Recycled Solids (HRS) retort. These retorts form the basic technology employed for oil extraction from oil shale in this study. Results are presented for both Commercial and Pre-commercial programs. Also analyzed are Pre-commercialization cost of Demonstration and Pilot programs which will confirm the HRS and MIS concepts and their mechanical designs. These programs will provide experience with the circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor (CFBC), the MIS retort, the HRS retort and establish environmental control parameters. Four cases are considered: commercial size plant, demonstration size plant, demonstration size plant minimum CFBC, and a pilot size plant. Budget cost estimates and schedules are determined. Process flow schemes and basic heat and material balances are determined for the HRS system. Results consist of summaries of major equipment sizes, capital cost estimates, operating cost estimates and economic analyses. 35 figs., 35 tabs.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Drilling and operational sounds from an oil production island in the ice-covered Beaufort Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recordings of sounds underwater and in air and of iceborne vibrations were obtained at Northstar Island an artificial gravel island in the Beaufort Sea near Prudhoe Bay (Alaska). The aim was to document the levels characteristics and range dependence of sounds and vibrations produced by drilling and oil production during the winter when the island was surrounded by shore-fast ice. Drilling produced the highest underwater broadband (10–10?000 Hz) levels (maximum=124 dB re: 1 ?Pa at 1 km) and mainly affected 700–1400 Hz frequencies. In contrast drilling did not increase broadband levels in air or ice relative to levels during other island activities. Production did not increase broadband levels for any of the sensors. In all media broadband levels decreased by ?20 dB/tenfold change in distance. Background levels underwater were reached by 9.4 km during drilling and 3–4 km without. In the air and ice background levels were reached 5–10 km and 2–10 km from Northstar respectively depending on the wind but irrespective of drilling. A comparison of the recorded sounds with harbor and ringed seal audiograms showed that Northstar sounds were probably audible to seals at least intermittently out to ?1.5 km in water and ?5 km in air.

Susanna B. Blackwell; Charles R. Greene Jr.; W. John Richardson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Olive Oil Production in Greece1 The 1981 accession of Greece into the EEC was significant for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Olive Oil Production in Greece1 The 1981 accession of Greece into the EEC was significant for the olive oil sector. Greece is covered by 1,025,748 hectares of olive groves. In the period of 1991 to 1996 to other crops due to the high level of CAP support and high olive-oil prices and d) the lack

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

386

Hydrodesulfurization of Fluid Catalytic Cracking Decant Oils for the Production of Low-sulfur Needle Coke Feedstocks.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Needle coke, produced by the delayed coking of fluid catalytic cracking decant oils, is the primary filler used in the production of graphite electrodes. The… (more)

Wincek, Ronald

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Microbial petroleum degradation enhancement by oil spill bioremediation products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was conducted using unpolluted, natural seawater. The products were tested in triplicate using 250 ml Erlenmeyer flasks and evaluated over a 28 day period to determine the products' capabilities based on the extent of petroleum degradation. Toxicity...

Lee, Salvador Aldrett

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Oil history, potential converge in Azerbaijan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Azerbaijan, the oldest known oil producing region in the world, still holds great potential for new discoveries and increased production. A multi-billion dollar production sharing agreement was recently signed with a consortium of primarily western oil companies to develop three oil fields in the Caspian Sea. Soon, Azerbaijan will offer new exploration acreage both offshore and onshore. This paper describes the history of oil production in Azerbaijan, offshore developments, tectonics, stratigraphy, petroleum traps, mud volcanoes, and short summaries of several oil producing areas. Current production is about 9 million tons/yr of oil and 7 billion cu m/yr of natural gas.

Narimanov, A.A. [State Oil Co. of Azerbaijan, Baku (Azerbaijan); Palaz, I. [Amoco Production Co., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

389

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment References Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2000, DOE/EIA-0383(2000) (Washington, DC, December 1999), Table A11. Energy Information Administration, Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, SR/RNGD/87-01 (Washington, DC, September 1987). U.S. Department of Interior, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, Coastal Plain Resource Assessment, (Washington, DC, November, 1986). U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Minerals Management Service. Northeast National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska Final Integrated Activity Plan / Environmental Impact Statement, (Anchorage , Alaska, August, 1998).

390

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Preface Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment is a product of the Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s (EIA) Reserves and Production Division. EIA, under various programs, has assessed foreign and domestic oil and gas resources, reserves, and production potential. As a policy-neutral agency, EIAÂ’s standard analysis of the potential of the Alaska North Slope (ANS) has focused on the areas without exploration and development restrictions. EIA received a letter (dated March 10, 2000) from Senator Frank H. Murkowski as Chairman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources requesting an EIA Service Report "with plausible scenarios for ANWR supply development consistent with the most recent U.S. Geological Survey resource assessments." This service report is prepared in response to the request of Senator Murkowski. It focuses on the ANWR coastal plain, a region currently restricted from exploration and development, and updates EIAÂ’s 1987 ANWR assessment.

391

Continuous biodiesel production from acidic oil using a combination of cation- and anion-exchange resins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A continuous process was developed to produce biodiesel from acidic oil containing soybean oil and oleic acid, which combined esterification by cation-exchange resin NKC-9, online separation and transesterification by anion-exchange resin D261. The esterification was carried out with soybean oil/oleic acid weight ratio of 5/5, methanol to oleic acid weight ratio of 1.5/1, reaction temperature of 338 K and residence time of 126.6 min. After the reaction, the mixture was settled to online separate into two layers, and the methanol–water–oleic acid mixture at the top layer was reclaimed. The bottom layer, mainly containing soybean oil and methyl oleate, was transesterified under methanol/soybean oil weight ratio of 1/3 and n-hexane/soybean oil weight ratio of 1/2 at 323 K for the residence time of 112.0 min. The high conversions of oleic acid (above 98%) and soybean oil (92.3%) were achieved. The yield of biodiesel in this process reached up to 95.1%. The main parameters of the product met the Chinese Standard of biodiesel.

Benqiao He; Yixuan Shao; Yanbiao Ren; Jianxin Li; Yu Cheng

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Modification of reservoir chemical and physical factors in steamfloods to increase heavy oil recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal methods, and particularly steam injection, are currently recognized as the most promising for the efficient recovery of heavy oil. Despite significant progress, however, important technical issues remain open. Specifically, still inadequate is our knowledge of the complex interaction between porous media and the various fluids of thermal recovery (steam, water, heavy oil, gases, and chemicals). While, the interplay of heat transfer and fluid flow with pore- and macro-scale heterogeneity is largely unexplored. The objectives of this contract are to continue previous work and to carry out new fundamental studies in the following areas of interest to thermal recovery: displacement and flow properties of fluids involving phase change (condensation-evaporation) in porous media; flow properties of mobility control fluids (such as foam); and the effect of reservoir heterogeneity on thermal recovery. The specific projects are motivated by and address the need to improve heavy oil recovery from typical reservoirs as well as less conventional fractured reservoirs producing from vertical or horizontal wells. During this past quarter, work continued on: the development of relative permeabilities during steam displacement; the optimization of recovery processes in heterogeneous reservoirs by using optical control methods; and in the area of chemical additives, work continued on the behavior of non-Newtonian fluid flow and on foam displacements in porous media.

Yortsos, Y.C.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

Modification of reservoir chemical and physical factors in steamfloods to increase heavy oil recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal methods, and particularly steam injection, are currently recognized as the most promising for the efficient recovery of heavy oil. Despite significant progress, however, important technical issues remain open. Specifically, still inadequate is our knowledge of the complex interaction between porous media and the various fluids of thermal recovery (steam, water, heavy oil, gases, and chemicals). While, the interplay of heat transfer and fluid flow with pore- and macro-scale heterogeneity is largely unexplored. The objectives of this contract are to continue previous work and to carry out new fundamental studies in the following areas of interest to thermal recovery: displacement and flow properties of fluids involving phase change (condensation-evaporation) in porous media; flow properties of mobility control fluids (such as foam); and the effect of reservoir heterogeneity on thermal recovery. The specific projects are motivated by and address the need to improve heavy oil recovery from typical reservoirs as well as less conventional fractured reservoirs producing from vertical or horizontal wells. During this quarter work continued on: development of relative permeabilities during steam injection; optimization of recovery processes in heterogeneous reservoirs by using optimal control methods; and behavior of non-Newtonian fluid flow and on foam displacements in porous media.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . . . .Venezuela with Mexico, another major oil pro- ducing countryOil Production and Productivity in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . .

CAKIR, NIDA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

INCREASE  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Interdisciplinary Consortium for Research and Educational Access in Science and Engineering (INCREASE), assists minority-serving institutions in gaining access to world-class research facilities.

None

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

396

Reducing Onshore Natural Gas and Oil Exploration and Production Impacts Using a Broad-Based Stakeholder Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Never before has the reduction of oil and gas exploration and production impacts been as important as it is today for operators, regulators, non-governmental organizations and individual landowners. Collectively, these stakeholders are keenly interested in the potential benefits from implementing effective environmental impact reducing technologies and practices. This research project strived to gain input and insight from such a broad array of stakeholders in order to identify approaches with the potential to satisfy their diverse objectives. The research team examined three of the most vital issue categories facing onshore domestic production today: (1) surface damages including development in urbanized areas, (2) impacts to wildlife (specifically greater sage grouse), and (3) air pollution, including its potential contribution to global climate change. The result of the research project is a LINGO (Low Impact Natural Gas and Oil) handbook outlining approaches aimed at avoiding, minimizing, or mitigating environmental impacts. The handbook identifies technical solutions and approaches which can be implemented in a practical and feasible manner to simultaneously achieve a legitimate balance between environmental protection and fluid mineral development. It is anticipated that the results of this research will facilitate informed planning and decision making by management agencies as well as producers of oil and natural gas. In 2008, a supplemental task was added for the researchers to undertake a 'Basin Initiative Study' that examines undeveloped and/or underdeveloped oil and natural gas resources on a regional or geologic basin scope to stimulate more widespread awareness and development of domestic resources. Researchers assessed multi-state basins (or plays), exploring state initiatives, state-industry partnerships and developing strategies to increase U.S. oil and gas supplies while accomplishing regional economic and environmental goals.

Amy Childers

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

397

Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

Donnelly, Mark (Warrenville, IL); Millard, Cynthia S. (Plainfield, IL); Stols, Lucy (Woodridge, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low-Dip Slope and Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California, Class III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is not just to produce oil from the Pru Fee property, but rather to test which operational strategies best optimize total oil recovery at economically acceptable rates of production and production costs.

Schamel, S.

2001-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

399

Extra Virgin Olive Oils Increase Hepatic Fat Accumulation and Hepatic Antioxidant Protein Levels in APOE-/- Mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The largest treatment effect on the first principal component (i.e., the largest distance between the spots representing the dietary intervention groups on the X-axis) was between the palm oil control group (red spots) and the Arbequina EVOO intervention group (blue spots). ... This research was supported by grants FEGA-FEOGA (CAO99-014), CICYT (SAF2004-08173-C03-02), FISS 01/0202, Redes DGA (A-26), and FISS de investigación cooperativa C03- 01 and G03-140 and by Fundación Española del Corazón. ...

Jose Miguel Arbones-Mainar; Karen Ross; Garry J. Rucklidge; Martin Reid; Gary Duncan; John R. Arthur; Graham W. Horgan; Maria A. Navarro; Ricardo Carnicer; Carmen Arnal; Jesus Osada; Baukje de Roos

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

400

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,980 842 4,204 1,948 672 -339 187 3,995 240 4,886 ,980 842 4,204 1,948 672 -339 187 3,995 240 4,886 Crude Oil 1,472 - - - - 1,839 556 -359 17 3,416 76 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 508 -17 115 63 -14 - - 75 105 71 404 Pentanes Plus 63 -17 - - 0 98 - - -18 37 53 72 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 444 - - 115 63 -112 - - 93 68 18 332 Ethane/Ethylene 163 - - - 0 -100 - - 11 - - 52 Propane/Propylene 186 - - 104 49 -22 - - 66 - 7 244 Normal Butane/Butylene 52 - - 16 5 5 - - 22 17 11 29 Isobutane/Isobutylene 43 - - -4 8 5 - - -6 50 - 7 Other Liquids - - 858 - - 12 -143 127 346 474 40 -6 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 858 - - 5 -547 -8 11 271 26 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 23 - - 23 0 - -

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401

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

562 822 4,163 1,839 735 -69 52 3,955 244 4,801 562 822 4,163 1,839 735 -69 52 3,955 244 4,801 Crude Oil 1,116 - - - - 1,730 800 -87 62 3,442 55 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 446 -16 121 74 -25 - - -12 105 111 395 Pentanes Plus 50 -16 - - 1 82 - - -4 31 101 -12 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 396 - - 121 73 -107 - - -8 74 11 407 Ethane/Ethylene 163 - - - 0 -108 - - -2 - - 58 Propane/Propylene 156 - - 108 59 -24 - - -3 - 2 300 Normal Butane/Butylene 48 - - 11 9 10 - - -4 29 9 45 Isobutane/Isobutylene 29 - - 2 6 14 - - 1 46 - 5 Other Liquids - - 838 - - 5 -258 -159 8 408 25 -16 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 838 - - 3 -565 4 1 257 21 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 22 - - 22 0 - -

402

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

124 22 3,585 1,761 3,291 117 -137 3,532 241 5,264 124 22 3,585 1,761 3,291 117 -137 3,532 241 5,264 Crude Oil 34 - - - - 897 1 113 -43 1,084 3 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 90 0 25 32 86 - - 16 27 15 174 Pentanes Plus 15 0 - - - - - - 0 - 10 4 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 75 - - 25 32 86 - - 16 27 5 169 Ethane/Ethylene 1 - - 0 - - - - 0 - - 1 Propane/Propylene 51 - - 36 27 83 - - 24 - 4 168 Normal Butane/Butylene 16 - - -11 3 3 - - -8 17 1 0 Isobutane/Isobutylene 8 - - 0 2 - - - -1 9 - 0 Other Liquids - - 22 - - 555 1,614 193 -31 2,421 5 -10 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 22 - - 25 273 -19 -35 332 5 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 4 - - 4 0 - - Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol)

403

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,164 20 3,171 1,425 308 193 28 2,990 349 2,914 1,164 20 3,171 1,425 308 193 28 2,990 349 2,914 Crude Oil 1,104 - - - - 1,209 - 140 10 2,443 - 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 61 0 66 4 - - - 36 59 13 22 Pentanes Plus 26 0 - - - - - - 5 18 3 -1 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 34 - - 66 4 - - - 30 41 10 23 Ethane/Ethylene 0 - - - - - - - - - - 0 Propane/Propylene 14 - - 49 4 - - - 12 - 10 45 Normal Butane/Butylene 5 - - 15 0 - - - 13 19 0 -11 Isobutane/Isobutylene 15 - - 1 - - - - 5 22 - -12 Other Liquids - - 20 - - 107 252 94 -71 488 13 43 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 20 - - 19 143 37 -2 219 3 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 47 - - 47 0 - - Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol)

404

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,173 16 2,988 1,321 324 106 21 2,811 344 2,751 1,173 16 2,988 1,321 324 106 21 2,811 344 2,751 Crude Oil 1,111 - - - - 1,160 2 62 4 2,331 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 61 0 50 5 - - - 1 66 15 35 Pentanes Plus 28 0 - - - - - - 0 21 3 4 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 33 - - 50 5 - - - 1 45 12 31 Ethane/Ethylene 0 - - - - - - - - - - 0 Propane/Propylene 12 - - 46 4 - - - 1 - 10 51 Normal Butane/Butylene 6 - - 6 1 - - - 0 26 1 -14 Isobutane/Isobutylene 15 - - -2 0 - - - 0 20 - -7 Other Liquids - - 16 - - 74 245 103 11 414 13 1 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 16 - - 7 138 37 2 193 3 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 43 - - 43 0 - - Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) - - - - 1 1 0

405

Oil production enhancement through a standardized brine treatment. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to permit the environmentally safe discharge of brines produced from oil wells in Pennsylvania to the surface waters of the Commonwealth and to rapidly brings as many wells as possible into compliance with the law, the Pennsylvania Oil and Gas Association (POGAM) approached the Pennsylvania State University to develop a program designed to demonstrate that a treatment process to meet acceptable discharge conditions and effluent limitations can be standardized for all potential stripper wells brine discharge. After the initial studies, the first phase of this project was initiated. A bench-scale prototype model was developed for conducting experiments in laboratory conditions. The experiments pursued in the laboratory conditions were focused on the removal of ferrous iron from synthetically made brine. Iron was selected as the primary heavy metals for studying the efficiency of the treatment process. The results of a number of experiments in the lab were indicative of the capability of the proposed brine treatment process in the removal of iron. Concurrent with the laboratory experiments, a comprehensive and extensive kinetic study was initiated. This study was necessary to provide the required data base for process modeling. This study included the investigation of the critical pH as well as the rate and order of reactions of the studied elements: aluminum, lead, zinc, and copper. In the second phase of this project, a field-based prototype was developed to evaluate and demonstrate the treatment process effectiveness. These experiments were conducted under various conditions and included the testing on five brines from different locations with various dissolved constituents. The outcome of this research has been a software package, currently based on iron`s reactivity, to be used for design purposes. The developed computer program was refined as far as possible using the results from laboratory and field experiments.

Adewumi, A.; Watson, R.; Tian, S.; Safargar, S.; Heckman, S.; Drielinger, I.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

SR/O&G/2000-02 Potential Oil Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0-02 0-02 Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment May 2000 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U. S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U. S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment ii Energy Information Administration

407

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Imports by Area of Entry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by Area of Entry by Area of Entry Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Ethylene Propane Propylene Normal Butane Butylene Isobutane Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Biomass-Based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene-Type Bonded Aircraft Fuel Other Bonded Aircraft Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Bonded, 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Other, 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Bonded, Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Other, Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Bonded, Greater than 500 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Other, Greater than 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Bonded, Greater than 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Other, Greater than 2000 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Bonded Ship Bunkers, Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., Bonded Ship Bunkers, 0.31 to 1.00% Sulfur Residual F.O., Bonded Ship Bunkers, Greater than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

408

Strain Design of Ashbya gossypii for Single-Cell Oil Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Single-Cell Oil Production Rodrigo Ledesma-Amaro Maria A. Santos Alberto Jimenez Jose Luis Revuelta...s002530051649 . 17. Jimenez, A , MA Santos, M Pompejus and JL Revuelta...2005 . 18. Jimenez, A , MA Santos and JL Revuelta. 2008. Phosphoribosyl...

Rodrigo Ledesma-Amaro; María A. Santos; Alberto Jiménez; José Luis Revuelta

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

409

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment, was prepared for the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources at the request of Chairman Frank H. Murkowski in a letter dated March 10, 2000. The request asked the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to develop plausible scenarios for Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) supply development consistent with the most recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) resource assessments. This report contains EIA projections of future daily production rates using recent USGS resource estimates. The Coastal Plain study area includes 1.5 million acres in the ANWR 1002 Area, 92,000 acres of Native Inupiat lands and State of Alaska offshore lands out to the 3-mile limit which are expected to be explored and developed if and when ANWR is developed. (Figure ES1) About 26 percent of the technically recoverable oil resources are in the Native and State lands.

410

Biodiesel production from vegetable oil and waste animal fats in a pilot plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, corn oil as vegetable oil, chicken fat and fleshing oil as animal fats were used to produce methyl ester in a biodiesel pilot plant. The FFA level of the corn oil was below 1% while those of animal fats were too high to produce biodiesel via base catalyst. Therefore, it was needed to perform pretreatment reaction for the animal fats. For this aim, sulfuric acid was used as catalyst and methanol was used as alcohol in the pretreatment reactions. After reducing the FFA level of the animal fats to less than 1%, the transesterification reaction was completed with alkaline catalyst. Due to low FFA content of corn oil, it was directly subjected to transesterification. Potassium hydroxide was used as catalyst and methanol was used as alcohol for transesterification reactions. The fuel properties of methyl esters produced in the biodiesel pilot plant were characterized and compared to EN 14214 and ASTM D6751 biodiesel standards. According to the results, ester yield values of animal fat methyl esters were slightly lower than that of the corn oil methyl ester (COME). The production cost of COME was higher than those of animal fat methyl esters due to being high cost biodiesel feedstock. The fuel properties of produced methyl esters were close to each other. Especially, the sulfur content and cold flow properties of the COME were lower than those of animal fat methyl esters. The measured fuel properties of all produced methyl esters met ASTM D6751 (S500) biodiesel fuel standards.

Ertan Alptekin; Mustafa Canakci; Huseyin Sanli

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

International Energy Outlook 1999 - World Oil Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil.gif (4669 bytes) oil.gif (4669 bytes) A moderate view of future oil market developments is reflected in IEO99. Sustained high levels of oil prices are not expected, whereas continued expansion of the oil resource base is anticipated. The crude oil market was wracked with turbulence during 1998, as prices fell by one-third on average from 1997 levels. Even without adjusting for inflation, the world oil price in 1998 was the lowest since 1973. The declining oil prices were influenced by an unexpected slowdown in the growth of energy demand worldwide—less than any year since 1990—and by increases in oil supply, particularly in 1997. Although the increase in world oil production in 1998 was smaller than in any year since 1993, efforts to bolster prices by imposing further limits on production were

412

U.S. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

96,229 107,478 106,354 120,656 114,693 108,925 1981-2013 96,229 107,478 106,354 120,656 114,693 108,925 1981-2013 Crude Oil 3,965 3,863 3,591 3,029 2,052 2,975 1920-2013 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 12,522 14,761 10,699 17,203 15,796 13,937 1981-2013 Pentanes Plus 3,327 4,292 1,655 7,308 5,315 2,989 1984-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 9,194 10,468 9,044 9,895 10,481 10,947 1981-2013 Ethane/Ethylene 1981-1992 Propane/Propylene 8,363 9,542 8,057 8,407 9,125 10,040 1981-2013 Normal Butane/Butylene 832 927 987 1,488 1,356 907 1981-2013 Isobutane/Isobutylene 1984-1992 Other Liquids 7,489 6,277 6,728 7,063 5,570 6,579 1991-2013 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/ Other Hydrocarbons 2,897 3,520 3,180 3,430 4,056 3,543 1991-2013 Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol)

413

U.S. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

302,265 311,620 293,713 317,538 316,119 299,380 1981-2013 302,265 311,620 293,713 317,538 316,119 299,380 1981-2013 Crude Oil 231,793 239,848 231,900 250,207 251,054 237,344 1920-2013 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 5,268 5,261 4,667 4,819 3,708 4,020 1981-2013 Pentanes Plus 1,366 2,222 730 1,461 316 772 1981-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 3,902 3,039 3,937 3,358 3,392 3,248 1981-2013 Ethane 1993-2006 Ethylene 9 12 8 12 12 9 1993-2013 Propane 2,585 1,818 2,474 2,105 1,901 1,875 1995-2013 Propylene 728 680 814 595 722 728 1993-2013 Normal Butane 181 121 149 106 272 194 1995-2013 Butylene 143 241 162 153 146 139 1993-2013 Isobutane 256 167 330 387 339 303 1995-2013 Isobutylene 1993-2010 Other Liquids 43,066 47,595 40,206 44,400 38,927 40,118 1981-2013

414

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25,966 7,956 1,280,301 725,573 1,191,766 9,116 -19,377 1,260,324 25,966 7,956 1,280,301 725,573 1,191,766 9,116 -19,377 1,260,324 90,720 1,909,011 152,389 Crude Oil 9,418 - - - - 316,140 4,126 8,405 -1,574 336,230 3,434 0 8,328 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 16,548 -84 14,202 18,043 26,704 - - -1,588 7,264 3,052 66,685 6,377 Pentanes Plus 2,828 -84 - - 185 -19 - - 12 63 315 2,520 43 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 13,720 - - 14,202 17,858 26,723 - - -1,600 7,201 2,737 64,165 6,334 Ethane/Ethylene 174 - - 93 - - - - 0 - - 267 - Propane/Propylene 9,223 - - 12,922 16,074 26,601 - - -793 - 1,230 64,383 5,184 Normal Butane/Butylene 2,091 - - 1,435 616 122 - - -866 3,435 1,507 188 837 Isobutane/Isobutylene 2,232 - - -248 1,168 - - - 59 3,766 - -673 313

415

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3,707 661 107,540 52,842 98,737 3,513 -4,105 105,957 7,218 3,707 661 107,540 52,842 98,737 3,513 -4,105 105,957 7,218 157,931 153,902 Crude Oil 1,020 - - - - 26,908 20 3,378 -1,285 32,517 94 0 10,326 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 2,687 -11 747 945 2,568 - - 471 798 453 5,214 6,541 Pentanes Plus 443 -11 - - - - - - 2 - 300 130 82 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 2,244 - - 747 945 2,568 - - 469 798 153 5,084 6,459 Ethane/Ethylene 27 - - 9 - - - - 6 - - 30 15 Propane/Propylene 1,517 - - 1,078 813 2,483 - - 724 - 126 5,041 4,442 Normal Butane/Butylene 474 - - -333 80 85 - - -246 523 27 2 1,673 Isobutane/Isobutylene 226 - - -7 52 - - - -15 275 - 11 329 Other Liquids - - 672 - - 16,653 48,432 5,798 -936 72,642 156 -307 61,003

416

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

429,215 5,872 1,093,588 483,473 118,666 38,688 7,789 1,028,754 429,215 5,872 1,093,588 483,473 118,666 38,688 7,789 1,028,754 126,026 1,006,933 150,671 Crude Oil 406,791 - - - - 424,639 598 22,523 1,445 853,106 0 0 56,432 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 22,424 -123 18,260 1,933 - - - 404 24,108 5,319 12,663 4,734 Pentanes Plus 10,215 -123 - - - - - - -20 7,565 1,094 1,453 51 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 12,209 - - 18,260 1,933 - - - 424 16,543 4,225 11,210 4,683 Ethane/Ethylene 34 - - - - - - - - - - 34 - Propane/Propylene 4,422 - - 16,669 1,593 - - - 335 - 3,714 18,635 1,915 Normal Butane/Butylene 2,360 - - 2,258 332 - - - 129 9,346 512 -5,037 2,249 Isobutane/Isobutylene 5,393 - - -667 8 - - - -40 7,197 - -2,423 519

417

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

302,630 5,088 230,918 121,366 -164,290 -11,531 4,472 221,774 5,269 302,630 5,088 230,918 121,366 -164,290 -11,531 4,472 221,774 5,269 252,667 39,043 Crude Oil 163,870 - - - - 115,845 -53,264 -13,771 3,101 209,575 5 0 18,928 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 138,760 -110 3,391 3,503 -119,108 - - 94 6,946 4,261 15,135 1,470 Pentanes Plus 18,508 -110 - - - -13,355 - - 14 2,156 3,795 -922 194 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 120,252 - - 3,391 3,503 -105,753 - - 80 4,790 466 16,057 1,276 Ethane/Ethylene 63,265 - - - - -61,214 - - -6 - - 2,057 400 Propane/Propylene 36,541 - - 3,406 3,155 -28,078 - - 7 - 12 15,005 363 Normal Butane/Butylene 15,114 - - 294 255 -9,019 - - 88 2,241 455 3,860 366 Isobutane/Isobutylene 5,332 - - -309 93 -7,442 - - -9 2,549 - -4,866 147

418

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

315,006 29,943 578,101 299,380 14,453 11,088 543,388 108,925 315,006 29,943 578,101 299,380 14,453 11,088 543,388 108,925 573,483 1,831,621 Crude Oil 233,810 - - - - 237,344 8,334 7,688 468,825 2,975 0 1,067,149 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 81,196 -552 19,023 4,020 - - 3,027 16,794 13,937 69,929 189,672 Pentanes Plus 11,167 -552 - - 772 - - -700 5,666 2,989 3,432 18,036 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 70,029 - - 19,023 3,248 - - 3,727 11,128 10,947 66,498 171,636 Ethane/Ethylene 30,015 - - 379 9 - - -414 - - 30,817 34,444 Propane/Propylene 25,545 - - 17,254 2,603 - - 2,582 - 10,040 32,780 67,782 Normal Butane/Butylene 6,893 - - 1,738 333 - - 999 4,711 907 2,347 58,942 Isobutane/Isobutylene 7,576 - - -348 303 - - 560 6,417 - 554 10,468

419

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8,897 964 18,564 10,598 335 158 17,505 3,205 18,490 8,897 964 18,564 10,598 335 158 17,505 3,205 18,490 Crude Oil 6,489 - - - - 8,527 144 93 14,999 67 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 2,408 -18 630 170 - - 65 509 314 2,301 Pentanes Plus 317 -18 - - 29 - - -13 174 118 50 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 2,091 - - 630 141 - - 79 335 196 2,251 Ethane/Ethylene 974 - - 18 0 - - 34 - - 958 Propane/Propylene 712 - - 553 116 - - 36 - 171 1,175 Normal Butane/Butylene 179 - - 56 15 - - 5 143 26 77 Isobutane/Isobutylene 225 - - 3 9 - - 4 192 - 41 Other Liquids - - 981 - - 1,257 53 51 1,997 214 28 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 981 - - 40 151 5 1,050 116 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 190 - - 190 0 - -

420

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

71 22 3,498 1,982 3,256 25 -53 3,444 248 5,216 71 22 3,498 1,982 3,256 25 -53 3,444 248 5,216 Crude Oil 26 - - - - 864 11 23 -4 919 9 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 45 0 39 49 73 - - -4 20 8 182 Pentanes Plus 8 0 - - 1 0 - - 0 0 1 7 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 37 - - 39 49 73 - - -4 20 7 175 Ethane/Ethylene 0 - - 0 - - - - 0 - - 1 Propane/Propylene 25 - - 35 44 73 - - -2 - 3 176 Normal Butane/Butylene 6 - - 4 2 0 - - -2 9 4 1 Isobutane/Isobutylene 6 - - -1 3 - - - 0 10 - -2 Other Liquids - - 22 - - 717 1,611 114 -5 2,505 10 -47 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 22 - - 29 291 -9 3 324 6 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 4 - - 4 0 - - Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) - - - - 0 - 0 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil production increased" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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421

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

34,932 594 95,116 42,741 9,239 5,791 830 89,707 10,470 87,406 34,932 594 95,116 42,741 9,239 5,791 830 89,707 10,470 87,406 142,840 Crude Oil 33,114 - - - - 36,279 - 4,213 311 73,295 - 0 52,719 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 1,818 -8 1,970 134 - - - 1,076 1,782 396 660 8,270 Pentanes Plus 794 -8 - - - - - - 163 552 92 -21 314 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1,024 - - 1,970 134 - - - 913 1,230 304 681 7,956 Ethane/Ethylene 3 - - - - - - - - - - 3 - Propane/Propylene 420 - - 1,475 124 - - - 374 - 299 1,346 2,272 Normal Butane/Butylene 158 - - 451 10 - - - 378 556 5 -320 5,110 Isobutane/Isobutylene 443 - - 44 - - - - 161 674 - -348 574 Other Liquids - - 602 - - 3,200 7,556 2,809 -2,126 14,630 387 1,276 46,625

422

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3,256,148 352,785 6,794,407 3,878,852 122,574 57,691 6,406,693 3,256,148 352,785 6,794,407 3,878,852 122,574 57,691 6,406,693 1,172,965 6,767,418 1,807,777 Crude Oil 2,374,842 - - - - 3,120,755 52,746 34,134 5,489,516 24,693 0 1,060,764 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 881,306 -6,534 230,413 62,192 - - 23,894 186,270 115,054 842,159 153,268 Pentanes Plus 116,002 -6,534 - - 10,680 - - -4,857 63,596 43,136 18,273 12,739 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 765,304 - - 230,413 51,512 - - 28,751 122,674 71,918 823,886 140,529 Ethane/Ethylene 356,592 - - 6,597 115 - - 12,504 - - 350,800 35,396 Propane/Propylene 260,704 - - 202,309 42,460 - - 13,013 - 62,490 429,970 67,991 Normal Butane/Butylene 65,555 - - 20,580 5,567 - - 1,795 52,246 9,428 28,233 28,574

423

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

59,397 25,268 126,131 58,449 20,168 -10,157 5,610 119,848 7,211 59,397 25,268 126,131 58,449 20,168 -10,157 5,610 119,848 7,211 146,586 280,571 Crude Oil 44,167 - - - - 55,181 16,673 -10,758 505 102,476 2,282 0 102,610 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 15,230 -515 3,462 1,887 -432 - - 2,252 3,146 2,129 12,105 58,830 Pentanes Plus 1,896 -515 - - 6 2,928 - - -549 1,119 1,599 2,146 7,743 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 13,334 - - 3,462 1,881 -3,360 - - 2,801 2,027 530 9,959 51,087 Ethane/Ethylene 4,901 - - - 9 -3,013 - - 339 - - 1,558 4,694 Propane/Propylene 5,587 - - 3,111 1,470 -650 - - 1,991 - 199 7,328 24,444 Normal Butane/Butylene 1,561 - - 475 162 156 - - 651 514 331 858 20,078 Isobutane/Isobutylene 1,285 - - -124 240 147 - - -180 1,513 - 215 1,871

424

U.S. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total 522,879 659,392 738,803 858,685 1,089,848 1,172,965 1981-2012 Crude Oil 10,006 10,464 15,985 15,198 17,158 24,693 1870-2012 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 25,584 36,951 50,681 59,842 90,968 115,054 1981-2012 Pentanes Plus 4,776 12,393 14,337 11,792 36,837 43,136 1984-2012 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 20,809 24,558 36,344 48,050 54,131 71,918 1981-2012 Ethane/Ethylene 1983-1992 Propane/Propylene 15,501 19,264 30,925 39,860 45,243 62,490 1981-2012 Normal Butane/Butylene 5,308 5,294 5,419 8,189 8,888 9,428 1981-2012 Isobutane/Isobutylene 1984-1992 Other Liquids 32,049 23,477 23,625 44,514 67,981 78,359 1991-2012 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/ Other Hydrocarbons

425

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

571,552 300,900 1,523,608 673,109 268,869 -25,130 18,853 1,447,490 571,552 300,900 1,523,608 673,109 268,869 -25,130 18,853 1,447,490 89,370 1,757,194 287,201 Crude Oil 408,314 - - - - 633,223 292,624 -31,767 22,602 1,259,826 19,966 0 115,743 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 163,238 -6,037 44,417 27,019 -9,288 - - -4,496 38,476 40,729 144,640 43,693 Pentanes Plus 18,229 -6,037 - - 213 29,889 - - -1,599 11,319 36,827 -4,253 6,686 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 145,009 - - 44,417 26,806 -39,177 - - -2,897 27,157 3,902 148,893 37,007 Ethane/Ethylene 59,649 - - - 115 -39,435 - - -716 - - 21,045 3,590 Propane/Propylene 57,022 - - 39,605 21,464 -8,812 - - -1,114 - 580 109,813 22,020 Normal Butane/Butylene 17,564 - - 4,181 3,156 3,807 - - -1,354 10,449 3,322 16,291

426

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10,500 998 19,270 9,979 482 370 18,113 3,631 19,116 10,500 998 19,270 9,979 482 370 18,113 3,631 19,116 Crude Oil 7,794 - - - - 7,911 278 256 15,628 99 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 2,707 -18 634 134 - - 101 560 465 2,331 Pentanes Plus 372 -18 - - 26 - - -23 189 100 114 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 2,334 - - 634 108 - - 124 371 365 2,217 Ethane/Ethylene 1,001 - - 13 0 - - -14 - - 1,027 Propane/Propylene 852 - - 575 87 - - 86 - 335 1,093 Normal Butane/Butylene 230 - - 58 11 - - 33 157 30 78 Isobutane/Isobutylene 253 - - -12 10 - - 19 214 - 18 Other Liquids - - 1,015 - - 1,337 296 304 1,926 219 199 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 1,015 - - 75 121 -36 1,129 118 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 208 - - 208 0 - -

427

Influence of steam-drive production on the properties of high-molecular weight components of heavy Ashal`chinsk crude oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparative analysis has been made of the composition and properties of heavy Ashal`chinsk crude oil produced both by natural flow and by the steam-drive method. It has been shown that the use of the steam-drive method in order to improve Elie oil yield leads to certain changes in the composition of the oil produced, which is reflected in a change in quality of the target petroleum products. In particular, because of the additional presence in the crude oil of high-molecular weight n-alkanes, there is an increase in the pour point and viscosity index of paraffinic-naphthenic hydrocarbons, which are the main components of residual base oils. An experimental study of the influence of temperatures characteristic of the steam-drive method (300{degrees}C) on the asphaltene-resinous components of Ashal`chinsk crude oil confirmed that during steam-drive production these substances undergo degradation processes associated with detachment of alkyl substituents at peripheral fragments containing sulphur, oxygen, nitrogen and other heteroatoms and consequently are a potential source of alkane hydrocarbons.

Kayukova, G.P.; Kurbskii, G.P.; Lifanova, Ye.V. [and others

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

926,785 32,969 2,665,992 1,875,331 -1,415,011 111,431 45,954 926,785 32,969 2,665,992 1,875,331 -1,415,011 111,431 45,954 2,448,351 861,579 1,841,613 1,178,473 Crude Oil 1,386,449 - - - - 1,630,908 -244,084 67,355 8,560 2,830,779 1,288 0 861,333 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 540,336 -180 150,143 11,694 101,692 - - 29,480 109,476 61,693 603,036 96,994 Pentanes Plus 66,222 -180 - - 10,282 -16,515 - - -3,264 42,493 1,105 19,475 5,765 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 474,114 - - 150,143 1,412 118,207 - - 32,744 66,983 60,588 583,561 91,229 Ethane/Ethylene 233,470 - - 6,504 - 100,649 - - 13,226 - - 327,397 31,406 Propane/Propylene 153,496 - - 129,707 174 10,289 - - 14,578 - 56,954 222,134 38,509 Normal Butane/Butylene 28,426 - - 12,412 1,208 5,090 - - 3,798 26,775 3,633 12,930

429

Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management, Class III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs, transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nguyen, John; Moos, Dan; Tagbor, Kwasi

2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

430

U.S. Total Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Area: U.S. PADD 1 New England Central Atlantic Lower Atlantic PADD 2 Cushing, Oklahoma PADD 3 PADD 4 PADD 5 PADD's 4 & 5 Period: Weekly Monthly Annual Area: U.S. PADD 1 New England Central Atlantic Lower Atlantic PADD 2 Cushing, Oklahoma PADD 3 PADD 4 PADD 5 PADD's 4 & 5 Period: Weekly Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 11/08/13 11/15/13 11/22/13 11/29/13 12/06/13 12/13/13 View History Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Incl. SPR) 1,806,930 1,795,196 1,793,557 1,786,470 1,781,747 1,769,150 1990-2013 Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Excl. SPR) 1,110,961 1,099,227 1,097,588 1,090,501 1,085,778 1,073,181 1990-2013 Crude Oil (Including SPR) 1,084,057 1,084,432 1,087,385 1,081,800 1,071,215 1,068,274 1982-2013 Commercial Crude Oil

431

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Glossary ANILCA: Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act ANS: Alaskan North Slope ANWR: Arctic National Wildlife Refuge BBbls: billion barrels Bbls: barrels Daily Petroleum Production Rate: The amount of petroleum extracted per day from a well, group of wells, region, etc. (usually expressed in barrels per day) EIA: Energy Information Administration MBbls: thousand barrels MMBbls: million barrels NPR-A: National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska Petroleum Play: A set of known or postulated petroleum accumulations sharing similar geologic, geographic, and temporal properties such as source rock, migration, pathway, timing, trapping mechanism, and hydrocarbon type

432

Hydrogen Production by Catalytic Steam Reforming of Bio-oil, Naphtha  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen production by catalytic steam reforming of the bio-oil, naphtha, and CH4 was investigated over a novel metal-doped catalyst of (Ca24Al28O64)4+4O?/Mg (C12A7-Mg). The catalytic steam reforming was investigated from 250 to 850°C in the fixed-bed continuous flow reactor. For the reforming of bio-oil, the yield of hydrogen of 80% was obtained at 750°C, and the maximum carbon conversion is nearly close to 95% under the optimum steam reforming condition. For the reforming of naphtha and CH4, the hydrogen yield and carbon conversion are lower than that of bio-oil at the same temperature. The characteristics of catalyst were also investigated by XPS. The catalyst deactivation was mainly caused by the deposition of carbon in the catalytic steam reforming process.

Yue Pan; Zhao-xiang Wang; Tao Kan; Xi-feng Zhu; Quan-xin Li

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Direct hydro-liquefaction of sawdust in petroleum ether and comprehensive bio-oil products analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The effect of temperature, time, hydrogen pressure and amount of catalyst on production distribution and the bio-oil yield obtained from the direct liquefaction of sawdust in the petroleum ether (60–90 °C) are investigated. The highest sawdust conversion obtained was 72.32% with a bio-oil yield of 47.69% were obtained at 370 °C, 40 min and 5wt.% catalyst content with the initial H2 pressure of 3.0 MPa. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) approach was utilized to analyze the non-volatile fraction. In this study, the composition of bio-oil could be analyzed in an unprecedented detail through a combination of GC–MS and FT-ICR MS techniques.

Dong Liu; Linhua Song; Pingping Wu; Yan Liu; Qingyin Li; Zifeng Yan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Consumer Surplus in the Digital Economy: Estimating the Value of Increased Product Variety at Online Booksellers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a framework and empirical estimates that quantify the economic impact of increased product variety made available through electronic markets. While efficiency ...

Brynjolfsson, Erik

2003-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

435

Applicability ranges for offshore oil and gas production facilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the early stages of the selection process for the hardware to exploit an offshore petroleum reservoir, it is important to be able to identify rapidly which production facility type(s) are likely to deliver the greatest value. This paper explores key features and constraints of the ten common fixed, floating and subsea facility options. Both shallow and deepwater are considered, along with regional variations. It is shown that facility applications may be categorised in a very simple matrix form, with the water depth and well count being particularly important drivers of facility choice.

Beverley F. Ronalds

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Industrial Use of Fish Oils UNITED STATES DEPART MENT OF THE INTERIOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of commerce are obtained as by-products from fish-meal production or from food fish wastes. vVorld fish-oil production was an estimated 865,000 tons in 1966. Production has increased 2S.Sjr since 1961. All other oils, selectively hydrogenated, and de- odorized for these applications. Fish oils in food products were discontin

437

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance and produced polymer evaluation of four alkaline-surfactant-polymer projects concluded that only one of the projects could have benefited from combining the alkaline-surfactant-polymer and gelation technologies. Cambridge, the 1993 Daqing, Mellott Ranch, and the Wardlaw alkaline-surfacant-polymer floods were studied. An initial gel treatment followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood in the Wardlaw field would have been a benefit due to reduction of fracture flow. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls or 3.3% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery improvement over a waterflood was 392,000 bbls or 6.5% OOIP. Placing a gel into the B sand prior to an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood resulted in 989,000 bbl or 16.4% OOIP more oil than only water injection. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls or 9.9% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand.

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

61. Nelson, D. C. Oil Shale: New Technologies Defining New Opportunities. Presented at the Platts Rockies Gas & Oil Conference, Denver, CO, April  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

61. Nelson, D. C. Oil Shale: New Technologies Defining New Opportunities. Presented at the Platts I, II Modeling of the In-Situ Production of Oil from .',1 l ',".1" Oil Shale ilil 'I' 'I~ :' l of conventional oil reserves amidst increasing liquid fuel demand in the world have renewed interest in oil shale

Kulp, Mark

439

Maximum Hydrogen Production by Autothermal Steam Reforming of Bio-oil With NiCuZnAl Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Autothermal steam reforming (ATR) of bio-oil, which couples the endothermic steam reforming reaction with the exothermic partial oxidation, offers many advantages from a technical and economic point of view. Effective production of hydrogen through ATR of bio-oil was performed at lower temperature with NiCuZnAl catalyst. The highest hydrogen yield from bio-oil reached 64.3% with a nearly complete bio-oil conversion at 600 °C, the ratio of steam to carbon fed (S/C) of 3 and the oxygen to carbon ratio (O/C) of 0.34. The reaction conditions in ATR including temperature, O/C, S/C and weight hourly space velocity can be used to control both hydrogen yield and products distribution. The comparison between the ATR and common steam reforming of bio-oil was studied. The mechanism of the ATR of bio-oil was also discussed.

Shi-zhi Yan; Qi Zhai; Quan-xin Li

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

GUILLE-ESCURET, G. et HLADIK, C.M. (1990) --Products of the oil palm In : C.M. HLADIK, S. BAHUCHET et I. de  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GUILLE-ESCURET, G. et HLADIK, C.M. (1990) -- Products of the oil palm In : C.M. HLADIK, S. BAHUCHET of production. Disnibution of the oil palm in Africa has been favoured by human activities. Schwartz(1) has African Republic, the most productive "wild" populations of oil palm are located on the sites of fonner

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil production increased" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Syngas production by plasma treatments of alcohols, bio-oils and wood This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Syngas production by plasma treatments of alcohols, bio-oils and wood This article has been Contact us My IOPscience #12;Syngas production by plasma treatments of alcohols, bio-oils and wood K conversion of biomass provide a great variety of products: oils, alcohols and gases. After treatment

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

442

Economic effects of peak oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assuming that global oil production peaked, this paper uses scenario analysis to show the economic effects of a possible supply shortage and corresponding rise in oil prices in the next decade on different sectors in Germany and other major economies such as the US, Japan, China, the OPEC or Russia. Due to the price-inelasticity of oil demand the supply shortage leads to a sharp increase in oil prices in the second scenario, with high effects on GDP comparable to the magnitude of the global financial crises in 2008/09. Oil exporting countries benefit from high oil prices, whereas oil importing countries are negatively affected. Generally, the effects in the third scenario are significantly smaller than in the second, showing that energy efficiency measures and the switch to renewable energy sources decreases the countries' dependence on oil imports and hence reduces their vulnerability to oil price shocks on the world market.

Christian Lutz; Ulrike Lehr; Kirsten S. Wiebe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Petrochemicals from oil, natural gas, coal and biomass: Production costs in 2030–2050  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methane, coal and biomass are being considered as alternatives to crude oil for the production of basic petrochemicals, such as light olefins. This paper is a study on the production costs of 24 process routes utilizing these primary energy sources. A wide range of projected energy prices in 2030–2050 found in the open literature is used. The basis for comparison is the production cost per t of high value chemicals (HVCs or light olefin-value equivalent). A Monte Carlo method was used to estimate the ranking of production costs of all 24 routes with 10,000 trials of varying energy prices and CO2 emissions costs (assumed to be within $0–100/t CO2; the total CO2 emissions, or cradle-to-grave CO2 emissions, were considered). High energy prices in the first three quarter of 2008 were tested separately. The main findings are:• Production costs: while the production costs of crude oil- and natural gas-based routes are within $500–900/t HVCs, those of coal- and biomass-based routes are mostly within $400–800/t HVCs. Production costs of coal- and biomass-based routes are in general quite similar while in some cases the difference is significant. Among the top seven most expensive routes, six are oil- and gas-based routes. Among the top seven least expensive routes, six are coal and biomass routes. • CO2 emissions costs: the effect of CO2 emissions costs was found to be strong on the coal-based routes and also quite significant on the biomass-based routes. However, the effect on oil- and gas-based routes is found to be small or relatively moderate. • Energy prices in 2008: most of the coal-based routes and biomass-based routes (particularly sugar cane) still have much lower production costs than the oil- and gas-based routes (even if international freight costs are included). To ensure the reduction of CO2 emissions in the long-term, we suggest that policies for the petrochemicals industry focus on stimulating the use of biomass as well as carbon capture and storage features for coal-based routes.

Tao Ren; Bert Daniëls; Martin K. Patel; Kornelis Blok

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

World oil demand’s shift toward faster growing and less price-responsive products and regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using data for 1971–2008, we estimate the effects of changes in price and income on world oil demand, disaggregated by product – transport oil, fuel oil (residual and heating oil), and other oil – for six groups of countries. Most of the demand reductions since 1973–74 were due to fuel-switching away from fuel oil, especially in the OECD; in addition, the collapse of the Former Soviet Union (FSU) reduced their oil consumption substantially. Demand for transport and other oil was much less price-responsive, and has grown almost as rapidly as income, especially outside the OECD and FSU. World oil demand has shifted toward products and regions that are faster growing and less price-responsive. In contrast to projections to 2030 of declining per-capita demand for the world as a whole – by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), International Energy Agency (IEA) and OPEC – we project modest growth. Our projections for total world demand in 2030 are at least 20% higher than projections by those three institutions, using similar assumptions about income growth and oil prices, because we project rest-of-world growth that is consistent with historical patterns, in contrast to the dramatic slowdowns which they project.

Joyce M. Dargay; Dermot Gately

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Biodiesel production from algae oil high in free fatty acids by two-step catalytic conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of storage temperature and time on lipid composition of Scenedesmus sp. was studied. When stored at 4 °C or higher, the free fatty acid content in the wet biomass increased from a trace to 62.0% by day 4. Using two-step catalytic conversion, algae oil with a high free fatty acid content was converted to biodiesel by pre-esterification and transesterification. The conversion rate of triacylglycerols reached 100% under the methanol to oil molar ratio of 12:1 during catalysis with 2% potassium hydroxide at 65 °C for 30 min. This process was scaled up to produce biodiesel from Scenedesmus sp. and Nannochloropsis sp. oil. The crude biodiesel was purified using bleaching earth. Except for moisture content, the biodiesel conformed to Chinese National Standards.

Lin Chen; Tianzhong Liu; Wei Zhang; Xiaolin Chen; Junfeng Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

U.S. Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Import Area: U.S. Import Area: U.S. Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Import Area Country May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History All Countries 311,620 293,713 317,538 316,119 299,380 297,359 1981-2013 Persian Gulf 66,194 56,827 59,730 66,973 64,391 59,920 1993-2013 OPEC* 125,395 114,753 117,595 120,909 117,616 105,745 1993-2013 Algeria 5,200 2,625 3,478 3,255 4,092 2,036 1993-2013 Angola 10,162 8,115 7,496 11,660 6,792 6,422 1993-2013 Ecuador 5,533 6,071 6,140 10,833 7,662 7,794 1993-2013 Iraq 9,937 6,850 9,275 12,308 8,618 7,000 1996-2013 Kuwait 11,181 6,518 9,585 13,006 8,980 10,382 1993-2013 Libya

447

U.S. Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Import Area: U.S. Import Area: U.S. Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Import Area Country 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History All Countries 4,915,957 4,726,994 4,267,110 4,304,533 4,174,210 3,878,852 1981-2012 Persian Gulf 789,607 867,559 616,371 624,638 679,403 789,082 1993-2012 OPEC* 2,182,607 2,179,305 1,743,143 1,790,811 1,662,720 1,563,273 1993-2012 Algeria 244,605 200,652 180,018 186,019 130,723 88,487 1993-2012 Angola 185,352 187,790 167,877 143,512 126,259 85,335 1993-2012 Ecuador 74,179 80,714 67,471 77,224 75,072 65,913 1993-2012 Iraq 176,709 229,300 164,357 151,619 167,690 174,080 1996-2012 Kuwait 66,185 76,986 66,477 71,782 69,890 111,586 1993-2012

448

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 3. Summary The 1.5 million-acre coastal plain of the 19 million-acre Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is the largest unexplored, potentially productive geologic onshore basin in the United States. The primary area of the coastal plain is the 1002 Area of ANWR established when ANWR was created. A decision on permitting the exploration and development of the 1002 Area is up to Congress and has not been approved to date. Also included in the Coastal Plain are State lands to the 3-mile offshore limit and Native Inupiat land near the village of Kaktovik. The USGS estimated: a 95 percent probability that at least 5.7 billion barrels of technically recoverable undiscovered oil are in the ANWR coastal plain,

449

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent assessment of oil and gas resources of ANWR Coastal Plain (The Oil and Gas Resource Potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge 1002 Area, Alaska, Open File Report 98-34, 1999) provided basic information used in this study. A prior assessment was completed in 1987 by the USGS. Information from recent offset drilling, offsetting discoveries, and new geologic and geophysical data were used to update the oil and gas resource potential. An evaluation was made of each of 10 petroleum plays (similar geologic settings). For each play, USGS constructed statistical distributions of the number and size of potential accumulations based on a probabilistic range of geologic attributes. Minimum accumulation size was 500 million barrels. The resulting distributions were subjected to three risk parameters. Risk was assigned for the occurrence of adequate generation and migration of petroleum to meet the minimum size requirements, for the occurrence of reservoir rock to contain the minimum volume, and for the occurrence of a trapping mechanism to seal the petroleum in the reservoir. USGS analysts applied an appropriate recovery factor to the estimated oil in place that was calculated for each play to obtain an estimate of technically recoverable petroleum resources. The combined recovery factor for the entire study area averages approximately 37 percent of the initial oil in place. It is likely that the actual recovery factor of potential large fields would exceed 37 percent, because the nearby giant Prudhoe Bay field recovery factor will exceed 50 percent.

450

Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low-Dip Slope and Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California, Class III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is not just to commercially produce oil from the Pru Fee property, but rather to test which operational strategies best optimize total oil recovery at economically acceptable rates of production volumes and costs.

Schamel, Steven; Deo, Milind; Deets, Mike

2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

451

Can the U.S. Oil and Gas Resource Base Support Sustained Production?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...that stable U.S. production levels ofthe first half...stable levels of domestic production? The productive character...Petroleum-Exporting Countries (OPEC). Statistics show...682,000 barrels a day (12). If adjustments...actual increase in Alaska production during 1986 and for...

WILLIAM L. FISHER

1987-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

452

Applications of advanced petroleum production technology and water alternating gas injection for enhanced oil recovery - Mattoon Oil Field, Illinois. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase I results of a C0{sub 2}-assisted oil recovery demonstration project in selected Cypress Sandstone reservoirs at Mattoon Field, Illinois are reported. The design and scope of this project included C0{sub 2} injectvity testing in the Pinnell and Sawyer units, well stimulaton treatments with C0{sub 2} in the Strong unit and infill well drilling, completion and oil production. The field activities were supported by extensive C0{sub 2}-oil-water coreflood experiments, CO{sub 2} oil-phase interaction experiments, and integrated geologic modeling and reservoir simulations. The progress of the project was made public through presentations at an industry meeting and a DOEs contractors` symposium, through quarterly reports and one-to-one consultations with interested operators. Phase II of this project was not implemented. It would have been a water-alternating-gas (WAG) project of longer duration.

Baroni, M. [American Oil Recovery, Inc., Decatur, IL (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

An assessment of using oil shale for power production in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the oil shale-for-power-production option in Jordan. Under consideration are 20- and 50-MW demonstration units and a 400-MW, commercial-scale plant with, at the 400-MW scale, a mining operation capable of supplying 7.8 million tonnes per year of shale fuel and also capable of disposal of up to 6.1 million tonnes per year of wetted ash. The plant would be a direct combustion facility, burning crushed oil shale through use of circulating fluidized bed combustion technology. The report emphasizes four areas: (1) the need for power in Jordan, (2) environmental aspects of the proposed oil shale-for-power plant(s), (3) the engineering feasibility of using Jordan's oil shale in circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) boiler, and (4) the economic feasibility of the proposed plant(s). A sensitivity study was conducted to determine the economic feasibility of the proposed plant(s) under different cost assumptions and revenue flows over the plant's lifetime. The sensitivity results are extended to include the major extra-firm benefits of the shale-for-power option: (1) foreign exchange savings from using domestic energy resources, (2) aggregate income effects of using Jordan's indigenous labor force, and (3) a higher level of energy security. 14 figs., 47 tabs.

Hill, L.J.; Holcomb, R.S.; Petrich, C.H.; Roop, R.D.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate gels that were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels maintained gel integrity in linear corefloods after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution at 125 F. At 175 F, Xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels were not stable either with or without subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls when a gel was placed in the B sand. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-pol

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Seabirds and North Sea Oil [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and around the North Sea. The oil industry recognized the problem...beaches. The feared increase in oil pollution incidents has not...few accidents associated with offshore production have had little effect...declines cannot be attributed to oil activities in the North Sea...

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Upgrading of petroleum oil feedstocks using alkali metals and hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of upgrading an oil feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the oil feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase separable from the organic oil feedstock material. The upgradant hydrocarbon bonds to the oil feedstock material and increases the number of carbon atoms in the product. This increase in the number of carbon atoms of the product increases the energy value of the resulting oil feedstock.

Gordon, John Howard

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

457

Heavy Oil Production Technology Challenges and the Effect of Nano Sized Metals on the Viscosity of Heavy Oil.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Heavy oil and bitumen make up 70% of the discovered petroleum resources in the world. Only a very small fraction of these resources have… (more)

Bjørnseth, Fabian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Wireless sensor networks for off-shore oil and gas installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the production process, to either prevent or detect oil and gas leakage or to enhance the production flow ­ Underwater development and production of oil and gas needs networked sensors and actuators to monitor and communication technology (ICT) enables the oil, gas and energy (OGE) industries to increase productivity

Gjessing, Stein

459

Peak Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At the start of the new millennium, the expression “Peak Oil” was unknown. Nevertheless, a discussion about when the world’s rate of oil production would reach its maximum had already ... . King Hubbert presented...

Kjell Aleklett

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Production of Onshore Lower-48 Oil and Gas-model methodology and data description. [PROLOG  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the methodology and data used in the Production of Onshore Lower-48 Oil and Gas (PROLOG) model. The model forecasts annual oil and natural gas production on a regional basis. A linear program is used to select drilling activities for conventional oil and gas on the basis of their economic merit, subject to constraints on available rotary rigs and constraints based on historical drilling patterns. Using an exogenously specified price path, net present values are computed for fixed amounts of drilling activity for oil and gas, and for exploration and development in each of six onshore regions. Forecasts of drilling for enhanced gas recovery (EGR) are exogenously determined, and this drilling is included when considering the constraints on drilling rigs. The report is organized as follows. Chapter 2 is a general overview of the model, describing the major characteristics of the methodology and the logical interaction of the various modules. Chapter 3 specifies the structure of the linear program including the equations for the objective function and the constraints. The details of the methodology used to model exploratory, developmental, and deep gas drilling are presented in Chapters 4-6, respectively. Chapter 7 presents a discussion of the economic evaluation which takes place in each discounted cash flow calculation performed by the model. Cost equations are presented, and various user-specified options as to how to incorporate these costs are discussed. Methodological details and equations used to model finding rates and revisions are given in Chapter 8. Possible areas of future enhancements to the PROLOG model are presented in Chapter 9.

Carlson, M.; Kurator, W.; Mariner-Volpe, B.; O'Neill, R.; Trapmann, W.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Peak Oil Netherlands Foundation (PONL) was founded in May 2005 by a group of citizens who are concerned about the effects of a premature peak in oil and other fossil fuels production. The main aims of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Peak Oil Netherlands Foundation (PONL) was founded in May 2005 by a group of citizens who are concerned about the effects of a premature peak in oil and other fossil fuels production. The main aims of this report, the other people in the Peak Oil Netherlands Foundation for their work, peakoil.com & the oildrum

Keeling, Stephen L.

462

Electrolysed palladium has the potential to increase methane production by a mixed rumen population in vitro  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrolysed palladium has the potential to increase methane production by a mixed rumen population the proportion of protozoa with attached methanogens decreased, however no estimate of CH4 production under were re-filled with H2:CO2, sealed with butyl rubber stoppers and incubated at 39�C with shaking

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

463

U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

18,553 18,551 18,724 19,046 19,091 19,116 1963-2013 18,553 18,551 18,724 19,046 19,091 19,116 1963-2013 Crude Oil 0 0 0 0 0 0 1981-2013 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs 2,297 2,086 2,138 2,169 2,159 2,331 1981-2013 Pentanes Plus 52 48 113 -52 15 114 1981-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 2,245 2,038 2,025 2,222 2,144 2,217 1973-2013 Ethane/Ethylene 921 930 894 963 940 1,027 1981-2013 Propane/Propylene 1,148 924 979 1,052 1,036 1,093 1973-2013 Normal Butane/Butylene 130 138 85 141 103 78 1981-2013 Isobutane/Isobutylene 47 45 68 66 64 18 1981-2013 Other Liquids 66 100 24 184 -43 199 1981-2013 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/ Other Hydrocarbons 0 0 0 0 0 0 1991-2013 Unfinished Oils 67 100 24 184 -43 199 1981-2013 Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. 0 0 0 0 0 0 1981-2013

464

Dietary fish oil and butyrate increase apoptosis and decrease aberrant crypt foci in colon cancer by enhancing histone acetylation and p21waf1/cip1 expression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experimental findings, we hypothesized that one mechanism by which dietary fish oil+pectin suppress the promotion stage of colon cancer is through butyrate, the fermentation product of fiber, targeting (in particular) the p21Waf1/Cip1 gene and, via targeted...

Covert, Kristy Lynn

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

465

Production of hydrogen rich bio-oil derived syngas from co-gasification of bio-oil and waste engine oil as feedstock for lower alcohols synthesis in two-stage bed reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract High efficient production of lower alcohols (C1–C5 mixed alcohols) from hydrogen rich bio-oil derived syngas was achieved in this work. A non-catalytic partial oxidation (NPOX) gasification technology was successfully applied in the production and conditioning of bio-oil derived syngas using bio-oil (BO) and emulsifying waste engine oil (EWEO) as feedstock. The effects of water addition and feedstock composition on the gasification performances were investigated. When the BO20 and EWEO30 was mixed with mass ratio of 1: 0.33, the maximum hydrogen yield of 93.7% with carbon conversion of 96.7% was obtained, and the hydrogen rich bio-oil derived syngas was effectively produced. Furthermore, a two-stage bed reactor was applied in the downstream process of lower alcohols synthesis from hydrogen rich bio-oil derived syngas (H2/CO/CO2/CH4/N2 = 52.2/19.5/3.0/9.4/15.9, v/v). The highest carbon conversion of 42.5% and the maximum alcohol yield of 0.18 kg/kgcat h with selectivity of 53.8 wt% were obtained over the Cu/ZnO/Al2O3(2.5)//Cu25Fe22Co3K3/SiO2(2.5) catalyst combination system. The mechanism and evaluation for lower alcohols synthesis from model bio-oil derived syngas and model mixture gas were also discussed. The integrative process of hydrogen rich bio-oil derived syngas production and downstream lower alcohols synthesis, potentially providing a promising route for the conversion of organic wastes into high performance fuels and high value-added chemicals.

Haijun Guo; Fen Peng; Hairong Zhang; Lian Xiong; Shanggui Li; Can Wang; Bo Wang; Xinde Chen; Yong Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Impact and future of heavy oil produciton  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heavy oil resources are becoming increaingly important in meeting world oil demand. Heavy oil accounts for 10% of the worlds current oil production and is anticipated to grow significantly. Recent narrowing of the price margins between light and heavy oil and the development of regional heavy oil markets (production, refining and marketing) have prompted renewed investment in heavy oil. Production of well known heavy oil resources of Canada, Venezuela, United States, and elsewhere throughout the world will be expanded on a project-by-project basis. Custom refineries designed to process these heavy crudes are being expanded. Refined products from these crudes will be cleaner than ever before because of the huge investment. However, heavy oil still remains at a competitive disadvantage due to higher production, transportation and refining have to compete with other investment opportunities available in the industry. Expansion of the U.S. heavy oil industry is no exception. Relaxation of export restrictions on Alaskan North Slope crude has prompted renewed development of California's heavy oil resources. The location, resource volume, and oil properties of the more than 80-billion barrel U.S. heavy oil resource are well known. Our recent studies summarize the constraints on production, define the anticipated impact (volume, location and time frame) of development of U.S. heavy oil resources, and examines the $7-billion investment in refining units (bottoms conversion capacity) required to accommodate increased U.S. heavy oil production. Expansion of Canadian and Venezuelan heavy oil and tar sands production are anticipated to dramatically impact the U.S. petroleum market while displacing some imported Mideast crude.

Olsen, D.K, (National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research/BDM-Oklahoma Inc., Bartlesville, OK (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Impact and future of heavy oil produciton  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heavy oil resources are becoming increaingly important in meeting world oil demand. Heavy oil accounts for 10% of the worlds current oil production and is anticipated to grow significantly. Recent narrowing of the price margins between light and heavy oil and the development of regional heavy oil markets (production, refining and marketing) have prompted renewed investment in heavy oil. Production of well known heavy oil resources of Canada, Venezuela, United States, and elsewhere throughout the world will be expanded on a project-by-project basis. Custom refineries designed to process these heavy crudes are being expanded. Refined products from these crudes will be cleaner than ever before because of the huge investment. However, heavy oil still remains at a competitive disadvantage due to higher production, transportation and refining have to compete with other investment opportunities available in the industry. Expansion of the U.S. heavy oil industry is no exception. Relaxation of export restrictions on Alaskan North Slope crude has prompted renewed development of California`s heavy oil resources. The location, resource volume, and oil properties of the more than 80-billion barrel U.S. heavy oil resource are well known. Our recent studies summarize the constraints on production, define the anticipated impact (volume, location and time frame) of development of U.S. heavy oil resources, and examines the $7-billion investment in refining units (bottoms conversion capacity) required to accommodate increased U.S. heavy oil production. Expansion of Canadian and Venezuelan heavy oil and tar sands production are anticipated to dramatically impact the U.S. petroleum market while displacing some imported Mideast crude.

Olsen, D.K, [National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research/BDM-Oklahoma Inc., Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

468

Forest sector impacts of the increased use of wood in energy production in Norway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main objective of this study was to analyse the impacts of increased energy prices on the traditional forest sector (forestry and forest industries) in Norway The study applied a regionalized partial equilibrium model covering forestry, forest industries and the bioenergy sector. In the model, an increase in the energy price from NOK 0.50/kWh (0.06 Euro/kWh) to NOK 0.70/kWh by the year 2015 reduces production by 12% for particleboard and by 4% for pulp (mainly sulphate), whereas the production of fibreboard was unaffected. The pulp and paper industries in Norway are mainly relying on spruce pulpwood, which is only partly affected by increased bioenergy prices. In the sawmill industries, the negative impact of higher energy prices (input of electricity) is compensated by higher prices received for chips, sawdust and bark. The production of pine sawnwood (accounting for about 31% of the sawnwood production in Norway) increased by 3% by 2015 when the energy price increased from NOK 0.50 to 0.70 NOK per kWh, whereas the production of spruce sawnwood (accounting for 69% of the sawnwood production) decreased by 0.4%. Future, improvements of the model should include even more detailed descriptions of bioenergy technologies, the supply of wood residues and the energy market, including consumer behaviour and investment decisions.

Erik Trømborg; Birger Solberg

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

East Coast (PADD 1) Net Receipts of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Type: Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Type: Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Type Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 1,009,989 959,458 1,099,509 1,131,797 1,168,599 1,191,766 1981-2012 Crude Oil -3,860 -5,544 8,672 5,983 5,106 4,126 1981-2012 Petroleum Products 1,013,849 965,002 1,090,837 1,125,814 1,163,493 1,187,640 1986-2012 Pentanes Plus -590 -452 -113 -19 1991-2012 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 32,846 32,207 20,384 34,725 33,545 26,723 1981-2012 Ethane/Ethylene 1989-2002 Propane/Propylene 32,199 31,673 19,415 33,585 33,025 26,601 1989-2012 Normal Butane/Butylene

470

East Coast (PADD 1) Net Receipts of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Type: Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Type: Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Type Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 96,936 96,489 98,076 99,950 102,408 98,737 1981-2013 Crude Oil -533 -654 -152 -479 -42 20 1981-2013 Petroleum Products 97,469 97,143 98,228 100,429 102,450 98,717 1986-2013 Pentanes Plus -2 1987-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 2,739 1,357 1,555 1,342 1,959 2,568 1981-2013 Ethane/Ethylene 1989-2002 Propane/Propylene 2,739 1,357 1,555 1,342 1,959 2,483 1989-2013 Normal Butane/Butylene 85 1989-2013 Isobutane/Isobutylene 1989-2013

471

Three Percent Dietary Fish Oil Concentrate Increased Efficacy of Doxorubicin Against MDA-MB 231 Breast Cancer Xenografts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Nu-Chek-Prep; Elysian, MN) were used for peak identification. The EPA and DHA content...in the livers of mice fed 19% w/w fish oil for 6 months. Our results demonstrate that...that the erythrocytes of mice fed 12% fish oil had higher levels of n-3 fatty acids and...

W. Elaine Hardman; C. P. Reddy Avula; Gabriel Fernandes; and Ivan L. Cameron

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Solvent extraction of bituminous coals using light cycle oil: characterization of diaromatic products in liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many studies of the pyrolytic degradation of coal-derived and petroleum-derived aviation fuels have demonstrated that the coal-derived fuels show better thermal stability, both with respect to deposition of carbonaceous solids and cracking to gases. Much previous work at our institute has focused on the use of refined chemical oil (RCO), a distillate from the refining of coal tar, blended with light cycle oil (LCO) from catalytic cracking of vacuum gas oil. Hydroprocessing of this blend forms high concentrations of tetralin and decalin derivatives that confer particularly good thermal stability on the fuel. However, possible supply constraints for RCO make it important to consider alternative ways to produce an 'RCO-like' product from coal in an inexpensive process. This study shows the results of coal extraction using LCO as a solvent. At 350{sup o}C at a solvent-to-coal ratio of 10:1, the conversions were 30-50 wt % and extract yields 28-40 wt % when testing five different coals. When using lower LCO/coal ratios, conversions and extract yields were much smaller; lower LCO/coal ratios also caused mechanical issues. LCO is thought to behave similarly to a nonpolar, non-hydrogen donor solvent, which would facilitate heat-induced structural relaxation of the coal followed by solubilization. The main components contributed from the coal to the extract when using Pittsburgh coal are di- and triaromatic compounds. 41 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

Josefa M. Griffith; Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Leslie R. Rudnick; Harold H. Schobert [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). EMS Energy Institute

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

473

Analysis of Crude Oil Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Analysis of Crude Oil Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge May 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Depart