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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil processing facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Simulation-Based Optimization of Multistage Separation Process in Offshore Oil and Gas Production Facilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simulation-Based Optimization of Multistage Separation Process in Offshore Oil and Gas Production Facilities ... As the demand for offshore oil platforms and eco-friendly oil production has increased, it is necessary to determine the optimal conditions of offshore oil production platforms to increase profits and reduce costs as well as to prevent environmental pollution. ... To achieve a practical design for an offshore platform, it is necessary to consider environmental specifications based on an integrated model describing all units concerned with oil and gas production. ...

Ik Hyun Kim; Seungkyu Dan; Hosoo Kim; Hung Rae Rim; Jong Min Lee; En Sup Yoon

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

2

Process oil manufacturing process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for producing a naphthenic process oil having reduced sulfur, nitrogen and polynuclear aromatics contents from a naphthenic feed containing same and having an atmospheric boiling range of about 650/sup 0/ to about 1200/sup 0/F. comprising: A. passing the feed into a first hydrotreating stage having a hydrotreating catalyst therein, the stage maintained at a temperature of about 600/sup 0/ to about 750/sup 0/F. and at a hydrogen partial pressure of about 400 to about 1500 psig, to convert at least a portion of the sulfur to hydrogen sulfide and the nitrogen to ammonia; B. passing the hydrotreated feed from the first hydrotreating stage in an intermediate stripping stage wherein hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, or both is removed; C. passing the hydrotreated feed from the intermediate stage into a second hydrotreating stage having therein a hydrotreating catalyst selected from the group consisting of nickel-molybdenum, cobalt-molybdenum, nickel-tungsten and mixtures thereof, the second hydrotreating stage maintained at a temperature lower than that of the first hydrotreating stage and at a hydrogen partial pressure ranging between about 400 and about 1,500 psig; D. monitoring the polynuclear aromatics content, the degree of saturation, or both of the product exiting the second hydrotreating stage; and, E. adjusting the temperature in the second hydrotreating stage to keep the polynuclear aromatics content, the degree of saturation, or both below a limit suitable for process oil.

Corman, B.G.; Korbach, P.F.; Webber, K.M.

1989-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

3

"Z" Facility Dielectric Oil Clean-Up  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In August of 1998 the Z facility leaked approximately 150 gallons of deionized water into the dielectric oil of the Energy Storage Section (ESS). After processing the oil to remove existing particulate and free water the dielectric breakdown strength increased from the mid 20kV range to values in excess of 40 kV. 40 kV is above historical operating levels of about 35 kV. This, however, was not enough to allow 90 kV charging of the Marx Generators in the ESS. Further analysis of the oil showed dissolved water at a saturated level (70 - 80 ppm) and some residual particulate contamination smaller than 3 microns. The dissolved water and particulate combination was preventing the 90 kV charging of the Marx Generators in the ESS. After consulting with the oil industry it was determined that nitrogen sparging could be used to remove the dissolved water. Further particulate filtering was also conducted. After approximately 20 hours of sparging the water content in the ESS was reduced to 42 ppm which enabled Marx charging to 90 kV.

Alessandri, Daniel; Bloomquist, Doug; Donovan, Guy; Feltz, Greg; Grelle, Nibby; Guthrie, Doug; Harris, Mark; Horry, Mike; Lockas, Mike; Potter, Jimmy; Pritchard, Chuck; Steedly, Jim

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

Shale oil recovery process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of producing within a subterranean oil shale deposit a retort chamber containing permeable fragmented material wherein a series of explosive charges are emplaced in the deposit in a particular configuration comprising an initiating round which functions to produce an upward flexure of the overburden and to initiate fragmentation of the oil shale within the area of the retort chamber to be formed, the initiating round being followed in a predetermined time sequence by retreating lines of emplaced charges developing further fragmentation within the retort zone and continued lateral upward flexure of the overburden. The initiating round is characterized by a plurality of 5-spot patterns and the retreating lines of charges are positioned and fired along zigzag lines generally forming retreating rows of W's. Particular time delays in the firing of successive charges are disclosed.

Zerga, Daniel P. (Concord, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Heavy oil recovery process: Conceptual engineering of a downhole methanator and preliminary estimate of facilities cost for application to North Slope Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The West Sak (Upper Cretaceous) sands, overlaying the Kuparuk field, would rank among the largest known oil fields in the US, but technical difficulties have so far prevented its commercial exploitation. Steam injection is the most successful and the most commonly-used method of heavy oil recovery, but its application to the West Sak presents major problems. Such difficulties may be overcome by using a novel approach, in which steam is generated downhole in a catalytic Methanator, from Syngas made at the surface from endothermic reactions (Table 1). The Methanator effluent, containing steam and soluble gases resulting from exothermic reactions (Table 1), is cyclically injected into the reservoir by means of a horizontal drainhole while hot produced fluids flow form a second drainhole into a central production tubing. The downhole reactor feed and BFW flow downward to two concentric tubings. The large-diameter casing required to house the downhole reactor assembly is filled above it with Arctic Pack mud, or crude oil, to further reduce heat leaks. A quantitative analysis of this production scheme for the West Sak required a preliminary engineering of the downhole and surface facilities and a tentative forecast of well production rates. The results, based on published information on the West Sak, have been used to estimate the cost of these facilities, per daily barrel of oil produced. A preliminary economic analysis and conclusions are presented together with an outline of future work. Economic and regulatory conditions which would make this approach viable are discussed. 28 figs.

Gondouin, M.

1991-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

6

THERMAL PROCESSING OF OIL SHALE/SANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

)-based simulation tools to a modified in-situ process for production of oil from oil shale. The simulation tools

Michal Hradisky; Philip J. Smith; Doe Award; No. De-fe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Beneficiation-hydroretort processing of US oil shales, engineering study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a beneficiation facility designed to process 1620 tons per day of run-of-mine Alabama oil shale containing 12.7 gallons of kerogen per ton of ore (based on Fischer Assay). The beneficiation facility will produce briquettes of oil shale concentrate containing 34.1 gallons of kerogen per ton (based on Fischer Assay). The beneficiation facility will produce briquettes of oil shale concentrate containing 34.1 gallons of kerogen per ton (based on Fischer Assay) suitable for feed to a hydroretort oil extraction facility of nominally 20,000 barrels per day capacity. The beneficiation plant design prepared includes the operations of crushing, grinding, flotation, thickening, filtering, drying, briquetting, conveying and tailings empoundment. A complete oil shale beneficiation plant is described including all anticipated ancillary facilities. For purposes of determining capital and operating costs, the beneficiation facility is assumed to be located on a generic site in the state of Alabama. The facility is described in terms of the individual unit operations with the capital costs being itemized in a similar manner. Additionally, the beneficiation facility estimated operating costs are presented to show operating costs per ton of concentrate produced, cost per barrel of oil contained in concentrate and beneficiation cost per barrel of oil extracted from concentrate by hydroretorting. All costs are presented in fourth quarter of 1988 dollars.

Johnson, L.R.; Riley, R.H.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Salt Waste Processing Facility Project - January 2013 January 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project The U.S. Department of Energy...

9

Process for oil shale retorting  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Particulate oil shale is subjected to a pyrolysis with a hot, non-oxygenous gas in a pyrolysis vessel, with the products of the pyrolysis of the shale contained kerogen being withdrawn as an entrained mist of shale oil droplets in a gas for a separation of the liquid from the gas. Hot retorted shale withdrawn from the pyrolysis vessel is treated in a separate container with an oxygenous gas so as to provide combustion of residual carbon retained on the shale, producing a high temperature gas for the production of some steam and for heating the non-oxygenous gas used in the oil shale retorting process in the first vessel. The net energy recovery includes essentially complete recovery of the organic hydrocarbon material in the oil shale as a liquid shale oil, a high BTU gas, and high temperature steam.

Jones, John B. (300 Enterprise Bldg., Grand Junction, CO 80501); Kunchal, S. Kumar (300 Enterprise Bldg., Grand Junction, CO 80501)

1981-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

10

Process for the production of refrigerator oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for producing a high quality refrigerator oil from an oil fraction boiling at a temperature within boiling point of lubricating oil by contacting said oil fraction with a solvent to extract undesirable components thereby lowering % C..cap alpha.. of said oil fraction, hydrogenating said solvent extracted fraction under the specific conditions, and then contacting said hydrogenated oil with a solid absorbant to remove impurities; said oil fraction being obtained from a low grade naphthenic crude oil.

Kunihiro, T.; Tsuchiya, K.

1985-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

11

Feasibility of establishing and operating a generic oil shale test facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The December 19, 1985, Conference Report on House Joint Resolution 465, Further continuing appropriations for Fiscal Year 1986, included instruction to DOE to conduct a feasibility study for a generic oil shale test facility. The study was completed, as directed, and its findings are documented in this report. To determine the feasibility of establishing and operating such a facility, the following approach was used: examine the nature of the resource, and establish and basic functions associated with recovery of the resource; review the history of oil shale development to help put the present discussion in perspective; describe a typical oil shale process; define the relationship between each oil shale system component (mining, retorting, upgrading, environmental) and its cost. Analyze how research could reduce costs; and determine the scope of potential research for each oil shale system component.

Not Available

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Improving operational efficiency of fuel oil facilities used at gas-and-oil-fired power stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results obtained from experimental investigations of energy consumption are described, and ways for considerably reducing it are proposed taking as an example the fuel oil facility at the 2400-MW Lukoml District ...

A. K. Vnukov; F. A. Rozanova; A. A. Bazylenko; V. L. Zhurbilo…

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

TA-55: LANL Plutonium-Processing Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TA-55: LANL Plutonium-Processing Facilities TA-55: LANL Plutonium-Processing Facilities TA-55: LANL Plutonium-Processing Facilities TA-55 supports a wide range of national security programs that involve stockpile stewardship, plutonium processing, nuclear materials stabilization, materials disposition, nuclear forensics, nuclear counter-terrorism, and nuclear energy. ...the only fully operational, full capability plutonium facility in the nation. National Security At the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), virtually all plutonium operations occur within the Plutonium Facility at Technical Area 55 (TA-55). TA-55 is the nation's most modern plutonium science and manufacturing facility, and it is the only fully operational, full capability plutonium facility in the nation. Thus, TA-55 supports a wide

14

Australian developments in oil shale processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study gives some background on Australian oil shale deposits, briefly records some history of oil shale processing in the country and looks at the current status of the various proposals being considered to produce syncrudes from Australian oil shales. 5 refs.

Baker, G.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Shale oil processes ready for commercialization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shale oil processes ready for commercialization ... However, Lurgi has been in the shale processing business by itself since the 1930s, and hopes to capitalize on this experience. ... Lurgi developed the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (LR) process in concert with Ruhrgas with an eye on the U.S. shale oil markets of the future. ...

1982-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

16

Strengthening the applicability of self-heating retorting process to oil shale via co-retorting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recently a facile low-energy-input retorting route but without marked loss in the shale-oil yield is developed, which is achieved by a self-heating effect, that is, spontaneously increasing retorting temperature in the absence of external heat provision (Guo et al., 2013, 2014). In this work, the applicability of self-heating retorting (SHR) process to three Chinese oil shales from different places (i.e., Longkou, Huadian and Fushun) is studied. Of these three oil shales, Fushun oil shale is associated with coal and was previously abandoned during coal mining due to its not high kerogen or oil content. The results show that it’s hard for Fushun oil shale to obtain satisfying self-heating effect, while Longkou or Huadian oil shale with higher kerogen or oil content shows satisfactory SHR. However, by adding suitable amounts of Longkou or Huadian oil shale into Fushun oil shale, a satisfying self-heating effect can be obtained as well. Thus, the relatively low-grade Fushun oil shale can also be well utilized to produce shale oil via this facile SHR route. Moreover, to utilize Fushun oil shale with a greener SHR process, the process can be performed by co-retorting Fushun oil shale with pine needles, a kind of renewable biomass. This finding also provides a new starting point for exploring plentiful biomass resources to utilize low-grade oil shale to produce oil in the future work.

Hongfan Guo; Yindong Yang; Kuikui Wang; Yansong Pei; Qicheng Wu; Yunyi Liu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Chemical kinetics and oil shale process design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale processes are reviewed with the goal of showing how chemical kinetics influences the design and operation of different processes for different types of oil shale. Reaction kinetics are presented for organic pyrolysis, carbon combustion, carbonate decomposition, and sulfur and nitrogen reactions.

Burnham, A.K.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Process for converting heavy oil deposited on coal to distillable oil in a low severity process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing oil from coal fines that have been agglomerated or blended with heavy oil comprises the steps of heating the coal fines to temperatures over 350.degree. C. up to 450.degree. C. in an inert atmosphere, such as steam or nitrogen, to convert some of the heavy oil to lighter, and distilling and collecting the lighter oils. The pressure at which the process is carried out can be from atmospheric to 100 atmospheres. A hydrogen donor can be added to the oil prior to deposition on the coal surface to increase the yield of distillable oil.

Ignasiak, Teresa (417 Heffernan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Strausz, Otto (13119 Grand View Drive, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Ignasiak, Boleslaw (417 heffernan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Janiak, Jerzy (17820 - 76 Ave., Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Pawlak, Wanda (3046 - 11465 - 41 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Szymocha, Kazimierz (3125 - 109 Street, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Turak, Ali A. (Edmonton, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Process for tertiary oil recovery using tall oil pitch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and compositions for enhancing the recovery of acid crudes are disclosed. The process involves injecting caustic solutions into the reservoir to maintain a pH of 11 to 13. The fluid contains an effective amount of multivalent cation for inhibiting alkaline silica dissolution with the reservoir. A tall oil pitch soap is added as a polymeric mobility control agent. (DMC)

Radke, C.J.

1983-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

20

Applicability ranges for offshore oil and gas production facilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the early stages of the selection process for the hardware to exploit an offshore petroleum reservoir, it is important to be able to identify rapidly which production facility type(s) are likely to deliver the greatest value. This paper explores key features and constraints of the ten common fixed, floating and subsea facility options. Both shallow and deepwater are considered, along with regional variations. It is shown that facility applications may be categorised in a very simple matrix form, with the water depth and well count being particularly important drivers of facility choice.

Beverley F. Ronalds

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil processing facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Processing alternatives for glandless cottonseed oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCESSING ALTERNATIVES FOR GLANDLESS COTTONSEED OIL A Thesis by NARONG C~SEM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1981 Major Subject...: Food Science and Technology PROCESSING ALTERNATIVES FOR GLANDLESS COTTONSEED OIL A Thesis by NARONG CHAMKASEM Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Me r) (Member) ember) ;. +7+i~', P; I j Head of D artment) May 1981...

Chamkasem, Narong

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

22

Oil recovery process employing cyclic wettability alteration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for recovering oil from an oil-wet fractured subterranean oil-bearing formation penetrated by at least two wells from the surface which are in fluid communication with the formation and with one another comprising: (a)injecting a first slug of a surfactant solution into the fractured formation via a first of the at least two wells, the surfactant solution capable of becoming the preferred wetting phase of an oil-wet matrix block in the fractured formation; (b) contacting a face of the oil-well matrix block the surfactant solution for a time sufficient for the surfactant solution to penetrate and become the preferred wetting phase of at least a portion of the matrix block thereby displacing oil from the portion of the matrix block toward the face of the matrix block; (c) injecting a second slug of water into the formation via a second of at least two wells; (d) contacting the face of the matrix block with the water for a time sufficient for the water to penetrate and restore the portion of the matrix block to an oil-wet condition; (e) displacing the oil away from the face of the matrix block the water toward the first well; (f) recovering the oil from the formation via the first well; and (g) repeating steps (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f).

McClure, D.C.

1989-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

23

Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

anaerobic thermophilic oil reservoir and well communities.been detected in hot oil reservoirs and production fluids (other thermophilic oil reservoirs and wells suggests that

Duncan, Kathleen E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Cyclone oil shale retorting concept. [Use it all retorting process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new concept for above-ground retorting of oil shale was disclosed by A.E. Harak in US Patent No. 4,340,463, dated July 20, 1982, and assigned to the US Department of Energy. This patent titled System for Utilizing Oil Shale Fines, describes a process wherein oil shale fines of one-half inch diameter and less are pyrolyzed in an entrained-flow reactor using hot gas from a cyclone combustor. Spent shale and supplemental fuel are burned at slagging conditions in this combustor. Because of fines utilization, the designation Use It All Retorting Process (UIARP) has been adopted. A preliminary process engineering design of the UIARP, analytical tests on six samples of raw oil shale, and a preliminary technical and economic evaluation of the process were performed. The results of these investigations are summarized in this report. The patent description is included. It was concluded that such changes as deleting air preheating in the slag quench and replacing the condenser with a quench-oil scrubber are recognized as being essential. The addition of an entrained flow raw shale preheater ahead of the cyclone retort is probably required, but final acceptance is felt to be contingent on some verification that adequate reaction time cannot be obtained with only the cyclone, or possibly some other twin-cyclone configuration. Sufficient raw shale preheating could probably be done more simply in another manner, perhaps in a screw conveyor shale transporting system. Results of the technical and economic evaluations of Jacobs Engineering indicate that further investigation of the UIARP is definitely worthwhile. The projected capital and operating costs are competitive with costs of other processes as long as electric power generation and sales are part of the processing facility.

Harak, A.E.; Little, W.E.; Faulders, C.R.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Proof-of-Concept Oil Shale Facility Environmental Analysis Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the Project are to demonstrate: (1) the Modified In- Situ (MIS) shale oil extraction process and (2) the application of CFBC technology using oil shale, coal and waste gas streams as fuels. The project will focus on evaluating and improving the efficiency and environmental performance of these technologies. The project will be modest by commercial standards. A 17-retort MIS system is planned in which two retorts will be processed simultaneously. Production of 1206-barrels per calendar day of raw shale oil and 46-megawatts of electricity is anticipated. West Virginia University coordinated an Environmental Analysis Program for the Project. Experts from around the country were retained by WVU to prepare individual sections of the report. These experts were exposed to all of OOSI`s archives and toured Tract C-b and Logan Wash. Their findings were incorporated into this report. In summary, no environmental obstacles were revealed that would preclude proceeding with the Project. One of the most important objectives of the Project was to verify the environmental acceptability of the technologies being employed. Consequently, special attention will be given to monitoring environmental factors and providing state of the art mitigation measures. Extensive environmental and socioeconomic background information has been compiled for the Tract over the last 15 years and permits were obtained for the large scale operations contemplated in the late 1970`s and early 1980`s. Those permits have been reviewed and are being modified so that all required permits can be obtained in a timely manner.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Proof-of-Concept Oil Shale Facility Environmental Analysis Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the Project are to demonstrate: (1) the Modified In- Situ (MIS) shale oil extraction process and (2) the application of CFBC technology using oil shale, coal and waste gas streams as fuels. The project will focus on evaluating and improving the efficiency and environmental performance of these technologies. The project will be modest by commercial standards. A 17-retort MIS system is planned in which two retorts will be processed simultaneously. Production of 1206-barrels per calendar day of raw shale oil and 46-megawatts of electricity is anticipated. West Virginia University coordinated an Environmental Analysis Program for the Project. Experts from around the country were retained by WVU to prepare individual sections of the report. These experts were exposed to all of OOSI's archives and toured Tract C-b and Logan Wash. Their findings were incorporated into this report. In summary, no environmental obstacles were revealed that would preclude proceeding with the Project. One of the most important objectives of the Project was to verify the environmental acceptability of the technologies being employed. Consequently, special attention will be given to monitoring environmental factors and providing state of the art mitigation measures. Extensive environmental and socioeconomic background information has been compiled for the Tract over the last 15 years and permits were obtained for the large scale operations contemplated in the late 1970's and early 1980's. Those permits have been reviewed and are being modified so that all required permits can be obtained in a timely manner.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Waste minimization at a plutonium processing facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of Los Alamos National Laboratory`s (LANL) mission to reduce the nuclear danger throughout the world, the plutonium processing facility at LANL maintains expertise and skills in nuclear weapons technologies as well as leadership in all peaceful applications of plutonium technologies, including fuel fabrication for terrestrial and space reactors and heat sources and thermoelectric generators for space missions. Another near-term challenge resulted from two safety assessments performed by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board and the U.S. Department of Energy during the past two years. These assessments have necessitated the processing and stabilization of plutonium contained in tons of residues so that they can be stored safely for an indefinite period. This report describes waste streams and approaches to waste reduction of plutonium management.

Pillay, K.K.S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

28

Western oil shale conversion using the ROPE copyright process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) is continuing to develop the Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) process to recover liquid hydrocarbon products from oil shale, tar sand, and other solid hydrocarbonaceous materials. The process consists of three major steps: (1) pyrolyzing the hydrocarbonaceous material at a low temperature (T {le} 400{degrees}C) with recycled product oil, (2) completing the pyrolysis of the residue at a higher temperature (T > 400{degrees}C) in the absence of product oil, and (3) combusting the solid residue and pyrolysis gas in an inclined fluidized-bed reactor to produce process heat. Many conventional processes, such as the Paraho and Union processes, do not use oil shale fines (particles smaller than 1.27 cm in diameter). The amount of shale discarded as fines from these processes can be as high as 20% of the total oil shale mined. Research conducted to date suggests that the ROPE process can significantly improve the overall oil recovery from western oil shale by processing the oil shale fines typically discarded by conventional processes. Also, if the oil shale fines are co-processed with shale oil used as the heavy recycle oil, a better quality oil will be produced that can be blended with the original shale oil to make an overall produce that is more acceptable to the refineries and easier to pipeline. Results from tests conducted in a 2-inch process development unit (PDU) and a 6-inch bench-scale unit (BSU) with western oil shale demonstrated a maximum oil yield at temperatures between 700 and 750{degrees}F (371 and 399{degrees}C). Test results also suggest that the ROPE process has a strong potential for recovering oil from oil shale fines, upgrading shale oil, and separating high-nitrogen-content oil for use as an asphalt additive. 6 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

Cha, C.Y.; Fahy, L.J.; Grimes, R.W.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Process evaluation of the gasification of leningrad oil shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of experiments on the thermal processing of Leningrad oil shale in a laboratory reactor under the conditions...

Yu. A. Strizhakova; N. Ch. Movsum-Zade; T. A. Avakyan; T. V. Usova

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Safeguards Approaches for Black Box Processes or Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to determine whether a safeguards approach can be developed for “black box” processes or facilities. These are facilities where a State or operator may limit IAEA access to specific processes or portions of a facility; in other cases, the IAEA may be prohibited access to the entire facility. The determination of whether a black box process or facility is safeguardable is dependent upon the details of the process type, design, and layout; the specific limitations on inspector access; and the restrictions placed upon the design information that can be provided to the IAEA. This analysis identified the necessary conditions for safeguardability of black box processes and facilities.

Diaz-Marcano, Helly; Gitau, Ernest TN; Hockert, John; Miller, Erin; Wylie, Joann

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

31

Biochemical processing of heavy oils and residuum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past several decades, the petroleum industry has adjusted gradually to accommodate the changes in market product demands, government regulations, and the quality and cost of feedstock crude oils. For example, the trends show that the demand for distillate fuels, such as diesel, as compared to gasoline are increasing. Air-quality standards have put additional demand on the processing of heavier and higher sulfur feed stocks. Thus, the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments require the industry to produce greater quantities of oxygenated gasoline, and lower sulfur diesel and reformulated gasoline. Biochemical technology may play an important role in responding to these demands on the petroleum industry. Since oil is of biological origin, some biochemical reactions started at the beginning of its formation are still continuing in reservoirs on a geological time scale. Although these rates are very slow, many reactions can proceed readily under optimal conditions. This article will address some of the reactions that may be useful for processing heavy oils and refinery residuum. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Lin, M.S.; Premuzic, E.T.; Yablon, J.H.; Zhou, Wei-Min [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

Process for Converting Algal Oil to Alternative Aviation Fuel...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Process for Converting Algal Oil to Alternative Aviation Fuel Los Alamos National Laboratory Contact LANL About This Technology The conversion process uses a Kolbe-based method of...

33

New Facility Saves $20 Million, Accelerates Waste Processing | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Facility Saves $20 Million, Accelerates Waste Processing Facility Saves $20 Million, Accelerates Waste Processing New Facility Saves $20 Million, Accelerates Waste Processing August 15, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis The new Cask Processing Enclosure (CPE) facility is located at the Transuranic Waste Processing Center (TWPC). The Transuranic Waste Processing Center (TWPC) processes, repackages, and ships the site's legacy TRU waste offsite. OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Oak Ridge's EM program recently began operations at a newly constructed facility that will accelerate the completion of remote-handled transuranic (TRU) waste processing at the site by two years and save taxpayers more than $20 million. The new Cask Processing Enclosure (CPE) facility is located at the Transuranic Waste Processing Center (TWPC). TWPC processes, repackages, and

34

Western states enhanced oil shale recovery program: Shale oil production facilities conceptual design studies report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report analyzes the economics of producing syncrude from oil shale combining underground and surface processing using Occidental's Modified-In-Situ (MIS) technology and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Hot Recycled Solids (HRS) retort. These retorts form the basic technology employed for oil extraction from oil shale in this study. Results are presented for both Commercial and Pre-commercial programs. Also analyzed are Pre-commercialization cost of Demonstration and Pilot programs which will confirm the HRS and MIS concepts and their mechanical designs. These programs will provide experience with the circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor (CFBC), the MIS retort, the HRS retort and establish environmental control parameters. Four cases are considered: commercial size plant, demonstration size plant, demonstration size plant minimum CFBC, and a pilot size plant. Budget cost estimates and schedules are determined. Process flow schemes and basic heat and material balances are determined for the HRS system. Results consist of summaries of major equipment sizes, capital cost estimates, operating cost estimates and economic analyses. 35 figs., 35 tabs.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Co-processing of carbonaceous solids and petroleum oil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a process for producing distillates from coal by a first stage thermal liquefaction followed by a catalytic hydrogenation, liquefaction solvent is added at points spaced over the length of the thermal liquefaction heater. Coal may be co-processed with petroleum oil by adding pre-hydrogenated oil to the first stage or unhydrogenated oil to the second stage.

Gupta, Avinash (Bloomfield, NJ); Greene, Marvin I. (Oradell, NJ)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Energy Efficient Pump Control for an Offshore Oil Processing System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficient Pump Control for an Offshore Oil Processing System Zhenyu Yang Kian Soleiman Bo, Denmark. Abstract: The energy efficient control of a pump system for an offshore oil processing system control, energy saving 1. INTRODUCTION Pump systems have been extensively used in offshore oil & gas

Yang, Zhenyu

37

Biochemical processing of heavy oils and residuum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past several decades, the petroleum industry has adjusted gradually to accommodate the changes in market product demands, government regulations, and the quality and cost of feedstock crude oils. For example, the trends show that the demand for distillate fuels, such as diesel, as compared to gasoline are increasing. Air-quality standards have put additional demand on the processing of heavier and higher sulfur feed stocks. Thus, the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments require the industry to produce greater quantities of oxygenated gasoline, and lower sulfur diesel and reformulated gasoline. Biochemical technology may play an important role in responding to these demands on the petroleum industry.

Lin, M.S.; Premuzic, T.; Yablon, J.H.; Zhou, Wei-Min

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Savannah River Site- Salt Waste Processing Facility: Briefing on the Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a presentation outlining the Salt Waste Processing Facility process, major risks, approach for conducting reviews, discussion of the findings, and conclusions.

39

Robust Offshore Networks for Oil and Gas Facilities :.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Offshore Communication Networks utilize multiple of communication technologies to eradicate any possibilities of failures, when the network is operational. Offshore Oil and Gas platforms and… (more)

Maheshwari, D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Altering Design Decisions to Better Suit Facilities Management Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research work reported in this paper tackles the communication between processes of both facilities management (FM) and design, showing the effect of such communication on the capability of newly built facilities in supporting organizations...

Jawdeh, H. B.; Abudul-Malak, M. A.; Wood, G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil processing facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Uranium Processing Facility | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About / Transforming Y-12 / Uranium Processing Facility About / Transforming Y-12 / Uranium Processing Facility Uranium Processing Facility UPF will be a state-of-the-art, consolidated facility for enriched uranium operations including assembly, disassembly, dismantlement, quality evaluation, and product certification. An integral part of Y-12's transformation efforts and a key component of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Uranium Center of Excellence, the Uranium Processing Facility is one of two facilities at Y-12 whose joint mission will be to accomplish the storage and processing of all enriched uranium in one much smaller, centralized area. Safety, security and flexibility are key design attributes of the facility, which is in the preliminary design phase of work. UPF will be built to modern standards and engage new technologies through a responsive and agile

42

Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility Project -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Salt Waste Processing Facility Salt Waste Processing Facility Project - January 2013 Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility Project - January 2013 January 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent assessment of nuclear safety culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) Project. The primary objective of the evaluation was to provide information regarding the status of the safety culture at the SWPF Project. The data collection phase of the assessment occurred during August - September 2012. Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility Project -

43

Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Boysen, John E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Laramie, WY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil Resources Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil Resources April 9, 2013 - 1:57pm Addthis Washington, DC - An innovative oil-upgrading technology that can increase the economics of unconventional petroleum resources has been developed under a U.S. Department of Energy -funded project. The promising technology, developed by Ceramatec of Salt Lake City, Utah, and managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, has been licensed to Western Hydrogen of Calgary for upgrading bitumen or heavy oil from Canada. A new company, Field Upgrading (Calgary, Alberta), has been formed dedicated to developing and commercializing the technology. Heavy oil is crude oil that is viscous and requires thermally enhanced oil

45

Summary - SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SRS Co SRS Co DOE S Proces concen actinid in a se remov adjustm sorben sorben solutio passed separa stream extract sufficie separa (with S vitrifica (DWP Sr/acti federa assure and ha Critica The te (CTE) descrip Readin The Ele Site: S roject: S F Report Date: J ited States Why DOE omposite High Lev Savannah Rive ssing Facility (S ntrate targeted des) from High eries of unit ope ved by contactin ment) with a m nt in a batch m nt (containing S on by cross flow d to a solvent e ated to an aque m. The bulk so tion process, w ently low levels ated high activi Sr and actinide ation in the Def F). Provisions inides adsorpti al project direct e that the plann ave been matu al Decision-3 ap What th eam identified e of the SWPF w ption. All CTE ness Level of 6 To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin

46

Co-processing of heavy oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In co-processing of petroleum and coal, the petroleum fraction may serve as the {open_quotes}liquefaction solvent,{close_quotes} or hydrogen donor, and the aromatics present in the coal liquid may serve as hydrogen {open_quotes}shuttlers{close_quotes} by efficiently transferring hydrogen moieties to places where they are most deficient. The important advantages of co-processing include the following: (1) upgrading of heavy petroleum in a reaction with coal and (2) conversion of coal to synthetic crudes which could be further upgraded to a premium liquid fuel. Co-processing of coal with petroleum, heavy crudes, and residues through catalytic hydrogenation or solvent extraction have been extensively investigated. The studies were typically conducted in the temperature range of 450{degrees}-500{degrees}C under pressurized hydrogen; catalysts are generally also added for hydroconversion of the feedstocks. However, relatively little has been reported in the literature regarding co-processing of coal with heavy petroleum by simple pyrolysis. In this study, co-processing of heavy oil and coal at relatively middle conditions was conducted without the complicating influences of pressurized hydrogen or catalysts. The resulted demonstrate that there is a synergism during co-processing of petroleum and coal. This synergism enhances both the yield and quality of the liquid products. In general, liquids from co-processing the mixture contain a higher content of alkane/alkene, neutral aromatics, lower content of monophenols, and other oxygen containing compounds as compared to the liquids from coal alone. The liquid from the mixture also contains a higher content of naphthenic carbon and naphthenic rings/molecules than those from coal liquid. This suggests that the product from the mixture can be easily upgraded to a premium quality fuel.

Khan, M.R. [Texaco Research and Development, Beacon, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Gas Processing Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In North Dakota, materials purchased for building or expending gas processing facilities are exempt from sales and use taxes. Building materials, equipment, and other tangible property are eligible...

48

Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning The Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the disposition of a vast number of facilities at numerous sites around the country which have been declared excess to current mission needs. Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning More Documents & Publications Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition.

49

Construction Begins on New Waste Processing Facility | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Construction Begins on New Waste Processing Facility Construction Begins on New Waste Processing Facility Construction Begins on New Waste Processing Facility February 9, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers construct a new facility that will help Los Alamos National Laboratory accelerate the shipment of transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad for permanent disposal. Workers construct a new facility that will help Los Alamos National Laboratory accelerate the shipment of transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad for permanent disposal. Construction has begun on a new facility that will help Los Alamos National Laboratory accelerate the shipment of transuranic (TRU) waste stored in large boxes at Technical Area 54, Area G. Construction has begun on a new facility that will help Los Alamos National

50

Northwestern University Facility for Clean Catalytic Process Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Northwestern University with DOE support created a Facility for Clean Catalytic Process Research. This facility is designed to further strengthen our already strong catalysis research capabilities and thus to address these National challenges. Thus, state-of-the art instrumentation and experimentation facility was commissioned to add far greater breadth, depth, and throughput to our ability to invent, test, and understand catalysts and catalytic processes, hence to improve them via knowledge-based design and evaluation approaches.

Marks, Tobin Jay [Northwestern University

2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

51

A methodical study of reliability analysis of the crude oil unit in processing heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel approach to analyse the safety and reliability issues on the crude oil unit in processing heavy oil. Based on the discussions of the corrosion mechanism, it uses fault tree analysis to identify the key factors that may lead to failure of crude oil unit when processing heavy oil. It has found that factors such as temperature, consistence, relatively move speed and material, critically affect the corrosion rate of the naphthenic acid. In order to explore the relationships between the identified factors and the corrosion rate of the naphthenic acid, this paper uses artificial neural networks to identify such normally non-linear relationships. Laboratory experiments have been conducted to collect data of the corrosion rate using different materials in different temperatures, consistence and velocity. The analyses show that the proposed research method is sound and can be used in safety and reliability analysis of crude oil unit in processing heavy oil.

Qingyou Liu; Guorong Wang; Yan Yang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Montana Facilities Which Do Not Discharge Process Wastewater...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Which Do Not Discharge Process Wastewater (MDEQ Form 2E) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Montana Facilities Which Do Not Discharge Process...

53

Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

09, 2013 09, 2013 Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil Resources Washington, D.C. - An innovative oil-upgrading technology that can increase the economics of unconventional petroleum resources has been developed under a U.S. Department of Energy -funded project. The promising technology, developed by Ceramatec of Salt Lake City, Utah, and managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, has been licensed to Western Hydrogen of Calgary for upgrading bitumen or heavy oil from Canada. A new company, Field Upgrading (Calgary, Alberta), has been formed dedicated to developing and commercializing the technology. Heavy oil is crude oil that is viscous and requires thermally enhanced oil recovery methods, such as steam and hot water injection, to reduce its viscosity and enable it to flow. The largest U.S. deposits of heavy oil are in California and on Alaska's North Slope. Estimates for the U.S. heavy oil resource total about 104 billion barrels of oil in place - nearly five times the United States' proved reserves. In addition, although no commercial-scale development of U.S. oil sands or oil shale has yet occurred, both represent another potential future domestic unconventional oil resource.

54

Appendix D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment Calibration  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment Calibration Data Sheets Appendix D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment Calibration Data Sheets Docket No. EO-05-01: Appendix D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment Calibration Data Sheets from Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac River Generating Station, Alexandria, Virginia Appendix D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment Calibration Data Sheets More Documents & Publications Comments on Department of Energy's Emergency Order To Resume Limited Operation at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station and Proposed Mirant Compliance Plan Answer of Potomac Electric Power Company and PJM lnterconnection, L.L.C. to the October 6, 2005 motion filed by the Virginia Department of

55

November 8, 1983: Defense Waste Processing Facility | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

November 8, 1983: Defense Waste Processing Facility November 8, 1983: Defense Waste Processing Facility November 8, 1983: Defense Waste Processing Facility November 8, 1983: Defense Waste Processing Facility November 8, 1983 The Department begins construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Plant in South Carolina. DWPF is designed to make high-level nuclear waste into a glass-like substance, which will then be shipped to a repository. DWPF will mix borosilicate glass with the waste, heat it to 2000 degrees F, and pour the mixture into stainless steel canisters. The mixture will cool into solid glass that can be permanently stored. DWPF will immobilize the more than 34 million gallons of liquid high-level waste that have accumulated from producing defense-related nuclear materials

56

Attrition and abrasion models for oil shale process modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As oil shale is processed, fine particles, much smaller than the original shale are created. This process is called attrition or more accurately abrasion. In this paper, models of abrasion are presented for oil shale being processed in several unit operations. Two of these unit operations, a fluidized bed and a lift pipe are used in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hot-Recycle-Solid (HRS) process being developed for the above ground processing of oil shale. In two reports, studies were conducted on the attrition of oil shale in unit operations which are used in the HRS process. Carley reported results for attrition in a lift pipe for oil shale which had been pre-processed either by retorting or by retorting then burning. The second paper, by Taylor and Beavers, reported results for a fluidized bed processing of oil shale. Taylor and Beavers studied raw, retorted, and shale which had been retorted and then burned. In this paper, empirical models are derived, from the experimental studies conducted on oil shale for the process occurring in the HRS process. The derived models are presented along with comparisons with experimental results.

Aldis, D.F.

1991-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

57

Salt Waste Processing Facility Fact Sheet | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Services » Waste Management » Tank Waste and Waste Processing » Services » Waste Management » Tank Waste and Waste Processing » Salt Waste Processing Facility Fact Sheet Salt Waste Processing Facility Fact Sheet Nuclear material production operations at SRS resulted in the generation of liquid radioactive waste that is being stored, on an interim basis, in 49 underground waste storage tanks in the F- and H-Area Tank Farms. SWPF Fact Sheet More Documents & Publications EIS-0082-S2: Amended Record of Decision Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment Report EIS-0082-S2: Record of Decision Waste Management Nuclear Materials & Waste Tank Waste and Waste Processing Waste Disposition Packaging and Transportation Site & Facility Restoration Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D)

58

Transfer Lines to Connect Liquid Waste Facilities and Salt Waste Processing Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

AIKEN, S.C. – Officials with the EM program at Savannah River Site (SRS) recently announced a key milestone in preparation for the startup of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF): workers installed more than 1,200 feet of new transfer lines that will eventually connect existing liquid waste facilities to SWPF.

59

Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tech Assistance Tech Assistance Savannah River National Laboratory- Assess Adequacy of Process Knowledge for D&D Guidance for Determining Adequacy of Process Knowledge Page 1 of 2 Savannah River National Laboratory South Carolina Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning Challenge The Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the disposition of a vast number of facilities at numerous sites around the country which have been declared excess to current mission needs. When such excess facilities are scheduled for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D), among the tasks the responsible project team is faced with include the evaluation and planning for the removal, characterization, and disposition of all legacy

60

Waste Heat Recovery from Refrigeration in a Meat Processing Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A case study is reviewed on a heat recovery system installed in a meat processing facility to preheat water for the plant hot water supply. The system utilizes waste superheat from the facility's 1,350-ton ammonia refrigeration system. The heat...

Murphy, W. T.; Woods, B. E.; Gerdes, J. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil processing facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Hydrocal II process for superior naphthenic lube oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The HydroCall II Process is an advanced technology process to produce superior napthenic base lube oil stocks and specialty products. All products will be unlabeled and cover the full viscosity range of 30 to 4000 SUS at 100/sup 0/F. The process features high pressure, multiple stages, a multiple catalyst system and plurality of reactors and catalyst beds to achieve selective conversion of specific aromatic types contained in typical naphthenic lube oil feedstocks. Calumet's new HydroCall II oils will be available to the industry the latter part of 1987.

Rausch, M.K.; Love, G.A.; Tollefsen, G.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Oil and Gas Environmental Review and Approval Processes (New Brunswick,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oil and Gas Environmental Review and Approval Processes (New Oil and Gas Environmental Review and Approval Processes (New Brunswick, Canada) Oil and Gas Environmental Review and Approval Processes (New Brunswick, Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider New Brunswick Natural Resources Oil and natural gas companies engaged in exploration, development and production in New Brunswick will be required by the Department of Environment to undergo a Phased Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process. The process will identify potential environmental impacts at the early stages before a project is implemented so that negative environmental impacts can be avoided.

63

Energy Efficiency Opportunities in California Food Processing Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Commission has conducted 10 targeted and plant-wide assessments in industrial facilities associated with the food processing industry. Two of these assessments were Energy Savings Assessments (ESA) funded under the DOE’s “Save Energy Now” Program. All...

Wong, T.; Kazama, D; Wang, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Savannah River Site - Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW November 22, 2006 Conducted by: Harry Harmon, Team Lead Civil/Structural Sub Team Facility Safety Sub Team Engineering Sub Team Peter Lowry, Lead James Langsted, Lead George Krauter, Lead Robert Kennedy Chuck Negin Art Etchells Les Youd Jerry Evatt Oliver Block Loring Wyllie Richard Stark Tim Adams Tom Anderson Todd LaPointe Stephen Gosselin Carl Costantino Norman Moreau Patrick Corcoran John Christian Ken Cooper Kari McDaniel _____________________________ Harry D. Harmon ITR Team Leader SPD-SWPF-217 SPD-SWPF-217: Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review 11/22/2006 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The ITR Team wishes to thank Shari Clifford of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for

65

Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil Resources Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil Resources April 9, 2013 - 1:57pm Addthis Washington, DC - An innovative oil-upgrading technology that can increase the economics of unconventional petroleum resources has been developed under a U.S. Department of Energy -funded project. The promising technology, developed by Ceramatec of Salt Lake City, Utah, and managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, has been licensed to Western Hydrogen of Calgary for upgrading bitumen or heavy oil from Canada. A new company, Field Upgrading (Calgary, Alberta), has been formed dedicated to developing and commercializing the technology.

66

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presented at the 13th Oil Shale Symposium, Golden, CO, April~1ETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS Richard H.compounds in the seven oil shale process waters. These

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Process for heating coal-oil slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Controlling gas to slurry volume ratio to achieve a gas holdup of about 0.4 when heating a flowing coal-oil slurry and a hydrogen containing gas stream allows operation with virtually any coal to solvent ratio and permits operation with efficient heat transfer and satisfactory pressure drops. The critical minimum gas flow rate for any given coal-oil slurry will depend on numerous factors such as coal concentration, coal particle size distribution, composition of the solvent (including recycle slurries), and type of coal. Further system efficiency can be achieved by operating with multiple heating zones to provide a high heat flux when the apparent viscosity of the gas saturated slurry is highest. Operation with gas flow rates below the critical minimum results in system instability indicated by temperature excursions in the fluid and at the tube wall, by a rapid increase and then decrease in overall pressure drop with decreasing gas flow rate, and by increased temperature differences between the temperature of the bulk fluid and the tube wall. At the temperatures and pressures used in coal liquefaction preheaters the coal-oil slurry and hydrogen containing gas stream behaves essentially as a Newtonian fluid at shear rates in excess of 150 sec[sup [minus]1]. The gas to slurry volume ratio should also be controlled to assure that the flow regime does not shift from homogeneous flow to non-homogeneous flow. Stable operations have been observed with a maximum gas holdup as high as 0.72. 29 figs.

Braunlin, W.A.; Gorski, A.; Jaehnig, L.J.; Moskal, C.J.; Naylor, J.D.; Parimi, K.; Ward, J.V.

1984-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

68

Process for heating coal-oil slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Controlling gas to slurry volume ratio to achieve a gas holdup of about 0.4 when heating a flowing coal-oil slurry and a hydrogen containing gas stream allows operation with virtually any coal to solvent ratio and permits operation with efficient heat transfer and satisfactory pressure drops. The critical minimum gas flow rate for any given coal-oil slurry will depend on numerous factors such as coal concentration, coal particle size distribution, composition of the solvent (including recycle slurries), and type of coal. Further system efficiency can be achieved by operating with multiple heating zones to provide a high heat flux when the apparent viscosity of the gas saturated slurry is highest. Operation with gas flow rates below the critical minimum results in system instability indicated by temperature excursions in the fluid and at the tube wall, by a rapid increase and then decrease in overall pressure drop with decreasing gas flow rate, and by increased temperature differences between the temperature of the bulk fluid and the tube wall. At the temperatures and pressures used in coal liquefaction preheaters the coal-oil slurry and hydrogen containing gas stream behaves essentially as a Newtonian fluid at shear rates in excess of 150 sec.sup. -1. The gas to slurry volume ratio should also be controlled to assure that the flow regime does not shift from homogeneous flow to non-homogeneous flow. Stable operations have been observed with a maximum gas holdup as high as 0.72.

Braunlin, Walter A. (Spring, TX); Gorski, Alan (Lovington, NM); Jaehnig, Leo J. (New Orleans, LA); Moskal, Clifford J. (Oklahoma City, OK); Naylor, Joseph D. (Houston, TX); Parimi, Krishnia (Allison Park, PA); Ward, John V. (Arvada, CO)

1984-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

69

Constructibility review process framework for transportation facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 49 5. CRITICAL ISSUES REI. ATED TO CONSTRUCTIBILITY . . . . . 51 5. 1 Questionnaire Results . 5. 2 Observations Regarding Critical Issues. . 6. THE IDEFO MODELING TECHNIQUE 6. 1 Historical Background 6. 2 IDEF Modeling Entities.... . . . . . . . . . . . 6. 3 Structure of IDEFO Model. 6. 4 IDEFO Labeling Conventions. 6. 5 Data Flow. 6. 6 Example . 51 . 62 . 68 . 69 . 70 . 71 73 . 74 7. PROJECT DEVELOPMENT PROCESS. . 7. 1 Source of Information 7. 2 Development of the Project Development...

Liman, Majed

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

70

LCA of a spent lube oil Re-refining process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although re-refining of spent lubricating oils (used oils) has been practiced with varying technical and commercial success for over the past 50 years, a sustainable processing technology has yet to become widely accepted. Poor on-stream efficiency, inconsistent product quality, and careless management of feedstock contaminants and byproducts have often resulted in widespread environmental problems and poor economics. Environmentally-conscious design of processes and products is increasingly viewed as an integral strategy in the sustainable development of new refining and chemical processes. Life cycle assessment is becoming the preferred methodology for comparing the environmental impacts of competing processes. A life cycle analyses of a promising new re-refining technology, the HyLubeTM process, has been undertaken to quantify the intrinsic benefits of HyLube re-refining over the current practice of recovering used oils for fuel value

Tom N. Kalnes; David R. Shonnard; Andreas Schuppel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

The measurement of solubility and viscosity of oil/refrigerant mixtures; At high pressures and temperatures test facility and initial results for R-22/naphthenic oil mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and construction of a test facility for measuring the solubility and viscosity of lubricating oil/refrigerant mixtures at high pressures and temperatures are described. An auxiliary charging system, developed to provide precisely measured quantities of oil and refrigerant to the test facility, is also presented. Initial results for liquid mixtures of 10% to 40% R-22 (by mass) in a 150 SUS naphthenic oil are reported over the temperature range 70 {degrees} F (20{degrees}C) to 300 {degrees} F(150 {degrees}C). Good agreement with existing data from the open literature is obtained over the limited temperature range for which previously published data are available.

Van Gaalen, N.A.; Zoz, S.C.; Pate, M.B. (Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Comparison of the Acceptability of Various Oil Shale Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While oil shale has the potential to provide a substantial fraction of our nation's liquid fuels for many decades, cost and environmental acceptability are significant issues to be addressed. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) examined a variety of oil shale processes between the mid 1960s and the mid 1990s, starting with retorting of rubble chimneys created from nuclear explosions [1] and ending with in-situ retorting of deep, large volumes of oil shale [2]. In between, it examined modified-in-situ combustion retorting of rubble blocks created by conventional mining and blasting [3,4], in-situ retorting by radio-frequency energy [5], aboveground combustion retorting [6], and aboveground processing by hot-solids recycle (HRS) [7,8]. This paper reviews various types of processes in both generic and specific forms and outlines some of the tradeoffs for large-scale development activities. Particular attention is given to hot-recycled-solids processes that maximize yield and minimize oil shale residence time during processing and true in-situ processes that generate oil over several years that is more similar to natural petroleum.

Burnham, A K; McConaghy, J R

2006-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

73

Overview of the Facility Safeguardability Analysis (FSA) Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The safeguards system of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) provides the international community with credible assurance that a State is fulfilling its nonproliferation obligations. The IAEA draws such conclusions from the evaluation of all available information. Effective and cost-efficient IAEA safeguards at the facility level are, and will remain, an important element of this “State-level” approach. Efficiently used, the Safeguards by Design (SBD) methodologies , , , now being developed can contribute to effective and cost-efficient facility-level safeguards. The Facility Safeguardability Assessment (FSA) introduced here supports SBD in three areas. 1. It describes necessary interactions between the IAEA, the State regulator, and the owner / designer of a new or modified facility to determine where SBD efforts can be productively applied, 2. It presents a screening approach intended to identify potential safeguard issues for; a) design changes to existing facilities; b) new facilities similar to existing facilities with approved safeguards approaches, and c) new designs, 3. It identifies resources (the FSA toolkit), such as good practice guides, design guidance, and safeguardability evaluation methods that can be used by the owner/designer to develop solutions for potential safeguards issues during the interactions with the State regulator and IAEA. FSA presents a structured framework for the application of the SBD tools developed in other efforts. The more a design evolves, the greater the probability that new safeguards issues could be introduced. Likewise, for first-of-a-kind facilities or research facilities that involve previously unused processes or technologies, it is reasonable to expect that a number of possible safeguards issues might exist. Accordingly, FSA is intended to help the designer and its safeguards experts identify early in the design process: • Areas where elements of previous accepted safeguards approach(es) may be applied to facility modifications or new designs • Modifications of the design that could mitigate a potential safeguards issue or facilitate a more efficient application of the safeguards approach • Possible innovative ideas for more efficient application of safeguards • The potential for changes in elements of the safeguard approach that may be required by IAEA as a result of facility design features and characteristics • Other potential concerns These issues will then be presented to the IAEA and the state regulator to be resolved in a timely manner, ensuring that the planned safeguards approach is acceptable and compatible with the facility design. The proposed approach should be validated by application to suitable facilities to assess its utility, comprehensiveness, and cost-effectiveness. The approach and example application should also be reviewed by industry to confirm the conclusions reached in the DOE review.

Bari, Robert A.; Hockert, John; Wonder, Edward F.; Johnson, Shirley J.; Wigeland, Roald; Zentner, Michael D.

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

74

Reverse osmosis process successfully converts oil field brine into freshwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A state-of-the-art process in the San Ardo oil field converted produced brine into freshwater. The conversion process used chemical clarification, softening, filtration, and reverse osmosis (RO). After extensive testing resolved RO membrane fouling problems, the pilot plant successfully handled water with about 7,000 mg/l. of total dissolved solids, 250 mg/l. silica, and 170 mg/l. soluble oil. The treated water complies with the stringent California drinking water standard. The paper describes water reclamation, the San Ardo process, stability, reverse osmosis membrane fouling, membranes at high pH, water quality, and costs.

Tao, F.T.; Curtice, S.; Hobbs, R.D.; Sides, J.L.; Wieser, J.D. (Texaco Inc., Bellaire, TX (United States)); Dyke, C.A.; Tuohey, D. (Texaco Inc., Beacon, NY (United States)); Pilger, P.F. (Texaco E and P Inc., Denver, CO (United States))

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

75

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure lonq-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years.

Lewis, C.J.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Teamwork Plus Technology Equals Reduced Emissions, Reduced Energy Usage, and Improved Productivity for an Oil Production Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Teamwork plus Technology Equals Reduced Emissions, Reduced Energy Usage, and Improved Productivity for an Oil Production Facility Garth Booker P Eng Extraction Energy Engineer Suncor Energy Company Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada ABSTRACT...Teamwork plus Technology Equals Reduced Emissions, Reduced Energy Usage, and Improved Productivity for an Oil Production Facility Garth Booker P Eng Extraction Energy Engineer Suncor Energy Company Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada ABSTRACT...

Booker, G.; Robinson, J.

77

Process Simulation, Modeling & Design for Soybean Oil Extraction Using Liquid Propane.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study investigates the use of liquid propane for soybean oil extraction and the use of commercial software for process modeling and simulation. Soybean oil… (more)

Patrachari, Anirudh Ramanujan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-degradable, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.; Potas, T.A.; DeWall, R.A.; Musich, M.A.

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

79

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-decrepitating, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

Knudson, Curtis L. (Grand Forks, ND); Timpe, Ronald C. (Grand Forks, ND); Potas, Todd A. (Plymouth, MN); DeWall, Raymond A. (Grand Forks, ND); Musich, Mark A. (Grand Forks, ND)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Savannah River Site - Salt Waste Processing Facility: Briefing on the Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review Harry Harmon January 9, 2007 2 U.S. Department of Energy Outline * SWPF Process Overview * Major Risks * Approach for Conducting Review * Discussion of Findings * Conclusions 3 U.S. Department of Energy Salt Waste Processing Facility 4 U.S. Department of Energy SWPF Process Overview Alpha Finishing Process CSSX Alpha Strike Process MST/ Sludge Cs Strip Effluent DSS 5 U.S. Department of Energy BOTTOM LINE The SWPF Project is ready to move into final design. 6 U.S. Department of Energy Major Risks * Final geotechnical data potentially could result in redesign of the PC-3 CPA base mat and structure. * Cost and schedule impacts arising from the change from ISO-9001 to NQA-1 quality assurance requirements. * The "de-inventory, flush, and then hands-on

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil processing facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

INTERLABORATORY, MULTIMETHOD STUDY OF AN IN SITU PRODUCED OIL SHALE PROCESS WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

W. A. Robb, and T. J. Spedding. Minor Elements in Oil Shaleand Oil Shale Products. LERC Rept. of Invest. 77-1, 1977.Significant to In Situ Oil Shale Processing. Quart. Colo.

Farrier, D.S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Development of miscella refining process for cottonseed oil-isopropyl alcohol system: laboratory-scale evaluations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A technologically feasible cottonseed oil-isopropyl alcohol (IPA) miscella refining process was developed to produce high quality cottonseed oil. Individual steps necessary to refine cottonseed oil-IPA miscella were determined and improved...

Chau, Chi-Fai

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

The Extraction?Flocculation Re-refining Lubricating Oil Process Using Ternary Organic Solvents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Extraction?Flocculation Re-refining Lubricating Oil Process Using Ternary Organic Solvents ... Res., 1997, 36 (9), ... Waste lubricating oils may be re-refined with organic solvents that dissolve base oil and segregate the additives and solid particles. ...

J. P. Martins

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

84

EIS-0082: Defense Waste Processing Facility, Savannah River Plant  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Defense Waste and Byproducts Management developed this EIS to provide environmental input into both the selection of an appropriate strategy for the permanent disposal of the high-level radioactive waste currently stored at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) and the subsequent decision to construct and operate a Defense Waste Processing Facility at the SRP site.

85

Evolution of seismic velocities in heavy oil sand reservoirs during thermal recovery process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Evolution of seismic velocities in heavy oil sand reservoirs during thermal recovery process localiser la chambre à vapeur. INTRODUCTION [1] Huge quantities of heavy oils (heavy oil, extra heavy oil. Larribau 64018 Pau Cedex, France Oil and Gas Science and Technology 2012, 67 (6), 1029-1039, doi:10

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

86

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility- August 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development.

87

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility- April 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Quality and Fire Protection Systems

88

Oil shale technology and evironmental aspects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale processes are a combination of mining, retorting, and upgrading facilities. This work outlines the processing steps and some design considerations required in an oil shale facility. A brief overview of above ground and in situ retorts is presented; 6 retorts are described. The development aspects which the oil shale industry is addressing to protect the environment are presented.

Scinta, J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Salt Waste Processing Facility Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment Report Kurt D. Gerdes Harry D. Harmon Herbert G. Sutter Major C. Thompson John R. Shultz Sahid C. Smith July 13, 2009 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 ii This page intentionally left blank SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 iii SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 iii Signatures SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 iv This page intentionally left blank SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility

90

Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee public safety, or the environment. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan ensures long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and must be updated, as a minimum, every 3 years.

DAVIS, W.E.

2000-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

91

The Uranium Processing Facility Finite Element Meshing Discussion  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Finite Element Meshing Discussion ...Need picture of Building... October 25, 2011 Department of Energy - Natural Phenomenon Hazard Workshop 1 Loring Wyllie Arne Halterman Degenkolb Engineers, San Francisco Purpose of Presentation * Design vs. Analysis * Discuss the mesh criteria * Discuss the evolution of the mesh of the UPF main building model * Discuss how the mesh affects the analysis process October 25, 2011 2 Department of Energy - Natural Phenomenon Hazard Workshop FEM Modeling * GTStrudl typically used for DOE projects. * Mesh size is important * What is to be captured? * How complex is the system? * Current criteria set to capture in-plane and out-of-plane response. October 25, 2011 3

92

Design characteristics for facilities which process hazardous particulate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory is establishing a research and processing capability for beryllium. The unique properties of beryllium, including light weight, rigidity, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and nuclear properties make it critical to a number of US defense and aerospace programs. Concomitant with the unique engineering properties are the health hazards associated with processing beryllium in a particulate form and the potential for worker inhalation of aerosolized beryllium. Beryllium has the lowest airborne standard for worker protection compared to all other nonradioactive metals by more than an order of magnitude. This paper describes the design characteristics of the new beryllium facility at Los Alamos as they relate to protection of the workforce. Design characteristics to be reviewed include; facility layout, support systems to minimize aerosol exposure and spread, and detailed review of the ventilation system design for general room air cleanliness and extraction of particulate at the source.

Abeln, S.P.; Creek, K.; Salisbury, S.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil & Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil & Gas Production Zhenyu (PWT) in offshore oil & gas production processes. Different from most existing facility- or material offshore and the oil industry expects this share to grow continuously in the future. In last decade, oil

Yang, Zhenyu

94

File:07FDCPURPAQualifyingFacilityCertificationProcess.pdf | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FDCPURPAQualifyingFacilityCertificationProcess.pdf FDCPURPAQualifyingFacilityCertificationProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:07FDCPURPAQualifyingFacilityCertificationProcess.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 35 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 14:34, 4 January 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 14:34, 4 January 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (35 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) 13:39, 4 January 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 13:39, 4 January 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (35 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) 13:35, 4 January 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 13:35, 4 January 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (35 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs)

95

Accident Fault Trees for Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document fault tree analyses which have been completed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) safety analysis. Logic models for equipment failures and human error combinations that could lead to flammable gas explosions in various process tanks, or failure of critical support systems were developed for internal initiating events and for earthquakes. These fault trees provide frequency estimates for support systems failures and accidents that could lead to radioactive and hazardous chemical releases both on-site and off-site. Top event frequency results from these fault trees will be used in further APET analyses to calculate accident risk associated with DWPF facility operations. This report lists and explains important underlying assumptions, provides references for failure data sources, and briefly describes the fault tree method used. Specific commitments from DWPF to provide new procedural/administrative controls or system design changes are listed in the ''Facility Commitments'' section. The purpose of the ''Assumptions'' section is to clarify the basis for fault tree modeling, and is not necessarily a list of items required to be protected by Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs).

Sarrack, A.G.

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

96

Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery - EOR thermal processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Eighth Amendment and Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Agreement. The report is presented in sections and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of efforts under each of the tasks. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The Sodium Process Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) has approximately 680,000 liters of raw sodium stored in facilities on site. As mandated by the State of Idaho and the US Department of Energy (DOE), this sodium must be transformed into a stable condition for land disposal. To comply with this mandate, ANL-W designed and built the Sodium Process Facility (SPF) for the processing of this sodium into a dry, sodium carbonate powder. The major portion of the sodium stored at ANL-W is radioactively contaminated. The sodium will be processed in three separate and distinct campaigns: the 290,000 liters of Fermi-1 primary sodium, the 50,000 liters of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) secondary sodium, and the 330,000 liters of the EBR-II primary sodium. The Fermi-1 and the EBR-II secondary sodium contain only low-level of radiation, while the EBR-II primary sodium has radiation levels up to 0.5 mSv (50 mrem) per hour at 1 meter. The EBR-II primary sodium will be processed last, allowing the operating experience to be gained with the less radioactive sodium prior to reacting the most radioactive sodium. The sodium carbonate will be disposed of in 270 liter barrels, four to a pallet. These barrels are square in cross-section, allowing for maximum utilization of the space on a pallet, minimizing the required landfill space required for disposal.

Michelbacher, J.A.; Henslee, S.P. McDermott, M.D.; Price, J.R.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Wells, P.B.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

The Role of the Flexicoking Process in Heavy Oil Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is transferred by crr FLUID COKING process, which in turn built on the culating coke from the exothermic reaction t~king fluid solids experience accumulated in cat crack- i place in the gasifier to the endothermic reaftion ing since the second world war... liquid volume basis. Virtually all of the energy input to the process comes from the exothermic reaction taking place in the gasification of the coke. Thus, oxidation of coke supplies the energy for con version to 1ight products, and no premium fuel...

Taylor, R. I.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Application of the Analytic Network Process to facility layout selection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper applies the Analytic Network Process (ANP) method to the selection of the best facility layout plan based on multiple dependent and independent criteria. This is the first time that this method is used in such a context. An ANP model is built taking into account the interdependencies between criteria that are found based on experts’ opinions and fundamental equations. A network structure is built that shows all elements and clusters and their interactions that can be used to find the most effective layout. Limit priorities are computed which identify the most important factors in the selection process. A case study is conducted in a wood factory which represents a real demonstration of the developed model. A comparison is conducted between ANP and Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) which shows the differences between the two methods. Finally, sensitivity analysis shows the robustness of the model.

Tarek Al-Hawari; Ahmad Mumani; Amer Momani

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

200 Area effluent treatment facility process control plan 98-02  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Process Control Plan (PCP) provides a description of the background information, key objectives, and operating criteria defining Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) Campaign 98-02 as required per HNF-IP-0931 Section 37, Process Control Plans. Campaign 98-62 is expected to process approximately 18 millions gallons of groundwater with an assumption that the UP-1 groundwater pump will be shut down on June 30, 1998. This campaign will resume the UP-1 groundwater treatment operation from Campaign 97-01. The Campaign 97-01 was suspended in November 1997 to allow RCRA waste in LERF Basin 42 to be treated to meet the Land Disposal Restriction Clean Out requirements. The decision to utilize ETF as part of the selected interim remedial action of the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit is documented by the Declaration of the Record of Decision, (Ecology, EPA and DOE 1997). The treatment method was chosen in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (known as the Tri-Party Agreement or TPA), and to the extent practicable, the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP).

Le, E.Q.

1998-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil processing facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Development of the Write Process for Pipeline-Ready Heavy Oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work completed under this program advances the goal of demonstrating Western Research Institute's (WRI's) WRITE{trademark} process for upgrading heavy oil at field scale. MEG Energy Corporation (MEG) located in Calgary, Alberta, Canada supported efforts at WRI to develop the WRITE{trademark} process as an oil sands, field-upgrading technology through this Task 51 Jointly Sponsored Research project. The project consisted of 6 tasks: (1) optimization of the distillate recovery unit (DRU), (2) demonstration and design of a continuous coker, (3) conceptual design and cost estimate for a commercial facility, (4) design of a WRITE{trademark} pilot plant, (5) hydrotreating studies, and (6) establish a petroleum analysis laboratory. WRITE{trademark} is a heavy oil and bitumen upgrading process that produces residuum-free, pipeline ready oil from heavy material with undiluted density and viscosity that exceed prevailing pipeline specifications. WRITE{trademark} uses two processing stages to achieve low and high temperature conversion of heavy oil or bitumen. The first stage DRU operates at mild thermal cracking conditions, yielding a light overhead product and a heavy residuum or bottoms material. These bottoms flow to the second stage continuous coker that operates at severe pyrolysis conditions, yielding light pyrolyzate and coke. The combined pyrolyzate and mildly cracked overhead streams form WRITE{trademark}'s synthetic crude oil (SCO) production. The main objectives of this project were to (1) complete testing and analysis at bench scale with the DRU and continuous coker reactors and provide results to MEG for process evaluation and scale-up determinations and (2) complete a technical and economic assessment of WRITE{trademark} technology to determine its viability. The DRU test program was completed and a processing envelope developed. These results were used for process assessment and for scaleup. Tests in the continuous coker were intended to determine the throughput capability of the coker so a scaled design could be developed that maximized feed rate for a given size of reactor. These tests were only partially successful because of equipment problems. A redesigned coker, which addressed the problems, has been build but not operated. A preliminary economic analysis conducted by MEG and an their engineering consultant concluded that the WRITE{trademark} process is a technically feasible method for upgrading bitumen and that it produces SCO that meets pipeline specifications for density. When compared to delayed coking, the industry benchmark for thermal upgrading of bitumen, WRITE{trademark} produced more SCO, less coke, less CO{sub 2} per barrel of bitumen fed, and had lower capital and operating costs. On the other hand, WRITE{trademark}'s lower processing severity yielded crude with higher density and a different product distribution for naphtha, light gas oil and vacuum oil that, taken together, might reduce the value of the SCO. These issues plus the completion of more detailed process evaluation and economics need to be resolved before WRITE{trademark} is deployed as a field-scale pilot.

Lee Brecher; Charles Mones; Frank Guffey

2009-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

102

Materials evaluation programs at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high-level waste produced since operations began has been consolidated by evaporation into 33 million gallons at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the function of which is to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters prior to the placement of the canisters in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and is undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. A brief description of the DWPF process is provided.

Gee, J.T.; Iverson, D.C.; Bickford, D.F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Materials evaluation programs at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high-level waste produced since operations began has been consolidated by evaporation into 33 million gallons at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the function of which is to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters prior to the placement of the canisters in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and is undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. A brief description of the DWPF process is provided.

Gee, J.T.; Iverson, D.C.; Bickford, D.F.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Oil drilling to use LSU process Show Caption BILL FEIG/THE ADVOCATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BUSINESS Oil drilling to use LSU process Show Caption BILL FEIG/THE ADVOCATE Advocate staff process to make wood-plastic composites has found a new application in the oil and gas business to turn used plastic motor oil containers and wood waste into a strong composite material that can be used

105

MEMORIAL UNIVERSITY OF NEWFOUNDLAND Three-year Term Appointment in Process (Oil and Gas) Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEMORIAL UNIVERSITY OF NEWFOUNDLAND Three-year Term Appointment in Process (Oil and Gas with oil and gas specialization at the assistant- or associate professor-level, commencing April 12, 2010 in the area of oil and gas, and process engineering, to supervise graduate students, to participate in other

George, Glyn

106

Economic impacts of oil spills: Spill unit costs for tankers, pipelines, refineries, and offshore facilities. [Task 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impacts of oil spills -- ranging from the large, widely publicized Exxon Valdez tanker incident to smaller pipeline and refinery spills -- have been costly to both the oil industry and the public. For example, the estimated costs to Exxon of the Valdez tanker spill are on the order of $4 billion, including $2.8 billion (in 1993 dollars) for direct cleanup costs and $1.125 billion (in 1992 dollars) for settlement of damages claims caused by the spill. Application of contingent valuation costs and civil lawsuits pending in the State of Alaska could raise these costs appreciably. Even the costs of the much smaller 1991 oil spill at Texaco`s refinery near Anacortes, Washington led to costs of $8 to 9 million. As a result, inexpensive waming, response and remediation technologies could lower oil spin costs, helping both the oil industry, the associated marine industries, and the environment. One means for reducing the impact and costs of oil spills is to undertake research and development on key aspects of the oil spill prevention, warming, and response and remediation systems. To target these funds to their best use, it is important to have sound data on the nature and size of spills, their likely occurrence and their unit costs. This information could then allow scarce R&D dollars to be spent on areas and activities having the largest impact. This report is intended to provide the ``unit cost`` portion of this crucial information. The report examines the three key components of the US oil supply system, namely, tankers and barges; pipelines and refineries; and offshore production facilities. The specific purpose of the study was to establish the unit costs of oil spills. By manipulating this key information into a larger matrix that includes the size and frequency of occurrence of oil spills, it will be possible` to estimate the likely future impacts, costs, and sources of oil spills.

Not Available

1993-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

GRR/Section 7-HI-b - Renewable Energy Facility Siting Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7-HI-b - Renewable Energy Facility Siting Process 7-HI-b - Renewable Energy Facility Siting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-HI-b - Renewable Energy Facility Siting Process 07HIBRenewableEnergyFacilitySitingProcessREFSP.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism Regulations & Policies Hawaii Revised Statutes 201N Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 15, Chapter 36 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 07HIBRenewableEnergyFacilitySitingProcessREFSP.pdf 07HIBRenewableEnergyFacilitySitingProcessREFSP.pdf 07HIBRenewableEnergyFacilitySitingProcessREFSP.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

108

Effects of scale-up on oil and gas yields in a solid-recycle bed oil shale retorting process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluidized bed pyrolysis of oil shale in a non-hydrogen atmosphere has been shown to significantly increase oil yield in laboratory-scale reactors compared to the Fischer assay by many workers. The enhancement in oil yield by this relatively simple and efficient thermal technique has led to the development of several oil shale retorting processes based on fluidized bed and related technologies over the past fifteen years. Since 1986, the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) has been developing one such process, KENTORT II, which is mainly tailored for the Devonian oil shales that occur in the eastern U.S. The process contains three main fluidized bed zones to pyrolyze, gasify, and combust the oil shale. A fourth fluidized bed zone serves to cool the spent shale prior to exiting the system. The autothermal process utilizes processed shale recirculation to transfer heat from the combustion to the gasification and pyrolysis zones. The CAER is currently testing the KENTORT II process in a 22.7-kg/hr process-development unit (PDU).

Carter, S.D.; Taulbee, D.N.; Vego, A. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

On the definition of exergy efficiencies for petroleum systems: Application to offshore oil and gas processing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Exergy-based efficiencies are measures of the thermodynamic perfection of systems and processes. A meaningful formulation of these performance criteria for petroleum systems is difficult because of (i) the high chemical exergy of hydrocarbons, (ii) the large variety of chemical components, and (iii) the differences in operating conditions between facilities. This work focuses on offshore processing plants, considering four oil platforms that differ by their working conditions and designs. Several approaches from the scientific literature for similar processes are presented and applied to the four cases. They showed a low sensitivity to performance improvements, gave inconsistent results, or favoured facilities operating under certain conditions. We suggest an alternative formulation, called the component-by-component exergy efficiency, which builds on the decomposition of the exergy flows at the level of the chemical compounds. It allows therefore for sound comparisons of separation systems, while it successfully evaluates their theoretical improvement potentials. The platform displaying the lowest efficiency (1.7%) is characterised by little pumping and compression works, at the opposite of the one displaying the highest performance (29.6%). A more realistic measure of the technical potential for improving these systems can be carried out by splitting further the exergy destruction into its avoidable and unavoidable parts.

Tuong-Van Nguyen; Mari Voldsund; Brian Elmegaard; Ivar Ståle Ertesvåg; Signe Kjelstrup

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Defense Waste Processing Facility wasteform and canister description: Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the reference wasteform and canister for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The principal changes include revised feed and glass product compositions, an estimate of glass product characteristics as a function of time after the start of vitrification, and additional data on glass leaching performance. The feed and glass product composition data are identical to that described in the DWPF Basic Data Report, Revision 90/91. The DWPF facility is located at the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, SC, and it is scheduled for construction completion during December 1989. The wasteform is borosilicate glass containing approximately 28 wt % sludge oxides, with the balance consisting of glass-forming chemicals, primarily glass frit. Borosilicate glass was chosen because of its stability toward reaction with potential repository groundwaters, its relatively high ability to incorporate nuclides found in the sludge into the solid matrix, and its reasonably low melting temperature. The glass frit contains approximately 71% SiO/sub 2/, 12% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and 10% Na/sub 2/O. Tests to quantify the stability of DWPF waste glass have been performed under a wide variety of conditions, including simulations of potential repository environments. Based on these tests, DWPF waste glass should easily meet repository criteria. The canister is filled with about 3700 lb of glass which occupies 85% of the free canister volume. The filled canister will generate approximately 690 watts when filled with oxides from 5-year-old sludge and precipitate from 15-year-old supernate. The radionuclide activity of the canister is about 233,000 curies, with an estimated radiation level of 5600 rad/hour at the canister surface. 14 figs., 28 tabs.

Baxter, R.G.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Pilot-scale used oil re-refining using a solvent treatment/distillation process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 1000 gallons of used automotive lubricating oil were collected from service stations in the Bartlesville region. This oil was then processed using the patented technology developed by the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) in earlier work. The resulting lube oil basestock was tested by both physical and chemical analytical techniques and rigorous engine sequence tests. The end product was a high-quality lubricating oil which passed all requirements for SE service. Analyses of the oil are presented at the end of each stage of processing to demonstrate the effects of that phase. 7 figures, 18 tables.

Cotton, F.O.; Brinkman, D.W.; Reynolds, J.W.; Goetzinger, J.W.; Whisman, M.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Application of the HYTORT process to oil shales throughout the world  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The HYTORT /sup R/ process is a unique oil shale retorting process which uses an atmosphere of hydrogen gas at elevated pressure to produce higher yields of oil than are possible using conventional thermal retorting techniques. In the U.S., HYTORT process development efforts have played a key role in recognition of the significance of the Devonian oil shales as a major fossil energy resource. The results presented in this paper show that application of the HYTORT process to oil shales of countries such as Sweden, Italy, Jordan, and Canada may yield equally significant results.

Janaka, J.C.; Rex, R.C.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Process Considerations in the Biodesulfurization of Crude Oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biodesulfurization offers an attractive alternative to conventional hydrodesulfurization due to the mild operating conditions and reaction specificity afforded by the biocatalyst. The enzymatic pathway existing in Rhodococcus has been demonstrated to oxidatively desulfhrize the organic sulfbr occurring in dibenzothiophene while leaving the hydrocarbon intact. In order for biodesulfiization to realize commercial success, a variety of process considerations must be addressed including reaction rate, emulsion formation and breakage, biocatalyst recovery, and both gas and liquid mass transport. This study compares batch stirred to electro-spray bioreactors in the biodesulfurization of both model organics and actual crudes in terms of their operating costs, ability to make and break emulsions, ability to effect efficient reaction rates and enhance mass transport. Further, sulfim speciation in crude oil is assessed and compared to the sulfur specificity of currently available biocatalyst.

Borole, A.P.; Kaufman, E.N.

1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

114

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Project- February 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluation to determine whether Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Project is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

115

Application of a Solar UV/Chlorine Advanced Oxidation Process to Oil Sands Process-Affected Water Remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Application of a Solar UV/Chlorine Advanced Oxidation Process to Oil Sands Process-Affected Water Remediation ... † Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Alberta, 9105 116th Street, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2W2 ...

Zengquan Shu; Chao Li; Miodrag Belosevic; James R. Bolton; Mohamed Gamal El-Din

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

116

Surveillance Guide - OPS 9.13 Operations Aspects of Facility Chemistry and Unique Processes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

OPERATIONS ASPECTS OF FACILITY CHEMISTRY AND UNIQUE PROCESSES OPERATIONS ASPECTS OF FACILITY CHEMISTRY AND UNIQUE PROCESSES 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that the contractor has provided for an effective interface between facility operations personnel and personnel responsible for operation of individual processes. The Facility Representative interviews facility and process operations personnel, observes ongoing work activities including shift rounds, and evaluates procedures and training for responding to off-normal or emergency conditions. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities 2.2 DOE-STD-1032-93, Guide to Good Practices for Operations Aspects of Unique Processes 3.0 Requirements Implemented

117

Application of the HYTORT process to oil shales throughout the world  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A deficiency of hydrogen relative to carbon in oil shale reduces the amount of kerogen that can be converted to hydrocarbon products by conventional retorting methods. HYTORT Process utilizes a hydrogen-rich gas to maximize this oil yield. A plant flowsheet and process economics are described. A hydroretorting assay using only a small sample of feed material has been developed to provide a measurement of the potential oil yield possible with the HYTORT Process. Details are given for results of this test on oil shale deposits of Sweden, Jordan, Brazil, South Africa, Sicily, Canada, and USA. 29 references.

Janka, J.C.; Rex, R.C. Jr.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Imports by Processing Area  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Total Products Other Liquids Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Total Products Other Liquids Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History East Coast (PADD 1) 62,196 60,122 54,018 52,671 54,668 52,999 1981-2013 Midwest (PADD 2) 54,439 53,849 53,638 60,984 63,482 56,972 1981-2013 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 141,142 150,846 138,204 149,059 141,421 138,656 1981-2013

119

Exploring the WTI crude oil price bubble process using the Markov regime switching model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The sharp volatility of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price in the past decade triggers us to investigate the price bubbles and their evolving process. Empirical results indicate that the fundamental price of WTI crude oil appears relatively more stable than that of the market-trading price, which verifies the existence of oil price bubbles during the sample period. Besides, by allowing the WTI crude oil price bubble process to switch between two states (regimes) according to a first-order Markov chain, we are able to statistically discriminate upheaval from stable states in the crude oil price bubble process; and in most of time, the stable state dominates the WTI crude oil price bubbles while the upheaval state usually proves short-lived and accompanies unexpected market events.

Yue-Jun Zhang; Jing Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Eastern oil shale research involving the generation of retorted and combusted oil shale solid waste, shale oil collection, and process stream sampling and characterization: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 518 tons of New Albany oil shale were obtained from the McRae quarry in Clark County, Indiana and shipped to Golden, CO. A portion of the material was processed through a TOSCO II pilot plant retort. About 273 tons of crushed raw shale, 136 tons of retorted shale, 1500 gallons of shale oil, and 10 drums of retort water were shipped to US Department of Energy, Laramie, WY. Process conditions were documented, process streams were sampled and subjected to chemical analysis, and material balance calculations were made. 6 refs., 12 figs., 14 tabs.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil processing facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Facilities LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Some LANL facilities are available to researchers at other laboratories, universities, and industry. Unique facilities foster experimental science, support LANL's security mission DARHT accelerator DARHT's electron accelerators use large, circular aluminum structures to create magnetic fields that focus and steer a stream of electrons down the length of the accelerator. Tremendous electrical energy is added along the way. When the stream of high-speed electrons exits the accelerator it is

122

Process for recovering uranium from waste hydrocarbon oils containing the same. [Uranium contaminated lubricating oils from gaseous diffusion compressors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for the recovery of uranium from uranium-bearing hydrocarbon oils containing carboxylic acid as a degradation product. In one aspect, the invention comprises providing an emulsion of water and the oil, heating the same to a temperature effecting conversion of the emulsion to an organic phase and to an acidic aqueous phase containing uranium carboxylate, and recovering the uranium from the aqueous phase. The process is effective, simple and comparatively inexpensive. It avoids the use of toxic reagents and the formation of undesirable intermediates.

Conrad, M.C.; Getz, P.A.; Hickman, J.E.; Payne, L.D.

1982-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

123

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oversight Assessment of Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project

124

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oversight Assessment of Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project

125

Radiation doses and hazards from processing of crude oil at the Tema oil refinery in Ghana  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......petroleum products and wastes at the Tema oil refinery...radionuclides in the wastes than the crude oil and...monitoring to establish long-term effect on both public...accumulate at the bottom of storage tanks, tubings and other...uncontrolled release of waste containing TENORM, concentrated......

E. O. Darko; D. O. Kpeglo; E. H. K. Akaho; C. Schandorf; P. A. S. Adu; A. Faanu; E. Abankwah; H. Lawluvi; A. R. Awudu

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

GRR/Section 7-FD-c - PURPA Qualifying Facility Certification Process | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7-FD-c - PURPA Qualifying Facility Certification Process 7-FD-c - PURPA Qualifying Facility Certification Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-FD-c - PURPA Qualifying Facility Certification Process 07FDCPURPAQualifyingFacilityCertificationProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Regulations & Policies Public Utilities Regulatory Policy Act 18 CFR 292 18 CFR 131.80 18 CFR 381 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 07FDCPURPAQualifyingFacilityCertificationProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative

127

Summary - Salt Waste Processing Facility Design at the Savannah River Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Salt Waste Processing Facility Salt Waste Processing Facility ETR Report Date: November 2006 ETR-4 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Salt Waste Processing Facility Design at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is intended to remove and concentrate the radioactive strontium (Sr), actinides, and cesium (Cs) from the bulk salt waste solutions in the SRS high-level waste tanks. The sludge and strip effluent from the SWPF that contain concentrated Sr, actinide, and Cs wastes will be sent to the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), where they will be vitrified. The decontaminated salt solution (DSS) that is left after removal of the highly

128

GRR/Section 7-WA-a - Energy Facility Siting Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 7-WA-a - Energy Facility Siting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-WA-a - Energy Facility Siting Process 7-WA-a - Energy Facility Siting Process (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council Regulations & Policies RCW 80.50.60(1) WAC 463-60 RCW 80.50.090(2) WAC 463-30-270 WAC 463-30-320 Triggers None specified Under RCW 80.50.60(1) a developer may not begin construction of a new energy facility site until they obtain Energy Facility Siting certification

129

GRR/Section 7-CA-c - California Energy Facility CPUC Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 7-CA-c - California Energy Facility CPUC Process GRR/Section 7-CA-c - California Energy Facility CPUC Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-CA-c - California Energy Facility CPUC Process 07CACCaliforniaEnergyFacilityCPUCProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California Public Utilities Commission Regulations & Policies Warren-Alquist Energy Resources Conservation and Development Act General Order 131-D California Environmental Quality Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 07CACCaliforniaEnergyFacilityCPUCProcess.pdf 07CACCaliforniaEnergyFacilityCPUCProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

130

Process and economic model of in-field heavy oil upgrading using aqueous pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process and economic model for aqueous pyrolysis in-field upgrading of heavy oil has been developed. The model has been constructed using the ASPEN PLUS chemical process simulator. The process features cracking of heavy oil at moderate temperatures in the presence of water to increase oil quality and thus the value of the oil. Calculations with the model indicate that for a 464 Mg/day (3,000 bbl/day) process, which increases the oil API gravity of the processed oil from 13.5{degree} to 22.4{degree}, the required value increase of the oil would need to be at least $2.80/Mg{center_dot}{degree}API($0.40/bbl{center_dot}{degree}API) to make the process economically attractive. This level of upgrading has been demonstrated in preliminary experiments with candidate catalysts. For improved catalysts capable of having the coke make and increasing the pyrolysis rate, a required price increase for the oil as low as $1.34/Mg{center_dot}{degree}API ($0.21/bbl{center_dot}{degree}API)has been calculated.

Thorsness, C. B., LLNL

1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

131

Comparison of Conventional and Catalytic in Situ Combustion Processes for Oil Recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although combustion and oxidation processes for oil recovery have traditionally been associated with heavy oil, it has been demonstrated recently that air injection into light oil reservoirs can provide good recoveries,(10, 11) while Al -Saffar et al.(12) have shown that the separation of a light oil fractions into individual SARA fractions followed by combustion can provide useful information on this light oil oxidation process. ... The system consists of the following interrelated parts: combustion cell, flow metering and pressure regulation units, temperature measurement and control, fluid production unit, and gas analysis unit. ... The combustion processes were very similar because the sample beds in all experiments were identical and the same processing parameters were used. ...

Musa B. Abuhesa; R. Hughes

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

132

Gas-assisted gravity drainage (GAGD) process for improved oil recovery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rapid and inexpensive process for increasing the amount of hydrocarbons (e.g., oil) produced and the rate of production from subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing reservoirs by displacing oil downwards within the oil reservoir and into an oil recovery apparatus is disclosed. The process is referred to as "gas-assisted gravity drainage" and comprises the steps of placing one or more horizontal producer wells near the bottom of a payzone (i.e., rock in which oil and gas are found in exploitable quantities) of a subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing reservoir and injecting a fluid displacer (e.g., CO.sub.2) through one or more vertical wells or horizontal wells. Pre-existing vertical wells may be used to inject the fluid displacer into the reservoir. As the fluid displacer is injected into the top portion of the reservoir, it forms a gas zone, which displaces oil and water downward towards the horizontal producer well(s).

Rao, Dandina N. (Baton Rouge, LA)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

133

SOLVENT-BASED ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY PROCESSES TO DEVELOP WEST SAK ALASKA NORTH SLOPE HEAVY OIL RESOURCES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A one-year research program is conducted to evaluate the feasibility of applying solvent-based enhanced oil recovery processes to develop West Sak and Ugnu heavy oil resources found on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). The project objective is to conduct research to develop technology to produce and market the 300-3000 cp oil in the West Sak and Ugnu sands. During the first phase of the research, background information was collected, and experimental and numerical studies of vapor extraction process (VAPEX) in West Sak and Ugnu are conducted. The experimental study is designed to foster understanding of the processes governing vapor chamber formation and growth, and to optimize oil recovery. A specially designed core-holder and a computed tomography (CT) scanner was used to measure the in-situ distribution of phases. Numerical simulation study of VAPEX was initiated during the first year. The numerical work completed during this period includes setting up a numerical model and using the analog data to simulate lab experiments of the VAPEX process. The goal was to understand the mechanisms governing the VAPEX process. Additional work is recommended to expand the VAPEX numerical study using actual field data obtained from Alaska North Slope.

David O. Ogbe; Tao Zhu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Overview of Fiscal Year 2002 Research and Development for Savannah River Site's Salt Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste program is responsible for storage, treatment, and immobilization of high-level waste for disposal. The Salt Processing Program (SPP) is the salt (soluble) waste treatment portion of the SRS high-level waste effort. The overall SPP encompasses the selection, design, construction and operation of treatment technologies to prepare the salt waste feed material for the site's grout facility (Saltstone) and vitrification facility (Defense Waste Processing Facility). Major constituents that must be removed from the salt waste and sent as feed to Defense Waste Processing Facility include actinides, strontium, cesium, and entrained sludge. In fiscal year 2002 (FY02), research and development (R&D) on the actinide and strontium removal and Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) processes transitioned from technology development for baseline process selection to providing input for conceptual design of the Salt Waste Processing Facility. The SPP R&D focused on advancing the technical maturity, risk reduction, engineering development, and design support for DOE's engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractors for the Salt Waste Processing Facility. Thus, R&D in FY02 addressed the areas of actual waste performance, process chemistry, engineering tests of equipment, and chemical and physical properties relevant to safety. All of the testing, studies, and reports were summarized and provided to the DOE to support the Salt Waste Processing Facility, which began conceptual design in September 2002.

H. D. Harmon, R. Leugemors, PNNL; S. Fink, M. Thompson, D. Walker, WSRC; P. Suggs, W. D. Clark, Jr

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

135

Process analysis and optimization of biodiesel production from vegetable oils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Table (2.2) (OTM, 1999). Crude oils are composed of 80 to 90% hydrogen saturated aliphatic alkanes (paraffins) and cycloalkanes (naphthenes). Aromatic hydrocarbons and alkenes (olefins) comprise 10- 20% and 1%, respectively, of crude oil composition....2 Hydrocarbon Contents in Crude Oil (ATSDR, 1995; OTM, 1999) HYDROCARBONS GENERAL FORMULA CHAIN TYPE STATE (Room temp) EXAMPLES Paraffins (Aliphatic) CnH2n+2 (n:1 to20) Linear or Branched Gas or Liquid Methane, Propane Hexane Aromatic C6H5-Y...

Myint, Lay L.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

Facility Siting and Layout Optimization Based on Process Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) that identifies potential layouts by minimizing overall costs. This approach gives the coordinates of each facility in a continuous plane, and estimates for the total length of pipes, the land area, and the selection of safety devices. Finally, the 3D...

Jung, Seungho

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

137

Conversion of lean oil absorption process to extraction process for conditioning natural gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an absorption process for the removal of C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons from a natural gas stream by absorbing the C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons with a lean oil to produce a residue gas stream of pipeline quality and a rich oil from which the C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons are recovered, this patent describes the improvement which comprises providing the capability, of selectively extracting the C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons from the gas stream with a lean preferential physical solvent according to the maximum recoveries and to the selected degrees of (a) ethane in amounts ranging up to 95%, (b) propane in amounts ranging up to 100%, (c) butane in amounts ranging up to 100%, or (d) pentanes and higher molecular weight hydrocarbons in amounts ranging up to 100% by: A. selecting an absorber plant, which is used for recovering maximum quantities of the C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons from the gas stream while using lean oils as solvent for the C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons; B. selecting a preferential physical solvent which is selective for ethane and heavier hydrocarbon components of the gas stream ; C. replacing the oils in the selected absorber plant with a selected volume of the selected preferential physical solvent; and D. while using the equipment in extraction mode, contacting the gas stream with the lean preferential physical solvent at a selected flow rate within the range of 0.001-0.5 gallon of lean solvent per standard cubic foot of the gas stream to produce a residue gas stream of pipeline specifications and a rich solvent stream containing the ethane and heavier hydrocarbon components.

Mehra, Y.R.

1987-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

138

An hybrid ensemble based approach for process parameter estimation in offshore oil platforms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An hybrid ensemble based approach for process parameter estimation in offshore oil platforms Piero in offshore oil platforms. In particular, the difference between the theoretical value of the valve flow on real measurements performed on a number of similar offshore choke valves. 1. Introduction In this paper

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

139

Facility design philosophy: Tank Waste Remediation System Process support and infrastructure definition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the current facility design philosophy for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) process support and infrastructure definition. The Tank Waste Remediation System Facility Configuration Study (FCS) initially documented the identification and definition of support functions and infrastructure essential to the TWRS processing mission. Since the issuance of the FCS, the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has proceeded to develop information and requirements essential for the technical definition of the TWRS treatment processing programs.

Leach, C.E.; Galbraith, J.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Grant, P.R.; Francuz, D.J.; Schroeder, P.J. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Overview of the Facility Safeguardability Analysis (FSA) Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive Summary The safeguards system of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is intended to provide the international community with credible assurance that a State is fulfilling its safeguards obligations. Effective and cost-efficient IAEA safeguards at the facility level are, and will remain, an important element of IAEA safeguards as those safeguards evolve towards a “State-Level approach.” The Safeguards by Design (SBD) concept can facilitate the implementation of these effective and cost-efficient facility-level safeguards (Bjornard, et al. 2009a, 2009b; IAEA, 1998; Wonder & Hockert, 2011). This report, sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, introduces a methodology intended to ensure that the diverse approaches to Safeguards by Design can be effectively integrated and consistently used to cost effectively enhance the application of international safeguards.

Bari, Robert A.; Hockert, John; Wonder, Edward F.; Johnson, Scott J.; Wigeland, Roald; Zentner, Michael D.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil processing facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Slow Radio-Frequency Processing of Large Oil Shale Volumes to Produce Petroleum-Like Shale Oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is proposed to convert oil shale by radio frequency heating over a period of months to years to create a product similar to natural petroleum. Electrodes would be placed in drill holes, either vertical or horizontal, and a radio frequency chosen so that the penetration depth of the radio waves is of the order of tens to hundreds of meters. A combination of excess volume production and overburden compaction drives the oil and gas from the shale into the drill holes, where it is pumped to the surface. Electrical energy for the process could be provided initially by excess regional capacity, especially off-peak power, which would generate {approx}3 x 10{sup 5} bbl/day of synthetic crude oil, depending on shale grade. The electricity cost, using conservative efficiency assumptions, is $4.70 to $6.30/bbl, depending on grade and heating rate. At steady state, co-produced gas can generate more than half the electric power needed for the process, with the fraction depending on oil shale grade. This would increase production to 7.3 x 10{sup 5} bbl/day for 104 l/Mg shale and 1.6 x 10{sup 6} bbl/day for 146 l/Mg shale using a combination of off-peak power and power from co-produced gas.

Burnham, A K

2003-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

143

Review of the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation Verification Review Processes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation Verification Review Processes June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 1

144

Review of the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation Verification Review Processes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation Verification Review Processes June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 1

145

Process for producing modified microorganisms for oil treatment at high temperatures, pressures and salinity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. The processes are comprised of steps which successively limit the carbon sources and increase the temperature, pressure and salinity of the media. This is done until microbial strains are obtained that are capable of growing in essentially crude oil as a carbon source and at a temperature range from about 70 C to 90 C, at a pressure range from about 2,000 to 2,500 psi and at a salinity range from about 1.3 to 35%. 68 figs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

146

Pore-Level Investigation of Heavy Oil Recovery During Water Alternating Solvent Injection Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study concerns with the microscopic and macroscopic fluid distribution and flow behavior during water alternating solvent (WAS) injection process to heavy oil using micromodel generated from thin section ...

A. A. Dehghan; S. A. Farzaneh; R. Kharrat; M. H. Ghazanfari…

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Integrated Remediation Process for a High Salinity Industrial Soil Sample Contaminated with Heavy Oil and Metals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A highly saline industrial soil sample contaminated with heavy oils and several heavy metals, was tested for remediation using NRC’s Solvent Extraction Soil Remediation (SESR) process. The sample was provided ...

Abdul Majid; Bryan D. Sparks

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Citrus essential oils and their influence on the anaerobic digestion process: An overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Citrus waste accounts for more than half of the whole fruit when processed for juice extraction. Among valorisation possibilities, anaerobic digestion for methane generation appears to be the most technically feasible and environmentally friendly alternative. However, citrus essential oils can inhibit this biological process. In this paper, the characteristics of citrus essential oils, as well as the mechanisms of their antimicrobial effects and potential adaptation mechanisms are reviewed. Previous studies of anaerobic digestion of citrus waste under different conditions are presented; however, some controversy exists regarding the limiting dosage of limonene for a stable process (24–192 mg of citrus essential oil per liter of digester and day). Successful strategies to avoid process inhibition by citrus essential oils are based either on recovery or removal of the limonene, by extraction or fungal pre-treatment respectively.

B. Ruiz; X. Flotats

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Electrostatic coalescence of used automotive crankcase oil as an alternative to other separation processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents an initial investigation of using electrostatic coalescence as an alternative to conventional separation processes to purify used automotive crankcase oil. Specific emphasis of this study was the feasibility of this approach...

Dixon, John Leslie

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Oil production by entrained pyrolysis of biomass and processing of oil and char  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Entrained pyrolysis of lignocellulosic material proceeds from a controlled pyrolysis-initiating temperature to completion of an oxygen free environment at atmospheric pressure and controlled residence time to provide a high yield recovery of pyrolysis oil together with char and non-condensable, combustible gases. The residence time is a function of gas flow rate and the initiating temperature is likewise a function of the gas flow rate, varying therewith. A controlled initiating temperature range of about 400.degree. C. to 550.degree. C. with corresponding gas flow rates to maximize oil yield is disclosed.

Knight, James A. (Atlanta, GA); Gorton, Charles W. (Atlanta, GA)

1990-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

151

Bisulfite reductase and nitrogenase genes retrieved from biocorrosive bacteria in saline produced waters of offshore oil recovery facilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water-flooding is a common strategy to enhance oil recovery in reservoirs. Maintaining quality and standards of produced water avoids oil biodegradation, biogenic souring and biocorrosion during operations, which are influenced by sulfate-reducing (SRB) and Fe (III) reducing bacteria. The aim of this work was to increase our knowledge of corrosive bacterial communities inhabiting saline produced waters of offshore oil exploitation facilities through retrieving sequences of functional genes, for instance, dsrAB and nifD of Desulfovibrionales, Desulfobacterales and Desulfuromonadales taxonomical orders. Five clone libraries were generated with retrieved sequences acquired from different saline produced waters, with and without biocide dosing. The dsrAB phylogenetic analyses showed Desulfomicrobium, Desulfovibrio, and Desulfohalobium as well as Desulfococcus, Desulfosarcina, Desulfobacter, Desulfobacterium and Desulfobulbus. The retrieved nifD genes displayed the Fe (III) reducing bacteria (Desulfuromonadales) such as Desulfuromusa, Pelobacter, Malonomonas, and Desulfuromonas. The relative abundance in all waters was: the Desulfovibrionales were represented by 55.28% of analyzed clones; the Desulfobacterales by 26.83% and 17.89% for the Desulfuromonadales. Diversity measures were calculated by the Shannon index (H?), which showed that there was a high degree of diversity between all produced waters; however, dominance in produced water with biocide was detected by a Desulfovibrio taxon.

I. Zapata-Peñasco; L. Salazar-Coria; M. Saucedo-García; L. Villa-Tanaka; C. Hernández-Rodríguez

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Criticality Safety Evaluation Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facilities Process Water Handling System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the criticality concerns associated with process water handling in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The controls and limitations on equipment design and operations to control potential criticality occurrences are identified.

KESSLER, S.F.

2000-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

153

Y-12s Building 9212 and the Uranium Processing Facility, part...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

wings. Never would a facility be designed like that today to process uranium. Yet, the workers at Y-12 have, for years, managed to sustain the Y-12 "Can Do" attitude and generate...

154

Surface water transport and distribution of uranium in contaminated sediments near a nuclear weapons processing facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The extent of remobilization of uranium from contaminated soils adjacent to a nuclear weapons processing facility during episodic rain events was investigated. In addition, information on the solid phase associations of U in floodplain and suspended...

Batson, Vicky Lynn

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Characterization of decontamination and decommissioning wastes expected from the major processing facilities in the 200 Areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was intended to characterize and estimate the amounts of equipment and other materials that are candidates for removal and subsequent processing in a solid waste facility when the major processing and handling facilities in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site are decontaminated and decommissioned. The facilities in this study were selected based on processing history and on the magnitude of the estimated decommissioning cost cited in the Surplus Facilities Program Plan; Fiscal Year 1993 (Winship and Hughes 1992). The facilities chosen for this study include B Plant (221-B), T Plant (221-T), U Plant (221-U), the Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant (224-U and 224-UA), the Reduction Oxidation (REDOX) or S Plant (202-S), the Plutonium Concentration Facility for B Plant (224-B), and the Concentration Facility for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and REDOX (233-S). This information is required to support planning activities for current and future solid waste treatment, storage, and disposal operations and facilities.

Amato, L.C.; Franklin, J.D.; Hyre, R.A.; Lowy, R.M.; Millar, J.S.; Pottmeyer, J.A. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States); Duncan, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

The Process, Methods and Tool Used To Integrate Safety During Design of a Category 2 Nuclear Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presenter: Lynn J. Harkey, SDIT Project Engineer, Uranium Processing Facility Project, B&W Y-12 Track 5-2

157

VolumeExplorer: Roaming Large Volumes to Couple Visualization and Data Processing for Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VolumeExplorer: Roaming Large Volumes to Couple Visualization and Data Processing for Oil and Gas dedicated to oil and gas exploration. Our system combines probe- based volume rendering with data processing Seismic interpretation is an important task in the oil and gas exploration-production (EP) workflow [9, 26

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

158

EIS-0070: Mining, Construction and Operation for a Full-size Module at the Anvil Points Oil Shale Facility, Rifle, Garfield County, Colorado  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this environmental impact statement to assess the environmental and socioeconomic implications of its proposal to mine 11 million tons of oil shale from the Naval Oil Shale Reserves (NOSR) at Anvil Points, Colorado; to construct an experimental full-size shale retort module on a 365-acre lease tract having a 4700 bbl/day production capacity; and to consider extension, modification or new leasing of the facility.

159

FINGERPRINTING INORGANIC ARSENIC AND ORGANOARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORT AND PROCESS VOTERS USING A LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPH COUPLED WITH AN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER AS A DETECTOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Process for Recovery of Oil Shale, Nov. 1976-0ct. 1977,M. A. , Proc. 12th Oil Shale Sympos. , Colorado School ofCOMPOUNDS IN IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORT ~~D PROCESS WATERS

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Progress of the High Level Waste Program at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 13178  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site treats and immobilizes High Level Waste into a durable borosilicate glass for safe, permanent storage. The High Level Waste program significantly reduces environmental risks associated with the storage of radioactive waste from legacy efforts to separate fissionable nuclear material from irradiated targets and fuels. In an effort to support the disposition of radioactive waste and accelerate tank closure at the Savannah River Site, the Defense Waste Processing Facility recently implemented facility and flowsheet modifications to improve production by 25%. These improvements, while low in cost, translated to record facility production in fiscal years 2011 and 2012. In addition, significant progress has been accomplished on longer term projects aimed at simplifying and expanding the flexibility of the existing flowsheet in order to accommodate future processing needs and goals. (authors)

Bricker, Jonathan M.; Fellinger, Terri L.; Staub, Aaron V.; Ray, Jeff W.; Iaukea, John F. [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, South Carolina, 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, South Carolina, 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil processing facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The emphasis of this work was on investigating the mechanisms and factors that control the recovery of heavy oil with the objective to improve recovery efficiencies. For this purpose the interaction of flow transport and reaction at various scales from the pore network to the field scales were studied. Particular mechanisms to be investigated included the onset of gas flow in foamy oil production and in in-situ steam drive, gravity drainage in steam processes, the development of sustained combustion fronts and the propagation of foams in porous media. Analytical, computational and experimental methods were utilized to advance the state of the art in heavy oil recovery. Successful completion of this research was expected to lead to improvements in the Recovery efficiency of various heavy oil processes.

Yorstos, Yanis C.

2002-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

162

Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The emphasis of this work was on investigating the mechanisms and factors that control the recovery of heavy oil, with the objective to improve recovery efficiencies. For this purpose, the interaction of flow, transport and reaction at various scales (from the pore-network to the field scales) were studied. Particular mechanisms investigated included the onset of gas flow in foamy oil production and in in-situ steam drive, gravity drainage in steam process, the development of sustained combustion fronts and the propagation of foams in porous media. Analytical, computational and experimental methods were utilized to advance the state of the art in heavy oil recovery. Successful completion of this research was expected to lead to improvements in the recovery efficiency of various heavy oil processes.

Yortsos, Yanis C.; Akkutlu, Yucel; Amilik, Pouya; Kechagia, Persefoni; Lu, Chuan; Shariati, Maryam; Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis; Zhan, Lang

2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

163

Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A: Advanced Conceptual Design Report. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This ACDR was performed following completed of the Conceptual Design Report in July 1992; the work encompassed August 1992 to January 1994. Mission of the WRAP Module 2A facility is to receive, process, package, certify, and ship for permanent burial at the Hanford site disposal facilities the Category 1 and 3 contact handled low-level radioactive mixed wastes that are currently in retrievable storage at Hanford and are forecast to be generated over the next 30 years by Hanford, and waste to be shipped to Hanford from about DOE sites. This volume provides an introduction to the ACDR process and the scope of the task along with a project summary of the facility, treatment technologies, cost, and schedule. Major areas of departure from the CDR are highlighted. Descriptions of the facility layout and operations are included.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Design of the Waste Receiving and Processing Module 2A Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Westinghouse Hanford Company has determined that a facility is required for the treatment of mixed low-level waste at the Hanford Site. The mission of that facility will be to receive, process/treat, package, certify, and ship the contact-handled, mixed low-level waste that must be handled by Hanford Site to permanent disposal. Preconceptual and conceptual design studies were performed by United Engineers and Constructors, and a conceptual design report was issued. This report presents a summary of the conceptual design for a facility that will meet the mission established.

Lamberd, D.L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vehicle Recycling Partnership Plastics Separation Pilot Plant Vehicle Recycling Partnership Plastics Separation Pilot Plant Sam Jody and displays recycled plastics Bassam Jody displays plastics recovered from shredder residue by the Argonne separation process and successfully tested for making auto parts. The Challenge of Separating Plastic Waste Separating plastics at high concentrations from waste streams has been a challenge because many conventional separation methods depend on material density or employ organic solvents. Many plastics have overlapping densities and, therefore, could not be separated from each other based on density differences alone. Organic solvents pose environmental risks. Argonne's Froth-flotation Process Argonne has developed a process for separating individual polymers and groups of compatible polymers from various polymer rich waste streams. The

166

Direct extraction of oil from sunflower seeds by twin-screw extruder according to an aqueous extraction process: Feasibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct extraction of oil from sunflower seeds by twin-screw extruder according to an aqueous the feasibility of an aqueous process to extract sunflower seed oil using a co-rotating twin-screw extruder. Aqueous extraction was carried out using whole seeds and the influence of the operating conditions on oil

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

167

File:07HIBRenewableEnergyFacilitySitingProcessREFSP.pdf | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HIBRenewableEnergyFacilitySitingProcessREFSP.pdf HIBRenewableEnergyFacilitySitingProcessREFSP.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:07HIBRenewableEnergyFacilitySitingProcessREFSP.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 124 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 3 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 16:39, 27 December 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 16:39, 27 December 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 3 pages (124 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information)

168

GRR/Section 18-CA-b - RCRA Process (Hazardous Waste Facility Permit) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

18-CA-b - RCRA Process (Hazardous Waste Facility Permit) 18-CA-b - RCRA Process (Hazardous Waste Facility Permit) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-CA-b - RCRA Process (Hazardous Waste Facility Permit) 18CABRCRAProcess (2).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California Environmental Protection Agency Department of Toxic Substances Control Regulations & Policies Resource Conservation and Recovery Act 40 CRF 261 Title 22, California Code of Regulations, Division 4.5 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18CABRCRAProcess (2).pdf 18CABRCRAProcess (2).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative

169

Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP), 2336W Building, on the Hanford Site is designed to receive, confirm, repackage, certify, treat, store, and ship contact-handled transuranic and low-level radioactive waste from past and present U.S. Department of Energy activities. The WRAP facility is comprised of three buildings: 2336W, the main processing facility (also referred to generically as WRAP); 2740W, an administrative support building; and 2620W, a maintenance support building. The support buildings are subject to the normal hazards associated with industrial buildings (no radiological materials are handled) and are not part of this analysis except as they are impacted by operations in the processing building, 2336W. WRAP is designed to provide safer, more efficient methods of handling the waste than currently exist on the Hanford Site and contributes to the achievement of as low as reasonably achievable goals for Hanford Site waste management.

TOMASZEWSKI, T.A.

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

170

Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report describing the evolution of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' from its conceptual stage in 2002 to the field implementation of the developed technology in 2006. This comprehensive report includes all the experimental research, models developments, analyses of results, salient conclusions and the technology transfer efforts. As planned in the original proposal, the project has been conducted in three separate and concurrent tasks: Task 1 involved a physical model study of the new GAGD process, Task 2 was aimed at further developing the vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for gas-oil miscibility determination, and Task 3 was directed at determining multiphase gas-oil drainage and displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks at realistic pressures and temperatures. The project started with the task of recruiting well-qualified graduate research assistants. After collecting and reviewing the literature on different aspects of the project such gas injection EOR, gravity drainage, miscibility characterization, and gas-oil displacement characteristics in porous media, research plans were developed for the experimental work to be conducted under each of the three tasks. Based on the literature review and dimensional analysis, preliminary criteria were developed for the design of the partially-scaled physical model. Additionally, the need for a separate transparent model for visual observation and verification of the displacement and drainage behavior under gas-assisted gravity drainage was identified. Various materials and methods (ceramic porous material, Stucco, Portland cement, sintered glass beads) were attempted in order to fabricate a satisfactory visual model. In addition to proving the effectiveness of the GAGD process (through measured oil recoveries in the range of 65 to 87% IOIP), the visual models demonstrated three possible multiphase mechanisms at work, namely, Darcy-type displacement until gas breakthrough, gravity drainage after breakthrough and film-drainage in gas-invaded zones throughout the duration of the process. The partially-scaled physical model was used in a series of experiments to study the effects of wettability, gas-oil miscibility, secondary versus tertiary mode gas injection, and the presence of fractures on GAGD oil recovery. In addition to yielding recoveries of up to 80% IOIP, even in the immiscible gas injection mode, the partially-scaled physical model confirmed the positive influence of fractures and oil-wet characteristics in enhancing oil recoveries over those measured in the homogeneous (unfractured) water-wet models. An interesting observation was that a single logarithmic relationship between the oil recovery and the gravity number was obeyed by the physical model, the high-pressure corefloods and the field data.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin; Thaer N. N. Mahmoud; Daryl S. Sequeira; Amit P. Sharma

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

171

Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A: Advanced Conceptual Design Report. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume presents the Total Estimated Cost (TEC) for the WRAP (Waste Receiving and Processing) 2A facility. The TEC is $81.9 million, including an overall project contingency of 25% and escalation of 13%, based on a 1997 construction midpoint. (The mission of WRAP 2A is to receive, process, package, certify, and ship for permanent burial at the Hanford site disposal facilities the Category 1 and 3 contact handled low-level radioactive mixed wastes that are currently in retrievable storage, and are forecast to be generated over the next 30 years by Hanford, and waste to be shipped to Hanford site from about 20 DOE sites.)

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Pyrolysis Using Microwave Heating: A Sustainable Process for Recycling Used Car Engine Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pyrolysis Using Microwave Heating: A Sustainable Process for Recycling Used Car Engine Oil ... A reaction temperature of 600 °C provided the greatest yield of commercially valuable products: the recovered liquid oils were composed of light paraffins and aromatic hydrocarbons that could be used as industrial feedstock; the remaining incondensable gases comprised light hydrocarbons that could potentially be used as a fuel source to power the process. ... The pyrolysis products leave the reactor and pass through a system of three water-cooled Liebig condensers [5, 6, 7], which collect condensed hydrocarbons in main and secondary collection flasks [8, 9]. ...

Su Shiung Lam; Alan D. Russell; Howard A. Chase

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

173

Critical Protection Item classification for a waste processing facility at Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the methodology for Critical Protection Item (CPI) classification and its application to the Structures, Systems and Components (SSC) of a waste processing facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The WSRC methodology for CPI classification includes the evaluation of the radiological and non-radiological consequences resulting from postulated accidents at the waste processing facility and comparison of these consequences with allowable limits. The types of accidents considered include explosions and fire in the facility and postulated accidents due to natural phenomena, including earthquakes, tornadoes, and high velocity straight winds. The radiological analysis results indicate that CPIs are not required at the waste processing facility to mitigate the consequences of radiological release. The non-radiological analysis, however, shows that the Waste Storage Tank (WST) and the dike spill containment structures around the formic acid tanks in the cold chemical feed area and waste treatment area of the facility should be identified as CPIs. Accident mitigation options are provided and discussed.

Ades, M.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Garrett, R.J. [ABB Government Services, Aiken, SC (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Environmental research on a modified in situ oil shale task process. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the US Department of Energy's Oil Shale Task Force in its research program at the Occidental Oil Shale, Inc. facility at Logan Wash, Colorado. More specifically, the Task Force obtained samples from Retort 3E and Retort 6 and submitted these samples to a variety of analyses. The samples collected included: crude oil (Retort 6); light oil (Retort 6); product water (Retort 6); boiler blowdown (Retort 6); makeup water (Retort 6); mine sump water; groundwater; water from Retorts 1 through 5; retort gas (Retort 6); mine air; mine dust; and spent shale core (Retort 3E). The locations of the sampling points and methods used for collection and storage are discussed in Chapter 2 (Characterization). These samples were then distributed to the various laboratories and universities participating in the Task Force. For convenience in organizing the data, it is useful to group the work into three categories: Characterization, Leaching, and Health Effects. While many samples still have not been analyzed and much of the data remains to be interpreted, there are some preliminary conclusions the Task Force feels will be helpful in defining future needs and establishing priorities. It is important to note that drilling agents other than water were used in the recovery of the core from Retort 3E. These agents have been analyzed (see Table 12 in Chapter 2) for several constituents of interest. As a result some of the analyses of this core sample and leachates must be considered tentative.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is an investigation of various multi-phase and multiscale transport and reaction processes associated with heavy oil recovery. The thrust areas of the project include the following: Internal drives, vapor-liquid flows, combustion and reaction processes, fluid displacements and the effect of instabilities and heterogeneities and the flow of fluids with yield stress. These find respective applications in foamy oils, the evolution of dissolved gas, internal steam drives, the mechanics of concurrent and countercurrent vapor-liquid flows, associated with thermal methods and steam injection, such as SAGD, the in-situ combustion, the upscaling of displacements in heterogeneous media and the flow of foams, Bingham plastics and heavy oils in porous media and the development of wormholes during cold production.

Yortsos, Yanis C.

2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

176

Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an investigation of various multi-phase and multiscale transport and reaction processes associated with heavy oil recovery. The thrust areas of the project include the following: Internal drives, vapor-liquid flows, combustion and reaction processes, fluid displacements and the effect of instabilities and heterogeneities and the flow of fluids with yield stress. These find respective applications in foamy oils, the evolution of dissolved gas, internal steam drives, the mechanics of concurrent and countercurrent vapor-liquid flows, associated with thermal methods and steam injection, such as SAGD, the in-situ combustion, the upscaling of displacements in heterogeneous media and the flow of foams, Bingham plastics and heavy oils in porous media and the development of wormholes during cold production.

Yortsos, Y.C.

2001-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

177

INTERLABORATORY, MULTIMETHOD STUDY OF AN IN SITU PRODUCED OIL SHALE PROCESS WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minor Elements in Oil Shale and Oil Shale Products. LERCfor Use 1n Oil Shale and Shale Oil. OSRD-32, 1945. Jeris, J.Water coproduced with shale oil and decanted from it is

Farrier, D.S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

A H-infinity Control Approach for Oil Drilling Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a robust optimization framework to improve the Managed Pressure Drilling (MPD) process for safer and superior economical and environmental operations while removing risk-prone conventional drilling limitations such as a need for constant monitoring of the system parameters. The nonlinear MPD process considers the mud pump flow rate and the differential flow rate of the backpressure pump and the choke as the two inputs while the process downhole pressure rate as the output. The MPD process unmodeled disturbances, uncertain geological parameters and related model nonlinearities are considered to be the corresponding system uncertainties in a closed loop robust control and optimization framework for real-time operations. Moreover, the MPD process inputs are formulated to remain within practical bounds by introducing performance weighting functions. The proposed framework numerical results demonstrate the efficiency of the closed loop robust control implementations for efficient drilling operations in operator guidance systems and provide a low-computational complexity design algorithm for safer drilling operations in regions with a-priori unknown geological properties.

Muhittin Yilmaz; Salman Mujeeb; Naren Reddy Dhansri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil processing facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Checkout and start-up of the integrated DWPF (Defense Waste Processing Facility) melter system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) is a one-ninth-scale demonstration of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed preparation, melter, and off-gas systems. The IDMS will be the first engineering-scale melter system at SRL to process mercury and flowsheet levels of halides and sulfates. This report includes a summary of the IDMS program objectives, system and equipment descriptions, and detailed discussions of the system checkout and start-up. 10 refs., 44 figs., 20 tabs.

Smith, M.E.; Hutson, N.D.; Miller, D.H.; Morrison, J.; Shah, H.; Shuford, J.A.; Glascock, J.; Wurzinger, F.H.; Zamecnik, J.R.

1989-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

182

Evaluating the effects of the number of caverns on the performance of underground oil storage facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three dimensional finite element calculations were performed to investigate the effect field size, in terms of the number of caverns, on the performance of SPR oil storage caverns leached in domal salt (interms of surface subsidence, storage losses, and cavern integrity). The calculations were performed for cavern fields containing 1, 7, 19, and an infinite number of caverns. The magnitude and volume of subsidence was significantly affected by increasing the number of caverns (nearly an order of magnitude increase was predicted for each increase in field size), while the extent of subsidence (approximately 2000 m fromthe center of the field) and storage loss were not. Furthermore, the percentage of storage loss volume manifested as surface subsidence increased as the cavern field was enlarged. This was attributed to elasticvolumetric dilatation of overlying strata. The multiple cavern calculations demonstrate that storage losses are greater for caverns farther from the center of the caverns field. Based on an accumulated strain stability criteria, the larger cavern fields are predicted to have a shorter life. This criteria also indicates that caverns on the periphery of a field may show signs of instability before the inner caverns. The West Hackberry site (containing 22 caverns) subsidence data closely agrees with the 19 cavern model subsidence predictions, providing confidence in the calculations. Even a 19 cavern field, substantially large by SPR standards, does not approach the behavior predicted by infinite cavern models (which are frequently used because they are economical). This demonstrates that 3D modeling is required to accurately investigate the performance of a multi-cavern array. Although based on a typical SPR cavern design, the results of this study describe mechanics common to all multi-cavern fields and should, in general, be useful tocavern engineers and architects.

Hoffman, E.L.; Ehgartner, B.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Use of process monitoring for verifying facility design of large-scale reprocessing plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the decade of the 1990s, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) faces the challenge of implementing safeguards in large, new reprocessing facilities. The Agency will be involved in the design, construction, checkout and initial operation of these new facilities to ensure effective safeguards are implemented. One aspect of the Agency involvement is in the area of design verification. The United States Support Program has initiated a task to develop methods for applying process data collection and validation during the cold commissioning phase of plant construction. This paper summarizes the results of this task. 14 refs., 1 tab.

Hakkila, E.A.; Zack, N.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Ehinger, M.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Franssen, F. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, the thrust areas include the following: Internal drives, vapor-liquid flows, combustion and reaction processes, fluid displacements and the effect of instabilities and heterogeneities and the flow of fluids with yield stress. These find respective applications in foamy oils, the evolution of dissolved gas, internal steam drives, the mechanics of concurrent and countercurrent vapor-liquid flows, associated with thermal methods and steam injection, such as SAGD, the in-situ combustion, the upscaling of displacements in heterogeneous media and the flow of foams, Bingham plastics and heavy oils in porous media and the development of wormholes during cold production.

Yortsos, Yanis C.

2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

185

Metals Processing Laboratory Users (MPLUS) Facility Annual Report FY 2002 (October 1, 2001-September 30, 2002)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Metals Processing Laboratory Users Facility (MPLUS) is a Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Industrial Technologies Program, user facility designated to assist researchers in key industries, universities, and federal laboratories in improving energy efficiency, improving environmental aspects, and increasing competitiveness. The goal of MPLUS is to provide access to the specialized technical expertise and equipment needed to solve metals processing issues that limit the development and implementation of emerging metals processing technologies. The scope of work can also extend to other types of materials. MPLUS has four primary user centers: (1) Processing--casting, powder metallurgy, deformation processing (including extrusion, forging, rolling), melting, thermomechanical processing, and high-density infrared processing; (2) Joining--welding, monitoring and control, solidification, brazing, and bonding; (3) Characterization--corrosion, mechanical properties, fracture mechanics, microstructure, nondestructive examination, computer-controlled dilatometry, and emissivity; and (4) Materials/Process Modeling--mathematical design and analyses, high-performance computing, process modeling, solidification/deformation, microstructure evolution, thermodynamic and kinetic, and materials databases A fully integrated approach provides researchers with unique opportunities to address technologically related issues to solve metals processing problems and probe new technologies. Access is also available to 16 additional Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) user facilities ranging from state-of-the-art materials characterization capabilities, and high-performance computing to manufacturing technologies. MPLUS can be accessed through a standardized user-submitted proposal and a user agreement. Nonproprietary (open) or proprietary proposals can be submitted. For open research and development, access to capabilities is provided free of charge, while for proprietary efforts, the user pays the entire project costs based on DOE guidelines for ORNL costs.

Angelini, P

2004-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

186

Observed oil and gas field size distributions: A consequence of the discovery process and prices of oil and gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If observed oil and gas field size distributions are obtained ... should approximate that of the parent population of oil and gas fields. However, empirical evidence ... the observable size distributions change w...

Lawrence J. Drew; Emil D. Attanasi; John H. Schuenemeyer

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Waste Analysis Plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for dangerous, mixed, and radioactive waste accepted for confirmation, nondestructive examination (NDE) and nondestructive assay (NDA), repackaging, certification, and/or storage at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP). Mixed and/or radioactive waste is treated at WRAP. WRAP is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

TRINER, G.C.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Diamonds in the rough: identification of individual napthenic acids in oil sands process water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Expansion of the oil sands industry of Canada has seen a concomitant increase in the amount of process water produced and stored in large lagoons known as tailings ponds. Concerns have been raised, particularly about the toxic complex mixtures of water-soluble naphthenic acids (NA) in the process water. To date, no individual NA have been identified, despite numerous attempts, and while the toxicity of broad classes of acids is of interest, toxicity is often structure-specific, so identification of individual acids may also be very important. The chromatographic resolution and mass spectral identification of some individual NA from oil sands process water is described. The authors concluded that the presence of tricyclic diamondoid acids, never before even considered as NA, suggests an unprecedented degree of biodegradation of some of the oil in the oil sands. The identifications reported should now be followed by quantitative studies, and these used to direct toxicity assays of relevant NA and the method used to identify further NA to establish which, or whether all NA, are toxic. The two-dimensional comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method described may also be important for helping to better focus reclamation/remediation strategies for NA as well as in facilitating the identification of the sources of NA in contaminated surface waters (auth)

Rowland, Steven J.; Scarlett, Alan G.; Jones, David; West, Charles E. (Petroleum and Environmental Geochemistry Group, Biogeochemistry Research Centre, University of Plymouth (United Kingdom)); Frank, Richard A. (Aquatic Ecosystems Protection Research Division-Water Science and Technology Directorate, Environment Canada, Burlington, Ontario (Canada)

2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

189

New Concepts in Hardware and Processes to Conserve Oil and Gas in Industrial Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Programs of the U.S. Department of Energy, Argonne interacted with 130 industrial companies to help define and evaluate appropriate areas of technology. The initial step was to assemble a master list of technologies that promised to conserve oil and gas...

Humphrey, J. L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Removal of heteroatoms and metals from heavy oils by bioconversion processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biocatalysts, either appropriate microorganisms or isolated enzymes, will be used in an aqueous phase in contact with the heavy oil phase to extract heteroatoms such as sulfur from the oil phase by bioconversion processes. Somewhat similar work on coal processing will be adapted and extended for this application. Bacteria such as Desulfovibrio desulfuricans will be studied for the reductive removal of organically-bound sulfur and bacteria such as Rhodococcus rhodochrum will be investigated for the oxidative removal of sulfur. Isolated bacteria from either oil field co-produced sour water or from soil contaminated by oil spills will also be tested. At a later time, bacteria that interact with organic nitrogen may also be studied. This type of interaction will be carried out in advanced bioreactor systems where organic and aqueous phases are contacted. One new concept of emulsion-phase contacting, which will be investigated, disperses the aqueous phase in the organic phase and is then recoalesced for removal of the contaminants and recycled back to the reactor. This program is a cooperative research and development program with the following companies: Baker Performance Chemicals, Chevron, Energy BioSystems, Exxon, Texaco, and UNOCAL. After verification of the bioprocessing concepts on a laboratory-scale, the end-product will be a demonstration of the technology at an industrial site. This should result in rapid transfer of the technology to industry.

Kaufman, E.N.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Commercial Light Water Reactor -Tritium Extraction Facility Process Waste Assessment (Project S-6091)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been tasked by the Department of Energy (DOE) to design and construct a Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) to process irradiated tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) from a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR). The plan is for the CLWR-TEF to provide tritium to the SRS Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) in Building 233-H in support of DOE requirements. The CLWR-TEF is being designed to provide 3 kg of new tritium per year, from TPBARS and other sources of tritium (Ref. 1-4).The CLWR TPBAR concept is being developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The TPBAR assemblies will be irradiated in a Commercial Utility light water nuclear reactor and transported to the SRS for tritium extraction and processing at the CLWR-TEF. A Conceptual Design Report for the CLWR-TEF Project was issued in July 1997 (Ref. 4).The scope of this Process Waste Assessment (PWA) will be limited to CLWR-TEF processing of CLWR irradiated TPBARs. Although the CLWR- TEF will also be designed to extract APT tritium-containing materials, they will be excluded at this time to facilitate timely development of this PWA. As with any process, CLWR-TEF waste stream characteristics will depend on process feedstock and contaminant sources. If irradiated APT tritium-containing materials are to be processed in the CLWR-TEF, this PWA should be revised to reflect the introduction of this contaminant source term.

Hsu, R.H.; Delley, A.O.; Alexander, G.J.; Clark, E.A.; Holder, J.S.; Lutz, R.N.; Malstrom, R.A.; Nobles, B.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Carson, S.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, NM (United States); Peterson, P.K. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, NM (United States)

1997-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

Review of Safety Basis Development for the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of5 of5 U.S. Department of Energy Subject: Review of Safety Basis Development for the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Line:~ HS: Rev: Eff. Date: HSS CRAD 45-57 0 January 31,2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Acting Direc or, Office of Sifety and Emergency Management Evaluations Date: January 31, 2013 Criteria Review and Approach Document LL.v. ~·M Criteria Lead:ife\riew of Safety Basis Development for the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Page 1 of 5 Date: January 31, 2013 1.0 PURPOSE Within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), the Office of Enforcement and Oversight, Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45) mission is to assess the effectiveness of the

193

Identification of Process Energy and Pollution Reduction Opportunities at DoD Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IDENTIFICATION OF PROCESS ENERGY AND POLLUTION REDUCTION OPPORTUNITIES AT DOD INDUSTRIAL FACILITIES Mike C. Lin Jeri 1. Northrup Principal Investigator Principal Investigator USACERL USACERL Champaign, IL Champaign, IL ABSTRACT Industrial... Information System (DEIS). DEIS is the infonnation system with which the DoD monitors its supplies and consumption of energy. It is primarily used as an energy management tool, providing infonnation about each fuel used within the DoD, including bulk...

Lin, M. C.; Northrup, J. I.; Smith, E. D.

194

An evaluation of hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical behavior of processed oil shale solid waste 2; The use of time domain reflectometry (TDR) for monitoring in-situ volumetric water content in processed oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the use of time domain reflectometry (TDR) for monitoring volumetric water contents in processed oil shale solid waste. TDR measures soil water content via a correlation between the dielectric constant (K) of the 3 phase (soil-water-air) system and the volumetric water content ({theta}{sub v}). An extensive bench top research program has been conducted to evaluate and verify the use of this technique in processed oil shale solid waste. This study utilizes columns of processed oil shale packed to known densities and varying water contents and compares the columetric water content measured via TDR and the volumetric water content measured through gravimetric determination.

Reeves, T.L.; Elgezawi, S.M. (Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Kaser, T.G. (GIGO Computer and Electronic, Laramie, WY (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Techno-economic analysis of the coal-to-olefins process in comparison with the oil-to-olefins process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Olefins are one of the most important oil derivatives widely used in industry. To reduce the dependence of olefins industry on oil, China is increasing the production of olefins from alternative energy resources, especially from coal. This study is concerned with the opportunities and obstacles of coal-to-olefins development, and focuses on making an overall techno-economic analysis of a coal-to-olefins plant with the capacity of 0.7 Mt/a olefins. Comparison is made with a 1.5 Mt/a oil-to-olefins plant based on three criteria including energy efficiency, capital investment, and product cost. It was found that the coal-based olefins process show prominent advantage in product cost because of the low price of its feedstock. However, it suffers from the limitations of higher capital investment, lower energy efficiency, and higher emissions. The effects of production scale, raw material price, and carbon tax were varied for the two production routes, and thus the operational regions were found for the coal-to-olefins process to be competitive.

Dong Xiang; Yu Qian; Yi Man; Siyu Yang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery: Third ammendment and extension to Annex IV enhanced oil recovery thermal processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the results of efforts under the seven tasks of the Third Amendment and Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Agreement. The report is presented in sections (for each of the tasks) and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of effort under each of the tasks. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section. The tasks are numbered 25 through 31. The first, second, and third reports on Annex IV, ((Venezuela-MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-1, IV-2, and IV-3 (DOE/BETC/SP-83/15, DOE/BC-84/6/SP, and DOE/BC-86/2/SP)) contain the results from the first 24 tasks. Those reports are dated April 1983, August 1984, and March 1986. Selected papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Peterson, G.; Munoz, J.D.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Discrete event simulation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) analytical laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A discrete event simulation of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) analytical laboratory has been constructed in the GPSS language. It was used to estimate laboratory analysis times at process analytical hold points and to study the effect of sample number on those times. Typical results are presented for three different simultaneous representing increasing levels of complexity, and for different sampling schemes. Example equipment utilization time plots are also included. SRS DWPF laboratory management and chemists found the simulations very useful for resource and schedule planning.

Shanahan, K.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

A process for establishing a financial assurance plan for LLW disposal facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes a process by which an effective financial assurance program can be developed for new low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities. The report identifies examples of activities that might cause financial losses and the types of losses they might create, discusses mechanisms that could be used to quantify and ensure against the various types of potential losses identified and describes a decision process to formulate a financial assurance program that takes into account the characteristics of both the potential losses and available mechanisms. A sample application of the concepts described in the report is provided.

Smith, P. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). National Low-Level Waste Management Program

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Engineering process and cost model for a conventional corn wet milling facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conventional wet milling of corn is a process designed for the recovery and purification of starch and several coproducts (germ, gluten, fiber and steep liquor). The total starch produced by the wet milling industry in the USA in 2004 equaled 21.5 billion kg, including modified starches and starches used for sweeteners and ethanol production. Process engineering and cost models for a corn wet milling process (for steeping and milling facilities) have been developed for a “generic” processing plant with a capacity of 2.54 million kg of corn per day (100,000 bu/day). The process includes grain cleaning, steeping, germ separation and recovery, fiber separation and recovery, gluten separation and recovery and starch separation. Information for the development of the models was obtained from a variety of technical sources including commercial wet milling companies, industry experts and equipment suppliers. The models were developed using process and cost simulation software (SuperPro Designer®) and include processing information such as composition and flow rates of the various process streams, descriptions of the various unit operations and detailed breakdowns of the operating and capital cost of the facility. Based on the information from the model, we can estimate the cost of production per kilogram of starch using the input prices for corn and other wet milling coproducts. We have also used the model to conduct a variety of sensitivity studies utilizing modifications such as feedstock costs, corn compositional variations, and the sale of wet corn gluten feed. The model is also being used as a base-case for the development of models to test alternative processing technologies and to help in the scale-up and commercialization of new wet milling technologies. This model is available upon request from the authors for educational, non-commercial and research uses.

Edna C. Ramirez; David B. Johnston; Andrew J. McAloon; Winnie Yee; Vijay Singh

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

DOE final report, phase one startup, Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is to validate that the WRAP facility is physically ready to start up phase 1, and that the managers and operators are prepared to safely manage and operate the facility when all pre-start findings have been satisfactorily corrected. The DOE Readiness Assessment (RA) team spent a week on-site at Waste Receiving and Processing Module 1 (WRAP-1) to validate the readiness for phase 1 start up of facility. The Contractor and DOE staff were exceptionally cooperative and contributed significantly to the overall success of the RA. The procedures and Conduct of Operations areas had significant discrepancies, many of which should have been found by the contractor review team. In addition the findings of the contractor review team should have led the WRAP-1 management team to correcting the root causes of the findings prior to the DOE RA team review. The findings and observations include many issues that the team believes should have been found by the contractor review and corrective actions taken. A significantly improved Operational Readiness Review (ORR) process and corrective actions of root causes must be fully implemented by the contractor prior to the performance of the contractor ORR for phase 2 operations. The pre-start findings as a result of this independent DOE Readiness Assessment are presented.

Jasen, W.G.

1998-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil processing facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Tritium Facilities Modernization and Consolidation Project Process Waste Assessment (Project S-7726)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the Tritium Facility Modernization {ampersand} Consolidation (TFM{ampersand}C) Project (S-7726) at the Savannah River Site (SS), all tritium processing operations in Building 232-H, with the exception of extraction and obsolete/abandoned systems, will be reestablished in Building 233-H. These operations include hydrogen isotopic separation, loading and unloading of tritium shipping and storage containers, tritium recovery from zeolite beds, and stripping of nitrogen flush gas to remove tritium prior to stack discharge. The scope of the TFM{ampersand}C Project also provides for a new replacement R&D tritium test manifold in 233-H, upgrading of the 233- H Purge Stripper and 233-H/234-H building HVAC, a new 234-H motor control center equipment building and relocating 232-H Materials Test Facility metallurgical laboratories (met labs), flow tester and life storage program environment chambers to 234-H.

Hsu, R.H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Oji, L.N.

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

202

Darlington tritium removal facility and station upgrading plant dynamic process simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ontario Power Generation Nuclear (OPGN) has a 4 x 880 MWe CANDU nuclear station at its Darlington Nuclear Div. located in Bowmanville. The station has been operating a Tritium Removal Facility (TRF) and a D{sub 2}O station Upgrading Plant (SUP) since 1989. Both facilities were designed with a Distributed Control System (DCS) and programmable logic controllers (PLC) for process control. This control system was replaced with a DCS only, in 1998. A dynamic plant simulator was developed for the Darlington TRF (DTRF) and the SUP, as part of the computer control system replacement. The simulator was used to test the new software, required to eliminate the PLCs. The simulator is now used for operator training and testing of process control software changes prior to field installation. Dynamic simulation will be essential for the ITER isotope separation system, where the process is more dynamic than the relatively steady-state DTRF process. This paper describes the development and application of the DTRF and SUP dynamic simulator, its benefits, architecture, and the operational experience with the simulator. (authors)

Busigin, A. [NITEK USA, Inc., 6405 NW 77 PL, Parkland, FL 33067 (United States); Williams, G. I. D.; Wong, T. C. W.; Kulczynski, D.; Reid, A. [Ontario Power Generation Nuclear, Box 4000, Bowmanville, ON L1C 3Z8 (Canada)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

On the evaluation of Fast-SAGD process in naturally fractured heavy oil reservoir  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Very recently, Fast-SAGD as a modification of steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) has been much attended due to lower cumulative steam oil ratio as well as higher cumulative oil production. However, there are still many suspicions about the successful application of this method in naturally fractured reservoirs (NFR) in which faults, fissures, vugs, micro-fractures, poorly interconnected matrix pore structure as well as undesirable wettability are combined with high-viscosity oil. In this communication, initially, Fast-SAGD has been compared with traditional SAGD in an Iranian naturally fractured heavy oil reservoir with oil wet rock using CMG-STARS thermal simulator. Moreover, the effects of operational parameters on Fast-SAGD method have been investigated. In addition, a novel economical model has been established in which all economical parameters including input cash flow costs such as the rate of oil production and oil price, and the output cash flow costs such as capital expenditures (CAPEX), operating expenditures (OPEX), injection material and pipe line tariffs, have been considered. During the optimization of the operational parameters, it was observed that by increasing steam injection rate into both offset and SAGD wells in Fast-SAGD system, ultimate recovery factor (RF) increased, but ultimate net present value (NPV) increased up to an optimal point which could be due to the increased SOR value. By increasing steam injection pressure into offset well, both the ultimate RF and NPV increased up to an optimal point. To optimally select parameters such as the number of cyclic steam stimulation (CSS) cycles, elevation of CSS well and well spacing of SAGD well pair, sensitivity analysis should be performed to achieve the best case economically and technically due to the lack of a decrease or increase trend. In contrast to conventional reservoirs, the performance affected by start-up time at the offset well during Fast-SAGD process in fractured reservoirs indicates that earlier start-up time of steam injection leads to high RF and NPV.

Arash Kamari; Abdolhossein Hemmati-Sarapardeh; Amir H. Mohammadi; Hani Hashemi-Kiasari; Erfan Mohagheghian

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Process Guide for the Identification and Disposition of S/CI or Defective Items at Department of Energy Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Process Guide for the Identification and Disposition of S/CI or Defective Items was developed to help DOE facilities to collect, screen, communicate information, and dispose of S/CI or defective items that could potentially impact operations at DOE facilities.

205

An Analytical Model for Determination of the Solvent Convective Dispersion Coefficient in the Vapor Extraction Heavy Oil Recovery Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this article, a new model is developed to determine the solvent convective dispersion coefficient in a solvent vapor extraction (VAPEX) heavy oil recovery process. It is assumed that solvent mass transfer b...

Mohammad Derakhshanfar; Yongan Gu

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

INSTALLATION OF BUBBLERS IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITED DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC assumed the liquid waste contract at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the summer of 2009. The main contractual agreement was to close 22 High Level Waste (HLW) tanks in eight years. To achieve this aggressive commitment, faster waste processing throughout the SRS liquid waste facilities will be required. Part of the approach to achieve faster waste processing is to increase the canister production rate of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) from approximately 200 canisters filled with radioactive waste glass per year to 400 canisters per year. To reach this rate for melter throughput, four bubblers were installed in the DWPF Melter in the late summer of 2010. This effort required collaboration between SRR, SRR critical subcontractor EnergySolutions, and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, including the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The tasks included design and fabrication of the bubblers and related equipment, testing of the bubblers for various technical issues, the actual installation of the bubblers and related equipment, and the initial successful operation of the bubblers in the DWPF Melter.

Smith, M.; Iverson, D.

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

207

IMPACTS OF ANTIFOAM ADDITIONS AND ARGON BUBBLING ON DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY REDUCTION/OXIDATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During melting of HLW glass, the REDOX of the melt pool cannot be measured. Therefore, the Fe{sup +2}/{Sigma}Fe ratio in the glass poured from the melter must be related to melter feed organic and oxidant concentrations to ensure production of a high quality glass without impacting production rate (e.g., foaming) or melter life (e.g., metal formation and accumulation). A production facility such as the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are possible. therefore, the acceptability decision is made on the upstream process, rather than on the downstream melt or glass product. That is, it is based on 'feed foward' statistical process control (SPC) rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the melter is controlled prior to vitrification. Use of the DWPF REDOX model has controlled the balanjce of feed reductants and oxidants in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). Once the alkali/alkaline earth salts (both reduced and oxidized) are formed during reflux in the SRAT, the REDOX can only change if (1) additional reductants or oxidants are added to the SRAT, the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), or the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) or (2) if the melt pool is bubble dwith an oxidizing gas or sparging gas that imposes a different REDOX target than the chemical balance set during reflux in the SRAT.

Jantzen, C.; Johnson, F.

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

208

A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A shielded storage rack has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE's Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which processes and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGs. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford's MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford's calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

Sherrell, D.L. (Westinghouse Hanford Company, P.O. Box 1970, Mail Stop N1-42, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States))

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses a shielded storage rack which has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE's Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which process and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGS. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford's MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford's calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

Sherrell, D.L.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses a shielded storage rack which has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE`s Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which process and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGS. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford`s MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford`s calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

Sherrell, D.L.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

CO2 Huff-n-Puff Process in a Light Oil Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of the Sundown Slaughter Unit (SSU) CO2 Huff- n- Puff (H- n- P) project is to determine the feasibility and practicality of the technology in a waterflooded shallow shelf carbonate environment. Sundown Slaughter Unit is the second demonstration site associated with this project, following the unsuccessful test at Central Vacuum Unit. The ultimate goal will be to develop guidelines based on commonly available data that other operators in the industry can use to investigate the applicability of the process within other fields. The technology transfer objective of the project is to disseminate the knowledge gained through an innovative plan in support of the Department of Energy's (DOE) objective of increasing domestic oil production and deferring the abandonment of shallow shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs. Tasks associated with this objective are carried out in what is a timely effort for near- term goals. The goal of this Sundown Slaughter Unit Project is to demonstrate the CO2 Huff- n- Puff process in a waterflooded, light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoir within the Permian Basin. The CO2 Huff- n- Puff process is a proven enhanced oil recovery technology for Louisiana- Texas gulf coast sandstone reservoirs. The reader is referred to three Society of Petroleum Engineer (SPE) papers, No. 15502, No. 16720 & No. 20208 for a review of the theory, mechanics of the process, and several case histories. The process has even been shown to be moderately effective in conjunction with steam on heavy California crude oils. Although the technology is proven in gulf coast sandstones, it continues to be a very underutilized enhanced recovery option for carbonates. The goal of this technology demonstration is to gain an overall understanding of the reservoir qualities that influence CO2 Huff- n- Puff production responses within a heterogeneous reservoir such as the shallow shelf carbonate environment of the Sundown Slaughter Unit. A generalized reservoir model was developed and used to determine the importance of various geological and operational influences upon the CO2 Huff- n- Puff process at CVU. The findings at CVU would be applied to the demonstration site at SSU without further simulation studies being conducted at SSU.

John Prieditis; Mark Kovar; Roger Cole; Scott Wehner

1998-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

212

Installation of semiconductor crystal growth and processing facilities in the Building 166 addition at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new addition has been constructed to Building 166 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This addition is intended to contain facilities as described below. The Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) facility is a proposed facility for the growth of semiconductor crystals composed of various combinations of gallium, aluminum, indium, arsenic, phosphorous, antimony, silicon, and zinc. This facility will utilize hazardous metal hydride gases (arsine, silane, and disilane) and pyrophoric materials (metal alkyls). The MOCVD process has been intensively developed over the past 10 years and is being safetly utilized in over 75 locations worldwide in both research and manufacturing applications. All equipment in the LLNL MOCVD facility is commercially available and is typical of that used in similar facilities in both industry and academia. The Semiconductor Device Fabrication (SDF) facility is a proposed facility for the fabrication of semiconductor devices from crystals grown in the MOCVD facility. General laboratory chemicals and silane gas will be utilized in this facility. The remaining space in the building addition will consist of an optics laboratory and general purpose work area. The only hazardous materials to be used in these areas are small quantities of common laboratory solvents. For the purposes of this Environmental Assessment, these areas will be considered to be part of the SDF. 27 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

RECENT PROCESS AND EQUIPMENT IMPROVEMENTS TO INCREASE HIGH LEVEL WASTE THROUGHPUT AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site's (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began stabilizing high level waste (HLW) in a glass matrix in 1996. Over the past few years, there have been several process and equipment improvements at the DWPF to increase the rate at which the high level waste can be stabilized. These improvements have either directly increased waste processing rates or have desensitized the process to upsets, thereby minimizing downtime and increasing production. Improvements due to optimization of waste throughput with increased HLW loading of the glass resulted in a 6% waste throughput increase based upon operational efficiencies. Improvements in canister production include the pour spout heated bellows liner (5%), glass surge (siphon) protection software (2%), melter feed pump software logic change to prevent spurious interlocks of the feed pump with subsequent dilution of feed stock (2%) and optimization of the steam atomized scrubber (SAS) operation to minimize downtime (3%) for a total increase in canister production of 12%. A number of process recovery efforts have allowed continued operation. These include the off gas system pluggage and restoration, slurry mix evaporator (SME) tank repair and replacement, remote cleaning of melter top head center nozzle, remote melter internal inspection, SAS pump J-Tube recovery, inadvertent pour scenario resolutions, dome heater transformer bus bar cooling water leak repair and new Infra-red camera for determination of glass height in the canister are discussed.

Odriscoll, R; Allan Barnes, A; Jim Coleman, J; Timothy Glover, T; Robert Hopkins, R; Dan Iverson, D; Jeff Leita, J

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Modular CSSX Unit (CSSX), and Waste Transfer Line System of Salt Processing Program (U)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All of the waste streams from ARP, MCU, and SWPF processes will be sent to DWPF for vitrification. The impact these new waste streams will have on DWPF's ability to meet its canister production goal and its ability to support the Salt Processing Program (ARP, MCU, and SWPF) throughput needed to be evaluated. DWPF Engineering and Operations requested OBU Systems Engineering to evaluate DWPF operations and determine how the process could be optimized. The ultimate goal will be to evaluate all of the Liquid Radioactive Waste (LRW) System by developing process modules to cover all facilities/projects which are relevant to the LRW Program and to link the modules together to: (1) study the interfaces issues, (2) identify bottlenecks, and (3) determine the most cost effective way to eliminate them. The results from the evaluation can be used to assist DWPF in identifying improvement opportunities, to assist CBU in LRW strategic planning/tank space management, and to determine the project completion date for the Salt Processing Program.

CHANG, ROBERT

2006-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

215

Review of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared to fulfill the Phase I deliverable for HLW/DWPF/TTR-98-0018, Rev. 2, ''Hydrogen Generation in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell'', 6/4/2001. The primary objective for the preliminary phase of the hydrogen generation study was to complete a review of past data on hydrogen generation and to prepare a summary of the findings. The understanding was that the focus should be on catalytic hydrogen generation, not on hydrogen generation by radiolysis. The secondary objective was to develop scope for follow-up experimental and analytical work. The majority of this report provides a summary of past hydrogen generation work with radioactive and simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) waste sludges. The report also includes some work done with Hanford waste sludges and simulants. The review extends to idealized systems containing no sludge, such as solutions of sodium formate and formic acid doped with a noble metal catalyst. This includes general information from the literature, as well as the focused study done by the University of Georgia for the SRS. The various studies had a number of points of universal agreement. For example, noble metals, such as Pd, Rh, and Ru, catalyze hydrogen generation from formic acid and formate ions, and more acid leads to more hydrogen generation. There were also some points of disagreement between different sources on a few topics such as the impact of mercury on the noble metal catalysts and the identity of the most active catalyst species. Finally, there were some issues of potential interest to SRS that apparently have not been systematically studied, e.g. the role of nitrite ion in catalyst activation and reactivity. The review includes studies covering the period from about 1924-2002, or from before the discovery of hydrogen generation during simulant sludge processing in 1988 through the Shielded Cells qualification testing for Sludge Batch 2. The review of prior studies is followed by a discussion of proposed experimental work, additional data analysis, and future modeling programs. These proposals have led to recent investigations into the mercury issue and the effect of co-precipitating noble metals which will be documented in two separate reports. SRS hydrogen generation work since 2002 will also be collected and summarized in a future report on the effect of noble metal-sludge matrix interactions on hydrogen generation. Other potential factors for experimental investigation include sludge composition variations related to both the washing process and to the insoluble species with particular attention given to the role of silver and to improving the understanding of the interaction of nitrite ion with the noble metals.

Koopman, D. C.

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Urnaium Processing Facility Project, June 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project May 2011 June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Independent Oversight Assessment of Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope and Methodology ....................................................................................................................... 2 3.0 Results and Conclusions ....................................................................................................................... 3

217

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Urnaium Processing Facility Project, June 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project May 2011 June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Independent Oversight Assessment of Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope and Methodology ....................................................................................................................... 2 3.0 Results and Conclusions ....................................................................................................................... 3

218

Review of the Implementation Verification Rev iew Processes at the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Nuclear Facilities, September 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Implementation Verification Review Implementation Verification Review Processes at the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Nuclear Facilities May 2011 September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Independent Oversight Review of the Implementation Verification Review Processes at the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Nuclear Facilities Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1

219

Review of the Implementation Verification Rev iew Processes at the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Nuclear Facilities, September 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Implementation Verification Review Implementation Verification Review Processes at the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Nuclear Facilities May 2011 September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Independent Oversight Review of the Implementation Verification Review Processes at the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Nuclear Facilities Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1

220

Using Biosurfactants Produced from Agriculture Process Waste Streams to Improve Oil Recovery in Fractured Carbonate Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of our research during the first 30 months (10/01/2004 to 03/31/2007) of the original three-year project cycle. The project was terminated early due to DOE budget cuts. This was a joint project between the Tertiary Oil Recovery Project (TORP) at the University of Kansas and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective was to evaluate the use of low-cost biosurfactants produced from agriculture process waste streams to improve oil recovery in fractured carbonate reservoirs through wettability mediation. Biosurfactant for this project was produced using Bacillus subtilis 21332 and purified potato starch as the growth medium. The INL team produced the biosurfactant and characterized it as surfactin. INL supplied surfactin as required for the tests at KU as well as providing other microbiological services. Interfacial tension (IFT) between Soltrol 130 and both potential benchmark chemical surfactants and crude surfactin was measured over a range of concentrations. The performance of the crude surfactin preparation in reducing IFT was greater than any of the synthetic compounds throughout the concentration range studied but at low concentrations, sodium laureth sulfate (SLS) was closest to the surfactin, and was used as the benchmark in subsequent studies. Core characterization was carried out using both traditional flooding techniques to find porosity and permeability; and NMR/MRI to image cores and identify pore architecture and degree of heterogeneity. A cleaning regime was identified and developed to remove organic materials from cores and crushed carbonate rock. This allowed cores to be fully characterized and returned to a reproducible wettability state when coupled with a crude-oil aging regime. Rapid wettability assessments for crushed matrix material were developed, and used to inform slower Amott wettability tests. Initial static absorption experiments exposed limitations in the use of HPLC and TOC to determine surfactant concentrations. To reliably quantify both benchmark surfactants and surfactin, a surfactant ion-selective electrode was used as an indicator in the potentiometric titration of the anionic surfactants with Hyamine 1622. The wettability change mediated by dilute solutions of a commercial preparation of SLS (STEOL CS-330) and surfactin was assessed using two-phase separation, and water flotation techniques; and surfactant loss due to retention and adsorption on the rock was determined. Qualitative tests indicated that on a molar basis, surfactin is more effective than STEOL CS-330 in altering wettability of crushed Lansing-Kansas City carbonates from oil-wet to water-wet state. Adsorption isotherms of STEOL CS-330 and surfactin on crushed Lansing-Kansas City outcrop and reservoir material showed that surfactin has higher specific adsorption on these oomoldic carbonates. Amott wettability studies confirmed that cleaned cores are mixed-wet, and that the aging procedure renders them oil-wet. Tests of aged cores with no initial water saturation resulted in very little spontaneous oil production, suggesting that water-wet pathways into the matrix are required for wettability change to occur. Further investigation of spontaneous imbibition and forced imbibition of water and surfactant solutions into LKC cores under a variety of conditions--cleaned vs. crude oil-aged; oil saturated vs. initial water saturation; flooded with surfactant vs. not flooded--indicated that in water-wet or intermediate wet cores, sodium laureth sulfate is more effective at enhancing spontaneous imbibition through wettability change. However, in more oil-wet systems, surfactin at the same concentration performs significantly better.

Stephen Johnson; Mehdi Salehi; Karl Eisert; Sandra Fox

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil processing facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery: EOR thermal processes. Seventh Amendment and Extension to Annex 4, Enhanced oil recovery thermal processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Seventh Amendment and Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Agreement. The report is presented in sections (for each of the 6 tasks) and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of efforts under each of the tasks. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section. The tasks are numbered 50 through 55. The first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh reports on Annex IV, Venezuela MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-1, IV-2, IV-3, IV-4, IV-5 and IV-6 (DOE/BETC/SP-83/15, DOE/BC-84/6/SP, DOE/BC-86/2/SP, DOE/BC-87/2/SP, DOE/BC-89/l/SP, DOE/BC-90/l/SP, and DOE/BC-92/l/SP) contain the results for the first 49 tasks. Those reports are dated April 1983, August 1984, March 1986, July 1987, November 1988, December 1989, and October 1991, respectively. Each task report has been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Reid, T B [USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States)] [USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States); Colonomos, P [INTEVEP, Filial de Petroleos de Venezuela, SA, Caracas (Venezuela)] [INTEVEP, Filial de Petroleos de Venezuela, SA, Caracas (Venezuela)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

PEMEX selects the H-Oil{reg_sign} process for their hydrodesulfurization residue complex at the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) has selected the H-Oil Process for the conversion and upgrading of a blend of Maya and Isthmus vacuum residua at the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery. The 8,450 metric ton/day (50,000 bpsd) H-Oil Plant will produce a low sulfur (0.8 wt%) fuel oil, diesel, naphtha, and LPG. The H-Oil Plant will be a key component of the Hydrodesulfurization Residue (HDR) Complex which will be located at the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery in Tula, State of Hidalgo, Mexico. The project is part of PEMEX`s Ecology Projects currently underway in Mexico. This paper describes the HDR Complex and the design basis of the H-Oil Plant and provides the current status of this project.

Wisdom, L.I.; Colyar, J.J. [Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Final report, November 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study is described on the hydrological and geotechnical behavior of an oil shale solid waste. The objective was to obtain information which can be used to assess the environmental impacts of oil shale solid waste disposal in the Green River Basin. The spent shale used in this study was combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas process by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company, Inc. Laboratory bench-scale testing included index properties, such as grain size distribution and Atterberg limits, and tests for engineering properties including hydraulic conductivity and shear strength. Large-scale tests were conducted on model spent shale waste embankments to evaluate hydrological response, including infiltration, runoff, and seepage. Large-scale tests were conducted at a field site in western Colorado and in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL)at the University of Wyoming. The ESL tests allowed the investigators to control rainfall and temperature, providing information on the hydrological response of spent shale under simulated severe climatic conditions. All experimental methods, materials, facilities, and instrumentation are described in detail, and results are given and discussed. 34 refs.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' for the duration of the second project year (October 1, 2003--September 30, 2004). There are three main tasks in this research project. Task 1 is scaled physical model study of GAGD process. Task 2 is further development of vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 is determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. In Section I, preliminary design of the scaled physical model using the dimensional similarity approach has been presented. Scaled experiments on the current physical model have been designed to investigate the effect of Bond and capillary numbers on GAGD oil recovery. Experimental plan to study the effect of spreading coefficient and reservoir heterogeneity has been presented. Results from the GAGD experiments to study the effect of operating mode, Bond number and capillary number on GAGD oil recovery have been reported. These experiments suggest that the type of the gas does not affect the performance of GAGD in immiscible mode. The cumulative oil recovery has been observed to vary exponentially with Bond and capillary numbers, for the experiments presented in this report. A predictive model using the bundle of capillary tube approach has been developed to predict the performance of free gravity drainage process. In Section II, a mechanistic Parachor model has been proposed for improved prediction of IFT as well as to characterize the mass transfer effects for miscibility development in reservoir crude oil-solvent systems. Sensitivity studies on model results indicate that provision of a single IFT measurement in the proposed model is sufficient for reasonable IFT predictions. An attempt has been made to correlate the exponent (n) in the mechanistic model with normalized solute compositions present in both fluid phases. IFT measurements were carried out in a standard ternary liquid system of benzene, ethanol and water using drop shape analysis and capillary rise techniques. The experimental results indicate strong correlation among the three thermodynamic properties solubility, miscibility and IFT. The miscibility determined from IFT measurements for this ternary liquid system is in good agreement with phase diagram and solubility data, which clearly indicates the sound conceptual basis of VIT technique to determine fluid-fluid miscibility. Model fluid systems have been identified for VIT experimentation at elevated pressures and temperatures. Section III comprises of the experimental study aimed at evaluating the multiphase displacement characteristics of the various gas injection EOR process performances using Berea sandstone cores. During this reporting period, extensive literature review was completed to: (1) study the gravity drainage concepts, (2) identify the various factors influencing gravity stable gas injection processes, (3) identify various multiphase mechanisms and fluid dynamics operative during the GAGD process, and (4) identify important dimensionless groups governing the GAGD process performance. Furthermore, the dimensional analysis of the GAGD process, using Buckingham-Pi theorem to isolate the various dimensionless groups, as well as experimental design based on these dimensionless quantities have been completed in this reporting period. On the experimental front, recommendations from previous WAG and CGI have been used to modify the experimental protocol. This report also includes results from scaled preliminary GAGD displacements as well as the details of the planned GAGD corefloods for the next quarter. The technology transfer activities have mainly consisted of preparing technical papers, progress reports and discussions with industry personnel for possible GAGD field tests.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Amit P. Sharma

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

CO2 Huff-n-Puff Process in a Light Oil Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application cyclic CO2, often referred to as the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process, may find its niche in the maturing waterfloods of the Permian Basin. Coupling the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process to miscible flooding applications could provide the needed revenue to sufficiently mitigate near-term negative cash flow concerns in capital-intensive miscible projects. Texaco Exploration and Production Inc. and the US Department of Energy have teamed up in a attempt to develop the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process in the Grayburg and San Andres formations which are light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs that exist throughout the Permian Basin. This cost-shared effort is intended to demonstrate the viability of this underutilized technology in a specific class of domestic reservoir.

Boomer, R.J.; Cole, R.; Kovar, M.; Prieditis, J.; Vogt, J.; Wehner, S.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

226

Enhanced oil recovery for thermal processes. First amendment and extension to Annex IV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the result of efforts under the several tasks of the First Amendment and Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal processes. The report is presented in six sections (for each of the six tasks) and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of efforts under each one of the tasks. Each section has been abstracted and processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section. The tasks are numbered 8-13. The first report on Annex IV, Venezuela-MEM/USE-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-1, (DOE/BETC/SP-83/15), contains the results from the first seven tasks. That report is dated April 1983, entitled, EOR Thermal Processes.

Peterson, G.; Schwartz, E.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

The Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility (RSF), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Design-Build Process for Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility An in-depth look at how the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory used a performance-based design-build contract process to build one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world. Table of Contents The Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility | 1 Table of Contents Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Building Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Owner Roles and Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Acquisition Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Defining Performance Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

228

Enhanced-oil-recovery thermal processes, annex IV. Venezuela-MEM/USA-DOE fossil-energy report IV-1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Agreement between the United States and Venezuela was designed to further energy research and development in six areas. This report focuses on Annex IV - Enhanced-Oil-Recovery Thermal Processes which was divided into seven tasks. This report will discuss the information developed within Task I related to the Department of Energy providing data on the performance of insulated oil-well tubulars. Surface generated steam has been traditionally used in thermal enhanced oil recovery processes. In past years the tubing through which the steam is injected into the reservoir has been bare with relatively high heat losses. In recent years however various materials and designs for insulating the tubing to reduce heat losses have been developed. Evaluation of several of these designs in an instrumented test tower and in an oil field test environment was undertaken. These tests and the resulting data are presented.

Peterson, G.; Schwartz, E.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

VERIFICATION OF THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY'S (DWPF) PROCESS DIGESTION METHOD FOR THE SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION SAMPLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For each sludge batch that is processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performs confirmation of the applicability of the digestion method to be used by the DWPF lab for elemental analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipt samples and SRAT product process control samples. DWPF SRAT samples are typically dissolved using a room temperature HF-HNO{sub 3} acid dissolution (i.e., DWPF Cold Chem Method, see DWPF Procedure SW4-15.201) and then analyzed by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from performing the Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium peroxide/Hydroxide Fusion (PF) and DWPF Cold Chem (CC) method digestions of Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples. The SB7a SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constituates the SB7a Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), to form the Sb7a Blend composition.

Click, D.; Edwards, T.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

230

Basic Data Report -- Defense Waste Processing Facility Sludge Plant, Savannah River Plant 200-S Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Basic Data Report for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)--Sludge Plant was prepared to supplement the Technical Data Summary. Jointly, the two reports were intended to form the basis for the design and construction of the DWPF. To the extent that conflicting information may appear, the Basic Data Report takes precedence over the Technical Data Summary. It describes project objectives and design requirements. Pertinent data on the geology, hydrology, and climate of the site are included. Functions and requirements of the major structures are described to provide guidance in the design of the facilities. Revision 9 of the Basic Data Report was prepared to eliminate inconsistencies between the Technical Data Summary, Basic Data Report and Scopes of Work which were used to prepare the September, 1982 updated CAB. Concurrently, pertinent data (material balance, curie balance, etc.) have also been placed in the Basic Data Report. It is intended that these balances be used as a basis for the continuing design of the DWPF even though minor revisions may be made in these balances in future revisions to the Technical Data Summary.

Amerine, D.B.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Design of an optimal process for enhanced production of bioethanol and biodiesel from algae oil via glycerol fermentation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, we optimize a process that integrates the use of glycerol to produce ethanol via fermentation within the simultaneous production of biodiesel and bioethanol from algae. The process consists of growing the algae, determining the optimal fraction of oil vs. starch, followed by oil extraction, starch liquefaction and saccharification, to sugars, oil transesterification, for which we consider two transesterification technologies (enzymes and alkali) and the fermentation of sugars and glycerol. The advantage of this process is that the dehydration technologies are common for the products of the glucose and glycerol fermentation. Simultaneous optimization and heat integration is performed using Duran and Grossmann’s model. The fermentation of glycerol to ethanol increases the production of bioethanol by at least 50%. The energy and water consumptions are competitive with other processes that either sell the glycerol or use it to obtain methanol. However, the price for the biofuels is only competitive if glycerol cannot be sold to the market.

Mariano Martín; Ignacio E. Grossmann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Evolution of seismic velocities in heavy oil sand reservoirs during thermal recovery process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In thermally enhanced recovery processes like cyclic steam stimulation (CSS) or steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD), continuous steam injection entails changes in pore fluid, pore pressure and temperature in the rock reservoir, that are most often unconsolidated or weakly consolidated sandstones. This in turn increases or decreases the effective stresses and changes the elastic properties of the rocks. Thermally enhanced recovery processes give rise to complex couplings. Numerical simulations have been carried out on a case study so as to provide an estimation of the evolution of pressure, temperature, pore fluid saturation, stress and strain in any zone located around the injector and producer wells. The approach of Ciz and Shapiro (2007) - an extension of the poroelastic theory of Biot-Gassmann applied to rock filled elastic material - has been used to model the velocity dispersion in the oil sand mass under different conditions of temperature and stress. A good agreement has been found between these pre...

Nauroy, Jean-François; Guy, N; Baroni, Axelle; Delage, Pierre; Mainguy, Marc; 10.2516/ogst/2012027

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

A high liquid yield process for retorting various organic materials including oil shale  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a continuous retorting process for various high molecular weight organic materials, including oil shale, that yields an enhanced output of liquid product. The organic material, mineral matter, and an acidic catalyst, that appreciably adsorbs alkenes on surface sites at prescribed temperatures, are mixed and introduced into a pyrolyzer. A circulating stream of olefin enriched pyrolysis gas is continuously swept through the organic material and catalyst, whereupon, as the result of pyrolysis, the enhanced liquid product output is provided. Mixed spent organic material, mineral matter, and cool catalyst are continuously withdrawn from the pyrolyzer. Combustion of the spent organic material and mineral matter serves to reheat the catalyst. Olefin depleted pyrolysis gas, from the pyrolyzer, is enriched in olefins and recycled into the pyrolyzer. The reheated acidic catalyst is separated from the mineral matter and again mixed with fresh organic material, to maintain the continuously cyclic process. 2 figs.

Coburn, T.T.

1988-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

234

High liquid yield process for retorting various organic materials including oil shale  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a continuous retorting process for various high molecular weight organic materials, including oil shale, that yields an enhanced output of liquid product. The organic material, mineral matter, and an acidic catalyst, that appreciably adsorbs alkenes on surface sites at prescribed temperatures, are mixed and introduced into a pyrolyzer. A circulating stream of olefin enriched pyrolysis gas is continuously swept through the organic material and catalyst, whereupon, as the result of pyrolysis, the enhanced liquid product output is provided. Mixed spent organic material, mineral matter, and cool catalyst are continuously withdrawn from the pyrolyzer. Combustion of the spent organic material and mineral matter serves to reheat the catalyst. Olefin depleted pyrolysis gas, from the pyrolyzer, is enriched in olefins and recycled into the pyrolyzer. The reheated acidic catalyst is separated from the mineral matter and again mixed with fresh organic material, to maintain the continuously cyclic process.

Coburn, Thomas T. (Livermore, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

1992-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

236

Using mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource for bio-fuel production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Distributed mobile conversion facilities using either fast pyrolysis or torrefaction processes can be used to convert forest residues to more energy dense substances (bio-oil, bio-slurry… (more)

Brown, Duncan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) projected glass compositions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vitrification of Savannah River Site (SRS) high level radioactive waste is scheduled to begin in late 1995. The vitrification operation will take place at the SRS Defense waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The US Department of Energy has instituted specifications which provide technical criteria which must be met by the DWPF to ensure that the waste glass will be suitable for permanent disposal in a federal geologic repository. Included in these criteria is a specification requiring DWPF to determine whether its high level, radioactive waste glass should also be classified as characteristically hazardous waste. A study was performed, using the anticipated range of glass compositions which will be produced over the lifetime of the DWPF, which definitively proved that DWPF waste glass should not be classified as characteristic hazardous waste.

Applewhite-Ramsey, A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Review of the Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Facility, Construction Quality of Piping and Pipe Supports, September 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Facility, Construction Quality of Piping & Pipe Supports September 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1

239

Review of the Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Facility, Construction Quality of Piping and Pipe Supports, September 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Facility, Construction Quality of Piping & Pipe Supports September 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1

240

Erosion/corrosion concerns in feed preparation systems at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950`s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to immobilize the high level radioactive waste resulting from these processes as a durable borosilicate glass. The DWPF, after having undergone extensive testing, has been approved for operations and is currently immobilizing radioactive waste. To ensure reliability of the DWPF remote canyon processing equipment, a materials evaluation program was performed prior to radioactive operations to determine to what extent erosion/corrosion would impact design life of equipment. The program consisted of performing pre-service baseline inspections on critical equipment and follow-up inspections after completion of DWPF cold chemical demonstration runs. Non-destructive examination (NDE) techniques were used to assess erosion/corrosion as well as evaluation of corrosion coupon racks. These results were used to arrive at predicted equipment life for selected feed preparation equipment. It was concluded with the exception of the coil and agitator for the slurry mix evaporator (SME), which are exposed to erosive glass frit particles, all of the equipment should meet its design life.

Gee, J.T.; Chandler, C.T.; Daugherty, W.L.; Imrich, K.J.; Jenkins, C.F.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil processing facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of the project ''Development And Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' for the duration of the thirteenth project quarter (Oct 1, 2005 to Dec 30, 2005). There are three main tasks in this research project. Task 1 is a scaled physical model study of the GAGD process. Task 2 is further development of a vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 is determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. Section I reports experimental work designed to investigate wettability effects of porous medium, on secondary and tertiary mode GAGD performance. The experiments showed a significant improvement of oil recovery in the oil-wet experiments versus the water-wet runs, both in secondary as well as tertiary mode. When comparing experiments conducted in secondary mode to those run in tertiary mode an improvement in oil recovery was also evident. Additionally, this section summarizes progress made with regard to the scaled physical model construction and experimentation. The purpose of building a scaled physical model, which attempts to include various multiphase mechanics and fluid dynamic parameters operational in the field scale, was to incorporate visual verification of the gas front for viscous instabilities, capillary fingering, and stable displacement. Preliminary experimentation suggested that construction of the 2-D model from sintered glass beads was a feasible alternative. During this reporting quarter, several sintered glass mini-models were prepared and some preliminary experiments designed to visualize gas bubble development were completed. In Section II, the gas-oil interfacial tensions measured in decane-CO{sub 2} system at 100 F and live decane consisting of 25 mole% methane, 30 mole% n-butane and 45 mole% n-decane against CO{sub 2} gas at 160 F have been modeled using the Parachor and newly proposed mechanistic Parachor models. In the decane-CO{sub 2} binary system, Parachor model was found to be sufficient for interfacial tension calculations. The predicted miscibility from the Parachor model deviated only by about 2.5% from the measured VIT miscibility. However, in multicomponent live decane-CO{sub 2} system, the performance of the Parachor model was poor, while good match of interfacial tension predictions has been obtained experimentally using the proposed mechanistic Parachor model. The predicted miscibility from the mechanistic Parachor model accurately matched with the measured VIT miscibility in live decane-CO2 system, which indicates the suitability of this model to predict miscibility in complex multicomponent hydrocarbon systems. In the previous reports to the DOE (15323R07, Oct 2004; 15323R08, Jan 2005; 15323R09, Apr 2005; 15323R10, July 2005 and 154323, Oct 2005), the 1-D experimental results from dimensionally scaled GAGD and WAG corefloods were reported for Section III. Additionally, since Section I reports the experimental results from 2-D physical model experiments; this section attempts to extend this 2-D GAGD study to 3-D (4-phase) flow through porous media and evaluate the performance of these processes using reservoir simulation. Section IV includes the technology transfer efforts undertaken during the quarter. This research work resulted in one international paper presentation in Tulsa, OK; one journal publication; three pending abstracts for SCA 2006 Annual Conference and an invitation to present at the Independents Day session at the IOR Symposium 2006.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Thaer N.N. Mahmoud; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting on the Status of Integration of Safety Into the Design of the Uranium Processing Facility, October 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HSS Independent Activity Report - HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-Y-12-2012-10-02 Site: Y-12 UPF Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Public Meeting on the Status of Integration of Safety into the Design of the Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Dates of Activity: October 2, 2012 Report Preparer: Timothy Mengers Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) observed the public hearing of the DNFSB review of the UPF project status for integrating safety into design. The meeting was broken into three parts: a panel discussion and questioning of National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) oversight and execution; a panel discussion and questioning of the B&W Y-12

243

Feasibility study for the retrofitting of used oil re-refineries to the BETC solvent treatment/distillation process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal policy encourages recycle of used oil, but requires that recycling be done in an environmentally sound manner. In order to encourage such recycling the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has developed the DOE/BETA solvent treatment/distillation re-refining process. The feasibility of retrofitting existing used oil re-refineries to the DOE/BETC process has been studied in this work. Twelve potential sites were chosen from almost 300 firms thought to be interested in re-refining technology. Three of these twelve sites have been recommended as prime candidates.

Weinstein, N.J.; Brinkman, D.W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Examination of eastern oil shale disposal problems - the Hope Creek field study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field-based study of problems associated with the disposal of processed Eastern oil shale was initiated in mid-1983 at a private research site in Montgomery County, Kentucky. The study (known as the Hope Creek Spent Oil Shale Disposal Project) is designed to provide information on the geotechnical, revegetation/reclamation, and leachate generation and composition characteristics of processed Kentucky oil shales. The study utilizes processed oil shale materials (retorted oil shale and reject raw oil shale fines) obtained from a pilot plant run of Kentucky oil shale using the travelling grate retort technology. Approximately 1000 tons of processed oil shale were returned to Kentucky for the purpose of the study. The study, composed of three components, is described. The effort to date has concentrated on site preparation and the construction and implementation of the field study research facilities. These endeavors are described and the project direction in the future years is defined.

Koppenaal, D.W.; Kruspe, R.R.; Robl, T.L.; Cisler, K.; Allen, D.L.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Review of the Long Lead Procurement Processed Used by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC for the Uranium Processing Facility Proect, July 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Long Lead Procurement Processes Used by Long Lead Procurement Processes Used by Babcock &Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC for the Uranium Processing Facility Project May 2011 July 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1

246

NREL: Energy Systems Integration Facility - Facility Design  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facility Design Throughout the Energy Systems Integration Facility design process, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory hosted workshops in which stakeholders from across the...

247

Qualification of the Nippon Instrumentation for use in Measuring Mercury at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 system installed in 221-S M-14 has been qualified for use. The qualification was a side-by-side comparison of the Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 system with the currently used Bacharach Mercury Analyzer. The side-by-side testing included standards for instrument calibration verifications, spiked samples and unspiked samples. The standards were traceable back to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The side-by-side work included the analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt, SRAT Product, and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples. With the qualification of the Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 system in M-14, the DWPF lab will be able to perform a head to head comparison of a second Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 system once the system is installed. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) analyzes receipt and product samples from the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) to determine the mercury (Hg) concentration in the sludge slurry. The SRAT receipt is typically sampled and analyzed for the first ten SRAT batches of a new sludge batch to obtain an average Hg concentration. This average Hg concentration is then used to determine the amount of steam stripping required during the concentration/reflux step of the SRAT cycle to achieve a less than 0.6 wt% Hg in the SRAT product solids. After processing is complete, the SRAT product is sampled and analyzed for mercury to ensure that the mercury concentration does not exceed the 0.45 wt% limit in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). The DWPF Laboratory utilizes Bacharach Analyzers to support these Hg analyses at this facility. These analyzers are more than 10 years old, and they are no longer supported by the manufacturer. Due to these difficulties, the Bacharach Analyzers are to be replaced by new Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 systems. DWPF issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) for the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to assist in the qualification of the new systems. SRNL prepared a task technical and quality assurance (TT&QA) plan that outlined the activities that are necessary and sufficient to meet the objectives of the TTR. In addition, TT&QA plan also included a test plan that provided guidance to the DWPF Lab in collecting the data needed to qualify the new Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 systems.

Edwards, T.; Mahannah, R.

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

248

Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Systems Process and Systems Process and Components Laboratory may include: * CSP technology developers * Utilities * Certification laboratories * Government agencies * Universities * Other National laboratories Contact Us If you are interested in working with NREL's Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory, please contact: ESIF Manager Carolyn Elam Carolyn.Elam@nrel.gov 303-275-4311 Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory The focus of the Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is to research, develop, test, and evaluate new techniques for thermal energy storage systems that are relevant to utility-scale concentrating solar power plants. The laboratory holds

249

OPS 9.13 Operations Aspects of Facility Chemistry and Unique Processes 8/24/98  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that the contractor has provided for an effective interface between facility operations personnel and personnel responsible for operation of...

250

CONTAMINATED PROCESS EQUIPMENT REMOVAL FOR THE D&D OF THE 232-Z CONTAMINATED WASTE RECOVERY PROCESS FACILITY AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the unique challenges encountered and subsequent resolutions to accomplish the deactivation and decontamination of a plutonium ash contaminated building. The 232-Z Contaminated Waste Recovery Process Facility at the Plutonium Finishing Plant was used to recover plutonium from process wastes such as rags, gloves, containers and other items by incinerating the items and dissolving the resulting ash. The incineration process resulted in a light-weight plutonium ash residue that was highly mobile in air. This light-weight ash coated the incinerator's process equipment, which included gloveboxes, blowers, filters, furnaces, ducts, and filter boxes. Significant airborne contamination (over 1 million derived air concentration hours [DAC]) was found in the scrubber cell of the facility. Over 1300 grams of plutonium held up in the process equipment and attached to the walls had to be removed, packaged and disposed. This ash had to be removed before demolition of the building could take place.

HOPKINS, A.M.; MINETTE, M.J.; KLOS, D.B.

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

251

Expansion of the commercial output of Estonian oil shale mining and processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Economic and ecological preconditions are considered for the transition from monoproduct oil shale mining to polyproduct Estonian oil shale deposits. Underground water, limestone, and underground heat found in oil shale mines with small reserves can be operated for a long time using chambers left after oil shale extraction. The adjacent fields of the closed mines can be connected to the operations of the mines that are still working. Complex usage of natural resources of Estonian oil shale deposits is made possible owing to the unique features of its geology and technology. Oil shale seam development is carried out at shallow depths (40--70 m) in stable limestones and does not require expensive maintenance. Such natural resources as underground water, carbonate rocks, heat of rock mass, and underground chambers are opened by mining and are ready for utilization. Room-and-pillar mining does not disturb the surface, and worked oil shale and greenery waste heaps do not breach its ecology. Technical decisions and economic evaluation are presented for the complex utilization of natural resources in the boundaries of mine take of the ``Tammiku`` underground mine and the adjacent closed mine N2. Ten countries have already experienced industrial utilization of oil shale in small volumes for many years. Usually oil shale deposits are not notable for complex geology of the strata and are not deeply bedded. Thus complex utilization of quite extensive natural resources of Estonian oil shale deposits is of both scientific and practical interest.

Fraiman, J.; Kuzmiv, I. [Estonian Oil Shale State Co., Jyhvi (Estonia). Scientific Research Center

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Effect of fatty acid composition in vegetable oils on combustion processes in an emulsion burner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The use of vegetable oils as a fuel in burners is an alternative which offers certain advantages over the use of vegetable oils in engines. The present work explores the use of four oils: rapeseed, sunflower, soya, and a commercial mixture-seed as heating fuel oil (HFO). The article relates the composition of the fatty acids in the various vegetable oils to the combustion products obtained in an emulsion burner. The work has been carried out in three stages. Firstly, describing the use of vegetable oils as a fuel and determining the fatty acid composition by proton NMR. Secondly, combustion of the vegetable oils studied is performed using an emulsion burner, varying the burner adjustments, and analysing combustion gases. Thirdly, exploring the link between the fatty acids contained in each oil and the combustion efficiency and combustion gas concentration for each oil type. Due to the fatty acids they contain, not all the oils behave equally, even though their description as fuels is very similar.

J. San José; M.A. Sanz-Tejedor; Y. Arroyo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

CHARACTERIZATION OF A PRECIPITATE REACTOR FEED TANK (PRFT) SAMPLE FROM THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY (DWPF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sample of from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Precipitate Reactor Feed Tank (PRFT) was pulled and sent to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in June of 2013. The PRFT in DWPF receives Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/ Monosodium Titanate (MST) material from the 512-S Facility via the 511-S Facility. This 2.2 L sample was to be used in small-scale DWPF chemical process cell testing in the Shielded Cells Facility of SRNL. A 1L sub-sample portion was characterized to determine the physical properties such as weight percent solids, density, particle size distribution and crystalline phase identification. Further chemical analysis of the PRFT filtrate and dissolved slurry included metals and anions as well as carbon and base analysis. This technical report describes the characterization and analysis of the PRFT sample from DWPF. At SRNL, the 2.2 L PRFT sample was composited from eleven separate samples received from DWPF. The visible solids were observed to be relatively quick settling which allowed for the rinsing of the original shipping vials with PRFT supernate on the same day as compositing. Most analyses were performed in triplicate except for particle size distribution (PSD), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). PRFT slurry samples were dissolved using a mixed HNO3/HF acid for subsequent Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICPAES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analyses performed by SRNL Analytical Development (AD). Per the task request for this work, analysis of the PRFT slurry and filtrate for metals, anions, carbon and base were primarily performed to support the planned chemical process cell testing and to provide additional component concentrations in addition to the limited data available from DWPF. Analysis of the insoluble solids portion of the PRFT slurry was aimed at detailed characterization of these solids (TGA, PSD, XRD and SEM) in support of the Salt IPT chemistry team. The overall conclusions from analyses performed in this study are that the PRFT slurry consists of 0.61 Wt.% insoluble MST solids suspended in a 0.77 M [Na+] caustic solution containing various anions such as nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, carbonate and oxalate. The corresponding measured sulfur level in the PRFT slurry, a critical element for determining how much of the PRFT slurry gets blended into the SRAT, is 0.437 Wt.% TS. The PRFT slurry does not contain insoluble oxalates nor significant quantities of high activity sludge solids. The lack of sludge solids has been alluded to by the Salt IPT chemistry team in citing that the mixing pump has been removed from Tank 49H, the feed tank to ARP-MCU, thus allowing the sludge solids to settle out. ? The PRFT aqueous slurry from DWPF was found to contain 5.96 Wt.% total dried solids. Of these total dried solids, relatively low levels of insoluble solids (0.61 Wt.%) were measured. The densities of both the filtrate and slurry were 1.05 g/mL. ? Particle size distribution of the PRFT solids in filtered caustic simulant and XRD analysis of washed/dried PRFT solids indicate that the PRFT slurry contains a bimodal distribution of particles in the range of 1 and 6 ?m and that the particles contain sodium titanium oxide hydroxide Na2Ti2O4(OH)2 crystalline material as determined by XRD. These data are in excellent agreement with similar data obtained from laboratory sampling of vendor supplied MST. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) combined with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis of washed/dried PRFT solids shows the particles to be like previous MST analyses consisting of irregular shaped micron-sized solids consisting primarily of Na and Ti. ? Thermogravimetric analysis of the washed and unwashed PRFT solids shows that the washed solids are very similar to MST solids. The TGA mass loss signal for the unwashed solids shows similar features to TGA performed on cellulose nitrate filter paper indicating significant presence of the deteriorated filter

Crawford, C.; Bannochie, C.

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

254

Independent Oversight Lessons Learned from Targeted Reviews of Implementation Verification Review Processes at Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities, May 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lessons Learned from Targeted Reviews of Implementation Verification Review Processes at Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities May 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents Acronyms ......................................................................................................................................................ii Executive Summaiy .....................................................................................................................................iii 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................. 1

255

Independent Oversight Lessons Learned from Targeted Reviews of Implementation Verification Review Processes at Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities, May 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned from Targeted Reviews of Implementation Verification Review Processes at Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities May 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents Acronyms ......................................................................................................................................................ii Executive Summaiy .....................................................................................................................................iii 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................. 1

256

Screening study for waste biomass to ethanol production facility using the Amoco process in New York State. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates the economic feasibility of locating biomass-to-ethanol waste conversion facilities in New York State. Part 1 of the study evaluates 74 potential sites in New York City and identifies two preferred sites on Staten, the Proctor Gamble and the Arthur Kill sites, for further consideration. Part 2 evaluates upstate New York and determines that four regions surrounding the urban centers of Albany, Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse provide suitable areas from which to select specific sites for further consideration. A separate Appendix provides supplemental material supporting the evaluations. A conceptual design and economic viability evaluation were developed for a minimum-size facility capable of processing 500 tons per day (tpd) of biomass consisting of wood or paper, or a combination of the two for upstate regions. The facility would use Amoco`s biomass conversion technology and produce 49,000 gallons per day of ethanol and approximately 300 tpd of lignin solid by-product. For New York City, a 1,000-tpd processing facility was also evaluated to examine effects of economies of scale. The reports evaluate the feasibility of building a biomass conversion facility in terms of city and state economic, environmental, and community factors. Given the data obtained to date, including changing costs for feedstock and ethanol, the project is marginally attractive. A facility should be as large as possible and located in a New York State Economic Development Zone to take advantage of economic incentives. The facility should have on-site oxidation capabilities, which will make it more financially viable given the high cost of energy. 26 figs., 121 tabs.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Production of hydrogen, liquid fuels, and chemicals from catalytic processing of bio-oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a method of generating hydrogen from a bio-oil, comprising hydrogenating a water-soluble fraction of the bio-oil with hydrogen in the presence of a hydrogenation catalyst, and reforming the water-soluble fraction by aqueous-phase reforming in the presence of a reforming catalyst, wherein hydrogen is generated by the reforming, and the amount of hydrogen generated is greater than that consumed by the hydrogenating. The method can further comprise hydrocracking or hydrotreating a lignin fraction of the bio-oil with hydrogen in the presence of a hydrocracking catalyst wherein the lignin fraction of bio-oil is obtained as a water-insoluble fraction from aqueous extraction of bio-oil. The hydrogen used in the hydrogenating and in the hydrocracking or hydrotreating can be generated by reforming the water-soluble fraction of bio-oil.

Huber, George W; Vispute, Tushar P; Routray, Kamalakanta

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

258

A study of the effect of process variables on forward combustion oil recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIST OF FIGURES AND TABLES Figure Pa ge Schematic Diagram of Combustion Tube Apparatus 12 Fuel Concentration vs. Clay Content in Matri~. 27 Fuel Concentration vs. Clay Content in Matrix Midway-Sunset Crude Oil 28 Fuel Concentration vs. Oil... the combustion tube through the use of proper equipment de- sign. Further possible design improvements were found as a result of this study. INTRODUCTION The increasing cost of locating new crude oil reserves has re- sulted in intensive research...

Berry, Holland James

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Impact of solvent type and injection sequence on Enhanced Cyclic Solvent Process (ECSP) for thin heavy oil reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A considerable portion of the western Canada's heavy oil resides in thin formations. In this situation, thermal methods cannot be used due to heat loss to overburden and underburden. Vapor extraction (VAPEX) fails because of inefficient gravity drainage and low initial production rate. Studies have been done on the cyclic solvent process (CSP) in an attempt to speed up the oil production rate in the solvent injection process. CSP performs poorly because the presence of continuous free methane saturation at the start of production cycles results in high gas mobility, and, consequently, quick methane production, quick pressure depletion, and a significant loss of oil viscosity reduction. As a result, the drive energy becomes depleted by methane production. Also, if low or intermediate initial production pressures are used, the methane solubility in the oil is not high, and the viscosity reduction is not significant. To resolve the above problems of CSP, Yadali Jamaloei et al. (2012) introduced a new process for thin reservoirs – Enhanced Cyclic Solvent Process (ECSP). In ECSP, two types of hydrocarbon solvents are injected separately, in a cyclic manner; one slug is more volatile (methane) and the other is more soluble (propane or ethane) in heavy oil and bitumen. The focus of this study is finding the optimum solvent injection sequence; this will be accomplished through examining the impact of the solvent injection sequence on the performance of ECSP, using different solvent pairs. The experimental results obtained from four series of ECSP tests, each consisting of six cycles, show higher oil recovery and production rate, and lower gas requirement and drawdown when methane is injected before ethane or propane. Wabiskaw formation in the Pelican oilfield in northern Alberta with 17 wells was chosen for performing simulation of ECSP. History matching was conducted for field-scale cumulative oil, gas and water production, and average reservoir pressure. Injection rate and injection time of methane and propane, soaking time and minimum well bottom-hole pressure in the methane–propane ECSP scheme were optimized to predict the field production performance of ECSP. Field-scale simulation revealed that the proposed methane–propane ECSP scheme is a highly effective method for improving heavy oil recovery in thin reservoirs.

Benyamin Yadali Jamaloei; Mingzhe Dong; Ping Yang; Daoyong Yang; Nader Mahinpey

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Investigation of the geokinetics horizontal in situ oil shale retorting process. Quarterly report, April, May, June 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Retort No. 18 burn was terminated on May 11, 1980. A total of 5547 barrels of shale oil or 46 percent of in-place resource was recovered from the retort. The EPA-DOE/LETC post-burn core sampling program is underway on Retort No. 16. Eleven core holes (of 18 planned) have been completed to date. Preliminary results indicate excellent core recovery has been achieved. Recovery of 702 ft of core was accomplished. The Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) permit application was submitted to the EPA regional office in Denver for review by EPA and Utah air quality officials. The application for an Underground Injection Control (UIC) permit to authorize GKI to inject retort wastewater into the Mesa Verde Formation is being processed by the State of Utah. A hearing before the Board of Oil, Gas and Mining is scheduled in Salt Lake City, Utah, for July 22, 1980. Re-entry drilling on Retort No. 24 is progressing and placement of surface equipment is underway. Retort No. 25 blasthole drilling was completed and blast preparations are ongoing. Retort No. 25 will be blasted on July 18, 1980. The retort will be similar to Retort No. 24, with improvements in blasthole loading and detonation. US Patent No. 4,205,610 was assigned to GKI for a shale oil recovery process. Rocky Mountain Energy Company (RME) is evaluating oil shale holdings in Wyoming for application of the GKI process there.

Hutchinson, D.L.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil processing facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility Safety Basis Preliminary Safety Design Report Process at the Y-12 National Security Complex, May 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Appraisal of the Appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility Safety Basis Preliminary Safety Design Report Process at the Y-12 National Security Complex May 2011 May 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 2

262

Appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility Safety Basis Preliminary Safety Design Report Process at the Y-12 National Security Complex, May 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Appraisal of the Appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility Safety Basis Preliminary Safety Design Report Process at the Y-12 National Security Complex May 2011 May 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 2

263

Supporting Technology for Enhanced Oil Recovery-EOR Thermal Processes Report IV-12  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Ninth Amendment and Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Agreement. The report is presented in sections (for each of the 6 tasks) and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of efforts under each of the tasks. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section. The tasks are numbered 62 through 67. The first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, eight, and ninth reports on Annex IV, [Venezuela MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-1, IV-2, IV-3, IV-4, IV-5, IV-6, IV-7, and IV-8 (DOE/BETC/SP-83/15, DOE/BC-84/6/SP, DOE/BC-86/2/SP, DOE/BC-87/2/SP, DOE/BC-89/1/SP, DOE/BC-90/1/SP) DOE/BC-92/1/SP, DOE/BC-93/3/SP, and DOE/BC-95/3/SP] contain the results from the first 61 tasks. Those reports are dated April 1983, August 1984, March 1986, July 1! 987, November 1988, December 1989, October 1991, February 1993, and March 1995 respectively.

Izequeido, Alexandor

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Project report: Tritiated oil repackaging highlighting the ISMS process. Historical radioactive and mixed waste disposal request validation and waste disposal project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) was established to define a framework for the essential functions of managing work safely. There are five Safety Management Functions in the model of the ISMS process: (1) work planning, (2) hazards analysis, (3) hazards control, (4) work performance, and (5) feedback and improve. Recent activities at the Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility underscored the importance and effectiveness of integrating the ISMS process to safely manage high-hazard work with a minimum of personnel in a timely and efficient manner. This report describes how project personnel followed the framework of the ISMS process to successfully repackage tritium-contaminated oils. The main objective was to open the boxes without allowing the gaseous tritium oxide, which had built up inside the boxes, to release into the sorting room. The boxes would be vented out the building stack until tritium concentration levels were acceptable. The carboys would be repackaged into 30-gallon drums and caulked shut. Sealing the drums would decrease the tritium off-gassing into the RMWMF.

Schriner, J.A. [Automated Solutions of Albuquerque, Inc., NM (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Processing capabilties for the elimination of contaminated metal scrapyards at DOE/ORO-managed sites. [Metal smelting facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Capabilities exist for reducing all the contaminated nickel, aluminum, and copper scrap to ingot form by smelting. Processing these metals at existing facilities could be completed in about 5 or 6 years. However, these metals represent only about 20% of the total metal inventories currently on hand at the DOE/ORO-managed sites. No provisions have been made for the ferrous scrap. Most of the ferrous scrap is unclassified and does not require secured storage. Also, the potential resale value of the ferrous scrap at about $100 per ton is very low in comparison. Consequently, this scrap has been allowed to accumulate. With several modifications and equipment additions, the induction melter at PGDP could begin processing ferrous scrap after its commitment to nickel and aluminum. The PGDP smelter is a retrofit installation, and annual throughput capabilities are limited. Processing of the existing ferrous scrap inventories would not be completed until the FY 1995-2000 time frame. An alternative proposal has been the installation of induction melters at the other two enrichment facilities. Conceptual design of a generic metal smelting facility is under way. The design study includes capital and operating costs for scrap preparation through ingot storage at an annual throughput of 10,000 tons per year. Facility design includes an induction melter with the capability of melting both ferrous and nonferrous metals. After three years of operation with scrapyard feed, the smelter would have excess capacity to support on-site decontamination and decomissioning projects or upgrading programs. The metal smelting facility has been proposed for FY 1984 line item funding with start-up operations in FY 1986.

Mack, J.E.; Williams, L.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

RMOTCTrainingFacilityNEW.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

* Field Laboratory with surface outcrops of Cretaceous fluvial and marine units * Gas Processing Facilities * Production Facilities * Tanks & Pipelines * Aquaculture &...

267

FIELD DEPLOYMENT EVALUATION OF THE FREEZE-THAW/EVAPORATION (FTE) PROCESS TO TREAT OIL AND GAS PRODUCED WATERS. Task 45. Final topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TASK 45 FIELD DEPLOYMENT EVALUATION OF THE FREEZE-THAW/ EVAPORATION (FTE ) PROCESS TO TREAT OIL AND GAS PRODUCED WATERS coupling evaporation with freezing. This offers operators a year- round method for treating produced water. Treating water with the FTE process reduces the volume of water to be disposed of as well as purifying the water to a level acceptable for watering livestock and agricultural lands. This process is currently used at two evaporation facilities, one in the San Juan Basin in New Mexico and one in the Green River Basin in Wyoming. the freezing point below that of pure water. When such a solution is cooled below 32EF, relatively pure ice crystals form, along with an unfrozen brine solution that contains elevated concentrations of salts. Because of the brine's high concentration of these constituents, its density is greater than that of the ice, and the purified ice and brine are easily separated. Coupling the natural processes of freezing and evaporation makes the FTE process a more cost- effective and efficient method for the treatment and disposal of produced water and allows for year-round operation of an FTE facility. drops below 32 F, produced water is automatically pumped from a holding pond and sprayed onto a freezing pad. The freezing pad consists of an elevated framework of piping with regularly placed, upright, extendable spray heads similar to those used to irrigate lawns. As the spray freezes, an ice pile forms over the elevated framework of pipes, and the brine, with an elevated constituent concentration, drains from the ice pile. The high-salinity brine, identified by its high electrical conductivity, is separated using automatic valves and pumped to a pond where it can subsequently be disposed of by conventional methods. As the ice pile increases in height, the sprayers are extended. When the ice on the freezing pad melts, the relatively pure water is pumped from the freezing pad and discharged or stored for later use . No new wastes are generated by the FTE process. and the U. S. Department of Energy has been conducted since 1992 to develop a commercial FTE purification process for produced waters. Numeric process and economic modeling, as well as the laboratory-scale process simulation that confirmed the technical and economic feasibility of the process, was performed by B. C. Technologies, Ltd., and the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) from 1992 to 1995. They then conducted a field evaluation from 1995 to 1997 in New Mexico's San Juan Basin at a conventional evaporation facility operated by Amoco Production Company. The results of this evaluation confirmed that the FTE process has significant commercial economic potential. A new facility was designed in 1998, and its construction is expected to begin in 1999.

Ames A. Grisanti; James A. Sorensen

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Development of CFD-Based Simulation Tools for In-Situ Thermal Processing of Oil Shale/Sands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In our research, we are taking the novel approach of developing and applying high performance computing, computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based simulation tools to a modified in-situ process for production of oil from oil shale. The simulation tools being developed capture the relevant physical processes and data from a large-scale system. The modified in-situ application is a pilot-scale heat transfer process inside Red Leaf Resourcesâ?? EcoShale capsule. We demonstrate the need to understand fluid flow behavior in the convective channels of the rubblized shale bed as convective heating greatly decreases the time required to heat the oil shale to the production temperature when compared with conductive heating alone. We have developed and implemented a geometry creation strategy for a representative section of the EcoShale capsule, developed a meshing approach to deal with the complicated geometry and produce a well-behaved mesh, analyzed the effects of boundary conditions on the simulation results, and devised a new operator splitting solution algorithm that reduces computational costs by taking advantage of the differing convective and conductive time scales occurring in the simulation. These simulation tools can be applied to a wide range of processes involving convective fluid flow heating in rubblized beds.

None

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

Evaluation Of A Turbidity Meter For Use At The Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River Remediation's (SRR's) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Laboratory currently tests for sludge carry-over into the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) by evaluating the iron concentration in the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) and relating this iron concentration to the amount of sludge solids present. A new method was proposed for detecting the amount of sludge in the SMECT that involves the use of an Optek turbidity sensor. Waste Services Laboratory (WSL) personnel conducted testing on two of these units following a test plan developed by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE). Both Optek units (SN64217 and SN65164) use sensor model AF16-N and signal converter model series C4000. The sensor body of each unit was modified to hold a standard DWPF 12 cc sample vial, also known as a ''peanut'' vial. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate the use of this model of turbidity sensor, or meter, to provide a measurement of the sludge solids present in the SMECT based upon samples from that tank. During discussions of the results from this study by WSE, WSL, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel, an upper limit on the acceptable level of solids in SMECT samples was set at 0.14 wt%. A ''go/no-go'' decision criterion was to be developed for the critical turbidity response, which is expressed in concentration units (CUs), for each Optek unit based upon the 0.14 wt% solids value. An acceptable or a ''go'' decision for the SMECT should reflect the situation that there is an identified risk (e.g. 5%) for a CU response from the Optek unit to be less than the critical CU value when the solids content of the SMECT is actually 0.14 wt% or greater, while a ''no-go'' determination (i.e., an Optek CU response above the critical CU value, a conservative decision relative to risk) would lead to additional evaluations of the SMECT to better quantify the possible solids content of the tank. A sludge simulant was used to develop standards for testing both Optek units and to determine the viability of a ''go/no-go'' CU response for each of the units. Statistical methods were used by SRNL to develop the critical CU value for the ''go/no-go'' decision for these standards for each Optek unit. Since only one sludge simulant was available for this testing, the sensitivity of these results to other simulants and to actual sludge material is not known. However, limited testing with samples from the actual DWPF process (both SRAT product samples and SMECT samples) demonstrated that the use of the ''go/no-go'' criteria developed from the sludge simulant testing was conservative for these samples taken from Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), the sludge batch currently being processed. While both of the Optek units performed very reliably during this testing, there were statistically significant differences (although small on a practical scale) between the two units. Thus, testing should be conducted on any new unit of this Optek model to qualify it before it is used to support the DWPF operation.

Mahannah, R. N.; Edwards, T. B.

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

SUMMARY OF FY11 SULFATE RETENTION STUDIES FOR DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of studies related to the incorporation of sulfate in high level waste (HLW) borosilicate glass produced at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). A group of simulated HLW glasses produced for earlier sulfate retention studies was selected for full chemical composition measurements to determine whether there is any clear link between composition and sulfate retention over the compositional region evaluated. In addition, the viscosity of several glasses was measured to support future efforts in modeling sulfate solubility as a function of predicted viscosity. The intent of these studies was to develop a better understanding of sulfate retention in borosilicate HLW glass to allow for higher loadings of sulfate containing waste. Based on the results of these and other studies, the ability to improve sulfate solubility in DWPF borosilicate glasses lies in reducing the connectivity of the glass network structure. This can be achieved, as an example, by increasing the concentration of alkali species in the glass. However, this must be balanced with other effects of reduced network connectivity, such as reduced viscosity, potentially lower chemical durability, and in the case of higher sodium and aluminum concentrations, the propensity for nepheline crystallization. Future DWPF processing is likely to target higher waste loadings and higher sludge sodium concentrations, meaning that alkali concentrations in the glass will already be relatively high. It is therefore unlikely that there will be the ability to target significantly higher total alkali concentrations in the glass solely to support increased sulfate solubility without the increased alkali concentration causing failure of other Product Composition Control System (PCCS) constraints, such as low viscosity and durability. No individual components were found to provide a significant improvement in sulfate retention (i.e., an increase of the magnitude necessary to have a dramatic impact on blending, washing, or waste loading strategies for DWPF) for the glasses studied here. In general, the concentrations of those species that significantly improve sulfate solubility in a borosilicate glass must be added in relatively large concentrations (e.g., 13 to 38 wt % or more of the frit) in order to have a substantial impact. For DWPF, these concentrations would constitute too large of a portion of the frit to be practical. Therefore, it is unlikely that specific additives may be introduced into the DWPF glass via the frit to significantly improve sulfate solubility. The results presented here continue to show that sulfate solubility or retention is a function of individual glass compositions, rather than a property of a broad glass composition region. It would therefore be inappropriate to set a single sulfate concentration limit for a range of DWPF glass compositions. Sulfate concentration limits should continue to be identified and implemented for each sludge batch. The current PCCS limit is 0.4 wt % SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in glass, although frit development efforts have led to an increased limit of 0.6 wt % for recent sludge batches. Slightly higher limits (perhaps 0.7-0.8 wt %) may be possible for future sludge batches. An opportunity for allowing a higher sulfate concentration limit at DWPF may lay lie in improving the laboratory experiments used to set this limit. That is, there are several differences between the crucible-scale testing currently used to define a limit for DWPF operation and the actual conditions within the DWPF melter. In particular, no allowance is currently made for sulfur partitioning (volatility versus retention) during melter processing as the sulfate limit is set for a specific sludge batch. A better understanding of the partitioning of sulfur in a bubbled melter operating with a cold cap as well as the impacts of sulfur on the off-gas system may allow a higher sulfate concentration limit to be established for the melter feed. This approach would have to be taken carefully to ensure that a

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

271

EVALUATION OF A TURBIDITY METER FOR USE AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River Remediation’s (SRR’s) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Laboratory currently tests for sludge carry-over into the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) by evaluating the iron concentration in the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) and relating this iron concentration to the amount of sludge solids present. A new method was proposed for detecting the amount of sludge in the SMECT that involves the use of an Optek turbidity sensor. Waste Services Laboratory (WSL) personnel conducted testing on two of these units following a test plan developed by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE). Both Optek units (SN64217 and SN65164) use sensor model AF16-N and signal converter model series C4000. The sensor body of each unit was modified to hold a standard DWPF 12 cc sample vial, also known as a “peanut” vial. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate the use of this model of turbidity sensor, or meter, to provide a measurement of the sludge solids present in the SMECT based upon samples from that tank. During discussions of the results from this study by WSE, WSL, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel, an upper limit on the acceptable level of solids in SMECT samples was set at 0.14 weight percent (wt%). A “go/no-go” decision criterion was to be developed for the critical turbidity response, which is expressed in concentration units (CUs), for each Optek unit based upon the 0.14 wt% solids value. An acceptable or a “go” decision for the SMECT should reflect the situation that there is an identified risk (e.g. 5%) for a CU response from the Optek unit to be less than the critical CU value when the solids content of the SMECT is actually 0.14 wt% or greater, while a “no-go” determination (i.e., an Optek CU response above the critical CU value, a conservative decision relative to risk) would lead to additional evaluations of the SMECT to better quantify the possible solids content of the tank. Subsequent to the issuance of the initial version of this report but under the scope of the original request for technical assistance, WSE asked for this report to be revised to include the “go/no-go” CU value corresponding to 0.28 wt% solids. It was this request that led to the preparation of Revision 1 of the report. The results for the 0.28 wt% solids value were developed following the same approach as that utilized for the 0.14 wt% solids value. A sludge simulant was used to develop standards for testing both Optek units and to determine the viability of a “go/no-go” CU response for each of the units. Statistical methods were used by SRNL to develop the critical CU value for the “go/no-go” decision for these standards for each Optek unit. Since only one sludge simulant was available for this testing, the sensitivity of these results to other simulants and to actual sludge material is not known. However, limited testing with samples from the actual DWPF process (both SRAT product samples and SMECT samples) demonstrated that the use of the “go/no-go” criteria developed from the sludge simulant testing was conservative for these samples taken from the sludge batch, Sludge Batch 7b, being processed at the time of this testing. While both of the Optek units performed very reliably during this testing, there were statistically significant differences (although small on a practical scale) between the two units. Thus, testing should be conducted on any new unit of this Optek model to qualify it before it is used to support the DWPF operation.

Mahannah, R.; Edwards, T.

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

272

Environmental Management Construction Project Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility, July 19-22, 210  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Shadowing of the Environmental Management Construction Project Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility on July 19-22, 2010 A Department of Energy Construction Project Review (CPR) of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) project was conducted on July 19-22, 2010, at the request of the Principal Deputy Secretary, Office of Environmental Management (EM-2). The purpose of the review was to assess the cost, schedule, and technical progress against the approved Performance Baseline. Specific review areas were Engineering; Commissioning; Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Assurance; Cost, Schedule, and Risk; and Management and Acquisition.

273

Wetland and Sensitive Species Survey Report for Y-12: Proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of an environmental survey conducted at sites associated with the proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) at the Y-12 National Security Complex in September-October 2009. The survey was conducted in order to evaluate potential impacts of the overall project. This project includes the construction of a haul road, concrete batch plant, wet soil storage area and dry soil storage area. The environmental surveys were conducted by natural resource experts at ORNL who routinely assess the significance of various project activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Natural resource staff assistance on this project included the collection of environmental information that can aid in project location decisions that minimize impacts to sensitive resource such as significant wildlife populations, rare plants and wetlands. Natural resources work was conducted in various habitats, corresponding to the proposed areas of impact. Thc credentials/qualifications of the researchers are contained in Appendix A. The proposed haul road traverses a number of different habitats including a power-line right-of-way. wetlands, streams, forest and mowed areas. It extends from what is known as the New Salvage Yard on the west to the Polaris Parking Lot on the east. This haul road is meant to connect the proposed concrete batch plant to the UPF building site. The proposed site of the concrete batch plant itself is a highly disturbed fenced area. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 1. The proposed Wet Soils Disposal Area is located on the north side of Bear Creek Road at the former Control Burn Study Area. This is a second growth arce containing thick vegetation, and extensive dead and down woody material. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 2. Thc dry soils storage area is proposed for what is currently known as the West Borrow Area. This site is located on the west side of Reeves Road south of Bear Creek Road. The site is an early successional field. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 2.

Giffen, N.; Peterson, M.; Reasor, S.; Pounds, L.; Byrd, G.; Wiest, M. C.; Hill, C. C.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Cold Vacuum Drying Facility - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Disposal Facility U Plant Vitrification Plant Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility Waste...

275

The evaluation of CO2-based vapour extraction (VAPEX) process for heavy-oil recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vapor extraction (VAPEX) has been proposed as an alternative for heavy-oil recovery in reservoirs where thermal methods face technical and economic problems. In VAPEX, a pair of horizontal injector-producer we...

Farshid Torabi; Benyamin Yadali Jamaloei…

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Improved process for re-refining cottonseed oil for the removal of color bodies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method for removing color from neutralized and degummed cottonseed oil is described. Data included shows color removal to be directly correlated to: a) concentration of sodium hydroxide solution, b) length o...

George C. Cavanagh

1951-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development, August 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development May 2011 August 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................. 1 3.0 Scope and Methodology ......................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Results .................................................................................................................................................... 3

278

Process Balances of Vegetable Oil Hydrogenation and Coprocessing Investigations with Middle-Distillates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hydrogenation of vegetable oil is a promising technology for the production of highly valuable diesel components. ... Finding a sustainable energy supplement as well as the need for carbon dioxide reduction leads to the necessity to integrate more and more renewable energy sources into the transportation fuel markets. ... A possibility for introduction of hydrogenated vegetable oils on the market is the coprocessing in conventional hydrotreater and hydrocracker units in a refinery. ...

Matthias Endisch; Thomas Kuchling; Jan Roscher

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

279

An evaluation of the benefits of combined steam and fireflooding as a recovery process for heavy oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lack of oil mobility is a major problem with in situ combustion field projects, since the combustion front displaces oil into an essentially unheated reservoir. One way of ensuring oil mobility is to utilize steam injection during the early life of the process, and then switch to combustion when heated communication paths have been developed. The in situ combustion characteristics of cores from the Primrose reservoir of Northeastern Alberta were investigated in a comprehensive series of 22 combustion tube tests. The program was carried out in order to evaluate the effectiveness of fireflooding in both cores that had been preheated to the extent that the oil was mobile and in those which were steam-flooded prior to dry combustion. Both normal- and 95% oxygen-enriched air were evaluated. Wet combustion tests were performed utilizing both liquid water and steam injection. The effects of parameters such as pressure, oxygen enrichment and injection flux on the combustion characteristics were examined. This paper will discuss the results of this study, which show that steam co-injection is more effective at lowering the oxygen requirement than was combustion following steam. Additionally, the cores which were preheated exhibited similar oxygen requirements to those which were presteamed to a near-residual saturation.

Moore, R.G.; Laureshen, C.J.; Belgrave, J.D.M.; Ursenbach, M.G. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Jha, K.N. [Dept. of Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa (Canada)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil processing facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fluidized bed retorting of eastern oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This topical report summarizes the conceptual design of an integrated oil shale processing plant based on fluidized bed retorting of eastern New Albany oil shale. This is the fourth design study conducted by Foster Wheeler; previous design cases employed the following technologies: Fluidized bed rotating/combustion of Colorado Mahogany zone shale. An FCC concept of fluidized bed retorting/combustion of Colorado Mahogany zone shale. Directly heated moving vertical-bed process using Colorado Mahogany zone shale. The conceptual design encompasses a grassroots facility which processes run-of-mine oil shale into a syncrude oil product and dispose of the spent shale solids. The plant has a nominal capacity of 50,000 barrels per day of syncrude product, produced from oil shale feed having a Fischer Assay of 15 gallons per ton. Design of the processing units was based on non-confidential published information and supplemental data from process licensors. Maximum use of process and cost information developed in the previous Foster Wheeler studies was employed. The integrated plant design is described in terms of the individual process units and plant support systems. The estimated total plant investment is detailed by plant section and estimates of the annual operating requirements and costs are provided. In addition, process design assumptions and uncertainties are documented and recommendations for process alternatives, which could improve the overall plant economics, are discussed. 12 refs., 17 figs., 52 tabs.

Gaire, R.J.; Mazzella, G.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Removal of heteroatoms and metals from heavy oils by bioconversion processes. CRADA final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this Cooperative research and Development Agreement project between Oak Ridge National Laboratory ( O W ) and Baker Performance Chemicals (BPC), Chevron, Energy BioSystems, Exxon, UNOCAL and Texaco is to investigate the biological desukrization of crude oil. Biological removal of organic s&%r fiom crude oil offers an attractive alternative to conventional thermochemical treatment due to the mild operating conditions afforded by the biocatalyst. In order for biodesulfbrization to realize commercial success, reactors must be designed which allow for sufficient liquid / liquid and gas / liquid mass transfer while simultaneously reducing operating costs. To this end we have been developing advanced bioreactors for biodesufirization and have been studying their performance using both actual crude oil as well as more easily characterized model systems.

Kaufman, E N; Borole, A P

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

A Process for the Aqueous Enzymatic Extraction of Corn Oil from Dry Milled Corn Germ and Enzymatic Wet Milled Corn Germ (E-Germ)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A bench-scale aqueous enzymatic method was developed to extract corn oil from corn germ from either a commercial corn dry mill or corn germ from a newly-developed experimental enzymatic wet milling process (E-Ger...

Robert A. Moreau; Leland C. Dickey…

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

RADIOLOGICAL CONTROLS FOR PLUTONIUM CONTAMINATED PROCESS EQUIPMENT REMOVAL FROM 232-Z CONTAMINATED WASTE RECOVERY PROCESS FACILITY AT THE PLUTONIUM FINSHING PLANT (PFP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 232-Z facility at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant operated as a plutonium scrap incinerator for 11 years. Its mission was to recover residual plutonium through incinerating and/or leaching contaminated wastes and scrap material. Equipment failures, as well as spills, resulted in the release of radionuclides and other contamination to the building, along with small amounts to external soil. Based on the potential threat posed by the residual plutonium, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued an Action Memorandum to demolish Building 232-2, Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERC1.A) Non-Time Critical Removal Action Memorandum for Removal of the 232-2 Waste Recovery Process Facility at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (04-AMCP-0486).

MINETTE, M.J.

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

285

Safeguards assessment of gamma-ray detection for process monitoring at natural uranium conversion facilities.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Conversion, the process by which natural uranium ore (yellowcake) is puri?ed and converted through a series of chemical processes into uranium hexa?uoride gas (UF6), has… (more)

Dewji, Shaheen Azim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Properties and processing of corn oils obtained by extraction with supercritical carbon dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crude oils were extracted from wet- and dry-milled corn germs with supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) at 50–90 C and 8,000–12,000 psi and were characterized for color, free fatty acids, phosphorus, refining lo...

G. R. List; J. P. Friedrich…

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Oil shale: The environmental challenges III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book presents the papers of a symposium whose purpose was to discuss the environmental and socio-economic aspects of oil shale development. Topics considered include oil shale solid waste disposal, modeling spent shale disposal, water management, assessing the effects of oil shale facilities on water quality, wastewater treatment and use at oil shale facilities, potential air emissions from oil shale retorting, the control of air pollutant emissions from oil shale facilities, oil shale air emission control, socioeconomic research, a framework for mitigation agreements, the Garfield County approach to impact mitigation, the relationship of applied industrial hygiene programs and experimental toxicology programs, and industrial hygiene programs.

Petersen, K.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Biochemical upgrading of oils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed. 121 figs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

289

A demonstration of variance and covariance calculations using MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculator) and PROFF (PROcessing and Fuel Facilities calculator)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Good decision-making in materials accounting requires a valid calculation of control limits and detection sensitivity for facilities handling special nuclear materials (SNM). A difficult aspect of this calculation is determining the appropriate variance and covariance values for the terms in the materials balance (MB) equation. Computer software such as MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculator) and PROFF (PROcessing and Fuel Facilities calculator) can efficiently select and combine variance terms. These programs determine the variance and covariance of an MB equation by first obtaining relations for the variance and covariance of each term in the MB equation through propagating instrument errors and then substituting the measured quantities and their uncertainties into these relations. MAVARIC is a custom spreadsheet used with the second release of LOTUS 1-2-3.** PROFF is a stand-alone menu-driven program requiring no commercial software. Programs such as MAVARIC and PROFF facilitate the complex calculations required to determine the detection sensitivity of an SNM facility. These programs can also be used to analyze materials accounting systems.

Barlich, G.L.; Nasseri, S.S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site: Results of Technology Down-Selection and Research and Development to Support New Salt Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste (HLW) program is responsible for storage, treatment, and immobilization of HLW for disposal. The Salt Processing Project (SPP) is the salt waste (water-soluble) treatment portion of this effort. The overall SPP encompasses the selection, design, construction, and operation of technologies to prepare the salt-waste feed material for immobilization at the site's Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and vitrification facility (Defense Waste Processing Facility [DWPF]). Major constituents that must be removed from the salt waste and sent as feed to DWPF include cesium (Cs), strontium (Sr), and actinides. In April 2000, the DOE Deputy Secretary for Project Completion (EM-40) established the SRS Salt Processing Project Technical Working Group (TWG) to manage technology development of treatment alternatives for SRS high-level salt wastes. The separation alternatives investigated included three candidate Cs-removal processes selected, as well as actinide and Sr removal that are also required as a part of each process. The candidate Cs-removal processes are: crystalline Silicotitanate Non-Elutable Ion Exchange (CST); caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX); and small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). The Tanks Focus Area was asked to assist DOE by managing the SPP research and development (R&D), revising roadmaps, and developing down-selection criteria. The down-selection decision process focused its analysis on three levels: (a) identification of goals that the selected technology should achieve, (b) selection criteria that are a measure of performance of the goal, and (c) criteria scoring and weighting for each technology alternative. After identifying the goals and criteria, the TWG analyzed R&D results and engineering data and scored the technology alternatives versus the criteria. Based their analysis and scoring, the TWG recommended CSSX as the preferred alternative. This recommendation was formalized in July 2001 when DOE published the Savannah River Site Salt Processing Alternatives Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and was finalized in the DOE Record of Decision issued in October 2001.

Lang, K.; Gerdes, K.; Picha, K.; Spader, W.; McCullough, J.; Reynolds, J.; Morin, J. P.; Harmon, H. D.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

291

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the Savannah River Site Hand Injury at the Salt Waste Processing Facility on October 6, 2009  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report documents the results of the Type B Accident Investigation Board (Board) investigation of the October 6, 2009, hand injury at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) Salt Waste Processing Facility construction site.

292

Robust Steam Temperature Regulation for Distillation of Essential Oil Extraction Process using Hybrid Fuzzy-PD plus PID Controller  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract—This paper presents a hybrid fuzzy-PD plus PID (HFPP) controller and its application to steam distillation process for essential oil extraction system. Steam temperature is one of the most significant parameters that can influence the composition of essential oil yield. Due to parameter variations and changes in operation conditions during distillation, a robust steam temperature controller becomes nontrivial to avoid the degradation of essential oil quality. Initially, the PRBS input is triggered to the system and output of steam temperature is modeled using ARX model structure. The parameter estimation and tuning method is adopted by simulation using HFPP controller scheme. The effectiveness and robustness of proposed controller technique is validated by real time implementation to the system. The performance of HFPP using 25 and 49 fuzzy rules is compared. The experimental result demonstrates the proposed HFPP using 49 fuzzy rules achieves a better, consistent and robust controller compared to PID when considering the test on tracking the set point and the effects due to disturbance. Keywords—Fuzzy Logic controller, steam temperature, steam distillation, real time control. T I.

Nurhani Kasuan; Zakariah Yusuf; Mohd Nasir Taib; Mohd Hezri; Fazalul Rahiman; Nazurah Tajuddin; Mohd Azri; Abdul Aziz

293

Process Flow Chart for Immobilizing of Radioactive High Concentration Sodium Hydroxide Product from the Sodium Processing Facility at the BN-350 Nuclear power plant in Aktau, Kazakhstan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of a joint research investigations carried out by the group of Kazakhstan, British and American specialists in development of a new material for immobilization of radioactive 35% sodium hydroxide solutions from the sodium coolant processing facility of the BN-350 nuclear power plant. The resulting solid matrix product, termed geo-cement stone, is capable of isolating long lived radionuclides from the environment. The physico-mechanical properties of geo-cement stone have been investigated and the flow chart for its production verified in a full scale experiments. (author)

Burkitbayev, M.; Omarova, K.; Tolebayev, T. [Ai-Farabi Kazakh National University, Chemical Faculty, Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Galkin, A. [KATEP Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Bachilova, N. [NIISTROMPROEKT Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Blynskiy, A. [Nuclear Technology Safety Centre, Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Maev, V. [MAEK-Kazatomprom Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Wells, D. [NUKEM Limited- a member of the Freyssinet Group, Winfrith Technology Centre, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom); Herrick, A. [NUKEM Limited- a member of the Freyssinet Group, Caithness (United Kingdom); Michelbacher, J. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Liquid-phase Processing of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oil using Pt/HZSM-5 Catalyst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as switchgrass, sorghum and miscanthus, agriculture crops such as corn and sugarcane, municipal solid waste, agriculture wastes and forest residues. Energy crops are more preferred since they produce high yield, low fertilizer application requirements and low...), plastic wastes (Bhattacharya et al., 2009; Karaduman et al., 2001; Rutkowski and 7 Kubacki, 2006; Scott et al., 1990), waste biomass like oil cakes (?zbay et al., 2001), energy crops (He et al., 2009), and forest residues (Ingram et al., 2007...

Santos, Bjorn Sanchez

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Heavy Oil Process Monitor: Automated On-Column Asphaltene Precipitation and Re-Dissolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An automated separation technique was developed that provides a new approach to measuring the distribution profiles of the most polar, or asphaltenic components of an oil, using a continuous flow system to precipitate and re-dissolve asphaltenes from the oil. Methods of analysis based on this new technique were explored. One method based on the new technique involves precipitation of a portion of residua sample in heptane on a polytetrafluoroethylene-packed (PTFE) column. The precipitated material is re-dissolved in three steps using solvents of increasing polarity: cyclohexane, toluene, and methylene chloride. The amount of asphaltenes that dissolve in cyclohexane is a useful diagnostic of the thermal history of oil, and its proximity to coke formation. For example, about 40 % (w/w) of the heptane asphaltenes from unpyrolyzed residua dissolves in cyclohexane. As pyrolysis progresses, this number decrease to below 15% as coke and toluene insoluble pre-coke materials appear. Currently, the procedure for the isolation of heptane asphaltenes and the determination of the amount of asphaltenes soluble in cyclohexane spans three days. The automated procedure takes one hour. Another method uses a single solvent, methylene chloride, to re-dissolve the material that precipitates on heptane on the PTFE-packed column. The area of this second peak can be used to calculate a value which correlates with gravimetric asphaltene content. Currently the gravimetric procedure to determine asphaltenes takes about 24 hours. The automated procedure takes 30 minutes. Results for four series of original and pyrolyzed residua were compared with data from the gravimetric methods. Methods based on the new on-column precipitation and re-dissolution technique provide significantly more detail about the polar constituent's oils than the gravimetric determination of asphaltenes.

John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani; Mark Sanderson

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

296

Investigation and development of alternative methods for shale oil processing and analysis. Final technical report, October 1979--April 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale, a carbonaceous rock which occurs abundantly in the earth`s crust, has been investigated for many years as an alternate source of fuel oil. The insoluble organic matter contained in such shales is termed {open_quotes}Kerogen{close_quotes} from the Greek meaning oil or oil forming. The kerogen in oil shale breaks down into oil-like products when subjected to conditions simulating destructive distillation. These products have been the subject of extensive investigations by several researchers and many of the constituents of shale oil have been identified. (1) Forsman (2) estimates that the kerogen content of the earth is roughly 3 {times} 10{sup 15} tons as compared to total coal reserves of about 5 {times} 10{sup 12}. Although the current cost per barrel estimate for commercial production of shale oil is higher than that of fossil oil, as our oil reserves continue to dwindle, shale oil technology will become more and more important. When oil shale is heated, kerogen is said to undergo chemical transformation to usable oil in two steps (3): Kerogen (in oil shale) 300-500{degrees}C bitumen. Crude shale oil and other products. The crude shale oil so obtained differs from fossil oil in that: (1) kerogen is thought to have been produced from the aging of plant matter over many years; (2) shale oil has a higher nitrogen content than fossil oil; (3) non-hydrocarbons are present to a much greater extent in shale oil; and (4) the hydrocarbons in shale oil are much more unsaturated than those in fossil oil (petroleum).

Evans, R.A.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and the System Engineer Program.Chg 1 incorporates the use of DOE-STD-1189-2008, Integration of Safety into the Design Process, mandatory for Hazard Category 1, 2 and 3 nuclear facilities. Cancels DOE O 420.1A.

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

298

Problem 65 in Section 4.1 (Page 274) Constructing a pipeline Supertankers off-load oil at a docking facility 4 mi offshore. The nearest refinery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

facility 4 mi offshore. The nearest refinery is 9 mi east of the shore point nearest the docking facility. A pipeline must be constructed connecting the docking facility with the refinery. The pipeline costs $300.42 miles away from the refinery, or equivalently 3.58 miles away from Point A (as the back of the book has

Schilling, Anne

299

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTEGRAL SEPARATOR FOR A CENTRIFUGAL GAS PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A COMPACT GAS PROCESSING DEVICE WAS INVESTIGATED TO INCREASE GAS PRODUCTION FROM REMOTE, PREVIOUSLY UN-ECONOMIC RESOURCES. THE UNIT WAS TESTED ON AIR AND WATER AND WITH NATURAL GAS AND LIQUID. RESULTS ARE REPORTED WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE WORK.

LANCE HAYS

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

300

Turbine cooling waxy oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for pipelining a waxy oil to essentially eliminate deposition of wax on the pipeline wall is described comprising: providing a pressurized mixture of the waxy oil and a gas; effecting a sudden pressure drop of the mixture of the oil and the gas through an expansion turbine, thereby expanding the gas and quickly cooling the oil to below its cloud point in the substantial absence of wax deposition and forming a slurry of wax particles and oil; and pipelining the slurry.

Geer, J.S.

1987-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil processing facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Pilot-scale testing of a fuel oil-explosives cofiring process for recovering energy from waste explosives: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Army generates and stores a significant quantity of explosives and explosive-related materials that do not meet specifications for their primary use. Current explosives disposal processes do not recover any resources from these materials. The heat of combustion of these materials is typically 9 to 15 kJ/g (4000 to 6500 Btu/lb), which is 21 to 33% of the high heating value of No. 2 fuel oil. One secondary use for explosives is to cofire them with other fuels to recover their energy content. Bench-scale testing has shown that cofiring is feasible and safe within certain guidelines. To further evaluate cofiring, a proof-of-principle test was conducted in a 300-kW (10/sup 6/ Btu/h) combustion chamber. The test program was discontinued before completion because of failures largely unrelated to the explosives contained in the fuel. This report presents the results of the proof-of-principle tests, as well as design and operational changes that would eliminate problems encountered during the course of the test program. It is clearly feasible to cofire explosives and fuel oil. However, more data are needed before the process can be tested in a production boiler, furnace, or incinerator. 20 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

Bradshaw, W.M.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Monitoring i n s i t u retorting processes of oil shale by reflected and transmitted electromagnetic waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A theoretical model for an i n s i t u oil shale retort with three distinct vertical zones all surrounded by a wall of oil shale overburden and underburden is considered for the study of potential electromagnetic monitoring of the progression of retorting processes using wave propagation techniques. The overall power reflection and transmission coefficients for both transverse electric and transverse magnetic waves are used for finding the position of a combustion zone in the retort based upon the assumption of straight?line propagation of monochromatic plane waves through layered lossy dielectric media characterized by the dielectric constants and loss tangents. The behavior of each power coefficient is discussed as a function of burn front positions and signal frequencies. As a result of the relatively moderate signal power for each coefficient required for detection and the one?to?one correspondence between each power coefficient and burn front position at typical conditions the feasibility of using low radio?frequency waves to monitor relatively large scale i n s i t u retorting process is established.

S. H. Hong; J. B. DuBow

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Design of generic coal conversion facilities: Process release---Refining and upgrading  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The refinery and upgrade process development unit (PDU) is designed to upgrade liquid hydrocarbon products from the direct and indirect liquefaction PDU's to transportation fuels. The refinery will comprise of the following reactor systems: (a) Hydrotreating (b) Hydrocracking (c) Reforming. The three reactor systems will share common feed preparation, product separation and fractionation sections. The refinery is being designed to operate independently of the other PDU's. The use of common feed and product handling systems will permit operation of one process reactor system at a time in the refinery. In addition, the hydrotreater and hydrocracker will be operable in series. The process is designed to utilize intermediate storage and maximize the use of equipment.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Design of generic coal conversion facilities: Process release---Refining and upgrading  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The refinery and upgrade process development unit (PDU) is designed to upgrade liquid hydrocarbon products from the direct and indirect liquefaction PDU`s to transportation fuels. The refinery will comprise of the following reactor systems: (a) Hydrotreating (b) Hydrocracking (c) Reforming. The three reactor systems will share common feed preparation, product separation and fractionation sections. The refinery is being designed to operate independently of the other PDU`s. The use of common feed and product handling systems will permit operation of one process reactor system at a time in the refinery. In addition, the hydrotreater and hydrocracker will be operable in series. The process is designed to utilize intermediate storage and maximize the use of equipment.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Design of generic coal conversion facilities: Process release---Direct coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The direct liquefaction portion of the PETC generic direct coal liquefaction process development unit (PDU) is being designed to provide maximum operating flexibility. The PDU design will permit catalytic and non-catalytic liquefaction concepts to be investigated at their proof-of-the-concept stages before any larger scale operations are attempted. The principal variations from concept to concept are reactor configurations and types. These include thermal reactor, ebullating bed reactor, slurry phase reactor and fixed bed reactor, as well as different types of catalyst. All of these operating modes are necessary to define and identify the optimum process conditions and configurations for determining improved economical liquefaction technology.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. 62 figures.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

307

Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow (Rocky Point, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

RESULTS OF THE EXTRACTION-SCRUB-STRIP TESTING USING AN IMPROVED SOLVENT FORMULATION AND SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY SIMULATED WASTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent - also known as the next generation solvent (NGS) - for deployment at the Savannah River Site to remove cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is a collaborative effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). As part of the program, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has performed a number of Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests. These batch contact tests serve as first indicators of the cesium mass transfer solvent performance with actual or simulated waste. The test detailed in this report used simulated Tank 49H material, with the addition of extra potassium. The potassium was added at 1677 mg/L, the maximum projected (i.e., a worst case feed scenario) value for the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The results of the test gave favorable results given that the potassium concentration was elevated (1677 mg/L compared to the current 513 mg/L). The cesium distribution value, DCs, for extraction was 57.1. As a comparison, a typical D{sub Cs} in an ESS test, using the baseline solvent formulation and the typical waste feed, is {approx}15. The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) uses the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process to remove cesium (Cs) from alkaline waste. This process involves the use of an organic extractant, BoBCalixC6, in an organic matrix to selectively remove cesium from the caustic waste. The organic solvent mixture flows counter-current to the caustic aqueous waste stream within centrifugal contactors. After extracting the cesium, the loaded solvent is stripped of cesium by contact with dilute nitric acid and the cesium concentrate is transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), while the organic solvent is cleaned and recycled for further use. The Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), under construction, will use the same process chemistry. The Office of Waste Processing (EM-31) expressed an interest in investigating the further optimization of the organic solvent by replacing the BoBCalixC6 extractant with a more efficient extractant. This replacement should yield dividends in improving cesium removal from the caustic waste stream, and in the rate at which the caustic waste can be processed. To that end, EM-31 provided funding for both the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SRNL wrote a Task Technical Quality and Assurance Plan for this work. As part of the envisioned testing regime, it was decided to perform an ESS test using a simulated waste that simulated a typical envisioned SWPF feed, but with added potassium to make the waste more challenging. Potassium interferes in the cesium removal, and its concentration is limited in the feed to <1950 mg/L. The feed to MCU has typically contained <500 mg/L of potassium.

Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Fink, S.

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

309

Perform research in process development for hydroretorting of eastern oil shales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Six bulk samples of eastern oil shale were taken from the Clegg Creek Member of the New Albany Shale in northwestern Kentucky, the Chattanooga Shale in northern Alabama, the Gassaway Member of the Chattanooga Shale in central Tennessee, the Antrim Shale in northeastern Michigan, the Cleveland Member of the Ohio Shale in central Ohio, and the Sunbury Shale in eastern Kentucky. A seventh sample of Clegg Creek from southern Indiana had been sampled earlier. The stratigraphic position of all bulk samples was documented using both outcrops and subsurface control; at five sites stratigraphic test holes were cored and logged. Surface gamma was run on the cores before slabbing. The representative character of the Tennessee sample was assured by recovering the required weight in four cores. Obtaining representative bulk samples at other sites often required adapting channel sampling techniques to earth moving equipment, reducing an initial sample by hand methods, and minimizing contamination throughout the sampling operation. Cores were assayed for carbon and Fischer Assay oil yield both on a selected per foot basis as composites. 29 refs., 25 figs., 7 tabs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

311

Interactions between nitrifying bacteria and hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria during detoxification of oil sands process affected water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large quantities of process water are produced during the extraction of bitumen from oil sands by the Syncrude and Suncor operations in northern Alberta. Freshly produced tailings water is acutely toxic, but it has been shown to slowly detoxify over time. As detoxification proceeds, there is also a precipitous decrease in ammonia concentrations. The present study examines these two microbially-mediated processes in relation to levels of bacteria and toxicants in mixtures of fresh and aged (detoxified) tailings water. Detoxification of tailings water was greatly accelerated when equal volumes of fresh and detoxified (natural aging for one year) tailings water were mixed. Addition of phosphorus further stimulated detoxification, causing levels of ammonia and naphthenic acids (toxic organic acids leached during bitumen extraction) to decrease to those of detoxified water within two months. Such changes were not observed when phosphorus was not added, or when it was added to less diluted (10-.1 or 3-.1) fresh tailings water. Populations of nitrifying bacteria and naphthenic acid degraders increased markedly in the phosphorus-amended mixtures, but not in its absence. Addition of CS{sub 2} (a specific inhibitor of nitrification) to these mixtures prevented ammonia oxidation. Surprisingly, it also prevented the increase in naphthenic acid-degraders and retarded the loss of naphthenic acids. These results suggest the existence of interactions in fresh tailings water between nitrifying bacteria, naphthenic acid degraders and toxicants. The activity of naphthenic acid-degraders apparently remains low until ammonia is oxidized, whereas that of nitrifying bacteria remains low until concentrations of naphthenic acids or other toxicants decrease below some threshold level. Understanding these interactions may lead to more efficient and effective processes to detoxify oil sands process water.

Sobolewski, A. [Microbial Technologies, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); MacKinnon, M. [Syncrude Research, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Third quarterly report, April 1993--June 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents research objectives, discusses activities, and presents technical progress for the period April 1, 1993 through June 31, 1993 on Contract No. DE-FC21-86LC11084 with the Department of Energy, Laramie Project Office. The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Rangarajan, S.; Skinner, Q.D.; Hasfurther, V.

1993-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

313

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Second quarterly report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

1992-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

314

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Fourth quarterly report, July--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

1993-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

315

Quantitative comparison of processes of oil-and water-based mud-filtrate invasion and corresponding effects on borehole resistivity measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for hydrocarbon exploration and production, drilling fluids sustain a pressure higher than that of formationQuantitative comparison of processes of oil- and water-based mud-filtrate invasion-filtrate invasion on borehole resistivity measurements. We simulate the process of mud-fil- trate invasion

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

316

CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in a light oil shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. 1994 Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is anticipated that this project will show that the application of the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in shallow shelf carbonates can be economically implemented to recover appreciable volumes of light oil. The goals of the project are the development of guidelines for cost-effective selection of candidate reservoirs and wells, along with estimating recovery potential. The selected site for the demonstration project is the Central Vacuum Unit waterflood in Lea County, New Mexico. Work is nearing completion on the reservoir characterization components of the project. The near-term emphasis is to, (1) provide an accurate distribution of original oil-in-place on a waterflood pattern entity level, (2) evaluate past recovery efficiencies, (3) perform parametric simulations, and (4) forecast performance for a site specific field demonstration of the proposed technology. Macro zonation now exists throughout the study area and cross-sections are available. The Oil-Water Contact has been defined. Laboratory capillary pressure data was used to define the initial water saturations within the pay horizon. The reservoir`s porosity distribution has been enhanced with the assistance of geostatistical software. Three-Dimensional kriging created the spatial distributions of porosity at interwell locations. Artificial intelligence software was utilized to relate core permeability to core porosity, which in turn was applied to the 3-D geostatistical porosity gridding. An Equation-of-State has been developed and refined for upcoming compositional simulation exercises. Options for local grid-refinement in the model are under consideration. These tasks will be completed by mid-1995, prior to initiating the field demonstrations in the second budget period.

Wehner, S.C.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Effect of the carbon addition to filling powder ball-milled with oils on the critical current density in ex situ processed MgB2 tapes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have studied the effect of planetary ball-milling of filling powder with mineral and silicon oils on the carbon substitution in MgB2 and the critical current density (Jc) of Fe-sheathed MgB2 tapes fabricated through an ex situ process in a powder-in-tube (PIT) technique. The mineral oil is much more effective for the carbon substitution and hence the Jc enhancement of tapes than the silicon oil. The silicon oil hardly refines MgB2 and causes a slight carbon substitution, compared with the mineral oil. Low-temperature drying of the as-milled powder to remove the mineral oil is more effective for the Jc enhancement due to an enhanced carbon substitution. This is probably because the low-temperature drying leaves more organic material from decomposed oil which acts as a carbon source. However, the carbon substitution amount is just x = 0.04–0.05 in MgB2?xCx. Although the carbon addition to filling powder is effective in increasing the carbon substitution, the Jc properties of tapes degrade due to induced weak coupling.

H Fujii; K Ozawa; H Kitaguchi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 2. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains reports on nine of these projects, references, and a bibliography. 351 refs., 192 figs., 65 tabs.

Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

319

The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains an executive summary and reports for five of these projects. 137 figs., 49 tabs.

Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

320

Reevaluation of Vitrified High-Level Waste Form Criteria for Potential Cost Savings at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 13598  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been immobilizing SRS's radioactive high level waste (HLW) sludge into a durable borosilicate glass since 1996. Currently the DWPF has poured over 3,500 canisters, all of which are compliant with the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms (WAPS) and therefore ready to be shipped to a federal geologic repository for permanent disposal. Due to DOE petitioning to withdraw the Yucca Mountain License Application (LA) from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2010 and thus no clear disposal path for SRS canistered waste forms, there are opportunities for cost savings with future canister production at DWPF and other DOE producer sites by reevaluating high-level waste form requirements and compliance strategies and reducing/eliminating those that will not negatively impact the quality of the canistered waste form. (authors)

Ray, J.W. [Savannah River Remediation (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation (United States); Marra, S.L.; Herman, C.C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil processing facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Full-Scale Cross-Flow Filter Testing in Support of the Salt Waste Processing Facility Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parsons and its team members General Atomics and Energy Solutions conducted a series of tests to assess the constructability and performance of the Cross-Flow Filter (CFF) system specified for the Department of Energy (DOE) Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The testing determined the optimum flow rates, operating pressures, filtrate-flow control techniques, and cycle timing for filter back pulse and chemical cleaning. Results have verified the design assumptions made and have confirmed the suitability of cross-flow filtration for use in the SWPF. In conclusion: The CFF Test Program demonstrated that the SWPF CFF system could be successfully fabricated, that the SWPF CFF design assumptions were conservative with respect to filter performance and provided useful information on operational parameters and techniques. The filter system demonstrated performance in excess of expectations. (authors)

Stephens, A.B.; Gallego, R.M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Singer, S.A.; Swanson, B.L. [Energy Solutions, Aiken, SC (United States); Bartling, K. [Parsons, Aiken, SC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Reevaluation Of Vitrified High-Level Waste Form Criteria For Potential Cost Savings At The Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been immobilizing SRS's radioactive high level waste (HLW) sludge into a durable borosilicate glass since 1996. Currently the DWPF has poured over 3,500 canisters, all of which are compliant with the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms (WAPS) and therefore ready to be shipped to a federal geologic repository for permanent disposal. Due to DOE petitioning to withdraw the Yucca Mountain License Application (LA) from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2010 and thus no clear disposal path for SRS canistered waste forms, there are opportunities for cost savings with future canister production at DWPF and other DOE producer sites by reevaluating high-level waste form requirements and compliance strategies and reducing/eliminating those that will not negatively impact the quality of the canistered waste form.

Ray, J. W.; Marra, S. L.; Herman, C. C.

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

323

FINGERPRINTING INORGANIC ARSENIC AND ORGANOARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORT AND PROCESS VOTERS USING A LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPH COUPLED WITH AN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER AS A DETECTOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

viable is the recovery of shale oil from our substantialdeposits of oil shale (1). Shale oil is recovered from oilproduce~ along with the shale oil, considerable amounts of

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Economic feasibility of biochemical processes for the upgrading of crudes and the removal of sulfur, nitrogen, and trace metals from crude oil -- Benchmark cost establishment of biochemical processes on the basis of conventional downstream technologies. Final report FY95  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past several years, a considerable amount of work has been carried out showing that microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is promising and the resulting biotechnology may be deliverable. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), systematic studies have been conducted which dealt with the effects of thermophilic and thermoadapted bacteria on the chemical and physical properties of selected types of crude oils at elevated temperatures and pressures. Current studies indicate that during the biotreatment several chemical and physical properties of crude oils are affected. The oils are (1) emulsified; (2) acidified; (3) there is a qualitative and quantitative change in light and heavy fractions of the crudes; (4) there are chemical changes in fractions containing sulfur compounds; (5) there is an apparent reduction in the concentration of trace metals; and (6) the qualitative and quantitative changes appear to be microbial species dependent; and (7) there is a distinction between biodegraded and biotreated oils. The downstream biotechnological crude oil processing research performed thus far is of laboratory scale and has focused on demonstrating the technical feasibility of downstream processing with different types of biocatalysts under a variety of processing conditions. Quantitative economic analysis is the topic of the present project which investigates the economic feasibility of the various biochemical downstream processes which hold promise in upgrading of heavy crudes, such as those found in California, e.g., Monterey-type, Midway Sunset, Honda crudes, and others.

Premuzic, E.T.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Standard for metal/nonmetal mining and metal mineral processing facilities. 2004 ed.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This standard addresses the protection of diesel-powered equipment and the storage and handling of flammable and combustible liquids at these specialized sites. The 2004 edition consolidates requirements from NFPA 122 and 121 : Standard on Fire Protection for Self-Propelled and Mobile Surface Mining Equipment. Major changes include a new chapter on fire protection of surface metal mineral processing plants. The Standard is also revised to emphasize the use of a fire risk assessment when determining fire protection criteria. Chapter headings are: Administration; Referenced publications; Definitions; General; Fire risk assessment and risk reduction; Fire detection and suppression equipment; Fire protection for diesel-powered equipment in underground mines; Transfer of flammable or combustible liquids in underground mines; Flammable liquid storage in underground mines; Combustible liquid storage in underground mines; Fire suppression for flammable or combustible liquid storage areas in underground mines; Fire protection of surface mobile and self-propelled equipment; and Fire protection of surface metal mineral processing plants. 3 annexes.

NONE

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Biodiesel production from Stauntonia chinensis seed oil (waste from food processing): Heterogeneous catalysis by modified calcite, biodiesel purification, and fuel properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the present research, the potential of Stauntonia chinensis (SC) seed oil obtained from processing waste was investigated for the first time as biodiesel feedstock, including physicochemical properties of the oil, the heterogeneous catalysis process, purification, and fuel properties. A 29.37 ± 0.64 wt.% of oil content and 2.41 mg KOH/g of acid value was found. Under the optimised reaction conditions in the presence of modified calcite, an 88.02% of yield and a 98.90 wt.% of FAME content were achieved. According to EN 14124 (2012), SC biodiesel exhibited superior fuel properties compared to the most of other feedstock oils since it had an ideal fatty acid composition (low Cn:0 (8.06 wt.%), high Cn:1 (80.16 wt.%), and low Cn:2,3 (8.45 wt.%)). It was absolutely vital that the use of SC seed oil as a biodiesel feedstock would not compete with its use in food. In summary, SC seed oil should be recommended as a promising feedstock for biodiesel.

Rui Wang; Lili Sun; Xiaolin Xie; Lizhi Ma; Zhigang Liu; Xiaoyan Liu; Ning Ji; Guofang Xie

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Process centrifuge operating problems and equipment failures in canyon reprocessing facilities at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) maintains a compilation of operating problems and equipment failures that have occurred in the fuel reprocessing areas of the Savannah River Site (SRS). At present, the data bank contains more than 230,000 entries ranging from minor equipment malfunctions to incidents with the potential for injury or contamination of personnel, or for economic loss. The data bank has been used extensively for a wide variety of purposes, such as failure analyses, trend analyses, and preparation of safety analyses. Typical of the data are problems associated with the canyon process centrifuges. This report contains a compilation of the centrifuge operating problems and equipment failures primarily as an aid to organizations with related equipment. Publication of these data was prompted by a number of requests for this information by other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. 11 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Durant, W.S.; Baughman, D.F.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Receiving and Processing Facility Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility Waste Treatment Plant Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility Email Email Page | Print Print...

329

Application of High-Temperature Simulated Distillation to the Residuum Oil Supercritical Extraction Process in Petroleum Refining  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......fractions from the residual oil supercritical...JOURNAL ARTICLE The gas chromatographic method...presented for refinery residual feed, deasphalted...fractions from the residual oil supercritical...fuels, gasoline, turbine (jet) fuels, diesel...high-value deasphalted gas oil (DAO) from......

Joe C. Raia; Dan C. Villalanti; Murugesan Subramanian; Bruce Williams

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Oil shale mining processing, uses, and environmental impacts. (Latest citations from the EI compendex*plus database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning oil shale mining and retorting, uses, and related environmental aspects. References discuss pyrolyzed, gasified, and combusted oil shales. Product yields and oil quality, socioeconomic impacts, exploration, reclamation of mined lands, and waste disposal are covered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

HANFORD CONTAINERIZED CAST STONE FACILITY TASK 1 PROCESS TESTING & DEVELOPMENT FINAL TEST REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory testing and technical evaluation activities on Containerized Cast Stone (CCS) were conducted under the Scope of Work (SOW) contained in CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) Contract No. 18548 (CHG 2003a). This report presents the results of testing and demonstration activities discussed in SOW Section 3.1, Task I--''Process Development Testing'', and described in greater detail in the ''Containerized Grout--Phase I Testing and Demonstration Plan'' (CHG, 2003b). CHG (2003b) divided the CCS testing and evaluation activities into six categories, as follows: (1) A short set of tests with simulant to select a preferred dry reagent formulation (DRF), determine allowable liquid addition levels, and confirm the Part 2 test matrix. (2) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF and a backup DRF, as selected in Part I, and using low activity waste (LAW) simulant. (3) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF using radioactive LAW. (4) Waste form validation testing on a selected nominal cast stone formulation using the preferred DRF and LAW simulant. (5) Engineering evaluations of explosive/toxic gas evolution, including hydrogen, from the cast stone product. (6) Technetium ''getter'' testing with cast stone made with LAW simulant and with radioactive LAW. In addition, nitrate leaching observations were drawn from nitrate leachability data obtained in the course of the Parts 2 and 3 waste form performance testing. The nitrate leachability index results are presented along with other data from the applicable activity categories.

LOCKREM, L L

2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

332

Nineteenth oil shale symposium proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book contains 23 selections. Some of the titles are: Effects of maturation on hydrocarbon recoveries from Canadian oil shale deposits; Dust and pressure generated during commercial oil shale mine blasting: Part II; The petrosix project in Brazil - An update; Pathway of some trace elements during fluidized-bed combustion of Israeli Oil Shale; and Decommissioning of the U.S. Department of Energy Anvil Points Oil Shale Research Facility.

Gary, J.H.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

HEAVY OIL PROCESS MONITOR: AUTOMATED ON-COLUMN ASPHALTENE PRECIPITATION AND RE-DISSOLUTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About 37-50% (w/w) of the heptane asphaltenes from unpyrolyzed residua dissolve in cyclohexane. As pyrolysis progresses, this number decrease to below 15% as coke and toluene insoluble pre-coke materials appear. This solubility measurement can be used after coke begins to form, unlike the flocculation titration, which cannot be applied to multi-phase systems. Currently, the procedure for the isolation of heptane asphaltenes and the determination of the amount of asphaltenes soluble in cyclohexane spans three days. A more rapid method to measure asphaltene solubility was explored using a novel on-column asphaltene precipitation and re-dissolution technique. This was automated using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) equipment with a step gradient sequence using the solvents: heptane, cyclohexane, toluene:methanol (98:2). Results for four series of original and pyrolyzed residua were compared with data from the gravimetric method. The measurement time was reduced from three days to forty minutes. The separation was expanded further with the use of four solvents: heptane, cyclohexane, toluene, and cyclohexanone or methylene chloride. This provides a fourth peak which represents the most polar components, in the oil.

John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani Jr; Mark Sanderson

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Used oil re-refining: Cote d`ivoire. Final report. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of work for this project was divided into two major phases of work, the Feasibility Study (FS) and the Process Design Specification (PDS). The Feasibility Study performed by Matrix Engineering, Inc. (Matrix) reviewed three solvent extraction processes, plus fractionation and adsorbent filtration, as suitable technologies for use in a used oil re-refining facility for Cote d`Ivoire.

NONE

1995-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

335

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CA 94720 ABSTRACT in the boiler used to make process steam.water, gas condensate, and boiler blowdown. A summary of thewater, gas condensate, and boiler blowd01m. Retort water and

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in a light oil shallow shelf carbonate reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of cyclic CO{sub 2}, often referred to as the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process, may find its niche in the maturing waterfloods of the Permian Basin. Coupling the CO{sub 2} H-n-P process to miscible flooding applications could provide the needed revenue to sufficiently mitigate near-term negative cash flow concerns in the capital intensive miscible projects. Texaco Exploration and Production Inc. and the US Department of Energy have teamed up in an attempt to develop the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in the Grayburg and San Andres formations, a light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoir that exists throughout the Permian Basin. This cost-shared effort is intended to demonstrate the viability of this underutilized technology in a specific class of domestic reservoir. The selected site for this demonstration project is the Central Vacuum Unit waterflood in Lea County, New Mexico. The goals of the project are the development of guidelines for cost-effective selection of candidate reservoirs and wells, along with estimating recovery potential. This project has two defined budget periods. The first budget period primarily involves tasks associated with reservoir analysis and characterization, characterizing existing producibility problems, and reservoir simulation of the proposed technology. The final budget period covers the actual field demonstration of the proposed technology. Technology transfer spans the entire course of the project. This report covers the concluding tasks performed under the second budget period.

NONE

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ABANDONED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recovery Vent gas '\\Raw shale oil Recycled gas compressorThis process produces shale oil, a low BTU gas, and char,Oil Shale Process" in Oil Shale and Tar Sands, J. W. Smith

Persoff, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Optimal Control of Vapor Extraction of Heavy Oil.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Vapor extraction (Vapex) process is an emerging technology for viscous oil recovery that has gained much attention in the oil industry. However, the oil production… (more)

Muhamad, Hameed (Author)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

International Facility Management Association Strategic Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Facility Management Association Facility Management Association Strategic Facility Planning: A WhIte PAPer Strategic Facility Planning: A White Paper on Strategic Facility Planning © 2009 | International Facility Management Association For additional information, contact: 1 e. Greenway Plaza, Suite 1100 houston, tX 77046-0104 USA P: + 1-713-623-4362 F: + 1-713-623-6124 www.ifma.org taBle OF cOntentS PreFace ......................................................... 2 executive Summary .................................... 3 Overview ....................................................... 4 DeFinitiOn OF Strategic Facility Planning within the Overall cOntext OF Facility Planning ................. 5 SPecializeD analySeS ................................ 9 OrganizatiOnal aPPrOacheS tO SFP ... 10 the SFP PrOceSS .......................................

340

Study of degumming process and evaluation of oxidative stability of methyl and ethyl biodiesel of Jatropha curcas L. oil from three different Brazilian states  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work describes the production of biodiesel from Jatropha curcas oil. The kernel samples provided by Embrapa-PI, were first crushed in a blender and then subjected to extraction with hexane. The oil yield was between 54.71 ± 0.47 and 64.16 ± 2.88%. The J. curcas oil was then submitted to two different kinds of degumming, first with water and second with H3PO4 to evaluate the influence of these processes in the yield of the transesterification reaction. Methyl and ethyl biodiesel prepared from the degummed oil with H3PO4 had higher conversions than those prepared with the degummed with water. Therefore, among the processes of degumming studied, H3PO4 was more suitable for the treatment of J. curcas oil. The study shows the results about oxidation stability were good, because the biodiesels methyl and ethyl biodiesel have induction period at 13.51 h and 13.03 h without antioxidant addition when submitted a Rancimat text. Such biodiesels had their physicochemical parameters defined under the specifications of ANP Resolutions n° 14/2012 (ANP- National Agency of Petroleum, Natural Gas and Biofuels from Brazil). The results showed that J. curcas cultivation in Brazil is an adequate source for biodiesel production, considering the technical standards available.

Francisca Diana da Silva Araújo; Iranildo C. Araújo; Isabella Cristhina G. Costa; Carla Verônica Rodarte de Moura; Mariana H. Chaves; Eugênio Celso E. Araújo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil processing facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Synthesis of biodiesel from vegetable oils wastewater sludge by in-situ subcritical methanol transesterification: Process evaluation and optimization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biodiesel are gaining increased public and scientific attention as an alternative to petroleum diesel fuel, driven by factors such as oil price spikes, energy security and environmental concerns. In this study, low grade wastewater sludge originated from wastewater treatment unit of vegetable oil factory as a viable alternative lipid source for biodiesel production was evaluated. The lipid mass fraction of the dry and ash-free sludge was 12.44 ± 0.87%, which mainly comprised of C16–C18 fatty acids. The in-situ transesterification process under subcritical water and methanol conditions was applied as a green pathway to convert lipids into fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). The reaction parameters investigated were temperatures (155–215 °C), pressures (5.5–6.5 MPa) and methanol to lipid mass ratios (1:1, 5:1 and 9:1). The highest FAME yield of 92.67 ± 3.23% was obtained at 215 °C, 6.5 MPa and methanol to lipid mass ratio of 5:1. Statistical analysis based on response surface methodology in 3-factor-3-level central composite designed experiments and analysis of variance were applied to examine the relation between input parameters and the response and to locate the optimum condition. Results showed that 98% of the variability in the response could be adequately explained by the second-order polynomial model. The optimum FAME yield (90.37%) was obtained at 215 °C, 6.5 MPa and methanol to lipid mass ratio of 5.12:1. Experimental validation (N = 3) demonstrated satisfactory agreement between the observed and predicted values with an error of at most 3.3%.

Farrel Gunawan; Alfin Kurniawan; Iwan Gunawan; Yi-Hsu Ju; Aning Ayucitra; Felycia E. Soetaredjo; Suryadi Ismadji

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

POLYVINYLCHLORIDE WASTE WITH OIL SHALE ASH TO CAPTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alkaline oil shale ash. Solid heat carrier (Galoter process)-type oil shale retorting units, where the

V. Oja; A. Elenurm; I. Rohtla; E. Tearo; E. Tali

343

Dismantling of Highly Contaminated Process Installations of the German Reprocessing Facility (WAK) - Status of New Remote Handling Technology - 13287  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decommissioning and dismantling of the former German Pilot Reprocessing Plant Karlsruhe (WAK) including the Vitrification Facility (VEK) is being executed in different Project steps related to the reprocessing, HLLW storage and vitrification complexes /1/. While inside the reprocessing building the total inventory of process equipment has already been dismantled and disposed of, the HLLW storage and vitrification complex has been placed out of operation since vitrification and tank rinsing procedures where finalized in year 2010. This paper describes the progress made in dismantling of the shielded boxes of the highly contaminated laboratory as a precondition to get access to the hot cells of the HLLW storage. The major challenges of the dismantling of this laboratory were the high dose rates up to 700 mSv/h and the locking technology for the removal of the hot cell installations. In parallel extensive prototype testing of different carrier systems and power manipulators to be applied to dismantle the HLLW-tanks and other hot cell equipment is ongoing. First experiences with the new manipulator carrier system and a new master slave manipulator with force reflection will be reported. (authors)

Dux, Joachim; Friedrich, Daniel; Lutz, Werner; Ripholz, Martina [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O. Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)] [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O. Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Balancing oil and environment... responsibly.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Balancing Oil and Environment…Responsibly As the price of oil continues to skyrocket and global oil production nears the brink, pursuing unconventional oil supplies, such as oil shale, oil sands, heavy oils, and oils from biomass and coal has become increasingly attractive. Of particular significance to the American way is that our continent has significant quantities of these resources. Tapping into these new resources, however, requires cutting-edge technologies for identification, production, processing and environmental management. This job needs a super hero or two for a job of this size and proportion…

Weimer, Walter C.; Teske, Lisa

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

345

Type B Accident Investigation of the April 8, 2003, Electrical Arc Blast at the Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation TRU Waste Processing Facility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

At approximately 0330 hours on April 8, 2003, a phase-to-phase arc blast occurred in the boiler electrical control panel at the Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation (FWENC) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Processing Facility. The boiler was providing steam for the evaporator and was reportedly operating at about 10% of its capacity.

346

The project RTPPP (Development of a realtime PPP processing facility) is planned to be a followup project of RAPPP (Innovative Algorithms for Rapid Precise Point Positioning),  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RTPPP The project RTPPP (Development of a realtime PPP processing facility) is planned to be a followup project of RAPPP (Innovative Algorithms for Rapid Precise Point Positioning), which has RAPPP, the proposed project RTPPP concentrates on the possibilities of the PPP technique within a real

Schuh, Harald

347

AN APPLICATION OF THE SSHAC LEVEL 3 PROCESS TO THE PROBABILISTIC SEISMIC HAZARD ANALYSIS FOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES AT THE HANFORD SITE, EASTERN WASHINGTON, USA  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

An Application of the SSHAC Level 3 Process to the Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis for Nuclear Facilities at the Hanford Site, Eastern Washington, USA Kevin J. Coppersmith Coppersmith Consulting, Inc. Julian J. Bommer Consultant Robert W. Bryce Pacific Northwest National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting October 21-22, 2014 Germantown, MD

348

A CT scan aided core-flood study of the leak-off process in oil-based drilling fluids :.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An experimental study on the leak-off of oil based drilling fluid sandstone cores is reported. First we revised the theoretical models for the rheology of… (more)

Van Overveldt, A.S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Process Simulation and Evaluation of Alternative Solvents for Jatropha Curcas L. Seed Oil Extraction in Biodiesel Production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Jatropha curcas L. is a drought-resistant plant which can be grown in poor soil and marginal lands. The use of Jatropha seed oil to produce… (more)

Chiou, Ming-Hao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

PAPER STUDY EVALUATIONS OF THE INTRODUCTION OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE WASTE STREAMS TO THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this paper study is to provide guidance on the impact of Monosodium Titanate (MST) and Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) streams from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet and glass waste form. A series of waste processing scenarios was evaluated, including projected compositions of Sludge Batches 8 through 17 (SB8 through SB17), MST additions, CST additions to Tank 40 or to a sludge batch preparation tank (Tank 42 or Tank 51, referred to generically as Tank 51 in this report), streams from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), and two canister production rates. A wide array of potential glass frit compositions was used to support this assessment. The sludge and frit combinations were evaluated using the predictive models in the current DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS). The results were evaluated based on the number of frit compositions available for a particular sludge composition scenario. A large number of candidate frit compositions (e.g., several dozen to several hundred) is typically a good indicator of a sludge composition for which there is flexibility in forming an acceptable waste glass and meeting canister production rate commitments. The MST and CST streams will significantly increase the concentrations of certain components in glass, such as Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, TiO{sub 2}, and ZrO{sub 2}, to levels much higher than have been previously processed at DWPF. Therefore, several important assumptions, described in detail in the report, had to be made in performing the evaluations. The results of the paper studies, which must be applied carefully given the assumptions made concerning the impact of higher Ti, Zr, and Nb concentrations on model validity, provided several observations: (1) There was difficulty in identifying a reasonable number of candidate frits (and in some cases an inability to identify any candidate frits) when a waste loading of 40% is targeted for Sludge Batches 8, 16, and 17, regardless of the addition of SCIX or SWPF streams. This indicates that the blending strategy for these sludge batches should be reevaluated by Savannah River Remediation (SRR). (2) In general, candidate frits were available to accommodate CST additions to either Tank 40 or Tank 51. A larger number of candidate frits were typically available for the sludge batches when CST is added to Tank 51 rather than Tank 40, meaning that more compositional flexibility would be available for frit selection and DWPF operation. Note however that for SB8 and SB17, no candidate frits were available to accommodate CST going to Tank 40 with and without SWPF streams. The addition of SWPF streams generally improves the number of candidate frits available for processing of a given sludge batch. (3) The change in production rate from 40 Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) batches per year (i.e., the current production rate) to 75 SRAT batches per year, without SWPF streams included, had varied results in terms of the number of candidate frits available for processing of a given sludge batch. Therefore, this variable is not of much concern in terms of incorporating the SCIX streams. Note that the evaluation at 75 SRAT batches per year (approximately equivalent to 325 canisters per year) is more conservative in terms of the impact of SCIX streams as compared to a production rate of 400 canisters per year. Overall, the outcome of this paper study shows no major issues with the ability to identify an acceptable glass processing window when CST from the SCIX process is transferred to either Tank 40 or Tank 51. The assumptions used and the model limitations identified in this report must be addressed through further experimental studies, which are currently being performed. As changes occur to the planned additions of MST and CST, or to the sludge batch preparation strategy, additional evaluations will be performed to determine the potential impacts. As stated above, the issues with Sludge Batches 8, 16, and 17 should be further evaluated by SRR. A

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.; Stone, M.; Koopman, D.

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

351

POC-SCALE TESTING OF OIL AGGLOMERATION TECHNIQUES AND EQUIPMENT FOR FINE COAL PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the technical progress achieved from July 01, 1997 to September 30, 1997 on the POC-Scale Testing Agglomeration Techniques and Equipment for Fine Coal Processing project. Experimental procedures and test data for recovery of fine coal from coal fines streams generated at a commercial coal preparation plant are described. Two coal fines streams, namely Sieve Bend Effluent and Cyclone Overflow were investigated. The test results showed that ash was reduced by more than 50% at combustible matter recovery levels exceeding 95%.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Characteristics of process oils from HTI coal/plastics co-liquefaction runs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to provide timely analytical support to DOE`s liquefaction development effort. Specific objectives of the work reported here are: (1) to determine the fate of the plastics feedstocks, relative to coal-only operation; (2) to determine the conversion of the feedstocks; (3) to determine the product streams to which the feedstocks are converted (bottoms vs. distillate); (4) to determine interactions of feedstocks; (5) to determine how use of plastics feedstocks affect product quality; and (6) to determine to what degree property differences reflect feedstock differences vs. other (process) condition changes, such as unit operations, space velocity, and catalyst age.

Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

353

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of eastern oil shales. Volume 2, Task 3, Testing of process improvement concepts: Final report, September 1987--May 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report, Volume 2, on ``Process Improvement Concepts`` presents the results of work conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the Ohio State University (OSU) to develop three novel approaches for desulfurization that have shown good potential with coal and could be cost-effective for oil shales. These are (1) In-Bed Sulfur Capture using different sorbents (IGT), (2) Electrostatic Desulfurization (IIT), and (3) Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification (OSU and IGT). Results of work on electroseparation of shale oil and fines conducted by IIT is included in this report, as well as work conducted by IGT to evaluate the restricted pipe discharge system. The work was conducted as part of the overall program on ``Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting of Eastern Oil Shales.``

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Fracture mechanics investigation of oil shale to aid in understanding the explosive fragmentation process. Final technical report, January 1983-July 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes goals and findings achieved in developing technologies to improve the overall efficiency of oil shale recovery processes. The objectives are to (a) develop theoretical fracture mechanics tools that are applicable to transversely isotropic materials such as sedimentary rock, more particularly oil shale; and (b) develop a fracture mechanics test procedure that can be conveniently used for rock specimens. Such a test procedure would: utilize the geometry of a typical rock core for the test; require a minimum amount of specimen machining; and provide meaningful, reproducible data that corresponds well to test data obtained from conventional fracture mechanics tests. Critical review of the state-of-the-art of fracture mechanics on layered rocks has been completed. Recommendations are made for innovative and promising methods for oil shale fracture mechanics. Numerical and analytical studies of mixed mode fracture mechanics are investigated. Transversely isotropic properties of oil shale are input using isoparametric finite elements with singular elements at the crack tip. The model is a plate with an edge crack whose angle with the edge varies to study the effect of mixed mode fracture under various conditions. The three-dimensional plate is in tension, and stress, energy methods are used in the fracture analysis. Precracked disks of oil shale cored perpendicular to bedding planes are analyzed numerically. Stress intensity factors are determined by (i) strain energy method, and (ii) elliptic simulation method. 47 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Chong, K.P.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

AMF ARM Mobile FAcility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AMF ARM Mobile FAcility Details on the AMF proposal process can be found at http:www.arm.govacrfsubmitproposals.stm. For more information, contact: Mark Miller Mary Jane...

356

NSA Barrow Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Barrow Facility Barrow Facility NSA Related Links Facilities and Instruments Barrow Atqasuk ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts NSA Barrow Facility Location: 71° 19' 23.73" N, 156° 36' 56.70" W Altitude: 8 meters The Barrow facility was dedicated in July 1997 and chosen because the Arctic is particularly sensitive to climate changes. Barrow is located at the northernmost point in the United States, 330 miles north of the Arctic Circle. Also known as the Top of the World, Barrow is Alaska's largest Eskimo village (home to 4,581 people). Tax revenue from the Slope's oil fields pay for services borough wide, and natural gas is used to heat homes and generate electricity in Barrow. Many residents, however, maintain

357

ARM - NSA Barrow Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Barrow Facility Barrow Facility NSA Related Links Facilities and Instruments Barrow Atqasuk ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts NSA Barrow Facility Location: 71° 19' 23.73" N, 156° 36' 56.70" W Altitude: 8 meters The Barrow facility was dedicated in July 1997 and chosen because the Arctic is particularly sensitive to climate changes. Barrow is located at the northernmost point in the United States, 330 miles north of the Arctic Circle. Also known as the Top of the World, Barrow is Alaska's largest Eskimo village (home to 4,581 people). Tax revenue from the Slope's oil fields pay for services borough wide, and natural gas is used to heat homes and generate electricity in Barrow. Many residents, however, maintain

358

Framework and systematic functional criteria for integrated work processes in complex assets: a case study on integrated planning in offshore oil and gas production industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Improving the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of the oil and gas (O&G) production process is considered as a critical timely need. The core work processes in particular are targeted for considerable improvements. In this context, development related to integrated planning (IP) is seen as one of the major bases for developing collaborative work processes connecting offshore production and onshore support system. With feasible benefits, for instance, relating to reduction of non-working time, less work repetition, reduction of reduction in production losses, better resource utilisation, etc., a systematic and a complete IP system is today seen as an attractive solution for integrating complex operations and to work smarter. This paper, based on a case study from North Sea oil and gas production environment, describes the systematic functional criteria required as the basis for developing a fully functional IP system.

Yu Bai; Jayantha P. Liyanage

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Oil spill response resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from Marathon Oil Company for their encouragement and support. Last, but not least, I would like to thank Lynette Schlandt for her help during my stay at this University. vu TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT. . . . . nl DEDICATION... tool for control. The State of Texas passed and implemented OSPRA (Oil Spill Prevention and Response Act) of 1991. The most significant requirement for both these laws was the need for a Facility Response Plan for the companies. This would help a...

Muthukrishnan, Shankar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

360

Manufacture of refrigeration oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lubricating oils suitable for use in refrigeration equipment in admixture with fluorinated hydrocarbon refrigerants are produced by solvent extraction of naphthenic lubricating oil base stocks, cooling the resulting extract mixture, optionally with the addition of a solvent modifier, to form a secondary raffinate and a secondary extract, and recovering a dewaxed oil fraction of lowered pour point from the secondary raffinate as a refrigeration oil product. The process of the invention obviates the need for a separate dewaxing operation, such as dewaxing with urea, as conventionally employed for the production of refrigeration oils.

Chesluk, R.P.; Platte, H.J.; Sequeira, A.J.

1981-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil processing facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Perform research in process development for hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales: Volume 2, Expansion of the Moving-Bed Hydroretorting Data Base for Eastern oil shales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive data base was developed for six Eastern oil shales: Alabama Chattanooga, Indiana New Albany, Kentucky Sunbury, Michigan Antrim, Ohio Cleveland, and Tennessee Chattanooga shales. The data base included the hydroretorting characteristics of the six shales, as well as the retorting characteristics in the presence of synthesis gas and ionized gas. Shale gasification was also successfully demonstrated. Shale fines (20%) can produce enough hydrogen for the hydroretorting of the remaining 80% of the shale. The amount of fines tolerable in a moving bed was also determined. 16 refs., 59 figs., 43 tabs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seyitömer, Himmeto?lu and Hat?lda? oil shale deposits. The results demonstrate that these oil shales are

Fields (in-situ Combustion Approach; M. V. Kök; G. Guner; S. Bagci?

363

CO{sub 2} huff-n-puff process in a light oil shallow carbonate reservoir. Annual report, January 1, 1996--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of cyclic CO{sub 2}, often referred to as the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process, may find its niche in the maturing waterfloods of the Permian Basin. Coupling the CO{sub 2} H-n-P process to miscible flooding applications could provide the needed revenue to sufficiently mitigate near-term negative cash flow concerns in the capital intensive miscible projects. Texaco Exploration & Production Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy have teamed up in an attempt to develop the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in the Grayburg and San Andres formations; a light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoir that exists throughout the Permian Basin. A significant amount of oil reserves are located in carbonate reservoirs. Specifically, the carbonates deposited in shallow shelf (SSC) environments make up the largest percentage of known reservoirs within the Permian Basin of North America. Many of these known resources have been under waterflooding operations for decades and are at risk of abandonment if crude oil recoveries cannot be economically enhanced. The selected site for this demonstration project is the Central Vacuum Unit waterflood in Lea County, New Mexico. Miscible CO{sub 2} flooding is the process of choice for enhancing recovery of light oils and already accounts for over 12% of the Permian Basin`s daily production. There are significant probable reserves associated with future miscible CO{sub 2} projects. However, many are marginally economic at current market conditions due to large up-front capital commitments for a peak response which may be several years in the future. The resulting negative cash-flow is sometimes too much for an operator to absorb. The CO{sub 2} H-n-P process is being investigated as a near-term option to mitigate the negative cash-flow situation--allowing acceleration of inventoried miscible CO{sub 2} projects when coupled together.

Prieditis, J.; Wehner, S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waters from Green River Oil Shale," Chem. and Ind. , 1. ,Effluents from In-Situ oil Shale Processing," in Proceedingsin the Treatment of Oil Shale Retort Waters," in Proceedings

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Deep Placement Gel Bank as an Improved Oil Recovery Process: Modeling, Economic Analysis and Comparison to Polymer Flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have conducted relevant literature review about the development, design, modeling and economics of the enhanced oil recovery methods. Schlumberger's Eclipse simulator software has been used for modeling purposes. Modeling runs have demonstrated...

Seyidov, Murad

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

366

CO2 Huff-n-Puff process in a light oil shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. Annual report, January 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of cyclic CO{sub 2}, often referred to as the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process, may find its niche in the maturing waterfloods of the Permian Basin. Coupling the CO{sub 2} H-n-P process to miscible flooding applications could provide the needed revenue to sufficiently mitigate near-term negative cash flow concerns in the capital intensive miscible projects. Texaco Exploration & Production Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy have teamed up in an attempt to develop the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in the Grayburg/San Andres formation; a light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoir within the Permian Basin. This cost-shared effort is intended to demonstrate the viability of this underutilized technology in a specific class of domestic reservoir. A significant amount of oil reserves are located in carbonate reservoirs. Specifically, the carbonates deposited in shallow shelf (SSC) environments make up the largest percentage of known reservoirs within the Permian Basin of North America. Many of these known resources have been under waterflooding operations for decades and are at risk of abandonment if crude oil recoveries cannot be economically enhanced. The selected site for this demonstration project is the Central Vacuum Unit waterflood in Lea County, New Mexico.

Wehner, S.C.; Boomer, R.J.; Cole, R.; Preiditus, J.; Vogt, J.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Two-stage coal liquefaction process materials from the Wilsonville Facility operated in the nonintegrated and integrated modes: chemical analyses and biological testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports the results from chemical analyses and biological testing of process materials sampled during operation of the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility (Wilsonville, Alabama) in both the noncoupled or nonintegrated (NTSL Run 241) and coupled or integrated (ITSL Run 242) two-stage liquefaction operating modes. Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity assays were conducted in conjunction with chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses to provide detailed, comparative chemical and biological assessments of several NTSL and ITSL process materials. In general, the NTSL process materials were biologically more active and chemically more refractory than analogous ITSL process materials. To provide perspective, the NTSL and ITSL results are compared with those from similar testing and analyses of other direct coal liquefaction materials from the solvent refined coal (SRC) I, SRC II and EDS processes. Comparisons are also made between two-stage coal liquefaction materials from the Wilsonville pilot plant and the C.E. Lummus PDU-ITSL Facility in an effort to assess scale-up effects in these two similar processes. 36 references, 26 figures, 37 tables.

Later, D.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Virent is Replacing Crude Oil  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 2A—Conversion Technologies II: Bio-Oils, Sugar Intermediates, Precursors, Distributed Models, and Refinery Co-Processing Virent is Replacing Crude Oil Randy Cortright, Founder & Chief Technology Officer, Virent

369

PRODUCTION FACILITY SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN Operator Name, Address, Phone, Contact Facility Name, Address, Phone, Contact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources 8 Department of Fish and Game (OSPR) 800-852-7550 or 800-OILS-911 9 provide resources and liaison fuctions during oil spills. Page 3 of 9 #12;PRODUCTION FACILITY SPILL the Location and Labeling of: 1 Permanent Tanks 7 Tank & Storage Container Volumes with Contents Storedg 2

370

Oil shale technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale is undoubtedly an excellent energy source that has great abundance and world-wide distribution. Oil shale industries have seen ups and downs over more than 100 years, depending on the availability and price of conventional petroleum crudes. Market forces as well as environmental factors will greatly affect the interest in development of oil shale. Besides competing with conventional crude oil and natural gas, shale oil will have to compete favorably with coal-derived fuels for similar markets. Crude shale oil is obtained from oil shale by a relatively simple process called retorting. However, the process economics are greatly affected by the thermal efficiencies, the richness of shale, the mass transfer effectiveness, the conversion efficiency, the design of retort, the environmental post-treatment, etc. A great many process ideas and patents related to the oil shale pyrolysis have been developed; however, relatively few field and engineering data have been published. Due to the vast heterogeneity of oil shale and to the complexities of physicochemical process mechanisms, scientific or technological generalization of oil shale retorting is difficult to achieve. Dwindling supplied of worldwide petroleum reserves, as well as the unprecedented appetite of mankind for clean liquid fuel, has made the public concern for future energy market grow rapidly. the clean coal technology and the alternate fuel technology are currently of great significance not only to policy makers, but also to process and chemical researchers. In this book, efforts have been made to make a comprehensive text for the science and technology of oil shale utilization. Therefore, subjects dealing with the terminological definitions, geology and petrology, chemistry, characterization, process engineering, mathematical modeling, chemical reaction engineering, experimental methods, and statistical experimental design, etc. are covered in detail.

Lee, S. (Akron Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

LANSCE | Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Isotope Production Facility (IPF) Lujan Neutron Scattering Center Materials Test Station (MTS) Proton Radiography (pRad) Ultracold Neutrons (UCN) Weapons Neutron Research Facility...

372

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix C: Scoping Summary Report for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities - Environmental Impact Statement Scoping Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX C: SCOPING SUMMARY REPORT FOR DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE CONVERSION FACILITIES ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT SCOPING PROCESS Scoping Summary Report C-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Scoping Summary Report C-3 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX C This appendix contains the summary report prepared after the initial public scoping period for the depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facilities environmental impact statement (EIS) project. The scoping period for the EIS began with the September 18, 2001, publication of a Notice of Intent (NOI) in the Federal Register (66 FR 23213) and was extended to January 11, 2002. The report summarizes the different types of public involvement opportunities provided and the content of the comments received.

373

Oil Pollution Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pollution Act Pollution Act Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Oil Pollution Act Year 1990 Url OPA.jpg Description The Oil Pollution Act (OPA) of 1990 streamlined and strengthened EPA's ability to prevent and respond to catastrophic oil spills. References OPA[1] Federal Oil and Gas[2] The Oil Pollution Act (OPA) of 1990 streamlined and strengthened EPA's ability to prevent and respond to catastrophic oil spills. A trust fund financed by a tax on oil is available to clean up spills when the responsible party is incapable or unwilling to do so. The OPA requires oil storage facilities and vessels to submit to the federal government response plans detailing how they will respond to large discharges. EPA has published regulations for aboveground storage facilities; the Coast Guard

374

A geochemical assessment of petroleum from underground oil storage caverns in relation to petroleum from natural reservoirs offshore Norway.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The aim of this study is to compare oils from known biodegraded fields offshore Norway to waxes and oils from an artificial cavern storage facility,… (more)

Østensen, Marie

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

„Peak Oil“  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wissenschaftliche Voraussagen deuten auf „Peak Oil“, das Maximum globaler Erdölförderung, in unserer ... der demokratischen Systeme führen. Psychoanalytische Betrachtung darf „Peak Oil“ für die Zivilisation als e...

Dr. Manuel Haus; Dr. med. Christoph Biermann

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

An Integrated Approach to Evaluating the Technical and Commercial Options for Cogeneration Facilities in the Process Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, economic and financial considerations, as well as to the determination of the appropriate degree of thermal integration of the power and process subsystems. An overview of steam and gas turbine cycle options for process/power integration typical...

Cooke, D. H.; McCue, R. H.

377

Crude Oil Analysis Database  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The composition and physical properties of crude oil vary widely from one reservoir to another within an oil field, as well as from one field or region to another. Although all oils consist of hydrocarbons and their derivatives, the proportions of various types of compounds differ greatly. This makes some oils more suitable than others for specific refining processes and uses. To take advantage of this diversity, one needs access to information in a large database of crude oil analyses. The Crude Oil Analysis Database (COADB) currently satisfies this need by offering 9,056 crude oil analyses. Of these, 8,500 are United States domestic oils. The database contains results of analysis of the general properties and chemical composition, as well as the field, formation, and geographic location of the crude oil sample. [Taken from the Introduction to COAMDATA_DESC.pdf, part of the zipped software and database file at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain PDF documents and a large Excel spreadsheet. It will also contain the database in Microsoft Access 2002.

Shay, Johanna Y.

378

UK FT PDU Facility Draft EA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Process Development Unit Facility February 2014 The facility is sized as a small-scale pilot CBTL plant that would produce research quantities of FT liquid fuels at...

379

Energy Performance Contracting in State Facilities | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Contracting in State Facilities Energy Performance Contracting in State Facilities Provides a brief overview of the performance contracting process, the benefits of using...

380

Oil shale: Technology status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the status of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Oil Shale Program as of the end of FY 86. The report consists of (1) a status of oil shale development, (2) a description of the DOE Oil Shale Program, (3) an FY 86 oil shale research summary, and (4) a summary of FY 86 accomplishments. Discoveries were made in FY 86 about the physical and chemical properties and behavior of oil shales, process chemistry and kinetics, in situ retorting, advanced processes, and the environmental behavior and fate of wastes. The DOE Oil Shale Program shows an increasing emphasis on eastern US oil shales and in the development of advanced oil shale processing concepts. With the award to Foster Wheeler for the design of oil shale conceptual plants, the first step in the development of a systems analysis capability for the complete oil shale process has been taken. Unocal's Parachute Creek project, the only commercial oil shale plant operating in the United States, is operating at about 4000 bbl/day. The shale oil is upgraded at Parachute Creek for input to a conventional refinery. 67 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil processing facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Rheology Of MonoSodium Titanate (MST) And Modified Mst (mMST) Mixtures Relevant To The Salt Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory performed measurements of the rheology of suspensions and settled layers of treated material applicable to the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility. Suspended solids mixtures included monosodium titanate (MST) or modified MST (mMST) at various solid concentrations and soluble ion concentrations with and without the inclusion of kaolin clay or simulated sludge. Layers of settled solids were MST/sludge or mMST/sludge mixtures, either with or without sorbed strontium, over a range of initial solids concentrations, soluble ion concentrations, and settling times.

Koopman, D. C.; Martino, C. J.; Shehee, T. C.; Poirier, M. R.

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Unconventional oil market assessment: ex situ oil shale.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis focused on exploring the economic limitations for the development of western oil shale. The analysis was developed by scaling a known process and… (more)

Castro-Dominguez, Bernardo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in a light oil shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. Topical report No. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principle objective of the Central Vacuum Unit (CVU) CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff (H-n-P) project is to determine the feasibility and practicality of the technology in a waterflooded shallow shelf carbonate environment. The results of parametric simulation of the CO{sub 2} H-n-P process coupled with the CVU reservoir characterization components will determine if this process is technically and economic for field implementation. The ultimate goal will be to develop guidelines based on commonly available data that other operators in the industry can use to investigate the applicability of the process within other field. The technology transfer objective of the project is to disseminate the knowledge gained through an innovative plan in support of the Department of Energy`s objective to increasing domestic oil production and deferring the abandonment of shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. Accomplishments to date are described in this report.

Cole, R.; Prieditis, J.; Vogt, J.; Wehner, S.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Reducing Plug and Process Loads for a Large Scale, Low Energy Office Building: NREL's Research Support Facility; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper documents the design and operational plug and process load energy efficiency measures needed to allow a large scale office building to reach ultra high efficiency building goals. The appendices of this document contain a wealth of documentation pertaining to plug and process load design in the RSF, including a list of equipment was selected for use.

Lobato, C.; Pless, S.; Sheppy, M.; Torcellini, P.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Selected Abstracts & Bibliography of International Oil Spill Research, through 1998  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contamination, environment, environmental impact, environmental pollution, model, oil spill, storage facility, tank, water pollution, wave (water), additive, administration, barrier, book, brine,

Louisiana Applied Oil Spill Research & Development Program Electronic Bibliography

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6, 2012 [Facility News] 6, 2012 [Facility News] News Tips from 2012 EGU General Assembly Bookmark and Share The ARM Facility is attending the 2012 European Geophysical Union General Assembly at the Austria Center in Vienna for the first time. The ARM Facility is attending the 2012 European Geophysical Union General Assembly at the Austria Center in Vienna for the first time. VIENNA - The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is the world's most comprehensive outdoor laboratory and data archive for research related to atmospheric processes that affect Earth's climate. At the European Geophysical Union (EGU) General Assembly 2012 in Vienna, find out how scientists use the ARM Facility to study the interactions between clouds,

387

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8, 2011 [Facility News, Publications] 8, 2011 [Facility News, Publications] Journal Special Issue Includes Mobile Facility Data from Germany Bookmark and Share The ARM Mobile Facility operated in Heselbach, Germany, as part of the COPS surface network. The ARM Mobile Facility operated in Heselbach, Germany, as part of the COPS surface network. In 2007, the ARM Mobile Facility participated in one of the most ambitious field studies ever conducted in Europe-the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS). Now, 21 papers published in a special issue of the Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society demonstrate that the data collected during COPS are providing new insight into: the key chemical and physical processes leading to convection initiation and to the modification of precipitation by orography;

388

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4, 2013 [Facility News] 4, 2013 [Facility News] Work Cut Out for ARM Science Board Bookmark and Share With a new fixed site on the horizon in the Azores, a third ARM Mobile Facility gearing up for action in the Arctic, and more aircraft probes and sensors than scientists can shake a stick at, the ARM Facility continues to expand its considerable suite of assets for conducting climate research. Along with this impressive inventory comes the responsibility to ensure the Facility is supporting the highest-value science possible. Enter the ARM Science Board. This eleven-member group annually reviews complex proposals for use of the ARM mobile and aerial facilities. To maintain excellence and integrity in the review process, each member serves a renewable term of two years, with membership updated annually.

389

Techno-economic evaluation of waste lube oil re-refining in Saudi Arabia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About 80 million gallons of automotive lubricating oils are sold in Saudi Arabia. Much of this oil, after use, is actually contributing to the increased pollution of land because of indiscriminate dumping. Any scheme of secondary use of the waste lube oils would be of interest both for conservation of energy resources and for protection of environment. This paper discusses the secondary use for the used automotive lubricating oils. Process technology of Meinken, Mohawk and KTI were selected for the techno-economic feasibility study for re-refining used oil. Profitability analysis for each process is worked out and the results are compared. In many countries, the re-refining of used oils has become an important industry. The objective of recovering high quality raffinates is attained through the use of widely differing techniques. The processes concerned can be classified according to the chemical or physical method of used-oil pretreatment selected. Meinken process is based on chemical pretreatment, whereas both Mohawk and KTI processes employ physical methods involving distillation and eliminate the use of sulfuric acid, thus providing a facility for safer operation than Meinken. The plant capacity of two existing units in Jeddah are 10,000 TPA and 80,000 TPA re-refining of waste oil. We selected a plant of 50,000 TPA waste oil re-refining for economic study of these three processes. The authors wish to acknowledge the support from King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals and King Abdulaziz City for Science & Technology for this work.

Ali, F.M.; Hamdan, A.J.; Rahman, F. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum & Minerals, Dharan (Saudi Arabia)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Oil Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasures Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental Protection Agency regulations 40 CFR Part 112, Oil Pollution Prevention,'' include requirements for a written Oil Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures (SPCC) Plan. This document provides such an SPCC Plan for facilities at 100-N Area managed by Westinghouse Hanford Co. Should an oil spill occur at 100-N Area, the following actions should be followed: stop the flow of oil, contain the oil spill in order to prevent it from reaching the river, and notify Environmental Protection. Environmental Protection will assess the oil spill and determine if remedial action is necessary. If needed, an oil spill response team will deploy oil spill control and clean-up equipment at the river shoreline to remove any oil that enters the river.

Zoric, J P

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Backup Software Improves Processing, Reliability at Data Management New Backup Software Improves Processing, Reliability at Data Management Facility Bookmark and Share Real-time data from all three of the ARM Climate Research Facility sites (North Slope of Alaska, Southern Great Plains, and Tropical Western Pacific) are collected and processed at the ARM Climate Research Facility Data Management Facility (DMF) each day. Processing involves the application of algorithms for performing simple averaging routines, qualitative comparisons, or more complicated experimental calculations. With continual advances in computer technology, keeping up with the volume and pace of incoming data is a daunting challenge. And because the remote sites do not provide backups, reliable backups of these data at the DMF are critical. In addition, significant numbers of value-added datasets are

392

Division of Oil, Gas, and Mining Permitting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" or "Gas" does not include any gaseous or liquid substance processed from coal, oil shale, or tar sands

Utah, University of

393

Removal of organic compounds and trace metals from oil sands process-affected water using zero valent iron enhanced by petroleum coke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The oil production generates large volumes of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), referring to the water that has been in contact with oil sands or released from tailings deposits. There are concerns about the environmental impacts of the release of OSPW because of its toxicity. Zero valent iron alone (ZVI) and in combination with petroleum coke (CZVI) were investigated as environmentally friendly treatment processes for the removal of naphthenic acids (NAs), acid-extractable fraction (AEF), fluorophore organic compounds, and trace metals from OSPW. While the application of 25 g/L ZVI to OSPW resulted in 58.4% removal of \\{NAs\\} in the presence of oxygen, the addition of 25 g petroleum coke (PC) as an electron conductor enhanced the \\{NAs\\} removal up to 90.9%. The increase in ZVI concentration enhanced the removals of NAs, AEF, and fluorophore compounds from OSPW. It was suggested that the electrons generated from the oxidation of ZVI were transferred to oxygen, resulting in the production of hydroxyl radicals and oxidation of NAs. When OSPW was de-oxygenated, the \\{NAs\\} removal decreased to 17.5% and 65.4% during treatment with ZVI and CZVI, respectively. The removal of metals in ZVI samples was similar to that obtained during CZVI treatment. Although an increase in ZVI concentration did not enhance the removal of metals, their concentrations effectively decreased at all ZVI loadings. The Microtox® bioassay with Vibrio fischeri showed a decrease in the toxicity of ZVI- and CZVI-treated OSPW. The results obtained in this study showed that the application of ZVI in combination with PC is a promising technology for OSPW treatment.

Parastoo Pourrezaei; Alla Alpatova; Kambiz Khosravi; Przemys?aw Drzewicz; Yuan Chen; Pamela Chelme-Ayala; Mohamed Gamal El-Din

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

FACILITY SAFETY (FS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FACILITY SAFETY (FS) FACILITY SAFETY (FS) OBJECTIVE FS.1 - (Core Requirement 7) Facility safety documentation in support of SN process operations,is in place and has been implemented that describes the safety envelope of the facility. The, safety documentation should characterize the hazards/risks associated with the facility and should, identify preventive and mitigating measures (e.g., systems, procedures, and administrative, controls) that protect workers and the public from those hazards/risks. (Old Core Requirement 4) Criteria 1. A DSA has been prepared by FWENC, approved by DOE, and implemented to reflect the SN process operations in the WPF. (10 CFR 830.200, DOE-STD-3009-94) 2. A configuration control program is in place and functioning such that the DSA is

395

Morphological Investigations of Fibrogenic Action of Estonian Oil Shale Dust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dust produced in the mining and processing of Estonian oil shale is given. Histological examination of

V. A. Kung

396

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

1996-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

397

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

1995-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

398

Certified Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Industrial Leaders: The industrial facilities shown below are among the first to earn certification for Superior Energy Performance® (SEP™).

399

Enhanced Oil Recovery and Other Oil Resources projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enhanced Oil Recovery and Other Oil Resources Enhanced Oil Recovery and Other Oil Resources Enhanced Oil Recovery and Other Oil Resources CO2 EOR | Other EOR & Oil Resources | Environmental | Completed Oil Projects Project Number Project Name Primary Performer DE-FE0013723 Development of Nanoparticle-Stabilized Foams To Improve Performance of Water-less Hydraulic Fracturing The University of Texas at Austin DE-FE0010799 Small Molecular Associative Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Thickeners for Improved Mobility Control University of Pittsburgh DE-FE0006011 Development of Real Time Semi-autonomous Geophysical Data Acquisition and Processing System to Monitor Flood Performance White River Technologies DE-FE0005979 Nanoparticle-stabilized CO2 Foam for CO2 EOR Application New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology

400

Enhanced oil recovery: miscible flooding; thermal methods; and process implementation. Annual report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The individual papers in this volume covering miscible flooding, thermal methods, and process implementation were indexed.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil processing facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

CO{sub 2} HUFF-n-PUFF process in a light oil shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. Quarterly technical progress report, [January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of the Central Vacuum Unit (CVU) CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff (H-n-P) project is to determine the feasibility and practicality of the technology in a waterflooded shallow shelf carbonate environment. The results of parametric simulation of the CO{sub 2} H-n-P process, coupled with the CVU reservoir characterization components will determine if this process is technically and economically feasible for field implementation. The technology transfer objective of the project is to disseminate the knowledge gained through an innovative plan in support of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) objective of increasing domestic oil production and deferring the abandonment of shallow shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs. Technical progress is reported for geostatitical realizations; paramatric simulation; waterflood review; and reservoir characterization.

Cole, R.; Prieditis, J.; Vogt, J.; Wehner, S.

1995-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

402

CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in a light oil shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. Second quarterly technical progress report, [April 1995--June 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of the Central Vacuum Unit (CVU) CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff (H-n-P) project is to determine the feasibility and practicality of the technology in a waterflooded shallow shelf carbonate environment. The results of parametric simulation of the CO{sub 2} H-n-P process, coupled with the CVU reservoir characterization components will determine if this process is technically and economically feasible for field implementation. The technology transfer objective of the project is to disseminate the knowledge gained through an innovative plan in support of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) objective of increasing domestic oil production and deferring the abandonment of shallow shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs. Tasks associated with this objective are carried out in what is considered a timely effort for near-term goals. Technical progress is summarized for; geostatistical realizations; site-specific simulation;waterflood review; and reservoir characterization.

Cole, R.; Prieditis, J.; Vogt, J.; Wehner, S.

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

403

CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in a light oil shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of the Central Vacuum Unit (CVU) CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff (H-n-P) project is to determine the feasibility and practicality of the technology in a waterflooded shallow shelf carbonate environment. The results of parametric simulation of the CO{sub 2} H-n-P process, coupled with the CVU reservoir characterization components will determine if this process is technically and economically feasible for field implementation. The technology transfer objective of the project is to disseminate the knowledge gained through an innovative plan in support of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) objective of increasing domestic oil production and deferring the abandonment of shallow shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs. Tasks associated with this objective are carried out in what is considered a timely effort for near-term goals.

Cole, R.; Prieditis, J.; Vogt, J. Wehner, S.

1995-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Synthetic fuels from US oil shales: a technical and economic verification of the HYTORT Process. Project 61040 quarterly report, April 1-June 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the HYTORT Process development work conducted from April 1 through June 30, 1980. Thermobalance tests have been conducted on samples of shale from each large multiton sample prior to large-scale tests and these test results have been fit with specific kinetic expressions. Approximately 80% of the instrumentation for the laboratory-scale reactor has been received. Fabrication of the reactor, feed hopper, and residue receiver is about 95% complete. Two successful moving-bed tests were conducted in the bench-scale reactor during this quarter. A large, 50-ton sample of the Lower Huron member of the Ohio Shale was mined and readied for shipment to IGT. Modification of the bench-scale steam-oxygen unit was completed. Spent shale from PDU tests was prepared for use in these tests. A set of five screening runs on New Albany shale oil and a set of four screening runs on Sunbury shale oil were conducted during this quarter. The nitrogen content of these oils was reduced to the 0.16 to 0.30 weight percent range in the bench-scale hydrotreating unit. Design of the laboratory test system for mist-size control studies was completed. Methods are being studied for measuring mist particle size. Shakedown and initial testing of the liquid-sealed lockhopper were performed during this quarter. Two runs were made in the PDU with Kentucky shales using a sample of the Cleveland member of the Ohio shale and a sample of New Albany shale. Samples for environmental analysis were taken during the PDU runs discussed above. On-line sampling equipment was installed prior to the PDU run with New Albany shale and samples were taken of the Stage 2 raw product gases.

None

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

RCRA facility assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA) broadened the authorities of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) by requiring corrective action for releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous constituents at treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. The goal of the corrective action process is to ensure the remediation of hazardous waste and hazardous constituent releases associated with TSD facilities. Under Section 3004(u) of RCRA, operating permits issued to TSD facilities must address corrective actions for all releases of hazardous waste and hazardous constituents from any solid waste management unit (SWMU) regardless of when the waste was placed in such unit. Under RCRA Section 3008(h), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) may issue administrative orders to compel corrective action at facilities authorized to operate under RCRA Section 3005(e) (i.e., interim status facilities). The process of implementing the Corrective Action program involves the following, in order of implementation; (1) RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA); (2) RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI); (3) the Corrective Measures Study (CMS); and (4) Corrective Measures Implementation (CMI). The RFA serves to identify and evaluate SWMUs with respect to releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous constituents, and to eliminate from further consideration SWMUs that do not pose a threat to human health or the environment. This Information Brief will discuss issues concerning the RFA process.

NONE

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels ? Bio-Oil Upgrading  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of bio-oils. Focus on process development activities and underlying science for biofuels production. Bio-oil Upgrading - Presenter Information Energy Efficiency & Renewable...

407

Rheological properties of heavy oils and heavy oil emulsions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the author investigated the effects of a number of process variables such as shear rate, measurement temperature, pressure, the influence of pretreatment, and the role of various amounts of added water on the rheology of the resulting heavy oil or the emulsion. Rheological properties of heavy oils and the corresponding emulsions are important from transportation and processing standpoints.

Khan, M.R. [Texaco, Inc., Beacon, NY (United States). Fuels and Lubricants Technology Dept.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Technology Readiness Assessment of Department of Energy Waste Processing Facilities: When is a Technology Ready for Insertion?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will describe a technology readiness assessment process (TRA) that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) piloted at Hanford's Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and has subsequently applied to other projects at Hanford and the Savannah River Site. The methodology used for these TRAs was based upon detailed guidance contained in the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), Technology Readiness Assessment Desk-book and adapted a technology readiness scale developed by the DOD and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to the DOE. This paper will discuss the application of the TRA process to the WTP and the development of a Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) based on the TRA findings. (authors)

Alexander, D. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Gerdes, K. [Department of Energy, Office of Waste Processing, Germantown, Maryland (United States); Holton, L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington (United States); Krahn, St. [Department of Energy, Office of Waste Processing, Germantown, Maryland (United States); Sutter, H. [Consultant, Department of Energy, Office of Project Recovery, Germantown, Maryland (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Peak Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At the start of the new millennium, the expression “Peak Oil” was unknown. Nevertheless, a discussion about when the world’s rate of oil production would reach its maximum had already ... . King Hubbert presented...

Kjell Aleklett

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Peak Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Between 2000 and 2010, world oil prices advanced from approximately $25 per barrel to more than $100 per barrel. The price appreciation of oil over the decade was around ten times the rate of inflation.

Robert Rapier

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

ARM Aerial Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govSitesAerial Facility govSitesAerial Facility AAF Information Proposal Process Science (PDF) Baseline Instruments Campaign Instruments Instrumentation Workshop 2008 AAF Fact Sheet G-1 Fact Sheet Images Field Campaigns AAF Campaigns 2007 - UAV Campaigns 1993 - 2006, 2015 Other Aircraft Campaigns 1993 - 2010 AAF Contacts Rickey Petty DOE AAF Program Director Beat Schmid Technical Director ARM Aerial Facility Numerous instrumented aircraft participated in CLASIC, a cross-disciplinary interagency research effort. Numerous instrumented aircraft participated in CLASIC, a cross-disciplinary interagency research effort. As an integral measurement capability of the ARM Climate Research Facility, the ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) provides airborne measurements required to answer science questions proposed by the ARM Science Team and the external

412

Water issues associated with heavy oil production.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

413

Science Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Microscopy Lab Ion Beam Materials Lab Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE) Proton Radiography Trident Laser Facility LOOK INTO LANL - highlights...

414

Characterization of Crude Oil Products Using Data Fusion of Process Raman, Infrared, and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectra  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Process Raman, infrared (IR), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses are currently being performed in industrial settings for the monitoring of large scale reactions. These...

Dearing, Thomas I; Thompson, Wesley J; Rechsteiner, Carl E; Marquardt, Brian J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. J. and Cecchine, G. Oil shale development in the Unitedresources of some world oil-shale deposits. Technical Reportfor CO2 evolved from oil shale. Fuel Processing Technology,

Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Dynamic analysis in productivity, oil shock, and recession  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use of oil in the US economy weakens the peak responses ofin the oil-price process shifts the timing of the peak by 2the same size of the oil-price shock. The peak response of

Katayama, Munechika

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Biocatalysis in Oil Refining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biocatalysis in Oil Refining focuses on petroleum refining bioprocesses, establishing a connection between science and technology. The micro organisms and biomolecules examined for biocatalytic purposes for oil refining processes are thoroughly detailed. Terminology used by biologists, chemists and engineers is brought into a common language, aiding the understanding of complex biological-chemical-engineering issues. Problems to be addressed by the future R&D activities and by new technologies are described and summarized in the last chapter.

Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL; Ramirez-Corredores, M. M. [BP Global Fuels Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Evaluation of metals release from oil sands coke : an ecotoxicological assessment of risk and hazard to aquatic invertebrates.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The oil sands operations in northeast Alberta, Canada, employ unconventional processes to produce synthetic crude oil (SCO). Because the extracted bitumen, ¡®the form of oil… (more)

PUTTASWAMY, NAVEEN V

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Enhanced oil recovery using hydrogen peroxide injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NOVATEC received an US Patent on a novel method to recovery viscous oil by hydrogen peroxide injection. The process appears to offer several significant improvements over existing thermal methods of oil recovery. Tejas joined NOVATEC to test the process in the laboratory and to develop oil field applications and procedures.

Moss, J.T. Jr.; Moss, J.T.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Heat Requirements for Retorting Oil Shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heat Requirements for Retorting Oil Shale ... Converting Oil Shale to Liquid Fuels: Energy Inputs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of the Shell in Situ Conversion Process ... Converting Oil Shale to Liquid Fuels: Energy Inputs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of the Shell in Situ Conversion Process ...

H. W. Sohns; L. E. Mitchell; R. J. Cox; W. I. Barnet; W. I. R. Murphy

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil processing facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Assessment and control of water contamination associated with shale oil extraction and processing. Progress report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Los Alamos National Laboratory's research on assessment and control of water contamination associated with oil shale operations is directed toward the identification of potential water contamination problems and the evaluation of alternative control strategies for controlling contaminants released into the surface and underground water systems from oil-shale-related sources. Laboratory assessment activities have focused on the mineralogy, trace element concentrations in solids, and leaching characteristics of raw and spent shales from field operations and laboratory-generated spent shales. This report details the chemical, mineralogic, and solution behavior of major, minor, and trace elements in a variety of shale materials (spent shales from Occidental retort 3E at Logan Wash, raw shale from the Colony mine, and laboratory heat-treated shales generated from Colony mine raw shale). Control technology research activities have focused on the definition of control technology requirements based on assessment activities and the laboratory evaluation of alternative control strategies for mitigation of identified problems. Based on results obtained with Logan Wash materials, it appears that the overall impact of in situ processing on groundwater quality (leaching and aquifer bridging) may be less significant than previously believed. Most elements leached from MIS spent shales are already elevated in most groundwaters. Analysis indicates that solubility controls by major cations and anions will aid in mitigating water quality impacts. The exceptions include the trace elements vanadium, lead, and selenium. With respect to in situ retort leaching, process control and multistaged counterflow leaching are evaluated as alternative control strategies for mitigation of quality impacts. The results of these analyses are presented in this report.

Peterson, E.J.; Henicksman, A.V.; Fox, J.P.; O'Rourke, J.A.; Wagner, P.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Strategies for Facilities Renewal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of steam production is from exothermic chem ical processes. A large gas fired cogeneration unit was completed in 1987 and supplies 90% of the facil ities' electrical needs and 25% of total steam demand (the remaining steam is supplied by process heat...

Good, R. L.

423

Facilities: NHMFL 9.4 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Citation: Characterization of Pine Pellet and Peanut Hull Pyrolysis of Bio-Oils by Negative-Ion Electrospray Ionization Fourier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with greater than 1% relative abundance in either phase are shown. Pyrolysis of solid biomass, in this case: Characterization of Pine Pellet and Peanut Hull Pyrolysis of Bio-Oils by Negative-Ion Electrospray Ionization of nitrogen-containing species identified in the peanut hull pyrolysis oil by FT-ICR mass spectrometry

Weston, Ken

424

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for Department of Energy facilities, which includes nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards mitigation, and the System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1A. DOE O 420.1B Chg 1 issued 4-19-10.

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

425

Oil shale, tar sands, and related materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This sixteen-chapter book focuses on the many problems and the new methodology associated with the commercialization of the oil shale and tar sand industry. Topics discussed include: an overview of the Department of Energy's oil shale R, D, and D program; computer simulation of explosive fracture of oil shale; fracturing of oil shale by treatment with liquid sulfur dioxide; chemistry of shale oil cracking; hydrogen sulfide evolution from Colorado oil shale; a possible mechanism of alkene/alkane production in oil shale retorting; oil shale retorting kinetics; kinetics of oil shale char gasification; a comparison of asphaltenes from naturally occurring shale bitumen and retorted shale oils: the influence of temperature on asphaltene structure; beneficiation of Green River oil shale by density methods; beneficiation of Green River oil shale pelletization; shell pellet heat exchange retorting: the SPHER energy-efficient process for retorting oil shale; retorted oil shale disposal research; an investigation into the potential economics of large-scale shale oil production; commercial scale refining of Paraho crude shale oil into military specification fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition; chemical characterization/physical properties of US Navy shale-II fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition: stability of oil shale-derived jet fuel; pyrolysis of shale oil residual fractions; synfuel stability: degradation mechanisms and actual findings; the chemistry of shale oil and its refined products; the reactivity of Cold Lake asphaltenes; influence of thermal processing on the properties of Cold Lake asphaltenes: the effect of distillation; thermal recovery of oil from tar sands by an energy-efficient process; and hydropyrolysis: the potential for primary upgrading of tar sand bitumen.

Stauffer, H.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Mobile Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facility Facility AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Mobile Facilities Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. To explore science questions beyond those addressed by ARM's fixed sites at

427

Comparison of electrical capacitance tomography and gamma densitometer measurement in viscous oil-gas flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multiphase flow is a common occurrence in industries such as nuclear, process, oil and gas, food and chemical. A prior knowledge of its features and characteristics is essential in the design, control and management of such processes due to its complex nature. Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT) and Gamma Densitometer (Gamma) are two promising approaches for multiphase visualization and characterization in process industries. In two phase oil and gas flow, ECT and Gamma are used in multiphase flow monitoring techniques due to their inherent simplicity, robustness, and an ability to withstand wide range of operational temperatures and pressures. High viscous oil (viscosity > 100 cP) is of interest because of its huge reserves, technological advances in its production and unlike conventional oil (oil viscosity < 100 cP) and gas flows where ECT and Gamma have been previously used, high viscous oil and gas flows comes with certain associated concerns which include; increased entrainment of gas bubbles dispersed in oil, shorter and more frequent slugs as well as oil film coatings on the walls of flowing conduits. This study aims to determine the suitability of both devices in the visualization and characterization of high-viscous oil and gas flow. Static tests are performed with both devices and liquid holdup measurements are obtained. Dynamic experiments were also conducted in a 1 and 3 inch facility at Cranfield University with a range of nominal viscosities (1000, 3000 and 7500 cP). Plug, slug and wavy annular flow patterns were identified by means of Probability Mass Function and time series analysis of the data acquired from Gamma and ECT devices with high speed camera used to validate the results. Measured Liquid holdups for both devices were also compared.

Archibong Eso, A.; Zhao, Yabin; Yeung, Hoi [Department of Offshore Process and Energy Systems Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield (United Kingdom)

2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

428

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and usually coal derived.

Knudson, Curtis L. (Grand Forks, ND); Timpe, Ronald C. (Grand Forks, ND)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 1 -- Base program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

Smith, V.E.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Kuwait: World Oil Report 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that the major event in Kuwait today is the ongoing effort to control blowouts stemming from Iraqi demolition of oil wells and producing facilities last February. A total of 732 wells---about two- thirds of all wells in Kuwait---were blown up. All but 80 caught on fire.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

The Economic and Environmental Aspects of Heat Exchanger Cleaning -- How FP&L Has Used the Newly Patented MCC Process to Clean Turbine Lube Oil Coolers to Maximize Efficiency and Minimize Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of efficient and timely cleaning of heat exchangers. There are great differences in the cleaning processes that are used to clean exchanger bundles in industry today. The cleaning of turbine lube oil coolers is a specialized case in point. A newly patented...

Wood, H. A. T.

432

Thermochemical Process Development Unit: Researching Fuels from Biomass, Bioenergy Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights Thermochemical conversion technologies convert biomass and its residues to fuels and chemicals using gasification and pyrolysis. Gasification entails heating biomass and results in a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, known as syngas. Pyrolysis, which is heating biomass in the absence of oxygen, produces liquid pyrolysis oil. Both syngas and pyrolysis oil can be chemically converted into clean, renewable transportation fuels and chemicals. The Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a unique facility dedicated to researching thermochemical processes to produce fuels from biomass. Thermochemical processes include gasification and pyrolysis-processes used to convert

433

PNNL: About PNNL - Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scientific Facilities Scientific Facilities At PNNL, we offer scientific researchers access to unique equipment housed in state-of-the-art facilities as well as onsite experts to help visiting researchers take advantage of and make best use of the capabilities. You also have the opportunity to collaborate with our world-renowned scientists and engineers who can help you advance your scientific research and publish your results. Take a virtual tour of some of our laboratories. William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) EMSL EMSL is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national user facility currently shared and used by researchers from around the world. Research at EMSL focuses principally on developing a molecular-level understanding of the physical, chemical, and biological processes that underlie the most

434

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mobile Facility Beta Testing Complete; System Headed to California Seashore Mobile Facility Beta Testing Complete; System Headed to California Seashore Bookmark and Share A key addition to the ARM Climate Research Facility scientific infrastructure is ready to roll...literally. In February, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is being packed up and shipped from Richland, Washington, to the Point Reyes National Seashore north of San Francisco, California. There, it will be reassembled in preparation for its first deployment as part of a 6-month experiment to study the microphysical characteristics of marine stratus clouds, and in particular, marine stratus drizzle processes. Throughout the deployment, the AMF will accommodate aerosol observing equipment for National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) researchers co-sponsored by ARM and the DOE Aerosol Science Program.

435

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

December 3, 2004 [Facility News] December 3, 2004 [Facility News] First Deployment of ARM Mobile Facility to Occur on California Coast Bookmark and Share Image - Point Reyes Beach Image - Point Reyes Beach Point Reyes National Seashore, on the California coast north of San Francisco, has been identified as the official location for the first deployment of the DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). As part of a 6-month field campaign beginning in March 2005 to study the microphysical characteristics of marine stratus and, in particular, marine stratus drizzle processes, the AMF will provide a mature instrument system to help fill information gaps in the existing limited surveys of marine stratus microphysical structure. Marine stratus clouds are known to be susceptible to the byproducts of fossil fuel consumption, a

436

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish facility safety requirements for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels DOE O 420.1. Canceled by DOE O 420.1B.

2002-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

437

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The objective of this Order is to establish facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. The Order has Change 1 dated 11-16-95, Change 2 dated 10-24-96, and the latest Change 3 dated 11-22-00 incorporated. The latest change satisfies a commitment made to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) in response to DNFSB recommendation 97-2, Criticality Safety.

2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

438

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

DOE-STD-1104 contains the Department's method and criteria for reviewing and approving nuclear facility's documented safety analysis (DSA). This review and approval formally document the basis for DOE, concluding that a facility can be operated safely in a manner that adequately protects workers, the public, and the environment. Therefore, it is appropriate to formally require implementation of the review methodology and criteria contained in DOE-STD-1104.

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

439

How do OPEC news and structural breaks impact returns and volatility in crude oil markets? Further evidence from a long memory process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Since its formation, OPEC through its conference decisions has been a major player in the world oil markets. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impacts of OPEC's different news announcements on the conditional expectations and volatility of crude oil markets in the presence of long memory and structural changes. To do so, we first discern OPEC's oil production behavior in response to its “cut”, “maintain”, and “increase” decisions. Then by applying the ARMA–GARCH class models to the two global benchmarks WTI and Brent over the period May 1987 through December 2012, we find strong evidence of long memory. The empirical evidence also shows that OPEC's announcements especially the “cut” and the “maintain” decisions have a significant effect on both returns and volatility of the crude oil markets, particularly that of the WTI. Moreover, we explore the possibility of structural breaks in the crude oil prices and detect five (six) breakpoints for the WTI (Brent) oil markets. The presence of structural breaks reduces the persistence of volatility. Accounting for OPEC's scheduled news announcements in the presence of structural changes reduces the degree of volatility persistence and enhances the understanding of this volatility in the oil markets. These results have several implications for policy makers, oil traders and other participants in the crude oil markets.

Walid Mensi; Shawkat Hammoudeh; Seong-Min Yoon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Tritium Recycling (Processing) Facility Design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Design, Operation, and Maintenance of Tritium System / Proceedings of the Fifth Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology In Fission, Fusion, and Isotopic Applications Belgirate, Italy May 28-June 3, 1995

Jack Metzler; Thuy Le