National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for oil market outlook

  1. Oil market outlook and drivers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oil inventories in industrialized countries to reach record high at end of 2015 The amount of year-end oil inventories held in industrialized countries is expected to be the highest on record in 2015. In its monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said it expects commercial oil inventories in the United States and other industrialized countries to total 2.83 billion barrels at the end of this year almost 90 million barrels more than at the end of 2014. Global oil production

  2. Oil and natural gas market outlook and drivers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFS | Oil and natural gas market outlook and drivers, May 18, 2016 Global supply has ... WTI price dollars per barrel EIA expects WTI oil prices to remain low compared to recent ...

  3. Energy Markets Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Markets Outlook For National Association for Business Economics March 7, 2016 | Washington, D.C. By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Forecast -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 100 2011-Q1 2012-Q1 2013-Q1 2014-Q1 2015-Q1 2016-Q1 2017-Q1 Implied stock change and balance (right axis) World production (left axis) World consumption (left axis) world supply and demand million barrels per day implied stock change million barrels per day Global oil inventories are forecast to

  4. Energy Market Outlook

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation covers the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Energy Market Outlook: Helping Customers Meet Their Diverse Energy Goals, held on May 22-23, 2013 in San Francisco, California.

  5. 2013 Propane Market Outlook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    domestic propane prices will not fully delink from oil prices, and competition against electricity and natural gas in traditional propane markets will remain very challenging....

  6. Review of EIA Oil Production Outlooks

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Review of EIA oil production outlooks For 2014 EIA Energy Conference July 15, 2014 | Washington, DC By Samuel Gorgen, Upstream Analyst Overview Gorgen, Tight Oil Production Trends EIA Conference, July 15, 2014 2 * Drilling Productivity Report performance review - Permian - Eagle Ford - Bakken * Crude oil production projections - Short-Term Energy Outlook - Annual Energy Outlook - International tight oil outlook * New DPR region highlights: Utica Drilling Productivity Report review - major tight

  7. Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    The Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status & Outlook was undertaken to characterize the global liquefied natural gas (LNG) market and to examine recent trends and future prospects in the LNG market.

  8. The outlook for US oil dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.; Jones, D.W.; Leiby, P.N.

    1995-05-11

    Market share OPEC lost in defending higher prices from 1979-1985 is being steadily regained and is projected to exceed 50% by 2000. World oil markets are likely to be as vulnerable to monopoly influence as they were 20 years ago, as OPEC regains lost market share. The U.S. economy appears to be as exposed as it was in the early 1970s to losses from monopoly oil pricing. A simulated 2-year supply reduction in 2005-6 boosts OPEC revenues by roughly half a trillion dollars and costs the U.S. economy an approximately equal amount. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve appears to be of little benefit against such a determined, multi-year supply curtailment either in reducing OPEC revenues or protecting the U.S. economy. Increasing the price elasticity of oil demand and supply in the U.S. and the rest of the world, however, would be an effective strategy.

  9. Oil-futures markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prast, W.G.; Lax, H.L.

    1983-01-01

    This book on oil futures trading takes a look at a market and its various hedging strategies. Growing interest in trading of commodity futures has spread to petroleum, including crude oil, and key refined products such as gasoline and heating oil. This book describes how the international petroleum trade is structured, examines the working of oil futures markets in the United States and the United Kingdom, and assesses the possible courses of further developments.

  10. Soviet Union oil sector outlook grows bleaker still

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-12

    This paper reports on the outlook for the U.S.S.R's oil sector which grows increasingly bleak and with it prospects for the Soviet economy. Plunging Soviet oil production and exports have analysts revising near term oil price outlooks, referring to the Soviet oil sector's self-destructing and Soviet oil production in a freefall. County NatWest, Washington, citing likely drops in Soviet oil production and exports (OGJ, Aug. 5, p. 16), has jumped its projected second half spot price for West Texas intermediate crude by about $2 to $22-23/bbl. Smith Barney, New York, forecasts WTI postings at $24-25/bbl this winter, largely because of seasonally strong world oil demand and the continued collapse in Soviet oil production. It estimates the call on oil from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries at more than 25 million b/d in first quarter 1992. That would be the highest level of demand for OPEC oil since 1980, Smith Barney noted.

  11. Annual Energy Outlook 2014 projects reduced need for U.S. oil...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Annual Energy Outlook 2014 projects reduced need for U.S. oil imports due to tight oil production growth U.S. production of tight crude oil is expected to make up a larger share ...

  12. Propane Market Outlook Key Market Trends, Opportunities, and Threats Facing the Consumer

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Propane Market Outlook Key Market Trends, Opportunities, and Threats Facing the Consumer Propane Industry Through 2025 Prepared for the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC) by: ICF International, Inc. 9300 Lee Highway Fairfax, VA 22031 Tel (703) 218-2758 www.icfi.com Principal Author: Mr. Michael Sloan msloan@icfi.com P R E S E N T E D B Y : Propane Market Outlook at a Glance ¡ ICF projects consumer propane sales to grow by about 800 million gallons (9 percent) between 2014 and

  13. The Outlook for U.S. Oil Dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    Market share OPEC lost in defending higher prices from 1979-1985 is being steadily regained and is projected to exceed 50% by 2000. World oil markets are likely to be as vulnerable to monopoly influence as they were 20 years ago, as OPEC regains lost market share. The US economy appears to be as exposed as it was in the early 1970s to losses from monopoly oil pricing. A simulated 2-year supply reduction in 2005-6 boosts OPEC revenues by roughly half a trillion dollars and costs the US economy an approximately equal amount. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve appears to be of little benefit against such a determined, multi-year supply curtailment either in reducing OPEC revenues or protecting the US economy. Increasing the price elasticity of oil demand and supply in the US and the rest of the world, however, would be an effective strategy.

  14. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Regional Residential Heating Oil Price Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The regional residential heating oil price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide residential retail price forecasts for the 4 census regions: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West.

  15. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Outlook September 2015 1 September 2015 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights * North Sea Brent crude oil prices averaged $47/barrel (b) in August, a $10/b decrease from July. This third consecutive monthly decrease in prices likely reflects concerns about lower economic growth in emerging markets, expectations of higher oil exports from Iran, and continuing growth in global inventories. Crude oil price volatility increased significantly, with Brent prices showing daily changes of more

  16. Modifications to incorporate competitive electricity prices in the annual energy outlook 1998 - electricity market module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe modifications to the Electricity Market Module (EMM) for the Annual Energy Outlook 1998. It describes revisions necessary to derive competitive electricity prices and the corresponding reserve margins.

  17. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - April 2006

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 1 April 2006 Short-Term Energy Outlook and Summer Fuels Outlook April 11, 2006 Release Contents Overview Global Petroleum Markets U.S. Petroleum Markets Motor Gasoline Diesel Fuel Natural Gas Markets Electricity Markets Coal Markets Overview Continued steady world oil demand growth, combined with only modest increases in world spare oil production capacity and the continuing risks of geopolitical instability, are expected to keep crude oil prices high through 2006. The price of West Texas

  18. Short Term Energy Outlook ,October 2002

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    October 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook October 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: Continued high oil prices are the result of declining OECD commercial oil inventories, worries over a potential clash with Iraq, and OPEC's decision to leave production quotas unchanged at its September meeting. Solid growth in world oil demand this winter (and for 2003 as a whole) is likely to tighten world oil markets and reduce commercial oil inventories. The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price

  19. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. Crude oil prices fell sharply at the onset of war in Iraq, but the initial declines probably overshot levels that we consider to be generally consistent with fundamental factors in the world oil market. Thus, while near-term price averages are likely to be below our previous projections, the baseline outlook for crude oil prices (while generally lower) is not drastically different and includes an average for spot West Texas

  20. Assumptions and Expectations for Annual Energy Outlook 2015: Oil and Gas Working Group

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Assumptions and Expectations for Annual Energy Outlook 2016: Oil and Gas Working Group AEO2016 Oil and Gas Supply Working Group Meeting Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuels Analysis December 1, 2015| Washington, DC http://www.eia.gov/forecasts/aeo/workinggroup/ WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE We welcome feedback on our assumptions and documentation * The AEO Assumptions report http://www.eia.gov/forecasts/aeo/assumptions/

  1. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Weather Sensitivity in Natural Gas Markets

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Weather Sensitivity in Natural Gas Markets October 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: Weather Sensitivity in Natural Gas Markets i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are

  2. Oil Market Assessment

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    Based on Energy Information Administration (EIA) contacts and trade press reports, overall U.S. and global oil supplies appear to have been minimally impacted by yesterday's terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.

  3. International energy outlook 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-06-15

    This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. After a chapter entitled 'Highlights', the report begins with a review of world energy and economic outlook, followed by energy consumption by end-use sector. The next chapter is on world oil markets. Natural gas, world coal market and electricity consumption and supply are then discussed. The final chapter covers energy-related carbon dioxide emissions.

  4. Introduction to energy storage with market analysis and outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmid, Robert; Pillot, Christophe

    2014-06-16

    At first, the rechargeable battery market in 2012 will be described by technology - lead acid, NiCd, NiMH, lithium ion - and application - portable electronics, power tools, e-bikes, automotive, energy storage. This will be followed by details of the lithium ion battery market value chain from the raw material to the final application. The lithium ion battery market of 2012 will be analyzed and split by applications, form factors and suppliers. There is also a focus on the cathode, anode, electrolyte and separator market included. This report will also give a forecast for the main trends and the market in 2020, 2025. To conclude, a forecast for the rechargeable battery market by application for 2025 will be presented. Since energy storage plays an important role for the growing Electric Vehicle (EV) market, this EV issue is closely considered throughout this analysis.

  5. International energy outlook 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-07-01

    This report presents international energy projections through 2025, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. After a chapter entitled 'Highlights', the report begins with a review of world energy and an economic outlook. The IEO2005 projections cover a 24 year period. The next chapter is on world oil markets. Natural gas and coal reserves and resources, consumption and trade discussed. The chapter on electricity deals with primary fuel use for electricity generation, and regional developments. The final section is entitled 'Energy-related greenhouse gas emissions'.

  6. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    of 2005 relative to the first quarter of 2004 and relatively lower fuel oil prices. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, April 2004 History Projections Jan-04 Feb-04 Mar-04...

  7. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    power sector eases and relative coal and fuel oil spot prices decline somewhat. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, May 2004 History Projections Feb-04 Mar-04 Apr-04 May-04...

  8. Annual outlook for US electric power, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-04-24

    This document includes summary information on the ownership structure of the US electric utility industry, a description of electric utility regulation, and identification of selected factors likely to affect US electricity markets from 1985 through 1995. This Outlook expands upon projections first presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1985, offering additional discussion of projected US electricity markets and regional detail. It should be recognized that work on the Annual Energy Outlook 1985 had been completed prior to the sharp reductions in world oil prices experienced early in 1986.

  9. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields Tuesday, September 10, 2013, 10:00AM EST Overview During July and August 2013, protests at major oil loading ports in the central-eastern region of Libya forced the complete or partial shut-in of oil fields linked to the ports. As a result of protests at ports and at some oil fields, crude oil production fell to 1.0 million barrels per day (bbl/d) in July and 600,000 bbl/d in August, although the

  10. Short Term Energy Outlook, February 2003

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. World oil markets will likely remain tight through most of 2003, as petroleum inventories and global spare production capacity continue to dwindle amid blasts of cold weather and constrained output from Venezuela. OPEC efforts to increase output to make up for lower Venezuela output has reduced global spare production capacity to only 2 million barrels per day, leaving little room to make up for unexpected supply or demand

  11. Short Term Energy Outlook, March 2003

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook March 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. February crude oil prices moved higher than expected pushed by fears of a war in Iraq, low inventories, slow recovery in Venezuelan exports, continued cold weather and sharply higher natural gas prices in the United States. West Texas Intermediate prices averaged close to $36 for the month (Figure 1), a level not seen since October 1990. Oil inventories continued lower through the month resulting in a cumulative reduction in

  12. Oil Shale Market | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Discussions Polls Q & A Events Notices My stuff Energy blogs Login | Sign Up Search Oil Shale Market Home There are currently no posts in this category. Syndicate content About...

  13. Short Term Energy Outlook, January 2003

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. The oil market is vulnerable to a number of forces that could cause substantial price volatility over the coming months. The combination of a sustained loss of most of Venezuela's exports, risk of increased tensions in the Middle East and low oil inventories could cause oil prices to spike at least temporarily above our base case. The average West Texas Intermediate (WTI) price, which stood at $27.27 per barrel on December 2,

  14. U.S., non-U.S. outlays to rise in `98, but oil price plunge clouds spending outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, R.J.

    1998-03-23

    Capital spending by oil and gas companies in and outside the US will rise in 1998, but that forecast may be jeopardized by the continuing plunge in oil prices. For operations in the US, oil and gas company capital spending is expected to move up in 1998 for the fourth year in a row. If the money is spent, it will be the highest industry investment level since 1985. Strong oil and gas prices and increased volumes have boosted company cash flow and profits the last few years, fueling increased spending. However, the near-term outlook has now been clouded by economic turmoil in a number of Asian countries and the recent collapse of oil prices. The paper discusses oil and gas prices, US upstream spending, US non-exploration and production spending, capital spending in Canada, and spending outside US and Canada.

  15. Modeling renewable portfolio standards for the annual energy outlook 1998 - electricity market module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. It consists of four submodules: the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) Submodule, the Electricity Fuel Dispatch (EFD) Submodule, the Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP) Submodule, and the Load and Demand-Side Management (LDSM) Submodule. For the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98), the EMM has been modified to represent Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS), which are included in many of the Federal and state proposals for deregulating the electric power industry. A RPS specifies that electricity suppliers must produce a minimum level of generation using renewable technologies. Producers with insufficient renewable generating capacity can either build new plants or purchase {open_quotes}credits{close_quotes} from other suppliers with excess renewable generation. The representation of a RPS involves revisions to the ECP, EFD, and the EFP. The ECP projects capacity additions required to meet the minimum renewable generation levels in future years. The EFD determines the sales and purchases of renewable credits for the current year. The EFP incorporates the cost of building capacity and trading credits into the price of electricity.

  16. South Pacific: Another slow year is ahead. [Oil and gas industry outlook in the South Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langley, B. )

    1993-08-01

    This paper summarizes the oil and gas exploration activities in Australia, Papua New Guinea, and New Zealand in the 1992--1993 period and projects the near-future market and development of these resources. It provides statistics on numbers of new wells drilled, footage involved, number or completions, and production information. The paper also describes the main geographical areas of exploration, types of exploration equipment involved.

  17. Short Term Energy Outlook, December 2002

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    December 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook December 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: Average crude oil prices fell by about $2.50 per barrel between October and November in response to continued high production levels from OPEC 10 countries (Figure 1). However, by the end of November oil prices had risen to end-October levels as concerns over the situations in Iraq and Venezuela pushed prices up. Oil inventories, which are currently in the lower portion of the previous 5-year range, are poised to

  18. International energy outlook 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    The International Energy Outlook 1998 (IEO98) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. Projections in IEO98 are displaced according to six basic country groupings. The industrialized region includes projections for four individual countries -- the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Japan -- along with the subgroups Western Europe and Australasia (defined as Australia, New Zealand, and the US Territories). The developing countries are represented by four separate regional subgroups: developing Asia, Africa, Middle East, and Central and South America. China and India are represented in developing Asia. New to this year`s report, country-level projections are provided for Brazil -- which is represented in Central and South America. Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union (EE/FSU) are considered as a separate country grouping. The report begins with a review of world trends in energy demand. Regional consumption projections for oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear power, and renewable energy (hydroelectricity, geothermal, wind, solar, and other renewables) are presented in five fuel chapters, with a review of the current status of each fuel on a worldwide basis. Summary tables of the IEO98 projections for world energy consumption, carbon emissions, oil production, and nuclear power generating capacity are provided in Appendix A. 88 figs., 77 tabs.

  19. Testing for market integration crude oil, coal, and natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachmeier, L.J.; Griffin, J.M.

    2006-07-01

    Prompted by the contemporaneous spike in coal, oil, and natural gas prices, this paper evaluates the degree of market integration both within and between crude oil, coal, and natural gas markets. Our approach yields parameters that can be readily tested against a priori conjectures. Using daily price data for five very different crude oils, we conclude that the world oil market is a single, highly integrated economic market. On the other hand, coal prices at five trading locations across the United States are cointegrated, but the degree of market integration is much weaker, particularly between Western and Eastern coals. Finally, we show that crude oil, coal, and natural gas markets are only very weakly integrated. Our results indicate that there is not a primary energy market. Despite current price peaks, it is not useful to think of a primary energy market, except in a very long run context.

  20. Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-17

    The Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 1993 is a companion document to the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook 1993 (AEO). Supplement tables provide the regional projections underlying the national data and projections in the AEO. The domestic coal, electric power, commercial nuclear power, end-use consumption, and end-use price tables present AEO forecasts at the 10 Federal Region level. World coal tables provide data and projections on international flows of steam coal and metallurgical coal, and the oil and gas tables provide the AEO oil and gas supply forecasts by Oil and Gas Supply Regions and by source of supply. All tables refer to cases presented in the AEO, which provides a range of projections for energy markets through 2010.

  1. Bio-Oil Deployment in the Home Heating Market

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bio-Oil Deployment in the Home Heating Market March 23, 2015 Dr. Thomas A. Butcher ... and end user acceptance. * Heating oil and diesel transportation both use the same ...

  2. International energy outlook 1997 with projections to 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The International Energy Outlook 1997 (IE097) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2015.

  3. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    change the pattern of annual demand shifts reported in earlier Outlooks. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, December 2002 History Projections Sep-02 Oct-02 Nov-02...

  4. Energy Markets

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    will show a lower growth trajectory Source: EIA, International Energy Outlook 2013 carbon dioxide emissions billion metric tons 6 CSIS | Energy Markets Outlook November 16,...

  5. Market analysis of shale oil co-products. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    Data are presented in these appendices on the marketing and economic potential for soda ash, aluminia, and nahcolite as by-products of shale oil production. Appendices 1 and 2 contain data on the estimated capital and operating cost of an oil shales/mineral co-products recovery facility. Appendix 3 contains the marketing research data.

  6. International Energy Outlook 2016 - Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    International Energy Outlook 2016 Release Date: May 11, 2016 | Next Release Date: September 2017 | | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2016) Preface International Energy Outlook 2014 cover. The International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) presents an assessment by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2040. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2016 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2015 (AEO2015). IEO2016 is

  7. U.S. Chamber of Commerce Biofuels Dialogue Series: Outlook for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Commerce Biofuels Dialogue Series: Outlook for an Emerging Global Biofuels Market U.S. Chamber of Commerce Biofuels Dialogue Series: Outlook for an Emerging Global Biofuels Market ...

  8. Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 July 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights  The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average $102 per barrel over the second half of 2013, and $100 per barrel in 2014. This forecast assumes there are no disruptions to energy markets arising from the recent unrest in Egypt. After increasing to $119 per barrel in early February 2013, the Brent crude oil spot price fell to a low of $97 per barrel in mid-April and then

  9. Summer_Gas_Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook -- April 2001) 1 Summer 2001 Motor Gasoline Outlook Summary April 2001 For the upcoming summer season (April to September), motor gasoline markets are projected to once again exhibit a very tight supply/demand balance. * Retail gasoline prices (regular grade) are expected to average $1.49 per gallon, slightly lower than last summer's average of $1.53 per gallon, but still above the previous (current-dollar) record summer average of

  10. International Energy Outlook 2016-World energy demand and economc outlook -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Information Administration Analysis & Projections International Energy Outlook 2016 Release Date: May 11, 2016 | Next Release Date: September 2017 | | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2016) Chapter 1. World energy demand and economic outlook print version Overview The International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) Reference case projects significant growth in worldwide energy demand over the 28-year period from 2012 to 2040. Total world consumption of marketed energy expands from 549

  11. Assumptions for Annual Energy Outlook 2014: Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4: Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group AEO2014 Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group Meeting Office of Petroleum, Natural Gas & Biofuels Analysis July 24, 2013 | Washington, DC WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Discussion topics Office of Petroleum, Natural Gas, & Biofuels Analysis Working Group Presentation for Discussion Purposes Washington DC, July 24, 2013 DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE as results are subject to change 2 *

  12. Base Oil Market Segment Forecasts up to 2020,Research Reports...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Market Research Home > Groups > Future of Condition Monitoring for Wind Turbines Wayne31jan's picture Submitted by Wayne31jan(150) Contributor 11 June, 2015 - 03:19 Base Oil...

  13. Assumptions and Expectations for Annual Energy Outlook 2014: Oil and Gas Working Group

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4: Oil and Gas Working Group AEO2014 Oil and Gas Supply Working Group Meeting Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuels Analysis July 25, 2013 | Washington, DC http://www.eia.gov/forecasts/aeo/workinggroup/ WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Introduction/Background Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuels Analysis Working Group Presentation for Discussion Purposes Washington, DC, July 25, 2013 DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE as results are

  14. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and Summer Fuels Outlook April 2015 1 April 2015 Short-Term Energy and Summer Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights * On April 2, Iran and the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council plus Germany (P5+1) reached a framework agreement that could result in the lifting of oil- related sanctions against Iran. Lifting sanctions could substantially change the STEO forecast for oil supply, demand, and prices by allowing a significantly increased volume of Iranian barrels to enter the

  15. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (STEO) Highlights  This edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook is the first to include forecasts for 2016.  December was the sixth consecutive month in which monthly average Brent prices decreased, falling $17/barrel (bbl) from November to a monthly average of $62/bbl, the lowest since May 2009. The December price decline reflects continued growth in U.S. tight oil production, strong global supply, and weakening outlooks for the global economy and oil demand growth.  EIA forecasts

  16. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix F

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    F-3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Regional maps Figure F2. Electricity market module regions Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, ...

  17. Canadian gas exports in the U.S. market: 1995 evaluation and outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    The report summarizes data and information relating to the North American natural gas industry including supply (US, Canada, regional), demand (focusing on US sectoral demand), prices, and transportation capacities. Section 1 presents a review of industry events in 1995 and section 2 contains forecasts to the year 2000. Section 3 reviews regulatory developments which affect current and future exports of Canadian natural gas, including rolled-in versus incremental tolling, unbundling of local distribution companies, policies on market-based rates, and incentive regulation. The appendix summarizes the current electric industry restructuring process in the United States.

  18. Canadian gas exports in the U. S. market: 1995 evaluation and outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1996-01-01

    The report summarizes data and information relating to the North American natural gas industry including supply (US, Canada, regional), demand (focusing on US sectoral demand), prices, and transportation capacities. Section 1 presents a review of industry events in 1995 and section 2 contains forecasts to the year 2000. Section 3 reviews regulatory developments which affect current and future exports of Canadian natural gas, including rolled-in versus incremental tolling, unbundling of local distribution companies, policies on market-based rates, and incentive regulation. The appendix summarizes the current electric industry restructuring process in the United States.

  19. Microsoft Word - Summer 2004 Motor Gasoline Outlook.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    April 2004 Summer 2004 Motor Gasoline Outlook Summary * Gasoline markets are tight as the 2004 driving season begins and conditions are likely to remain volatile through the summer. High crude oil costs, strong gasoline demand growth, low gasoline inventories, uncertainty about the availability of gasoline imports, high transportation costs, and changes in gasoline specifications have added to current and expected gasoline costs and pump prices. * For the upcoming summer driving season (April to

  20. Annual Energy Outlook

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    The projections in the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Annual Energy Outlook 2015 (AEO2015) focus on the factors that shape the U.S. energy system over the long term. For the first time, the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) is presented as a shorter edition under a newly adopted two-year release cycle. With this approach, full editions and shorter editions of the AEO will be produced in alternating years. This approach will allow EIA to focus more resources on rapidly changing energy markets both in the United States and internationally, and to consider how they might evolve over the next few years.

  1. Notes from Financial and Physical Oil Market Linkages

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Notes from Financial and Physical Oil Market Linkages August 24, 2011 Session 1: 9:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. Paper Title: Does 'Paper Oil' Matter? Presenter: Michel Robe, American University Discussant: James Smith, Southern Methodist University Paper Abstract We construct a uniquely detailed, comprehensive dataset of trader positions in U.S. energy futures markets. We find considerable changes in the make-up of the open interest between 2000 and 2010 and show that these changes impact asset pricing.

  2. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual Energy Outlook 2016 Full Release Date: Mid September 2016 Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer By Section Issues in Focus Annual Energy Outlook 2016 presents yearly projections and analysis of energy topics Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2016 (AEO2016) focus on the factors expected to shape U.S. energy markets through 2040. The projections provide a basis for examination and discussion of energy market trends and serve as a starting point for analysis

  3. The Oil Market: From Boom to Gloom

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserve Bank of Dallas From Boom to Gloom: Energy States After the Oil Bust Mine Yücel Senior Vice President and Director of Research Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas July 12, 2016 Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas *Natural gas price is multiplied by ten. Oil is priced in $/barrel, while natural gas is priced in $/million British thermal units. Last data points are for the week ending June 24, 2016. 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018 Nominal price, weekly

  4. Short-Term Energy Outlook April 1999-Summer Gasoline Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Summer Motor Gasoline Outlook This year's base case outlook for summer (April-September) motor gasoline markets may be summarized as follows: * Pump Prices: (average regular) projected to average about $1.13 per gallon this summer, up 9-10 cents from last year. The increase, while substantial, still leaves average prices low compared to pre-1998 history, especially in inflation-adjusted terms. * Supplies: expected to be adequate, overall. Beginning-of-season inventories were even with the 1998

  5. The commanding heights of oil: Control over the International oil market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krapels, E.N.

    1992-01-01

    The Commanding Heights of Oil is an analysis of oil's role in the international environment. It identifies the degree of control over oil in terms of what is asserted as the most important processes and factors that determine the condition of international affairs: (1) The state of oil demand in relation to the capacity to supply, with special emphasis on the amount of spare production capacity; (2) The nature of the business, and how the structure of the industry changes over time as companies cope with the risks peculiar to an extremely capital intensive enterprise; (3) The financial strength of the parties contending for control, including their ability to outlast their opponents in contests for influence over oil affairs; and (4) The nature of the mechanisms whereby the governments and companies strive to create a situation in which they do not have to rely on price to balance supply and demand. Each of the four central factors was prominent at every major turn of the international oil market over the decades. The dissertation argues that the international oil market was controlled in the past by first a group of companies, and, later, a group of countries, for a combination of reasons that is unlikely to be repeated. That does not mean that the 1990s will be spared oil price shocks such as occurred in the 1970s and 1980s. It does suggest that those shocks are unlikely to last long, that OPEC members are unlikely to be able to leverage their position in oil into larger positions in world affairs. It means that oil is unlikely to play as prominent a role in world affairs in the 1990s as it has in the past, even if oil demand, and along with it dependence on OPEC oil, rises.

  6. Summer 2003 Motor Gasoline Outlook.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2003 Summer 2003 Motor Gasoline Outlook Summary For the upcoming summer season (April to September 2003), high crude oil costs and other factors are expected to yield average retail motor gasoline prices higher than those of last year. Current crude oil prices reflect a substantial uncertainty premium due to concerns about the current conflict in the Persian Gulf, lingering questions about whether Venezuelan oil production will recover to near pre-strike

  7. Oil and gas outlook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 non-OECD consumption growth non-OECD GDP growth* Prices and economic growth are important, but policy, preferences, and technology may have a bigger...

  8. Biggest oil spill tackled in gulf amid war, soft market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-02-04

    Industry is scrambling to cope with history's biggest oil spill against the backdrop of a Persian Gulf war and a softening oil market. U.S. and Saudi Arabian officials accused Iraq of unleashing an oil spill of about 11 million bbl into the Persian Gulf off Kuwait last week by releasing crude from the giant Sea Island tanker loading terminal at Mina al Ahmadi. Smart bombs delivered by U.S. aircraft hit two onshore tank farm manifold stations, cutting off the terminal's source of oil flow Jan. 26. A small volume of oil was still leaking from 13 mile feeder pipelines to the terminal at presstime. Press reports quoted U.S. military and Saudi officials as estimating the slick at 35 miles long and 10 miles wide but breaking up in some areas late last week. Meantime, Iraq reportedly opened the valves at its Mina al Bakr marine terminal at Fao to spill crude into the northern gulf. BBC reported significant volumes of crude in the water off Fao 24 hr after the terminal valves were opened. Mina al Bakr is a considerably smaller terminal than Sea Island, suggesting that the resulting flow of oil would be smaller than that at Sea Island.

  9. Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowland, P.J. Associates )

    1992-05-01

    The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 ( OPA'') and an even more problematic array of State pollution laws have raised the cost, and risk, of carrying oil into and out of the US. This report, prepared under contract to the US Department of energy's Office of Domestic and International Policy, examines the impact of Federal and State oil spill legislation on the tanker market. It reviews the role of marine transportation in US oil supply, explores the OPA and State oil spill laws, studies reactions to OPA in the tanker and tank barge industries and in related industries such as insurance and ship finance, and finally, discusses the likely developments in the years ahead. US waterborne oil imports amounted to 6.5 million B/D in 1991, three-quarters of which was crude oil. Imports will rise by almost 3 million B/D by 2000 according to US Department of energy forecasts, with most of the crude oil growth after 1995. Tanker demand will grow even faster: most of the US imports and the increased traffic to other world consuming regions will be on long-haul trades. Both the number of US port calls by tankers and the volume of offshore lightering will grow. Every aspect of the tanker industry's behavior is affected by OPA and a variety of State pollution laws.

  10. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    March 2015 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights  North Sea Brent crude oil prices averaged $58/barrel (bbl) in February, an increase of $10/bbl from the January average, and the first monthly average price increase since June 2014. The price increase reflects news of falling U.S. crude oil rig counts and announced reductions in capital expenditures by major oil companies, along with lower-than-expected Iraqi crude oil exports.  EIA forecasts that Brent crude oil prices will average

  11. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Regional maps Figure F4. Oil and gas supply model regions F-5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual ...

  12. International energy outlook 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The International Energy Outlook 1994 (IEO94) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets between 1990 and 2010. The report is provided as a statistical service to assist energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. These forecasts are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Depart. of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO94 projections are based on US and foreign government policies in effect on October 1, 1993-which means that provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan unveiled by the Administration in mid-October are not reflected by the US projections.

  13. Economic Effects of High Oil Prices (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2006 projections of future energy market conditions reflect the effects of oil prices on the macroeconomic variables that affect oil demand, in particular, and energy demand in general. The variables include real gross domestic product (GDP) growth, inflation, employment, exports and imports, and interest rates.

  14. Markets during world oil supply crises: an analysis of industry, consumer, and governmental response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erfle, Stephen; Pound, John; Kalt, Joseph

    1981-04-01

    An analysis of the response of American markets to supply crises in world oil markets is presented. It addresses four main issues: the efficiency of the operation of American oil markets during oil supply crises; the problems of both economic efficiency and social equity which arise during the American adaptation process; the propriety of the Federal government's past policy responses to these problems; and the relationship between perceptions of the problems caused by world oil crises and the real economic natures of these problems. Specifically, Chapter 1 presents a theoretical discussion of the effects of a world supply disruption on the price level and supply availability of the world market oil to any consuming country including the US Chapter 2 provides a theoretical and empirical analysis of the efficiency of the adaptations of US oil product markets to higher world oil prices. Chapter 3 examines the responses of various groups of US oil firms to the alterations observed in world markets, while Chapter 4 presents a theoretical explanation for the price-lagging behavior exhibited by firms in the US oil industry. Chapter 5 addresses the nature of both real and imagined oil market problems in the US during periods of world oil market transition. (MCW)

  15. Energy and Financial Markets Overview: Crude Oil Price Formation

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Standards (CAFE) in three cases, 2005-2035 2 0 20 40 60 80 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 miles per gallon Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011 CAFE6 CAFE3 Reference ...

  16. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    to increase because of accelerated economic growth and generally lower prices. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, October 2003 History Projections Jul-03 Aug-03 Sep-03...

  17. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    to increase because of accelerated economic growth and generally lower prices. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, November 2003 History Projections Aug-03 Sep-03 Oct-03...

  18. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 1 October 2014 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights  EIA projects average U.S. household expenditures for natural gas, heating oil, electricity, and propane will decrease this winter heating season (October 1 through March 31) compared with last winter, which was 11% colder than the previous 10-year average nationally. Projected average household expenditures for propane and heating oil are 27% and 15% lower, respectively, because of lower heating demand and prices.

  19. Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This report looks at the impact of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 and the developing State oil spill regulations on the tanker and coastal barge markets, and at the implications for the future of the U.S. seaborne petroleum trades. The analysis relied on a dual approach. Because much of the legislation, both State and Federal, is still evolving--particularly with respect to implementing regulations--as yet there can be no definitive assessment of its impact. Consequently a quantitative analysis of fleets, trades, and vessel movements, was complemented by extensive interviews. Discussions have been held with oil companies large and small, shipowners, charterers, insurance companies, classification societies, and a variety of public and private institutions active in the maritime industry. All interviews were conducted in confidence: no individual views are identified in the report. (AT)

  20. Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This report looks at the impact of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 and the developing State oil spill regulations on the tanker and coastal barge markets, and at the implications for the future of the U.S. seaborne petroleum trades. The analysis relied on a dual approach. Because much of the legislation, both State and Federal, is still evolving--particularly with respect to implementing regulations--as yet there can be no definitive assessment of its impact. Consequently a quantitative analysis of fleets, trades, and vessel movements, was complemented by extensive interviews. Discussions have been held with oil companies large and small, shipowners, charterers, insurance companies, classification societies, and a variety of public and private institutions active in the maritime industry. All interviews were conducted in confidence: no individual views are identified in the report. (AT)

  1. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    June 2014 1 June 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights  North Sea Brent crude oil spot prices increased from a monthly average of $108/barrel (bbl) in April to $110/bbl in May. This was the 11 th consecutive month in which the average Brent crude oil spot price fell within a relatively narrow range of $107/bbl to $112/bbl. The discount of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil to Brent crude oil, which averaged more than $13/bbl from November through January, fell below $4/bbl in

  2. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - October 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 1 October 2005 Short-Term Energy Outlook and Winter Fuels Outlook October 12, 2005 Release (Next Update: November 8, 2005) Overview Warnings from previous Outlooks about the potential adverse impacts of an active hurricane season on domestic energy supply and prices are unfortunately being reflected in the challenging realities brought about by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The impact of the hurricanes on oil and natural gas production, oil refining, natural gas processing, and pipeline systems

  3. Annual energy outlook 2005 with projections to 2025

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-02-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO2005) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2025 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modelling System (NEMS). The report begins with an 'Overview' summarizing the AEO2005 reference case. The next section, 'Legislation and Regulations', discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues in the USA. Issues in Focus includes discussions on key energy market issues and examines their potential impacts. In particular, it includes a discussion of the world oil price assumptions used in the reference case and four alternative world oil price cases examined in AEO2005. 'Issues in Focus' is followed by 'Market Trends', which provides a summary of energy market trends in the AEO2005 forecast. The analysis in AEO2005 focuses primarily on a reference case, lower and higher economic growth cases, and four alternative oil price cases, a low world oil price case, an October oil futures case, and two high world oil price cases. Forecast tables for those cases are provided in Appendixes A through D. The major results for the alterative cases, which explore the impacts of varying key assumption in NEMS (such as rates of technology penetration), are summarized in Appendix E. Appendix F briefly describes NEMS and the alternative cases. 115 figs., 38 tabs., 8 apps.

  4. Big questions cloud Iraq's future role in world oil market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tippee, B.

    1992-03-09

    This paper reports that Iraq raises questions for the world oil market beyond those frequently asked about when and under what circumstances it will resume exports. Two wars since 1981 have obscured encouraging results from a 20 year exploration program that were only beginning to come to light when Iraq invaded Kuwait in August 1990. Those results indicate the country might someday be able to produce much more than the 3.2 million b/d it was flowing before a United Nations embargo blocked exports. If exploratory potential is anywhere near what officials asserted in the late 1980s, and if Iraq eventually turns hospitable to international capital, the country could become a world class opportunity for oil companies as well as an exporter with productive capacity approaching that of Saudi Arabia. But political conditions can change quickly. Under a new, secular regime, Iraq might welcome non-Iraqi oil companies and capital as essential to economic recovery. It's a prospect that warrants a new industry look at what the country has revealed about its geology and exploration history.

  5. August 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    August 2012 1 August 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Highlights  EIA projects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average about $103 per barrel during the second half of 2012, about $3.50 per barrel higher than in last month's Outlook. The forecast Brent crude oil spot price falls to an average of $100 per barrel in 2013. The projected West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price discount to Brent crude oil narrows from about $14 in the third quarter of 2012 to $9 by late 2013.

  6. Specific heavy oil processing market study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    The market potential for two not-yet-commercialized, proprietary processes for upgrading heavy oil was evaluated. Dynacracking (TM) of Hydrocarbon Research Inc. (HRI) and Aurabon of UOP Process Division (UOP), including an integrated commercial hydrotreating unit were the processes studied. The report concludes that while a large market for Heavy Oil Processing (HOP) units was originally forecast as the result of the shift to heavier crudes by US refiners under a given demand slate and refinery configuration, this market has either eroded due to massive demand shifts (both in volumetric and relative product mix terms) or largely been satisfied on an accelerated basis (due to downstream restructuring pressures) by units already constructed or under firm commitment utilizing other HOP technology. Dynacracking or Aurabon does not appear to offer the substantial economic advantage needed to replace other HOP units already committed. However, additional demands for HOP units couold arise, particularly on a regional basis, if significant additional foreign or domestic sources of heavy crude are introduced into the supply picture or the demand structure moves dramatically away from that currently foreseen by the EIA. Expected profit margins were calculated for both processes, allowing $2/barrel extra credit to the Aurabon products because of their higher quality. Both processes appear to produce about the same fraction of vacuum bottoms when processing the same crude. Dynacracking produces a higher proportion of naphtha and Aurabon produces substantially more heavy distillate. This report is not intended to serve as a basis of selecting either process for a particular installation. 10 references, 7 figures, 29 tables.

  7. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Oil Price case projections Table D1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.5 124.2 128.2 131.8 136.7 144.7 0.6 United States a 94.9 97.9 96.0 99.4 100.9 101.4 103.0 107.3 0.3 Canada 13.7 13.5 13.9 14.3 15.3 16.4

  8. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 December 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights  North Sea Brent crude oil spot prices fell by more than 15% in November, declining from $85/barrel (bbl) on November 3 to $72/bbl on November 28. Monthly average Brent crude oil prices have declined 29% from their 2014 high of $112/bbl in June to an average of $79/bbl in November, the lowest monthly average since September 2010. The November price decline reflects continued growth in U.S. tight oil production along with weakening

  9. Outlook for Non-OPEC Oil Supply in 2010-2011 (Released in the STEO January 2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    Two large categories define the world's producing countries of crude oil and other liquid fuels (hereafter liquids): those that are members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and those that are outside that group (non-OPEC). This article takes a closer look at the latter category.

  10. Outlook for Non-OPEC Oil Supply Growth in 2008-2009 (Released in the STEO February 2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    In 2008-2009, the Energy Information Administration expects that non-OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) petroleum supply growth will surpass that in recent years because of the large number of new oil projects scheduled to come online during the forecast period.

  11. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    23 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Reference case Table A11. Petroleum and other liquids supply and disposition (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A11. Petroleum and other liquids supply and disposition (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Supply and disposition Reference case Annual growth 2013-2040 (percent) 2012 2013 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Crude oil Domestic

  12. Update: US oil-import market. 1982 top 7 suppliers to US import market: how their shares changed since 1973

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-03-09

    This issue updates the Energy Detente 7/09/82, which tracked US oil imports since the Arab Oil Embargo. Since then, the phrase oil glut became common even among cautious market analysts as many exporters, hard-pressed for petrodollars, produced much more than the market was prepared to absorb. To examine how the US import market has adjusted to this continued buyers market, the top seven suppliers of 1982 are tracked backwards through time. A graph shows the 1982 reversal of Mexico's and Saudi Arabia's positions in this market. The three main reasons for Mexico's strong present position in the US market are: crude costs and corresponding refined value; proximity to US refining centers; and strategic importance of Mexico's economic stability through oil sales. Interviews with various US refiners and other market observers confirm that these elements will persist during 1983, regardless of significant price cuts among OPEC and other producers. It is believed that the profitability of running heavy Maya crude in sophisticated plants will continue to look optimistic, and that Mexican crude sales to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve implies US government interest in Mexico's economic recovery, and in its stability in the light of civil wars being waged in Central America. This issue presents the Energy Detente (1) fuel price/tax series and (2) industrial fuel prices for March 1983 for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere. 6 figures, 8 tables.

  13. World Oil Price Cases (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    World oil prices in Annual Energy Outlook 2005 are set in an environment where the members of OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) are assumed to act as the dominant producers, with lower production costs than other supply regions or countries. Non-OPEC oil producers are assumed to behave competitively, producing as much oil as they can profitability extract at the market price for oil. As a result, the OPEC member countries will be able effectively to set the price of oil when they can act in concert by varying their aggregate production. Alternatively, OPEC members could target a fixed level of production and let the world market determine the price.

  14. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    should relieve some of the potential upward price pressure on the domestic market Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, January 2003 History Projections Oct-02 Nov-02 Dec-02...

  15. International energy outlook 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-03-01

    This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. The report begins with a review of world trends in energy demand. The historical time frame begins with data from 1970 and extends to 1996, providing readers with a 26-year historical view of energy demand. The IEO99 projections covers a 24-year period. The next part of the report is organized by energy source. Regional consumption projections for oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear power, and renewable energy (hydroelectricity, geothermal, wind, solar, and other renewables) are presented in the five fuel chapters, along with a review of the current status of each fuel on a worldwide basis. The third part of the report looks at energy consumption in the end-use sectors, beginning with a chapter on energy use for electricity generation. New to this year`s outlook are chapters on energy use in the transportation sector and on environmental issues related to energy consumption. 104 figs., 87 tabs.

  16. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 1 October 2015 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights  EIA projects average U.S. household expenditures for natural gas, heating oil, and propane during the upcoming winter heating season (October 1 through March 31) will be 10%, 25%, and 18% lower, respectively, than last winter, because of lower fuel prices and lower heating demand. Forecast lower heating demand and relatively unchanged prices contribute to electricity expenditures that are 3% lower than last winter

  17. EIA - Special Report 8/29/05 - Hurricane Katrina's Impact on Oil Markets

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    the U.S. Oil Market Hurricane Katrina's Impact on the U.S. Oil Market As of 3:00 pm, Monday, August 29 --SEE MOST RECENT-- According to the Minerals Management Service (MMS), Gulf of Mexico oil production was reduced by about 1.4 million barrels per day as a result of Hurricane Katrina. The MMS also reported that 8.3 billion cubic feet per day of natural gas production was shut in. The Louisiana Offshore Oil Port (LOOP) stopped making shipments to onshore facilities as of Saturday, and was

  18. Oil Spill Management Market is Estimated to Reach USD 114,441...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oil Spill Management Market is Estimated to Reach USD 114,441.1 Million by 2020 Home > Groups > Renewable Energy RFPs Wayne31jan's picture Submitted by Wayne31jan(150) Contributor...

  19. Oil Shale Market is Estimated to Reach USD 7,400.70 Million by...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oil Shale Market is Estimated to Reach USD 7,400.70 Million by 2022 Home > Groups > Renewable Energy RFPs Wayne31jan's picture Submitted by Wayne31jan(150) Contributor 1 July, 2015...

  20. Key Milestones/Outlook

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Key Milestones/Outlook per the Department of Energy 2015 Congressional Budget Request, Environmental Management, March 2014

  1. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 Reference case Table A14. Oil and gas supply Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A14. Oil and gas supply Production and supply Reference case Annual growth 2013-2040 (percent) 2012 2013 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Crude oil Lower 48 average wellhead price 1 (2013 dollars per barrel) ...................................... 96 97 75 87 101 117 136 1.3% Production (million barrels per day) 2 United States total ............................................... 6.50 7.44

  2. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (83/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook iuarterly Projections August 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. 20585 t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- iort- nort- lort- '.ort- ort- Tt- .-m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Term .-Term -Term xrm Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy -OJ.UUK Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  3. Short-term energy outlook quarterly projections. First quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-07

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short- term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets.

  4. Too early to tell on $100 oil

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Presentation to: April 8, 2008 Lehman Brothers oil outlook: Stronger signals of weaker prices Adam Robinson What's driving oil markets today? u Not the short run: Oil prices go up every time the US economy gets worse u It's tempting to argue that the rise in oil prices now is simply a continuation of past trends - The cost of F&D continues to march up - Demand in China growing faster with no signs of slowdown - Upstream and downstream supply bottlenecks are permanent u We think current price

  5. International energy outlook 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    This International Energy Outlook presents historical data from 1970 to 1993 and EIA`s projections of energy consumption and carbon emissions through 2015 for 6 country groups. Prospects for individual fuels are discussed. Summary tables of the IEO96 world energy consumption, oil production, and carbon emissions projections are provided in Appendix A. The reference case projections of total foreign energy consumption and of natural gas, coal, and renewable energy were prepared using EIA`s World Energy Projection System (WEPS) model. Reference case projections of foreign oil production and consumption were prepared using the International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Nuclear consumption projections were derived from the International Nuclear Model, PC Version (PC-INM). Alternatively, nuclear capacity projections were developed using two methods: the lower reference case projections were based on analysts` knowledge of the nuclear programs in different countries; the upper reference case was generated by the World Integrated Nuclear Evaluation System (WINES)--a demand-driven model. In addition, the NEMS Coal Export Submodule (CES) was used to derive flows in international coal trade. As noted above, foreign projections of electricity demand are now projected as part of the WEPS. 64 figs., 62 tabs.

  6. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, Third quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-02

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202). The feature article for this issue is Demand, Supply and Price Outlook for Reformulated Gasoline, 1995.

  7. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

    2012-08-01

    This report describes the status of the U.S. wind energy industry market in 2011; its trends, performance, market drivers and future outlook.

  8. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.; Barbose, G.; Darghouth, N.; Hoen, B.; Mills, A.; Weaver, S.; Porter, K.; Buckley, M.; Fink, S.; Oteri, F.; Tegen, S.

    2013-08-01

    This report describes the status of the U.S. wind energy industry market in 2012; its trends, performance, market drivers and future outlook.

  9. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

    2011-06-01

    This report describes the status of the U.S. wind energy industry market in 2010; its trends, performance, market drivers and future outlook.

  10. 2013 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2014-08-15

    This report describes the status of the U.S. wind energy industry market in 2013; its trends, performance, market drivers and future outlook.

  11. Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowland, P.J.

    1992-05-01

    The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (``OPA``) and an even more problematic array of State pollution laws have raised the cost, and risk, of carrying oil into and out of the US. This report, prepared under contract to the US Department of energy`s Office of Domestic and International Policy, examines the impact of Federal and State oil spill legislation on the tanker market. It reviews the role of marine transportation in US oil supply, explores the OPA and State oil spill laws, studies reactions to OPA in the tanker and tank barge industries and in related industries such as insurance and ship finance, and finally, discusses the likely developments in the years ahead. US waterborne oil imports amounted to 6.5 million B/D in 1991, three-quarters of which was crude oil. Imports will rise by almost 3 million B/D by 2000 according to US Department of energy forecasts, with most of the crude oil growth after 1995. Tanker demand will grow even faster: most of the US imports and the increased traffic to other world consuming regions will be on long-haul trades. Both the number of US port calls by tankers and the volume of offshore lightering will grow. Every aspect of the tanker industry`s behavior is affected by OPA and a variety of State pollution laws.

  12. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - January 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    January 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2005 Winter Fuels Update (Figure 1) Consumer prices for heating fuels are relatively unchanged since the December Outlook, leaving projections for household heating fuel expenditures about the same as previously projected, despite continued warm weather in the middle of the heating season. Heating oil expenditures by typical Northeastern households are expected to average 30 percent above last winter's levels, with residential fuel oil prices

  13. The social costs to the US of monopolization of the world oil market, 1972--1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.; Leiby, P.N.

    1993-03-01

    The partial monopolization of the world oil market by the OPEC cartel has produced significant economic costs to the economies of the world. This paper reports estimates of the costs of monopolization of oil to the US over the period 1972--1991. Two fundamental assumptions of the analysis are, (1) that OPEC has acted as a monopoly, albeit with limited control, knowledge, and ability to act and, (2) that the US and other consuming nations could, through collective (social) action affect the cartel's ability to act as a monopoly. We measure total costs by comparing actual costs for the 1972--1991 period to a hypothetical more competitive'' world oil market scenario. By measuring past costs we avoid the enormous uncertainties about the future course of the world oil market and leave to the reader's judgment the issue of how much the future will be like the past. We note that total cost numbers cannot be used to determine the value of reducing US oil use by one barrel. They are useful for describing the overall size of the petroleum problem and are one important factor in deciding how much effort should be devoted to solving it. Monopoly pricing of oil transfers wealth from US oil consumers to foreign oil producers and, by increasing theeconomic scarcity of oil, reduces the economy's potential to produce. The actions of the OPEC cartel have also produced oil price shocks, both upward and downward, that generate additional costs because of the economy's inherent inability to adjust quickly to a large change in energy prices. Estimated total costs to the United States from these three sources for the 1972--1991 period are put at $4.1 trillion in 1990$($1.2 T wealth transfer, $0.8 T macroeconomic adjustment costs, $2.1 T potential GNP losses). The cost of the US's primary oil supply contingency program is small ($10 B) by comparison.

  14. The social costs to the US of monopolization of the world oil market, 1972--1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.; Leiby, P.N.

    1993-03-01

    The partial monopolization of the world oil market by the OPEC cartel has produced significant economic costs to the economies of the world. This paper reports estimates of the costs of monopolization of oil to the US over the period 1972--1991. Two fundamental assumptions of the analysis are, (1) that OPEC has acted as a monopoly, albeit with limited control, knowledge, and ability to act and, (2) that the US and other consuming nations could, through collective (social) action affect the cartel`s ability to act as a monopoly. We measure total costs by comparing actual costs for the 1972--1991 period to a hypothetical ``more competitive`` world oil market scenario. By measuring past costs we avoid the enormous uncertainties about the future course of the world oil market and leave to the reader`s judgment the issue of how much the future will be like the past. We note that total cost numbers cannot be used to determine the value of reducing US oil use by one barrel. They are useful for describing the overall size of the petroleum problem and are one important factor in deciding how much effort should be devoted to solving it. Monopoly pricing of oil transfers wealth from US oil consumers to foreign oil producers and, by increasing theeconomic scarcity of oil, reduces the economy`s potential to produce. The actions of the OPEC cartel have also produced oil price shocks, both upward and downward, that generate additional costs because of the economy`s inherent inability to adjust quickly to a large change in energy prices. Estimated total costs to the United States from these three sources for the 1972--1991 period are put at $4.1 trillion in 1990$($1.2 T wealth transfer, $0.8 T macroeconomic adjustment costs, $2.1 T potential GNP losses). The cost of the US`s primary oil supply contingency program is small ($10 B) by comparison.

  15. Annual Energy Outlook2014

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    For further information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2014 (AEO2014) was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), under the direction of John J. Conti...

  16. Energy & Financial Markets: What Drives Crude Oil Prices? - Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration Crudeoil - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks,

  17. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    commercial sector demand are offset by lower demand in the electric power sector. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, September 2003 History Projections Jun-03 Jul-03 Aug-03...

  18. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    by 1.8 percent as the economy continues to expand and prices ease slightly. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, January 2004 History Projections Oct-03 Nov-03 Dec-03...

  19. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    economy. In 2003, natural gas demand growth is expected across all sectors. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, July 2002 History Projections Apr-02 Ma May-02 Jun-02...

  20. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    because of somewhat weaker prices and higher demand in the electric power sector. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, July 2003 History Projections Apr-03 May-03 Jun-03 Jul-03...

  1. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    than those of 2003, when stocks after the winter of 2002-2003 were at record lows. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, December 2003 History Projections Sep-03 Oct-03 Nov-03...

  2. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    demand in the first quarter of 2005 relative to the first quarter of 2004. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, March 2004 History Projections Dec-03 Jan-04 Feb-04...

  3. Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) Supplemental tables were generated for the reference case of the AEO using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets. Most of the tables were not published in the AEO, but contain regional and other more detailed projections underlying the AEO projections.

  4. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    market outlook and drivers for Official Monetary and Financial Institutions Forum (OMFIF) July 14, 2016 | St. Louis, MO by Howard Gruenspecht, Deputy Administrator Forecast -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 100 2011-Q1 2012-Q1 2013-Q1 2014-Q1 2015-Q1 2016-Q1 2017-Q1 Implied stock change and balance (right axis) World production (left axis) World consumption (left axis) world supply and demand million barrels per day implied stock change million barrels per day OMFIF l Third Main

  5. Preliminary Results for Annual Energy Outlook 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Results for Annual Energy Outlook 2014: Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group AEO2014 Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group Meeting Office of Petroleum, Natural Gas & Biofuels Analysis September 19, 2013 | Washington, DC WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Overview 2 Office of Petroleum, Natural Gas, & Biofuels Analysis Working Group Presentation for Discussion Purposes Washington DC, September 19, 2013 DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE

  6. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Reference case Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A17. Renewable energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2013-2040 (percent) 2012 2013 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Marketed renewable energy 1 Residential (wood) ............................................... 0.44 0.58 0.41 0.39 0.38 0.36 0.35 -1.8% Commercial (biomass)

  7. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (STEO) Highlights * The market's perception of reduced risk to Iraqi oil exports and news regarding increasing Libyan oil exports contributed to a drop in the Brent crude oil spot price to an average of $107 per barrel (bbl) in July, $5/bbl lower than the June average. EIA projects Brent crude oil prices to average $107/bbl over the second half of 2014 and $105/bbl in 2015. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil prices fell from an average of $106/bbl in June to $104/bbl in July, despite record

  8. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (STEO) Highlights * Crude oil prices increased during the first three weeks of July 2013 as world oil markets tightened in the face of seasonal increases in world consumption, unexpected supply disruptions, and heightened uncertainty over the security of supply with the renewed unrest in Egypt. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects that the Brent crude oil spot price, which averaged $108 per barrel over the first half of 2013, will average $104 per barrel over the second half

  9. Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual Energy Outlook 2015 AEO Annual Energy Outlook AEO2015 Annual Energy Outlook 2015 API American Petroleum Institute bbl Barrels bbl/d Barrels per day Brent North Sea Brent Btu British thermal unit(s) CAFE Corporate average fuel economy CAIR Clean Air Interstate Rule CHP Combined heat and power CO2 Carbon dioxide CPI Consumer price index CSAPR Cross-State Air Pollution Rule CTL Coal-to-liquids E85 Motor fuel containing up to 85% ethanol EIA U.S. Energy Information Administration EOR Enhanced

  10. Short-term energy outlook, January 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from January 1999 through December 2000. Data values for the fourth quarter 1998, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the January 1999 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 28 figs., 19 tabs.

  11. The Outlook for Energy: A View to 2030 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Outlook for Energy: A View to 2030 The Outlook for Energy: A View to 2030 Presents an outlook on the future supply and demand for energy until the year 2030, with a major focus on oil, natural gas, coal, and renewable sources of energy. deer08_tunison.pdf (288.67 KB) More Documents & Publications Energy Outlook for the Transport Sector Measuring the Costs of U.S. Oil Dependence and the Benefits of Reducing It Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee

  12. Impacts on U.S. Energy Markets and the Economy of Reducing Oil Imports

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1996-01-01

    This study was undertaken at the request of the General Accounting Office (GAO). Its purpose is to evaluate the impacts on U.S. energy markets and the economy of reducing oil imports. The approach and assumptions underlying this report were specified by GAO and are attached as an Appendix. The study focuses on two approaches: (1) a set of cases with alternative world crude oil price trajectories and (2) two cases which investigate the use of an oil import tariff to achieve a target reduction in the oil imports. The analysis presented uses the National Energy Modeling System, which is maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting within the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and the DRI/McGraw Hill Macroeconomic Model of the U.S. Economy, a proprietary model maintained by DRI and subscribed to by EIA.

  13. Microsoft Word - Hurricane Outlook_v3.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    June 2007 1 June 2007 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: The 2007 Outlook for Hurricane Impacts on Gulf of Mexico Crude Oil and Natural Gas Production Highlights * The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicts above-normal hurricane activity in the May 22, 2007 version of its Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook. They project 13 to 17 named storms will form within the Atlantic Basin, including 7 to 10 hurricanes of which 3 to 5 will be intense. 1 * Above-normal hurricane

  14. Annual energy outlook 1999, with projections to 2020

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA`s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an Overview summarizing the AEO99 reference case. The next section, Legislation and Regulations, describes the assumptions made with regard to laws that affect energy markets and discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues. Issues in Focus discusses current energy issues--the economic decline in East Asia, growth in demand for natural gas, vehicle emissions standards, competitive electricity pricing, renewable portfolio standards, and carbon emissions. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends. The analysis in AEO99 focuses primarily on a reference case and four other cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices than in the reference case. Forecast tables for these cases are provided in Appendixes A through C. Appendixes D and E present a summary of the reference case forecasts in units of oil equivalence and household energy expenditures. The AEO99 projections are based on Federal, State, and local laws and regulations in effect on July 1, 1998. Pending legislation and sections of existing legislation for which funds have not been appropriated are not reflected in the forecasts. Historical data used for the AEOI99 projections were the most current available as of July 31, 1998, when most 1997 data but only partial 1998 data were available.

  15. International Energy Outlook 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    band is very wide 2 WTI price dollars per barrel Source: EIA, Short-Term Energy Outlook, June 2015 0 25 50 75 100 125 150 Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan Apr Jul Oct...

  16. International Energy Outlook 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    band is very wide 2 WTI price dollars per barrel Source: EIA, Short-Term Energy Outlook, May 2015 0 25 50 75 100 125 150 Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan Apr Jul Oct...

  17. Tribal Economic Outlook Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by Northern Arizona University, the Tribal Economic Outlook Conference will preview the conditions that will impact business and economy in the year ahead. Hear what the experts are predicting for 2016 at the tribal, state, and local level.

  18. China Energy Outlook

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    X I A O J I E X U C H A I R F E L L O W , W O R L D E N E R G Y C H I N A O U T L O O K I N S T I T U T E O F W O R L D E C O N O M I C S A N D P O L I T I C S , C H I N E S E A C A D E M Y O F S O C I A L S C I E N C E S China Energy Outlook 2020 2014-7-15 Washington DC World Energy China Outlook | Xiaojie Xu and Chen Tangsi | xuoffice@vip.sina.com 1 World Energy China Outlook 2014-2015 Annual interactive Energy Outlook Mid-year Updates IWEP Energy Chinese Academy of Social Sciences 2014-7-15

  19. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - February 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    February 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2005 Winter Fuels Update (Figure 1) Despite some cold weather during the second half of January, expected average consumer prices for heating fuels this heating season are little changed since the January Outlook, leaving projections for household heating fuel expenditures about the same as previously reported. Heating oil expenditures by typical Northeastern households are expected to average 32 percent above last winter's levels, with

  20. Market Prices and Uncertainty Report

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2016-01-01

    Monthly analysis of crude oil, petroleum products, natural gas, and propane prices is released as a regular supplement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook.

  1. International Energy Outlook 2016

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    484(2016) I May 2016 International Energy Outlook 2016 ~ Independent Statistics & Ana[ysis e~ ~* a~ 1 U.S. ~~ergy. Information Administration Contacts The International Energy Outlook 2016 was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) under the direction of John Conti, Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis (john.conti@eia.gov, 202-586-2222); Paul Holtberg, Team Leader, Analysis Integration Team (paul.holtberg@eia.gov, 202-586-1284); Jim Diefenderfer, Director, Office

  2. Study of the competitive viability of minority fuel oil marketers. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-09-30

    Previous studies on the competitive viability of the fuel oil heating market had addressed some of the unique problems facing minority fuel oil marketers (MFMs) within the total market sector (TMS). This study focused on identifying and developing quantitative information on MFMs in the TMS. The specific objective was to determine whether the business problems experienced by MFMs were directly related to their minority status or were characterstic of any firm in the TMS operating under comparable conditions. As an overall conclusion, thorough investigation of the MFMs considered to constitute the universe of minoriy firms within the TMS did not reveal any evidence of overt discrimination affecting the competitive viability of MFMs. Upon analysis, the problems reported by MFMs could not be reasonably ascribed to discrimination on the basis of their minority business status. The study, however, did point up problems unique to MFMs as the result of typical operational and financial characteristics. For example, MFMs, compared to the TMS norm, have not been in the market as long and are smaller in terms of total assets, number of employees, number of trucks, number of accounts and annual volume of oil delivered. Their primary customers are low-income families in urban areas. Financial indicators suggest that the average MFM does not have long-term financial stability. The basis for this overall conclusion, derived by analyses of information from MFMs, as well as many independent sources, is summarized in three parts: (1) MFM industry profile; (2) financial analyses; and (3) problem analyses.

  3. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (STEO) Highlights  North Sea Brent crude oil prices averaged $57/barrel (b) in July, a $5/b decrease from June. Brent crude oil spot prices fell further in early August, settling at $48/b on August 7. The recent price declines reflect concerns about lower economic growth in emerging markets, expectations of higher oil exports from Iran, and continuing actual and expected growth in global inventories.  EIA forecasts that Brent crude oil prices will average $54/b in 2015 and $59/b in 2016,

  4. Too early to tell on $100 oil

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Confidential Presentation to: April 7, 2008 Middle East oil demand and Lehman Brothers oil price outlook Adam Robinson Middle East oil demand u Three pillars of Middle East oil ...

  5. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, Third quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-02

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent projections with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the third quarter of 1995 through the fourth quarter of 1996. Values for the second quarter of 1995, however, are preliminary EIA estimates.

  6. Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Preliminary Results

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Working Group 2 September 25, 2013 | Washington, DC By Trisha Hutchins and Nicholas Chase Office of Transportation Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis Annual Energy Outlook 2014: transportation modeling updates and preliminary results Overview 2 AEO2014 Transportation Working Group 2: Modeling updates and preliminary results Washington, D.C., September 25, 2013 Discussion purposes only - Do not cite or circulate * Macroeconomic drivers - GDP, population, world oil price * Light-duty

  7. Supplement to the annual energy outlook 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    This section of the Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 1995 present the major assumptions of the modeling system used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 1995 (AEO95). In this context, assumptions include general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports listed in Appendix B. A synopsis of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented. The NEMS is developed and maintained by the office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projection of domestic energy-economy markets in the midterm time period and perform policy analyses requested by various government agencies and the private sector.

  8. 2013 Distributed Wind Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orrell, A. C.

    2014-08-15

    This report describes the status of the U.S. distributed wind industry in 2013; its trends, performance, market drivers and future outlook.

  9. Short-Term Energy Outlook June 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 June 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights * After increasing to $119 per barrel in early February 2013, the Brent crude oil spot price fell to a low of $97 per barrel in mid-April and then recovered to an average of $103 per barrel in May. EIA expects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average $102 per barrel over the second half of 2013, and $100 per barrel in 2014. * EIA expects the price of regular gasoline will average $3.53 per gallon over the summer driving season

  10. How might North American oil and gas markets have performed with a Free Trade Agreement in 1970?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, G.C.; Waverman, L.

    1993-12-31

    Deregulation on both sides of the U.S.-Canadian border has made certain aspects of trade agreements largely superfluous in the near term. It is over the longer term that the impact of the NAFTA will become apparent. To grapple with this issue, simulations are attempted of oil and gas trade between the United States and Canada as if the NAFTA had been in place before the first oil price shock of 1973. The simulations suggest substantial additional exports of Canadian oil and gas would have enabled the United States to back out volumes of OPEC oil during the critical years of the late 1970s and early 1980s. This would have served to dampen world oil markets during the years of OPEC ascendancy-not dramatically, but not negligibly either. By promoting closer integration of energy markets, the NAFTA should lead to more cohesive North American responses to any future world oil shocks. 13 refs., 8 tabs.

  11. US Crude Oil Production Surpasses Net Imports | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    US Crude Oil Production Surpasses Net Imports US Crude Oil Production Surpasses Net Imports Source: Energy Information Administration Short Term Energy Outlook. Chart by Daniel...

  12. US Crude Oil Production Surpasses Net Imports | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    US Crude Oil Production Surpasses Net Imports US Crude Oil Production Surpasses Net Imports Source: Energy Information Administration Short Term Energy Outlook. Chart by Daniel ...

  13. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Special Analysis + EXPAND ALL Feature Articles The Short-Term Outlook for Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids March 2016 PDF Changes to the Natural Gas Storage Regions December 2015 PDF 2015 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages June 2015 PDF Weather Sensitivity in Natural Gas Markets October 2014 PDF 2014 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages June 2014 PDF Uncertainties in the Short-Term Global Petroleum and Other Liquids Supply Forecast February 2014

  14. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - May 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook May 2005 2005 Summer Motor Gasoline Outlook Update (Figure 1) A considerable break in the expected strength of near-term crude oil prices has resulted in a lower forecast for retail gasoline prices this spring. Gasoline prices may well have seen their peak for the year, barring sharp disruptions in crude oil supply or refinery operations. Pump prices for the summer (April-September) are now projected to average $2.17 per gallon, still high by historical standards

  15. Microsoft Word - high-oil-price.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Short Term Energy Outlook 1 STEO Supplement: Why are oil prices so high? During most of the 1990s, the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price averaged close to $20 per barrel, before plunging to almost $10 per barrel in late 1998 as a result of the Asian financial crisis slowing demand growth while extra supply from Iraq was entering the market for the first time since the Gulf War. Subsequently, as Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) producers more closely adhered to a

  16. Short-term energy outlook, April 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-04-01

    The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from April 1999 through December 2000. Data values for the first quarter 1999, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the April 1999 version of the Short-Term Integrated forecasting system (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 25 figs., 19 tabs.

  17. Annual energy outlook 1997 with projections to 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 1997 (AEO97) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2015 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). These projections are based on results of EIA`s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). This report begins with a summary of the reference case, followed by a discussion of the legislative assumptions and evolving legislative and regulatory issues. ``Issues in Focus`` discusses emerging energy issues and other topics of particular interest. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends. The analysis in AEO97 focuses primarily on a reference case and four other cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices than in the reference case. Forecast tables for these cases are provided in Appendixes A through C. Appendixes D and E present summaries of the reference case forecasts in units of oil equivalence and household energy expenditures. Twenty-three other cases explore the impacts of varying key assumptions in NEMS--generally, technology penetration, with the major results shown in Appendix F. Appendix G briefly describes NEMS and the major AEO97 assumptions, with a summary table. 114 figs., 22 tabs.

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - BP 2030 Outlook (EIA conference Apr 2011).ppt

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    BP Energy Outlook 2030 Washington, DC 26 April 2011 Energy Outlook 2030 2 © BP 2011 Global trends US particulars What can bend the trend? Outline Energy Outlook 2030 3 © BP 2011 Non-OECD economies drive consumption growth Billion toe Billion toe 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 OECD Non-OECD 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 Renewables Hydro Nuclear Coal Gas Oil * * Includes biofuels Energy Outlook 2030 4 © BP 2011 Gas and renewables win as fuel shares

  19. Iran`s petroleum policy: Current trends and the future outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pezeshki, S.; Fesharaki, F.

    1994-12-01

    The Iranian economy and political situation have undergone radical changes since the 1979 Islamic revolution. The excesses of the early years of the revolution have gradually given way to moderation and a more pragmatic economic policy--based on the principles of the free market. The petroleum policy, as a subset of the economic policies, has been somewhat affected by the political and economic developments in Iran. The petroleum policy has changed from a position of no foreign participation to a position that includes a desire for foreign participation, the text of a model contract, and an attempt to introduce new technologies in the upstream sector. This report provides an overview of the key issues facing the Iranian oil industry and the economic context in which the oil industry is operating in Iran. It describes the evolution of policies meant to move the oil industry toward the free market; it discusses Iran`s oil trading partners, the outlook for refining and project investments, and current and likely future developments in the natural gas and petrochemical sectors. In short, the report provides an up-to-date assessment of the Iranian petroleum sector and its likely evolution in the future.

  20. Short-term energy outlook, quarterly projections, second quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections. The details of these projections, as well as monthly updates, are available on the Internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. The paper discusses outlook assumptions; US energy prices; world oil supply and the oil production cutback agreement of March 1998; international oil demand and supply; world oil stocks, capacity, and net trade; US oil demand and supply; US natural gas demand and supply; US coal demand and supply; US electricity demand and supply; US renewable energy demand; and US energy demand and supply sensitivities. 29 figs., 19 tabs.

  1. Market Data for Renewable Energy Projects and Programs at NREL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    trends; cost, price, and performance trends; policy and market drivers; as well as future outlook. Overview "This Web page includes market data for renewable energy...

  2. Stochastic Energy Deployment System (SEDS) World Oil Model (WOM)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-08-07

    The function of the World Oil Market Model (WOMM) is to calculate a world oil price. SEDS will set start and end dates for the forecast period, and a time increment (assumed to be 1 year in the initial version). The WOMM will then randomly select an Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) oil price case and calibrate itself to that case. As it steps through each year, the WOMM will generate a stochastic supply shock tomore » OPEC output and accept a new estimate of U.S. petroleum demand from SEDS. The WOMM will then calculate a new oil market equilibrium for the current year. The world oil price at the new equilibrium will be sent back to SEDS. When the end year is reached, the process will begin again with the selection of a new AEO forecast. Iterations over forecasts will continue until SEDS has completed all its simulation runs.« less

  3. Stochastic Energy Deployment System (SEDS) World Oil Model (WOM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-08-07

    The function of the World Oil Market Model (WOMM) is to calculate a world oil price. SEDS will set start and end dates for the forecast period, and a time increment (assumed to be 1 year in the initial version). The WOMM will then randomly select an Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) oil price case and calibrate itself to that case. As it steps through each year, the WOMM will generate a stochastic supply shock to OPEC output and accept a new estimate of U.S. petroleum demand from SEDS. The WOMM will then calculate a new oil market equilibrium for the current year. The world oil price at the new equilibrium will be sent back to SEDS. When the end year is reached, the process will begin again with the selection of a new AEO forecast. Iterations over forecasts will continue until SEDS has completed all its simulation runs.

  4. The North American Free Trade Agreement: Implications for the parties and world oil markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verleger, P.K. Jr.

    1993-12-31

    The proposed North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has been criticized because it failed to open Mexico`s hydrocarbon reserves to development by private parties. This failure is an economic tragedy. Consumer welfare will clearly be reduced as a consequence. However, the loss is confined to Mexico where economic growth rates may be reduced by as much as one half of one percent per year. Otherwise, the agreement will have insignificant impacts on the world oil market. Future levels of production and prices will be unaffected by the agreement. 24 refs., 6 tabs.

  5. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Petroleum Product Prices Module

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    The petroleum products price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide U.S. average wholesale and retail price forecasts for motor gasoline, diesel fuel, heating oil, and jet fuel.

  6. The Social Costs to the U.S. of Monopolization of the World Oil Market, 1972-1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    The partial monopolization of the world oil market by the OPEC cartel has produced significant economic costs to the economies of the world. This paper reports estimates of the costs of monopolization of oil to the U.S. over the period 1972-1991. Two fundamental assumptions of the analysis are, (1) that OPEC has acted as a monopoly, albeit with limited control, knowledge, and ability to act and, (2) that the U.S. and other consuming nations could, through collective (social) action affect the cartel's ability to act as a monopoly. We measure total costs by comparing actual costs for the 1972-1991 period to a hypothetical ''more competitive'' world oil market scenario. By measuring past costs we avoid the enormous uncertainties about the future course of the world oil market and leave to the reader's judgment the issue of how much the future will be like the past. We note that total cost numbers cannot be used to determine the value of reducing U.S. oil use by one barrel. They are useful for describing the overall size of the petroleum problem and are one important factor in deciding how much effort should be devoted to solving it. Monopoly pricing of oil transfers wealth from US. oil consumers to foreign oil producers and, by increasing the economic scarcity of oil, reduces the economy's potential to produce. The actions of the OPEC Cartel have also produced oil price shocks, both upward and downward, that generate additional costs because of the economy's inherent inability to adjust quickly to a large change in energy prices. Estimated total costs to the United States from these three sources for the 1972-1991 period are put at $4.1 trillion in 1990$ ($1.2 T wealth transfer, $0.8 T macroeconomic adjustment costs, $2.1 T potential GNP losses). The cost of the US's primary oil supply contingency program is small ($10 B) by comparison.

  7. Annual Energy Outlook 2011 with Projections to 2035

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-04-01

    The projections in the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook 2011 (AEO2011) focus on the factors that shape the U.S. energy system over the long term. Under the assumption that current laws and regulations remain unchanged throughout the projections, the AEO2011 Reference case provides the basis for examination and discussion of energy production, consumption, technology, and market trends and the direction they may take in the future. It also serves as a starting point for analysis of potential changes in energy policies. But AEO2011 is not limited to the Reference case. It also includes 57 sensitivity cases (see Appendix E, Table E1), which explore important areas of uncertainty for markets, technologies, and policies in the U.S. energy economy. Key results highlighted in AEO2011 include strong growth in shale gas production, growing use of natural gas and renewables in electric power generation, declining reliance on imported liquid fuels, and projected slow growth in energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions even in the absence of new policies designed to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. AEO2011 also includes in-depth discussions on topics of special interest that may affect the energy outlook. They include: impacts of the continuing renewal and updating of Federal and State laws and regulations; discussion of world oil supply and price trends shaped by changes in demand from countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development or in supply available from the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries; an examination of the potential impacts of proposed revisions to Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards for light-duty vehicles and proposed new standards for heavy-duty vehicles; the impact of a series of updates to appliance standard alone or in combination with revised building codes; the potential impact on natural gas and crude oil production of an expanded offshore resource base

  8. Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    For further information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2015 (AEO2015) was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), under the direction of John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.gov, 202/586-2222), Assistant Administrator of Energy Analysis; Paul D. Holtberg (paul.holtberg@ eia.gov, 202/586-1284), Team Leader, Analysis Integration Team, Office of Integrated and International Energy Analysis; James R. Diefenderfer (jim.diefenderfer@eia.gov, 202/586-2432), Director, Office of

  9. Internatioanl Energy Outlook 2016

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Chapter 6 Buildings sector energy consumption Overview Energy consumed in the buildings sector consists of residential and commercial end users and accounts for 20.1% of the total delivered energy consumed worldwide. Consumption of delivered, or site, energy contrasts with the use of the primary energy that also includes the energy used to generate and deliver electricity to individual sites such as homes, offices, or industrial plants. In the International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016)

  10. Natural Gas Winter Outlook 2000-2001

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    This article is based on the Winter Fuels Outlook published in the 4th Quarter Short-Term Energy Outlook and discusses the supply and demand outlook from October 2000 through March 2001.

  11. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... power Liquid biofuels Wood biomass Hydropower Source: Short-Term Energy Outlook, August 2016. Note: Hydropower excludes pumped storage generation. Liquid biofuels include ...

  12. 2015 Trilateral Energy Outlook Project

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2015 Trilateral Energy Outlook Project December 2015 Prepared by: The National Energy Board Canada Secretara de Energa de Mxico U.S. Energy Information Administration 2015 ...

  13. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A1. Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Supply, disposition, and prices Reference case Annual growth 2013-2040 (percent) 2012 2013 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Production Crude oil and lease condensate ............................ 13.7 15.6 22.2 21.5 21.1 19.8 19.9 0.9% Natural gas plant liquids ........................................ 3.3 3.6 5.5 5.7 5.7 5.6

  14. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    20 Reference case Table A9. Electricity generating capacity (gigawatts) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A9. Electricity generating capacity (gigawatts) Net summer capacity 1 Reference case Annual growth 2013-2040 (percent) 2012 2013 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Electric power sector 2 Power only 3 Coal 4 .................................................................... 300.2 296.1 255.4 252.8 252.8 252.8 252.9 -0.6% Oil and natural gas steam 4,5

  15. Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (STEO) Highlights  This edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook is the first to include forecasts for 2015.  After falling to the lowest monthly average of 2013 in November, U.S. regular gasoline retail prices increased slightly to reach an average of $3.28 per gallon (gal) during December. The annual average regular gasoline retail price, which was $3.51/gal in 2013, is expected to fall to $3.46/gal in 2014 and $3.39/gal in 2015.  The North Sea Brent crude oil spot price in December

  16. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Reference case Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A15. Coal supply, disposition, and prices ...

  17. International energy outlook 1995, May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    The International Energy Outlook 1995 (IEO95) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the international energy market outlook through 2010. The report is an extension of the EIA`s Annual Energy Outlook 1995 (AEO95), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). US projections appearing in the IEO95 are consistent with those published in the AEO95. IEO95 is provided as a statistical service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projects are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 295(c). The IEO95 projections are based on US and foreign government policies in effect on October 1, 1994. IEO95 displays projections according to six basic country groupings. The regionalization has changed since last year`s report. Mexico has been added to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and a more detailed regionalization has been incorporated for the remainder of the world, including the following subgroups: non-OECD Asia, Africa, Middle East, and Central and South America. China is included in non-OECD Asia. Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union are combined in the EE/FSU subgroup.

  18. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - July 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    July 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2005 2005 Summer Motor Fuels Outlook Update (Figure 1) Retail regular-grade gasoline prices moved up from about $2.12 per gallon at the beginning of June to $2.33 on July 11. Gasoline pump prices for the summer (April-September) are now projected to average $2.25 per gallon, 8 cents per gallon higher than last month's projection and about 35 cents per gallon above the year-ago level. Crude oil prices are expected to remain high enough to keep quarterly

  19. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - June 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook June 2005 2005 Summer Motor Fuels Outlook Update (Figure 1) In May, while West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil prices oscillated from the low $50s range to $47 and back again, retail gasoline prices declined steadily from about $2.24 per gallon at the beginning of the month to $2.10 on May 30. On June 6, average retail prices were $2.12 per gallon. Pump gasoline prices for the summer (April-September) are now projected to average $2.17 per gallon, similar to last

  20. International Energy Outlook 2016-Electricity - Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Administration 5. Electricity print version Overview In the International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) Reference case, world net electricity generation increases 69% by 2040, from 21.6 trillion kilowatthours (kWh) in 2012 to 25.8 trillion kWh in 2020 and 36.5 trillion kWh in 2040. Electricity is the world's fastest-growing form of end-use energy consumption, as it has been for many decades. Power systems have continued to evolve from isolated, small grids to integrated national markets and

  1. Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review provides a yearly comparison between realized energy outcomes and the Reference case projections included in previous Annual Energy Outlooks (AEO) beginning with 1982. This edition of the report adds the AEO 2012 projections and updates the historical data to incorporate the latest data revisions.

  2. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    57 Liquid Fuels Market Module The NEMS Liquid Fuels Market Module (LFMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of liquid fuels supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of liquid fuels supply include petroleum-based fuels, such as crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, and unfinished oil imports. It also includes non-petroleum-based inputs, including alcohols, ethers, esters, corn, biomass, natural gas, and coal. In addition, liquid fuels supply

  3. Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections. Second quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-02

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent projections with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202.) The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the second quarter of 1995 through the fourth quarter of 1996. Values for the first quarter of 1995, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled into the second quarter 1995 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service.

  4. Outlook optimistic for 1997 E and P industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popov, S.

    1997-01-01

    The ninth annual Arthur Andersen Oil and Gas Industry Outlook Survey of company executives` forecasts for the US exploration and production industry were presented last month at the 17th Annual Energy Symposium. The consulting firm surveyed the chief financial officers of more than 350 US E and P companies, with 92 companies responding, including 8 majors, 9 large and 75 small independents. Overall, top E and P company executives predict 1997 to be a healthy year for the oil and gas industry. The paper discusses demand and supply, oil and gas prices, capital spending, employment, rig counts and availability, problems and opportunities.

  5. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - September 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2005 Hurricane Katrina (Figures 1 and 2) The Gulf of Mexico coast region is a major oil and natural gas supply center for the United States with significant offshore oil and natural gas production, refining capacity, and petrochemical facilities, and serves as a major import hub and nexus for pipeline infrastructure. In the Gulf coast region, Federal offshore crude oil production accounts for 1.5 million barrels per day (29 percent of total U.S.

  6. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F1. Total world delivered energy consumption by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 9.5 9.5 9.1 8.9 8.7 8.5 8.3 -0.4 Natural gas 19.9 20.8 22.6 24.8 27.1 29.0 30.8 1.5 Coal 4.6 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.4 4.4 4.3 -0.3

  7. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F11. Delivered energy consumption in Russia by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 -0.7 Natural gas 2.8 2.7 2.8 2.9 3.1 3.3 3.5 0.8 Coal 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 -1.5 Electricity 0.4

  8. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F13. Delivered energy consumption in China by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 1.2 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 0.9 -1.0 Natural gas 0.9 1.6 2.5 3.5 4.7 5.9 7.1 7.2 Coal 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.9 -0.2 Electricity 1.8

  9. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F15. Delivered energy consumption in Other Non-OECD Asia by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.3 Natural gas 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.1 3.7 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.4

  10. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F17. Delivered energy consumption in Africa by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.5 Natural gas 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 3.4 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 2.5 Electricity 0.6

  11. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F19. Delivered energy consumption in Other Central and South America by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.3 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 -0.1 Natural gas 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 1.0 1.1 3.2 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

  12. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F3. Delivered energy consumption in the United States by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.9 0.9 -1.0 Natural gas 4.9 4.8 4.6 4.5 4.5 4.3 4.2 -0.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -1.6

  13. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F5. Delivered energy consumption in Mexico and Chile by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.1 Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 3.4 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -0.2

  14. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F7. Delivered energy consumption in Japan by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.4 -1.2 Natural gas 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.3 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 1.1 1.2

  15. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F9. Delivered energy consumption in Australia/New Zealand by end-use sector and fuel, 2008-2035 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 1.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 --

  16. Instructions for using HSPD-12 Authenticated Outlook Web Access...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Instructions for using HSPD-12 Authenticated Outlook Web Access (OWA) Instructions for using HSPD-12 Authenticated Outlook Web Access (OWA) Provides instructions for remote Outlook...

  17. Energy Outlook for the Transport Sector | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Outlook for the Transport Sector Energy Outlook for the Transport Sector Energy Outlook for the Transport Sector PDF icon deer10karsner.pdf More Documents & Publications The ...

  18. Renewable Generation Technologies: Costs and Market Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    "In 2009... EIA made a forecast for the next two decades: U.S. wind power would grow modestly, reaching 44 GW of generating capacity in 2030, while solar power would remain ...

  19. Annual Energy Outlook 2014 foresees growth of LNG as a fuel for railroads

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    14, 2014 Annual Energy Outlook 2014 foresees growth of LNG as a fuel for railroads The U.S. Energy Information Administration expects liquefied natural gas, or LNG, to play an increasing role in powering freight locomotives in the coming years. EIA's Reference case, in its recently released Annual Energy Outlook 2014 indicates that growing natural gas production and lower natural gas spot prices compared to crude oil prices could provide significant cost savings for locomotives that use LNG as a

  20. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Petroleum Products Supply Module

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2013-01-01

    The Petroleum Products Supply Module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model provides forecasts of petroleum refinery inputs (crude oil, unfinished oils, pentanes plus, liquefied petroleum gas, motor gasoline blending components, and aviation gasoline blending components) and refinery outputs (motor gasoline, jet fuel, distillate fuel, residual fuel, liquefied petroleum gas, and other petroleum products).

  1. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Other Petroleum Products Consumption Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    The other petroleum product consumption module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide U.S. consumption forecasts for 6 petroleum product categories: asphalt and road oil, petrochemical feedstocks, petroleum coke, refinery still gas, unfinished oils, and other miscvellaneous products

  2. International Energy Outlook 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    September 9, 2014" "Figure 1. North Sea Brent crude oil spot prices in three cases, 1990-2040 (2012 dollars per barrel)" 1990,,,37.26967935 1991,,,30.36263812 1992,,,28.59310566 ...

  3. International Energy Outlook 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 0 40 80 120 160 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 World crude oil price projection is lower in the AEO2015 Reference case than in AEO2014, particularly...

  4. Petroleum Marketing Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crude oil prices U.S. Energy Information Administration | Petroleum Marketing Monthly 3 September 2016

  5. Oil

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department works to ensure domestic and global oil supplies are environmentally sustainable and invests in research and technology to make oil drilling cleaner and more efficient.

  6. Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 1 October 2013 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights  EIA projects average U.S. household expenditures for natural gas and propane will increase by 13% and 9%, respectively, this winter heating season (October 1 through March 31) compared with last winter. Projected U.S. household expenditures are 2% higher for electricity and 2% lower for heating oil this winter. Although EIA expects average expenditures for households that heat with natural gas will be significantly

  7. Contango in Cushing? Evidence on Financial-Physical Interactions in the U.S. Crude Oil Market

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Contango in Cushing? Evidence on Financial-Physical Interactions in the U.S. Crude Oil Market Louis H. Ederington, University of Oklahoma Chitru S. Fernano, University of Oklahoma Kateryna Holland, University of Oklahoma Thomas K. Lee, U.S. Energy Information Administration March, 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Washington, DC 20585 This paper is released to encourage discussion and critical comment. The analysis and conclusions

  8. U.S. Chamber of Commerce Biofuels Dialogue Series: Outlook for an Emerging

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Global Biofuels Market | Department of Energy Commerce Biofuels Dialogue Series: Outlook for an Emerging Global Biofuels Market U.S. Chamber of Commerce Biofuels Dialogue Series: Outlook for an Emerging Global Biofuels Market January 29, 2008 - 10:53am Addthis Remarks as Prepared For Delivery by Secretary Bodman Thank you very much, Bruce, for that kind introduction. My thanks also to Tom Donahue and the leadership of the Chamber for inviting me to be with you today. I was quite pleased to

  9. The outlook for crops (and biofuels and policy and...)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    biofuel markets Stochastic process to account for different assumptions in oil price, weather patterns, etc. Cellulosic model basics Key assumptions in the biofuel ...

  10. Supplement to the annual energy outlook 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-03-01

    This report is a companion document to the Annual Energy Outlook 1994 (AEO94), (DOE/EIA-0383(94)), released in Jan. 1994. Part I of the Supplement presents the key quantitative assumptions underlying the AEO94 projections, responding to requests by energy analysts for additional information on the forecasts. In Part II, the Supplement provides regional projections and other underlying details of the reference case projections in the AEO94. The AEO94 presents national forecasts of energy production, demand and prices through 2010 for five scenarios, including a reference case and four additional cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices. These forecasts are used by Federal, State, and local governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers in the public and private sectors.

  11. International Energy Outlook 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Household heating bills expected to be lower this winter U.S. consumers are expected to pay less this winter on their home heating bills because of lower oil and natural gas prices and projected milder temperatures than last winter. In its new forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said households that rely on heating oil which are mainly located in the Northeast will pay the lowest heating expenditures in 9 years down 25% from last winter as consumers are expected to save about

  12. Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 1 January 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights This edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook is the first to include forecasts for 2015. After falling to the...

  13. INFOGRAPHIC: Offshore Wind Outlook | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    INFOGRAPHIC: Offshore Wind Outlook INFOGRAPHIC: Offshore Wind Outlook December 12, 2012 - 2:15pm Addthis According to a new report commissioned by the Energy Department, a U.S. ...

  14. Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2000--STEO Preface

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    April 2000 Summer 2000 Motor Gasoline Outlook Summary For the upcoming summer season (April to September), motor gasoline markets are projected to exhibit an extraordinarily tight supply/demand balance. * Retail gasoline prices (regular grade) are expected to average $1.46 per gallon, 25 percent higher than last summer's average of $1.17 per gallon. That projection also exceeds the previous (current-dollar) record summer average of $1.35 recorded in 1981. Nominal prices are expected to reach a

  15. Microsoft Word - Hurricane Outlook.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement - June 2010 1 June 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2010 Outlook for Hurricane-Related Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico Highlights  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook, released on May 27, 2010, predicted that the Atlantic basin will likely experience above-normal tropical weather activity during the upcoming hurricane season (June 1 - November 30). 1

  16. LED Watch: The Outlook for OLEDs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    December 2014 LED Watch: The Outlook for OLEDs James Brodrick, U.S. Department of Energy LD+A Magazine

  17. Annual Energy Outlook 2013 with Projections to 2040

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    liquids production. The “Market trends” section summarizes the projections for energy markets. The analysis in AEO2013 focuses primarily on a Reference case, Low and High Economic Growth cases, and Low and High Oil Price cases. Results from a number of other alternative cases also are presented, illustrating uncertainties associated with the Reference case projections for energy demand, supply, and prices. Complete tables for the five primary cases are provided in Appendixes A through C. Major results from many of the alternative cases are provided in Appendix D. Complete tables for all the alternative cases are available on EIA’s website in a table browser at http://www.eia.gov/oiaf/aeo/tablebrowser. AEO2013 projections are based generally on federal, state, and local laws and regulations in effect as of the end of September 2012. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and standards (and sections of existing legislation that require implementing regulations or funds that have not been appropriated) are not reflected in the projections. In certain situations, however, where it is clear that a law or regulation will take effect shortly after the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) is completed, it may be considered in the projection.

  18. Question 3: Industry outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrigg, J.A.; Crespo, J.R.; Croom, J.H.; Davis, E.B. Jr.; Green, R.C. Jr.; Hale, R.W.; Howard, J.J.; McCormick, W.T. Jr.; Page, T.A.; Ryan, W.F.; Schrader, T.F.; Schuchart, J.A.; Smith, J.F.; Stys, R.D.

    1990-10-25

    This article is a collection of responses from natural gas distribution company representatives to questions on what they believe is the most important problem facing local distribution companies today and how are they positioning their companies to respond to the problem. Topics include remaining competitive in a changing market and business environment, proper pricing of services, procurement and marketing of natural gas, avoiding gas shortages from deliverability problems, coordination with state regulators on relevant issues such as cost recovery and rate structures, diversification of natural gas sources, regulation, service to customers, bypassing of local utilities, unbundling of rates and services at the pipeline level, and nonutility electric generators.

  19. 2015 Outlook for NERSC Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 Outlook for NERSC Systems 2015 Outlook for NERSC Systems January 6, 2015 by David Turner, Richard Gerber NERSC staff member David Turner put together the following nice summary of NERSC systems schedule for the next year: The year 2015 promises to be a busy one for NERSC! After almost 15 years in downtown Oakland, NERSC will be moving back to the main Berkeley Lab site in the hills above the UC Berkeley campus. We will take up residence in a brand-new, purpose-built facility: the

  20. China's energy outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fridley, D.

    1991-03-01

    Economic reform in China has given a major boost to the development of China's energy industries. Demand for energy has risen steadily in response to the rapid expansion of the economy over the past ten years, while economic liberalization and deregulation have stimulated energy output as the energy industries found new sources of capital, labor, and investment opportunities. In the first half of 1980s, the coal, oil, and electric power industries all experienced accelerating rates of growth. After mid-decade, however, an overheating economy, rising inflation, and lower international oil prices had a serious impact on the vitality of the energy industries. At a time when energy demand was soaring, the state-owned energy industries faced a decline in the real value of their output, excessive debt, falling productivity, and sharply higher costs of production. These trends have continued into 1990 despite the economic slowdown engineered in late 1988 and, if left unmanaged, will constrain the ability of the domestic energy industries to meet the energy needs of China's modernization program. This in turn could lead to progressively higher imports of energy, particularly oil, and could limit the speed and scope of economic expansion in the 1990s and beyond. 2 figs., 18 tabs.

  1. World oil - An essay on its spectacular 120-year rise (1859-1979), recent decline, and uncertain future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linden, H.R.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of the evolution of the oil security problems of import-dependent industrialized countries and of the rise and recent erosion of the market power of the major oil exporting countries, particularly those located in the Persian Gulf area. The counterproductive reaction of the United States and other large oil importers to the resulting oil supply and price instability, especially since the 1973-74 oil embargo, is critiqued. In addition, the synergism between the early commercialization of crude oil production and refining in the United States and the development of the automobile industry is discussed, and the long-term outlook for oil-base transportation fuels is assessed. OPEC's role in destabilizing the world oil market during the 1970s and its current efforts to restabilize it are evaluated, as is the likely future course of world oil prices and of U.S. and other non-OPEC production. An important finding of this study is that the share of oil in the world energy mix has peaked and will continue its downward trend and that recurring expectations for a sharp escalation of world oil prices and shortages are based on erroneous assessments of the fundamentals governing the oil business.

  2. The outlook for natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-12-31

    The proceedings of the Institute of Gas Technology`s Houston Conference on the Outlook for Natural Gas held October 5, 1993 are presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  3. OPEC's maximum oil revenue will be $80 billion per year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steffes, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    OPEC's income from oil is less than $80 billion this year, only one fourth its 1981 revenue. The optimum revenue OPEC can expect is 15 MBB/D at $15/barrel. Energy conservation will continue despite falling prices because consumers no longer feel secure that OPEC can deliver needed supplies. Eleven concepts which affect the future world economic outlook include dependence upon petroleum and petroleum products, the condition of capital markets, low energy and commodity prices, the growth in money supply without a corresponding growth in investment, and the high debt level of the US and the developing countries.

  4. Oil supply increase due in 1996`s second half

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, R.J.

    1996-07-29

    The crucial oil-market issue for this year`s second half is new supply. Production will increase again outside the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. And Iraq has general approval to resume exports under limits set by the United Nations, although start of the exports has been delayed by at least 60 days. The big question is the market`s ability to absorb the supply gains. As usual, the market`s need for oil in the second half will depend on economies. So far in 1996, economic growth has pushed consumption to levels unexpected a year ago. Demand the rest of the year depends heavily on economic performances of the industrialized nations that make up the organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and the rapidly growing nations of the Asia-Pacific region. Growth in countries elsewhere in the developing world, especially Latin America, remains a wild card. The paper discusses the worldwide outlook, crude oil prices, US product prices, natural gas prices, US economy, US energy demand, natural gas in the US, US oil demand, gasoline prices, distillate gains, resid slumps, LPG, ethane, US supply, production patterns, rise in refinery capacity, imports, stocks, and stock coverage.

  5. Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections, second quarter 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in January, April, July, and October in the Outlook. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the second quarter of 1997 through the fourth quarter of 1998. Values for the first quarter of 1997, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the second quarter 1997 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). 34 figs., 19 tabs.

  6. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, first quarter 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Outlook. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the first quarter of 1996 through the fourth quarter of 1997. Values for the fourth quarter of 1995, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled into the first quarter 1996 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service. The cases are produced using the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook.

  7. AEO2012 Preliminary Assumptions: Oil and Gas Supply

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3 Oil and Gas Supply Working Group Meeting Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuels Analysis ... for Annual Energy Outlook 2013: Oil and Gas Working Group Overview 2 Office of ...

  8. US energy outlook: 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linden, H.R.

    1981-01-01

    This study examines new perceptions of the US energy picture through the year 2000. US energy consumption has been relatively stable since the 1973 oil embargo in terms of demand by both fuel type and sector. Total consumption has temporarily flattened out in the 75 to 80 quads range, because of high price elasticity of demand operating during a period of rapidly escalating real costs for most energy commodities, compounded by structural changes in the US economy. Only coal use shows a consistent upward trend among major primary energy sources. The share of primary energy consumption used for electric power generation shows the only clear upward trend in the sectoral demands. The consensus opinion is that primary energy consumption in the US by the year 2000 will be in the range of 90 to 100 quads. Estimates of fossil fuel supplies to meet this level of demand are presented.

  9. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Appendix D Table D3. World gross domestic product (GDP) by region expressed in purchasing power parity, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (billion 2005 dollars) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 15,498 15,929 17,914 20,777 23,647 26,726 30,368 34,751 2.6 United States a 12,758 13,063 14,519 16,803 19,017 21,301 23,998 27,270 2.5 Canada 1,165 1,202 1,351 1,524 1,701 1,897 2,148 2,445 2.4 Mexico/Chile 1,575

  10. GRC Annual Meeting 2015 Presentation: GTO Current Outlook | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy GRC Annual Meeting 2015 Presentation: GTO Current Outlook GRC Annual Meeting 2015 Presentation: GTO Current Outlook 2015 GRC GTO Current Outlook final.pdf (3.38 MB) More Documents & Publications Geothermal Technologies Office Current Outlook GRC Annual Meeting 2015 Presentation: GTO Current Outlook 2015 Annual Report, Geothermal Technologies Office 2015 Peer Review | Plenaries

  11. Geothermal Technologies Office Current Outlook | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Current Outlook Geothermal Technologies Office Current Outlook 2015 GRC GTO Current Outlook final.pdf (3.38 MB) More Documents & Publications GRC Annual Meeting 2015 Presentation: GTO Current Outlook Geothermal Technologies Office Current Outlook 2015 Annual Report, Geothermal Technologies Office FORGE, 2015 Peer Review Plenary

  12. Microsoft Office Outlook - Memo Style

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... - underground - bldg 2211 4. Waste Oil Storage - 550 gal - used oil - underground - ... tank - bldg 2211 6. Facility Backup Power Generator - 550 gal - underground - Fuel ...

  13. World nuclear outlook 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-29

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  14. World nuclear outlook 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-01

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2010 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  15. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Appendix D Table D2. World total energy consumption by region and fuel, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas Liquids 45.5 46.4 45.0 44.8 44.1 43.6 43.8 45.0 -0.1 Natural gas 28.9 29.9 31.9 34.0 36.2 38.4 40.7 43.0 1.2 Coal 21.3 22.5 19.3 20.2 21.1 21.7 22.2 22.6 0.0 Nuclear 9.4 9.5 9.8 10.3 10.9 11.1 11.1 12.4 0.9 Other 11.9 11.9 13.6 15.0 15.9 17.0 18.9

  16. Microsoft Word - Hurricane Outlook.docx

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    June 2012 1 June 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2012 Outlook for Hurricane-Related Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico Highlights  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook, released on May 24, 2012, predicts that the Atlantic basin likely will experience near- normal tropical weather activity during the upcoming hurricane season (June 1 - November 30). 1 NOAA projects that 9 to 15 named storms will form within the Atlantic

  17. Microsoft Word - Hurricane Outlook.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 1 June 2008 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: The 2008 Outlook for Hurricane Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico Highlights * The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicted above-normal hurricane activity in its Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook released on May 22, 2008. 1 NOAA projects 12 to 16 named storms will form within the Atlantic Basin, including 6 to 9 hurricanes, of which 2 to 5 will be intense, during the upcoming hurricane season (June 1 - November

  18. Microsoft Word - Hurricane Outlook.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 1 June 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: The 2009 Outlook for Hurricane Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico Highlights * The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicted in its Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook released on May 21, 2009 that the Atlantic basin will most likely experience near-normal activity during the upcoming hurricane season (June 1 - November 30). 1 NOAA projects 9 to 14 named storms will form within the Atlantic Basin over the next 6

  19. Microsoft Word - Hurricane Outlook.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    June 2010 1 June 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2010 Outlook for Hurricane-Related Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico Highlights  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook, released on May 27, 2010, predicted that the Atlantic basin will likely experience above-normal tropical weather activity during the upcoming hurricane season (June 1 - November 30). 1 NOAA projects that 14 to 23 named storms will form within the

  20. Annual energy outlook, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-02-11

    The forecast summary highlights the principal components of the Energy Information Administration's projections of energy supply, demand, and prices. Key issues are addressed for each of the major energy markets (petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity), along with the developments anticipated for end-use energy consumption and new technologies. The overview lists the principal conclusions followed by discussions of the important elements of the projections. This information revises production forecasts for 1986, 1987, and 1988, but its effect on later years should be much less, because some portion of the production fall amounts to production delays (Table 1). Lower well completions and delayed work-overs remove production from significantly sized wells, but little of this production is lost permanently. To the extent that higher prices encourage higher development activity, well completions and work-overs should resume at a more normal level. In the short run, shut-in wells, which are mostly marginal stripper wells, can also be returned to production. With the liberalization of State and Federal regulations on when shut-in wells must be permanently abandoned, a window of about one year exists during which these stripper wells can be restored. Some of these wells will never resume production, but with prices in the $18 plus range, most will again be economic.

  1. World Bio Markets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The World Bio Markets meeting will held from March 14-17, 2016 in Amsterdam, Netherlands. The meeting will gather experts in the bioenergy industry from all over the world. Bioenergy Technologies Office Demonstration and Market Transformation Program Manager Jim Spaeth will be giving a presentation entitled, “Policy updates and outlooks from key biofuel markets,” and will discuss technical, policy and investment developments, and success stories.

  2. Short-term energy outlook, quarterly projections, first quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the first quarter of 1998 through the fourth quarter of 1999. Values for the fourth quarter of 1997, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the first quarter 1998 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 24 figs., 19 tabs.

  3. Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections, fourth quarter 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-14

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for printed publication in January, April, July, and October in the Short-Term Energy Outlook. The details of these projections, as well as monthly updates on or about the 6th of each interim month, are available on the internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the fourth quarter of 1997 through the fourth quarter of 1998. Values for the fourth quarter of 1997, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the fourth quarter 1997 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. 19 tabs.

  4. 2010 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report, June 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    This report summarizes 2010 data on fuel cells, including market penetration and industry trends. It also covers cost, price, and performance trends, along with policy and market drivers and the future outlook for fuel cells.

  5. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix F

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Figure F5. Natural gas transmission and distribution model regions 218 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Figure F5. Natural Gas Transmission and ...

  6. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix F

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Analysis. U.S. Energy Information ...

  7. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2015 Reference case Table A12. Petroleum and other liquids prices (2013 dollars per gallon, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2015 ...

  8. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix B

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    C-1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table C1. Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise ...

  9. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix B

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    B-1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table B1. Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise ...

  10. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix D

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    D-1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table D1. Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise ...