Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Table 25. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

EIA-856, "Monthly Foreign Crude Oil Acquisition Report," July 1984 to present. 25. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil, by Selected Country Energy Information Administration ...

2

Table 27. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

EIA-856, "Monthly Foreign Crude Oil Acquisition Report," July 1984 to present. 27. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity Energy Information Administration Petroleum...

3

Energy Prices Note 4. Crude Oil Landed Costs.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Prices Note 1. Crude Oil Refinery Acquisition Costs. Begin-ning with January 1981, refiner acquisition costs of crude oil are from data collected on U.S ...

4

Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 53 Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued...

5

Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 53 Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued...

6

Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 53 Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued...

7

Table 24. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

49 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly February 2012 Table 24. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

8

Table 27. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

27. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly June 1998 49. Created Date:

9

U.S. Landed Costs of Nigerian Bonny Light Crude Oil (Dollars ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Referring Pages: Landed Costs of Imported Crude for Selected Crude Streams; Landed Costs of Imported Crude for Selected Crude Streams

10

U.S. Landed Costs of Canadian Bow River Heavy Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Referring Pages: Landed Costs of Imported Crude for Selected Crude Streams; Landed Costs of Imported Crude for Selected Crude Streams

11

Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

21.56 19.18 18.50 19.91 21.79 17.95 21.89 See footnotes at end of table. 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams Energy Information Administration ...

12

Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

19.47 16.46 15.72 18.06 20.07 15.57 20.05 See footnotes at end of table. 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams Energy Information Administration ...

13

U.S. Landed Costs of Crude Oil (Dollars per Barrel)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

98.51: 95.72: 97.41: 96.90: 101.03: 102.86 ... Landed Costs of Imported Crude by Area; Landed Costs of Imported Crude by Area ...

14

U.S. Landed Costs of Canada Crude Oil (Dollars per Barrel)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Release Date: 9/3/2013: Next Release Date: 10/1/2013: Referring Pages: Landed Costs of Imported Crude by Area; Landed Costs of Imported Crude by Area

15

Table 27. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

of loading, the month of landing, or sometime between those events. Prices for crude oil can be determined at a time other than the acquisition date. See the Explanatory Notes...

16

Table 25. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of loading, the month of landing, or sometime between those events. Prices for crude oil can be determined at a time other than the acquisition date. See the Explanatory Notes...

17

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs U.S. Petroleum Use, 1970-2010 Nearly 40% of the oil we use is imported, costing us roughly 300 billion annually. Increased domestic oil production from...

18

OPPORTUNITY COST OF LAND AND URBAN GROWTH.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines the impact of the opportunity cost of urban land on urban growth. Based on prices, costs and productivity data on agricultural commodities… (more)

Jiang, Bo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Bureau of Land Management Oil Shale Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bureau of Land Management Oil Shale Development Unconventional Fuels Conference University of Utah May 17, 2011 #12;#12;Domestic Oil Shale Resources Primary oil shale resources in the U.S. are in the Green River Formation in Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. 72 % of this oil shale resource is on Federal

Utah, University of

20

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: The outlook for heating oil costs this winter, due to high crude oil costs and tight heating oil supplies, breaks down to an expected increase in heating expenditures for a typical oil-heated household of more than $200 this winter, the result of an 18% increase in the average price and an 11% increase in consumption. The consumption increase is due to the colder than normal temperatures experienced so far this winter and our expectations of normal winter weather for the rest of this heating season. Last winter, Northeast heating oil (and diesel fuel) markets experienced an extremely sharp spike in prices when a severe weather situation developed in late January. It is virtually impossible to gauge the probability of a similar (or worse) price shock recurring this winter,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

extra-heavy oil and shale have zero Resource- Cost), whileof the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, andof the oil transition: modeling capacity, costs, and

Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

,,,,,,,,,,"Lease Equipment Costs for Primary Oil Production in...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Lease Equipment Costs for Primary Oil Recovery ",,,"Oil Production--West Texas" ,,"Operations (10 Producing Wells)" ,,,"Lease Equipment Costs for Primary Oil...

23

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 of 18 Notes: Using the Northeast as an appropriate regional focus for heating oil, the typical oil-heated household consumes about 680 gallons of oil during the winter, assuming...

24

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Using the Northeast as a regional focus for heating oil, the typical oil-heated household consumes about 680 gallons of oil during the winter, assuming that weather is "normal." The previous three winters were warmer than average and generated below normal consumption rates. Last winter, consumers saw large increases over the very low heating oil prices seen during the winter of 1998-1999 but, outside of the cold period in late January/early February they saw relatively low consumption rates due to generally warm weather. Even without particularly sharp cold weather events this winter, we think consumers are likely to see higher average heating oil prices than were seen last winter. If weather is normal, our projections imply New England heating oil

25

Collusion Through Insurance: Sharing the Costs of Oil Spill Cleanups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Insurance: Sharing the Costs of Oil Spill Cleanups." EddieInsurance: Sharing the Costs of Oil Spill Cleanups EddieINSURANCE: SHARING THE COSTS OF OIL SPILL CLEANUPS Eddie

Dekel, Eddie; Scothmer, Suzanne

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Costs of Oil Dependence: A 2000 Update  

SciTech Connect

Oil dependence remains a potentially serious economic and strategic problem for the United States. This report updates previous estimates of the costs of oil dependence to the U.S. economy and introduces several methodological enhancements. Estimates of the costs to the U.S. economy of the oil market upheavals of the last 30 years are in the vicinity of $7 trillion, present value 1998 dollars, about as large as the sum total of payments on the national debt over the same period. Simply adding up historical costs in 1998 dollars without converting to present value results in a Base Case cost estimate of $3.4 trillion. Sensitivity analysis indicates that cost estimates are sensitive to key parameters. A lower bound estimate of $1.7 trillion and an upper bound of $7.1 trillion (not present value) indicate that the costs of oil dependence have been large under almost any plausible set of assumptions. These cost estimates do not include military, strategic or political costs associated with U.S. and world dependence on oil imports.

Greene, D.L.

2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

27

Cost of Oil Dependence: A 2000 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil dependence remains a potentially serious economic and strategic problem for the United States. This report updates previous estimates of the costs of oil dependence to the U.S. economy and introduces several methodological enhancements. Estimates of the costs to the U.S. economy of the oil market upheavals of the last 30 years are in the vicinity of $7 trillion, present value 1998 dollars, about as large as the sum total of payments on the national debt over the same period. Simply adding up historical costs in 1998 dollars without converting to present value results in a Base Case cost estimate of $3.4 trillion. Sensitivity analysis indicates that cost estimates are sensitive to key parameters. A lower bound estimate of $1.7 trillion and an upper bound of $7.1 trillion (not present value) indicate that the costs of oil dependence have been large under almost any plausible set of assumptions. These cost estimates do not include military, strategic or political costs associated with U.S. and world dependence on oil imports.

Greene, D.L.; Tishchishyna, N.I.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

User cost in oil production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The assumption of an initial fixed mineral stock is superfluous and wrong. User cost (resource rent) in mineral production is the present value of expected increases in development cost. It can be measured as the difference ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Environmental control costs for oil shale processes  

SciTech Connect

The studies reported herein are intended to provide more certainty regarding estimates of the costs of controlling environmental residuals from oil shale technologies being readied for commercial application. The need for this study was evident from earlier work conducted by the Office of Environment for the Department of Energy Oil Shale Commercialization Planning, Environmental Readiness Assessment in mid-1978. At that time there was little reliable information on the costs for controlling residuals and for safe handling of wastes from oil shale processes. The uncertainties in estimating costs of complying with yet-to-be-defined environmental standards and regulations for oil shale facilities are a critical element that will affect the decision on proceeding with shale oil production. Until the regulatory requirements are fully clarified and processes and controls are investigated and tested in units of larger size, it will not be possible to provide definitive answers to the cost question. Thus, the objective of this work was to establish ranges of possible control costs per barrel of shale oil produced, reflecting various regulatory, technical, and financing assumptions. Two separate reports make up the bulk of this document. One report, prepared by the Denver Research Institute, is a relatively rigorous engineering treatment of the subject, based on regulatory assumptions and technical judgements as to best available control technologies and practices. The other report examines the incremental cost effect of more conservative technical and financing alternatives. An overview section is included that synthesizes the products of the separate studies and addresses two variations to the assumptions.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Landed Costs of Imported Crude by Area  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Area Area (Dollars per Barrel) Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Average Landed Cost 95.72 97.41 96.90 101.19 103.27 102.19 1973-2013 Persian Gulf 102.31 101.35 101.26 103.15 104.94 104.24 1996-2013 Total OPEC 101.76 101.62 101.21 103.96 105.34 105.33 1973-2013 Non OPEC 90.79 93.50 93.49 98.66 101.65 100.05 1973-2013 Selected Countries Canada 83.02 86.83 88.26 94.16 98.81 96.09 1973-2013 Colombia 101.42 100.70 99.47 102.47 106.04 105.49 1996-2013 Angola 105.56 106.32 106.73 110.43 111.75 115.03 1996-2013 Mexico 100.63 100.07 97.56 101.87 101.52 101.12 1975-2013

31

LOW COST BIOHEATING OIL APPLICATION.  

SciTech Connect

The report describes primarily the results of combustion tests carried out with a soy methyl ester (SME) that can be considered as a biofuel that does not quite meet the ASTM D 6751-02 specifications for biodiesel. The tests were performed in a residential boiler and a commercial boiler. Blends of the SME in distillate fuel (home heating fuel or equivalently, ASTM No.2 fuel oil) were tested in both the boilers. Similar tests had been conducted in a previous project with ASTM biodiesel blends and hence provided a comparison. Blends of the SME in ASTM No.6 oil (residual oil) were also tested in the commercial boiler using a different burner. Physical properties of the blends (in both the petroleum based fuels) were also measured. It was found that the SME blends in the distillate burned, not surprisingly, similarly to biodiesel blends. Reductions in NOx with blending of the SME were the most significant finding as before with biodiesel blends. The blends in No.6 oil also showed reductions in NOx in the commercial boiler combustion tests, though levels with No.6 blends are higher than with No.2 blends as expected. A significant conclusion from the physical property tests was that even the blending of 10% SME with the No.6 oil caused a significant reduction in viscosity, which suggests a potential direction of application of such blends.

KRISHNA,C.R.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Oil and Gas on Public Lands (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on Public Lands (Texas) on Public Lands (Texas) Oil and Gas on Public Lands (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Program Info State Texas Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Texas General Land Office The School Land Board may choose to lease lands for the production of oil and natural gas, on the condition that oil and gas resources are leased together and separate from other minerals. Lands that may be leased include: (1) islands, saltwater lakes, bays, inlets, marshes, and reefs owned by the state within tidewater limits; (2) the portion of the Gulf of Mexico within the jurisdiction of the state; (3) all unsold surveyed and

33

Landed Costs of Imported Crude by Area  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Average Landed Cost 67.97 93.33 60.23 76.50 102.92 101.00 1973-2012 Persian Gulf 69.83 93.59 62.15 78.60 108.01 107.74 1973-2012 Total OPEC 71.14 95.49 61.90 78.28 107.84 107.56 1973-2012 Non OPEC 63.96 90.59 58.58 74.68 98.64 95.05 1973-2012 Selected Countries Canada 60.38 90.00 57.60 72.80 89.92 84.24 1973-2012 Colombia 70.91 93.43 58.50 74.25 102.57 107.07 1973-2012 Angola 71.27 98.18 61.32 80.61 114.05 114.95 1973-2012 Mexico 62.31 85.97 57.35 72.86 101.21 102.45 1973-2012 Nigeria 78.01 104.83 68.01 83.14 116.43 116.88 1973-2012 Saudi Arabia 70.78 94.75 62.14 79.29 108.83 108.15 1973-2012 United Kingdom 72.47 96.95 63.87 80.29 118.45 W 1973-2012 Venezuela

34

Linking Oil Prices, Gas Prices, Economy, Transport, and Land Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Linking Oil Prices, Gas Prices, Economy, Transport, and Land Use A Review of Empirical Findings Hongwei Dong, Ph.D. Candidate John D. Hunt, Professor John Gliebe, Assistant Professor #12;Framework Oil-run Short and Long-run #12;Topics covered by this presentation: Oil price and macro-economy Gas price

Bertini, Robert L.

35

Costs of Oil Dependence: A 2000 Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.............................................................. ix 1. INTRODUCTION ........................................................ 1 2. COST COMPONENTS .................................................... 7 2.1 LOSS OF POTENTIAL GDP ......................................... 7 2.2 MACROECONOMIC ADJUSTMENT COSTS ........................... 7 2.3 TRANSFER OF WEALTH ........................................... 8 3. MEASURING THE COSTS ................................................ 9 3.1 TRANSFER OF WEALTH ........................................... 9 3.2 LOSS OF POTENTIAL GDP ........................................ 11 3.3 MACROECONOMIC ADJUSTMENT LOSSES ......................... 14 4. DATA ................................................................ 17 4.1 EMPIRICAL ESTIMATES OF PRICE SLOPES AND ADJUSTMENT RATES OF OIL SUPPLY AND DEMAND IN THE UNITED STATES ............. 17 5. RESULTS ............................................................. 21 5.1 SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS .....

David L. Greene; Nataliya I. Tishchishyna

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Draft environmental statement: proposed superior oil company land exchange and oil shale resource development  

SciTech Connect

The Superior Oil Company requested an exchange of public land for private land. With the exchange, an economical mining unit would be formed and oil shale resources developed. Major federal actions would be the revoking of the oil shale withdrawal by the Secretary of the Interior and the exchange of land by the Bureau of Land Management. Following the exchange, Superior would construct an underground mine and a processing plant. The mine would produce an average of about 26,000 tons of oil shale daily. From the oil shale, the plant would produce about 4800 tons of nahcolite, 11,500 barrels of shale oil, 580 tons of alumina, and 1000 tons of soda ash daily. Production would continue for about 20 years. Above-ground facilities would occupy about 380 acres. Approximately 920 people would be employed during operation of the project. Products would be hauled from the plant by truck.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

U.S. Crude Oil Imported Acquisition Cost by Refiners ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Release Date: 1/2/2014: Next Release Date: 2/3/2014: Referring Pages: Refiner Acquisition Cost of Imported Crude Oil ; U.S. Refiner Acquisition Cost ...

38

Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CTL production Oil shale production Biofuels productionshale have zero Resource- Cost), while in GTL and CTL production,

Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GTL production CTL production Oil shale production Biofuelsoil and shale have zero Resource- Cost), while in GTL and CTL production,

Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Exploration and Development of Oil and Gas on School and Public Lands (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute authorizes the Board of School Lands and Funds to lease school and public lands under its jurisdiction for oil and gas exploration and development purposes.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The cost of transportation`s oil dependence  

SciTech Connect

Transportation is critical to the world`s oil dependence problem because of the large share of world oil it consumes and because of its intense dependence on oil. This paper will focus on the economic costs of transportation`s oil dependence.

Greene, D.L.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

EIA-856, "Monthly Foreign Crude Oil Acquisition Report," July 1984 to present. 24. F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil, by Selected Country 46 Energy Information Administration ...

43

Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

EIA-856, "Monthly Foreign Crude Oil Acquisition Report," July 1984 to present. 26. F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity 48 Energy Information Administration ...

44

Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of loading, the month of landing, or sometime between those events. Prices for crude oil can be determined at a time other than the acquisition date. See the Explanatory Notes...

45

Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of loading, the month of landing, or sometime between those events. Prices for crude oil can be determined at a time other than the acquisition date. See the Explanatory Notes...

46

Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-TR/0606 Distribution Category UC-950 Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs For The Persian Gulf January 1996 Energy Information Administration

47

Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 51 Table 29. F.O.B. a Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued...

48

Costs of Land Subsidence Due to Groundwater Withdrawal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years the area around Houston and Baytown, Texas, has been affected to an increasing degree by land subsidence. Sinking of the land surface has reached critical proportions in many areas, and subsidence of as much as eight feet has occurred. The severity of this phenomenon has been aggravated by the proximity of much of the affected area to bay waters, and tidal flooding has resulted in significant damages and property loss. Subsidence has been linked by engineers to the decline of subsurface water levels due to heavy ground water withdrawals in the area. An alternative source for water demands has been introduced, although price differentials have slowed its acceptance. Major objectives of this study included estimation of historical costs attributable to subsidence, projecting estimated costs, and examining the economics of the two alternatives for water supply. A study area of 300 square miles was identified and sampling of residences, businesses, and public officials was carried out. The cost data resulting from those samples formed the basis for economic analysis. Historical costs and property losses that were attributable to subsidence were estimated to be $60.7 million and $48.9 million, respectively, or $109.6 million total. Of the $109.6 million, $53.2 million were incurred in 1973, principally due to a six foot tide. Probability of the occurrence of a six foot tide in any one year is 20 percent. Given five additional feet of subsidence in the study area the occurrence of a six foot tide was projected to cause an estimated $63,5 million in costs and losses, $10.3 million more than were incurred in 1973. Estimated annual subsidence-related costs and losses of $14.6 million for the study area, based on 1969 to 1973 data, were used to evaluate total costs associated with supplying water needs from two alternative sources, A break-even analysis indicated that to minimize total water costs, pumping only that quantity of water that would result in no subsidence could be economically justified; i,e,, water needs or demand above that rate would need to be purchased from an alternative source. This implied that when pumping is continued to the point that subsidence occurs, the cost of pumping plus associated subsidence- related costs and losses exceed water costs from an alternative source, per unit of water.

Warren, J. P.; Jones, L. L.; Griffin, W. L.; Lacewell, R. D.

1974-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Costs of U.S. Oil Dependence: 2005 Update  

SciTech Connect

For thirty years, dependence on oil has been a significant problem for the United States. Oil dependence is not simply a matter of how much oil we import. It is a syndrome, a combination of the vulnerability of the U.S. economy to higher oil prices and oil price shocks and a concentration of world oil supplies in a small group of oil producing states that are willing and able to use their market power to influence world oil prices. Although there are vitally important political and military dimensions to the oil dependence problem, this report focuses on its direct economic costs. These costs are the transfer of wealth from the United States to oil producing countries, the loss of economic potential due to oil prices elevated above competitive market levels, and disruption costs caused by sudden and large oil price movements. Several enhancements have been made to methods used in past studies to estimate these costs, and estimates of key parameters have been updated based on the most recent literature. It is estimated that oil dependence has cost the U.S. economy $3.6 trillion (constant 2000 dollars) since 1970, with the bulk of the losses occurring between 1979 and 1986. However, if oil prices in 2005 average $35-$45/bbl, as recently predicted by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, oil dependence costs in 2005 will be in the range of $150-$250 billion. Costs are relatively evenly divided between the three components. A sensitivity analysis reflecting uncertainty about all the key parameters required to estimate oil dependence costs suggests that a reasonable range of uncertainty for the total costs of U.S. oil dependence over the past 30 years is $2-$6 trillion (constant 2000 dollars). Reckoned in terms of present value using a discount rate of 4.5%, the costs of U.S. oil dependence since 1970 are $8 trillion, with a reasonable range of uncertainty of $5 to $13 trillion.

Greene, D.L.

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

50

Trends in oil production costs in the Middle East, elsewhere  

SciTech Connect

This article focuses on the costs of oil production in the major areas of the world, including OPEC and non-OPEC countries. The question of production costs has become even more important since 1986, when the Saudis unilaterally undercut the oil price. Shaikh Yamani slashed oil prices in 1986 with three clearly articulated objectives: (1) to reduce conservation; (2) to stimulate global economic growth; and (3) to discourage non-OPEC energy supplies of all kinds. Here the authors address the last of those strategic objectives -- squeezing out non-OPEC oil -- by comparing oil production costs around the world. The analysis is framed with respect to five questions: How great is the variation in full costs of production within OPEC itself Are the costs of OPEC and non-OPEC producers radically different Are there producing areas today that are cost-constrained, meaning where E P activity is limited by high costs in relation to expected prices Has the Saudi market share strategy been successful in curbing non-OPEC oil development Is it probably, as is often bruited, that lack of capital for new E P projects might constrain future oil production, especially in the OPEC states

Stauffer, T.R. (Stauffer, (Thomas R.), Washington, DC (United States))

1994-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

51

Cost, Conflict and Climate: U.S. Challenges in the World Oil Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

how the challenge from high oil costs interacts with, but isproducts will re?ect that oil cost. A more appropriate andvirtually all of the cost of that oil must be paid directly

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Nutritionally Enhanced Edible Oil and Oilseed ProcessingChapter 13 Low-Cost Oil-Processing Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutritionally Enhanced Edible Oil and Oilseed Processing Chapter 13 Low-Cost Oil-Processing Techniques Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 13 Low-Cost Oil-Processing Techniques from t

53

U.S. FOB Costs of Canadian LLoydminster Crude Oil (Dollars per Barrel)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Referring Pages: F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams; F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams

54

U.S. FOB Costs of Ecuadorian Oriente Crude Oil (Dollars per Barrel)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Referring Pages: F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams; F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams

55

U.S. FOB Costs of Canadian Bow River Heavy Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Referring Pages: F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams; F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams

56

Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

TR/0606 TR/0606 Distribution Category UC-950 Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs For The Persian Gulf January 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf iii Preface Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf provides estimates of development and operating costs for various size fields in countries surrounding the Persian

57

,"U.S. Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Refiner...

58

Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 51 Table 29. F.O.B. a Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued...

59

Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 51 Table 29. F.O.B. a Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued...

60

Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 20.44 18.19 17.14 18.84 20.97 See footnotes at end of table. 29. F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams Energy Information Administration ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 17.93 15.37 14.29 17.95 18.75 See footnotes at end of table. 29. F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams Energy Information Administration ...

62

Rock, Mineral, Coal, Oil, and Gas Resources on State Lands (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter authorizes and regulates prospecting permits and mining leases for the exploration and development of rock, mineral, oil, coal, and gas resources on state lands.

63

Landed Costs of Imported Crude by Area - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Landed Costs of Imported Crude by Area (Dollars per Barrel) Period: Download Series History: Definitions, Sources & Notes: Area: Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug ...

64

Facilitating Oil Industry Access to Federal Lands through Interagency Data Sharing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much of the environmental and technical data useful to the oil and gas industry and regulatory agencies is now contained in disparate state and federal databases. Delays in coordinating permit approvals between federal and state agencies translate into increased operational costs and stresses for the oil and gas industry. Making federal lease stipulation and area restriction data available on state agency Web sites will streamline a potential lessors review of available leases, encourage more active bidding on unleased federal lands, and give third-party operators independent access to data who otherwise may not have access to lease restrictions and other environmental data. As a requirement of the Energy Policy Conservation Act (EPCA), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is in the process of inventorying oil and natural gas resources beneath onshore federal lands and the extent and nature of any stipulation, restrictions, or impediments to the development of these resources. The EPCA Phase 1 Inventory resulted in a collection of GIS coverage files organized according to numerous lease stipulation reference codes. Meanwhile, state agencies also collect millions of data elements concerning oil and gas operations. Much of the oil and gas data nationwide is catalogued in the Ground Water Protection Council's (GWPC's) successfully completed Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS). The GWPC and the states of Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Montana are implementing a pilot project where BLM lease stipulation data and RBDMS data will be displayed in a GIS format on the Internet. This increased access to data will increase bid activity, help expedite permitting, and encourage exploration on federal lands. Linking environmental, lease stipulation and resource inventory assessment data and making a GIS interface for the data available to industry and other agencies via the internet represents an important step in the GWPC strategy for all oil and gas regulatory e-commerce. The next step beyond mere data sharing for facilitating the permitting process is to make it possible for industry to file those permit applications electronically. This process will involve the use of common XML schemas.

Paul Jehn; Ben Grunewald

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Regional Cost Estimates for Reclamation Practices on Arid and Semiarid Lands  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Army uses the Integrated Training Area Management program for managing training land. One of the major objectives of the Integrated Training Area Management program has been to develop a method for estimating training land carrying capacity in a sustainable manner. The Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity methodology measures training load in terms of Maneuver Impact Miles. One Maneuver Impact Mile is the equivalent impact of an M1A2 tank traveling one mile while participating in an armor battalion field training exercise. The Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity methodology is also designed to predict land maintenance costs in terms of dollars per Maneuver Impact Mile. The overall cost factor is calculated using the historical cost of land maintenance practices and the effectiveness of controlling erosion. Because land maintenance costs and effectiveness are influenced by the characteristics of the land, Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity cost factors must be developed for each ecological region of the country. Costs for land maintenance activities are presented here for the semiarid and arid regions of the United States. Five ecoregions are recognized, and average values for reclamation activities are presented. Because there are many variables that can influence costs, ranges for reclamation activities are also presented. Costs are broken down into six major categories: seedbed preparation, fertilization, seeding, planting, mulching, and supplemental erosion control. Costs for most land reclamation practices and materials varied widely within and between ecological provinces. Although regional cost patterns were evident for some practices, the patterns were not consistent between practices. For the purpose of estimating land reclamation costs for the Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity methodology, it may be desirable to use the ''Combined Average'' of all provinces found in the last row of each table to estimate costs for arid lands in general.

W. K. Ostler

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

How much does it cost to produce crude oil and natural gas? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much does it cost to produce crude oil and natural gas? A measure of the total cost to produce crude oil and natural gas is the upstream costs.

67

Costs of Oil Dependence: A 2000 Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RNL RNL / TM -2000/ 152 Cos t s of O il D e pe nde nce : A 2000 Updat e David L. Greene Oak Ridge National Laboratory Nataliya I. Tishchishyna University of Tennessee May 2000 Prepared by the OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 managed by UT-BATTELLE, LLC for the U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 iii TA BL E O F CO NTENTS LIST OF FIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v LIST OF TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v ACKNOWLEDGMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii ABSTRACT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. COST COMPONENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

68

Regional differences for cost of crude oil to refiners widened in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The cost of crude oil to refiners varies across regions based on the different types of crude oil available to refiners and transportation bottlenecks in that region.

69

Ex Situ Bioremediation of Mineral Oil in Soils: Land Treatment and Composting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mineral oil dielectric fluid (MODF) has replaced PCB oil as the insulating medium in electrical transformers. Although eliminating PCBs has reduced the environmental impact resulting from transformer leaks, soil contaminated with mineral oil still often requires remediation. This study evaluated the feasibility of ex situ biotreatment by land farming and composting for Southern Company Services/Georgia Power. Research results indicate that composting does not enhance the biodegradation of mineral oil com...

1998-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

70

U.S. FOB Costs of Venezuela Crude Oil (Dollars per Barrel)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Release Date: 9/3/2013: Next Release Date: 10/1/2013: Referring Pages: F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Area; F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Area

71

Revegetation research on oil shale lands in the Piceance Basin  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to study the effects of various reclamation practices on above- and belowground ecosystem development associated with disturbed oil shale lands in northwestern Colorado. Plant growth media that are being used in field test plots include retorted shale, soil over retorted shale, subsoil materials, and surface disturbed topsoils. Satisfactory stands of vegetation failed to establish on unleached retorted shale during two successive years of seeding. All seedings with soil over retorted shale were judged to be successful at the end of three growing seasons, but deep-rooted shrubs that depend upon subsoil moisture may have their growth hampered by the retorted shale substrate. Natural revegetation on areas with various degrees of disturbance shows that natural invasion and succession was slow at best. Invasion of species on disturbed topsoil plots showed that after three years introduced seed mixtures were more effective than native mixtures in occupying space and closing the community to invading species. Fertilizer appears to encourage the invasion of annual plants even after the third year following application. Long-term storage of topsoil without vegetation significantly decreases the mycorrhizal infection potential and, therefore, decreases the relative success of aboveground vegetation and subsequent succession. Ecotypic differentation related to growth and competitive ability, moisture stress tolerance, and reproductive potential have been found in five native shrub species. Germplasm sources of two grasses and two legumes, that have shown promise as revegetation species, have been collected and evaluated for the production of test seed. Fertilizer (nitrogen) when added to the soil at the time of planting may encourage competition from annual weeds to the detriment of seeded species.

Redente, E.F.; Cook, C.W.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 View History Thousand Dollars per Well All (Real*) 1,011.9 1,127.4 1,528.5 1,522.3 1,801.3 3,481.8 1960-2007 All (Nominal) 1,054.2 1,199.5 1,673.1 1,720.7 2,101.7 4,171.7 1960-2007 Crude Oil (Nominal) 882.8 1,037.3 1,441.8 1,920.4 2,238.6 4,000.4 1960-2007 Natural Gas (Nominal) 991.9 1,106.0 1,716.4 1,497.6 1,936.2 3,906.9 1960-2007 Dry Holes (Nominal) 1,673.4 2,065.1 1,977.3 2,392.9 2,664.6 6,131.2 1960-2007 Dollars per Foot All (Real*) 187.46 203.25 267.28 271.16 324.00 574.46 1960-2007 All (Nominal) 195.31 216.27 292.57 306.50 378.03 688.30 1960-2007

73

PERCENT FEDERAL LAND FOR OIL/GAS FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

pFLayer As IFeatureLayer, pOutSR As ISpatialReference) As IPolygon ' project the search geometry (well buffer polygon) into ' whatever the projection of the federal land...

74

Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1] Andrews, S. and Udall, R. Oil Prophets: Lookingat World Oil Studies Over Time. In Campbell, C.International Workshop on Oil Depletion 2003, Paris, France,

Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

response to high oil prices and geopolitical threats tofor the e?ect of the oil price through the price elasticityprojections, corresponding oil price series are extracted

Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

U.S. Real Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Real Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0...

77

U.S. Nominal Cost per Crude Oil Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Oil Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Nominal Cost per Crude Oil Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

78

U.S. Nominal Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Nominal Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0...

79

U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Crude Oil Wells Drilled (Dollars...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Crude Oil Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

80

U.S. Real Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Real Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

82

Table 3a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars per barrel in ""dollar year"" specific to each...

83

How much does it cost to produce crude oil and natural gas? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. ... How much does it cost to produce crude oil and natural gas?

84

Regional differences for cost of crude oil to refiners widened in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary For Teachers. Energy Explained. ... Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Petroleum Marketing Monthly, Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil.

85

Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Price elasticity of demand for crude oil: estimates for 2327] Krichene, N. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandIn contrast to synthetic crude oils produced from the above

Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

playing key role in peak-oil debate, future energy supply.of di?ering views of peak oil, including Yergin’s, isHubbert’s Peak: The Impending World Oil Shortage. Princeton

Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

testing their above-ground shale oil retorting technology.and Miller, G. A. Oil shales and carbon dioxide. Science, [D. J. and Cecchine, G. Oil shale development in the United

Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for CO2 evolved from oil shale. Fuel Processing Technology,E. T. and Miller, G. A. Oil shales and carbon dioxide.D. J. and Cecchine, G. Oil shale development in the United

Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. J. and Cecchine, G. Oil shale development in the Unitedresources of some world oil-shale deposits. Technical Reportfor CO2 evolved from oil shale. Fuel Processing Technology,

Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Oil shale in the Piceance Basin: an analysis of land use issues  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to contribute to a framework for establishing policies to promote efficient use of the nation's oil shale resources. A methodology was developed to explain the effects of federal leasing policies on resource recovery, extraction costs, and development times associated with oil shale surface mines. This report investigates the effects of lease size, industrial development patterns, waste disposal policies, and lease boundaries on the potential of Piceance Basin oil shale resource. This approach should aid in understanding the relationship between federal leasing policies and requirements for developing Piceance Basin oil shale. 16 refs., 46 figs. (DMC)

Rubenson, D.; Pei, R.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009 Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009 Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009 Released: September 28, 2010 Next Release: Discontinued Excel Spreadsheet Model - 1994-2009 XLS (1,178 KB) Overview Oil and gas well equipment and operating costs, including coal bed methane costs, stopped their upward trend from the 1990s and fell sharply in 2009. The extremely high oil and gas prices during the first half of 2008 followed by an unprecedented drop to very low prices by the end of the year had a major impact on equipment demand. Operating costs tumbled also because fuel costs were reduced and well servicing rates fell in most areas. The exceptions were in California where electric rates continued to increase, causing a one (1) percent increase in annual operating costs for leases producing from 12,000 feet. Operating cost for coal bed methane wells in the Appalachian and Powder River areas increased because electric rates continued to climb. Due to the timing of the data collection, the cost reported here could be higher than the actual annual average for 2008. However, some production costs (labor and equipment) are not as volatile as drilling, pipe, and other well completion costs, so the effect of the oil and gas prices on collected data may be lessened. Annual average electric rates and natural gas prices are used, which also helps to dampen cost variances.

92

Planning manual for energy resource development on Indian lands. Volume I. Benefit--cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Section II follows a brief introduction and is entitled ''Benefit-Cost Analysis Framework.'' The analytical framework deals with two major steps involved in assessing the pros and cons of energy resource development (or any other type of development). The first is to identify and describe the overall tribal resource planning and decision process. The second is to develop a detailed methodological approach to the assessment of the benefits and costs of energy development alternatives within the context of the tribe's overall planning process. Sections III, IV, and V present the application of the benefit-cost analysis methodology to coal; oil and gas; and uranium, oil shale, and geothermal development, respectively. The methodology creates hypothetical examples that illustrate realistic development opportunities for the majority of tribes that have significant reserves of one or more of the resources that may be economic to develop.

Not Available

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

The social costs to the US of monopolization of the world oil market, 1972--1991  

SciTech Connect

The partial monopolization of the world oil market by the OPEC cartel has produced significant economic costs to the economies of the world. This paper reports estimates of the costs of monopolization of oil to the US over the period 1972--1991. Two fundamental assumptions of the analysis are, (1) that OPEC has acted as a monopoly, albeit with limited control, knowledge, and ability to act and, (2) that the US and other consuming nations could, through collective (social) action affect the cartel's ability to act as a monopoly. We measure total costs by comparing actual costs for the 1972--1991 period to a hypothetical more competitive'' world oil market scenario. By measuring past costs we avoid the enormous uncertainties about the future course of the world oil market and leave to the reader's judgment the issue of how much the future will be like the past. We note that total cost numbers cannot be used to determine the value of reducing US oil use by one barrel. They are useful for describing the overall size of the petroleum problem and are one important factor in deciding how much effort should be devoted to solving it. Monopoly pricing of oil transfers wealth from US oil consumers to foreign oil producers and, by increasing theeconomic scarcity of oil, reduces the economy's potential to produce. The actions of the OPEC cartel have also produced oil price shocks, both upward and downward, that generate additional costs because of the economy's inherent inability to adjust quickly to a large change in energy prices. Estimated total costs to the United States from these three sources for the 1972--1991 period are put at $4.1 trillion in 1990$($1.2 T wealth transfer, $0.8 T macroeconomic adjustment costs, $2.1 T potential GNP losses). The cost of the US's primary oil supply contingency program is small ($10 B) by comparison.

Greene, D.L.; Leiby, P.N.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

The social costs to the US of monopolization of the world oil market, 1972--1991  

SciTech Connect

The partial monopolization of the world oil market by the OPEC cartel has produced significant economic costs to the economies of the world. This paper reports estimates of the costs of monopolization of oil to the US over the period 1972--1991. Two fundamental assumptions of the analysis are, (1) that OPEC has acted as a monopoly, albeit with limited control, knowledge, and ability to act and, (2) that the US and other consuming nations could, through collective (social) action affect the cartel`s ability to act as a monopoly. We measure total costs by comparing actual costs for the 1972--1991 period to a hypothetical ``more competitive`` world oil market scenario. By measuring past costs we avoid the enormous uncertainties about the future course of the world oil market and leave to the reader`s judgment the issue of how much the future will be like the past. We note that total cost numbers cannot be used to determine the value of reducing US oil use by one barrel. They are useful for describing the overall size of the petroleum problem and are one important factor in deciding how much effort should be devoted to solving it. Monopoly pricing of oil transfers wealth from US oil consumers to foreign oil producers and, by increasing theeconomic scarcity of oil, reduces the economy`s potential to produce. The actions of the OPEC cartel have also produced oil price shocks, both upward and downward, that generate additional costs because of the economy`s inherent inability to adjust quickly to a large change in energy prices. Estimated total costs to the United States from these three sources for the 1972--1991 period are put at $4.1 trillion in 1990$($1.2 T wealth transfer, $0.8 T macroeconomic adjustment costs, $2.1 T potential GNP losses). The cost of the US`s primary oil supply contingency program is small ($10 B) by comparison.

Greene, D.L.; Leiby, P.N.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or design of improved production cost models. to assess thelearning which lowers production costs, and resourcewhich increases production costs. Each of these modules are

Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1994 through 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1997. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (compliance costs and lease availability) have a significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas equipment and production operations.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Evaluation of land disposal and underground injection of shale oil wastewaters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results indicate that the salinity of retort water, the principal wastewater generated by shale oil recovery operations, will be too high in most cases for irrigation of cover crops needed for effective stabilization by land disposal. Furthermore, large storage lagoons would be required to hold the retort water during the long winters encountered in the oil shale regions of Colorado, Wyoming and Utah. Land disposal cannot be carried out during prolonged periods of freezing weather. Additional problems which may arise with land disposal include air pollution from volatile constituents and groundwater pollution from refractory organics and dissolved salts in the retort water. Pretreatment requirements include the removal of ammonia which is present at toxic concentrations in retort water. Underground injection of retort water may be permitted in regions possessing favorable geological characteristics. It is anticipated that this method would be used as a last resort where effective or resonably priced treatment technology is not available. Regulatory restraints are expected to limit the use of underground injection for disposal of highly polluted shale oil wastewaters. Proving the confinement of injected wastes, a frequently difficult and expensive task, will be required to assure protection of drinking water resources.

Mercer, B.W.; Campbell, A.C.; Wakamiya, W.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1990 through 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimated costs and indice for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations for 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993. The costs of all equipment and serives were those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of oil wells to gas wells. The body of the report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (costs and lease availability) have significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas production equipment and operations.

1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

99

Table 3b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per barrel)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,20...

100

A review of Oil production capacity expansion costs for the Persian Gulf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Energy Information Agency has recently published a report prepared by Petroconsultants, Inc. that addresses the cost of expanding crude oil production capacity in the Persian Gulf. A study on this subject is much ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Options and costs for offsite disposal of oil and gas exploration and production wastes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the United States, most of the exploration and production (E&P) wastes generated at onshore oil and gas wells are disposed of or otherwise managed at the well site. Certain types of wastes are not suitable for onsite management, and some well locations in sensitive environments cannot be used for onsite management. In these situations, operators must transport the wastes offsite for disposal. In 1997, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) prepared a report that identified offsite commercial disposal facilities in the United States. This information has since become outdated. Over the past year, Argonne has updated the study through contacts with state oil and gas agencies and commercial disposal companies. The new report, including an extensive database for more than 200 disposal facilities, provides an excellent reference for information about commercial disposal operations. This paper describes Argonne's report. The national study provides summaries of the types of offsite commercial disposal facilities found in each state. Data are presented by waste type and by disposal method. The categories of E&P wastes in the database include: contaminated soils, naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), oil-based muds and cuttings, produced water, tank bottoms, and water-based muds and cuttings. The different waste management or disposal methods in the database involve: bioremediation, burial, salt cavern, discharge, evaporation, injection, land application, recycling, thermal treatment, and treatment. The database includes disposal costs for each facility. In the United States, most of the 18 billion barrels (bbl) of produced water, 149 million bbl of drilling wastes, and 21 million bbl of associated wastes generated at onshore oil and gas wells are disposed of or otherwise managed at the well site. However, under certain conditions, operators will seek offsite management options for these E&P wastes. Commercial disposal facilities are offsite businesses that accept and manage E&P wastes for a fee. Their services include waste management and disposal, transportation, cleaning of vehicles and tanks, disposal of wash water, and, in some cases, laboratory analysis. Commercial disposal facilities offer a suite of waste management methods and technologies.

Puder, M. G.; Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

cost reported here could be higher than the actual annual average for 2008. However, some production costs (labor and equipment) are not as volatile as drilling, pipe, and other...

103

COSTS OF U.S. OIL DEPENDENCE: 2005 UPDATE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M.A. and M.C.Lynch. 1997. "Fixed View of Resource Limits Creates Undue Pessimism," Oil & Gas Journal, April 7, pp. 56-59. Alazard, N. 1996. "Technical Scientific Progress in...

104

Laser Oil & Gas Well Drilling [Laser Applications Laboratory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

benefit in reducing the high costs of operating a drill rig. Today, a typical land-based oil or gas well costs around 400,000 to drill, while costs for an offshore well average...

105

Pros, cons of techniques used to calculate oil, gas finding costs  

SciTech Connect

A major problem facing the U.S. petroleum industry is the higher average finding costs that now exist within the U.S. compared with the average finding costs outside the U.S. It has been argued that federal lands and offshore areas need to be open for drilling in order to reduce average finding costs in the U.S. This article analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of conventional techniques for determining finding costs. Our goal is a finding costs measure that is a reliable indicator of future profitability.

Gaddis, D.; Brock, H.; Boynton, C. (Inst. of Petroleum Accounting, Denton, TX (US))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations, 1992--1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1992, 1993, 1994, and 1995. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sum (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measured do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

CO? mitigation costs for Canada and the Alberta Oil Sands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The threat of climate change proposes difficult problems for regulators and decision-makers in terms of uncertainties, varying exposures to risks and different attitudes towards risk among nations. Impact and cost assessments ...

Anderson, Justin David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Development of Simpler, Cost Effective Oil Conditioning Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It was recognized that the flexibility and complexity associated with the multipurpose on-line continuous oil-conditioning unit (Mark I), developed in this project in prior years, might not be needed in some cases. Furthermore, it was anticipated that simpler or single purpose units might have equal or higher merit. Subsequent efforts were focused towards the development of stand-alone units for dehydration, decontamination, and degassing/dehydration. This technical update describes work to date on the d...

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

109

Supplying Synthetic Crude Oil from Canadian Oil Sands: A Comparative Study of the Costs and CO2 Emissions of Mining and In-Situ Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and of unconventional deposits such as heavy oils, tar sands and oil shales.” As conventional oil becomes scarcer, the transport sector will remain dependent on petroleum resources, if no oil substitute is available. Fuels from non-conventional oil resources... www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk E P R G W O R K IN G P A P E R Abstract Supplying Synthetic Crude Oil from Canadian Oil Sands: A Comparative Study of the Costs and CO2 Emissions of Mining and In-situ Recovery EPRG Working Paper 1005...

Méjean, A; Hope, Chris

110

Oil shale mining cost analysis. Volume I. Surface retorting process. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An Oil Shale Mining Economic Model (OSMEM) was developed and executed for mining scenarios representative of commercially feasible mining operations. Mining systems were evaluated for candidate sites in the Piceance Creek Basin. Mining methods selected included: (1) room-and-pillar; (2) chamber-and-pillar, with spent shale backfilling; (3) sublevel stopping; and (4) sublevel stopping, with spent shale backfilling. Mines were designed to extract oil shale resources to support a 50,000 barrels-per-day surface processing facility. Costs developed for each mining scenario included all capital and operating expenses associated with the underground mining methods. Parametric and sensitivity analyses were performed to determine the sensitivity of mining cost to changes in capital cost, operating cost, return on investment, and cost escalation.

Resnick, B.S.; English, L.M.; Metz, R.D.; Lewis, A.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Predicted costs of environmental controls for a commercial oil shale industry. Volume 1. An engineering analysis  

SciTech Connect

The pollution control costs for a commercial oil shale industry were determined in a joint effort by Denver Research Institute, Water Purification Associates of Cambridge, and Stone and Webster Engineering of Boston and Denver. Four commercial oil shale processes were considered. The results in terms of cost per barrel of syncrude oil are predicted to be as follows: Paraho Process, $0.67 to $1.01; TOSCO II Process, $1.43 to $1.91; MIS Process, $2.02 to $3.03; and MIS/Lurgi-Ruhrgas Process, $1.68 to $2.43. Alternative pollution control equipment and integrated pollution control strategies were considered and optimal systems selected for each full-scale plant. A detailed inventory of equipment (along with the rationale for selection), a detailed description of control strategies, itemized costs and predicted emission levels are presented for each process. Capital and operating cost data are converted to a cost per barrel basis using detailed economic evaluation procedures. Ranges of cost are determined using a subjective self-assessment of uncertainty approach. An accepted methodology for probability encoding was used, and cost ranges are presented as subjective probability distributions. Volume I presents the detailed engineering results. Volume II presents the detailed analysis of uncertainty in the predicted costs.

Nevens, T.D.; Culbertson, W.J. Jr.; Wallace, J.R.; Taylor, G.C.; Jovanovich, A.P.; Prien, C.H.; Hicks, R.E.; Probstein, R.F.; Domahidy, G.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Exporting Alaskan North Slope crude oil: Benefits and costs  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy study examines the effects of lifting the current prohibitions against the export of Alaskan North Slope (ANS) crude. The study concludes that permitting exports would benefit the US economy. First, lifting the ban would expand the markets in which ANS oil can be sold, thereby increasing its value. ANS oil producers, the States of California and Alaska, and some of their local governments all would benefit from increased revenues. Permitting exports also would generate new economic activity and employment in California and Alaska. The study concludes that these economic benefits would be achieved without increasing gasoline prices (either in California or in the nation as a whole). Lifting the export ban could have important implications for US maritime interests. The Merchant Marine Act of 1970 (known as the Jones Act) requires all inter-coastal shipments to be carried on vessels that are US-owned, US-crewed, and US-built. By limiting the shipment of ANS crude to US ports only, the export ban creates jobs for the seafarers and the builders of Jones Act vessels. Because the Jones Act does not apply to exports, however, lifting the ban without also changing US maritime law would jeopardize the jobs associated with the current fleet of Jones Act tankers. Therefore the report analyzes selected economic impacts of several maritime policy alternatives, including: Maintaining current law, which allows foreign tankers to carry oil where export is allowed; requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on Jones Act vessels; and requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on vessels that are US-owned and US-crewed, but not necessarily US-built. Under each of these options, lifting the export ban would generate economic benefits.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Supplying Synthetic Crude Oil from Canadian Oil Sands: A Comparative Study of the Costs and CO2 Emissions of Mining and In-situ Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High crude oil prices and the eventual decline of conventional oil production raise the issue of alternative fuels such as non-conventional oil. The paper describes a simple probabilistic model of the costs of synthetic crude oil (SCO) produced from Canadian oil sands. Synthetic crude oil is obtained by upgrading bitumen that is first produced through mining or in-situ recovery techniques. This forward-looking analysis quantifies the effects of learning and production constraints on the costs of supplying synthetic crude oil from Canadian bitumen deposits. The results show the uncertainties associated with the future costs of synthetic crude oil. Carbon costs have a large impact of the total costs of synthetic crude oil, in particular in the case of synthetic crude oil from in-situ bitumen, due to the carbon-intensity of the recovery techniques. The influence of each parameter on the supply costs is examined. In the case of mined SCO, the maximum production rate, the ultimate recovery rate and the depletion parameters show the largest influence on the results, while learning parameters dominate in the case of in-situ SCO.

Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope; Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope; Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

EPRG WORKING PAPER Supplying Synthetic Crude Oil from Canadian Oil Sands: A Comparative Study of the Costs and CO2 Emissions of Mining and In-situ Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High crude oil prices and the eventual decline of conventional oil production raise the issue of alternative fuels such as non-conventional oil. The paper describes a simple probabilistic model of the costs of synthetic crude oil (SCO) produced from Canadian oil sands. Synthetic crude oil is obtained by upgrading bitumen that is first produced through mining or in-situ recovery techniques. This forward-looking analysis quantifies the effects of learning and production constraints on the costs of supplying synthetic crude oil from Canadian bitumen deposits. The results show the uncertainties associated with the future costs of synthetic crude oil. Carbon costs have a large impact of the total costs of synthetic crude oil, in particular in the case of synthetic crude oil from in-situ bitumen, due to the carbon-intensity of the recovery techniques. The influence of each parameter on the supply costs is examined. In the case of mined SCO, the maximum production rate, the ultimate recovery rate and the depletion parameters show the largest influence on the results, while learning parameters dominate in the case of in-situ SCO.

Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope; Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Economic impacts of oil spills: Spill unit costs for tankers, pipelines, refineries, and offshore facilities. [Task 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The impacts of oil spills -- ranging from the large, widely publicized Exxon Valdez tanker incident to smaller pipeline and refinery spills -- have been costly to both the oil industry and the public. For example, the estimated costs to Exxon of the Valdez tanker spill are on the order of $4 billion, including $2.8 billion (in 1993 dollars) for direct cleanup costs and $1.125 billion (in 1992 dollars) for settlement of damages claims caused by the spill. Application of contingent valuation costs and civil lawsuits pending in the State of Alaska could raise these costs appreciably. Even the costs of the much smaller 1991 oil spill at Texaco`s refinery near Anacortes, Washington led to costs of $8 to 9 million. As a result, inexpensive waming, response and remediation technologies could lower oil spin costs, helping both the oil industry, the associated marine industries, and the environment. One means for reducing the impact and costs of oil spills is to undertake research and development on key aspects of the oil spill prevention, warming, and response and remediation systems. To target these funds to their best use, it is important to have sound data on the nature and size of spills, their likely occurrence and their unit costs. This information could then allow scarce R&D dollars to be spent on areas and activities having the largest impact. This report is intended to provide the ``unit cost`` portion of this crucial information. The report examines the three key components of the US oil supply system, namely, tankers and barges; pipelines and refineries; and offshore production facilities. The specific purpose of the study was to establish the unit costs of oil spills. By manipulating this key information into a larger matrix that includes the size and frequency of occurrence of oil spills, it will be possible` to estimate the likely future impacts, costs, and sources of oil spills.

Not Available

1993-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

The Welfare Implications of Oil Privatisation: A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Norway's Statoil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.electricitypolicy.org.uk E P R G W O R K IN G P A P E R Abstract The Welfare Implications of Oil Privatisation: A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Norway's Statoil EPRG Working Paper EPRG0905 Cambridge Working Paper in Economics... , and that privatisation can be structured with state involvement at several levels, aiming to maximise the public share of benefits. Keywords Privatisation, Cost-Benefit, Welfare, Oil and Gas, Norway JEL Classification D61, H43, L33, L71, Q48 Contact christian...

Wolf, C; Pollitt, Michael G.

117

Practical Handbook of Soybean Processing and UtilizationChapter 26 Cost Estimates for Soybean Processing and Soybean Oil Refining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Handbook of Soybean Processing and Utilization Chapter 26 Cost Estimates for Soybean Processing and Soybean Oil Refining Processing eChapters Processing AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 26 Cost Est

118

U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the cost of crude oil and the cost of the products is notare related to the amount and cost of oil imported from theDivision, The External Costs of Oil Used in Transportation,

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Disposal of oil field wastes into salt caverns: Feasibility, legality, risk, and costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Salt caverns can be formed through solution mining in the bedded or domal salt formations that are found in many states. Salt caverns have traditionally been used for hydrocarbon storage, but caverns have also been used to dispose of some types of wastes. This paper provides an overview of several years of research by Argonne National Laboratory on the feasibility and legality of using salt caverns for disposing of oil field wastes, the risks to human populations from this disposal method, and the cost of cavern disposal. Costs are compared between the four operating US disposal caverns and other commercial disposal options located in the same geographic area as the caverns. Argonne`s research indicates that disposal of oil field wastes into salt caverns is feasible and legal. The risk from cavern disposal of oil field wastes appears to be below accepted safe risk thresholds. Disposal caverns are economically competitive with other disposal options.

Veil, J.A. [Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Water Policy Program

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

The Social Costs to the U.S. of Monopolization of the World Oil Market, 1972-1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The partial monopolization of the world oil market by the OPEC cartel has produced significant economic costs to the economies of the world. This paper reports estimates of the costs of monopolization of oil to the U.S. over the period 1972-1991. Two fundamental assumptions of the analysis are, (1) that OPEC has acted as a monopoly, albeit with limited control, knowledge, and ability to act and, (2) that the U.S. and other consuming nations could, through collective (social) action affect the cartel's ability to act as a monopoly. We measure total costs by comparing actual costs for the 1972-1991 period to a hypothetical ''more competitive'' world oil market scenario. By measuring past costs we avoid the enormous uncertainties about the future course of the world oil market and leave to the reader's judgment the issue of how much the future will be like the past. We note that total cost numbers cannot be used to determine the value of reducing U.S. oil use by one barrel. They are useful for describing the overall size of the petroleum problem and are one important factor in deciding how much effort should be devoted to solving it. Monopoly pricing of oil transfers wealth from US. oil consumers to foreign oil producers and, by increasing the economic scarcity of oil, reduces the economy's potential to produce. The actions of the OPEC Cartel have also produced oil price shocks, both upward and downward, that generate additional costs because of the economy's inherent inability to adjust quickly to a large change in energy prices. Estimated total costs to the United States from these three sources for the 1972-1991 period are put at $4.1 trillion in 1990$ ($1.2 T wealth transfer, $0.8 T macroeconomic adjustment costs, $2.1 T potential GNP losses). The cost of the US's primary oil supply contingency program is small ($10 B) by comparison.

Greene, D.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

COST EFFECTIVE REGULATORY APPROACHES TO ENHANCE DOMESTIC OIL & GAS PRODUCTION AND ENSURE THE PROTECTION OF THE ENVIRONMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Information Management Suite/Risk Based Data Management System (EIMS/RBDMS) and Cost Effective Regulatory Approach (CERA) programs continue to be successful. All oil and gas state regulatory programs participate in these efforts. Significant accomplishments include: streamline regulatory approaches, enhancing environmental protection, and making oil and gas data available via the Internet. Oil and gas companies worldwide now have access to data on state web sites. This reduces the cost of exploration and enables companies to develop properties in areas that would have been cost prohibited for exploration. Early in project, GWPC and State Oil and Gas agencies developed the EIMS and CERA strategic plan to prioritize long term development and implementation. The planning process identifies electronic commerce and coal bed methane as high priorities. The group has involved strategic partners in industry and government to develop a common data exchange process. Technical assistance to Alaska continues to improve their program management capabilities. New initiatives in Alaska include the development of an electronic permit tracking system. This system allows managers to expedite the permitting process. Nationwide, the RBDMS system is largely completed with 22 states and one Indian Nation now using this nationally accepted data management system. Additional remaining tasks include routine maintenance and the installation of the program upon request for the remaining oil and gas states. The GWPC in working with the BLM and MMS to develop an XML schema to facilitate electronic permitting and reporting (Appendix A, B, and C). This is a significant effort and, in years to come, will increase access to federal lands by reducing regulatory barriers. The new initiatives are coal bed methane and e-commerce. The e-commerce program will provide industry and BLM/MMS access to the millions of data points housed in the RBDMS system. E-commerce will streamline regulatory approaches and allow small operators to produce energy from areas that have become sub-economic for the major producers. The GWPC is working with states to develop a coal bed methane program, which will both manage the data and develop a public education program on the benefits of produced water. The CERA program benefits all oil and gas states by reducing the cost of regulatory compliance, increasing environmental protection, and providing industry and regulatory agencies a discussion forum. Activities included many small and large group forum settings for discussions of technical and policy issues as well as the ongoing State Class II UIC peer review effort. The accomplishments detailed in this report will be the basis for the next initiative which is RBDMS On-Line. RBDMS On-Line will combine data mining, electronic permitting and electronic reporting with .net technology. Industry, BLM, GWPC and all Oil and Gas states are partnering this effort.

Ben Grunewald; Paul Jehn; Tom Gillespie; Ben Binder

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

122

Downhole oil/water separators offer lower costs and greater environmental protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Produced water management can be a significant expense for oil and gas operators. This paper summarizes a study of the technical, economic, and regulatory feasibility of a relatively new technology, downhole oil/water separators (DOWS), to reduce the volume of water pumped to the surface. The study was funded by the US Department of Energy and conducted by Argonne National Laboratory, CH2M Hill, and the Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. DOWS are devices that separate oil and gas from produced water at the bottom of the well and reinject some of the produced water into another formation or another horizon within the same formation, while the oil and gas are pumped to the surface. Since much of the produced water is not pumped to the surface, treated, and pumped from the surface back into a deep formation, the cost of handling produced water is greatly reduced. The oil production rate has increased for more than half of the DOWS installations to date.

Veil, J. A.

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

123

Table 1A","Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil by PAD District (Domestic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A","Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil by PAD District (Domestic)" A","Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil by PAD District (Domestic)" ,"(Dollars per Barrel)" ,,," "," " ,,,"Previous ","Final" "Frequency","Date","Area","Price","Price","Difference" "Annual",2010,"PAD District 2",78.7,78.85,0.15 ,,"PAD District 4",73.65,73.56,-0.09 ,,"U.S.",77.96,78.01,0.05 ,2011,"PAD District 3",103.19,103.24,0.05 ,,"PAD District 2",96.82,96.81,-0.01 ,,"PAD District 4",89.36,89.34,-0.02 ,,"U.S.",100.74,100.71,-0.03 ,,"PAD District 5",103.85,103.83,-0.02 "Month","application/vnd.ms-excel","PAD District 4",73.68,72.66,-1.02

124

Economic variables in production of oil from oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The oil-shale production cost estimates reported by the National Petroleum Council in Dec. 1972, as part of an overall study of the U.S. energy situation are the most recent publicly available data on oil-shale economics. Using the basic NPC costs, this study examines several important parameters affecting shale oil's economic viability. Other factors pertinent to consideration of oil shale as a domestic fuel source, such as the leasing of federal oil shale lands, water availability, and environmental restraints are reviewed.

Cameron, R.J.

1973-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Rehabilitation potential and practices of Colorado oil shale lands. Progress report, June 1, 1976--May 31, 1977  

SciTech Connect

Substantial progress has been made towards implementing all of the prescribed studies and satisfying the stated objectives since the Oil Shale Rehabilitation Project was actively initiated in June 1976. Concurrent with implementation, research objectives were substantively defined and supplemented without distracting or departing from the original purpose. Current studies are designed to fill voids in the present status of knowledge regarding lands disturbed by an impending oil shale industry in Colorado. The efforts of all contributing investigators have therefore been integrated and directed toward the goal of developing methodologies requisite for restoring diverse and complex ecosystems which will require only a minimal amount of maintenance or input of scarce resources. An intensive study site southeast of the Oil Shale Tract C-a has been obtained through a Cooperative Agreement with the Bureau of Land Management. Following this agreement, most subprojects were initiated at the intensive site. Additional programs will be implemented as spent shale becomes available this summer. Studies conducted principally in the laboratory and greenhouse, such as the microbiological and plant genetic studies, have achieved significant results.

Sims, P.L.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Cost Effective Surfactant Formulations for Improved Oil Recovery in Carbonate Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes work during the 30 month time period of this project. This was planned originally for 3-years duration, but due to its financial limitations, DOE halted funding after 2 years. The California Institute of Technology continued working on this project for an additional 6 months based on a no-cost extension granted by DOE. The objective of this project is to improve the performance of aqueous phase formulations that are designed to increase oil recovery from fractured, oil-wet carbonate reservoir rock. This process works by increasing the rate and extent of aqueous phase imbibition into the matrix blocks in the reservoir and thereby displacing crude oil normally not recovered in a conventional waterflood operation. The project had three major components: (1) developing methods for the rapid screening of surfactant formulations towards identifying candidates suitable for more detailed evaluation, (2) more fundamental studies to relate the chemical structure of acid components of an oil and surfactants in aqueous solution as relates to their tendency to wet a carbonate surface by oil or water, and (3) a more applied study where aqueous solutions of different commercial surfactants are examined for their ability to recover a West Texas crude oil from a limestone core via an imbibition process. The first item, regarding rapid screening methods for suitable surfactants has been summarized as a Topical Report. One promising surfactant screening protocol is based on the ability of a surfactant solution to remove aged crude oil that coats a clear calcite crystal (Iceland Spar). Good surfactant candidate solutions remove the most oil the quickest from the surface of these chips, plus change the apparent contact angle of the remaining oil droplets on the surface that thereby indicate increased water-wetting. The other fast surfactant screening method is based on the flotation behavior of powdered calcite in water. In this test protocol, first the calcite power is pre-treated to make the surface oil-wet. The next step is to add the pre-treated powder to a test tube and add a candidate aqueous surfactant formulation; the greater the percentage of the calcite that now sinks to the bottom rather than floats, the more effective the surfactant is in changing the solids to become now preferentially water-wet. Results from the screening test generally are consistent with surfactant oil recovery performance reported in the literature. The second effort is a more fundamental study. It considers the effect of chemical structures of different naphthenic acids (NA) dissolved in decane as model oils that render calcite surfaces oil-wet to a different degree. NAs are common to crude oil and are at least partially responsible for the frequent observation that carbonate reservoirs are oil-wet. Because pure NA compounds are used, trends in wetting behavior can be related to NA molecular structure as measured by solid adsorption, contact angle and our novel, simple flotation test with calcite. Experiments with different surfactants and NA-treated calcite powder provide information about mechanisms responsible for sought after reversal to a water-wet state. Key findings include: (1) more hydrophobic NA's are more prone to induce oil-wetting, and (2) recovery of the model oil from limestone core was better with cationic surfactants, but one nonionic surfactant, Igepal CO-530, also had favorable results. This portion of the project included theoretical calculations to investigate key basic properties of several NAs such as their acidic strength and their relative water/oil solubility, and relate this to their chemical structure. The third category of this project focused on the recovery of a light crude oil from West Texas (McElroy Field) from a carbonate rock (limestone outcrop). For this effort, the first item was to establish a suite of surfactants that would be compatible with the McElroy Field brine. Those were examined further for their ability to recover oil by imbibition. Results demonstrate several types of promising candida

William A. Goddard; Yongchun Tang; Patrick Shuler; Mario Blanco; Yongfu Wu

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

127

,"F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

for Selected Crude Streams" for Selected Crude Streams" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams",14,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_imc2_k_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_imc2_k_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

128

Potential for non-thermal cost-effective chemical augmented waterflood for producing viscous oils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Chemical enhanced oil recovery has regained its attention because of high oil price and the depletion of conventional oil reservoirs. This process is more complex… (more)

Xu, Haomin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Using a total landed cost model to foster global logistics strategy in the electronics industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global operation strategies have been widely used in the last several decades as many companies and industries have taken advantage of lower production costs. However, in choosing a location, companies often only consider ...

Jearasatit, Apichart

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

An Investigation into the Derived Demand for Land in Palm Oil Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Over the years, the world industry of oil palm has been rapidly increasing in the tropical areas of Asia, Africa and America. One of the… (more)

Lau, Jia Li

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Table 27. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1996 January ................. 14.41 14.81 17.62 18.12 18.80 19.22 18.47 February ............... 15.29 15.52 17.66 18.86 18.80 20.03 19.74 March .................... 16.57 17.52 19.84 20.30 20.54 21.63 21.48 April ...................... 17.04 18.65 21.71 20.94 22.12 21.86 22.15 May ....................... 15.97 17.39 19.92 19.90 21.01 21.48 21.57 June ...................... 16.10 16.90 19.17 19.20 20.09 20.30 20.63 July ....................... 16.63 17.28 19.70 19.75 20.66 21.02 20.96 August .................. 17.33 18.00 20.52 20.86 21.72 21.54 21.81 September ............ 19.12 19.91 22.55 22.38 23.33 22.93 22.54 October ................. 19.23 20.97 23.32 23.34 24.80 24.73 24.87 November ............. 18.99 19.57 22.43 22.95 24.10 24.61 24.37 December ............. 19.17 19.92 22.96 22.71 24.77

132

Table 27. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1995 January ................. 13.91 14.06 16.26 16.91 17.27 16.74 17.41 February ............... 14.21 14.62 16.88 17.27 17.84 17.99 17.20 March .................... 14.72 15.31 16.96 17.67 17.94 18.16 18.53 April ...................... 15.94 16.74 18.43 18.72 19.05 18.83 18.93 May ....................... 16.20 16.75 18.26 18.12 19.28 19.21 19.08 June ...................... 14.78 15.44 17.03 17.20 18.59 18.51 18.82 July ....................... 13.96 14.10 15.97 16.41 17.16 17.30 17.81 August .................. 13.70 14.30 16.38 16.36 17.32 16.95 16.55 September ............ 14.04 14.20 16.49 16.65 17.55 18.60 18.02 October ................. 12.88 13.40 15.78 16.24 17.30 17.78 17.46 November ............. 13.56 13.74 16.13 17.01 17.54 17.53 18.21 December ............. 14.80 15.03 17.13 17.15 18.69

133

Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Algerian Algerian Condensate Angolan Cabinda Canadian Lloydminster Cameroon Kole Marine Ecuadorian Oriente Mexican Isthmus Mexican Mayan 1978 Average .......... W 14.07 - W 13.85 13.54 - 1979 Average .......... W 21.51 - 25.40 29.17 20.78 22.23 1980 Average .......... 37.73 34.68 W 37.89 34.61 33.42 29.49 1981 Average .......... 40.03 36.84 W 38.95 33.56 36.87 31.52 1982 Average .......... 33.71 33.08 W 34.95 32.97 33.11 25.86 1983 Average .......... 30.79 29.31 25.27 30.28 28.90 30.00 24.56 1984 Average .......... 28.59 28.63 25.35 29.51 28.79 29.46 25.84 1985 Average .......... 27.21 27.48 24.38 27.94 26.97 27.60 24.57 1986 Average .......... 14.54 14.27 13.52 13.71 14.39 14.28 11.24 1987 Average .......... 17.72 18.43 15.98 18.63 17.60 18.32 16.03 1988 Average .......... W 14.96 12.21 15.21 13.77 14.69 11.65 1989 Average .......... W 18.15 15.36 18.71 17.69 W

134

Table 27. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1993 January ................. 13.07 13.09 16.23 17.15 18.48 18.48 19.00 February ............... 13.25 13.79 17.04 17.94 19.22 19.49 19.64 March .................... 13.94 14.49 17.56 18.17 19.51 20.41 21.29 April ...................... 13.87 14.73 17.49 18.13 19.55 20.22 20.05 May ....................... 13.43 14.53 17.33 17.45 19.31 20.18 20.64 June ...................... 12.37 13.19 16.62 16.81 18.54 18.94 19.43 July ....................... 11.74 12.66 15.48 16.06 17.61 18.77 18.46 August .................. 12.40 12.86 14.97 15.77 17.37 18.78 18.35 September ............ 12.63 12.67 14.82 15.08 16.97 17.41 17.38 October ................. 12.07 12.67 14.82 15.23 17.12 17.64 17.62 November ............. 10.55 10.98 13.73 14.19 16.27 17.09 14.92 December ............. 9.72 9.91 11.60 12.43 14.37 15.33

135

Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1997 January ................. 23.98 20.83 19.55 24.63 24.60 19.10 25.13 February ............... 21.33 18.73 17.84 20.28 20.97 16.56 22.63 March .................... 19.46 17.33 16.23 18.31 W 15.49 20.20 1st Quarter Average ................... 21.80 18.80 17.96 20.67 22.45 17.04 22.65 April ...................... 17.72 16.04 15.43 17.71 18.41 15.14 18.98 May ....................... 19.00 16.21 15.66 17.41 W 15.97 19.88 June ...................... W 15.45 14.78 17.30 W 14.78 18.29 2nd Quarter Average ................... 18.35 15.93 15.31 17.45 18.85 15.30 19.06 July ....................... 18.26 15.50 15.14 15.97 19.49 15.00 18.83 August .................. 18.65 16.05 15.61 16.75 W 15.53 19.18 September ............ 18.96 16.01 15.39 16.05 W 15.36 19.05 3rd Quarter Average ................... 18.61 15.87

136

Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1998 January ................. 15.18 11.86 11.36 14.31 16.34 10.37 16.01 February ............... 14.25 10.79 10.17 13.97 14.77 9.66 14.88 March .................... 13.29 10.51 10.15 11.94 14.44 8.21 13.77 1st Quarter Average ................... 14.04 11.14 10.59 13.35 15.12 9.40 14.94 April ...................... 13.81 10.25 9.65 12.14 14.28 9.63 14.18 May ....................... 14.17 10.34 9.42 10.54 15.11 9.61 14.38 June ...................... 12.46 9.54 9.02 10.74 12.27 8.84 12.79 2nd Quarter Average ................... 13.39 9.98 9.41 11.03 13.99 9.39 13.81 July ....................... 12.18 10.00 10.00 10.63 12.67 9.53 13.03 August .................. 12.09 10.39 9.74 10.93 12.70 8.87 12.61 September ............ 12.77 11.11 11.29 11.71 14.43 9.93 14.01 3rd Quarter Average ................... 12.36 10.49

137

U.S. Landed Costs of Ecuadorian Oriente Crude Oil (Dollars per Barrel)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1983-W: 27.09: 28.16: 28.68: 29.13: 29.78: 29.85: 29.85: 29.35: 28.64: 28.13: 1984: 28.25: 29.15: 29.22: 29.52 ...

138

U.S. Landed Costs of Ecuadorian Napo Crude Oil (Dollars per Barrel)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 2009: 28.28: 32.32: 41.80: 46.34: 56.99: 62.80: 62.14: 64.98: W: W: 71.34: 2010: W: W: 76.56: W: 65.16: 66.60 ...

139

U.S. Landed Costs of Ecuadorian Oriente Crude Oil (Dollars per Barrel)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1970's: 13.85: 29.17: 1980's: 34.61: 33.56: 32.97: 28.90: 28.79: 26.97: 14.39: 17.60: 13 ...

140

U.S. Landed Costs of Nigerian Bonny Light Crude Oil (Dollars ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1970's: 15.04: 27.11: 1980's: 38.58: 39.25: 36.45: 31.06: 30.46: 28.98: 15.00: 19.26: 16 ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

U.S. Landed Costs of Canadian Light Sour Blend Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 2009: 35.41: 35.91: 48.71: 49.82: 56.69: 64.76: 63.14: 66.50: 67.73: 71.74: 74.54: 72.47: 2010: 75.78: W: 79.69 ...

142

U.S. Landed Costs of Iraqi Basrah Light Crude Oil (Dollars per ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 2009: 43.58: 42.61: 49.14: 58.46: 62.08: 66.59: 67.52: 69.51: 71.71: 75.73: 74.43: 77.05: 2010: 75.46: 78.31: 79 ...

143

U.S. Landed Costs of Saudi Arabian Light Crude Oil (Dollars ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1983: W: W: W: W: W: W: W: 30.56: 30.77: 30.86: W: W: 1984: W: W: W: W: W: 30.45: W: W: W: W-- 1985: W: W----W-W ...

144

U.S. Landed Costs of Venezuelan Merey Crude Oil (Dollars ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 2009: 37.66: 39.18: W: 49.22: 58.30: 64.00: 63.21: 68.17: 65.89: 68.26: 72.03: 69.99: 2010: ...

145

U.S. Landed Costs of Brazilian Marlim Crude Oil (Dollars per Barrel)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 2009: 33.22: 36.04: 43.91: 49.09: 60.75: 62.88: 63.14: 67.07: 67.97: 74.40: 73.06: 75.50: 2010: 71.02: 76.04: 79 ...

146

U.S. Landed Costs of Canada Crude Oil (Dollars per Barrel)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1970's: 5.33: 11.48: 12.84: 13.36: 14.13: 14.41: 20.22: 1980's: 30.11: 32.32: 27.15: 25 ...

147

Table 3a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per barrel in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 16.69 16.43 16.99 17.66 18.28 19.06 19.89 20.72 21.65 22.61 23.51 24.29 24.90 25.60 26.30 27.00 27.64 28.16 AEO 1995 1993 14.90 16.41 16.90 17.45 18.00 18.53 19.13 19.65 20.16 20.63 21.08 21.50 21.98 22.44 22.94 23.50 24.12 AEO 1996 1994 16.81 16.98 17.37 17.98 18.61 19.27 19.92 20.47 20.97 21.41 21.86 22.25 22.61 22.97 23.34 23.70 24.08

148

Table 3b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per barrel) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 17.06 17.21 18.24 19.43 20.64 22.12 23.76 25.52 27.51 29.67 31.86 34.00 36.05 38.36 40.78 43.29 45.88 48.37 AEO 1995 15.24 17.27 18.23 19.26 20.39 21.59 22.97 24.33 25.79 27.27 28.82 30.38 32.14 33.89 35.85 37.97 40.28 AEO 1996 17.16 17.74 18.59 19.72 20.97 22.34 23.81 25.26 26.72 28.22 29.87 31.51 33.13 34.82 36.61 38.48 40.48

149

Offsite commercial disposal of oil and gas exploration and production waste :availability, options, and cost.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A survey conducted in 1995 by the American Petroleum Institute (API) found that the U.S. exploration and production (E&P) segment of the oil and gas industry generated more than 149 million bbl of drilling wastes, almost 18 billion bbl of produced water, and 21 million bbl of associated wastes. The results of that survey, published in 2000, suggested that 3% of drilling wastes, less than 0.5% of produced water, and 15% of associated wastes are sent to offsite commercial facilities for disposal. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) collected information on commercial E&P waste disposal companies in different states in 1997. While the information is nearly a decade old, the report has proved useful. In 2005, Argonne began collecting current information to update and expand the data. This report describes the new 2005-2006 database and focuses on the availability of offsite commercial disposal companies, the prevailing disposal methods, and estimated disposal costs. The data were collected in two phases. In the first phase, state oil and gas regulatory officials in 31 states were contacted to determine whether their agency maintained a list of permitted commercial disposal companies dedicated to oil. In the second stage, individual commercial disposal companies were interviewed to determine disposal methods and costs. The availability of offsite commercial disposal companies and facilities falls into three categories. The states with high oil and gas production typically have a dedicated network of offsite commercial disposal companies and facilities in place. In other states, such an infrastructure does not exist and very often, commercial disposal companies focus on produced water services. About half of the states do not have any industry-specific offsite commercial disposal infrastructure. In those states, operators take their wastes to local municipal landfills if permitted or haul the wastes to other states. This report provides state-by-state summaries of the types of offsite commercial disposal facilities that are found in each state. In later sections, data are presented by waste type and then by disposal method.

Puder, M. G.; Veil, J. A.

2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

150

Cost, Conflict and Climate: U.S. Challenges in the World Oil Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1A Figure 6: Uses of Crude Oil in the United States Otherincreases in the price of crude oil during the last half ofdollar-denominated price of crude oil increased about 50%.

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Cost, Conflict and Climate: U.S. Challenges in the World Oil Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 and 1.1A Figure 6: Uses of Crude Oil in the UnitedStates Other Residual Fuel Oil (bunker fuel) PetrochemicalDiesel Fuel and Heating Oil Jet Fuel Figure 7: Sources of

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Cost, Conflict and Climate: U.S. Challenges in the World Oil Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the world price of oil and prices of gasoline and otherincremental pro?ts when oil prices rise come from both U.S.the recent increases in oil prices and attempts to clarify

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Cost, Conflict and Climate: U.S. Challenges in the World Oil Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

position that exporters of oil (as well as other goods andsite versus the value of the oil, as well as the size of thee?ect of an oil price shock extends well beyond the pump, of

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Cost, Conflict and Climate: U.S. Challenges in the World Oil Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel Oil (bunker fuel) Petrochemical Feedstock Motorof re?ned oil product used in the U.S. is motor gasoline.

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Drop in U.S. gasoline prices reflects decline in crude oil costs ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

156

Gasoline prices rise due to increased crude oil costs - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

157

Cost, Conflict and Climate: U.S. Challenges in the World Oil Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

high oil prices and large import quantities contribute toOil is also produced in the U.S. In 2007, the quantity was

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

H.R. 817: A Bill to authorize the Secretary of Energy to lease lands within the naval oil shale reserves to private entities for the development and production of oil and natural gas. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This bill would give the Secretary of Energy authority to lease lands within the Naval oil shale reserves to private entities for the purpose of surveying for and developing oil and gas resources from the land (other than oil shale). It also allows the Bureau of Land Management to be used as a leasing agent, establishes rules on royalties, and the sharing of royalties with the state, and covers the transfer of existing equipment.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

Design and Cost Estimating Procedures for SCR and SNCR Retrofits on Gas- and Oil-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility companies have been reevaluating the feasibility of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) retrofits in order to meet increasingly stringent nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission limits. This report describes two EPRI-developed models for helping utility companies screen the cost effectiveness of SCR and SNCR technologies for application at specific gas- and oil-fired boiler sites.

2002-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

160

Modelling the costs of non-conventional oil: A case study of Canadian bitumen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in conventional deposits. The longer- term problem of climate change arises from the fuller and longer-term use of coal, and of unconventional deposits such as heavy oils, tar sands and oil shales.” (Grubb, 2001) As conventional oil becomes scarcer, the transport... , it is not mobile at reservoir conditions, (Cupcic, 2003): density Oil shale is a fine-grained sedimentary rock rich in organic matter, (USGS, 2005): oil shales contain kerogen, which is a solid, insoluble organic material...

Méjean, A; Hope, Chris

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1986 Through 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Water handling costs are a major factor in coal bed methane operating costs and partially account for the difference in operating costs. Items tracked

162

LOWER COST METHODS FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY (IOR) VIA SURFACTANT FLOODING  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a summary of the work performed in this 3-year project sponsored by DOE. The overall objective of this project is to identify new, potentially more cost-effective surfactant formulations for improved oil recovery (IOR). The general approach is to use an integrated experimental and computational chemistry effort to improve our understanding of the link between surfactant structure and performance, and from this knowledge, develop improved IOR surfactant formulations. Accomplishments for the project include: (1) completion of a literature review to assemble current and new surfactant IOR ideas, (2) Development of new atomistic-level MD (molecular dynamic) modeling methodologies to calculate IFT (interfacial tension) rigorously from first principles, (3) exploration of less computationally intensive mesoscale methods to estimate IFT, Quantitative Structure Property Relationship (QSPR), and cohesive energy density (CED) calculations, (4) experiments to screen many surfactant structures for desirable low IFT and solid adsorption behavior, and (5) further experimental characterization of the more promising new candidate formulations (based on alkyl polyglycosides (APG) and alkyl propoxy sulfate surfactants). Important findings from this project include: (1) the IFT between two pure substances may be calculated quantitatively from fundamental principles using Molecular Dynamics, the same approach can provide qualitative results for ternary systems containing a surfactant, (2) low concentrations of alkyl polyglycoside surfactants have potential for IOR (Improved Oil Recovery) applications from a technical standpoint (if formulated properly with a cosurfactant, they can create a low IFT at low concentration) and also are viable economically as they are available commercially, and (3) the alkylpropoxy sulfate surfactants have promising IFT performance also, plus these surfactants can have high optimal salinity and so may be attractive for use in higher salinity reservoirs. Alkylpropoxy sulfate surfactants are not yet available as large volume commercial products. The results presented herein can provide the needed industrial impetus for extending application (alkyl polyglycoside) or scaling up (alkylpropoxy sulfates) of these two promising surfactants for enhanced oil recovery. Furthermore, the advanced simulations tools presented here can be used to continue to uncover new types of surfactants with promising properties such as inherent low IFT and biodegradability.

William A. Goddard III; Yongchun Tang; Patrick Shuler; Mario Blanco; Seung Soon Jang; Shiang-Tai Lin; Prabal Maiti; Yongfu Wu; Stefan Iglauer; Xiaohang Zhang

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Design and manufacture of a low-cost mechanism for compacting used oil filters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Used automotive oil filter disposal is a real and increasing problem in the United States. With over 450 million oil filters sold each year, and 80% of used filters thrown into landfills, this waste represents a significant ...

Kosoglow, Richard D

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on U.S. dependence on foreign oil: “…protecting againston U.S. dependence on foreign oil, that the cost of the 1991U.S. dependence on foreign oil is not to reduce military

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Rehabilitation potential and practices of Colorado oil shale lands. Progress report, June 1, 1978--May 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect

The following document is a third-year progress report for the period June 1, 1978 to May 31, 1979. The overall objective of the project is to study the effects of seeding techniques, species mixtures, fertilizer, ecotypes, improved plant materials, mycorrhizal fungi, and soil microorganisms on the initial and final stages of reclamation obtained through seeding and subsequent succession on disturbed oil shale lands. Plant growth medias that are being used in field-established test plots include retorted shale, soil over retorted shale, subsoil materials, and surface disturbed topsoils. Because of the long-term nature of successional and ecologically oriented studies the project is just beginning to generate significant publications. Several of the studies associated with the project have some phases being conducted principally in the laboratories and greenhouses at Colorado State Univerisity. The majority of the research, however, is being conducted on a 20 hectare Intensive Study Site located near the focal points of oil shale activity in the Piceance Basin. The site is at an elevation of 2,042 m, receives approximately 30 to 55 cm of precipitation annually, and encompasses the plant communities most typical of the Piceance Basin. Most of the information contained in this report originated from the monitoring and sampling of research plots established in either the fall of 1976 or 1977. Therefore, data that have been obtained from the Intensive Study Site represent only first- or second-year results. However, many trends have been identified in thesuccessional process and the soil microorganisms and mycorrhizal studies continue to contribute significant information to the overall results. The phytosociological study has progressed to a point where field sampling is complete and the application and publication of this materials will be forthcoming in 1979.

Cook, C.W.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

External costs of oil and gas exploration in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this study was to investigate the phenomenal impact of oil and gas exploration on the host communities, with a central focus… (more)

Amaefule, Ezewuchi Fidelis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Crude Existence: The Politics of Oil in Northern Angola  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

agreements divide produced oil into cost oil and profit oil.to development in Angola as “cost oil” or as tax write-offs,The sale of cost oil, also called cost recovery oil, is used

Reed, Kristin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

“Costs and Indices for Domestic Oil and Gas Field Equipment and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Lease Equipment Costs for Gas Production in the Mid-Continent: Direct Annual Operating Costs for Gas Production in the Mid-Continent: Gas Production--the Rocky Mountains

169

Oil and natural gas reserve prices, 1982-2002 : implications for depletion and investment cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A time series is estimated of in-ground prices - as distinct from wellhead prices ? of US oil and natural gas reserves for the period 1982-2002, using market purchase and sale transaction information. The prices are a ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Table 5.21 Crude Oil Refiner Acquisition Costs, 1968-2011 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1972 E. 3.67: R 13.77: 3.22: ... 2 In chained (2005) dollars, calculated by using gross domestic product implicit price ... crude oil was derived by adding estimated ...

171

Table 5.21 Crude Oil Refiner Acquisition Costs, 1968-2011 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1972 E. 3.67: 13.77 [R] 3 ... 2 In chained (2005) dollars, calculated by using gross domestic product implicit price ... crude oil was derived by adding estimated ...

172

Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine  

SciTech Connect

This study is developing a comprehensive study of what is involved in the desalination of oil field produced brine and the technical developments and regulatory changes needed to make the concept a commercial reality. It was originally based on ''conventional'' produced water treatment and reviewed (1) the basics of produced water management, (2) the potential for desalination of produced brine in order to make the resource more useful and available in areas of limited fresh water availability, and (3) the potential beneficial uses of produced water for other than oil production operations. Since we have begun however, a new area of interest has appeared that of brine water treatment at the well site. Details are discussed in this technical progress report. One way to reduce the impact of O&G operations is to treat produced brine by desalination. The main body of the report contains information showing where oil field brine is produced, its composition, and the volume available for treatment and desalination. This collection of information all relates to what the oil and gas industry refers to as ''produced water management''. It is a critical issue for the industry as produced water accounts for more than 80% of all the byproducts produced in oil and gas exploration and production. The expense of handling unwanted waste fluids draws scarce capital away for the development of new petroleum resources, decreases the economic lifetimes of existing oil and gas reservoirs, and makes environmental compliance more expensive to achieve. More than 200 million barrels of produced water are generated worldwide each day; this adds up to more than 75 billion barrels per year. For the United States, the American Petroleum Institute estimated about 18 billion barrels per year were generated from onshore wells in 1995, and similar volumes are generated today. Offshore wells in the United States generate several hundred million barrels of produced water per year. Internationally, three barrels of water are produced for each barrel of oil. Production in the United States is more mature; the US average is about 7 barrels of water per barrel of oil. Closer to home, in Texas the Permian Basin produces more than 9 barrels of water per barrel of oil and represents more than 400 million gallons of water per day processed and re-injected.

David B. Burnett

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

173

Gasoline prices rise due to increased crude oil costs - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

However, as a result of vehicle fuel economy improvements, costs-per-mile-driven are not at record highs. Further, gasoline prices vary significantly by region, ...

174

Results of research to develop cost effective biomonitoring at oil shale lease tracts. Phase I. Fall sampling report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of censuses conducted during October 1981 to estimate the fall abundance of small mammals and avifauna on replicate plots in the vicinity of Federal Tract C-a (Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company). The objectives of the fall censuses were to evaluate alternative census techniques, test assumptions vital to the use of indices and abundance estimators, determine cost-functions associated with monitoring efforts, and estimate variance components needed to devise optimal monitoring designs. Analyses of the fall census data on small mammal abundance were performed.

Skalski, J.R.; Fitzner, R.E.; Gano, K.A.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Regulation and Political Costs in the Oil and Gas Industry: An Investigation of Discretion in Reporting Earnings and Oil and Gas Reserves Estimates.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study investigates the use of discretion by oil and gas companies in reporting financial performance and oil and gas reserve estimates during times of… (more)

Kurdi, Ammr

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

COMPARATIVE COSTS OF SEA DISPOSAL AND LAND BURIAL FOR THE RADIOACTIVE WASTES OF THE LAWRENCE RADIATION LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

A study has been made of comparative costs of disposal of radioactive wastes at sea and by burial, taking into account such factors as loading, storage, and transportation by various means. (auth)

Nielsen, E.

1959-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

177

SOLAR HEATING OF TANK BOTTOMS Application of Solar Heating to Asphaltic and Parrafinic Oils Reducing Fuel Costs and Greenhouse Gases Due to Use of Natural Gas and Propane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sale of crude oil requires that the crude meet product specifications for BS&W, temperature, pour point and API gravity. The physical characteristics of the crude such as pour point and viscosity effect the efficient loading, transport, and unloading of the crude oil. In many cases, the crude oil has either a very high paraffin content or asphalt content which will require either hot oiling or the addition of diluents to the crude oil to reduce the viscosity and the pour point of the oil allowing the crude oil to be readily loaded on to the transport. Marginal wells are significantly impacted by the cost of preheating the oil to an appropriate temperature to allow for ease of transport. Highly paraffinic and asphaltic oils exist throughout the D-J basin and generally require pretreatment during cold months prior to sales. The current study addresses the use of solar energy to heat tank bottoms and improves the overall efficiency and operational reliability of stripper wells.

Eugene A. Fritzler

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Responses of soil microbial and nematode communities to aluminum toxicity in vegetated oil-shale-waste lands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Responses of soil microbial and nematode communities to aluminum toxicity in vegetated oil-shale and total Al concentrations showed a significant decrease after planting S. cumini plantation onto the shale

Neher, Deborah A.

179

Oil, Gas, and Minerals, Exploration and Production, Lease of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil, Gas, and Minerals, Exploration and Production, Lease of Public Land (Iowa) Oil, Gas, and Minerals, Exploration and Production, Lease of Public Land (Iowa) Eligibility Utility...

180

Oil shale data book  

SciTech Connect

The Oil Shale Data Book has been prepared as a part of its work under DOE Management Support and Systems Engineering for the Naval Oil Shale Reserves Predevelopment Plan. The contract calls for the preparation of a Master Development Plan for the Reserves which comprise some 145,000 acres of oil shale lands in Colorado and Utah. The task of defining the development potential of the Reserves required that the resources of the Reserves be well defined, and the shale oil recovery technologies that are potentially compatible with this resource be cataloged. Additionally, processes associated with shale oil recovery like mining, materials handling, beneficiation, upgrading and spent shale disposal have also been cataloged. This book, therefore, provides a ready reference for evaluation of appropriate recovery technologies and associated processes, and should prove to be valuable for many oil shale activities. Technologies that are still in the process of development, like retorting, have been treated in greater detail than those that are commercially mature. Examples of the latter are ore crushing, certain gas clean-up systems, and pipeline transportation. Emphasis has been on documenting available design information such as, maximum module size, operation conditions, yields, utility requirements, outlet gas compositions, shale oil characteristics, etc. Cost information has also been included where available.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

factors add 20 percent to liquefaction plant total installed cost 6 Distribution Pipeline Costs Collected historical Oil & Gas Journal data, and surveyed for current urban and...

182

The Social-Cost Calculator (SCC): Documentation of Methods and Data, and Case Study of Sacramento  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

N. I. Tishchcishyna, Costs of Oil Dependence: A 2000 Update,costs • Climate change costs • Oil use costs • Fuel costs •sections on climate-change costs, oil-use external costs,

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

THE SOCIAL-COST CALCULATOR (SCC): DOCUMENTATION OF METHODS AND DATA, AND CASE STUDY OF SACRAMENTO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

N. I. Tishchcishyna, Costs of Oil Dependence: A 2000 Update,costs • Climate change costs • Oil use costs • Fuel costs •sections on climate-change costs, oil-use external costs,

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Selected Abstracts & Bibliography of International Oil Spill Research, through 1998  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transport, gasoline, land pollution, mapping, monitoring,words: health, environment, land pollution, water pollution25 pp. Key words: Land Pollution, Oil Spills, Recovery Two

Louisiana Applied Oil Spill Research & Development Program Electronic Bibliography

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Using Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the construction costs of natural gas, oil, and petroleumR. “Current pipeline costs. ” Oil & Gas Journal; Nov 21,cost projections for over 20,000 miles of natural gas, oil, and

Parker, Nathan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table3 to the incre- no oil costs, and that Na/S batteries,costs, of vehicle’s Oil costs, percent ofgasoline vehicle’stires are (M&R) costs (we exclude fires and oil) than ICEVs,

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change, and noise. Oil-use costs comprise the cost of theexcept as indicated) Oil-use cost SPR Low Best High BY ROCdirect economic costs of oil dependence – including wealth

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

PURADYN Oil Bypass Filtration System Evaluation Test Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

including: * Less dependency on foreign oil * Less oil disposed as waste products * Lower oil disposal costs * Less downtime of equipment * Reduced vehicle maintenance costs *...

189

Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Land or Conveyance of Rights for Exploration or Extraction of Gas, Oil or Coal Bed Methane Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974 - Utilization of Land or...

190

Heavy oil recovery process: Conceptual engineering of a downhole methanator and preliminary estimate of facilities cost for application to North Slope Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The West Sak (Upper Cretaceous) sands, overlaying the Kuparuk field, would rank among the largest known oil fields in the US, but technical difficulties have so far prevented its commercial exploitation. Steam injection is the most successful and the most commonly-used method of heavy oil recovery, but its application to the West Sak presents major problems. Such difficulties may be overcome by using a novel approach, in which steam is generated downhole in a catalytic Methanator, from Syngas made at the surface from endothermic reactions (Table 1). The Methanator effluent, containing steam and soluble gases resulting from exothermic reactions (Table 1), is cyclically injected into the reservoir by means of a horizontal drainhole while hot produced fluids flow form a second drainhole into a central production tubing. The downhole reactor feed and BFW flow downward to two concentric tubings. The large-diameter casing required to house the downhole reactor assembly is filled above it with Arctic Pack mud, or crude oil, to further reduce heat leaks. A quantitative analysis of this production scheme for the West Sak required a preliminary engineering of the downhole and surface facilities and a tentative forecast of well production rates. The results, based on published information on the West Sak, have been used to estimate the cost of these facilities, per daily barrel of oil produced. A preliminary economic analysis and conclusions are presented together with an outline of future work. Economic and regulatory conditions which would make this approach viable are discussed. 28 figs.

Gondouin, M.

1991-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a “negative” storage cost for oil in the form of a bene?tin levels. oil for more than your costs, that is, if P t+1 QSaudi oil, and M S the Saudi’s marginal cost of production.

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Predicted costs of environmental controls for a commercial oil shale industry. Volume II. A subjective self-assessment of uncertainty in the predicted costs  

SciTech Connect

The uncertainties in Volume I without extensive additional engineering effort were identified and quantified. Substantial uncertainty was found in several critical variables, allowing a broad range of possible values. Calculations of the cost impact associated with such broad ranges, however, did not always result in significant differences. Seven major areas of pollution control activity were judged to warrant the assessment effort. Three of these areas were found to contain significant uncertainty and additional research is suggested. These areas are: H/sub 2/S removal from the retort gas stream (Stretford process); organic removal from process wastewaters (bio-oxidation or other alternatives); and slurry backfilling of spent Modified In Situ (MIS) retorts. The overall results of the assessment and analysis process are summarized in Table 1-1 in terms of total cost for pollution control. The distributions have been divided into three ranges in this table. A center range is given which contains 80% to 90% probability, and the costs outside this range with probabilities are given. The full distributions can be found in Section 5.0. The subjective probability distributions are a quantification of opinion. The probability of encountering costs below the low figure or above the high figure for each process and scenario is judged to be nearly zero.

Jovanovich, A.P.; Stone, M.L.; Taylor, G.C.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

used the cost of onshore oil wells and dry holes (i.e. , weCosts Alaska onshore oil wells and dry holes Cost per well (field, and the number of oil wells on the cost of production

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

IDRISI Land Change Modeler | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IDRISI Land Change Modeler IDRISI Land Change Modeler Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IDRISI Land Change Modeler Agency/Company /Organization: Clark Labs Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.clarklabs.org/ Cost: Paid IDRISI Land Change Modeler Screenshot References: IDRISI Land Change Modeler[1] Overview "The Land Change Modeler is revolutionary land cover change analysis and prediction software with tools to analyze, measure and project the impacts of such change on habitat and biodiversity." References ↑ "IDRISI Land Change Modeler" Retrieved from

195

Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of bene?ts and costs of oil and to deeper global, economic,distribution of bene?ts and costs from oil. It is virtuallyboth the bene?ts and costs of oil production and consumption

O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

The Social Costs of an MTBE Ban in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Montgomery. “Social Cost of Imported Oil and U.S. ImportCredit Change in Re?ning Cost, Oil Import Bill, and ConsumerCredit Change in Re?ning Cost, Oil Import Bill, and Consumer

Rausser, Gordon C.; Adams, Gregory D.; Montgomery, W. David; Smith, Anne E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

External Costs of Transport in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1986). “Estimating the Cost of Oil Spills: Lessons from theEnergy security/oil-importing costs Brief Review of Methodsnot reflected in the price of oil: the cost of the Strategic

Delucchi, Mark A.; McCubbin, Donald R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Shale oil production system reference case study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Material balances, utility balances, and overall processing schemes were developed for two reference shale oil production systems. For both cases, crushed and sized oil shale is fed into a mix of surface retorts specified for this study, which handle both coarse and fine ore. Case 1A produces an upgraded crude product suitable for refinery feedstock, and Case 1B produces a crude shale oil. The reference system uses room-and-pillar mining, three different types of retorts not unlike those proposed for the White River Shale Project on Federal Lease Tracts U-a and U-b, a straightforward upgrading of the raw shale oil to a refinery feedstock syncrude, and pipeline transportation of that product. In addition to the production of an upgraded product, there is also a modified system for producing raw shale oil that is minimally upgraded for pipeline transportation purposes. The capital cost estimate for the two reference cases has 26 cost elements, excluding, for example, any land or finance costs. A more complete list of excluded cost elements is provided in Section VII. The two distinct cases, production of raw and upgraded shale oil, were included to avoid foreclosing the issue of on- or off-site upgrading. The difference in estimated capital cost ($795M vs. $875M) amounts to about 10 percent.

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multicomponent seismic analysis and calibration to improve recovery from algal mounds: application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc area of the Paradox Basin, Ute Mountain Ute Reservation, Colorado Multicomponent seismic analysis and calibration to improve recovery from algal mounds: application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc area of the Paradox Basin, Ute Mountain Ute Reservation, Colorado DE-FG26-02NT15451 Project Goal The project is designed to: Promote development of both discovered and undiscovered oil reserves contained within algal mounds on the Ute Mountain Ute, Southern Ute, and Navaho native-controlled lands. Promote the use of advanced technology and expand the technical capability of the Native American oil exploration corporations by direct assistance in the current project and dissemination of technology to other tribes. Develop the most cost-effective approach to using non-invasive seismic imaging to reduce the risk in exploration and development of algal mound reservoirs on surrounding Native American lands.

200

Production cost analysis of Euphorbia lathyris. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to estimate costs of production for Euphorbia lathyris (hereafter referred to as Euphorbia) in commercial-scale quantities. Selection of five US locations for analysis was based on assumed climatic and cultivation requirements. The five areas are: nonirrigated areas (Southeast Kansas and Central Oklahoma, Northeast Louisiana and Central Mississippi, Southern Illinois), and irrigated areas: (San Joaquin Valley and the Imperial Valley, California and Yuma, Arizona). Cost estimates are tailored to reflect each region's requirements and capabilities. Variable costs for inputs such as cultivation, planting, fertilization, pesticide application, and harvesting include material costs, equipment ownership, operating costs, and labor. Fixed costs include land, management, and transportation of the plant material to a conversion facility. Euphorbia crop production costs, on the average, range between $215 per acre in nonirrigated areas to $500 per acre in irrigated areas. Extraction costs for conversion of Euphorbia plant material to oil are estimated at $33.76 per barrel of oil, assuming a plant capacity of 3000 dry ST/D. Estimated Euphorbia crop production costs are competitive with those of corn. Alfalfa production costs per acre are less than those of Euphorbia in the Kansas/Oklahoma and Southern Illinois site, but greater in the irrigated regions. This disparity is accounted for largely by differences in productivity and irrigation requirements.

Mendel, D.A.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Production cost analysis of Euphorbia lathyris. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to estimate costs of production for Euphorbia lathyris (hereafter referred to as Euphorbia) in commercial-scale quantities. Selection of five US locations for analysis was based on assumed climatic and cultivation requirements. The five areas are: nonirrigated areas (Southeast Kansas and Central Oklahoma, Northeast Louisiana and Central Mississippi, Southern Illinois), and irrigated areas: (San Joaquin Valley and the Imperial Valley, California and Yuma, Arizona). Cost estimates are tailored to reflect each region's requirements and capabilities. Variable costs for inputs such as cultivation, planting, fertilization, pesticide application, and harvesting include material costs, equipment ownership, operating costs, and labor. Fixed costs include land, management, and transportation of the plant material to a conversion facility. Euphorbia crop production costs, on the average, range between $215 per acre in nonirrigated areas to $500 per acre in irrigated areas. Extraction costs for conversion of Euphorbia plant material to oil are estimated at $33.76 per barrel of oil, assuming a plant capacity of 3000 dry ST/D. Estimated Euphorbia crop production costs are competitive with those of corn. Alfalfa production costs per acre are less than those of Euphorbia in the Kansas/Oklahoma and Southern Illinois site, but greater in the irrigated regions. This disparity is accounted for largely by differences in productivity and irrigation requirements.

Mendel, D.A.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Why solar oil shale retorting produces more oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solar oil shale retorting process may produce higher oil yield than conventional processing. High oil yield is obtained for three reasons: oil carbonization inside of the shale is reduced, oil cracking outside of the shale is reduced, and oil oxidation is essentially eliminated. Unique capabilities of focused solar energy produce these advantages. An increase in yield will reduce the cost of mining and shale transportation per barrel of oil produced. These cost reductions may justify the increased processing costs that will probably be associated with solar oil shale retorting.

Aiman, W.R.

1981-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

203

Land use and energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides estimates of the amount of land required by past and future energy development in the United States and examines major federal legislation that regulates the impact of energy facilities on land use. An example of one land use issue associated with energy development - the potential conflict between surface mining and agriculture - is illustrated by describing the actual and projected changes in land use caused by coal mining in western Indiana. Energy activities addressed in the report include extraction of coal, oil, natural gas, uranium, oil shale, and geothermal steam; uranium processing; preparation of synfuels from coal; oil refineries; fossil-fuel, nuclear, and hydro-electric power plants; biomass energy farms; and disposal of solid wastes generated during combustion of fossil fuels. Approximately 1.1 to 3.3 x 10/sup 6/ acres were devoted to these activities in the United States in 1975. As much as 1.8 to 2.0 x 10/sup 6/ additional acres could be required by 1990 for new, nonbiomass energy development. The production of grain for fuel ethanol could require an additional 16.9 to 55.7 x 10/sup 6/ acres by 1990. Federal laws that directly or indirectly regulate the land-use impacts of energy facilities include the National Environmental Protection Act, Clean Air Act, Federal Water Pollution Control Act, Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and Coastal Zone Management Act. The major provisions of these acts, other relevant federal regulations, and similar state and local regulatons are described in this report. Federal legislation relating to air quality, water quality, and the management of public lands has the greatest potential to influence the location and timing of future energy development in the United States.

Robeck, K.E.; Ballou, S.W.; South, D.W.; Davis, M.J.; Chiu, S.Y.; Baker, J.E.; Dauzvardis, P.A.; Garvey, D.B.; Torpy, M.F.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table3 to the incre- no oil costs, and that Na/S batteries,costs, of vehicle’s Oil costs, percent ofgasoline vehicle’stires are (M&R) costs (we exclude fires and oil) than ICEVs,

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

The effect of biofuel on the international oil market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

denotes the marginal cost of oil extraction and production.C. Given no-transaction costs, the oil prices in H equal thereduce prices. Oil-exporting countries mitigate the cost by

Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

function. The majority of oil production costs in Alaska arethink of a scalar for oil production cost based on drillingfor changes in oil production costs (as proxied by drilling

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Selected Abstracts & Bibliography of International Oil Spill Research, through 1998  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transformers, insulating oil, cost analysis, ground water,Baltimore, MD. Key words: costs, oil spill, cleanup. Moller,the savings in fuel oil and disposal costs brought about by

Louisiana Applied Oil Spill Research & Development Program Electronic Bibliography

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Meeting the Demand for Biofuels: Impact on Land Use and Carbon Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research was to develop an integrated, interdisciplinary framework to investigate the implications of large scale production of biofuels for land use, crop production, farm income and greenhouse gases. In particular, we examine the mix of feedstocks that would be viable for biofuel production and the spatial allocation of land required for producing these feedstocks at various gasoline and carbon emission prices as well as biofuel subsidy levels. The implication of interactions between energy policy that seeks energy independence from foreign oil and climate policy that seeks to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions for the optimal mix of biofuels and land use will also be investigated. This project contributes to the ELSI research goals of sustainable biofuel production while balancing competing demands for land and developing policy approaches needed to support biofuel production in a cost-effective and environmentally friendly manner.

Khanna, Madhu; Jain, Atul; Onal, Hayri; Scheffran, Jurgen; Chen, Xiaoguang; Erickson, Matt; Huang, Haixiao; Kang, Seungmo.

2011-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

209

US military expenditures to protect the use of Persian Gulf oil for motor vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assistance related to oil, and the cost of defending oil21 April 2008 Keywords: Oil importing cost Motor fuel socialexample, if the oil defense cost per gallon is proportional

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Options and cost for disposal of NORM waste.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil field waste containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is presently disposed of both on the lease site and at off-site commercial disposal facilities. The majority of NORM waste is disposed of through underground injection, most of which presently takes place at a commercial injection facility located in eastern Texas. Several companies offer the service of coming to an operator's site, grinding the NORM waste into a fine particle size, slurrying the waste, and injecting it into the operator's own disposal well. One company is developing a process whereby the radionuclides are dissolved out of the NORM wastes, leaving a nonhazardous oil field waste and a contaminated liquid stream that is injected into the operator's own injection well. Smaller quantities of NORM are disposed of through burial in landfills, encapsulation inside the casing of wells that are being plugged and abandoned, or land spreading. It is difficult to quantify the total cost for disposing of NORM waste. The cost components that must be considered, in addition to the cost of the operation, include analytical costs, transportation costs, container decontamination costs, permitting costs, and long-term liability costs. Current NORM waste disposal costs range from $15/bbl to $420/bbl.

Veil, J. A.

1998-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

211

Improved supplier selection and cost management for globalized automotive production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For many manufacturing and automotive companies, traditional sourcing decisions rely on total landed cost models to determine the cheapest supplier. Total landed cost models calculate the cost to purchase a part plus all ...

Franken, Joseph P., II (Joseph Philip)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of eastern oil shales. [Estimation of the cost of beneficiating Alabama shale  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the work performed during the program quarter from September 1, 1992 though November 30, 1992. The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is the prime contractor for the program extension to develop the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting II system technology. Four institutions are working with IGT as subcontractors. Task achievements are discussed for the following active tasks of the program: Subtask 3.7 innovative reactor concept testing; Subtask 3.9 catalytic hydroretorting; Subtask 3.10 autocatalysis in hydroretorting; Subtask 3.11 shale oil upgrading and evaluation; Subtask 4.1.3 stirred ball mill grinding; Subtask 4.1.5 alternative technology evaluation; Subtask 4.1.6 ultrafine size separation; Subtask 4.2.1 column flotation tests; Subtask 4.4 integrated grinding and flotation; Subtask 4.7 economic analysis; Subtask 6.2.2 wastewater treatability; Subtask 6.2.3 waste management facility conceptual design; and Subtask 8 project management and reporting.

Roberts, M.J.; Mensinger, M.C.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Evaluation of MODIS gross primary productivity and land cover products for the humid tropics using oil palm trees in Peninsular Malaysia and Google Earth imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conducting quantitative studies on the carbon balance or productivity of oil palm is important in understanding the role of this ecosystem in global climate change. In this study, we evaluated the accuracy of MODIS Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer ...

Arthur Philip Cracknell, Kasturi Devi Kanniah, Kian Pang Tan, Lei Wang

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Large 718 Forgings for Land Based Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the development of the first gas turbine, the drive for lower cost electrical power has lead to more efficient land based power systems. Increased efficiency  ...

215

The effect of biofuel on the international oil market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hand, the literature on crude oil usually assumes a COFconsequence of extracting crude oil. User costs include thecountries, at times when crude oil prices surged during 2002

Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

now control most of world oil reserves (Jaffe, 2007). Thisto find and evaluate oil reserves, development costs toand likely holds oil reserves that may be produced in the

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Impacts of Motor Vehicle Operation on Water Quality in the United States - Clean-up Costs and Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil and oil filter reimbursement checks, so check processing costsCosts of remediating underground storage tank leaks exceed benefits. Oil andOil Companies Pay US EPA to Settle Santa Monica MTBE Cleanup Costs,

Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Selected Abstracts & Bibliography of International Oil Spill Research, through 1998  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prevention is still the best medicine. Key words: oil spills, emergency plans, Gulf of Alaska, land pollution

Louisiana Applied Oil Spill Research & Development Program Electronic Bibliography

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Reducing Home Heating and Cooling Costs  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . . . . . . . . . . . 19 B1. Annual Cost of Oil Heat in Various Climates for a Range of Heating Oil Prices and System Efficiencies . . . . . 21 B2. Annual Cost of Gas Heat in...

220

REACH: Reduced Emissions and Advanced Combustion Hardware: A Low-Cost, Retrofit Approach to Reducing Stack Emissions and Enhancing t he Performance of Oil-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improved oil combustion technology, based upon optimization of oil atomizer and flame stabilizer design, has been developed for retrofit to oil-fired utility boilers. This technology is referred to as Reduced Emissions and Advanced Combustion Hardware, or REACH. REACH is commercially available for retrofit to oil-fired boilers to simultaneously reduce NOx, PM, and opacity, as well as provide operational and performance benefits.

1995-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Federal Regulations: Bureau of Land Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a bureau in the U.S. Department of the Interior, has jurisdiction over onshore leasing, exploration, development, and production of oil and gas on federal lands. In addition, the...

222

Global Oil Geopolitics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 imported refiner acquisition cost of crude oil WTI crude ... World Crude Oil Supply and Demand Balance 14

223

Biodiesel Performance, Costs, and Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biodiesel Performance, Costs, and Use. by Anthony Radich. Introduction. The idea of using vegetable oil for fuel has been around as long as the diesel engine.

224

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of separate costs for natural gas or oil, and electricity.receives oil-fired boilers INPUTS First Cost Inputs The flowfurnaces, and oil-fired furnaces, we scaled the cost for

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Review of Some of the Literature on the Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concludes that oil dependency costs the State of CaliforniaL. Parker, External Costs of Oil Used in Transportation, 92-such as gas, oil and parts; the indirect costs, such as

Murphy, James; Delucchi, Mark

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Modelling the costs of energy crops: A case study of U.S. corn and Brazilian sugar cane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPRG WORKING PAPER High crude oil prices, uncertainties about the consequences of climate change and the eventual decline of conventional oil production raise the prospects of alternative fuels, such as biofuels. This paper describes a simple probabilistic model of the costs of energy crops, drawing on the user's degree of belief about a series of parameters as an input. This forward-looking analysis quantifies the effects of production constraints and experience on the costs of corn and sugar cane, which can then be converted to bioethanol. Land is a limited and heterogeneous resource: the crop cost model builds on the marginal land suitability, which is assumed to decrease as more land is taken into production, driving down the marginal crop yield. Also, the maximum achievable yield is increased over time by technological change, while the yield gap between the actual yield and the maximum yield decreases through improved management practices. The results show large uncertainties in the future costs of producing corn and sugar cane, with a 90% confidence interval of 2.9 to 7.2 $/GJ in 2030 for marginal corn costs, and 1.5 to 2.5 $/GJ in 2030 for marginal sugar cane costs. The influence of each parameter on these costs is examined.

Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope; Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Using Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adjustments in 1991. ” Oil & Gas Journal; Nov 23, 1992; 90,begin 1993 on upbeat. ” Oil & Gas Journal; Nov 22, 1993; 91,Current pipeline costs. ” Oil & Gas Journal; Nov 21, 1994;

Parker, Nathan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

EOS Land Validation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EOS Land Validation The EOS Land Validation Project Overview EOS Land Validation Logo The objective of the EOS Land Validation Project is to achieve consistency, completeness,...

229

Biofuels and indirect land use change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation October 2011 #12;About this study), Malaysian Palm Oil Board, National Farmers Union, Novozymes, Northeast Biofuels Collaborative, Patagonia Bio contributed views on a confidential basis. #12;1Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation

230

FINAL REPORT: An Integrated Inter-temporal Analysis of Land Use Change in Forestry and Agriculture: An Assessment of the Influence of Technological Change on Carbon Sequestration and Land Use.  

SciTech Connect

This project built a global land use model to examine the implications of land based carbon sequestration on land uses. The model also can be used to assess the costs of different land-based actions to reduce carbon emissions.

Brent Sohngen

2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

231

Oil, Gas, and Mining Leases (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section contains rules on oil, gas, and mining leases, and grants authority to the State of Nebraska and local governments to issue leases for oil and gas mining and exploration on their lands.

232

ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

national access to foreign oil, the federal government hasalmost exclusively and on oil foreign oil. shale costs ofprincipal bases. First, foreign oil does find its way into

Kay, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007). The world will reach peak oil production rates, atenergy security costs, and peak oil as emergencies, we willwhen oil price is high, then the first peak in drilling cost

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Distributed Reforming of Biomass Pyrolysis Oils (Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gas (0.5% H 2 ) System Definition (1500 kgday station used for H2A analysis) Capital Costs Bio-Oil Reforming H2A Analysis Bio-Oil Case (Ethanol Case) Bio-oil Storage Tank...

235

USA oilgas production cost : recent changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During 1984-1989, oil development investment cost in the USA fell, but only because of lower activity. The whole cost curve shifted unfavorably (leftward). In contrast, natural gas cost substantially decreased, the curve ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from U.S. consumers to foreign oil producers (a cost only inThus, the PS received by foreign oil producers is a real

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ABANDONED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Control Costs for Oil Shale Processes, DOE/EV-dicted Costs of Environmental Controls for a Commercial Oilsitu retorts. Cost per Barrel of Oil, $ Tract C-b Technology

Persoff, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

A Review of the Literature on the Social Cost of Motor Vehicle Use in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L. Parker. 1992. External Costs of Oil Used in Transporta-such as gas, oil and parts; the indirect costs, such asTABLE 3 Estimated External Costs of Oil Used in Transport

Murphy, James; Delucchi, Mark

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

The Allocation of the Social Costs of Motor-Vehicle Use to Six Classes of Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of garages and parking spaces • the cost of oil spills, perbarrel of oil All of these costs pertain to all motorand macroeconomic costs of importing oil (Report #8) -- and

Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Table 1. Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

month of loading, the month of landing, or sometime between those events. Prices for crude oil can be determined at a time other than the acquisition date. See the Explanatory...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Oil-Grade Alloy 718 in Oil Field Drilling Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the performance of oil-grade alloy 718 for applications in bottom hole ... Additive Manufacturing for Superalloys - Producibility and Cost.

242

Energy Policy 34 (2006) 515531 Have we run out of oil yet? Oil peaking analysis from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bureau of Land Management Oil Shale Development Unconventional Fuels Conference University of Utah;#12;Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369 Oil Shale, Tar Sands and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Sec May 17, 2011 #12;#12;Domestic Oil Shale Resources Primary oil shale resources in the U

243

Landed Costs of Imported Crude by Area  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: See Definitions ...

244

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MN 55441 Background Electronic data acquisition systems are necessary to make deep oil and gas drilling and production cost effective, yet the basic electronic components...

245

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS) and Cost Effective Regulatory Approaches (CERA) Related to Hydraulic...

246

Potential supply and cost of biomass from energy crops in the TVA region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic and supply structures of energy crop markets have not been established. Establishing the likely price and supply of energy crop biomass in a region is a complex task because biomass is not an established commodity as are oil, natural gas, and coal. In this study, the cost and supply of short-rotation woody crop (SRWC) and switchgrass biomass for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) region-a 276-county area that includes portions of 11 states in the southeastern United States - are projected. Projected prices and quantities of biomass are assumed to be a function of the amount and quality of crop and pasture land available in a region, expected energy crop yields and production costs on differing soils and land types, and the profit that could be obtained from current conventional crop production on these same lands. Results include the supply curves of SRWC and switchgrass biomass that are projected to be available from the entire region, the amount and location of crop and pasture land that would be used, and the conventional agricultural crops that would be displaced as a function of energy crop production. Finally, the results of sensitivity analysis on the projected cost and supply of energy crop biomass are shown. In particular, the separate impacts of varying energy crop production costs and yields, and interest rates are examined.

Graham, R.L.; Downing, M.E.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974 - Utilization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974 - Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974 - Utilization of Land or Conveyance of Rights for Exploration or Extraction of Gas, Oil or Coal Bed Methane Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974 - Utilization of Land or Conveyance of Rights for Exploration or Extraction of Gas, Oil or Coal Bed Methane < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Program Info Start Date 2011 State Pennsylvania Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection This act prescribes the procedure utilization of land or conveyance of rights for exploration or extraction of gas, oil or coal bed methane in

248

U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Middle East (% of total) Oil and Gas Extraction Petroleumand industry category Oil and Gas Extraction Petroleum andMiddle East (million $) Oil and Gas Extraction Petroleum and

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

2010 Cost of Wind Energy Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides a detailed description of NREL's levelized cost of wind energy equation, assumptions and results in 2010, including historical cost trends and future projections for land-based and offshore utility-scale wind.

Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Lantz, E.; Schwabe, P.; Smith, A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #522: June 9, 2008 Costs of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: June 9, 2008 Costs of Oil Dependence 2008 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 522: June 9, 2008 Costs of Oil Dependence 2008 on Facebook Tweet about...

251

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #632: July 19, 2010 The Costs...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: July 19, 2010 The Costs of Oil Dependence to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 632: July 19, 2010 The Costs of Oil Dependence on Facebook Tweet about...

252

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #179: August 20, 2001 The Costs...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9: August 20, 2001 The Costs of Oil Dependence to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 179: August 20, 2001 The Costs of Oil Dependence on Facebook Tweet...

253

GRR/Section 3-NV-a - State Land Leasing Process and Land Access | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 3-NV-a - State Land Leasing Process and Land Access < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-NV-a - State Land Leasing Process and Land Access 03NVAStateLandLeasingProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Nevada Division of State Lands Regulations & Policies Nevada Revised Statutes (NRS) Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) NRS 322.010-322.040 Leases for Extraction of Oil, Coal, Gas or Geothermal Resources Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03NVAStateLandLeasingProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

254

HEFA and F-T jet fuel cost analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aviation and the Environment 2. HEFA jet fuel from vegetable oil bottom-up cost study 3. HEFA jet fuel from microalgae bottom-up cost

Nick Carter; Michael Bredehoeft; Christoph Wollersheim; Hakan Olcay; James Hileman; Steven Barrett; Website Lae. Mit. Edu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands of 1947 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Acquired Lands of 1947 Acquired Lands of 1947 Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands of 1947 Year 1947 Url Acquiredlands.jpg Description (30 U.S.C. § 351 et seq.) - Extends the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act and the authority of the Secretary of the Interior over oil and gas operations to federal "acquired lands." References Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands of 1947 [1] The Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands of 1947 (30 U.S.C. § 351 et seq.) - Extends the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act and the authority of the Secretary of the Interior over oil and gas operations to federal "acquired lands." "To promote the mining of coal, phosphate, sodium, potassium, oil, oil shale, gas, and sulfur on lands acquired by the United States."

256

Market assessment for shale oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study identified several key issues on the cost, timeliness, and ease with which shale oil can be introduced into the United States' refining system. The capacity of the existing refining industry to process raw shale oil is limited by the availability of surplus hydrogen for severe hydrotreating. The existing crude oil pipeline system will encounter difficulties in handling raw shale oil's high viscosity, pour point, and contaminant levels. The cost of processing raw shale oil as an alternate to petroleum crude oil is extremely variable and primarily dependent upon the percentage of shale oil run in the refinery, as well as the availability of excess hydrogen. A large fraction of any shale oil which is produced will be refined by the major oil companies who participate in the shale oil projects and who do not anticipate problems in processing the shale oil in their refineries. Shale oil produced for sale to independent refiners will initially be sold as boiler fuel. A federal shale oil storage program might be feasible to supplement the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Based on refinery configurations, hydrogen supply, transportation systems, and crude availability, eleven refineries in Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADDs) 2A and 2B have been identified as potential processors of shale oil. Based on refining technology and projected product demands to the year 2000, shale oil will be best suited to the production of diesel fuel and jet fuel. Tests of raw shale oil in boilers are needed to demonstrate nitrogen oxide emissions control.

Not Available

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

2 World Oil Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Crude oil prices react to a variety of geopolitical and economic events price per barrel (real 2010 dollars, quarterly average) 140 120 imported refiner acquisition cost of crude oil WTI crude oil price Global financial collapse 100 80 60 U.S. spare capacity exhausted Iran-Iraq War Saudis abandon swing producer role Asian financial crisis 9-11 attacks Low spare capacity

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

NETL: News Release - Leveling the Playing (Oil) Field For Small...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

considerably more expensive than conventional methods, but is expected to reduce drilling costs, increase oil discovery rates, and improve the recovery of bypassed oil. Vecta...

259

U.S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian-Gulf Oil For Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of crude oil includes all transportation costs and fees updid not produce or consume oil); the cost of defending theDivision, The External Costs of Oil Used in Transportation,

Delucchi, Mark A.; Murphy, James

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Refining of shale oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The refining of shale oil is reviewed to assess the current state-of-the-art, especially as to the avaiability of technology suitable for operation on a commercial scale. Oil shale retorting processes as they affect the quality of the crude shale oil for refining, exploratory research on the character and refining of shale oil, and other published refining background leading to the present status are discussed. The initial refining of shale oil requires the removal of a large concentration of nitrogen, an added step not required for typical petroleum crude oils, and recently published estimates show that the total cost of refining will be high. Specific technoloy is reported by industry to be technically proven and available for commercial-scale refining. Although the refining will be more costly than that of petroleum, the viability of a shale oil industry will also be affected greatly by the technology and costs of producing the crude shale oil, environmental costs, and future price and tax treatment, and these are outside the scope of this study of refining.

Lanning, W.C.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

US military expenditures to protect the use of Persian Gulf oil for motor vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

total social cost of importing oil in transportation alsoin transportation. In their analysis of the social cost of

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

MOTOR-VEHICLE INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE PUBLIC SECTOR Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL - HOLDING COSTS .AND MANAGEMENT, AND OIL-HOLDING COSTS 7.12.1 Background TheO & M costs, and oil–holding costs -- can be estimated from

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Motor-Vehicle Infrastructure and Services Provided by the Public Sector: Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL - HOLDING COSTS .AND MANAGEMENT, AND OIL-HOLDING COSTS 7.12.1 Background TheO & M costs, and oil–holding costs -- can be estimated from

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

IXTOC OIL SPILL ASSESSMENT FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IXTOC OIL SPILL ASSESSMENT FINAL REPORT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Prepared for : Bureau of Land Management in input of tar/oil to the Texas Gulf Coast (Geyer ;, 1981) have less of an obvious ecological impact, if any . The Brittany coast of France has been affected for several years by the acute oil input from

Mathis, Wayne N.

265

Middle East Production Costs - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Persian Gulf Oil Production Capacity and Development Cost Forecast (without additional development to replace production) Based on Low-Case Weighted Average

266

Land Turtles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turtles Turtles Nature Bulletin No. 157 May 29, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation LAND TURTLES Turtles are four-legged reptiles that originated before the dinosaurs appeared, some 175 million years ago. The distinguishing feature of the turtle is its shell, varying in shape and markings with the different species: an arched upper shell grown fast to the backbone, and a flat lower shell grown fast to the breastbone, the two connected on either side by a bony bridge. In some species, like the box turtles, the lower shell is hinged, enabling the animal to completely conceal its head, tail and limbs by closing the two shells together. Most turtles live in water all or part of the time, but all of them lay their eggs on land, and neither the nest nor the young is attended by the parents. Each species has its own method of nest construction, using the hind legs to dig a hole in the ground, but the eggs are covered and left to be hatched by the heat of the sun. The eggs are relished by many animals such as skunks and squirrels; the young, before their armor hardens, are devoured by birds, mammals, fishes and other turtles.

267

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Glossary ANILCA: Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act ANS:...

268

ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shown the effects of using oil costs as a measure of avoidedfcity or heat, an oil-based cost city probably overstatescombustion. The external costs of oil use differ coal and

Kay, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI) USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI) Agency/Company /Organization: United States Geological Survey Sector: Land Focus Area: Land Use Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps User Interface: Website Website: landcover.usgs.gov/landcoverdata.php Cost: Free USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI) Screenshot References: USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI)[1] "Welcome to the U.S Geological Survey (USGS) Land Cover Institute (LCI). The USGS currently houses the institute at the Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. The LCI will address land cover topics from local to global scales, and in both domestic and international settings. The USGS through the Land Cover Institute

270

The Need for Open Lands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Need for Open Lands Need for Open Lands Nature Bulletin No. 742 February 8, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour .Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor THE NEED FOR OPEN LANDS There is an old saying: The proof of the pudding is the eating . In other words, if it's good, people enjoy it and beg for more. The proof of the need for open lands -- publicly owned areas for recreational uses and open spaces undisturbed -- is the tremendous and ever-increasing use of those we have. We need more now. Year after year we will need more and more. It is imperative that areas desirable for future use be acquired now or as soon as possible, regardless of cost and even though they may stand idle ' -- vacant and undeveloped -- until more funds become available. Otherwise they may be gone, or the asking price may be a hundred times greater. Open spaces such as farm lands and prairies may have been occupied by residential, commercial or industrial developments. Woodlands may have been cut, stream channels dredged and wetlands drained, destroying all but a memory of their beauty and recreational values. There are compelling reasons for our need of open lands and why we should waste no time in providing more. Those reasons have been confirmed and emphasized by exhaustive studies and statistical analyses nationwide in scope.

271

Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Land or Conveyance of Rights for Exploration or Extraction of Gas, Oil or Coal Bed Methane This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being the most...

272

Oil spill response resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pollution has become one of the main problems being faced by humanity. Preventing pollution from occurring might be the best idea but is not possible in this fast developing world. So the next best thing to do would be to respond to the pollution source in an effective manner. Oil spills are fast becoming pollution sources that are causing the maximum damage to the environment. This is owing to the compounds that are released and the way oil spreads in both water and land. Preventing the oil spill would be the best option. But once the oil has been spilled, the next best thing to do is to respond to the spill effectively. As a result, time becomes an important factor while responding to an oil spill. Appropriate response to contain and cleanup the spill is required to minimize its potential damage to the ecosystem. Since time and money play a very important role in spill response, it would be a great idea if decisions can be made in such a way that a quick response can be planned. The first part of this study deals with the formation of an 'Oil Spill Resources Handbook', which has information on all the important Oil Spill Contractors. The second and the main part of the study, deals with creating a database in Microsoft Access of the Oil Spill Contractors. The third portion of the study deals with planning an oil spill response using a systems approach.

Muthukrishnan, Shankar

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United. Building from their work on environmental costs and benefits associated with biofuel production, ORNL positively impact the sustainability of the biofuels industry. Building understanding of land-use change from

274

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first well at Prudhoe Bay produced oil on March 12,1968, but the first oil flowed down TAPS in January, 1978.function to define the cost of oil production is necessary.

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

The effect of biofuel on the international oil market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy security and high oil prices, as well as greenhousetransaction costs, the oil prices in H equal the prices inat times when crude oil prices surged during 2002 to 2006 (

Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Crude Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barrels) Product: Crude Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases Distillate Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Oil Still Gas Petroleum Coke Marketable Petroleum Coke Catalyst Petroleum Coke Other...

277

OIL PRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OIL PRODUCTION Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) is a term applied to methods used for recovering oil from a petroleum reservoir beyond that recoverable by primary and secondary methods....

278

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agency/Company /Organization: Colorado State University Partner: United States Agency for International Development, United States Forest Service, United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.nrel.colostate.edu/projects/ghgtool/index.php Cost: Free Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Screenshot References: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software[1]

279

U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of prices for domestic and imported oil. F IGURE 15-2.THE VALUE OF P ERSIAN -G ULF OIL IMPORTS , Source: Tables 4Middle East (% of total) Oil and Gas Extraction Petroleum

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

T ABLE 15-1. S OURCES OF CRUDE OIL AND PRODUCTS SUPPLIED IN55 F IGURE 15-1. M ONTHLY CRUDE OIL PRICES 1990-1991 ($/t depends on imports of crude oil and petroleum products in

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

defending: the use of oil by motor vehicles in the U. S. (THE USE OF PERSIAN-GULF OIL FOR MOTOR VEHICLES Report #15 inthe Use of Persian-Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles (M. Delucchi

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF P ERSIAN -G ULF OIL IMPORTS , Source: Tables 4 and 9.2005 Oil Price Spikes Recessions Began Sources: Hamilton (in the Persian gulf? Oil is the major source of energy for

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bohi and W. D. Montgomery, Oil Prices, Energy Security, andand I. K. Paik, "Oil Price Shocks and the Macroeconomy: Whatto Worse: Impacts of the 1986 Oil Price Collapse, ENR90-08,

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the world's proven oil reserves 2 , and the countries ofof the world’s proven oil reserves it typically has producedthe largest proven oil reserves in the world. For example,

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Water issues associated with heavy oil production.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

286

Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs Bruce Kelly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs Bruce Kelly Nexant, Inc. Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Meeting May 8 total installed cost #12;6 Distribution Pipeline Costs Collected historical Oil & Gas Journal data, and surveyed for current urban and downtown data Verified that historical natural gas pipeline cost data

287

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shaaf, and the FLUXNET validation communities to choose sites and to identify the land products needed for validation. We also worked with MODAPS on subsetting the Land...

288

Africa Land Use (1980)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Land Use (1980) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNLCDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information...

289

Land Validation web site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

web site A web site is now available for the Land Validation project. It was created with the purpose of facilitating communication among MODIS Land Validation Principal...

290

U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of crude oil price histories (http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/dnav/Given the huge oil reserves and the history of instability

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a result, the price and quantity of oil in the world marketdefense spending to the quantity of oil imports, whereas we

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Fusion reactor design studies: standard unit costs and cost scaling rules  

SciTech Connect

This report establishes standard unit costs and scaling rules for estimating costs of material, equipment, land, and labor components used in magnetic confinement fusion reactor plant construction and operation. Use of the standard unit costs and scaling rules will add uniformity to cost estimates, and thus allow valid comparison of the economic characteristics of various reactor concepts.

Schulte, S.C.; Bickford, W.E.; Willingham, C.E.; Ghose, S.K.; Walker, M.G.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Summary Statistics Table 1. Crude Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

can be the month of loading, the month of landing, or sometime between those events. Prices for crude oil can be determined at a time other than the acquisition date. See the...

294

MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the third quarter of the first project year (January 1 through March 31, 2003). This work included gathering field data and analyzing best practices in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah, and the Colorado portion of the Paradox Basin. Best practices used in oil fields of the eastern Uinta Basin consist of conversion of all geophysical well logs into digital form, running small fracture treatments, fingerprinting oil samples from each producing zone, running spinner surveys biannually, mapping each producing zone, and drilling on 80-acre (32 ha) spacing. These practices ensure that induced fractures do not extend vertically out of the intended zone, determine the percentage each zone contributes to the overall production of the well, identify areas that may be by-passed by a waterflood, and prevent rapid water breakthrough. In the eastern Paradox Basin, Colorado, optimal drilling, development, and production practices consist of increasing the mud weight during drilling operations before penetrating the overpressured Desert Creek zone; centralizing treatment facilities; and mixing produced water from pumping oil wells with non-reservoir water and injecting the mixture into the reservoir downdip to reduce salt precipitation, dispose of produced water, and maintain reservoir pressure to create a low-cost waterflood. During this quarter, technology transfer activities consisted of technical presentations to members of the Technical Advisory Board in Colorado and the Colorado Geological Survey. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Craig D. Morgan; Roger L. Bon

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Geothermal probabilistic cost study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model is used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents are analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance are examined. (MHR)

Orren, L.H.; Ziman, G.M.; Jones, S.C.; Lee, T.K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Novel Cleanup Agents Designed Exclusively for Oil Field Membrane Filtration Systems Low Cost Field Demonstrations of Cleanup Agents in Controlled Experimental Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of our project is to develop innovative processes and novel cleaning agents for water treatment facilities designed to remove fouling materials and restore micro-filter and reverse osmosis (RO) membrane performance. This project is part of Texas A&M University's comprehensive study of the treatment and reuse of oilfield brine for beneficial purposes. Before waste water can be used for any beneficial purpose, it must be processed to remove contaminants, including oily wastes such as residual petroleum hydrocarbons. An effective way of removing petroleum from brines is the use of membrane filters to separate oily waste from the brine. Texas A&M and its partners have developed highly efficient membrane treatment and RO desalination for waste water including oil field produced water. We have also developed novel and new cleaning agents for membrane filters utilizing environmentally friendly materials so that the water from the treatment process will meet U.S. EPA drinking water standards. Prototype micellar cleaning agents perform better and use less clean water than alternate systems. While not yet optimized, the new system restores essentially complete membrane flux and separation efficiency after cleaning. Significantly the amount of desalinated water that is required to clean the membranes is reduced by more than 75%.

David Burnett; Harold Vance

2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

V. Shifts in Governance: Oil Pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the American Oil Pollution Act these costs are included in the term ..... The background of this second objective is that from 1969 to 1972 the proportion.

298

Brush Busters: How to Estimate Costs for Controlling Pricklypear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simple directions help you determine the density of pricklypear on your land, and then estimate the cost of controlling these plants with the pad or stem spray method.

Ueckert, Darrell; McGinty, Allan

1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Market assessment for shale oil  

SciTech Connect

This study identified several key issues on the cost, timeliness, and ease with which shale oil can be introduced into the United States' refining system. The capacity of the existing refining industry to process raw shale oil is limited by the availability of surplus hydrogen for severe hydrotreating. The existing crude oil pipeline system will encounter difficulties in handling raw shale oil's high viscosity, pour point, and contaminant levels. The cost of processing raw shale oil as an alternate to petroleum crude oil is extremely variable and primarily dependent upon the percentage of shale oil run in the refinery, as well as the availability of excess hydrogen. A large fraction of any shale oil which is produced will be refined by the major oil companies who participate in the shale oil projects and who do not anticipate problems in processing the shale oil in their refineries. Shale oil produced for sale to independent refiners will initially be sold as boiler fuel. A federal shale oil storage program might be feasible to supplement the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Based on refinery configurations, hydrogen supply, transportation systems, and crude availability, eleven refineries in Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADDs) 2A and 2B have been identified as potential processors of shale oil. Based on refining technology and projected product demands to the year 2000, shale oil will be best suited to the production of diesel fuel and jet fuel. Tests of raw shale oil in boilers are needed to demonstrate nitrogen oxide emissions control.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN KAZAKHASTAN: USING OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION BY-PRODUCT SULFUR FOR COST-EFFECTIVE SECONDARY END-USE PRODUCTS.  

SciTech Connect

The Republic of Kazakhstan is continuing to develop its extensive petroleum reserves in the Tengiz region of the northeastern part of the Caspian Sea. Large quantities of by-product sulfur are being produced as a result of the removal of hydrogen sulfide from the oil and gas produced in the region. Lack of local markets and economic considerations limit the traditional outlets for by-product sulfur and the buildup of excess sulfur is a becoming a potential economic and environmental liability. Thus, new applications for re-use of by-product sulfur that will benefit regional economies including construction, paving and waste treatment are being developed. One promising application involves the cleanup and treatment of mercury at a Kazakhstan chemical plant. During 19 years of operation at the Pavlodar Khimprom chlor-alkali production facility, over 900 tons of mercury was lost to the soil surrounding and beneath the buildings. The Institute of Metallurgy and Ore Benefication (Almaty) is leading a team to develop and demonstrate a vacuum-assisted thermal process to extract the mercury from the soil and concentrate it as pure, elemental mercury, which will then be treated using the Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process. The use of locally produced sulfur will recycle a low-value industrial by-product to treat hazardous waste and render it safe for return to the environment, thereby helping to solve two problems at once. SPSS chemically stabilizes mercury to mercuric sulfide, which has a low vapor pressure and low solubility, and then physically encapsulates the material in a durable, monolithic solid sulfur polymer matrix. Thus, mercury is placed in a solid form very much like stable cinnabar, the form in which it is found in nature. Previous research and development has shown that the process can successfully encapsulate up to 33 wt% mercury in the solid form, while still meeting very strict regulatory standards for leachable mercury (0.025 mg/l in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure). The research and development to deploy Kazakhstan recycled sulfur for secondary applications described in this paper is being conducted with support from the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) and the U.S. Department of Energy Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (DOE IPP).

KALB, P.D.; VAGIN, S.; BEALL, P.W.; LEVINTOV, B.L.

2004-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Impacts of Land Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The impact on climate of future land use and energy policy scenarios is explored using two landuse frameworks: (i) Pure Cost Conversion Response (PCCR), or 'extensification', where the price of land is the only constraint ...

Hallgren, Willow

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

302

Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves. Annual report of operations, Fiscal year 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During fiscal year 1993, the reserves generated $440 million in revenues, a $33 million decrease from the fiscal year 1992 revenues, primarily due to significant decreases in oil and natural gas prices. Total costs were $207 million, resulting in net cash flow of $233 million, compared with $273 million in fiscal year 1992. From 1976 through fiscal year 1993, the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves generated $15.7 billion in revenues for the US Treasury, with expenses of $2.9 billion. The net revenues of $12.8 billion represent a return on costs of 441 percent. See figures 2, 3, and 4. In fiscal year 1993, production at the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves at maximum efficient rates yielded 25 million barrels of crude oil, 123 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 158 million gallons of natural gas liquids. The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves has embarked on an effort to identify additional hydrocarbon resources on the reserves for future production. In 1993, in cooperation with the US Geological Survey, the Department initiated a project to assess the oil and gas potential of the program`s oil shale reserves, which remain largely unexplored. These reserves, which total a land area of more than 145,000 acres and are located in Colorado and Utah, are favorably situated in oil and gas producing regions and are likely to contain significant hydrocarbon deposits. Alternatively the producing assets may be sold or leased if that will produce the most value. This task will continue through the first quarter of fiscal year 1994.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

land | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

land land Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

304

MODIS Land Product Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation > MODIS Land Subsets Validation > MODIS Land Subsets MODIS Land Product Subsets Overview Earth, Western Hemisphere The goal of the MODIS Land Product Subsets project is to provide summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote-sensing products and to characterize field sites. Output files contain pixel values of MODIS land products in text format and in GeoTIFF format. In addition, data visualizations (time series plots and grids showing single composite periods) are available. MODIS Land Product Subsets Resources The following MODIS Land Product Subsets resources are maintained by the ORNL DAAC: MODIS Land Products Offered Background Citation Policy Methods and formats MODIS Sinusoidal Grid - Google Earth KMZ Classroom Exercises

305

The social costs of an MTBE ban in California (Long version)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an equivalent quantity (in energy terms), oil imports, sinceworld oil price times the equilibrium quantity of importsDG Quantity of Gasoline Figure 3: Social Cost of Higher Oil

Rausser, Gordon C.; Adams, Gregory D.; Montgomery, W. David; Smith, Anne E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

The social costs of an MTBE ban in California (Long version)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an equivalent quantity (in energy terms), oil imports, sinceQuantity of Gasoline Figure 3: Social Cost of Higher Oil Importsworld oil price times the equilibrium quantity of imports

Rausser, Gordon C.; Adams, Gregory D.; Montgomery, W. David; Smith, Anne E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Active oil shale operations: Eastern Uinta Basin  

SciTech Connect

A Utah Geological and Mineral survey Map of the Eastern Uinta Basin is presented. Isopach lines for the Mahogany oil shale are given, along with the locations of active oil shale operations and the land ownership (i.e. federal, state, or private).

Ritzma, H.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

National Lab Uses OGJ Data to Develop Cost Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the past 30 years, the Oil and Gas Journal (OGJ) has published data on the costs of onshore and offshore oil and gas pipelines and related equipment. This article describes the methodology employed and resulting equations developed for conceptual capital cost estimating of onshore pipelines. Also described are cost trends uncovered during the course of the analysis.

Brown, Daryl R.; Cabe, James E.; Stout, Tyson E.

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

309

Transmission line capital costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The displacement or deferral of conventional AC transmission line installation is a key benefit associated with several technologies being developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management (OEM). Previous benefits assessments conducted within OEM have been based on significantly different assumptions for the average cost per mile of AC transmission line. In response to this uncertainty, an investigation of transmission line capital cost data was initiated. The objective of this study was to develop a database for preparing preliminary estimates of transmission line costs. An extensive search of potential data sources identified databases maintained by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) as superior sources of transmission line cost data. The BPA and WAPA data were adjusted to a common basis and combined together. The composite database covers voltage levels from 13.8 to 765 W, with cost estimates for a given voltage level varying depending on conductor size, tower material type, tower frame type, and number of circuits. Reported transmission line costs vary significantly, even for a given voltage level. This can usually be explained by variation in the design factors noted above and variation in environmental and land (right-of-way) costs, which are extremely site-specific. Cost estimates prepared from the composite database were compared to cost data collected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for investor-owned utilities from across the United States. The comparison was hampered because the only design specifications included with the FERC data were voltage level and line length. Working within this limitation, the FERC data were not found to differ significantly from the composite database. Therefore, the composite database was judged to be a reasonable proxy for estimating national average costs.

Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Micro and Nano-enabled Separation Technologies for the Oil and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Aspects of Corrosion and Fouling in Oil Refining and ... and cost effective separation technologies are in demand in diverse oil and gas ...

311

The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the U.S., 1990-1991: Summary of Theory, Data, Methods, and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to count all price-times-quantity oil revenues as the cost,cost simply as the quantity of crude oil embodied in highwaythe actual price-times-quantity payment for oil. That is, in

Delucchi, Mark A.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals Country Yemen Name Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals Website http://www.mom.gov.ye/en/ References Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals Website[1] The Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals Website contains some content in English. Associated Organizations Yemeni Company for Oil-Product Distribution Petroleum Exploration and Production Authority Safr Company for Scouting Production Operations Organization of Oil Scouting Aden Refinery Company Yemen Company for Oil Refining Yemen Investments Company for Oil & Mineral Geological Land Survey & Mineral Wealth Organization References ↑ "Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals Website" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Yemen_Ministry_of_Oil_and_Minerals&oldid=334954"

313

Land animal sizes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land animal sizes Name: tamar c Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: Around 1993 Question: Why are today's land mammals so much smaller than prehistoric mammals?...

314

The Common Land Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Common Land Model (CLM) was developed for community use by a grassroots collaboration of scientists who have an interest in making a general land model available for public use and further development. The major model characteristics include ...

Yongjiu Dai; Xubin Zeng; Robert E. Dickinson; Ian Baker; Gordon B. Bonan; Michael G. Bosilovich; A. Scott Denning; Paul A. Dirmeyer; Paul R. Houser; Guoyue Niu; Keith W. Oleson; C. Adam Schlosser; Zong-Liang Yang

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

School Land Board (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The School Land Board oversees the use of land owned by the state or held in trust for use and benefit by the state or one of its departments, boards, or agencies. The Board is responsible for...

316

US military expenditures to protect the use of Persian Gulf oil for motor vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

US military expenditures to protect the use of Persian Gulf oil for motor vehicles Mark A. Delucchi 2008 Keywords: Oil importing cost Motor fuel social cost Energy security cost a b s t r a c t Analyses of the full social cost of motor vehicle use in the US often estimate an ``oil import premium'' that includes

Murphy, James J.

317

Oil, Climate Change & Sustainable Energy PASEF-20 October 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil, Climate Change & Sustainable Energy PASEF- 20 October 2011 1) How much longer can we rely should it contain? Ken Lande ­ Physics Department #12;Remaining Crude Oil Supplies Present World consumption = 30 billion barrels/year 1) Conventional Oil- Originally ~ 2 trillion barrels ­ ½ used ~ 1

Zywina, David

318

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of an image data set from the Land Use and Land Cover science theme, a component of the LBA-ECO Large...

319

Making Sense of Oil Stamp Saving Schemes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or part for one's oil bill. In this paper, we explore why this is. After ruling out high costs associated with more conventional savings vehicles (such as bank accounts) and the notion that oil stamps serve some purpose other than saving for heating oil...

Brutscher, Philipp-Bastian

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

320

Marginal Expense Oil Well Wireless Surveillance (MEOWWS)  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to identify and field test a new, low cost, wireless oil well surveillance system. A variety of suppliers and technologies were considered. One supplier and system was chosen that was low cost, new to the oil field, and successfully field tested.

Nelson, Donald G.

2002-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A Review of the Literature on the Social Cost of Motor Vehicle Use in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accidents, air pollution, noise, land use, and “dissociationpollution Total societal costs Unquantified costs Wetlands lost Agricultural landland use Vehicle ownership and operation Vibration damage to buildings Water pollution

Murphy, James; Delucchi, Mark

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

PHS Philadelphia LandCare Program Managed by the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.10 annual Cost per square foot $ 0.01 visit / $ 0.14 annual Clean and Green Treatment (Stabilization) Cost per parcel $ 1,329.62 Cost per square foot $ 0.99 Community LandCare (7 visits) Cost per parcel $ 22.50 visit / $ 155.00 annual Cost per square foot $ 0.015 visit / $ .10 annual #12;"Valuing the Conversion

323

Since 1995, under its Land Legacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

program, The Conservation Fund has helped protect 272,751 acres and raised $15 million for land protection. The Conservation Fund has launched the final phase of its American Land Legacy initiative to protect 200 sites around the country by 2001. The effort focuses on acquisition of threatened landscapes, critical wildlife habitat, watershed areas, prime outdoor recreational opportunities, key historical sites and community greenways. Since starting the project in 1995, the Fund and its partners have protected 1,300 acres per week. As part of the Land Legacy initiative, the Fund is working to triple the size of its revolving fund, which is used solely to finance land protection, to $30 million. “With our new resources, the Fund will be able to move more effectively to save valuable land under threat of development, ” said John Turner, the Fund’s president and chief executive officer. “As we move into a new century, this effort will provide us with new tools to address the growing needs of the conservation community.” The third component of the Land Legacy program involves the expansion of educational opportunities to bolster the leadership skills of conservation professionals. Land legacy sites: The Fund’s Legacy initiative has helped preserve 85 natural, cultural and managed landscapes covering 272,751 acres valued at $222 million and acquired at a cost of $86 million. Continued on page 6

unknown authors

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Ecological perspectives of land use history: The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to gather information on the land use history of the Arid Land Ecology (ALE) Reserve so that current ecological research could be placed within a historical perspective. The data were gathered in the early 1980s by interviewing former users of the land and from previously published research (where available). Interviews with former land users of the ALE Reserve in Benton County, Washington, revealed that major land uses from 1880 to 1940 were homesteading, grazing, oil/gas production, and road building. Land use practices associated with grazing and homesteading have left the greatest impact on the landscape. Disturbed sites where succession is characterized by non-native species, plots where sagebrush was railed away, and sheep trails are major indications today of past land uses. Recent estimates of annual bunchgrass production do ALE do not support the widespread belief that bunchgrass were more productive during the homesteading era, though the invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), Jim Hill mustard (Sisymbrium altissium), and other European alien plant species has altered pre-settlement succession patterns. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Hinds, N R; Rogers, L E

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Process Simulation and Evaluation of Alternative Solvents for Jatropha Curcas L. Seed Oil Extraction in Biodiesel Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jatropha curcas L. is a drought-resistant plant which can be grown in poor soil and marginal lands. The use of Jatropha seed oil to produce biodiesel has been widely studied in recent years. Results showed that it is one of the most promising alternatives for conventional petro-diesel. Currently, hexane is still the most commonly used solvent for commercial oil extraction. However, the increasing price and flammability properties of hexane are motivating industry to seek alternative solvents. The objectives of this study are to design and analyze the Jatropha seed oil extraction for use in biodiesel production, and to provide a systematic safety-economic analysis of alternative solvents that can be used in Jatropha seed oil extraction. First, a base-case flowsheet is synthesized for oil extraction. Then, the base-case extraction process and each solvent Fire and Explosion Index (F & EI) and the Solvent Safety Index (SSI). Eight solvents, including n-heptane, toluene, xylene, dichloromethane, chloroform, 1,2-dichloroethane, methanol and ethanol are selected for candidates by comparing these results to those for hexane. Two cases are developed to evaluate the economic potential of these candidates. Furthermore, heat integration is applied to the process to minimize energy usage. Finally, a comprehensive solvent comparison is developed based on F & EI, SSI, solvent makeup cost, utilities cost, and capital investment. The results show that chloroform is the optimal solvent, while dichloromethane is the next best.

Chiou, Ming-Hao

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

RMOTC to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) announces that the "Teapot Dome" oil field in Wyoming is hosting a series of tests funded by STWA, Inc. ("STWA") to determine the performance of its Applied Oil Technology (AOT(tm)) in reducing crude oil's viscosity to lower transportation costs for pipeline operators. The testing is managed by RMOTC, and conducted at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, also known as the Teapot Dome oil field. RMOTC is providing the infrastructure and technical expertise to support companies such as STWA in their efforts to validate new technologies and bring those products and

327

Oil and Oil Derivatives Compliance Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for international connection of oiled residues discharge ... C to + 163°C, fuels, lubricating oils and hydraulic ... fuel of gas turbine, crude oil, lubricating oil ...

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

328

Carbon Dioxide Transport and Storage Costs in NETL Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering and Economic Assessment. 2 This study utilized a similar basis for pipeline costs (Oil and Gas Journal's pipeline cost data up to the year 2000) but added a CO 2...

329

Why don't fuel prices change as quickly as crude oil prices? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Why don't fuel prices change as quickly as crude oil prices? The cost of crude oil is a major component in the price of diesel fuel, gasoline, and heating oil.

330

Why don't fuel prices change as quickly as crude oil prices ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Why don't fuel prices change as quickly as crude oil prices? The cost of crude oil is a major component in the price of diesel fuel, gasoline, and heating oil.

331

US military expenditures to protect the use of Persian Gulf oil for motor vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recessn.html), and crude oil price histories are from thea long history of estimates of the military costs of oil usehistory: Received 7 May 2007 Accepted 3 March 2008 Available online 21 April 2008 Keywords: Oil

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

US military expenditures to protect the use of Persian Gulf oil for motor vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

defense spending to the quantity of oil imports. Annuala result, the price and quantity of oil in the world marketdefense cost at today’s quantity of oil will be greater than

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil - Composite  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Values shown for the U.S ...

334

Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil - Composite  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 67.94 94.74 59.29 76.69 101.87 100.93 1968-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 72.44 96.97 61.63 79.91 111.01 111.50 2004-2012 Midwest (PADD 2)...

335

U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and petroleum products/ Petroleum wholesale trade TotalEast (% of total) Oil and Gas Extraction Petroleum andcoal products Petroleum and petroleum products/ Petroleum

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) Analysis of Crankcase Oils and Oil Residues From the Electric Utility Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If used crankcase oils and oil residues from electric utilities were listed as hazardous waste by EPA, disposal would be costly and recycling options would be limited. The toxicity characteristic test results from this study reveal that such used oils and oil residues are generally nonhazardous and therefore do not warrant classification as hazardous wastes.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Colorado oil shale: the current status, October 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general background to oil shale and the potential impacts of its development is given. A map containing the names and locations of current oil shale holdings is included. The history, geography, archaeology, ecology, water resources, air quality, energy resources, land use, sociology, transportation, and electric power for the state of Colorado are discussed. The Colorado Joint Review Process Stages I, II, and III-oil shale are explained. Projected shale oil production capacity to 1990 is presented. (DC)

Not Available

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

EOS Land Validation Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EOS Land Validation Presentations EOS Land Validation Presentations Meeting: Land Cover Validation Workshop Date: February 2, 2004 Place: Boston, MA Title: Validation Data Support Activities at the ORNL DAAC (Power Point) Presenter: Bob Cook Meeting: Fall 2003 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Meeting Date: December 9, 2003 Place: San Francisco, CA Title: Ground-Based Data Supporting the Validation of MODIS Land Products (Power Point) Presenter: Larry Voorhees Meeting: Terra and Aqua Products Review Date: March 2003 Place: NASA HQ Title: Supporting the Validation of MODIS Land Products (Power Point) Presenter: Larry Voorhees Meeting: Terra and Aqua Products Review Date: March 2003 Place: NASA HQ Title: MODIS Land Summary (Power Point) Presenter: Chris Justice, University of Maryland Meeting: Spring 2002 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Meeting

339

Electricity Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs journal International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy volume year month chapter...

340

Oil futures price curve has steepened over the past six months ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... the future can be used as an indicator of longer term supply and demand expectations. Costs to store oil, opportunity costs associated with long-term market ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Prototype oil-shale leasing program. Volume I. Regional impacts of oil shale development. [Colorado, Wyoming, Utah  

SciTech Connect

This action would make available for private development up to 6 leases of public oil shale lands of not more than 5,120 acres each. Two tracts are located in each of the states of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. Oil shale development would produce both direct and indirect changes in the environment of the oil shale region in each of the 3 states where commercial quantities of oil shale resources exist.

1973-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

342

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL DAAC MODIS Land Product Subsets MODIS Collection 5 Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool Create subset for user selected site, area, product, and time period. Data for...

343

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Citation When using subsets of MODIS Land Products from the ORNL DAAC, please use the citation: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC). 2011....

344

National Land Cover Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

products was done by the Multi-Resolution Land Characterization Consortium and EROS Data Center (U.S. Geological Survey). The Consortium includes the Environmental Monitoring and...

345

Sugar Land, TX -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Petroleum Engineering Alumnus Recognized by Secretary of Energy for Work at National Lab Sugar Land, TX - The National Energy Technology Laboratory is proud to announce that...

346

NETL: News Release - Submersible Oil Pump, More Revealing Seismic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

seven days a week.Enerdyne projects that, if the submersible pump succeeds in reducing oil field costs, an additional 780 million barrels of oil from the Red Mountain Reservoir...

347

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Ninth Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Background on prior quarterly reports * Bus mileage and performance status * Used engine-oil disposal costs * Unscheduled oil change * Light-duty vehicle test status Oct 3-Dec 3...

348

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Eighth Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Background on prior quarterly reports * Bus mileage and performance status * Used engine-oil disposal costs * Unscheduled oil change * Light-duty vehicle test status Oct 3-Dec 3...

349

Crude oil, natural gas, and petroleum products prices all fell ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

So oil prices averaged over the year decreased sharply while year-end price ... Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, 1972-2009

350

U.S. Department of Energy Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves combined financial statements, September 30, 1996 and 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves (NPOSR) produces crude oil and associated hydrocarbons from the Naval Petroleum Reserves (NPR) numbered 1, 2, and 3, and the Naval Oil Shale Reserves (NOSR) numbered 1, 2, and 3 in a manner to achieve the greatest value and benefits to the US taxpayer. NPOSR consists of the Naval Petroleum Reserve in California (NPRC or Elk Hills), which is responsible for operations of NPR-1 and NPR-2; the Naval Petroleum Oil Shale Reserve in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming (NPOSR-CUW), which is responsible for operations of NPR-3, NOSR-1, 2, and 3 and the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC); and NPOSR Headquarters in Washington, DC, which is responsible for overall program direction. Each participant shares in the unit costs and production of hydrocarbons in proportion to the weighted acre-feet of commercially productive oil and gas formations (zones) underlying the respective surface lands as of 1942. The participating shares of NPR-1 as of September 30, 1996 for the US Government and Chevron USA, Inc., are listed. This report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants` audit of the Department of Energy`s (Department) Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves (NPOSR) financial statements as of September 30, 1996.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Hierarchical Marginal Land Assessment for Land Use Planning  

SciTech Connect

Marginal land provides an alternative potential for food and bioenergy production in the face of limited land resources; however, effective assessment of marginal lands is not well addressed. Concerns over environmental risks, ecosystem services and sustainability for marginal land have been widely raised. The objective of this study was to develop a hierarchical marginal land assessment framework for land use planning and management. We first identified major land functions linking production, environment, ecosystem services and economics, and then classified land resources into four categories of marginal land using suitability and limitations associated with major management goals, including physically marginal land, biologically marginal land, environmental-ecological marginal land, and economically marginal land. We tested this assessment framework in south-western Michigan, USA. Our results indicated that this marginal land assessment framework can be potentially feasible on land use planning for food and bioenergy production, and balancing multiple goals of land use management. We also compared our results with marginal land assessment from the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and land capability classes (LCC) that are used in the US. The hierarchical assessment framework has advantages of quantitatively reflecting land functions and multiple concerns. This provides a foundation upon which focused studies can be identified in order to improve the assessment framework by quantifying high-resolution land functions associated with environment and ecosystem services as well as their criteria are needed to improve the assessment framework.

Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL; Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Oil and Gas Supply Module of the National Energy Modeling System ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Advanced technology impacts ... • regulatory or legislatively mandated environmental costs ... as the 1984 Enhanced Oil Recovery Study completed by the National ...

353

Chemically enhanced oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yet when conducted according to present state of the art, chemical flooding (i.e., micellar/polymer flooding, surfactant/polymer flooding, surfactant flooding) can mobilize more residual crude oil than any other method of enhanced oil recovery. It also is one of the most expensive methods of enhanced oil recovery. This contribution will describe some of the technology that comprises the state of the art technology that must be adhered to if a chemical flood is to be successful. Although some of the efforts to reduce cost and other points are discussed, the principle focus is on technical considerations in designing a good chemical flooding system. The term chemical flooding is restricted here to methods of enhanced oil recovery that employs a surfactant, either injected into the oil reservoir or generated in situ, primarily to reduce oil-water interfacial tension. Hence, polymer-water floods for mobility or profile control, steam foams, and carbon dioxide foams are excluded. Some polymer considerations are mentioned because they apply to providing mobility control for chemical flooding systems.

Nelson, R.C.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Oil shale: a new set of uncertainties  

SciTech Connect

The discovery and delivery of North Sea oil has created an uncertain future for the British oil shale industry in spite of its lower price per barrel. While oil companies have long been interested in a secure shale oil source for chemical feedstocks, environmental concerns, mining difficulties, and inflated operating costs have counteracted the opportunity provided by the 1973 oil embargo. With the financial risks of oil shale mining and retorting too great for a single company, research efforts have shifted to a search for technologies that will be multistaged and less costly, such as in-situ mining, in-situ processing, and hydraulic fracturing. Successful testing and demonstration of these processes will determine the future commercial role of oil shales. 17 references and footnotes.

Schanz, J.J. Jr.; Perry, H.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

csp land use | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

csp land use Home Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land...

356

how much land | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm...

357

land requirements | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm...

358

Water, Land and People  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water, Land and People Water, Land and People Nature Bulletin No. 251 January 8, 1983 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER, LAND AND PEOPLE "Water, Land and People" is the title of a book which, like "Road to Survival", should be read by every American. Water, and its uses or control, has become a vital national problem. Some places, some years, we have too much of it and suffer disastrous floods. Elsewhere we have too little. In cities like New York and Los Angeles -- even in many inland towns -- and in the western lands which depend upon irrigation, the demand far exceeds the supply. Our Congress is beseeched for huge appropriations to provide flood control, navigation, electric power and irrigation.

359

THE SOCIAL-COST CALCULATOR (SCC): DOCUMENTATION OF METHODS AND DATA, AND CASE STUDY OF SACRAMENTO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and ICEV energy-use and lifecycle-cost model (8 pp. ) (M. A.and N. I. Tishchcishyna, Costs of Oil Dependence: A 2000An Assessment of Benefits and Costs, ORNL-6851, Oak Ridge

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

The Social-Cost Calculator (SCC): Documentation of Methods and Data, and Case Study of Sacramento  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and ICEV energy-use and lifecycle-cost model (8 pp. ) (M. A.and N. I. Tishchcishyna, Costs of Oil Dependence: A 2000An Assessment of Benefits and Costs, ORNL-6851, Oak Ridge

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

depleted underground oil shale for the permanent storage of carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depleted underground oil shale for the permanent storage of carbon depleted underground oil shale for the permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) generated during the oil shale extraction process. AMSO, which holds a research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) lease from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management for a 160-acre parcel of Federal land in northwest Colorado's oil-shale rich Piceance Basin, will provide technical assistance and oil shale core samples. If AMSO can demonstrate an economically viable and environmentally acceptable extraction process, it retains the right to acquire a 5,120-acre commercial lease. When subject to high temperatures and high pressures, oil shale (a sedimentary rock that is rich in hydrocarbons) can be converted into oil. Through mineralization, the CO 2 could be stored in the shale

362

Using Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Warren R. “U.S. interstate pipelines begin 1993 on upbeat. ”66. ? True, Warren R. “Current pipeline costs. ” Oil & GasWarren R. “U.S. interstate pipelines ran more efficiently in

Parker, Nathan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Impacts of PSC Elements on Contract Economics under Oil Price Uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production sharing contract (PSC) is one of the most common types of cooperation modes in international petroleum contracts. The elements that affect PSC economics mainly include royalty, cost oil, profit oil as well as income tax. Assuming that oil ... Keywords: Production Sharing, Oil Price, Oil Contract, International Petroleum Cooperation

Wang Zhen; Zhao Lin; Liu Mingming

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Oil reserves  

SciTech Connect

As of March 1988, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve inventory totaled 544.9 million barrels of oil. During the past 6 months the Department of Energy added 11.0 million barrels of crude oil to the SPR. During this period, DOE distributed $208 million from the SPR Petroleum Account. All of the oil was purchased from PEMEX--the Mexican national oil company. In FY 1988, $164 million was appropriated for facilities development and management and $439 million for oil purchases. For FY 1989, DOE proposes to obligate $173 million for facilities development and management and $236 million for oil purchases. DOE plans to postpone all further drawdown exercises involving crude oil movements until their effects on cavern integrity are evaluated. DOE and the Military Sealift Command have made progress in resolving the questions surrounding nearly $500,000 in payments for demurrage charges.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Land-Use and Ecosystems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land-Use and Ecosystems Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses National Land Cover Data 1992 (2005), and 2001 (2008) Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use...

366

LANDS WITH WILDERNESS CHARACTERISTICS, RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN CONSTRAINTS, AND LAND EXCHANGES: CROSS-JURISDICTIONAL MANAGEMENT AND IMPACTS ON UNCONVENTIONAL FUEL DEVELOPMENT IN UTAH’S UINTA BASIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utah is rich in oil shale and oil sands resources. Chief among the challenges facing prospective unconventional fuel developers is the ability to access these resources. Access is heavily dependent upon land ownership and applicable management requirements. Understanding constraints on resource access and the prospect of consolidating resource holdings across a fragmented management landscape is critical to understanding the role Utah’s unconventional fuel resources may play in our nation’s energy policy. This Topical Report explains the historic roots of the “crazy quilt” of western land ownership, how current controversies over management of federal public land with wilderness character could impact access to unconventional fuels resources, and how land exchanges could improve management efficiency. Upon admission to the Union, the State of Utah received the right to title to more than one-ninth of all land within the newly formed state. This land is held in trust to support public schools and institutions, and is managed to generate revenue for trust beneficiaries. State trust lands are scattered across the state in mostly discontinuous 640-acre parcels, many of which are surrounded by federal land and too small to develop on their own. Where state trust lands are developable but surrounded by federal land, federal land management objectives can complicate state trust land development. The difficulty generating revenue from state trust lands can frustrate state and local government officials as well as citizens advocating for economic development. Likewise, the prospect of industrial development of inholdings within prized conservation landscapes creates management challenges for federal agencies. One major tension involves whether certain federal public lands possess wilderness character, and if so, whether management of those lands should emphasize wilderness values over other uses. On December 22, 2010, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar issued Secretarial Order 3310, Protecting Wilderness Characteristics on Lands Managed by the Bureau of Land Management. Supporters argue that the Order merely provides guidance regarding implementation of existing legal obligations without creating new rights or duties. Opponents describe Order 3310 as subverting congressional authority to designate Wilderness Areas and as closing millions of acres of public lands to energy development and commodity production. While opponents succeeded in temporarily defunding the Order’s implementation and forcing the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to adopt a more collaborative approach, the fundamental questions remain: Which federal public lands possess wilderness characteristics and how should those lands be managed? The closely related question is: How might management of such resources impact unconventional fuel development within Utah? These questions remain pressing independent of the Order because the BLM, which manages the majority of federal land in Utah, is statutorily obligated to maintain an up-to-date inventory of federal public lands and the resources they contain, including lands with wilderness characteristics. The BLM is also legally obligated to develop and periodically update land use plans, relying on information obtained in its public lands inventory. The BLM cannot sidestep these hard choices, and failure to consider wilderness characteristics during the planning process will derail the planning effort. Based on an analysis of the most recent inventory data, lands with wilderness characteristics — whether already subject to mandatory protection under the Wilderness Act, subject to discretionary protections as part of BLM Resource Management Plan revisions, or potentially subject to new protections under Order 3310 — are unlikely to profoundly impact oil shale development within Utah’s Uinta Basin. Lands with wilderness characteristics are likely to v have a greater impact on oil sands resources, particularly those resources found in the southern part of the state. Management requirements independent of l

Keiter, Robert; Ruple, John; Holt, Rebecca; Tanana, Heather; McNeally, Phoebe; Tribby, Clavin

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Rising North Dakota oil production and demand spurs two new ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Trenton Diesel Refinery, whose parent company is Dakota Oil Processing, is expected to cost $200 million to build and start-up.

368

Materials Solutions for Fouling Mitigation in Oil and Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Aspects of Corrosion and Fouling in Oil Refining and ... nations, with costs frequently measured on the scale of percentage of GDP.

369

NETL: News Release - Oil Well Stability Studies Underway in the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 20, 2003 Oil Well Stability Studies Underway in the Gulf of Mexico Initial Results of Salt Mobility Studies Help Industry Cut Costs, Improve Odds of Deepwater Drilling...

370

Modeling the Mobile Oil Recovery Problem as a Multiobjective ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

blem (MORP) is to optimize both the oil extraction and the travel costs. We describe several formulations for the MORP using a single vehicle or a fleet of ...

371

Optimization Online - Modeling the Mobile Oil Recovery Problem as ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 6, 2009 ... The goal of the MOR optimization Problem (MORP) is to optimize both the oil extraction and the travel costs. We describe several formulations ...

372

Increases in oil prices affect broader measures of inflation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Over the past ten years, the Chained Consumer Price Index (C-CPI-U) ... oil price increases boost freight transportation costs—for example, ...

373

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12;· Marginal Cost: ­ Change in total cost ­ Any production process involves fixed and variable costs. As production increases/expands, fixed costs are unchanged, so

Boisvert, Jeff

374

High-Temperature Nuclear Reactors for In-Situ Recovery of Oil from Oil Shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The world is exhausting its supply of crude oil for the production of liquid fuels (gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel). However, the United States has sufficient oil shale deposits to meet our current oil demands for {approx}100 years. Shell Oil Corporation is developing a new potentially cost-effective in-situ process for oil recovery that involves drilling wells into oil shale, using electric heaters to raise the bulk temperature of the oil shale deposit to {approx}370 deg C to initiate chemical reactions that produce light crude oil, and then pumping the oil to the surface. The primary production cost is the cost of high-temperature electrical heating. Because of the low thermal conductivity of oil shale, high-temperature heat is required at the heater wells to obtain the required medium temperatures in the bulk oil shale within an economically practical two to three years. It is proposed to use high-temperature nuclear reactors to provide high-temperature heat to replace the electricity and avoid the factor-of-2 loss in converting high-temperature heat to electricity that is then used to heat oil shale. Nuclear heat is potentially viable because many oil shale deposits are thick (200 to 700 m) and can yield up to 2.5 million barrels of oil per acre, or about 125 million dollars/acre of oil at $50/barrel. The concentrated characteristics of oil-shale deposits make it practical to transfer high-temperature heat over limited distances from a reactor to the oil shale deposits. (author)

Forsberg, Charles W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6165 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

land.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 AUDIT REPORT SALE OF LAND AT OAK RIDGE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES May 2001 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, DC 20585 May 7, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on the "Sale of Land at Oak Ridge" BACKGROUND Under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, the U.S. Department of Energy (Department) may sell land in the performance of identified programmatic functions. The functions specified in the Atomic Energy Act include encouraging scientific and industrial progress, controlling special nuclear

376

Economic feasibility of biochemical processes for the upgrading of crudes and the removal of sulfur, nitrogen, and trace metals from crude oil -- Benchmark cost establishment of biochemical processes on the basis of conventional downstream technologies. Final report FY95  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past several years, a considerable amount of work has been carried out showing that microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is promising and the resulting biotechnology may be deliverable. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), systematic studies have been conducted which dealt with the effects of thermophilic and thermoadapted bacteria on the chemical and physical properties of selected types of crude oils at elevated temperatures and pressures. Current studies indicate that during the biotreatment several chemical and physical properties of crude oils are affected. The oils are (1) emulsified; (2) acidified; (3) there is a qualitative and quantitative change in light and heavy fractions of the crudes; (4) there are chemical changes in fractions containing sulfur compounds; (5) there is an apparent reduction in the concentration of trace metals; and (6) the qualitative and quantitative changes appear to be microbial species dependent; and (7) there is a distinction between biodegraded and biotreated oils. The downstream biotechnological crude oil processing research performed thus far is of laboratory scale and has focused on demonstrating the technical feasibility of downstream processing with different types of biocatalysts under a variety of processing conditions. Quantitative economic analysis is the topic of the present project which investigates the economic feasibility of the various biochemical downstream processes which hold promise in upgrading of heavy crudes, such as those found in California, e.g., Monterey-type, Midway Sunset, Honda crudes, and others.

Premuzic, E.T.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Cost of Fuel to General Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Fuel to Generate Electricity of Fuel to Generate Electricity Cost of Fuel to Generate Electricity Herb Emmrich Gas Demand Forecast, Economic Analysis & Tariffs Manager SCG/SDG&E SCG/SDG&E Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) 2009 Fall Meeting November 18, 2009 Ontario, California The Six Main Costs to Price Electricity are:  Capital costs - the cost of capital investment (debt & equity), depreciation, Federal & State income taxes and property taxes and property taxes  Fuel costs based on fuel used to generate electricity - hydro, natural gas, coal, fuel oil, wind, solar, photovoltaic geothermal biogas photovoltaic, geothermal, biogas  Operating and maintenance costs  Transmission costs  Distribution costs  Social adder costs - GHG adder, low income adder,

378

NASA Land Validation Campaign Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products > Validation NASA Land Validation Campaign Data Land Validation Campaigns The goal of the EOS Validation Program is the comprehensive assessment of all EOS science data...

379

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil)...

380

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 July 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Highlights * EIA projects the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price to average about $88 per barrel over the second half of 2012 and the U.S. refiner acquisition cost (RAC) of crude oil to average $93 per barrel, both about $7 per barrel lower than last month's Outlook. EIA expects WTI and RAC crude oil prices to remain roughly at these second half levels in 2013. Beginning in this month's Outlook, EIA is also providing a forecast of Brent crude oil spot prices (see Brent Crude Oil Spot Price Added to Forecast), which are expected to average $106 per barrel for 2012 and $98 per barrel in 2013. These price forecasts assume that world oil-consumption-weighted real gross domestic product

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Solar retorting of oil shale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed analysis of technical and economic factors solar retorting of oil shale shows that such a process should be technically feasible and, depending on the grade of the shale, should improve the fuel yield from the oil shale by 10 to 40%, compared to one of the best competing surface ay for the incremental processes. The improved oil yield should more than pay for the incremental cost associated with adding the solar collection system. An experiment is described in which solar energy is used to retort oil shale, and the experimental results show that yields of better than 110% Fischer Assay are achievable. An advanced design for a solar oil-shale retort is also discussed.

Gregg, D.W.; Grens, J.Z.; Taylor, R.W.; Aiman, W.R.

1980-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

382

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Performance Evaluation - First Quarterly Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the initial activities to evaluate the performance of the oil bypass filter technology being tested by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Eight full-size, four-cycle diesel-engine buses used to transport INEEL employees on various routes have been equipped with oil bypass systems from the puraDYN Corporation. Each bus averages about 60,000 miles a year. The evaluation includes an oil analysis regime to monitor the presence of necessary additives in the oil and to detect undesirable contaminants. Very preliminary economic analysis suggests that the oil bypass system can reduce life-cycle costs. As the evaluation continues and oil avoidance costs are quantified, it is estimated that the bypass system economics may prove increasingly favorable, given the anticipated savings in operational costs and in reduced use of oil and waste oil avoidance.

Zirker, L.R.; Francfort, J.E.

2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Sugar Land, TX -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alumnus Recognized by Secretary of Energy for Work at National Lab Sugar Land, TX - The National Energy Technology Laboratory is proud to announce that U.S. Air Force Academy...

384

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Meter) MCD12Q1 LC MODISTerra+Aqua Lan Cover ( LC ) Type Yearly L3 Global 500m SIN Grid annual 500 MCD12Q2 LCD MODISTerra+Aqua Land Cover Dynamics ( LCD ) Yearly L3 Global...

385

OpenEI - land  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4150 en Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode454

This dataset is part of...

386

National Land Cover Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Land Cover Data National Land Cover Data Metadata also available as Metadata: q Identification_Information q Data_Quality_Information q Spatial_Data_Organization_Information q Spatial_Reference_Information q Entity_and_Attribute_Information q Distribution_Information q Metadata_Reference_Information Identification_Information: Citation: Citation_Information: Originator: United States Geological Survey Publication_Date: Unpublished Material Title: National Land Cover Data Edition: 01 Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: raster digital data Other_Citation_Details: Classification and processing of the orginal remote sensing products was done by the Multi-Resolution Land Characterization Consortium and EROS Data Center (U.S. Geological Survey). The Consortium includes the

387

Enhanced Oil Recovery of Viscous Oil by Injection of Water-in-Oil Emulsion Made with Used Engine Oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solids-stabilized water-in-oil emulsions have been suggested as a drive fluid to recover viscous oil through a piston-like displacement pattern. While crude heavy oil was initially suggested as the base oil, an alternative oil ? used engine oil was proposed for emulsion generation because of several key advantages: more favorable viscosity that results in better emulsion injectivity, soot particles within the oil that readily promote stable emulsions, almost no cost of the oil itself and relatively large supply, and potential solution of used engine oil disposal. In this research, different types of used engine oil (mineral based, synthetic) were tested to make W/O emulsions simply by blending in brine. A series of stable emulsions was prepared with varied water contents from 40~70%. Viscosities of these emulsions were measured, ranging from 102~104 cp at low shear rates and ambient temperature. Then an emulsion made of 40% used engine oil and 60% brine was chosen for a series of coreflood experiments, to test the stability of this emulsion while flowing through porous media. Limited breakdown of the effluent was observed at ambient injection rates, indicating a stability of the emulsion in porous media. Pressure drops leveled off and remained constant at constant rate of injection, indicating steady-state flows under the experimental conditions. No plug off effect was observed after a large volume of emulsion passed through the cores. Reservoir scale simulations were conducted for the emulsion flooding process based on the emulsion properties tested from the experiments. Results showed significant improvement in both displacement pattern and oil recovery especially compared to water flooding. Economics calculations of emulsion flooding were also performed, suggesting this process to be highly profitable.

Fu, Xuebing

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Plan for addressing issues relating to oil shale plant siting  

SciTech Connect

The Western Research Institute plan for addressing oil shale plant siting methodology calls for identifying the available resources such as oil shale, water, topography and transportation, and human resources. Restrictions on development are addressed: land ownership, land use, water rights, environment, socioeconomics, culture, health and safety, and other institutional restrictions. Descriptions of the technologies for development of oil shale resources are included. The impacts of oil shale development on the environment, socioeconomic structure, water availability, and other conditions are discussed. Finally, the Western Research Institute plan proposes to integrate these topics to develop a flow chart for oil shale plant siting. Western Research Institute has (1) identified relative topics for shale oil plant siting, (2) surveyed both published and unpublished information, and (3) identified data gaps and research needs. 910 refs., 3 figs., 30 tabs.

Noridin, J.S.; Donovan, R.; Trudell, L.; Dean, J.; Blevins, A.; Harrington, L.W.; James, R.; Berdan, G.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Penobscot Indian Nation's Strategic Energy Planning Efficiency on tribal Lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy grant provided the resources to evaluate the wind, hydro, biomass, geothermal and solar resource potential on all Penobscot Indian Naiton's Tribal lands. The two objectives address potential renewable energy resources available on tribal lands and energy efficiency measures to be taken after comprehensive energy audits of commercial facilities. Also, a Long Term Strategic Energy Plan was developed along with a plan to reduce high energy costs.

Sockalexis, Mike; Fields, Brenda

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

390

Energy Corridors on Federal Lands | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Corridors on Federal Lands Energy Corridors on Federal Lands Energy Corridors on Federal Lands In many areas of the United States, the infrastructure required to deliver energy has not always kept pace with growth in demand. To improve energy delivery and enhance the electric transmission grid for the future, several government agencies currently are working together to establish a coordinated network of Federal energy corridors on Federal lands throughout the United States. Energy corridors would help address growing energy demand by facilitating future siting of oil, gas, and hydrogen pipelines and electricity transmission and distribution facilities, while also protecting the environment. As the agency-preferred siting locations, the energy transport corridors will provide industry and the public with

391

Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 Year 1976 Url Landpolicy1976.jpg Description FLPMA, also called the BLM Organic Act, consolidated and articulated BLM management responsibilities and delegated many management responsibilities pertaining to federal land from the Secretary of the Interior to the Director of the BLM, including oversight of oil and gas leases. References Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976[1] The Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (43 U.S.C. §1701 et seq.) - FLPMA, also called the BLM Organic Act, consolidated and articulated BLM management responsibilities and delegated many management responsibilities pertaining to federal land from the Secretary of the

392

GRR/Section 3-FD-b - Tribal Land Leasing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-FD-b - Tribal Land Leasing 3-FD-b - Tribal Land Leasing < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-FD-b - Tribal Land Leasing 03FDBTribalLandLeasing.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Indian Affairs Division of Energy and Mineral Development Division of Indian Energy Policy Development Bureau of Land Management Office of Natural Resources Revenue Regulations & Policies Indian Mineral Development Act of 1982 (IMDA) Bureau of Indian Affairs Regulations: 25 C.F.R. 1 to 293 Rights-of-Way over Indian Lands - 25 CFR 169 Leasing of Tribal Lands for Mineral Development - 25 CFR 211 Tribal Energy Resource Agreements - 25 CFR Part 224 Oil and Gas, Geothermal, and Solid Minerals Agreements - 25 CFR 225

393

Production of Shale Oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intensive pre-project feasibility and engineering studies begun in 1979 have produced an outline plan for development of a major project for production of shale oil from private lands in the Piceance Basin in western Colorado. This outline plan provides a blueprint for the development of a 28,000 acre holding on Clear Creek in Garfield County, Colorado on property acquired by Standard Oil of California in the late 1940's and early 1950's. The paper describes these planning activities and the principal features of a proposed $5 billion project to develop facilities for production of 100,000 barrels per day of synthetic crude from oil shale. Subjects included are resource evaluation, environmental baseline studies, plans for acquisition of permits, plans for development of required retorting and mining technology and a preliminary description of the commercial project which will ultimately emerge from these activities. General financial impact of the project and the case for additional tax incentives to encourage it will be described.

Loper, R. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Future land use plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) changing mission, coupled with the need to apply appropriate cleanup standards for current and future environmental restoration, prompted the need for a process to determine preferred Future Land Uses for DOE-owned sites. DOE began the ``Future Land Use`` initiative in 1994 to ensure that its cleanup efforts reflect the surrounding communities` interests in future land use. This plan presents the results of a study of stakeholder-preferred future land uses for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), located in central Long Island, New York. The plan gives the Laboratory`s view of its future development over the next 20 years, as well as land uses preferred by the community were BNL ever to cease operations as a national laboratory (the post-BNL scenario). The plan provides an overview of the physical features of the site including its history, topography, geology/hydrogeology, biological inventory, floodplains, wetlands, climate, and atmosphere. Utility systems and current environmental operations are described including waste management, waste water treatment, hazardous waste management, refuse disposal and ground water management. To complement the physical descriptions of the site, demographics are discussed, including overviews of the surrounding areas, laboratory population, and economic and non-economic impacts.

NONE

1995-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Energy and land use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report addresses the land use impacts of past and future energy development and summarizes the major federal and state legislation which influences the potential land use impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which are used to measure, and in some cases, predict the potential conflicts between energy development and alternative uses of the nation's land resources. The topics section of this report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the myriad of federal, state and local legislation which have a direct or indirect impact upon the use of land for energy development. The second part addresses the potential land use impacts associated with the extraction, conversion and combustion of energy resources, as well as the disposal of wastes generated by these processes. The third part discusses the conflicts that might arise between agriculture and energy development as projected under a number of DOE mid-term (1990) energy supply and demand scenarios.

Not Available

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Research and information needs for management of oil shale development  

SciTech Connect

This report presents information and analysis to assist BLM in clarifying oil shale research needs. It provides technical guidance on research needs in support of their regulatory responsibilities for onshore mineral activities involving oil shale. It provides an assessment of research needed to support the regulatory and managerial role of the BLM as well as others involved in the development of oil shale resources on public and Indian lands in the western United States.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Landed Costs of Imported Crude for Selected Crude Streams  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

for Selected Crude Streams for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Crude Stream Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Algerian Saharan Blend W W W W 2009-2013 Angolan Cabinda 1983-2010 Brazilian Marlim W W W W W 2009-2013 Canadian Bow River 75.11 81.32 80.69 90.70 94.40 88.54 1996-2013 Canadian Light Sour Blend 86.95 92.97 91.76 94.96 103.23 102.09 2009-2013 Canadian Lloydminster 73.88 80.34 84.17 87.50 94.64 91.89 1983-2013 Ecuadorian Napo W W W 104.38 103.06 101.56 2009-2013 Ecuadorian Oriente 104.18 104.42 101.61 106.94 107.51 105.09 1983-2013 Gabon Rabi-Kouanga 1996-2008

398

Landed Costs of Imported Crude for Selected Crude Streams  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Algerian Saharan Blend 65.95 81.78 115.82 114.02 2009-2012 Angolan Cabinda 69.17 W 1978-2008 Brazilian Marlim 58.94 76.63 107.13 114.32 2009-2012 Canadian Bow River 52.36 84.29 55.71 68.92 82.02 77.19 1978-2012 Canadian Light Sour Blend 59.12 76.56 96.52 87.82 2009-2012 Canadian Lloydminster 50.94 82.50 53.44 68.13 82.24 81.33 1978-2012 Ecuadorian Napo 48.74 72.97 97.91 101.53 2009-2012 Ecuadorian Oriente 64.57 87.25 56.97 75.48 101.74 105.50 1978-2012 Gabon Rabi-Kouanga 72.93 95.46 1978-2008 Iraqi Basrah Light 64.38 77.96 106.67 106.93 2009-2012 Mexican Mayan 60.93 84.29 56.03 70.87 98.81 100.29 1978-2012 Mexican Olmeca 72.77 101.14 1978-2008

399

Landed Costs of Imported Crude for Selected Crude Streams  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: See Definitions ...

400

Landed Costs of Imported Crude by API Gravity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Values shown for the current two months are preliminary. Values shown for the second and third months may be revised to account for late submissions and corrections. Final...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Landed Costs of Imported Crude by API Gravity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: See Definitions ...

402

Landed Costs of Imported Crude by API Gravity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Values shown for the ...

403

Land Use History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focuses on the cultural-historical environment of the 88,900-acre (35,560-ha) Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP) over the past four centuries of Spanish, Mexican, and U.S. governance. It includes a review and synthesis of available published and unpublished historical, ethnohistorical, and ethnographic literature about the human occupation of the area now contained within the VCNP. Documents include historical maps, texts, letters, diaries, business records, photographs, land and mineral patents, and court testimony. This study presents a cultural-historical framework of VCNP land use that will be useful to land managers and researchers in assessing the historical ecology of the property. It provides VCNP administrators and agents the cultural-historical background needed to develop management plans that acknowledge traditional associations with the Preserve, and offers managers additional background for structuring and acting on consultations with affiliated communities.

United States; Forest Service; Kurt F. Anschuetz

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

The effect of biofuel on the international oil market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

barrel of crude oil in the Middle East was 14.85 US$ between5,000 US$ mark). Although consumption of crude oil in theUS$ for o?shore drilling; in other words, the marginal cost of a barrel of crude oil

Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Groundwater and Wastewater Remediation Using Agricultural Oils  

agricultural oils to stimulate endogenous microbes which accelerates the cleanup.  The oils tested include canola oil, grapeseed oil, coconut oil, corn oil, cottonseed oil, olive oil, palm oil, palm kernel oil, peanut oil, ...

406

Oil-shale mining, Rifle, Colorado, 1944-1956  

SciTech Connect

The Rifle, Colorado, oil-shale project of the Bureau of Mines included three major divisions: (1) mining, (2) retorting, and (3) refining. The major functions of the mining program were to supply oil shale to the retorts, to devise mining procedures, and to develop an underground-mining method by which oil shale could be produced safely at an unusually low cost per ton. The selected mining procedures and direct mining costs were demonstrated by sustained test runs.

East, J.H. Jr.; Gardner, E.D.

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Safe recycling of used oil  

SciTech Connect

It`s not just recovery of used oil, but how you recover it, that ultimately determines the impact on the environment. No matter what recycling technology is employed, there are environmental/economic factors that come into play. One is the distance to the end user. Sending the used oil to a nearby plant (e.g. a local asphalt manufacturer as opposed to a distant refiner) both reduces hauling costs and the potential for a spill occurring during transport. Management practices of the used oil recycler, pollution control, insurance coverage and environmental compliance record are other factors in evaluating recovery options. Generators need to be careful about who is collecting their used oil, because they can be held liable for mismanagement.

Arner, R. [Northern Virginia Planning District Commission, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentations Presentations Web and Web Services based tool that provides Subsets and Visualization of MODIS land products to facilitate land validation and field site characterization. S.K. Santhana Vannan; R. B. Cook; B. E. Wilson. AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 14-18 2009 MODIS Land Product Subsets,S.K. Santhana Vannan; R. B. Cook. November, 2009 MODIS Web Service, S.K. Santhana Vannan. ORNL DAAC UWG Meeting, May 2009 Subsetting Tools for MODIS Land Products: Time-series data for field sites, R. B. Cook, S. M. Margle, S. K. Santhana Vannan, S. K. Holladay, and T. W. Beaty. Global Vegetation Workshop, Missoula MT, August 8-10, 2006 MODIS ASCII Subsets, R. B. Cook. May 2006 Subsets of Remote Sensing Products for AmeriFlux Sites: MODIS ASCII Subsets, AmeriFlux Annual Meeting, R. B. Cook, S. M. Margle, S. K. Holladay, F. A. Heinsch, and C. B. Schaaf. October 5-7, 2004, Boulder, Colorado

409

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction Introduction The goal of the MODIS Land Product Subsets project is to provide summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote-sensing products, and to characterize field sites. The MODIS Land Product Subsets are derived from MODIS products that were generated with Collection 4 or later algorithms. Please be advised that these products are subject to continual review and revision. The MODIS land product subsets are provided in ASCII and GeoTIFF format. The subsets are stored as individual text(ASCII) files, each file represents one field site and one MODIS product.The ASCII data covers 7x7 km of the field site. These ASCII files contain comma-delimited rows of parameter values (image bands) for each pixel in the selected area. Each row in the file will contain data from one 8-day, 16-day, or annual period (depending on the temporal frequency of the data product represented).

410

Cost of Offshore Wind Energy Charlene Nalubega  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost of Offshore Wind Energy water as well as on land based wind farms. The specific offshore wind energy case under consideration kilowatt Hour will be determined. Wind Energy has been around for a very long time. It started as out

Mountziaris, T. J.

411

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating...

412

OIl Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investor Flows and the 2008 BoomBust in Oil Prices Kenneth J. Singleton 1 August 10, 2011 1 Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, kenneths@stanford.edu. This research...

413

Drilling costs drop 7% in 1985  

SciTech Connect

Drilling costs dropped about 7% last year. This decline cancels a slight increase in 1984. Total costs to drill now run about 59% of the 1981 highs. Comparable figures for the previous 2 years are 63 and 61%. Deeper wells showed the biggest drops. Shallow well costs fell about 6%. Energy Information Administration (EIA) indexes drilling costs on a 1976 base year. Costs for shallow wells (5,000 ft or less) show an index about 138. Deeper wells have an index around 149. Cost declines were the greatest in West and North Texas and the Rockies, of 11%. The Northeast and Western areas showed greater than average declines, 9% or so. The High Plains, New Mexico, and Midcontinent areas recorded near the average 7% decline. Costs in South Louisiana, the Southeast, and Ark-La-Tex 2%. West Central Texas costs were off only 1%. The Southeast was essentially unchanged. Indexes by area show generally that drilling costs have declined since 1983. The summary here comes from EIA's ''Indexes and Estimates of Domestic Well Drilling Costs 1984 and 1985''. That report covers oil, gas, and dry hole costs, cost components, and overall costs.

Anderson, T.; Funk, V.

1986-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

414

External Costs of Energy Technologies Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society believes that decisions concerning national energy policy should appropriately take external costs into account. In some energy options, external costs are not included in the cost of the energy produced; instead, they are borne by parties not involved in the original transaction, generally without consent or due compensation. External costs 1 may be related to many factors, including impacts on public health, environmental impacts, degradation of quality of life, degradation of agricultural land, depletion of natural resources, and reduction in security. These costs are incurred at various stages of the life cycle of an energy technology. While some energy technologies may appear to have smaller environmental impacts than others, their external costs may be significant when the complete life cycle costs are taken into account. Particularly, an energy source that is inherently intermittent will require, for applications demanding reliable performance, either a backup energy supply or an energy storage facility, whose external costs are not negligible. On the other hand, practically all the costs to make nuclear power technology safe and secure, including the costs of waste management and disposal, are already incorporated into the cost of electricity generation. 2 Appropriately accounting for external costs should be an essential element in energy policy since in doing so, the final product is compared based on a consistent set of parameters for all technologies, and the resulting mix of energy sources will more appropriately balance the competing economic, environmental, and social needs from energy production and consumption.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Solar retorting of oil shale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

First, in an overview, we outline and discuss the potential applications of solar energy to the production of fuels. We show that, starting from a fossil feedstock, there are four areas in which solar energy can have a major impact in the production of fuels: in solar retorting of oil shale, in solar coal gasification, in solar steam flooding of oil fields, and in solar steam-reforming of methane. We performed a detailed technical and economic analysis of solar retorting of oil shale. The analysis shows that this solar process not only should be technically feasible but also should improve the fuel yield from the oil-shale feedstock by 10 to 40%, depending on the grade of the shale, compared to the most efficient competing (nonsolar) process. The improved oil yield should more than pay for the incremental cost associated with adding the solar collection system (field of focusing heliostats). The results from an experiment in which solar energy was used to retort oil shale show that yields of better than 110% Fischer Assay are achievable. An advanced design for a solar oil-shale retort is also presented.

Gregg, D.W.; Taylor, R.W.; Grens, J.Z.; Aiman, W.R.; Marsh, L.E.

1980-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Minimum Cost Flow Problems with Value-at-Risk and Conditional ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stochastic minimum cost flow (SMCF) problems have been studied for applica- tions involving random ...... approach to stochastic programming of heating oil.

417

County Land Preservation and Use Commissions (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This ordinance creates Land Preservation and Use Commissions in each county to provide for the orderly use and development of land, to protect agricultural land from nonagricultural development,...

418

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408) costs apply to those items that are consumed in production process and are roughly proportional to level in cash flow analysis and in the decision to use the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12

Boisvert, Jeff

419

Heading off the permanent oil crisis  

SciTech Connect

The 1996 spike in gasoline prices was not a signal of any fundamental worldwide shortage of crude oil. But based on a review of many studies of recoverable crude oil that have been published since the 1950s, it looks as though such a shortfall is now within sight. With world demand for oil growing at 2 percent per year, global production is likely to peak between the years 2007 and 2014. As this time approaches, we can expect prices to rise markedly and, most likely, permanently. Policy changes are needed now to ease the transition to high-priced oil. Oil production will continue, though at a declining rate, for many decades after its peak, and there are enormous amounts of coal, oil sands, heavy oil, and oil shales worldwide that could be used to produce liquid or gaseous substitutes for crude oil, albeit at higher prices. But the facilities for making such synthetic fuels are costly to build and environmentally damaging to operate, and their use would substantially increase carbon dioxide emissions (compared to emissions from products made from conventional crude oil). This paper examines ways of heading of the impending oil crisis. 8 refs., 3 figs.

MacKenzie, J.J. [World Resources Inst., Washington, DC (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Interfacial Mixing in Viscous Pipe Flows Interim report to Imperial Oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Introduction The cost of energy to pump oil through a pipe line is greatly reduced if the ow is not turbulent in this area, in part, because oil companies have only recently considered pumping oil through pipesInterfacial Mixing in Viscous Pipe Flows Interim report to Imperial Oil D. Van Vliet and B. R

Sutherland, Bruce

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Crude Oil Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: Crude oil exports are restricted to: (1) crude oil derived from fields under the State waters of Alaska's Cook Inlet; (2) Alaskan North Slope crude oil; (3) ...

422

Heavy Oil Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Select Reports from Heavy Oil Projects Project Number Performer Title Heavy Oil Recovery US (NIPERBDM-0225) BDM-Oklahoma, Inc. Feasibility Study of Heavy Oil Recovery in the...

423

3. Crude Oil Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3. Crude Oil Statistics The United States had 21,371 million barrels of crude oil proved reserves as of December 31, 2004. Crude oil proved reserves ...

424

Oil prices in a new light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a clear picture of how oil prices develop, the author steps away from the price levels to which the world is accustomed, and evaluates scientifically. What makes prices jump from one notch to another The move results from a political or economic shock or the perception of a particular position by the futures market and the media. The shock could range from a war or an assassination to a promise of cooperation among OPEC members (when believed by the market) or to speculation about another failure at an OPEC meeting. In the oil market, only a couple of factual figures can provide a floor to the price of oil. The cost of production of oil in the Gulf is around $2 to $3/bbl, and the cost of production of oil (capital and operating costs) in key non-OPEC areas is well under $10/bbl. With some adjustments for transport and quality, a price range of $13/bbl to $16/bbl would correspond to a reasonable sustainable floor price. The reason for prices above the floor price has been a continuous fear of oil supply interruptions. That fear kept prices above the floor price for many years. The fear factor has now almost fully disappeared. The market has gone through the drama of the Iranian Revolution, the Iran-Iraq war, the tanker war, the invasion of Kuwait, and the expulsions of the Iraqis. And still the oil flowed -- all the time. It has become abundantly clear that fears above the oil market were unjustified. Everyone needs to export oil, and oil will flow under the worst circumstances. The demise of the fear factor means that oil prices tend toward the floor price for a prolonged period.

Fesharaki, F. (East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States))

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

5 World Oil Trends WORLD OIL TRENDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 World Oil Trends Chapter 1 WORLD OIL TRENDS INTRODUCTION In considering the outlook for California's petroleum supplies, it is important to give attention to expecta- tions of what the world oil market. Will world oil demand increase and, if so, by how much? How will world oil prices be affected

426

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool The Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool provides customized subsets of MODIS Land products in ASCII format on demand for any location on Earth. Users select a site (either from a picklist or by entering the site's geographic coordinates) and the area surrounding that site, from one pixel up to 201 x 201 km. The tool is expected to take up to 60 minutes to complete the processing, and the tool will send you an email message containing the URL where you can access the output. The tool provides time series plots of the measurement, an ASCII file of the pixel values for the selected product along with quality information, average and standard deviations for the area selected, and a file that can be imported directly into GIS software. In addition we provide a land cover grid (IGBP classification) of the area, along with an estimate of heterogeneity (Shannon richness and evenness).

427

Special Feature: Reducing Energy Costs with Better Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or less to consumers. Such a vehicle would reduce the United States' reliance on foreign oil and lower energy costs for the average American, so one of the Department of Energy's...

428

Fuel costs and the retirement of capital goods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores the effect that energy prices and market conditions have on the retirement rates of capital goods using new micro data on aircraft lifetimes and fuel costs. The oil shocks of the 1970s made fuel intensive ...

Goolsbee, Austan Dean

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

DOE to Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE to Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve May 24, 2007 - 4:16pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that it will sell approximately 35,000 barrels of home heating oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). The Reserve's current 5-year storage contracts expire on September 30, 2007 and market conditions have caused new storage costs to rise to a level that exceeds available funds. Revenue from the sale will be used to supplement funds for the award of new long-term storage contracts that will begin on October 1, 2007. The Department will work with Congress to resolve these funding issues in order to restore the inventory of the Reserve to its full authorized size.

430

DOE to Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating to Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE to Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve May 24, 2007 - 4:16pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that it will sell approximately 35,000 barrels of home heating oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). The Reserve's current 5-year storage contracts expire on September 30, 2007 and market conditions have caused new storage costs to rise to a level that exceeds available funds. Revenue from the sale will be used to supplement funds for the award of new long-term storage contracts that will begin on October 1, 2007. The Department will work with Congress to resolve these funding issues in order

431

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

methods methods This section describes methods used to generate MODIS Land Subsets for Collection 4 and Collection 5 data products. Methods for Selected Sites (Collections 4 and 5) Methods for North America Tool (Collection 4) Methods for the Global Tool (Collection 5) Methods for Selected Sites (Collection 4 and 5) Source for Selected Site Data: Full MODIS scenes (1200-km x 1200-km) are initially subset to 11-km x 31-km (Collection 4) or 25-km x 25-km (Collection 5) by the MODAPS; these initial subsets contain the field site or flux tower. Reformatting and additional subsetting to 7-km x 7-km containing the field site or flux tower are done by the ORNL DAAC. Tools Used: The ORNL DAAC uses the MODIS Reprojection Tool (MRT) to reformat the MODIS data from HDF-EOS to binary format. A tool developed at ORNL is then used to convert the binary format to ASCII. The MRT is available from the Land Processes DAAC. Whereas the MRT can also be used to reproject data from its native projection to other projections, ORNL chose to forgo the resampling associated with reprojection to minimize data manipulation and distortion. The MOD12Q1 Land Cover Collection 3 data are in I-Sin projection, and the Collection 4 and Collection 5 data are in Sinusoidal projection.

432

Crude Oil and Gasoline Price Monitoring  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What drives crude oil prices? What drives crude oil prices? November 13, 2013 | Washington, DC An analysis of 7 factors that influence oil markets, with chart data updated monthly and quarterly Crude oil prices react to a variety of geopolitical and economic events November 13, 2013 2 price per barrel (real 2010 dollars, quarterly average) Low spare capacity Iraq invades Kuwait Saudis abandon swing producer role Iran-Iraq War Iranian revolution Arab Oil Embargo Asian financial crisis U.S. spare capacity exhausted Global financial collapse 9-11 attacks OPEC cuts targets 1.7 mmbpd OPEC cuts targets 4.2 mmbpd Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Thomson Reuters 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 imported refiner acquisition cost of crude oil

433

Land Stewardship | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Stewardship Land Stewardship Land Stewardship Mission The team advocates improved ecosystem health on LM properties in accordance with DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management; federal regulations, such as the Endangered Species Act, the Noxious Weed Act, and the Wetlands and Floodplains Act; and in consideration of LM agreements with regulatory agencies and tribes. The team advocates identifying and proposing land management improvements on LM sites that are beneficial to ecosystems and improve remedy sustainability. Improvements are implemented with consideration of adjacent land uses, owners, and political entities. Success is defined when measurable parameters are achieved. Scope The team identifies and evaluates proposals to enhance ecosystem health at

434

Renewable Energy Project Leasing on Tribal Lands Webinar | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Leasing on Tribal Lands Webinar Project Leasing on Tribal Lands Webinar Renewable Energy Project Leasing on Tribal Lands Webinar June 26, 2013 11:00AM MDT Webinar The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program, and Western Area Power Administration are pleased to continue their sponsorship of the Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar Series. According to the Intertribal Council on Utility Policy, wind resources on tribal lands in the Great Plains alone could power more than 50 million homes. The HEARTH Act of 2012 provides the opportunity for Tribes to eliminate delays, costs, federal environmental reviews, federal administrative and judicial litigation, and risks associated with Bureau of

435

The Stock Market Reaction to Oil Price Changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I explore the reaction of the stock market as a whole and of different industries to daily oil price changes. I find that the direction and magnitude of the market?s reaction to oil price changes depend on the magnitude of the price changes. Oil price changes most likely caused by supply shocks have a negative impact while oil price changes most likely caused by shifts in aggregate demand have a positive impact on the same day market returns. In addition to the returns of oil-intensive industries, returns of industries that do not use oil to any significant extent are also sensitive to oil price changes. Finally, I show that both the cost-side dependence and demand-side dependence on oil are important in explaining the sensitivity of industry returns to oil price changes. I am indebted to Louis Ederington. I am grateful for the helpful comments received from Chitru Fernando,

Sridhar Gogineni

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Specialty Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing provider for Specialty Oils. Samples tested include Walnut Oil, Pecan Oil, Pistachio Oil, Sesame Seed Oil, Flax Seed Oil, Neem Oil, Safflower Oil, Sunflower Oil. Specialty Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Pro

437

New Technologies to Reclaim Arid Lands User's Manual  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Under conventional technologies to mitigate these impacts, it is estimated that up to 35 percent of revegetation projects in arid areas will fail due to unpredictable natural environmental conditions, such as drought, and reclamation techniques that were inadequate to restore vegetative cover in a timely and cost-effective manner. New reclamation and restoration techniques are needed in desert ranges to help mitigate the adverse effects of military training and other activities to arid-land environments. In 1999, a cooperative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the US. Department of Defense (DoD), and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on mitigating military impacts in arid lands. As arid lands are impacted due to DoD and DOE activities, biological and soil resources are gradually lost and the habitat is altered. A conceptual model of that change in habitat quality is described for varying levels of disturbance in the Mojave Desert. As the habitat quality degrades and more biological and physical resources are lost from training areas, greater costs are required to return the land to sustainable levels. The purpose of this manual is to assist land managers in recognizing thresholds associated with habitat degradation and provide reclamation planning and techniques that can reduce the costs of mitigation for these impacted lands to ensure sustainable use of these lands. The importance of reclamation planning is described in this manual with suggestions about establishing project objectives, scheduling, budgeting, and selecting cost-effective techniques. Reclamation techniques include sections describing: (1) erosion control (physical, chemical, and biological), (2) site preparation, (3) soil amendments, (4) seeding, (5) planting, (6) grazing and weed control, (7) mulching, (8) irrigation, and (9) site protection. Each section states the objectives of the technique, the principles, an in-depth look at the techniques, and any special considerations as it relates to DoD or DOE lands. The need for monitoring and remediation is described to guide users in monitoring reclamation efforts to evaluate their cost-effectiveness. Costs are provided for the proposed techniques for the major deserts of the southwestern U.S. showing the average and range of costs. A set of decision tools are provided in the form of a flow diagram and table to guide users in selecting effective reclamation techniques to achieve mitigation objectives. Recommendations are provided to help summarize key reclamation principles and to assist users in developing a successful program that contributes to sustainable uses of DoD and DOE lands. The users manual is helpful to managers in communicating to installation management the needs and consequences of training decisions and the costs required to achieve successful levels of sustainable use. This users manual focuses on the development of new reclamation techniques that have been implemented at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, and are applicable to most arid land reclamation efforts.

W. K. Ostler

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

land use | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

use use Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

439

land requirements | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

requirements requirements Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

440

PAFC Cost Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PAFC Cost Challenges Sridhar Kanuri Manager, PAFC Technology *Sridhar.Kanuri@utcpower.com 2 AGENDA Purecell 400 cost challenge Cost reduction opportunities Summary 3 PURECELL ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Vegetable Oil from Leaves and Stems: Vegetative Production of Oil in a C4 Crop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PETRO Project: Arcadia Biosciences, in collaboration with the University of California-Davis, is developing plants that produce vegetable oil in their leaves and stems. Ordinarily, these oils are produced in seeds, but Arcadia Biosciences is turning parts of the plant that are not usually harvested into a source of concentrated energy. Vegetable oil is a concentrated source of energy that plants naturally produce and is easily separated after harvest. Arcadia Biosciences will isolate traits that control oil production in seeds and transfer them into leaves and stems so that all parts of the plants are oil-rich at harvest time. After demonstrating these traits in a fast-growing model plant, Arcadia Biosciences will incorporate them into a variety of dedicated biofuel crops that can be grown on land not typically suited for food production

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Chapter 37 Land Disposal Restrictions (Kentucky) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 Land Disposal Restrictions (Kentucky) Chapter 37 Land Disposal Restrictions (Kentucky) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor...

443

Spatial decision support system for land assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: GIS, agriculture planning, artificial intelligence, decision support system, expert system, geoinformatics, geoinformation system, land evaluation, land use planning

Cláudio Chauke Nehme; Margareth Simões

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Oil | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Oil Oil Prices, 2000-2008 For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. |...

445

Environment Canada research on land treatment of petroleum wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the studies presented in this book is to identify wastes which can be applied to land in an environmentally acceptable manner and to provide information on which to base guidelines for the proper application of such wastes to land. The information which has been collected to date has focused on the persistence and fate of oil and toxic constituents of petroleum wastes when applied to soil, potential environmental impacts and risk to human health associated with application to land, and site managements techniques which enhance treatment of organic constituents of wastes while protecting environmental quality. The potential for contamination of groundwater, the accumulation of hazardous substances in soil and effects on plant growth have undergone the most intensive investigation to date. Impingement on air quality has received limited study.

Bulman, T.L.; Scroggins, R.P. (Wastewater Technolgy Centre, Burlington, Ontario (CA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Biocrude oils from the fast pyrolysis of poultry litter and hardwood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The safe and economical disposal of poultry litter is becoming a major problem for the USA poultry industry. Current disposal methods such as land application and feeding to cattle are now under pressure because of pollution of water resources due to leaching, runoffs and concern for mad cow disease contamination of the food chain. Incineration or combustion is potentially applicable to large scale operations, but for small scale growers and EPA non-attainment areas, this is not a suitable option because of the high cost of operation. Thus, there is a need for developing appropriate technologies to dispose poultry litter. Poultry litters from broiler chicken and turkey houses, as well as bedding material were converted into biocrude oil in a fast pyrolysis fluidized bed reactor. The biocrude oil yields were relatively low ranging from 36 wt% to 50 wt% depending on the age and bedding material content of the litter. The bedding material (which was mostly hardwood shavings) biocrude oil yield was 63 wt%. The higher heating value (HHV) of the poultry litter biocrude oils ranged from 26 MJ/kg to 29 MJ/kg while that of the bedding material was 24 MJ/kg. The oils had relatively high nitrogen content ranging from 4 wt% to 8 wt%, very low sulfur (biochar yield ranged from 27 wt% to 40 wt% depending on the source, age and composition of the poultry litter. The biochar ash content ranged from 24 wt% to 54 wt% and was very rich in inorganic components such as potassium and phosphorous.

Agblevor, F.A., E-mail: Fagblevo@vt.ed [Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Beis, S.; Kim, S.S.; Tarrant, R.; Mante, N.O. [Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

of oil yields from enhanced oil recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO 2 storage capacity in depleted oil reservoirs. The primary goal of the project is to demonstrate that remaining oil can be economically produced using CO 2 -EOR technology in untested areas of the United States. The Citronelle Field appears to be an ideal site for concurrent CO 2 storage and EOR because the field is composed of sandstone reservoirs

448

EIA Oil price timeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, ... Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions.

449

OIL PRICES AND THE WORLD ECONOMY 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Oil prices, associated with bouts of inflation and economic instability over the last 30 years, have been rising in recent months. We argue that the inflationary consequences of a rise in oil prices depend upon the policy response of the monetary authorities. They can ameliorate the short term impacts on output, but only at the cost of higher inflation. In the short term the size and distribution of output effects from an increase in oil prices depends on the intensity of oil use in production and on the speed at which oil producers spend their revenue. In the medium term higher oil prices change the terms of trade between the OECD and the rest of the world and hence reduce the equilibrium level of output in the OECD. In this paper we first discuss oil market developments and survey previous studies on the impacts of increases in oil prices. We then use our model, NiGEM, to evaluate the impact of temporary and permanent oil price increases on the world economy under various policy responses, and also analyse the impact of a decline in the speed of oil revenue recycling. 1 This paper has benefited from inputs from a number of colleagues at the Institute, and we would like to thank

Ray Barrell; Olga Pomerantz

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Oil shale mining processing, uses, and environmental impacts. (Latest citations from the EI compendex*plus database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning oil shale mining and retorting, uses, and related environmental aspects. References discuss pyrolyzed, gasified, and combusted oil shales. Product yields and oil quality, socioeconomic impacts, exploration, reclamation of mined lands, and waste disposal are covered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Beneficiation-hydroretort processing of US oil shales, engineering study  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a beneficiation facility designed to process 1620 tons per day of run-of-mine Alabama oil shale containing 12.7 gallons of kerogen per ton of ore (based on Fischer Assay). The beneficiation facility will produce briquettes of oil shale concentrate containing 34.1 gallons of kerogen per ton (based on Fischer Assay). The beneficiation facility will produce briquettes of oil shale concentrate containing 34.1 gallons of kerogen per ton (based on Fischer Assay) suitable for feed to a hydroretort oil extraction facility of nominally 20,000 barrels per day capacity. The beneficiation plant design prepared includes the operations of crushing, grinding, flotation, thickening, filtering, drying, briquetting, conveying and tailings empoundment. A complete oil shale beneficiation plant is described including all anticipated ancillary facilities. For purposes of determining capital and operating costs, the beneficiation facility is assumed to be located on a generic site in the state of Alabama. The facility is described in terms of the individual unit operations with the capital costs being itemized in a similar manner. Additionally, the beneficiation facility estimated operating costs are presented to show operating costs per ton of concentrate produced, cost per barrel of oil contained in concentrate and beneficiation cost per barrel of oil extracted from concentrate by hydroretorting. All costs are presented in fourth quarter of 1988 dollars.

Johnson, L.R.; Riley, R.H.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of two image data sets from the Land Use and Land Cover science theme (LC-15 team), a component of the LBA-ECO Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO LC-15 SRTM30 Digital Elevation Model Data, Amazon Basin: 2000 . Data set prepared by S. Saatchi. This data set provides a subset of the SRTM30 Digital Elevation Model (DEM) elevation and standard deviation data (STD of the data points used in the averaging) for the Amazon Basin. SRTM30 is a near-global digital elevation model (DEM) comprising a combination of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), flown in February, 2000, and the earlier U.S. Geological Survey's GTOPO30 data set.

453

Minimum Changeover Cost Arborescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

having minimum changeover cost, a cost that we now describe. ... We define the changeover cost at j, denoted by d(j), as the sum of the costs at j paid for each of  ...

454

Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Management Act of 1982 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of 1982 of 1982 Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Management Act of 1982 Year 1982 Url RoyaltyAct.jpg Description The Royalty Management Act affirmed the authority of the Secretary of the Interior to administer and enforce all rules and regulations governing oil and gas leases on Federal or Indian Land References Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Management Act of 1982[1] The Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Management Act of 1982 (30 U.S.C. § 1701 et seq.) - The Royalty Management Act affirmed the authority of the Secretary of the Interior to administer and enforce all rules and regulations governing oil and gas leases on Federal or Indian Land, and established a policy aimed at developing a comprehensive system to manage royalties derived from leased oil and gas operations. Typically, oil and

455

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geography of the MODIS Land Subsets for selected Field Sites Geography of the MODIS Land Subsets for selected Field Sites The 7- x 7-km grid containing the field or tower site is provided to enable comparison of pixel values of MODIS products with field data collected at a site. The values are intended to be examined over time either as a collection of individual values or combined (e.g., the average and range) within a 3- x 3-km grid or a 5- x 5-km grid around the site. Examples of analyses using the ASCII subset data can be found in presentations. If users would like to examine the MODIS data spatially in a map, we suggest that they obtain the GeoTIFF subsets or MODIS products from the LP DAAC. Please note that the grid and pixel sizes are not exact multiples of 1 km, but are only approximations. For instance, the grid and pixel size for the 1 km Sinusoidal grid is approximately 926 m. For additional information, please view the MODIS Web site.

456

Do oil producers act as [open quotes]oil[close quotes]igopolists  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, I analyze an oligopoly model of exhaustible resource extraction and develop predictions about relative extraction patterns of different producers. Using the [open quotes]oil[close quotes]igopoly model of Loury, one can show that producers with large stocks produce a larger amount, but a smaller percentage, of their stocks than producers with small stocks. I extend Loury's model to cases where extraction costs differ among producers and where costs are a function of cumulative extraction. An increase in extraction costs for a producer causes it to produce less relative to its rivals. When extraction costs rise with cumulative extraction, producers with large reserves tend to have lower extraction costs and a smaller ratio of cumulative production to initial reserves than producers with small reserves. I test the predictions of the model using oil industry data and find that the empirical results are consistent with the predictions of [open quotes]oil[close quotes]igopoly theory. Producers with larger reserves extract a smaller share of their reserves and have lower production costs than producers with smaller reserves. This pattern holds for 73 countries with oil reserves during the time period 1970-1989, and for approximately 400 US oil companies in 1983 and 1984. The observed pattern of production for both OPEC and non-OPEC producers is consistent with [open quotes]oil[close quotes]igopoly theory. OPEC producers do not appear to restrain production given their level of reserves relative to non-OPEC producers. Thus, viewing the oil market as containing one dominant firm (OPEC) with a competitive fringe may be misleading. Further, the pattern of extraction observed in oil markets is inconsistent with the pattern predicted by competitive theory. 29 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

Polasky, S. (Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Do oil producers act as [open quote]oil[close quote]igopolists  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the author analyzes an oligopoly model of exhaustible resource extraction and develop predictions about relative extraction patterns of different producers. Using the [open quote]oil[close quote]igopoly model of Loury, one can show that producers with large stocks produce a larger amount, but a smaller percentage, of their stocks than producers with small stocks. The authors extend Loury's model to cases where extraction costs differ among producers and where costs are a function of cumulative extraction. An increase in extraction costs for a producer causes it to produce less relative to its rivals. When extraction costs rise with cumulative extraction, producers with large reserves tend to have lower extraction costs and a smaller ratio of cumulative production to initial reserves than producers with small reserves. The authors test the predictions of the model using oil industry data and find that the empirical results are consistent with the predictions of [open quotes]oil[close quotes]igopoly theory. Producers with larger reserves extract a smaller share of their reserves and have lower production costs than producers with smaller reserves. This pattern holds for 73 countries with oil reserves during the time period 1970-1989, and for approximately 400 US oil companies in 1983 and 1984. The observed pattern of production for both OPEC and non-OPEC producers is consistent with [open quote]oil[close quote]igopoly theory. OPEC producers do not appear to restrain production given their level of reserves relative to non-OPEC producers. Thus, viewing the oil market as containing one dominant firm (OPEC) with a competitive fringe may be misleading. Further, the pattern of extraction observed in oil markets is inconsistent with the pattern predicted by competitive theory. 29 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

Polasky, S. (Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Increasing CO2 Storage in Oil Recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increasing CO Increasing CO 2 Storage in Oil Recovery Kristian Jessen (krisj@pangea.stanford.edu, 650-723-6348) Linda C. Sam-Olibale (chizoba@pangea.stanford.edu, 650-725-0831) Anthony R. Kovscek (kovscek@pangea.stanford.edu, 650-723-1218) Franklin M. Orr, Jr. (fmorr@pangea.stanford.edu, 650-723-2750) Department of Petroleum Engineering, Stanford University 65 Green Earth Sciences Building 367 Panama Street Stanford, CA 94305-2220 Introduction Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) injection has been used as a commercial process for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) since the 1970's. Because the cost of oil recovered is closely linked to the purchase cost of the CO 2 injected, considerable reservoir engineering design effort has gone into reducing the total amount of CO 2 required to recover each barrel of oil. If,

459

Shale Oil Value Enhancement Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Raw kerogen oil is rich in heteroatom-containing compounds. Heteroatoms, N, S & O, are undesirable as components of a refinery feedstock, but are the basis for product value in agrochemicals, pharmaceuticals, surfactants, solvents, polymers, and a host of industrial materials. An economically viable, technologically feasible process scheme was developed in this research that promises to enhance the economics of oil shale development, both in the US and elsewhere in the world, in particular Estonia. Products will compete in existing markets for products now manufactured by costly synthesis routes. A premium petroleum refinery feedstock is also produced. The technology is now ready for pilot plant engineering studies and is likely to play an important role in developing a US oil shale industry.

James W. Bunger

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

460

Application of Weld Overlays and Fusion Claddings to Oil and Gas ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil producers have choices of using corrosion and wear resistant alloys, lower cost clad carbon steel, injection of inhibitors and control agents, and the use of ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Use of Alloy 718 and 725 in Oil and Gas Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

maximum ID and minimum OD to increase oil and gas production at a lower completion cost. 718 has also been used in downhole measurement tools, ...

462

An economic analysis of crude oil exploration in Saskatchewan and Alberta .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The International market of crude oil and natural gas is well established and very competitive. Knowledge about costs is important in helping to understand the… (more)

Kamsari, Haul

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

A New Ni-Base Superalloy for Oil and Gas Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

mechanical and corrosion properties to obtain the most cost effective solution to the needs of the oil and gas (O&G) industry. Introduction. As older shallow and ...

464

In-Process Separation of Mill Scale From Oil at Steel Hot Rolling Mills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is of vital importance to find cost-effective technologies of reducing oil concentration in mill scale in order to recycle the mill scale without causing detrimental ...

465

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy Headquaters Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy...

466

Vsd Oil Free Compressor, Vsd Oil Free Compressor Products, Vsd ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vsd Oil Free Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Vsd Oil Free Compressor Products from Global Vsd Oil Free Compressor Suppliers and Vsd Oil ...

467

International developments in oil shale  

SciTech Connect

An overview of oil shale research and development outside the US provides a status report on technology approaches under active consideration in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, West Germany, Israel, Jordan, Morocco, Soviet Union, Thailand, Turkey, and Yugoslavia. The status report covers the development plans and project costs of industrial projects. The technologies under consideration include the Fushun, Galoter, Kiviter, Lurgi, and Petrosix processes. 10 references.

Uthus, D.B.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

World Oil Price Cases (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

World oil prices in AEO2005 are set in an environment where the members of OPEC are assumed to act as the dominant producers, with lower production costs than other supply regions or countries. Non-OPEC oil producers are assumed to behave competitively, producing as much oil as they can profitability extract at the market price for oil. As a result, the OPEC member countries will be able effectively to set the price of oil when they can act in concert by varying their aggregate production. Alternatively, OPEC members could target a fixed level of production and let the world market determine the price.

Information Center

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

How Chula Vista, California Is Turning Cooking Oil Into Savings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How Chula Vista, California Is Turning Cooking Oil Into Savings How Chula Vista, California Is Turning Cooking Oil Into Savings How Chula Vista, California Is Turning Cooking Oil Into Savings January 19, 2011 - 1:21pm Addthis Truck 51 of the Chula Vista Fire Department. Truck 51 of the Chula Vista Fire Department. John Young What does this project do? Reuses cooking oil that is normally considered waste, saving taxpayer dollars. Reduces reliance on foreign oil Cuts emissions Anyone who has ever worked in a restaurant probably shudders at the mention of having to dispose of used cooking oil. While not much can be done to eliminate this unpleasant kitchen task, what's changing is how that oil can be recycled to help reduce our dependence on foreign sources of energy. Used cooking oil is a key (and very low cost) ingredient in the production

470

Category:Federal Oil and Gas Statutes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Statutes Statutes Jump to: navigation, search Add a new Federal Oil and Gas Statute You need to have JavaScript enabled to view the interactive timeline. Further results for this query.DECADEFederal Oil and Gas Royalty Simplification and Fairness Act of 19961996-01-010Year: 1996 Federal Onshore Oil and Gas Leasing Reform Act of 1987 (FOOGLRA)1987-01-010Year: 1987 Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Management Act of 19821982-01-010Year: 1982 Indian Mineral Development Act of 19821982-01-010Year: 1982 Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 19761976-01-010Year: 1976 Mining and Minerals Policy Act of 19701970-01-010Year: 1970 Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands of 19471947-01-010Year: 1947 Indian Mineral Leasing Act of 19381938-01-010Year: 1938 Mineral Leasing Act of 19201920-01-010Year: 1920

471

OIl Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investor Investor Flows and the 2008 Boom/Bust in Oil Prices Kenneth J. Singleton 1 August 10, 2011 1 Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, kenneths@stanford.edu. This research is the outgrowth of a survey paper I prepared for the Air Transport Association of America. I am grateful to Kristoffer Laursen for research assistance and to Kristoffer and Stefan Nagel for their comments. Abstract This paper explores the impact of investor flows and financial market conditions on returns in crude-oil futures markets. I begin by arguing that informational frictions and the associated speculative activity may induce prices to drift away from "fundamental" values and show increased volatility. This is followed by a discussion of the interplay between imperfect infor- mation about real economic activity, including supply, demand, and inventory accumulation, and speculative

472

Solid fuel fired oil field steam generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increased shortages being experienced in the domestic crude oil supply have forced attention on the production of heavy crude oils from proven reserves to supplement requirements for petroleum products. Since most heavy crudes require heat to facilitate their extraction, oil field steam generators appear to represent a key component in any heavy crude oil production program. Typical oil field steam generator experience in California indicates that approx. one out of every 3 bbl of crude oil produced by steam stimulation must be consumed as fuel in the steam generators to produce the injection steam. The scarcity and price of crude oil makes it desirable to substitute more readily available and less expensive solid fuels for the crude oil which is presently serving as the primary steam generator fuel. Solid fuel firing capability also is of importance because of the substantial amounts of high heating value and low cost petroleum coke available from the processing of heavy crude oil and suitable for use as a steam generator fuel.

Young, W.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Biofuels, land and water : a systems approach to sustainability.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is a strong societal need to evaluate and understand the sustainability of biofuels, especially because of the significant increases in production mandated by many countries, including the United States. Sustainability will be a strong factor in the regulatory environment and investments in biofuels. Biomass feedstock production is an important contributor to environmental, social, and economic impacts from biofuels. This study presents a systems approach where the agricultural, energy, and environmental sectors are considered as components of a single system, and environmental liabilities are used as recoverable resources for biomass feedstock production. We focus on efficient use of land and water resources. We conducted a spatial analysis evaluating marginal land and degraded water resources to improve feedstock productivity with concomitant environmental restoration for the state of Nebraska. Results indicate that utilizing marginal land resources such as riparian and roadway buffer strips, brownfield sites, and marginal agricultural land could produce enough feedstocks to meet a maximum of 22% of the energy requirements of the state compared to the current supply of 2%. Degraded water resources such as nitrate-contaminated groundwater and wastewater were evaluated as sources of nutrients and water to improve feedstock productivity. Spatial overlap between degraded water and marginal land resources was found to be as high as 96% and could maintain sustainable feedstock production on marginal lands. Other benefits of implementing this strategy include feedstock intensification to decrease biomass transportation costs, restoration of contaminated water resources, and mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions.

Gopalakrishnan, G.; Negri, M. C.; Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Snyder, S. W.; LaFreniere, L.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MODIS ASCII Subset Products - FTP Access MODIS ASCII Subset Products - FTP Access All of the MODIS ASCII Subsets are available from the ORNL DAAC's ftp site. The directory structure of the ftp site is based on the abbreviated names for the MODIS Products. Terra MODIS products are abbreviated "MOD", Aqua MODIS products are abbreviated "MYD" and combined Terra and Aqua MODIS products are abbreviated "MCD". The abbreviated names also include the version number (also known as collection). For specific products, please refer to the following table: Product Acronym Spatial Resolution Temporal Frequency Terra V005 SIN Aqua V005 SIN Terra/Aqua Combined V005 SIN Surface Reflectance SREF 500 m 8 day composites MOD09A1 MYD09A1 ---------- Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity TEMP 1 km 8 day composites MOD11A2 MYD11A2 ----------

475

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction Introduction Collection 5 The MODIS data from the Terra and Aqua satellites are being reprocessed using revised algorithms beginning in September 2006. This new set of MODIS Products is called Collection 5. To view the product changes that took place in going from Collection 4 to Collection 5, please visit the following Web site: http://landweb.nascom.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/QA_WWW/newPage.cgi?fileName=MODLAND_C005_changes The ORNL DAAC provides subsets of the Collection 5 MODIS Land Products. Investigators from around the world have shown a great deal of interest in this activity, asking that over 1000 field and flux tower sites be included in Collection 5 subsetting (up from 280 sites for Collection 4 MODIS subsetting). Availability of the Collection 5 Data Products

476

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data for Selected Field Sites (n=1147) Data for Selected Field Sites (n=1147) Obtain MODIS data for areas centered on selected field sites or flux towers from around the world. The goal of the MODIS Subsets for Selected Field Sites is to prepare summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote sensing products and to characterize field sites. Search for data: By Site from a Map Server from Google Earth (Install Google Earth) From FTP site (ASCII) Methods Data products were first subsetted from one or more 1200x1200-km MODIS tiles to 25 x 25-km arrays by the MODIS Science Data Support Team (MODAPS). These products were further subsetted (7x7) and reformatted from their native HDF-EOS to ASCII using version 2.2 of the MODIS Reprojection Tool (MRT) in combination with code developed at the ORNL DAAC.

477

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity/PUMP 2 Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity/PUMP 2 DE-FC26-02NT15133 Goal The primary goal of this study is to increase recovery of oil reserves from existing reservoirs and from new discoveries by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. The overall objectives of this study are to: 1) increase recoverable oil from existing reservoirs, 2) add new discoveries, 3) prevent premature abandonment of numerous small fields, 4) increase deliverability through identifying the latest drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary recovery techniques, and 5) reduce development costs and risk. Performer Utah Geological Survey (UGS), Salt Lake City, UT

478

Too early to tell on $100 oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Presentation to: Presentation to: April 8, 2008 Lehman Brothers oil outlook: Stronger signals of weaker prices Adam Robinson What's driving oil markets today? u Not the short run: Oil prices go up every time the US economy gets worse u It's tempting to argue that the rise in oil prices now is simply a continuation of past trends - The cost of F&D continues to march up - Demand in China growing faster with no signs of slowdown - Upstream and downstream supply bottlenecks are permanent u We think current price may be rising despite improvements on these fronts u Yes, in the short run, weak dollar and inflation fears can push prices higher, but these are likely to dissipate by the end of the year u We may be on the verge of a turning point in prices - Possibly the peak oil price comes this summer at $110-$120

479

COOPERATIVE LAND REUSE PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to determine what financial return, if any, DOE would realize if they invest solely in removal of the asbestos from these three Hanford steam plants and the associated large bore distribution piping at the site. Once the asbestos was removed the strategy was to bring in companies that specialize in salvage and material re-use and have them remove, at no cost to DOE, the plants and the associated large bore piping. The salvage companies we contacted had said that if they didn't have to remove asbestos, they may be able to realize enough value from these plants to offset their demolition and/or dismantling cost. The results were not what we expected but they do offer DOE some favorable financial alternatives to their present approach. The study concluded that there was very little salvage and/or re-use value remaining in the steam plant material that could be used to offset the demolition and/or dismantling cost. The notable exception to this is the removal of the 24 inch steam piping that runs from 200E to 200W areas (see IDM executive summary under Dismantling cost). It is estimated that the re-use value of the 24-inch piping would more than pay for the dismantling cost of this piping. On a more favorable note, it does appear as though the cost of conventional demolition can be reduced by a factor of 3 to 5 if the asbestos is removed first and the demolition is performed using competitive and commercial practices. Both estimates in this study are similar except that IDM did not include floor slab removal nor remove the same quantity of piping. This is why we are using a range of 3 to 5 as a reduction factor. The IDM estimate (using union labor) for demolition after removal of asbestos was approximately $1.5M versus $10.0M for accomplishing the work using Hanford practices and rates.

Unknown

1999-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

480

Liver antioxidant and plasmatic immune responses in juvenile1 golden grey mullet (Liza aurata) exposed to dispersed crude oil2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) exposed to dispersed crude oil2 3 Thomas Milinkovitch1* , Awa Ndiaye2 , Wilfried Sanchez2 , Stéphane Le ; CD : Chemically Dispersed oil ; D : Dispersant solution ; MD : Mechanically Dispersed oil; WSF application is an oil spill response technique. To evaluate the environmental31 cost of this operation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil landed cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Land reclamation beautifies coal mines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article explains how the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiments station, MAFES, has helped prepare land exploited by strip mining at North American Coal Corporation's Red Hills Mine. The 5,800 acre lignite mine is over 200 ft deep and uncovers six layers of coal. About 100 acres of land a year is mined and reclaimed, mostly as pine plantations. 5 photos.

Coblentz, B. [MSU Ag Communications (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

482

Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects Agency/Company /Organization: Forest Trends, The Climate, Community and Biodiversity (CCB) Alliance, The Rainforest Alliance, Flora and Fauna International Partner: United Nations Development Programme, U.S. Agency for International Development Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Website: www.forest-trends.org/documents/files/doc_2436.pdf Cost: Free Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects Screenshot References: Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects[1]

483

2011 Cost of Wind Energy Review  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for a typical land-based wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011, as well as the modeled LCOE for a fixed-bottom offshore wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011. Each of the four major components of the LCOE equation are explained in detail, such as installed capital cost, annual energy production, annual operating expenses, and financing, and including sensitivity ranges that show how each component can affect LCOE. These LCOE calculations are used for planning and other purposes by the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program.

Tegen, S.; Lantz, E.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Smith, A.; Schwabe, P.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

2011 Cost of Wind Energy Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for a typical land-based wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011, as well as the modeled LCOE for a fixed-bottom offshore wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011. Each of the four major components of the LCOE equation are explained in detail, such as installed capital cost, annual energy production, annual operating expenses, and financing, and including sensitivity ranges that show how each component can affect LCOE. These LCOE calculations are used for planning and other purposes by the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program.

Tegen, S.; Lantz, E.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Smith, A.; Schwabe, P.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

What oil changers in America are doing with their used oil  

SciTech Connect

Each year, the US generates 1.378 billion gallons of used oil, with just 57% of this oil accounted for by recycling. The most significant types of used oil disposition come from the very small generator or the so called do-it-yourselfer (DIY). The DIY is an individual who removes used oil from a motor vehicle, utility engine, or piece of farm equipment that he or she owns and operates. Numerous retailers have shown that accepting DIY used oil translates into good public relations and business. First Recovery/Valvoline conducted a recent study of its 2,000 auto parts stores that collect used oil. Sixty-five percent of their customers who returned used oil made a special trip for its return and 44% of them purchased something at the store (average of $13 per customer) when they returned their used oil. The cost of accepting used oil was $85 per month for the 185-gallon indoor collection system including oil pickup. This public service stimulated an additional $429 per month in new revenue for the retailer.

Arner, R.; O'Hare, M.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Oil price; oil demand shocks; oil supply shocks; dynamic effects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Using a newly developed measure of global real economic activity, a structural decomposition of the real price of crude oil in four components is proposed: oil supply shocks driven by political events in OPEC countries; other oil supply shocks; aggregate shocks to the demand for industrial commodities; and demand shocks that are specific to the crude oil market. The latter shock is designed to capture shifts in the price of oil driven by higher precautionary demand associated with fears about future oil supplies. The paper quantifies the magnitude and timing of these shocks, their dynamic effects on the real price of oil and their relative importance in determining the real price of oil during 1975-2005. The analysis sheds light on the origin of the observed fluctuations in oil prices, in particular during oil price shocks. For example, it helps gauge the relative importance of these shocks in the build-up of the real price of crude oil since the late 1990s. Distinguishing between the sources of higher oil prices is shown to be crucial in assessing the effect of higher oil prices on U.S. real GDP and CPI inflation, suggesting that policies aimed at dealing with higher oil prices must take careful account of the origins of higher oil prices. The paper also quantifies the extent to which the macroeconomic performance of the U.S. since the mid-1970s has been driven by the external economic shocks driving the real price of oil as opposed to domestic economic factors and policies. Key words: JEL:

Lutz Kilian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Data Sets Released from Two LBA Land Use-Land Change Teams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two land Use-Land Change Teams The ORNL DAAC and the LBA DIS announce the release of two data sets from the Land Use-Land Change teams, a component of the LBA-ECO Large Scale...

488

A Dynamic Simulation of the Indirect Land Use Implications of Recent Biofuel Production and Use in the United States.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global indirect land use change (ILUC) implications of biofuel use in the United States of America (USA) from 2001 to 2010 are evaluated with a dynamic general equilibrium model. The effects of biofuels production on agricultural land area vary by year; from a net expansion of 0.17 ha per 1000 gallons produced (2002) to a net contraction of 0.13 ha per 1000 gallons (2018) in Case 1 of our simulation. In accordance with the general narrative about the implications of biofuel policy, agricultural land area increased in many regions of the world. However, oil-export dependent economies experienced agricultural land contraction because of reductions in their revenues. Reducing crude oil imports is a major goal of biofuel policy, but the land use change implications have received little attention in the literature. Simulations evaluating the effects of doubling supply elasticities for land and fossil resources show that these parameters can significantly influence the land use change estimates. Therefore, research that provides empirically-based and spatially-detailed agricultural land-supply curves and capability to project future fossil energy prices is critical for improving estimates of the effects of biofuel policy on land use.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Oil shale: a framework for development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The price escalation of petroleum in recent times has removed the economic barrier to shale oil production, or soon will. A technological base for production is available which can be rapidly developed to the size and quality needed. The resource base in the Piceance Creek Basin of Colorado can support production of 1 to 5 million barrels of oil per day for hundreds of years. Institutional problems are the major remaining impediment to the development of oil shale. The small part of the resource in private hands is economically marginal and cannot support large production rates or the most efficient methods. The best land is owned by the Federal Government and is unavailable under present laws and policies. The lack of an integrated federal policy and an implementation plan prevents the development that is now technically and economically practical. One possible solution is a Piceance Basin Authority chartered by Congress to efficiently manage this resource and coordinate the federal governmental responsibility for oil shale resource development and conservation, water development, environmental control, and land use policy. It should be located in Colorado for an effective interaction with State and local authorities where both have responsibility. Government lands must be made accessible on a scale suitable to the technology and in a way that is acceptable to the public and to industry. Government and industry can then cooperate in a unitized, coordinated development of the resource and the area. With access to the resource and a clear government responsibility for area-wide, non-commercial planning and development, industry can provide the technology and capital for production and marketing of shale oil on an economically competitive basis.

Lewis, A.E.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Transaction Costs and Tradable Permit Markets: The United  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We econometrically estimate the effect of transaction costs on the cost-effectiveness of the tradable permit market created during the US lead phasedown. We develop a methodology to identify transaction costs in the absence of price data. We find that refineries generally trade efficiently. We also, however, find evidence that transaction costs affect trading. We find evidence that refineries are less likely to trade in cases where theory suggests they will face high transaction costs. The data were collected from 30 major oil companies and include the trading partners and quantities traded for all permit trades carried out by each of 87 refineries over 8 quarters. 2 1

Suzi Kerr; David Maré

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Cost Study Manual  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28, 2012 28, 2012 Cost Study Manual Executive Summary This Cost Study Manual documents the procedures for preparing a Cost Study to compare the cost of a contractor's employee benefits to the industry average from a broad-based national benefit cost survey. The annual Employee Benefits Cost Study Comparison (Cost Study) assists with the analysis of contractors' employee benefits costs. The Contracting Officer (CO) may require corrective action when the average benefit per capita cost or the benefit cost as a percent of payroll exceeds the comparator group by more than five percent. For example, if per capita benefit costs for the comparator group are $10,000 and the benefit costs as a percent of payroll for the comparator group are 20%, the threshold for the contractor's benefits as a

492

Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration Land Record...

493

EA-365 Centre Land Trading Limited | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Centre Land Trading Limited EA-365 Centre Land Trading Limited Order Authorizing Centre Land Trading Limited to export electric energy to Canada EA-365 Centre Land Trading...

494

PIA - Land Record System (SWPA) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Record System (SWPA) PIA - Land Record System (SWPA) PIA - Land Record System (SWPA) PIA - Land Record System (SWPA) More Documents & Publications Thursday, February 14, 2008...

495

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World Production of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other Liquids, andWorld Production of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other Liquids, andProduction of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other Liquids, and Re?

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),Figure 3. Price of crude oil contract maturing December ofbarrels per day. Monthly crude oil production Iran Iraq

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interpretations of China’s foreign oil strategy. Argumentsof aspects of China’s foreign oil activities, they do notits largest directly-run foreign oil project. Supplying 10

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas, Heating Oil and Gasoline,” NBER Working Paper.2006. “China’s Growing Demand for Oil and Its Impact on U.S.and Income on Energy and Oil Demand,” Energy Journal 23(1),

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Oil Spills and Wildlife  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Spills and Wildlife Name: jess Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: what are some effects of oil spills on plants? Replies: The effects of oil spills over the last...

500

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Michael T. Klare, Blood and Oil: The Dangers of America’sDowns and Jeffrey A. Bader, “Oil-Hungry China Belongs at BigChina, Africa, and Oil,” (Council on Foreign Relations,

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z