Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Oil price; oil demand shocks; oil supply shocks; dynamic effects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Using a newly developed measure of global real economic activity, a structural decomposition of the real price of crude oil in four components is proposed: oil supply shocks driven by political events in OPEC countries; other oil supply shocks; aggregate shocks to the demand for industrial commodities; and demand shocks that are specific to the crude oil market. The latter shock is designed to capture shifts in the price of oil driven by higher precautionary demand associated with fears about future oil supplies. The paper quantifies the magnitude and timing of these shocks, their dynamic effects on the real price of oil and their relative importance in determining the real price of oil during 1975-2005. The analysis sheds light on the origin of the observed fluctuations in oil prices, in particular during oil price shocks. For example, it helps gauge the relative importance of these shocks in the build-up of the real price of crude oil since the late 1990s. Distinguishing between the sources of higher oil prices is shown to be crucial in assessing the effect of higher oil prices on U.S. real GDP and CPI inflation, suggesting that policies aimed at dealing with higher oil prices must take careful account of the origins of higher oil prices. The paper also quantifies the extent to which the macroeconomic performance of the U.S. since the mid-1970s has been driven by the external economic shocks driving the real price of oil as opposed to domestic economic factors and policies. Key words: JEL:

Lutz Kilian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

The Di¤erential E¤ects of Oil Demand and Supply Shocks on the Global Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We employ a set of sign restrictions on the impulse responses of a Global VAR model, estimated for 38 countries/regions over the period 1979Q2–2011Q2, as well as bounds on impact price elasticities of oil supply and oil demand to discriminate between supply-driven and demand-driven oil-price shocks, and to study the time pro…le of their macroeconomic e¤ects across a wide range of countries and real/…nancial variables. We show that the above identi…cation scheme can greatly bene…t from the cross-sectional dimension of the GVAR — by providing a large number of additional cross-country sign restrictions and hence reducing the set of admissible models. The results indicate that the economic consequences of a supply-driven oil-price shock are very di¤erent from those of an oil-demand shock driven by global economic activity, and vary for oilimporting countries compared to energy exporters. While oil importers typically face a long-lived fall in economic activity in response to a supply-driven surge in oil prices, the impact is positive for energy-exporting countries that possess large proven oil/gas reserves. However, in response to an oil-demand disturbance, almost all countries in

Paul Cashin A; Kamiar Mohaddes B; Maziar Raissi C; Mehdi Raissi Ay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

The Differential Effects of Oil Demand and Supply Shocks on the Global Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.6 11.7 51 3.7 World 81.5 100.0 39.0 100.0 1365 100.0 Source: Oil reserve and production data is from the British Petroleum Statistical Review of World Energy and oil export data is from the OPEC Annual Statistical Bulletin. For country groupings see... .g. the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) member states). While the international business cycle is very important for the economic performance of commodity exporters, macroeconomic and political developments 1 in this group of countries also...

Cashin, Paul; Mohaddes, Kamiar; Raissi, Maziar; Raissi, Mehdi

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Annual World Oil Demand Growth  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Following relatively small increases of 1.3 million barrels per day in 1999 and 0.9 million barrels per day in 2000, EIA is estimating world demand may grow by 1.6 million barrels per day in 2001. Of this increase, about 3/5 comes from non-OECD countries, while U.S. oil demand growth represents more than half of the growth projected in OECD countries. Demand in Asia grew steadily during most of the 1990s, with 1991-1997 average growth per year at just above 0.8 million barrels per day. However, in 1998, demand dropped by 0.3 million barrels per day as a result of the Asian economic crisis that year. Since 1998, annual growth in oil demand has rebounded, but has not yet reached the average growth seen during 1991-1997. In the Former Soviet Union, oil demand plummeted during most of the

5

Oil Price Shocks and Inflation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil prices have risen sharply over the last year, leading to concerns that we could see a repeat of the 1970s, when rising oil prices were accompanied by severe recessions and surging inflation. This Economic Letter examines the historical relationship between oil price shocks and inflation in light of some recent research and goes on to discuss what the recent jump in oil prices might mean for inflation in the future. Figure 1 Inflation and the relative price of oil The historical record Figure 1 plots the price of oil relative to the core personal consumption expenditures price index (PCEPI) together with the core PCEPI inflation

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

OECD Crude Oil v Product Demand Seasonal Patterns  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 Notes: The answer lies in separating crude oil demand from product demand. Crude oil demand should be a better indicator of pressures on crude oil price than product demand....

7

Time-Varying Effects of Oil Supply Shocks on the US Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate how the dynamic effects of oil supply shocks on the US economy have changed over time. We first document a remarkable structural change in the oil market itself, i.e. a considerably steeper, hence, less elastic oil demand curve since the mid-eighties. Accordingly, a typical oil supply shock is currently characterized by a much smaller impact on world oil production and a greater effect on the real price of crude oil, but has a similar impact on US output and inflation as in the 1970s. Second, we find a smaller role for oil supply shocks in accounting for real oil price variability over time, implying that current oil price fluctuations are more demand driven. Finally, while unfavorable oil supply disturbances explain little of the "Great Inflation", they seem to have contributed to the 1974/75, early 1980s and 1990s recessions but also dampened the economic boom at the end of the millennium.

Christiane Baumeister; Gert Peersman

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Supply and demand of lube oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lube oil consumption in the world has reached about 40 million tonnes per year, of which 24 million tonnes is used outside the communist areas. There are large regional differences in annual consumption per head from one kilogramme (kg) in India to 35 kg in North America. A statistical analysis of historical data over twenty years in about ninety countries has lead to the conclusion that national income, measured as GDP per head, is the key determinant of total lube oil consumption per head. The functional relationship, however, is different in different countries. Starting from GDP projections until the year 2000, regional forecasts of lube oil demand have been made which show that the share of developing nations outside the communist area in world demand will grow. This will increase the regional imbalance between base oil capacity and demand.

Vlemmings, J.M.L.M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Chinese Oil Demand: Steep Incline Ahead  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chinese Oil Demand: Chinese Oil Demand: Steep Incline Ahead Malcolm Shealy Alacritas, Inc. April 7, 2008 Oil Demand: China, India, Japan, South Korea 0 2 4 6 8 1995 2000 2005 2010 Million Barrels/Day China South Korea Japan India IEA China Oil Forecast 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Million Barrels/Day WEO 2007 16.3 mbd 12.7 mbd IEA China Oil Forecasts 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Million Barrels/Day WEO 2007 WEO 2006 WEO 2004 WEO 2002 Vehicle Sales in China 0 2 4 6 8 10 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 Million Vehicles/Year Vehicle Registrations in China 0 10 20 30 40 50 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 Million Vehicles/Year Vehicle Density vs GDP per Capita 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 GDP per capita, 2005$ PPP Vehicles per thousand people Taiwan South Korea China Vehicle Density vs GDP per Capita

10

Dynamic analysis in productivity, oil shock, and recession  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use of oil in the US economy weakens the peak responses ofpeak under other factors considered, less persistence in the oil-the same size of the oil-price shock. The peak response of

Katayama, Munechika

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Dynamic analysis in productivity, oil shock, and recession  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Declining E?ects of Oil-price Shocks . . . . . . . . . . .of IRFs to a 10% Increase in the Oil Price: Case 3 and Caseof IRFs to a 10% Increase in the Oil Price: Before and After

Katayama, Munechika

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Oil Price Shocks, Inventories, and Macroeconomic Dynamics,” mimeo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper employs disaggregated manufacturing data to investigate the causes of the time delay between an increase in oil prices and the following slowdown in economic activity. VAR results show that, unlike aggregate GDP, the effect of an oil price shock on new motor vehicles production shows up immediately and is statistically significantly. After one quarter, similar patterns are observed for industries that are oil-intensive or for which motor vehicles constitute a demand-shifter. The continuing fall in manufacturing production then leads the economy into a recession. The paper then estimates a modified linear-quadratic inventory model and shows that this description of the oil price dynamics is consistent with rational behavior by firms. An increase in oil prices leads to a decline in manufacturing sales; partly because the shock catches manufacturers by surprise and partly because of their desire to balance the accelerator and production smoothing motives, manufacturers deviate from the target level of inventories and spread the decline in production over various quarters. Moreover, the dynamics entailed by the structural estimates capture two stylized facts about inventory behavior: procyclicality and persistence.

Ana María Herrera

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Measuring oil-price shocks using market-based information’, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco Working Paper No  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper takes on a narrative and quantitative approach to examine the dynamic effects of oil-price shocks to the U.S. economy. Based on market information collected from various oil-industry trade journals, we separate different kinds of oilprice shocks, and construct measures of exogenous oil shocks that are free of endogeneity and anticipatory problems. Estimation results indicate that oil shocks have had substantial and statistically significant impacts on the U.S. economy during the past two and a half decades. By contrast, traditional VAR identification strategies lead to a much weaker and insignificant real effect for the same period. Further investigation suggests that this discrepancy is possibly due to a lack of identification on the VAR approach, originating from mixing the exogenous oil-supply shocks with endogenous oil-price movements driven by changes in oil demand.

Tao Wu; Michele Cavallo

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

CRUDE OIL PRICE SHOCKS AND GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study uses ordinary least squares estimation to test multivariate models in order to find out whether or not crude oil price shocks are contractionary… (more)

Hernandez, Jordan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Reducing US vulnerability to oil supply shocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1990 crisis in the Middle East has raised concern about the United States`s vulnerability to oil supply disruptions. In addition, a number of trends point to increased US dependence on imported oil. Oil imports have increased and production has declined in the United States for the last eight years. Imports now comprise 42 percent of total oil consumption and US dependence on oil imports is projected to increase over the next 20 years. The Energy Modeling Forum forecasts imports to be more than twice domestic production by the year 2010. There are many studies examining the effects of various policies to protect US energy security. Not many consider the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR), which can be a powerful tool in combating energy supply shocks. The SPR can dramatically increase the domestic short run supply elasticity, which has been found to be a key element in the welfare cost of protectionist policies. Upon examining 5 policies the author finds that the SPR together with a protectionist policy works best against a supply disruption. 27 refs., 3 tabs.

Yuecel, M.K. [Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, TX (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Patterns of crude demand: Future patterns of demand for crude oil as a func-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the perspective of `peak oil', that is from the pers- pective of the supply of crude, and price#12;2 #12;Patterns of crude demand: Future patterns of demand for crude oil as a func- tion is given on the problems within the value chain, with an explanation of the reasons why the price of oil

Langendoen, Koen

17

Oil resources: the key to prosperity or to poverty? : Influence of oil price shocks on spending of oil revenues.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Abundant natural resources, in particular oil, play an important role in the economics of many countries. The oil price shocks that have been happening continuously… (more)

Selivanova, Olga

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

EIA forecasts increased oil demand, need for additional supply ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

World oil demand is forecast to increase by 1.7 million barrels per day (bbl/d) ... Cooling demand in the Middle East is expected to rise to record levels this summer.

19

Warm Winters Held Heating Oil Demand Down While Diesel Grew  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: To understand the inventory situation, we must look the balance between demand and supply that drives inventories up or down. First consider demand. Most of the remaining charts deal with total distillate demand. Total distillate demand includes both diesel and heating oil. These are similar products physically, and prior to the low sulfur requirements for on-road diesel fuel, were used interchangeably. But even today, low sulfur diesel can be used in the heating oil market, but low sulfur requirements keep heating oil from being used in the on-road transportation sector. The seasonal increases and decreases in stocks stem from the seasonal demand in heating oil shown as the bottom red line. Heating oil demand increases by more than 50 percent from its low point to its high

20

U.S. Energy Demand, Offshore Oil Production and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Summary of Conclusions. . . The global rate of production of oil is peaking now, coal will peak in 2U.S. Energy Demand, Offshore Oil Production and BP's Macondo Well Spill Tad Patzek, Petroleum that run the U.S. Complexity, models, risks Gulf of Mexico's oil and gas production Conclusions ­ p.3/4 #12

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Oil, gas tanker industry responding to demand, contract changes  

SciTech Connect

Steady if slower growth in demand for crude oil and natural gas, low levels of scrapping, and a moderate newbuilding pace bode well for the world`s petroleum and natural-gas shipping industries. At year-end 1997, several studies of worldwide demand patterns and shipping fleets expressed short and medium-term optimism for seaborne oil and gas trade and fleet growth. The paper discusses steady demand and shifting patterns, the aging fleet, the slowing products traffic, the world`s fleet, gas carriers, LPG demand, and LPG vessels.

True, W.R.

1998-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

22

Does the Fed Respond to Oil Price Shocks?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Since Bernanke, Gertler and Watson (1997), a common view in the literature has been that systematic monetary policy responses to the inflation triggered by oil price shocks are an important source of aggregate fluctuations in the U.S. economy. We show that there is no evidence of systematic monetary policy responses to oil price shocks after 1987 and that this lack of a policy response is unlikely to be explained by reduced real wage rigidities. Prior to 1987, according to standard VAR models, the Federal Reserve was not responding to the inflation triggered by oil price shocks, as commonly presumed, but rather to the oil price shocks directly, consistent with a preemptive move by the Federal Reserve to counteract potential inflationary pressures. There are indications that this response is poorly identified, however, and there is no evidence that this policy response in the pre-1987 period caused substantial fluctuations in the Federal Funds rate or in real output. Our analysis suggests that the traditional monetary policy reaction framework explored by BGW and incorporated in subsequent DSGE models should be replaced by DSGE models that take account of the endogeneity of the real price of oil and that allow policy responses to depend on the underlying causes of oil price shocks.

Lutz Kilian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Measuring the Impact of Negative Demand Shocks on Car Dealer Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this paper is to study the behavior of consumers, dealers, and manufacturers in the car sector and present an approach that can be used by managers and policy makers to investigate the impact of significant demand shocks on profits, prices, ... Keywords: automobile industry, models of demand and supply, spatial competition

Paulo Albuquerque; Bart J. Bronnenberg

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Oil price shocks: Testing a macroeconomic model  

SciTech Connect

The main research objective was to answer the following question: Will Consumer Price Index forecast models utilizing computer oil-consumption ratios have better predictive capability as indicated by lower numerical differences from actual results than a model utilizing oil prices as the energy-related variable Multiple linear regressions were run on the components of the United States CPI to reduce them to a kernel set with meaningful predictive capability. New linear regressions were run with this kernel set and crude oil prices during the 1973 to 1984 time period. Crude oil prices were rationalized with a 1972 = 100 based index of GNP base petroleum consumption, the index of net energy imports, and the index of petroleum imports to create new oil substitute constructs to be used in multiple regressions with the CPI. Predictions obtained from the model were compared with actual results in the 1985-1987 time period to determine which model version showed the greatest predictive power. Results of the model tests show that oil prices are strongly related to the CPI, but neither the use of oil prices or the index of GNP-based petroleum consumption produced results that closely predict future prices.

Williams, D.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Enhanced oil recovery: major equipment and its projected demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After years of research and pilot tests, the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) industry is taking major leaps forward in 1981. With the launching of several hundred new EOR pilot tests, the announcement of major CO/sub 2/ pipelines into W. Texas, and a $3.6-billion purchase of South Belridge heavy oil by Shell, oil companies are showing their confidence in this technologically-emerging area. While much research remains to be done to make these processes more efficient and economic, the important commercial stage of the EOR industry's growth has clearly been reached. Along with the growth of the EOR industry will come a major demand for equipment and facilities. This demand will include traditional requirements for steam generators and compressors, although on a scale many times larger than at present, as well as new requirements for gas separation, chemical storage, and special tubulars.

Kuuskraa, V.A.; Hammershaimb, E.C.; Wicks, D.E.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service on Northeast Heating Oil Demand  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Assesses the extent of interruptible natural gas contracts and their effect on heating oil demand in the Northeast.

Elizabeth E. Campbell

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Causes and Consequences of the Oil Shock of 2007-08  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores similarities and differences between the run-up of oil prices in 2007-08 and earlier oil price shocks, looking at what caused the price increase and what effects it had on the economy. Whereas historical oil price shocks were primarily caused by physical disruptions of supply, the price run-up of 2007-08 was caused by strong demand confronting stagnating world production. Although the causes were different, the consequences for the economy appear to have been very similar to those observed in earlier episodes, with significant effects on overall consumption spending and purchases of domestic automobiles in particular. In the absence of those declines, it is unlikely that we would have characterized the period 2007:Q4 to 2008:Q3 as one of economic recession for the U.S. The experience of 2007-08 should thus be added to the list of recessions to which oil prices appear to have made a material contribution.

James D. Hamilton

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Import Demand of Crude Oil and Economic Growth in China: Evidence from the ARDL Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to quantify the demand elasticity of China's imported crude oil, a long-run stable relationship is estimated among the crude oil import, income and crude oil prices by the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) bound testing approach over the ... Keywords: ARDL bound test, price elasticity, income elasticity, crude oil demand

Wei Sun; Zhongying Qi; Niannian Jia

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Outlook for US lube oil supply and demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the domestic demand for automotive and industrial lubricants to the year 2000 and evaluates the ability of U.S. refiners to meet the associated demand for base stocks. Changes in the supply/demand picture over the past several years are also reviewed. In the late 1970's, lube base stocks had been in short supply as healthy increases in demand pushed U.S. refiners to near maximum operating levels. Imports were increased to what were then record high levels and exports were reduced. This situation began to reverse itself in mid-1980 as marketers began to feel the impact of recession here and abroad. U.S. base stock consumption has since declined dramatically, to a level in 1982 estimated to be 17.5% below that of 1979's peak. In the meantime, refiners had added another 7.0 MB/CD to manufacturing capacity. 1982 lube plant operations are estimated to have dropped as low as 62% of nameplate capacity. The outlook for recovery is conservative. Due to continued depressed demand in certain market segments, 1983's increase in base oil demand is projected to be held to only 2%. Gains in 1984 and 1985 will be more robust, in the area of 6% per year. Thereafter, the overall rate of growth will drop to under 1% per year. The outlooks for automotive and industrial lubricants demand are summarized. Due to a forecast of greater relative growth in synthetic and water-based lubricants, base stock consumption is forecast to increase at a slower pace than that of the total finished lubricants volume.

Brecht, F.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Oil Shocks and Aggregate Macroeconomic Behavior: The Role of Monetary Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the oil price variable y OIL,t in 1972:1. From these oneoil price shocks Lag with Study Hamilton (1983) Hamilton (1983) Sample period 1949:II-1972:

Herrera, Ana Maria; Hamilton, James D.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Technology-Based Oil and Natural Gas Plays: Shale Shock! Could ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Technology-Based Oil and Natural Gas Plays: Shale Shock! Could There Be Billions in the Bakken? Through the use of technology, U.S. oil and natural gas operators are ...

32

How Increased Crude Oil Demand by China and India Affects the International Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-WTI Spot Cushing US$/BBL Brent Crude Oil-Brent Dated FOB US$/BBL Dubai Crude Oil-Arab Gulf Dubai FOB US$/BBL Tapis Crude Oil-Malaysia Tapis FOB US$/BBL Urals Crude Oil-Urals FOB US$/BBL Bonny Crude Oil-Africa FOB1 How Increased Crude Oil Demand by China and India Affects the International Market

33

Sluggish Responses of Prices and Inflation to Monetary Shocks in an Inventory Model of Money Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the responses of prices and inflation to monetary shocks in an inventory-theoretic model of money demand. We show that the price level responds sluggishly to an exogenous increase in the money stock because the dynamics of households ’ money inventories leads to a partially offsetting endogenous reduction in velocity. We also show that inflation responds sluggishly to an exogenous increase in the nominal interest rate because changes in monetary policy affect the real interest rate. In a quantitative example, we show that this nominal sluggishness is substantial and persistent if inventories in the model are calibrated to match U.S. households ’ holdings of M2. I.

Fernando Alvarez; Andrew Atkeson; Chris Edmond

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

A Quantitative Analysis of Oil-Price Shocks, Systematic Monetary Policy, and Economic Downturns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for their comments. The views expressed here are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent Are the recessionary consequences of oil-price shocks due to oil-price shocks themselves or to contractionary monetary policies that arise in response to inflation concerns engendered by rising oil prices? Can systematic monetary policy be used to alleviate the consequences of oil shocks on the economy? This paper builds a dynamic general equilibrium model of monopolistic competition in which oil and money matter to study these questions. The economy's response to oil-price shocks is examined under a variety of monetary policy rules in environments with flexible and sticky prices. We find that easy-inflation policies amplify the negative output response to positive oil shocks and that systematic monetary policy accounts for up to two thirds of the fall in output. On the other hand, we show that a monetary policy that targets the (overall) price level substantially alleviates the impact of oil-price shocks

Sylvan Leduc; Keith Sill; Sylvain Leduc; Keith Sill

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Future world oil supply and demand-the impact on domestic exploration  

SciTech Connect

Current world oil consumption (demand) of about 68 million B/D will increase to over 81 million B/D in 10 years. World oil production capacity (supply), currently 6-8% over current demand, cannot meet this demand without adequate investments to boost capacity, particularly in the Middle East. Because of low oil prices these investments are not being made. In 10 years the Middle East needs to supply over 50% of the worlds oil; the Far East will by then surpass North America in demand. It is very possible that there will soon be a period of time when the supply/demand balance will be, or will perceived to be failing. This may cause rapid rises in crude oil prices until the balance is again achieved. Crude oil prices are actually quite volatile; the steadiness and abnormally low prices in recent years has been due to several factors that probably won`t be present in the period when the supply/demand situation is seen to be unbalanced. Domestic oil exploration is strongly affected by the price of crude oil and domestic producers should soon benefit by rising oil prices. Exploration will be stimulated, and small incremental amounts of new oil should be economically viable. Oil has been estimated to be only 2% of the total cost of producing all U.S. goods and services-if so, then oil price increase should not create any real problems in the total economic picture. Nevertheless, certain industries and life styles heavily dependent on cheap fuel will have problems, as the days of cheap oil will be gone. Future undiscovered oil in the Earth could be one trillion barrels or more, equal to the amount now considered as proved reserves. There will soon be more of a challenge to find and produce this oil in sufficient quantity and at a competitive cost with other sources of energy. This challenge should keep us busy.

Townes, H.L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

The Effect of CO2 Pricing on Conventional and Non- Conventional Oil Supply and Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assumes that nonconventional crude oil enters the market when conventional oil supply alone is unable to meet demand, and the social cost of CO2 is included in the calculation of the oil rent at that time. The results reveal the effect of a CO2 tax set...

Méjean, Aurélie; Hope, Chris

37

The effect of oil price shocks on the macroeconomy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The traditional view of oil price movements is that they represent exogenous changes in the supply of oil. In that case, oil price increases will… (more)

Embergenov, Bakhitbay

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Warm Winters Held Heating Oil Demand Down While Diesel Grew  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 Notes: To understand the inventory situation, we must look the balance between demand and supply that drives inventories up or down. First consider demand. Most of the remaining...

39

Global crude oil supply disruptions and strong demand support high ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

While Brent crude oil spot prices have increased as much as $7 per barrel (6%) since the chemical weapons incident in Syria on August 21, 2013, market fundamentals ...

40

Rising North Dakota oil production and demand spurs two new ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Trenton Diesel Refinery, whose parent company is Dakota Oil Processing, is expected to cost $200 million to build and start-up.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Strong demand growth seen for oil and gas in 1997--99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides historical information on worldwide crude oil productions from 1984 to present and makes predictions on future demand and refinery capacities. It provides information on oil reserves on a world scale and the pricing of these commodities. It breaks reserves, production and capacities down into OPEC and non-OPEC countries. It then provides general energy demand for both developed and developing countries in all energy forms.

Beck, R.J.

1996-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

42

Supply and demand planning for crude oil procurement in refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The upstream petroleum supply chain is inefficient and uneconomical because of the independence of the four complex and fragmented functions which comprise it. Crude oil exploration, trading, transportation, and refining ...

Nnadili, Beatrice N. (Beatrice Nne)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Annual World Oil Demand Growth - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Following relatively small increases of 1.3 million barrels per day in 1999 and 0.8 million barrels per day in 2000, EIA is estimating world demand may grow by 1.5 ...

44

Non-OPEC oil supply gains to outpace demand in 1997  

SciTech Connect

Rising oil supplies in 1997 will relax some of the market tightness that drove up crude prices last year. Worldwide demand for petroleum products in 1996 rose faster than anticipated and faster than supply from outside the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. This increased demand for OPEC oil and pushed up prices for crude. At year end, the world export price of crude was up more than 25% from the same period a year earlier. Market conditions will change in 1997. While worldwide economic growth will continue to boost demand for energy and petroleum, non-OPEC petroleum supply will grow even more. Increases in North Sea and Latin American production will help boost non-OPEC output by 1.9 million b/d. And revenues from 1996 production gains will make additional investment possible in exploration and production. The paper discusses world economic growth, world oil demand, worldwide supply, supply outlook, prices and international drilling.

Beck, R.J.

1997-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

45

Heating oil prices rise due to winter demand and crude oil prices ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

46

Evidence is growing on demand side of an oil peak  

SciTech Connect

After years of continued growth, the number of miles driven by Americans started falling in December 2007. Not only are the number of miles driven falling, but as cars become more fuel efficient, they go further on fewer gallons - further reducing demand for gasoline. This trend is expected to accelerate. Drivers include, along with higher-efficiency cars, mass transit, reversal in urban sprawl, biofuels, and plug-in hybrid vehicles.

NONE

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

EPRG WORKING PAPER The Effect of CO2 Pricing on Conventional and Non-Conventional Oil Supply and Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What would be the effect of CO2 pricing on global oil supply and demand? This paper introduces a model describing the interaction between conventional and non-conventional oil supply in a Hotelling framework and under CO2 constraints. The model assumes that nonconventional crude oil enters the market when conventional oil supply alone is unable to meet demand, and the social cost of CO2 is included in the calculation of the oil rent at that time. The results reveal the effect of a CO2 tax set at the social cost of CO2 on oil price and demand and the uncertainty associated with the time when conventional oil production might become unable to meet demand. The results show that a tax on CO2 emissions associated with fuel use would reduce oil demand despite the effect of lower future rents, and would delay the time when conventional oil supply is unable to satisfy demand. More precisely, between 81 and 99 % of the CO2 tax is carried into the oil price despite the counter-balancing effect of the reduced rent. A CO2 tax on fuel use set at the social cost of CO2 would delay by 25 years the time when conventional oil production is unable to meet oil demand, from 2019 to 2044 (mean value). The results show that this date is very sensitive to the price elasticity of demand and the demand growth rate, which shows the great potential of demand-side measures to smooth the transition towards low-carbon liquid fuel alternatives. www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk EPRG WORKING PAPER Keywords JEL Classification Oil supply and demand; Conventional and non-conventional oil; CO2 pricing; Social cost of CO2.

Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope; Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Product Price Spreads Over Crude Oil Vary With Seasons and Supply/Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Of course, petroleum product prices don't move in lockstep to crude oil prices, for a number of reasons. We find it useful to look at variations in the spread between product and crude oil prices, in this case comparing spot market prices for each. The difference between heating oil and crude oil spot prices tends to vary seasonally; that is, it's generally higher in the winter, when demand for distillate fuels is higher due to heating requirements, and lower in the summer. (Gasoline, as we'll see later, generally does the opposite.) However, other factors affecting supply and demand, including the relative severity of winter weather, can greatly distort these "typical" seasonal trends. As seen on this chart, the winters of 1995-96 and 1996-97 featured

49

Estimating relative confidence of conditional world oil supply and demand equilibrium  

SciTech Connect

This paper draws from the survey by the National Petroleum Council (NPC) of industry representatives and consulting/forecasting organizations on the likely market configuration under two different world oil price scenarios. The pseudo-data approach treats the forecast price and quantity variables from the various forecasts as pooled time-series, cross-sectional data, and applies traditional econometric techniques to estimate supply and demand curves. We focus on estimating US domestic supply and demand curves and respondent-specific shift factors from a subsample of the NPC survey. We find that all respondents in the survey are more confident about demand than supply forecasts. The underlying differences in individual GNP forecasts account for much of the uncertainty in demand for most respondents, but are still 2 to 6 times more confident of demand than supply. 4 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Boyd, G.A.; Hanson, D.A.; Hochheiser, H.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Oil demand continues to grow in the U.S. and worldwide  

SciTech Connect

Rising oil consumption is challenging the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries production quota--but not the group`s ability to meet demand. In the second half of 1995, the oil market will continue to need more oil from OPEC members than the group claims to be willing to produce with its quota at 24.52 million b/d. If the quota really limited supply, ingredients would be in place for a significant price hike. Growth in a non-OPEC production intensities temptations on OPEC members to cheat on quotas and has become a key factor in the market. OPEC producers have seen that if they don`t meet incremental demand at the current price, other producers will. OPEC eventually will have to raise its quota or acknowledge that the artificial production limit lacks meaning. At present, the only real limit to supply is production capacity, which remains in excess relative to demand and which has demonstrated its ability to grow both within and outside of OPEC when prices rise. The paper discusses worldwide trends, pressures on OPEC, world crude prices, US prices, natural gas prices, US energy demand, natural gas use, gas supply, US demand for petroleum products, imports, and inventories.

Tippee, B.; Beck, R.J.

1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Method for attenuating seismic shock from detonating explosive in an in situ oil shale retort  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In situ oil shale retorts are formed in formation containing oil shale by excavating at least one void in each retort site. Explosive is placed in a remaining portion of unfragmented formation within each retort site adjacent such a void, and such explosive is detonated in a single round for explosively expanding formation within the retort site toward such a void for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in each retort. This produces a large explosion which generates seismic shock waves traveling outwardly from the blast site through the underground formation. Sensitive equipment which could be damaged by seismic shock traveling to it straight through unfragmented formation is shielded from such an explosion by placing such equipment in the shadow of a fragmented mass in an in situ retort formed prior to the explosion. The fragmented mass attenuates the velocity and magnitude of seismic shock waves traveling toward such sensitive equipment prior to the shock wave reaching the vicinity of such equipment.

Studebaker, Irving G. (Grand Junction, CO); Hefelfinger, Richard (Grand Junction, CO)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Introduction to Macroeconomic Dynamics Special Issue on Oil Price Shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, as director of the National Economic Council, stated that "if energy prices will trend higher, you invest one, in which global real economic activity and real oil prices share a common stochastic trend, they ...nd way; if energy prices will be lower, you invest a di¤erent way. But if you don't know what prices

Garousi, Vahid

53

The macroeconomic effects of oil price shocks : why are the 2000s so different from the 1920s?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We characterize the macroeconomic performance of a set of industrialized economies in the aftermath of the oil price shocks of the 1970s and of the last decade, focusing on the differences across episodes. We examine four ...

Blanchard, Olivier

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Factors that will influence oil and gas supply and demand in the 21st century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent report published by the National Petroleum Council (NPC) in the United States predicted a 50-60% growth in total global demand for energy by 2030. Because oil, gas, and coal will continue to be the primary energy sources during this time, the energy industry will have to continue increasing the supply of these fuels to meet this increasing demand. Achieving this goal will require the exploitation of both conventional and unconventional reservoirs of oil and gas in (including coalbed methane) an environmentally acceptable manner. Such efforts will, in turn, require advancements in materials science, particularly in the development of materials that can withstand high-pressure, high-temperature, and high-stress conditions.

Holditch, S.A.; Chianelli, R.R. [Texas A& amp; M University, College Station, TX (United States)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

The asymmetric effects of changes in price and income on energy and oil demand.” Energy Journal 23(1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper estimates the effects on energy and oil demand of changes in income and oil prices, for 96 of the world’s largest countries, in per-capita terms. We examine three important issues: the asymmetric effects on demand of increases and decreases in oil prices; the asymmetric effects on demand of increases and decreases in income; and the different speeds of demand adjustment to changes in price and in income. Its main conclusions are the following: (1) OECD demand responds much more to increases in oil prices than to decreases; ignoring this asymmetric price response will bias downward the estimated response to income changes; (2) demand’s response to income decreases in many Non-OECD countries is not necessarily symmetric to its response to income increases; ignoring this asymmetric income response will bias the estimated response to income changes; (3) the speed of demand adjustment is faster to changes in income than to changes in price; ignoring this difference will bias upward the estimated response to income changes. Using correctly specified equations for energy and oil demand, the long-run response in demand for income growth is about 1.0 for Non-OECD Oil Exporters, Income Growers and perhaps all Non-OECD countries, and about 0.55 for OECD countries. These estimates for developing countries are significantly higher than current estimates used by the US Department of Energy. Our estimates for the OECD countries are also higher than those estimated recently by Schmalensee-Stoker-Judson (1998) and Holtz-Eakin and Selden (1995), who ignore the (asymmetric) effects of prices on demand. Higher responses to income changes, of course, will increase projections of energy and oil demand, and of carbon dioxide emissions.

Dermot Gately; Hillard G. Huntington; Dermot Gately; Hillard G. Huntington; Joyce Dargay; Lawrence Goulder; Mary Riddel; Shane Streifel

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

A supply-demand model for OPEC oil-pricing policies  

SciTech Connect

OPEC and its pricing policies have been subjected to constant international attention as well as criticism since 1973. Consumers find OPEC behavior irrational, while OPEC tries to justify its policies as rational and in accordance with the realities of the international oil market. The focus of this study is to contribute toward an analytical and empirical work on OPEC pricing behavior, and highlight the various factors believed to affect the future oil policies of OPEC member countries. After a survey of literature on the theoretical framework of world oil models in general, and OPEC models in particular, a linear econometric model for pricing OPEC oil is formulated which is a supply-demand equilibrium model comprising of supply, demand, and inflation-rate functions. Estimation of the behavioral equations are carried out by Ordinary and Two-Stage Least Square estimators. Econometric results from the estimation and simulation of the model seem to indicate that OPEC's pricing behavior is market-responsive and may best be explained by employing the theoretical framework of market-equilibrium condition.

Heiat, N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

New Delhi http://www.nipfp.org.in Oil Price Shock, Pass-through Policy and its Impact on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyses the impact of transmission of international oil prices and domestic oil price pass-through policy on major macroeconomic variables in India with the help of a macroeconomic policy simulation model. Three major channels of transmission viz. import channel, price channel, and fiscal channel are explored with the help of a structural macroeconomic framework. The policy option of deregulation of domestic oil prices in the scenario of occurrence of a one-time shock in international oil prices as well as no oil price shock situation analysed through its impact on growth, inflation, fiscal balances and external balances during the 12 th Plan period of 2012-13 to 2016-17. The simulation results indicate that in the short run the deregulation policy would have adverse impact on the growth as well as on the inflation. But if this policy is complemented with the policy of switching of subsidy bill to capital expenditure it might result in positive growth effects in the medium and long run. Given, the current passthrough policy, one-time oil shock has adverse impact on growth and inflation in the year of shock while it mitigates slowly over time. The model shows that with the oil shock and with current partial pass-through regime, a 10 percent rise in oil prices result in a 0.6 percent fall in growth while in the full pass-through situation, it can reduce the growth by 0.9 percent. Overall, the paper argues that the pass-through has differential impact on growth and inflation over the 12 th Plan period. Hence, the policy of oil price deregulation must be carefully weighed and prioritised.

N R Bhanumurthy; Surajit Das; Sukanya Bose; N R Bhanumurthy; Surajit Das; Sukanya Bose

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

World's 1993 oil flow slips; demand to move up in 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

World crude oil production in 1993 was down slightly from the year before. Production averaged 59.752 million b/d, off 287,000 b/d from 1992, largely because of production declines in the Commonwealth of Independent States (C.I.S.) and US. Those declines were offset in part by increases among members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries as well as in regions such as the North Sea and other non-OPEC areas. International Energy Agency (IEA) figures show world demand for petroleum products fell 100,000 b/d in 1993 to average 67 million b/d for the year. This included a stock build estimated at 400,000 b/d. IEA expects world demand to move up this year. However, it is still doubtful whether OPEC production will have to expand to meet the higher level of consumption. That will depend on decisions about additions to stocks. The paper discusses OPEC production, OPEC quota, world liquids supply, world demand, and outlook for 1994.

Beck, R.J.

1994-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

59

OPEC and lower oil prices: Impacts on production capacity, export refining, domestic demand and trade balances  

SciTech Connect

The East-West Center received a research grant from the US Department of Energy's Office of Policy, Planning, and Analysis to study the impact of lower oil prices on OPEC production capacity, on export refineries, and the petroleum trade. The project was later expanded to include balance-of-payments scenarios and impacts on OPEC domestic demand. The Department of Energy requested that the study focus on the Persian Gulf countries, as these countries have the largest share of OPEC reserves and production. Since then, staff members from the East-West Center have visited Iran, the United Arab Emirates, and Saudi Arabia and obtained detailed information from other countries. In addition, the East-West Center received from a number of large international oil companies and national governments valuable information on OPEC production capabilities. In order to safeguard the confidential nature of this information, these data have been aggregated in this report. The East-West Center considers the results presented to be the most up-to-date information and analysis available today. This report also provides a major reassessment of the export refining and economic competitiveness of Middle East refineries. As pioneers of the research on OPEC export refineries, the East-West Center has fully reevaluated the performance and outlook of these refineries as of the present. 21 figs., 20 tabs.

Fesharaki, F.; Fridley, D.; Isaak, D.; Totto, L.; Wilson, T.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Projection of Chinese motor vehicle growth, oil demand, and CO{sub 2}emissions through 2050.  

SciTech Connect

As the vehicle population in China increases, oil consumption and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions associated with on-road transportation are rising dramatically. During this study, we developed a methodology to project trends in the growth of the vehicle population, oil demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions associated with on-road transportation in China. By using this methodology, we projected--separately--the number of highway vehicles, motorcycles, and rural vehicles in China through 2050. We used three scenarios of highway vehicle growth (high-, mid-, and low-growth) to reflect patterns of motor vehicle growth that have occurred in different parts of the world (i.e., Europe and Asia). All are essentially business-as-usual scenarios in that almost none of the countries we examined has made concerted efforts to manage vehicle growth or to offer serious alternative transportation means to satisfy people's mobility needs. With this caveat, our projections showed that by 2030, China could have more highway vehicles than the United States has today, and by 2035, it could have the largest number of highway vehicles in the world. By 2050, China could have 486-662 million highway vehicles, 44 million motorcycles, and 28 million rural vehicles. These numbers, which assume essentially unmanaged vehicle growth, would result in potentially disastrous effects on the urban infrastructure, resources, and other social and ecological aspects of life in China. We designed three fuel economy scenarios, from conservative to aggressive, on the basis of current policy efforts and expectations of near-future policies in China and in developed countries. It should be noted that these current and near-future policies have not taken into consideration the significant potential for further fuel economy improvements offered by advanced technologies such as electric drive technologies (e.g., hybrid electric vehicles and fuel-cell vehicles). By using vehicle growth projections and potential vehicle fuel economy, we projected that China's on-road vehicles could consume approximately 614-1016 million metric tons of oil per year (12.4-20.6 million barrels per day) and could emit 1.9-3.2 billion metric tons of CO{sub 2} per year in 2050, which will put tremendous pressure on the balance of the Chinese and world oil supply and demand and could have significant implications on climate change. Our analysis shows that, while improvements in vehicle fuel economy are crucial for reducing transportation energy use, containing the growth of the vehicle population could have an even more profound effect on oil use and CO{sub 2} emissions. This benefit is in addition to other societal and environmental benefits--such as reduced congestion, land use, and urban air pollution--that will result from containing vehicle population growth. Developing public transportation systems for personal travel and rail and other modes for freight transportation will be important for containing the growth of motor vehicles in China. Although the population of passenger cars will far exceed that of all truck types in China in the future, our analysis shows that oil use by and CO{sub 2} emissions from the Chinese truck fleet will be far larger than those related to Chinese passenger cars because trucks are very use intensive (more vehicle miles traveled per year) and energy intensive (lower fuel economy). Unfortunately, the potential for improving fuel economy and reducing air pollutant emissions for trucks has not been fully explored; such efforts are needed. Considering the rapid depletion of the world's oil reserve, the heightened global interest in addressing greenhouse gas emissions, and the geopolitical complications of global oil supply and demand, the study results suggest that unmanaged vehicle growth and limited improvements in vehicle fuel efficiency will lead to an unsustainable and unstable transportation system in China. In other words, while our projections do not definitively indicate what will happen in the Chinese transportation sector by 2050, they do demonstrate

Wang, M.; Huo, H.; Johnson, L.; He, D.

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Projection of Chinese motor vehicle growth, oil demand, and CO{sub 2}emissions through 2050.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the vehicle population in China increases, oil consumption and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions associated with on-road transportation are rising dramatically. During this study, we developed a methodology to project trends in the growth of the vehicle population, oil demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions associated with on-road transportation in China. By using this methodology, we projected--separately--the number of highway vehicles, motorcycles, and rural vehicles in China through 2050. We used three scenarios of highway vehicle growth (high-, mid-, and low-growth) to reflect patterns of motor vehicle growth that have occurred in different parts of the world (i.e., Europe and Asia). All are essentially business-as-usual scenarios in that almost none of the countries we examined has made concerted efforts to manage vehicle growth or to offer serious alternative transportation means to satisfy people's mobility needs. With this caveat, our projections showed that by 2030, China could have more highway vehicles than the United States has today, and by 2035, it could have the largest number of highway vehicles in the world. By 2050, China could have 486-662 million highway vehicles, 44 million motorcycles, and 28 million rural vehicles. These numbers, which assume essentially unmanaged vehicle growth, would result in potentially disastrous effects on the urban infrastructure, resources, and other social and ecological aspects of life in China. We designed three fuel economy scenarios, from conservative to aggressive, on the basis of current policy efforts and expectations of near-future policies in China and in developed countries. It should be noted that these current and near-future policies have not taken into consideration the significant potential for further fuel economy improvements offered by advanced technologies such as electric drive technologies (e.g., hybrid electric vehicles and fuel-cell vehicles). By using vehicle growth projections and potential vehicle fuel economy, we projected that China's on-road vehicles could consume approximately 614-1016 million metric tons of oil per year (12.4-20.6 million barrels per day) and could emit 1.9-3.2 billion metric tons of CO{sub 2} per year in 2050, which will put tremendous pressure on the balance of the Chinese and world oil supply and demand and could have significant implications on climate change. Our analysis shows that, while improvements in vehicle fuel economy are crucial for reducing transportation energy use, containing the growth of the vehicle population could have an even more profound effect on oil use and CO{sub 2} emissions. This benefit is in addition to other societal and environmental benefits--such as reduced congestion, land use, and urban air pollution--that will result from containing vehicle population growth. Developing public transportation systems for personal travel and rail and other modes for freight transportation will be important for containing the growth of motor vehicles in China. Although the population of passenger cars will far exceed that of all truck types in China in the future, our analysis shows that oil use by and CO{sub 2} emissions from the Chinese truck fleet will be far larger than those related to Chinese passenger cars because trucks are very use intensive (more vehicle miles traveled per year) and energy intensive (lower fuel economy). Unfortunately, the potential for improving fuel economy and reducing air pollutant emissions for trucks has not been fully explored; such efforts are needed. Considering the rapid depletion of the world's oil reserve, the heightened global interest in addressing greenhouse gas emissions, and the geopolitical complications of global oil supply and demand, the study results suggest that unmanaged vehicle growth and limited improvements in vehicle fuel efficiency will lead to an unsustainable and unstable transportation system in China. In other words, while our projections do not definitively indicate what will happen in the Chinese transportation sector by 2050, they do demonstrate

Wang, M.; Huo, H.; Johnson, L.; He, D.

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

62

New York, New York 10003-6687The Asymmetric Effects of Changes in Price and Income on Energy and Oil Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper estimates the effects on energy and oil demand of changes in income and oil prices, for 96 of the world’s largest countries, in per-capita terms. We examine three important issues: the asymmetric effects on demand of increases and decreases in oil prices; the asymmetric effects on demand of increases and decreases in income; and the different speeds of demand adjustment to changes in price and in income. Its main conclusions are the following: (1) OECD demand responds much more to increases in oil prices than to decreases; ignoring this asymmetric price response will bias downward the estimated income elasticity; (2) demand’s response to income decreases in many non-OECD countries is not necessarily symmetric to its response to income increases; ignoring this asymmetric income response will bias the estimated income elasticity; (3) the speed of demand adjustment is faster to changes in income than to changes in price; ignoring this difference will bias upward the estimated response to income changes. Using correctly specified equations for energy and oil demand, the long-run elasticity for increases in income is about 0.55 for OECD energy and oil, and 1.0 or higher for Non-OECD Oil Exporters, Income Growers and perhaps all Non-OECD countries. These income elasticity

Dermot Gately; Hillard G. Huntington; Dermot Gately; Hillard G. Huntington; Dermot Gately; Hillard G. Huntington

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Technology-Based Oil and Natural Gas Plays: Shale Shock! Could There Be Billions in the Bakken?  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Technology-Based Technology-Based Oil and Natural Gas Plays: Shale Shock! Could There Be Billions in the Bakken? Through the use of technology, U.S. oil and natural gas operators are converting previously uneconomic oil and natural gas resources into proved reserves and production. The Bakken Formation of the Williston Basin is a success story of horizontal drilling, fracturing, and completion technologies. The recent, highly productive oil field discoveries within the Bakken Formation did not come from venturing out into deep uncharted waters heretofore untapped by man, nor from blazing a trail into pristine environs never open to drilling before. Instead, success came from analysis of geologic data on a decades-old producing area, identification of uptapped resources, and application of the new drilling and completion technology necessary to exploit them. In short, it came from using technology

64

An Investigation into the Derived Demand for Land in Palm Oil Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Over the years, the world industry of oil palm has been rapidly increasing in the tropical areas of Asia, Africa and America. One of the… (more)

Lau, Jia Li

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

The relationship between crude oil and natural gas prices and its effect on demand.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The overall theme of the three chapters is the relationship between the prices of natural gas and crude oil, and the factors that cause short… (more)

Rosthal, Jennifer Elizabeth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Quarterly update. [Oil supply and demand data for the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report presents detailed statistics on oil supply and demand in the countries of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. The information consists of complete balances of production, trade, refinery intake/output, final consumption, stock levels, and changes for crude oil, natural gas liquids, refinery feedstocks, and 9 product groups; separate trade data for main product groups, LPG, and naphtha; imports for 48 origins; exports for 31 destinations; international marine bunkers and deliveries by product group; aggregates of quarterly data to annual totals; and natural gas supply and consumption. The information supplied is for Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, UK, European Economic Community, Austria, Finland, Greece, Iceland, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, OECD Europe, Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, and the US.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

European Economic Review 18 11982)243-248. Norfh-Holle,nd Publishing Company THE OIL SHOCKS AND MACROECONOMIC ADJUSTMEN'F IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/38, USA Though 'supply-side economics' is politically ascendant in the United States, the relative importance of supply versus demand factors in r,x:ent U.S. macroeconomic history remains in strong dispute the oil price increases a~d pre-ta~: profitability remained strong throughout the 1970s. Demand factors

68

The Role of Inventories and Speculative Trading in the Global Market for Crude Oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a structural model of the global market for crude oil that for the first time explicitly allows for shocks to the speculative demand for oil as well as shocks to the flow demand and flow supply. The forward-looking element of the real price of oil is identified with the help of data on oil inventories. The model estimates rule out explanations of the 2003-08 oil price surge based on unexpectedly diminishing oil supplies and based on speculative trading. Instead, we find that this surge was caused by fluctuations in the flow demand for oil driven by the global business cycle. There is evidence, however, that speculative demand shifts played an important role during earlier oil price shock episodes including 1979, 1986, and 1990. We also show that, even after accounting for the role of inventories in smoothing oil consumption, our estimate of the short-run price elasticity of oil demand is much higher than traditional estimates from dynamic models that do not account for price endogeneity. We conclude that additional regulation of oil markets would not have prevented the 2003-08 oil price surge.

Lutz Kilian; Dan Murphy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model of the Global Crude Oil Market and the U.S. RetailNoureddine. 2002. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandanalysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. Energy

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Joint Model of the Global Crude Oil Market and the U.S.Noureddine. 2002. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandelasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline. Results

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Joint Model of the Global Crude Oil Market and the U.S.Noureddine. 2002. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandelasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline. Results

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The Stock Market Reaction to Oil Price Changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I explore the reaction of the stock market as a whole and of different industries to daily oil price changes. I find that the direction and magnitude of the market?s reaction to oil price changes depend on the magnitude of the price changes. Oil price changes most likely caused by supply shocks have a negative impact while oil price changes most likely caused by shifts in aggregate demand have a positive impact on the same day market returns. In addition to the returns of oil-intensive industries, returns of industries that do not use oil to any significant extent are also sensitive to oil price changes. Finally, I show that both the cost-side dependence and demand-side dependence on oil are important in explaining the sensitivity of industry returns to oil price changes. I am indebted to Louis Ederington. I am grateful for the helpful comments received from Chitru Fernando,

Sridhar Gogineni

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China’s domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robertpeak will come around 2020, 24 and that by this point, China’s demand Oil

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

EIA Oil price timeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, ... Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions.

75

Asymptotic behavior of two-phase flows in heterogeneous porous media for capillarity depending only on space. II. Non-classical shocks to model oil-trapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a one-dimensional problem modeling two-phase flow in heterogeneous porous media made of two homogeneous subdomains, with discontinuous capillarity at the interface between them. We suppose that the capillary forces vanish inside the domains, but not on the interface. Under the assumption that the gravity forces and the capillary forces are oriented in opposite directions, we show that the limit, for vanishing diffusion, is not the entropy solution of the hyperbolic scalar conservation law. A non-classical shock occurs on the interface, modeling oil-trapping.

Cancès, Clément

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Distillate Demand Strong in December 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total distillate demand includes both diesel and heating oil. These are similar products. Physically, diesel can be used in the heating oil market, but low sulfur ...

77

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas, Heating Oil and Gasoline,” NBER Working Paper.2006. “China’s Growing Demand for Oil and Its Impact on U.S.and Income on Energy and Oil Demand,” Energy Journal 23(1),

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Oil consumption, pollutant emission, oil proce volatility and economic activities in selected Asian Developing Economies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??It is now well established in the literature that oil consumption, oil price shocks, and oil price volatility may impact the economic activities negatively. Studies… (more)

Rafiq, Shuddhasattwa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table of Contents. Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook. Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast . Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance

80

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand Response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

82

CRUDE OIL PRICE FLUCTUATIONS AND SAUDI ARABIAN BEHAVIOUR by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The responsibility for the contents of the working paper rests with the author, not the Institute. Since working papers are of a preliminary nature, it may be useful to contact the author of a particular working paper about results or caveats before referring to, or quoting, a paper. Any comments on working papers should be sent directly to the author. CRUDE OIL PRICE FLUCTUATIONS AND SAUDI ARABIAN BEHAVIOUR* This study seeks to explain why crude oil prices fluctuate, the main cause being the quota regime, which characterises the OPEC agreements. Given that the Saudi oil supply is inelastic in the short term, a shock in the oil market is accommodated by an immediate price change. In contrast, a dominant firm behaviour in the long term causes an output change, which is accompanied by a smaller price change. This explains why oil prices overshoot. The results of a general equilibrium model applied to Saudi Arabia support this analysis. They also indicate that Saudi Arabia does not have any incentive in altering the crude oil market equilibrium with either positive or negative supply shocks; and that its behaviour is asymmetric in the presence of world demand shocks, having an incentive (disincentive) in intervening if a negative (positive) demand shock hits the crude oil market. A second set of simulations is designed to understand what might be a correct OECD policy to lower prices. A tax cut would worsen the situation, whereas policies which can increase the price elasticity of demand seem to be very effective. * I have benefited from discussions with Christiane Kasten, Bodo Steiner and Manfred Wiebelt. All errors are my responsibility.

Roberto A. De Santis; Roberto A. De Santis

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

United States lubricant demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines United States Lubricant Demand for Automotive and Industrial Lubricants by year from 1978 to 1992 and 1997. Projected total United States Lubricant Demand for 1988 is 2,725 million (or MM) gallons. Automotive oils are expected to account for 1,469MM gallons or (53.9%), greases 59MM gallons (or 2.2%), and Industrial oils will account for the remaining 1,197MM gallons (or 43.9%) in 1988. This proportional relationship between Automotive and Industrial is projected to remain relatively constant until 1992 and out to 1997. Projections for individual years between 1978 to 1992 and 1997 are summarized.

Solomon, L.K.; Pruitt, P.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices...

85

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and...

86

Winter Demand Impacted by Weather  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 Notes: Heating oil demand is strongly influenced by weather. The "normal" numbers are the expected values for winter 2000-2001 used in EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook. The chart...

87

5 World Oil Trends WORLD OIL TRENDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 World Oil Trends Chapter 1 WORLD OIL TRENDS INTRODUCTION In considering the outlook for California's petroleum supplies, it is important to give attention to expecta- tions of what the world oil market. Will world oil demand increase and, if so, by how much? How will world oil prices be affected

88

Distillate Demand Strong in December 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5% higher than in the prior year, due mainly to diesel demand growth, since warm weather kept heating oil demand from growing much. Last December, when stocks dropped below...

89

Q:\asufinal_0107_demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

00 00 (AEO2000) Assumptions to the January 2000 With Projections to 2020 DOE/EIA-0554(2000) Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution

90

US military expenditures to protect the use of Persian Gulf oil for motor vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Montgomery, W.D. , 1982. Oil Prices, Energy Security, andPaik, I.K. , 2004. Oil price shocks and the macroeconomy:the United States from Oil Price Shocks? CRS 91-438E.

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Weimer, D.L. (1984) Oil prices shock, market response,OPEC behavior and world oil prices (pp. 175-185) London:many decades. Recent high oil prices have caused oil-holding

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Fly Shock  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shock Name: Kunal Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Hi, I am a student in Astronaut High School in Titusville Florida. I am doing a science Research project on Genetic...

93

Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight and passenger rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous

94

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook 8/13/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance OPEC Production Likely To Remain Low U.S. Reflects World Market Crude Oil Outlook Conclusions Distillate Prices Increase With Crude Oil Distillate Stocks on the East Coast Were Very Low Entering Last Winter Distillate Demand Strong Last Winter More Supply Possible This Fall than Forecast Distillate Fuel Oil Imports Could Be Available - For A Price Distillate Supply/Demand Balance Reflected in Spreads Distillate Stocks Expected to Remain Low Winter Crude Oil and Distillate Price Outlook Heating Oil Outlook Conclusion Propane Prices Follow Crude Oil

95

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry analysts and academics agree that China’s domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robert Ebel, China’s Energy

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Business cycles in oil economies  

SciTech Connect

This study examines the impact of oil price shocks on output fluctuations of several oil-exporting economies. In most studies of business cycles, the role of oil price is ignored; the few studies that use oil price as one of the variables in the system focus on modeling oil-importing economies. The vector autoregression (VAR) technique is used to consider the cases of Norway, Nigeria, and Mexico. Both atheoretical and structural' VARs are estimated to determine the importance of oil price impulses on output variations. The study reports two types of results: variance decomposition and impulse response functions, with particular emphasis on the issues of stationarity and co-integration among the series. The empirical results suggest that shocks to oil price are important in explaining output variations. In most cases, shocks to oil price are shown to explain more than 20% of the forecast variance of output over a 40-quarter horizon.

Al-Mutairi, N.H.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment for Eastern Interconnection Youngsun Baek, Stanton W. Hadley, Rocio Martinez, Gbadebo Oladosu, Alexander M. Smith, Fran Li, Paul Leiby and Russell Lee Prepared for FY12 DOE-CERTS Transmission Reliability R&D Internal Program Review September 20, 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy DOE National Laboratory Studies Funded to Support FOA 63 * DOE set aside $20 million from transmission funding for national laboratory studies. * DOE identified four areas of interest: 1. Transmission Reliability 2. Demand Side Issues 3. Water and Energy 4. Other Topics * Argonne, NREL, and ORNL support for EIPC/SSC/EISPC and the EISPC Energy Zone is funded through Area 4. * Area 2 covers LBNL and NREL work in WECC and

98

Turkey's energy demand and supply  

SciTech Connect

The aim of the present article is to investigate Turkey's energy demand and the contribution of domestic energy sources to energy consumption. Turkey, the 17th largest economy in the world, is an emerging country with a buoyant economy challenged by a growing demand for energy. Turkey's energy consumption has grown and will continue to grow along with its economy. Turkey's energy consumption is high, but its domestic primary energy sources are oil and natural gas reserves and their production is low. Total primary energy production met about 27% of the total primary energy demand in 2005. Oil has the biggest share in total primary energy consumption. Lignite has the biggest share in Turkey's primary energy production at 45%. Domestic production should be to be nearly doubled by 2010, mainly in coal (lignite), which, at present, accounts for almost half of the total energy production. The hydropower should also increase two-fold over the same period.

Balat, M. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Energy Source Demand Coal, Oil, Gas, Heat, Electricity Demography Japan’s population, an important factor in predicting residential energy demand as well

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Global Oil Geopolitics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 imported refiner acquisition cost of crude oil WTI crude ... World Crude Oil Supply and Demand Balance 14

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Propane Demand is Highly Seasonal, But Fresh Supply is Not  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Notes: Propane, like heating oil, has a highly seasonal demand pattern. Demand increases about 50% from its low point to its peak. Production and net imports, on the other hand,...

102

Residual Fuel Demand - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In the 1986 to 1991 period, residual fuel oil demand declined only slightly both in absolute and as a percent of total product demand. While not shown, residual fuel ...

103

Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Price elasticity of demand for crude oil: estimates for 2327] Krichene, N. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandIn contrast to synthetic crude oils produced from the above

Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

D:\assumptions_2001\assumptions2002\currentassump\demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Petroleum Market Module. . . . . . . . . . . . .

105

World Petroleum Supply/Demand Forecast - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... surplus supply over demand for spring and summer quarters compared with some other forecasters such as Oil Market Intelligence, ...

106

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

107

Is Real-Time Pricing Green?: The Environmental Impacts of Electricity Demand Variance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L) of demand. Oil Marginal Cost ($/MWh) Hydroelectricsince oil and gas have high marginal costs, their shares ofcost, fuel sources are gen- erally ordered hydroelectric, nuclear, coal, natural gas, and oil.

Holland, Stephen P.; Mansur, Erin T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

California Crude Oil Prices - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

California Crude Oil Prices 6/2/98. Click here to start. Table of Contents. California Crude Oil Prices. CA Crude Oil Price History. World Petroleum Supply/Demand Balance

109

Essays on the macroeconomic effects of energy price shocks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the first chapter I study the effects of oil price shocks on economic activity at the U.S. state-level, an innovative feature of this dissertation.… (more)

Melichar, Mark Alan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... March 2003 Price Spike August 2003 Price Spike Quarterly World Oil Demand Growth from Previous Year Overview of Market Fundamentals Tight balance in global ...

111

Winter Demand Impacted by Weather  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: Heating oil demand is strongly influenced by weather. The "normal" numbers are the expected values for winter 2000-2001 used in EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook. The chart indicates the extent to which the last winter exhibited below-normal heating degree-days (and thus below-normal heating demand). Temperatures were consistently warmer than normal throughout the 1999-2000 heating season. This was particularly true in November 1999, February 2001 and March 2001. For the heating season as a whole (October through March), the 1999-2000 winter yielded total HDDs 10.7% below normal. Normal temperatures this coming winter would, then, be expected to bring about 11% higher heating demand than we saw last year. Relative to normal, the 1999-2000 heating season was the warmest in

112

Evaluation of EOR Potential by Gas and Water Flooding in Shale Oil Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The demand for oil and natural gas will continue to increase for the foreseeable future; unconventional resources such as tight oil, shale gas, shale oil… (more)

Chen, Ke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Experimental studies in a bottom-burning oil shale combustion retort.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As the domestic demand for oil continues to increase, it is expected that the enormous worldwide oil shale reserves will eventually be tapped. Oil from… (more)

Udell, Kent S.

1905-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Validation of high performance pneumo-hydraulic shock absorbers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper discusses a theoretical and experimental approach to the validation of high performance shock absorbers, based on a flexible and innovative procedure. This type of components needs specific and unconventional tests, in order to detect the actual ... Keywords: oil-hydraulics, shock absorbers, validation, virtual instrumentation

Enrico Ravina

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Oil Exports and the Iranian Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper develops a long run growth model for a major oil exporting economy and derives conditions under which oil revenues are likely to have a lasting impact. This approach contrasts with the standard literature on the "Dutch disease" and the "resource curse", which primarily focus on short run implications of a temporary resource discovery. Under certain regularity conditions and assuming a Cobb Douglas production function, it is shown that (log) oil exports enter the long run output equation with a coefficient equal to the share of capital. The long run theory is tested using a new quarterly data set on the Iranain economy over the period 1979Q1-2006Q4. Building an error correction specification in real output, real money balances, inflation, real exchange rate, oil exports, and foreign real output, the paper finds clear evidence for two long run relations: an output equation as predicted by the theory and a standard real money demand equation with inflation acting as a proxy for the (missing) market interest rate. Real output in the long run is shaped by oil exports through their impact on capital accumulation, and the foreign output as the main channel of technological transfer. The results also show a significant negative long run association between in‡ation and real GDP, which is suggestive of economic inefficiencies. Once the effects of oil exports are taken into account, the estimates support output growth convergence between Iran and the rest of the world. We also find that the Iranian economy adjusts quite quickly to the shocks in foreign output and oil exports, which could be partly due to the relatively underdeveloped nature of Iran’s financial markets.

Hadi Salehi Esfahani; Kamiar Mohaddes; M. Hashem Pesaran

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Oil Exports and the Iranian Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an error-correcting macroeconometric model for the Iranian economy estimated using a new quarterly data set over the period 1979Q1-2006Q4. It builds on a recent paper by the authors, Esfahani et al. (2012), which develops a theoretical long-run growth model for major oil exporting economies. The core variables included in this paper are real output, real money balances, in‡ation, exchange rate, oil exports, and foreign real output, although the role of investment and consumption are also analyzed in a sub-model. The paper …nds clear evidence for the existence of two long-run relations: an output equation as predicted by the theory and a standard real money demand equation with in‡ation acting as a proxy for the (missing) market interest rate. The results show that real output in the long run is in‡uenced by oil exports and foreign output. However, it is also found that in‡ation has a signi…cant negative long-run e¤ect on real GDP, which is suggestive of economic ine ¢ ciencies and is matched by a negative association between in‡ation and the investment-output ratio. Finally, the results of impulse responses show that the Iranian economy adjusts quite quickly to the shocks in foreign output and oil exports, which could be partly due to the relatively underdeveloped nature of Iran’s …nancial markets.

Hadi Salehi Esfahani A; Kamiar Mohaddes; M. Hashem Pesaran Bc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

World Oil Refining Logistics Demand Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This manual is intended primarily for use as a reference by analysts applying the WORLD model to regional studies. It also provides overview information on WORLD features of potential interest to managers and analysts.

Information Center

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

WORLD OIL REFINING LOGISTICS DEMAND MODEL  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20585. ... OB1 Optimization with Barriers 1 OSL Optimization Subroutine Library

119

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

120

Transportation Demand This  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Demand Response Spinning Reserve  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Title Demand Response Spinning Reserve Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2007 Authors Eto, Joseph H., Janine Nelson-Hoffman, Carlos...

122

Addressing Energy Demand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Bo Shen, Girish Ghatikar, Chun Chun Ni, and Junqiao Dudley Environmental Energy...

123

Propane Sector Demand Shares  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... agricultural demand does not impact regional propane markets except when unusually high and late demand for propane for crop drying combines with early cold ...

124

Laherrere’s Oil Production Forecast, 1930-2150  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

L. F. Ivanhoe’s estimate also showed peak production around 2010 (“Get Ready For Another Oil Shock!,” The Futurist, Jan-Feb, 1997).

125

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supply and demand for US crude oil resources. A dichotomyEIA (2008b) “U.S. Crude Oil Supply and Disposition,”

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of oil shocks in a FAVAR with sign restrictions Shocks: supply, global demand, oil inventory demand, speculation FAVAR: small-scale VAR is not informationally su cient to...

127

DEVELOPMENT OF AN EXPERT SYSTEM TO IDENTIFY PHASE EQUILIBRIA AND ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY CHARACTERISTICS OF CRUDE OILS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With the increasing demand of oil and gas in the past decades, great endeavors in the oil industry have been devoted to develop and incorporate… (more)

Hua, Luoyi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Cost, Conflict and Climate: U.S. Challenges in the World Oil Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

position that exporters of oil (as well as other goods andsite versus the value of the oil, as well as the size of thee?ect of an oil price shock extends well beyond the pump, of

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Cosmological shock waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large-scale structure formation, accretion and merging processes, AGN activity produce cosmological gas shocks. The shocks convert a fraction of the energy of gravitationally accelerated flows to internal energy of the gas. Being the main gas-heating agent, cosmological shocks could amplify magnetic fields and accelerate energetic particles via the multi-fluid plasma relaxation processes. We first discuss the basic properties of standard single-fluid shocks. Cosmological plasma shocks are expected to be collisionless. We then review the plasma processes responsible for the microscopic structure of collisionless shocks. A tiny fraction of the particles crossing the shock is injected into the non-thermal energetic component that could get a substantial part of the ram pressure power dissipated at the shock. The energetic particles penetrate deep into the shock upstream producing an extended shock precursor. Scaling relations for postshock ion temperature and entropy as functions of shock velocity in strong collisionless multi-fluid shocks are discussed. We show that the multi-fluid nature of collisionless shocks results in excessive gas compression, energetic particle acceleration, precursor gas heating, magnetic field amplification and non-thermal emission. Multi-fluid shocks provide a reduced gas entropy production and could also modify the observable thermodynamic scaling relations for clusters of galaxies.

A. M. Bykov; K. Dolag; F. Durret

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

130

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers...

131

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Demand Trading: Building Liquidity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand trading holds substantial promise as a mechanism for efficiently integrating demand-response resources into regional power markets. However, regulatory uncertainty, the lack of proper price signals, limited progress toward standardization, problems in supply-side markets, and other factors have produced illiquidity in demand-trading markets and stalled the expansion of demand-response resources. This report shows how key obstacles to demand trading can be overcome, including how to remove the unce...

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

133

Import policy effects on the optimal oil price  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A steady increase in oil imports leaves oil importing countries increasingly vulnerable tofuture oil price shocks. Using a variation of the U.S. EIA`s oil market simulation model, equilibria displaying multiple price shocks is derived endogenously as a result of optimizing behavior on the part of OPEC. Here we investigate the effects that an oil import tariff and a petroleum stock release policy may have on an OPEC optimal price path. It is shown that while both policies can reduce the magnitude of future price shocks neither may be politically or technically feasible. 21 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Suranovic, S.M. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Simulations reveal fast mode shocks in magnetic reconnection outflows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetic reconnection is commonly perceived to drive flow and particle acceleration in flares of solar, stellar, and astrophysical disk coronae but the relative roles of different acceleration mechanisms in a given reconnection environment are not well understood. While outflow fast mode shocks have been predicted analytically, we show for the first time via direct numerical simulations that such shocks do indeed occur in the outflows of fast reconnection when an obstacle is present. These shocks are distinct from the slow mode Petschek inflow shocks. If Fermi acceleration of electrons operates in the weak fast shocks, the associated compression ratios will induce a Fermi acceleration particle spectrum that is significantly steeper than strong fast shocks commonly studied, but consistent with the demands of solar flares. While this is not the only acceleration mechanism operating in a reconnection environment, it is plausibly a ubiquitous one.

Workman, Jared C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, Colorado Mesa University, Grand Junction, Colorado 81501 (United States); Blackman, Eric G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Ren, Chuang [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

The Heliospheric Termination Shock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heliospheric Termination Shock is the largest (by dimension) shock in the heliosphere. It is believed that it is also the strongest shock and is responsible for the generation of the Anomalous Cosmic Ray component in the heliosphere. This chapter review the gross properties and observations of the Termination Shock. It is structured as follows: 1. The heliosphere, providing the heliospheric stage for Termination Shock formation, 2. The argument for a heliospheric Termination Shock, 3. The global heliospheric system, 4. Termination Shock properties, 5. Observations: the Voyager passages, radio observations, plasma waves and electron beams, traces of plasma and magnetic field, energetic particles, galactic cosmic rays, Termination Shock particles, the anomalous cosmic ray component, 6. Conclusions.

R. A. Treumann; C. H. Jaroschek

2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

136

Geostrophic Shock Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organized depth discontinuities involving a balance between steepening and dissipation are usually referred to as shock waves. An analytical “educed gravity” model is used to examine a special kind of shock wave. The wave under study is a depth ...

Doron Nof

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

OIL PRICES AND LONG-RUN RISK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I show that relative levels of aggregate consumption and personal oil consumption provide an excellent proxy for oil prices, and that high oil prices predict low future aggregate consumption growth. Motivated by these facts, I add an oil consumption good to the long-run risk model of Bansal and Yaron [2004] to study the asset pricing implications of observed changes in the dynamic interaction of consumption and oil prices. Empirically I observe that, compared to the first half of my 1987- 2010 sample, oil consumption growth in the last 10 years is unresponsive to levels of oil prices, creating an decrease in the mean-reversion of oil prices, and an increase in the persistence of oil price shocks. The model implies that the change in the dynamics of oil consumption generates increased systematic risk from oil price shocks due to their increased persistence. However, persistent oil prices also act as a counterweight for shocks to expected consumption growth, with high expected growth creating high expectations of future oil prices which in turn slow down growth. The combined effect is to reduce overall consumption risk and lower the equity premium. The model also predicts that these changes affect the riskiness of of oil futures contracts, and combine to create a hump shaped

Robert Ready; Robert Clayton Ready; Robert Clayton Ready; Amir Yaron

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Mass Market Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

139

Demand Impacted by Weather  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

When you look at demand, it’s also interesting to note the weather. The weather has a big impact on the demand of heating fuels, if it’s cold, consumers will use ...

140

Demand Trading Toolkit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Download report 1006017 for FREE. The global movement toward competitive markets is paving the way for a variety of market mechanisms that promise to increase market efficiency and expand customer choice options. Demand trading offers customers, energy service providers, and other participants in power markets the opportunity to buy and sell demand-response resources, just as they now buy and sell blocks of power. EPRI's Demand Trading Toolkit (DTT) describes the principles and practice of demand trading...

2001-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

EIA - AEO2010 - Natural Gas Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Demand Gas Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Natural Gas Demand Figure 68. Regional growth in nonhydroelectric renewable electricity capacity including end-use capacity, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 69. Annual average lower 48 wellhead and Henry Hub spot market prices for natural gas, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 70. Ratio of low-sulfur light crude oil price to Henry Hub natural gas price on an energy equivalent basis, 1990-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 71. Annual average lower 48 wellhead prices for natural gas in three technology cases, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 72. Annual average lower 48 wellhead prices for natural gas in three oil price cases, 1990-2035

142

Ethanol Demand in United States Gasoline Production  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (OWL) Refinery Yield Model (RYM) has been used to estimate the demand for ethanol in U.S. gasoline production in year 2010. Study cases examine ethanol demand with variations in world oil price, cost of competing oxygenate, ethanol value, and gasoline specifications. For combined-regions outside California summer ethanol demand is dominated by conventional gasoline (CG) because the premised share of reformulated gasoline (RFG) production is relatively low and because CG offers greater flexibility for blending high vapor pressure components like ethanol. Vapor pressure advantages disappear for winter CG, but total ethanol used in winter RFG remains low because of the low RFG production share. In California, relatively less ethanol is used in CG because the RFG production share is very high. During the winter in California, there is a significant increase in use of ethanol in RFG, as ethanol displaces lower-vapor-pressure ethers. Estimated U.S. ethanol demand is a function of the refiner value of ethanol. For example, ethanol demand for reference conditions in year 2010 is 2 billion gallons per year (BGY) at a refiner value of $1.00 per gallon (1996 dollars), and 9 BGY at a refiner value of $0.60 per gallon. Ethanol demand could be increased with higher oil prices, or by changes in gasoline specifications for oxygen content, sulfur content, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS), and octane numbers.

Hadder, G.R.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

143

Identifying the Oil Price-Macroeconomy Relationship: An Empirical Mode Decomposition Analysis of U.S. Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work applies the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) method to data on real quarterly oil price (West Texas Intermediate - WTI) and U.S. gross domestic product (GDP). This relatively new method is adaptive and capable of handling non-linear and non-stationary data. Correlation analysis of the decomposition results was performed and examined for insights into the oil-macroeconomy relationship. Several components of this relationship were identified. However, the principal one is that the medium-run cyclical component of the oil price exerts a negative and exogenous influence on the main cyclical component of the GDP. This can be interpreted as the supply-driven or supply-shock component of the oil price-GDP relationship. In addition, weak correlations suggesting a lagging demand-driven, an expectations-driven, and a long-run supply-driven component of the relationship were also identified. Comparisons of these findings with significant oil supply disruption and recession dates were supportive. The study identified a number of lessons applicable to recent oil market events, including the eventuality of persistent economic and price declines following a long oil price run-up. In addition, it was found that oil-market related exogenous events are associated with short- to medium-run price implications regardless of whether they lead to actual supply disruptions.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

THE RIMINI PROTOCOL Oil Depletion Protocol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soaring oil prices have drawn attention to the issue of the relative supply and demand for crude oil. This fact alone tells us that oil is a finite resource, which in turn means that it is subject to depletion1 THE RIMINI PROTOCOL an Oil Depletion Protocol ~ Heading Off Economic Chaos and Political Conflict

Keeling, Stephen L.

145

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Publication Type...

146

Materials for Oil and Gas Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 18, 2008 ... The demand on materials for transporting oil, natural gas, and other fluids, including hydrogen, ethanol, etc. is severe in terms of material ...

147

Hugoniots of Colorado oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Standard experimental shock wave techniques were used to obtain Hugoniots of Anvil Points oil shale as functions of richness and orientation in the pressure regime encountered in the near-field region of an explosion. The shock response was found to be sensitive to kerogen content but independent of bedding orientation relative to the direction of shock propagation. A two-component model combining the inferred dynamic parameters for the end members (kerogen and mineral matrix) is adequate to predict the Hugoniots of oil shale of any arbitrary composition. Hence, the Hugoniots, as for other material properties, can be ultimately uniquely related to the oil yield. Preliminary dynamic results from samples obtained from other sites in Colorado and Wyoming indicate that this is generally true within the accuracy required for predictive explosive rock breakage calculations. 7 figures.

Carter, W.J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Electrical Demand Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Demand Management Plan set forth in this paper has proven to be a viable action to reduce a 3 million per year electric bill at the Columbus Works location of Western Electric. Measures are outlined which have reduced the peak demand 5% below the previous year's level and yielded $150,000 annual savings. These measures include rescheduling of selected operations and demand limiting techniques such as fuel switching to alternate power sources during periods of high peak demand. For example, by rescheduling the startup of five heat treat annealing ovens to second shift, 950 kW of load was shifted off peak. Also, retired, non-productive steam turbine chillers and a diesel air compressor have been effectively operated to displaced 1330 kW during peak periods each day. Installed metering devices have enabled the recognition of critical demand periods. The paper concludes with a brief look at future plans and long range objectives of the Demand Management Plan.

Fetters, J. L.; Teets, S. J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capita terms. When crude oil prices are used, these are theprices are driven by oil prices, moreover, and oil isby ‡uctuations in the crude oil price. The overall mean real

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Demand Dispatch-Intelligent  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and energy efficiency throughout the value chain resulting in the most economical price for electricity. Having adequate quantities and capacities of demand resources is a...

151

Shock absorbing battery housing  

SciTech Connect

A portable battery device is provided which dampens shock incident upon the battery device such that an electrical energizable apparatus connected to the battery device is subject to reduced shock whenever the battery device receives an impact. The battery device includes a battery housing of resilient shock absorbing material injection molded around an interconnecting structure which mechanically and electrically interconnects the battery housing to an electrically energizable apparatus.

McCartney, W.J.; Jacobs, J.D.; Keil, M.J.

1984-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

152

OIl Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investor Investor Flows and the 2008 Boom/Bust in Oil Prices Kenneth J. Singleton 1 August 10, 2011 1 Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, kenneths@stanford.edu. This research is the outgrowth of a survey paper I prepared for the Air Transport Association of America. I am grateful to Kristoffer Laursen for research assistance and to Kristoffer and Stefan Nagel for their comments. Abstract This paper explores the impact of investor flows and financial market conditions on returns in crude-oil futures markets. I begin by arguing that informational frictions and the associated speculative activity may induce prices to drift away from "fundamental" values and show increased volatility. This is followed by a discussion of the interplay between imperfect infor- mation about real economic activity, including supply, demand, and inventory accumulation, and speculative

153

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

xxxv Option Value of Electricity Demand Response, Osmanelasticity in aggregate electricity demand. With these newii) reduction in electricity demand during peak periods (

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

U.S. Propane Demand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand is higher in 1999 due to higher petrochemical demand and a strong economy. We are also seeing strong demand in the first quarter of 2000; however, ...

155

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully-Automated Demand Response Test in Large Facilities14in DR systems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercialof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response – SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response – Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response – Spinning Reserve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Relativistic Photon Mediated Shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A system of equations governing the structure of a steady, relativistic radiation dominated shock is derived, starting from the general form of the transfer equation obeyed by the photon distribution function. Closure is obtained by truncating the system of moment equations at some order. The anisotropy of the photon distribution function inside the shock is shown to increase with increasing shock velocity, approaching nearly perfect beaming at upstream Lorentz factors $\\Gamma_{-}>>1$. Solutions of the shock equations are presented for some range of upstream conditions. These solutions are shown to converge as the truncation order is increased.

Amir Levinson; Omer Bromberg

2007-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

158

Burning desires An obsession with oil distorts an account of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Systems Figure 3 100 mb/d Crude oil: currently producing fields Unconventional oil Natural gasAvailable online at www.sciencedirect.com Future world oil production: growth, plateau, or peak? Larry Hughes and Jacinda Rudolph With the exception of two oil shocks in the 1970s, world oil production

Smil, Vaclav

159

Non-OPEC supply to fill global 1996 demand gain  

SciTech Connect

Excess capacity brought on by rapidly rising oil production from outside the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, coupled with stabilization of output from the Commonwealth of Independent States, will hamper OPEC`s efforts to balance the oil market in 1996. World demand for oil is projected to move up sharply. But non-OPEC output will increase even more, challenging OPEC to reduce production quotas. This paper reviews data on supply, demand, and production from these non-OPEC countries and the overall effects it will have on OPEC operations and costs.

Beck, R.J.

1996-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

160

CONSULTANT REPORT DEMAND FORECAST EXPERT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSULTANT REPORT DEMAND FORECAST EXPERT PANEL INITIAL forecast, end-use demand modeling, econometric modeling, hybrid demand modeling, energyMahon, Carl Linvill 2012. Demand Forecast Expert Panel Initial Assessment. California Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

internal conditions. Maximum Demand Saving Intensity [W/ft2]automated electric demand sheds. The maximum electric shed

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Micro and Nano-enabled Separation Technologies for the Oil and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Aspects of Corrosion and Fouling in Oil Refining and ... and cost effective separation technologies are in demand in diverse oil and gas ...

163

Why don't fuel prices change as quickly as crude oil prices? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Prices are determined by demand and supply in our market economy. Fuel demand is affected mainly by economic conditions, and for heating oil, the weather.

164

Market assessment for shale oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study identified several key issues on the cost, timeliness, and ease with which shale oil can be introduced into the United States' refining system. The capacity of the existing refining industry to process raw shale oil is limited by the availability of surplus hydrogen for severe hydrotreating. The existing crude oil pipeline system will encounter difficulties in handling raw shale oil's high viscosity, pour point, and contaminant levels. The cost of processing raw shale oil as an alternate to petroleum crude oil is extremely variable and primarily dependent upon the percentage of shale oil run in the refinery, as well as the availability of excess hydrogen. A large fraction of any shale oil which is produced will be refined by the major oil companies who participate in the shale oil projects and who do not anticipate problems in processing the shale oil in their refineries. Shale oil produced for sale to independent refiners will initially be sold as boiler fuel. A federal shale oil storage program might be feasible to supplement the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Based on refinery configurations, hydrogen supply, transportation systems, and crude availability, eleven refineries in Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADDs) 2A and 2B have been identified as potential processors of shale oil. Based on refining technology and projected product demands to the year 2000, shale oil will be best suited to the production of diesel fuel and jet fuel. Tests of raw shale oil in boilers are needed to demonstrate nitrogen oxide emissions control.

Not Available

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA

166

U.S. crude oil production growth contributes to global oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

China accounted for almost one-third of growth in global demand and surpassed the United States to become the world's largest importer of crude oil.

167

Oil Price Volatility  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Speculation and Oil Price Volatility Speculation and Oil Price Volatility Robert J. Weiner Robert J. Weiner Professor of International Business, Public Policy & Professor of International Business, Public Policy & Public Administration, and International Affairs Public Administration, and International Affairs George Washington University; George Washington University; Membre Associ Membre Associ é é , GREEN, Universit , GREEN, Universit é é Laval Laval EIA Annual Conference Washington Washington 7 April 2009 7 April 2009 1 FACTORS DRIVNG OIL PRICE VOLATILITY FACTORS DRIVNG OIL PRICE VOLATILITY ► ► Market fundamentals Market fundamentals . . Fluctuations in supply, Fluctuations in supply, demand, and market power demand, and market power Some fundamentals related to expectations of Some fundamentals related to expectations of

168

Futures oil market outlook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We expect the broader expansion of global economic activity in 1995 to more than offset the anticipated slowdown in the US economic growth. This should result in worldwide oil demand growth in excess of 1 million barrels per day and firmer oil prices. This comes on the heels of nearly identical growth in 1994 and should be followed by an even larger increase in 1996. This year`s demand growth comes against a backdrop of flat OPEC production and an increase in non-OPEC supplies that will fall short of the expected increase in consumption. Some degree of political upheaval in at least a half dozen important oil exporting nations could also have implication for crude supplies. One major wildcard that remains for global oil markets is the status of the United Nations` sanctions on Iraqi exports and the timing of when these sanctions are to be eased or lifted completely.

Saucer, J. [Smith Barney, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Heating Oil and Propane Update  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Weekly residential, wholesale, and spot prices; and production, demand, and stocks of heating fuels. (Weekly heating oil and propane prices are only collected during the heating season which extends from October through March. )

Information Center

170

International Energy Outlook 2006 - World Oil Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Markets Oil Markets International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 3: World Oil Markets In the IEO2006 reference case, world oil demand increases by 47 percent from 2003 to 2030. Non-OECD Asia, including China and India, accounts for 43 percent of the increase. In the IEO2006 reference case, world oil demand grows from 80 million barrels per day in 2003 to 98 million barrels per day in 2015 and 118 million barrels per day in 2030. Demand increases strongly despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than in last yearÂ’s outlook. Much of the growth in oil consumption is projected for the nations of non-OECD Asia, where strong economic growth is expected. Non-OECD Asia (including China and India) accounts for 43 percent of the total increase in world oil use over the projection period.

171

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Demand Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Demand Module calculates energy consumption for the four Census Regions (see Figure 5) and disaggregates the energy consumption

172

demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

173

Demand Response Database & Demo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Database & Demo Speaker(s): Mike Graveley William M. Smith Date: June 7, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Mary Ann Piette Infotility...

174

Tankless Demand Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Demand (tankless or instantaneous) water heaters have heating devices that are activated by the flow of water, so they provide hot water only as needed and without the use of a storage tank. They...

175

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

176

Industrial Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Kelly Perl

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

177

Industrial Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Kelly Perl

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

179

Transportation Demand This  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transportation Demand Transportation Demand This page inTenTionally lefT blank 75 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific and associated technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight

180

Automated Demand Response Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes assessments and test results of four end-use technologies, representing products in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, each configured to automatically receive real-time pricing information and critical peak pricing (CPP) demand response (DR) event notifications. Four different vendors were asked to follow the interface requirements set forth in the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) standard that was introduced to the public in 2008 and currently used in two ...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Automated Demand Response Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, which is an update to EPRI Report 1016082, includes assessments and test results of four end-use vendor technologies. These technologies represent products in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, each configured to automatically receive real-time pricing information and critical peak pricing (CPP) demand response (DR) event notifications. Four different vendors were asked to follow the interface requirements set forth in the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) Communicat...

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

182

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capita terms. When crude oil prices are used, these are thedriven by the world crude oil price rather than by exchange-how consumers think about oil prices and price expectations,

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Can Deployment of Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Put Downward Pressure on Natural Gas Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hogan, W. 1989. World Oil Price Projections: A Sensitivitybe significant in the case of oil price shocks and one mightreductions in oil demand and oil prices, indirectly reducing

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time. 4 Reducing this peak demand through DR programs meansthat a 5% reduction in peak demand would have resulted insame 5% reduction in the peak demand of the US as a whole.

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.A meta-analysis of the price elasticity of gasoline demand.2007. Consumer demand un- der price uncertainty: Empirical

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

California Independent System Operator demand response & proxy demand resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response programs are designed to allow end use customers to contribute to energy load reduction individually or through a demand response provider. One form of demand response can occur when an end use customer reduces their electrical usage ...

John Goodin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Shock Chlorination of Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock chlorination is a method of disinfecting a water well. This publication gives complete instructions for chlorinating with bleach or with dry chlorine. It is also available in Spanish as publication L-5441S

McFarland, Mark L.; Dozier, Monty

2003-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

188

Too early to tell on $100 oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Confidential Confidential Presentation to: April 7, 2008 Middle East oil demand and Lehman Brothers oil price outlook Adam Robinson Middle East oil demand u Three pillars of Middle East oil demand - Petrodollar reinvestment - Purchasing power rise - Power sector constraints u Natural gas shortages for power generation mean balance of risks to any Middle East oil demand forecast are firmly to the upside, adding to summer upside seasonality u Lehman Brothers has pegged 3Q08 as the tightest quarter of the current oil cycle, with a possible turning point coming by the end of the year 1 Putting the GCC economy in global context u GCC = Saudi Arabia, UAE, Kuwait, Qatar, Bahrain, Oman u GDP/capita in 2007: $19,000 - Nearly 3x China and 5x India u At $800 bn, GCC is a top 10 developing economy by size

189

A High-Strength Ni-Cr-Mo Alloy for Severe Oil and Gas Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2012. Symposium, Development of Advanced Alloys and Coating Systems for Demanding Oil and ...

190

Crude Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barrels) Product: Crude Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases Distillate Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Oil Still Gas Petroleum Coke Marketable Petroleum Coke Catalyst Petroleum Coke Other...

191

OIL PRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OIL PRODUCTION Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) is a term applied to methods used for recovering oil from a petroleum reservoir beyond that recoverable by primary and secondary methods....

192

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

193

Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type

194

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS 27 data.

195

Demand Response In California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency & Energy Efficiency & Demand Response Programs Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner California Public Utilities Commission California Public Utilities Commission FUPWG 2006 Fall Meeting November 2, 2006 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 1 Highest Priority Resource Energy Efficiency is California's highest priority resource to: Meet energy needs in a low cost manner Aggressively reduce GHG emissions November 2, 2006 2 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 3 http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/PUBLISHED/REPORT/51604.htm Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 4 Energy Action Plan II Loading order continued "Pursue all cost-effective energy efficiency, first." Strong demand response and advanced metering

196

Travel Demand Modeling  

SciTech Connect

This chapter describes the principal types of both passenger and freight demand models in use today, providing a brief history of model development supported by references to a number of popular texts on the subject, and directing the reader to papers covering some of the more recent technical developments in the area. Over the past half century a variety of methods have been used to estimate and forecast travel demands, drawing concepts from economic/utility maximization theory, transportation system optimization and spatial interaction theory, using and often combining solution techniques as varied as Box-Jenkins methods, non-linear multivariate regression, non-linear mathematical programming, and agent-based microsimulation.

Southworth, Frank [ORNL; Garrow, Dr. Laurie [Georgia Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Automated Demand Response Today  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) has progressed over recent years beyond manual and semi-automated DR to include growing implementation and experience with fully automated demand response (AutoDR). AutoDR has been shown to be of great value over manual and semi-automated DR because it reduces the need for human interactions and decisions, and it increases the speed and reliability of the response. AutoDR, in turn, has evolved into the specification known as OpenADR v1.0 (California Energy Commission, PIER Program, C...

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

198

Diffusive Shock Acceleration in Unmodified Relativistic, Oblique Shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from a fully relativistic Monte Carlo simulation of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in unmodified shocks. The computer code uses a single algorithmic sequence to smoothly span the range from nonrelativistic speeds to fully relativistic shocks of arbitrary obliquity, providing a powerful consistency check. While known results are obtained for nonrelativistic and ultra-relativistic parallel shocks, new results are presented for the less explored trans- relativistic regime and for oblique, fully relativistic shocks. We find, for a wide trans-relativistic range extending to shock Lorentz factors >30, that the particle spectrum produced by DSA varies strongly from the canonical f(p) proportional to p^{-4.23} spectrum known to result in ultra-relativistic shocks. Trans- relativistic shocks may play an important role in gamma-ray bursts and other sources and most relativistic shocks will be highly oblique.

Donald C. Ellison; Glen P. Double

2004-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

199

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

On Demand Guarantees in Iran.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??On Demand Guarantees in Iran This thesis examines on demand guarantees in Iran concentrating on bid bonds and performance guarantees. The main guarantee types and… (more)

Ahvenainen, Laura

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Transportation Demand Management Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Demand Management Plan FALL 2009 #12;T r a n s p o r t a t i o n D e m a n d M a n the transportation impacts the expanded enrollment will have. Purpose and Goal The primary goal of the TDM plan is to ensure that adequate measures are undertaken and maintained to minimize the transportation impacts

202

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

204

Shock Tube Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock accelerated flows exhibit some of the most violent and complex mechanisms in nature by which two separate fluids can be mixed. The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is generated when a perturbed interface between two fluids is impulsively accelerated by a shock wave. In order to further study the phenomenon of the RMI, a new shock tube will be designed. This shock tube will have the capability to change the angle of inclination, allowing for a diverse possibility of fluid interfaces, and provide two driver sections to allow for dual shock capability. The tube was designed to accommodate a 2.5 MACH shockwave, and incorporated a factor of safety of 3 in the design. A modular approach to design was followed to allow further diversification of the shock tube by changing the configuration of the modules. A circular driver section was used to maximize volume and a square driven section was used to minimize affects from the boundary layer. A slide rail mechanism was devised for changing the diaphragms which allows a single person to change the diaphragm in a timely manner. The entire tube is supported on an I-beam to maintain the rigidity of the system while inclined. To accommodate a variable inclination, a hybrid winch support system was designed. A winch changes the angle of the tube and a telescoping support system maintains the position during experimentation. It was determined after running COSMOS finite element stress analysis, that with the 2.5 MPa internal pressure associated with a 2.5 MACH shock wave, a 19.05 mm sidewall thickness was needed to provide a factor of safety of 3.

Koppenberger, Peter K.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

US military expenditures to protect the use of Persian Gulf oil for motor vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on US dependence on foreign oil when he testi?ed that ‘‘US dependence on foreign oil is not to reduce militaryincrease in oil prices, at a minimum because foreign demand

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Risk analysis in oil and gas projects : a case study in the Middle East  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global demand for energy is rising around the world. Middle East is a major supplier of oil and gas and remains an important region for any future oil and gas developments. Meanwhile, managing oil and gas projects are ...

Zand, Emad Dolatshahi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Tactile robotic mapping of unknown surfaces: An application to oil well exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World oil demand and advanced oil recovery techniques have made it economically attractive to rehabilitate previously abandoned oil wells. This requires relatively fast mapping of the shape and location of the down-hole ...

Mazzini, Francesco

208

Numerical overcooling in shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a study of cooling in radiative shocks simulated with smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and adaptive mesh refinement codes. We obtain a similarity solution for a shock-tube problem in the presence of radiative cooling, and test how well the solution is reproduced in Gadget and Flash. Shock broadening governed by the details of the numerical scheme (artificial viscosity or Riemann solvers) leads to potentially significant overcooling in both codes. We interpret our findings in terms of a resolution criterion, and apply it to realistic simulations of cosmological accretion shocks onto galaxy haloes, cold accretion and thermal feedback from supernovae or active galactic nuclei. To avoid numerical overcooling of accretion shocks onto haloes that should develop a hot corona requires a particle or cell mass resolution of 10^6 M_sun, which is within reach of current state-of-the-art simulations. At this mass resolution, thermal feedback in the interstellar medium of a galaxy requires temperatures of s...

Creasey, Peter; Bower, Richard G; Lacey, Cedric G

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bohi and W. D. Montgomery, Oil Prices, Energy Security, andand I. K. Paik, "Oil Price Shocks and the Macroeconomy: Whatto Worse: Impacts of the 1986 Oil Price Collapse, ENR90-08,

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

OECD Crude "Demand" Remains Flat Between 1st and 2nd Quarters  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: As we enter the year 2000, we can expect crude oil demand to follow the usual pattern and remain relatively flat in OECD countries between first and second quarters. Note that for OECD, product demand is greater than crude use. These areas import products from outside the region. While product demand falls during the second and third quarters, crude inputs to refineries remain high enough to allow for some product stock building Additionally, purchases of crude oil exceed inputs to refineries for a time, allowing crude oil stocks to build as well in order to cover the shortfall between crude oil production and demand during the fourth and first quarters. Price can strengthen during the "weak product demand" summer months when the market feels stock building is inadequate to meet the

211

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 15 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 16 for eleven building categories 17 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

212

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Module calculates

213

On Demand Paging Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The power consumption of the network interface plays a major role in determining the total operating lifetime of wireless handheld devices. On demand paging has been proposed earlier to reduce power consumption in cellular networks. In this scheme, a low power secondary radio is used to wake up the higher power radio, allowing the latter to sleep or remain off for longer periods of time. In this paper we present use of Bluetooth radios to serve as a paging channel for the 802.11 wireless LAN. We have implemented an on-demand paging scheme on a WLAN consisting of iPAQ PDAs equipped with Bluetooth radios and Cisco Aironet wireless networking cards. Our results show power saving ranging from 19% to 46% over the present 802.11b standard operating modes with negligible impact on performance.

Bluetooth Radios On; Yuvraj Agarwal; Rajesh K. Gupta

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT Companion Report to the California Energy Demand 2006-2016 Staff Energy Demand Forecast Report STAFFREPORT June 2005 CEC-400 .......................................................................................................................................1-1 ENERGY DEMAND FORECASTING AT THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION: AN OVERVIEW

215

Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY A 20-year forecast of electricity demand is a required of any forecast of electricity demand and developing ways to reduce the risk of planning errors that could arise from this and other uncertainties in the planning process. Electricity demand is forecast

216

TIMING OF SHOCK WAVES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to means for ascertaining the instant of arrival of a shock wave in an exploslve charge and apparatus utilizing this means to coordinate the timing of two operations involving a short lnterval of time. A pair of spaced electrodes are inserted along the line of an explosive train with a voltage applied there-across which is insufficient to cause discharge. When it is desired to initiate operation of a device at the time the explosive shock wave reaches a particular point on the explosive line, the device having an inherent time delay, the electrodes are located ahead of the point such that the ionization of the area between the electrodes caused by the traveling explosive shock wave sends a signal to initiate operation of the device to cause it to operate at the proper time. The operated device may be photographic equipment consisting of an x-ray illuminating tube.

Tuck, J.L.

1955-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: The outlook for heating oil costs this winter, due to high crude oil costs and tight heating oil supplies, breaks down to an expected increase in heating expenditures for a typical oil-heated household of more than $200 this winter, the result of an 18% increase in the average price and an 11% increase in consumption. The consumption increase is due to the colder than normal temperatures experienced so far this winter and our expectations of normal winter weather for the rest of this heating season. Last winter, Northeast heating oil (and diesel fuel) markets experienced an extremely sharp spike in prices when a severe weather situation developed in late January. It is virtually impossible to gauge the probability of a similar (or worse) price shock recurring this winter,

218

Net Demand3 Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contract Number: DE-FE0004002 (Subcontract: S013-JTH-PPM4002 MOD 00) Summary The US DOE has identified a number of materials that are both used by clean energy technologies and are at risk of supply disruptions in the short term. Several of these materials, especially the rare earth elements (REEs) yttrium, cerium, and lanthanum were identified by DOE as critical (USDOE 2010) and are crucial to the function and performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) 1. In addition, US DOE has issued a second Request For Information regarding uses of and markets for these critical materials (RFI;(USDOE 2011)). This report examines how critical materials demand for SOFC applications could impact markets for these materials and vice versa, addressing categories 1,2,5, and 6 in the RFI. Category 1 – REE Content of SOFC Yttria (yttrium oxide) is the only critical material (as defined for the timeframe of interest for SOFC) used in SOFC 2. Yttrium is used as a dopant in the SOFC’s core ceramic cells.. In addition, continuing developments in SOFC technology will likely further reduce REE demand for SOFC, providing credible scope for at least an additional 50 % reduction in REE use if desirable. Category 2 – Supply Chain and Market Demand SOFC developers expect to purchase

J. Thijssen Llc

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Shock destruction armor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock destruction armor system is constructed and arranged to destroy the force of impact of a projectile by shock hydrodynamics. The armor system is designed to comprise a plurality of superimposed armor plates each preferably having a thickness less than five times the projectile's diameter and are preferably separated one-from-another by a distance at least equal to one-half of the projectile's diameter. The armor plates are effective to hydrodynamically and sequentially destroy the projectile. The armor system is particularly adapted for use on various military vehicles, such as tanks, aircraft and ships.

Froeschner, Kenneth E. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes China's coal industry by focusing on four related areas. First, data are reviewed to identify the major drivers of historical and future coal demand. Second, resource constraints and transport bottlenecks are analyzed to evaluate demand and growth scenarios. The third area assesses the physical requirements of substituting coal demand growth with other primary energy forms. Finally, the study examines the carbon- and environmental implications of China's past and future coal consumption. There are three sections that address these areas by identifying particular characteristics of China's coal industry, quantifying factors driving demand, and analyzing supply scenarios: (1) reviews the range of Chinese and international estimates of remaining coal reserves and resources as well as key characteristics of China's coal industry including historical production, resource requirements, and prices; (2) quantifies the largest drivers of coal usage to produce a bottom-up reference projection of 2025 coal demand; and (3) analyzes coal supply constraints, substitution options, and environmental externalities. Finally, the last section presents conclusions on the role of coal in China's ongoing energy and economic development. China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. In 2007 Chinese coal production contained more energy than total Middle Eastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand after 2001 created supply strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about sustainability. Urbanization, heavy industrial growth, and increasing per-capita income are the primary interrelated drivers of rising coal usage. In 2007, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement production accounted for 66% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units would save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand for the power sector. A new wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. If coal to chemicals capacity reaches 70 million tonnes and coal-to-liquids capacity reaches 60 million tonnes, coal feedstock requirements would add an additional 450 million tonnes by 2025. Even with more efficient growth among these drivers, China's annual coal demand is expected to reach 3.9 to 4.3 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not reversed China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Substitution is a matter of scale: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth of 200 million tonnes would require 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas (compared to 2007 growth of 13 BCM), 48 GW of nuclear (compared to 2007 growth of 2 GW), or 86 GW of hydropower capacity (compared to 2007 growth of 16 GW). Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on a high growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China has a low proportion of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport capacity. Furthermore, transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transportation oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 million tonnes by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets.

Aden, Nathaniel; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Factor demand linkages and the business cycle: Interpreting aggregate fluctuations as sectoral fluctuations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stylized fact that need to be addressed by any theory of the business cycle. Whether the comovement between sectors and the aggregate business cycle originates from aggregate shocks or sectoral shocks ampli?ed by sectoral interactions, or a combination... Factor demand linkages and the business cycle: interpreting aggregate ?uctuations as sectoral ?uctuations. Sean Holly Ivan Petrella Faculty of Economics and Centre for International Macroeconomics and Finance (CIMF), University of Cambridge...

Petrella, I; Holly, Sean

222

Eastern Mediterranean Region Overview of oil and natural gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

demand. In Cyprus, Lebanon, and the Palestinian Territories oil exploration and development is still in its infancy, however each hopes to capitalize on successful ...

223

Energy and Financial Markets Overview: Crude Oil Price Formation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 ... oil demand growth, slow supply growth and tight spare capacity 22 Richard Newell, May 5, 2011

224

Shocking Results from Diamond Anvil Cell Experiments  

Shocked behavior in microscopic samples can consist of the behavior of shocked explosives before chemistry begins or the high density, ...

225

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Demands..xi Annual natural gas demand for each alternativeused in natural gas demand projections. 34

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

International Energy Outlook 1999 - World Oil Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil.gif (4669 bytes) oil.gif (4669 bytes) A moderate view of future oil market developments is reflected in IEO99. Sustained high levels of oil prices are not expected, whereas continued expansion of the oil resource base is anticipated. The crude oil market was wracked with turbulence during 1998, as prices fell by one-third on average from 1997 levels. Even without adjusting for inflation, the world oil price in 1998 was the lowest since 1973. The declining oil prices were influenced by an unexpected slowdown in the growth of energy demand worldwide—less than any year since 1990—and by increases in oil supply, particularly in 1997. Although the increase in world oil production in 1998 was smaller than in any year since 1993, efforts to bolster prices by imposing further limits on production were

227

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimum demand and Maximum demand incorporate assumptionslevels, or very minor Maximum demand household size, growthvehicles in Increasing Maximum demand 23 mpg truck share

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Resource supply shocks and the interest rate  

SciTech Connect

Using a model of optimal economic growth with exhaustible resources, the author focuses on a real shock as an essential element of a model of ecomomic fluctuations that contributes substantially to variations in the interest rate, and output. When there occurs a sudden negative resource supply shock, the rate of extraction of the resource declines. Along the optimal path with capital stock fixed in the short run, the output-capital ratio and the real interest rate fall instantaneously. The hypothesis is tested with the quarterly US data using estimation techniques of Vector Autoregressions (VARs). Included are five variables in the VAR model: crude oil price, price level, interest rate, industrial production, and copper price. The general vector autoregressive models are estimated with a prior distribution imposed on the parameters of the model. The period of fit is 1958 to 1983. Impulse response functions of the system and historical decompositions of the time series are investigated. Empirical studies support the derived working hypothesis that real interest rate falls instantaneously and then slowly recovers in the long run when there occurs a negative resource supply shock.

Kang, M.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

61. Nelson, D. C. Oil Shale: New Technologies Defining New Opportunities. Presented at the Platts Rockies Gas & Oil Conference, Denver, CO, April  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

61. Nelson, D. C. Oil Shale: New Technologies Defining New Opportunities. Presented at the Platts I, II Modeling of the In-Situ Production of Oil from .',1 l ',".1" Oil Shale ilil 'I' 'I~ :' l of conventional oil reserves amidst increasing liquid fuel demand in the world have renewed interest in oil shale

Kulp, Mark

230

Dividends with Demand Response  

SciTech Connect

To assist facility managers in assessing whether and to what extent they should participate in demand response programs offered by ISOs, we introduce a systematic process by which a curtailment supply curve can be developed that integrates costs and other program provisions and features. This curtailment supply curve functions as bid curve, which allows the facility manager to incrementally offer load to the market under terms and conditions acceptable to the customer. We applied this load curtailment assessment process to a stylized example of an office building, using programs offered by NYISO to provide detail and realism.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Goldman, Charles; Sezgen, O.; Pratt, D.

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

Total OECD Oil Stocks*  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low levels. EIA expects inventories to remain low through the coming year. This increases the potential for price volatility through the rest of the winter, and into the next gasoline season. Inventories are a good measure of the supply/demand balance that affects prices. A large over-supply (production greater than demand) will put downward pressure on prices, while under-supply will push prices upward. As global oil production changed relative to demand, the world moved from a period of over-supply in 1998 to one of under-supply in 1999 and 2000. OECD inventories illustrate the changes in the world petroleum balance. OECD inventories rose to high levels during 1997 and 1998 when production exceeded demand and prices dropped to around $10 per barrel in

232

Total OECD Oil Stocks*  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low levels. EIA expects inventories to remain low through the coming year. This increases the potential for price volatility through the winter, and even extending to the next gasoline season. Inventories are a good measure of the supply/demand balance that effects prices. A large over-supply (production greater than demand) will put downward pressure on prices, while under-supply will push prices upward. As global oil production changed relative to demand, the world moved from a period of over-supply in 1998 to one of under-supply in 1999 and 2000. OECD inventories illustrate the changes in the world petroleum balance. OECD inventories rose to high levels during 1997 and 1998 when production exceeded demand and prices dropped to around $10 per barrel in

233

Total OECD Oil Stocks*  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low levels. EIA expects inventories to remain low through the coming year. This increases the potential for price volatility through the winter, and even extending to the next gasoline season. Inventories are a good measure of the supply/demand balance that effects prices. A large over-supply (production greater than demand) will put downward pressure on prices, while under-supply will push prices upward. As global oil production changed relative to demand, the world moved from a period of over-supply in 1998 to one of under-supply in 1999 and 2000. OECD inventories illustrate the changes in the world petroleum balance. OECD inventories rose to high levels during 1997 and 1998 when production exceeded demand and prices dropped to around $10 per barrel in

234

Estimating the effect of future oil prices on petroleum engineering project investment yardsticks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study proposes two methods, (1) a probabilistic method based on historical oil prices and (2) a method based on Gaussian simulation, to model future prices of oil. With these methods to model future oil prices, we can calculate the ranges of uncertainty in traditional probability indicators based on cash flow analysis, such as net present values, net present value to investment ratio and internal rate of return. We found that conventional methods used to quantify uncertainty which use high, low and base prices produce uncertainty ranges far narrower than those observed historically. These methods fail because they do not capture the "shocks" in oil prices that arise from geopolitical events or supply-demand imbalances. Quantifying uncertainty is becoming increasingly important in the petroleum industry as many current investment opportunities in reservoir development require large investments, many in harsh exploration environments, with intensive technology requirements. Insight into the range of uncertainty, particularly for downside, may influence our investment decision in these difficult areas.

Mendjoge, Ashish V

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. nepdg_251_500.pdf. Demand for Fossil Fuels. Renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply sooner or later, as indeed it already has in the casc of United States domestic oil drilling. Recognition also is growing that our air and land can no longer absorb unlimited quantities of waste from fossil fuel extraction and combustion. As that day draws nearer, policymakers will have no realistic alternative but to turn to sources of power that today make up a viable but small part of America's energy picture. And they will be

236

World Crude Production Not Keeping Pace with Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: The crude market is the major factor behind todayÂ’s low stocks. This graph shows the balance between world production and demand for petroleum. Normally, production exceeds demand in the summer, building stocks, and is less than demand in the winter months, drawing the stocks back down (dark blue areas). However, production exceeded demand through most of 1997 and 1998, building world stocks to very high levels and driving prices down. But the situation reversed in 1999. Recently, there has been more petroleum demand than supply, requiring the use of stocks to meet petroleum needs. Following the extremely low crude oil prices at the beginning of 1999, OPEC agreed to remove about 6% of world production from the market in order to work off excess inventories and bring prices back up.

237

Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation By Tansa Musa zones and do not respect size limits in their quest for maximum financial returns. "I lack words economy. China's demand for hardwood drives illegal logging says "Both illegal and authorized

238

Estimating a Demand System with Nonnegativity Constraints: Mexican Meat Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Properties of the AIDS Generalized Maximum Entropy Estimator 24 #12;Estimating a Demand SystemEstimating a Demand System with Nonnegativity Constraints: Mexican Meat Demand Amos Golan* Jeffrey with nonnegativity constraints is presented. This approach, called generalized maximum entropy (GME), is more

Perloff, Jeffrey M.

239

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST Demand Forecast report is the product of the efforts of many current and former California Energy Commission staff. Staff contributors to the current forecast are: Project Management and Technical Direction

240

Market assessment for shale oil  

SciTech Connect

This study identified several key issues on the cost, timeliness, and ease with which shale oil can be introduced into the United States' refining system. The capacity of the existing refining industry to process raw shale oil is limited by the availability of surplus hydrogen for severe hydrotreating. The existing crude oil pipeline system will encounter difficulties in handling raw shale oil's high viscosity, pour point, and contaminant levels. The cost of processing raw shale oil as an alternate to petroleum crude oil is extremely variable and primarily dependent upon the percentage of shale oil run in the refinery, as well as the availability of excess hydrogen. A large fraction of any shale oil which is produced will be refined by the major oil companies who participate in the shale oil projects and who do not anticipate problems in processing the shale oil in their refineries. Shale oil produced for sale to independent refiners will initially be sold as boiler fuel. A federal shale oil storage program might be feasible to supplement the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Based on refinery configurations, hydrogen supply, transportation systems, and crude availability, eleven refineries in Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADDs) 2A and 2B have been identified as potential processors of shale oil. Based on refining technology and projected product demands to the year 2000, shale oil will be best suited to the production of diesel fuel and jet fuel. Tests of raw shale oil in boilers are needed to demonstrate nitrogen oxide emissions control.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Microsoft PowerPoint - GlobalOilEcon.ppt  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Globalization, Oil Prices and Globalization, Oil Prices and U.S. Economic Activity Stephen Brown Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas 2008 Energy Conference U.S. Energy Information Administration Globalization, Oil Price Shocks and U.S. Economic Activity Nathan Balke, Stephen Brown, Mine Yücel March 31, 2008 I. Introduction. What are the economic consequences to the United States of an increase in the oil price? Conventional thinking: oil supply shock * Higher oil price * Slower GDP growth * Increased price level Real oil price and recessions (shaded) Index, 1982 = 100 0 30 60 90 120 150 48 51 54 57 60 63 66 69 72 75 78 81 84 87 90 93 96 99 02 05 Empirical evidence of a negative relationship is mixed: For: Mork and Hall (1980), Hamilton (1983, 2003), Balke, Brown, and Yücel (2002), Hamilton and Herrera (2004),

242

Coal in transition 1980--2000 demand considerations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The usefulness of the Brookhaven model, TESOM, lies in its exploration of the demand side of the energy system. Sectors where coal may be substituted for other energy forms are identified, and attractive technologies are highlighted. The results of the runs accord well with intuitive expectations. The increasing prices of oil and natural gas usually imply that (a) coal synthetics become increasingly attractive technologies, except in the High Demand and CRUNCH Cases (b) nuclear and hydro-electric generation are preferred technologies, (c) coal steam electric, even with expensive scrubbers, becomes more attractive than oil or gas steam electric by year 1990, (d) fluidized bed combustion for electricity generation is cost effective (with relatively small environmental impacts) when compared to oil, gas and coal steam electric. FBC process steam exhibits similar behavior. In the High Demand and CRUNCH scenarios, technologies such as solar electric, which are usually not chosen on the basis of cost, enter the solution because meeting demands has become extremely difficult. As the allowed coal expansion rate becomes a limiting factor, coal synthetics manufacturing becomes an unattractive alternative. This is due both to the need for coal electric generation to meet high electricity demand levels, and to the inefficiencies in the manufacturing process. Due to preferred allocation of coal to electricity generation or synthetics, direct coal use is reduced, although this is normally a preferred option.

Kydes, A S; Cherniavsky, E A

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Demand Response | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand response provides an opportunity for consumers to play a significant role in the operation of the electric grid by reducing or shifting their electricity usage during peak periods in response to time-based rates or other forms of financial incentives. Demand response programs are being used by electric system planners and operators as resource options for balancing supply and demand. Such programs can lower the cost of electricity in wholesale markets, and in turn, lead to lower retail rates. Methods of engaging customers in demand response efforts include offering time-based rates such as time-of-use pricing, critical peak pricing, variable peak pricing, real time pricing, and critical peak rebates. It also includes direct load control programs which provide the

244

ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT STAFFREPORT June 2005 ..............................................................................3 Residential Forecast Comparison ..............................................................................................5 Nonresidential Forecast Comparisons

245

U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: Consistent with OECD inventories, U.S. inventories are low. They have been well below the normal range for over one year. Crude oil stocks in the United States, while tending to increase of late toward more normal levels, remain well below average. At the end of December, crude oil stocks were near 289 million barrels, about 4% below the 5-year average, and slightly higher than at the end of 1999. The latest weekly data, for the week ending January 19, show U.S. crude oil stocks at 286 million barrels, just about a million barrels above their level a year ago. Near-term tightness in U.S. crude oil markets have kept current prices above forward prices, reflecting current strength in crude oil demand relative to supply. Relatively strong U.S. oil demand next year should keep crude oil

246

Overview of Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

08 PJM 08 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Overview of Demand Response PJM ©2008 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Growth, Statistics, and Current Footprint AEP, Dayton, ComEd, & DUQ Dominion Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Current PJM RTO Statistics Current PJM RTO Statistics PJM Mid-Atlantic Integrations completed as of May 1 st , 2005 ©2008 PJM

247

Desalination shocks in microstructures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Salt transport in bulk electrolytes is limited by diffusion and convection, but in microstructures with charged surfaces (e.g. microfluidic devices, porous media, soils, or biological tissues) surface conduction and electro-osmotic flow also contribute to ionic fluxes. For small applied voltages, these effects lead to well known linear electrokinetic phenomena. In this paper, we predict some surprising nonlinear dynamics that can result from the competition between bulk and interfacial transport at higher voltages. When counter-ions are selectively removed by a membrane or electrode, a "desalination shock" can propagate through the microstructure, leaving in its wake an ultrapure solution, nearly devoid of co-ions and colloidal impurities. We elucidate the basic physics of desalination shocks and develop a mathematical theory of their existence, structure, and stability, allowing for slow variations in surface charge or channel geometry. Via asymptotic approximations and similarity solutions, we show that des...

Mani, Ali

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Chondrules and Nebular Shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beneath the fusion-encrusted surfaces of the most primitive stony meteorites lies not homogeneous rock, but a profusion of millimeter-sized igneous spheres. These chondrules, and their centimeter-sized counterparts, the calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, comprise more than half of the volume fraction of chondritic meteorites. They are the oldest creations of the solar system. Their chemical composition matches that of the solar photosphere in all but the most volatile of elements, reflecting their condensation from the same pristine gas that formed the sun. In this invited editorial, we review the nebular shock wave model of Desch and Connolly (Meteoritics and Planetary Science 2002, 37, 183) that seeks to explain their origin. While the model succeeds in reproducing the unique petrological signatures of chondrules, the origin of the required shock waves in protoplanetary disks remains a mystery. Outstanding questions are summarized, with attention paid briefly to competing models.

Chiang, E I

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Chondrules and Nebular Shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beneath the fusion-encrusted surfaces of the most primitive stony meteorites lies not homogeneous rock, but a profusion of millimeter-sized igneous spheres. These chondrules, and their centimeter-sized counterparts, the calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, comprise more than half of the volume fraction of chondritic meteorites. They are the oldest creations of the solar system. Their chemical composition matches that of the solar photosphere in all but the most volatile of elements, reflecting their condensation from the same pristine gas that formed the sun. In this invited editorial, we review the nebular shock wave model of Desch and Connolly (Meteoritics and Planetary Science 2002, 37, 183) that seeks to explain their origin. While the model succeeds in reproducing the unique petrological signatures of chondrules, the origin of the required shock waves in protoplanetary disks remains a mystery. Outstanding questions are summarized, with attention paid briefly to competing models.

E. I. Chiang

2002-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

250

A Shocking Solar Nebula?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been suggested that shock waves in the solar nebula formed the high temperature materials observed in meteorites and comets. It is shown that the temperatures at the inner rim of the solar nebula could have been high enough over a sufficient length of time to produce chondrules, CAIs, refractory dust grains and other high-temperature materials observed in comets and meteorites. The solar bipolar jet flow may have produced an enrichment of 16O in the solar nebula over time and the chondrule oxygen isotopic reservoirs are possibly due to temporal changes in the relative position of the inner edge of the solar nebula and the subsequent strength of the solar bipolar jet flow. As such, nebula heating models, such as the shock model, are not required to explain the formation of most high-temperature chondritic components

Liffman, Kurt

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

GPRS Based Remote Monitoring and Controlling System for Oil Delivery Truck  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the oil retail market, to participate into the whole oil sale process is an urgent demand for oil retail company. As a respond to this situation, a GPRS based remote monitoring and controlling system for oil delivery truck is proposed in this paper. ... Keywords: GPRS, oil delivery, ATmega16

Yang Jia-zhi; Shen Xian-hao

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Water issues associated with heavy oil production.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

253

WORKING PAPER SERIESFEDERAL RESERVE BANK of ATLANTA WORKING PAPER SERIES Crude Substitution: The Cyclical Dynamics of Oil Prices and the Skill Premium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Higher oil-price shocks benefit unskilled workers relative to skilled workers: At the businesscycle frequency, energy prices and the skill premia display a strong, negative correlation. We assess the robustness of this negative correlation using several methods and data sources, including sector-level data. We find that the negative correlation is robust to different de-trending procedures, and the wages of unskilled workers in energy-intensive industries have a larger positive correlation with oil prices. We also estimate the parameters of an aggregate technology, which uses, among other inputs, energy and heterogeneous skills. We find that both capital-skill and capital-energy complementarity are responsible for this correlation pattern. As energy prices rise, the use of capital decreases and the demand for unskilled labor relative to skilled labor increases, resulting in lower skill premia. JEL classification: E24, E32, J24 Key words: skill heterogeneity, energy prices, business cycles, capital-skill complementarity

Linnea Polgreen; Pedro Silos; Linnea Polgreen; Pedro Silos; Nir Jaimovich; Karsten Jeske; Jim Nason; B. Ravikumar; Víctor Ríos-rull; Ellis Tallman; Robert Tamura

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

A new era for oil prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 2003 the international oil market has been moving away from the previous 20-year equilibrium in which prices fluctuated around $25/bbl (in today's dollars). The single most important reason is that growing demand has ...

Mitchell, John V.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model By Tancred C.M. Lidderdale This article first appeared in the Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995, Energy Information Administration, DOE/EIA-0202(95) (Washington, DC, July 1995), pp. 33-42, 83-85. The regression results and historical data for production, inventories, and imports have been updated in this presentation. Contents * Introduction o Table 1. Oxygenate production capacity and demand * Oxygenate demand o Table 2. Estimated RFG demand share - mandated RFG areas, January 1998 * Fuel ethanol supply and demand balance o Table 3. Fuel ethanol annual statistics * MTBE supply and demand balance o Table 4. EIA MTBE annual statistics * Refinery balances

256

Economic Effects of High Oil Prices (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The AEO2006 projections of future energy market conditions reflect the effects of oil prices on the macroeconomic variables that affect oil demand, in particular, and energy demand in general. The variables include real GDP growth, inflation, employment, exports and imports, and interest rates.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Demand Response Programs, 6. edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 EMCS EPACT ERCOT FCM FERC FRCC demand side managementEnergy Regulatory Commission (FERC). EPAct began the processin wholesale markets, which FERC Order 888 furthered by

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Oil recovery process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An on-site, in-line process and system is claimed for recovering oil from oil-bearing subterranean formations which involves the production, modification, dilution and injection of a polymer solution, preferably consisting essentially of an aqueous solution of a partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide, having injectivity and mobility properties capable of meeting the specific permeability requirements of substantially any subterranean formation to be achieved. The polymer solutions prepared by the process and system can be used as drive fluids for displacing oil (secondary polymer flood) in an oil-bearing formation, as mobility buffers to follow micellar dispersion floods in the conjoint presence of chemical reagents in other chemical floods (e.g., surfactant, caustic, etc.), or they can follow a water flood. The solutions can also be used to promote pipelining of high viscosity crude oil. Irrespective of the use to which the solutions are put, the process and system enable the polymer solutions to be customized, or tailor-made, so to speak, to meet the performance demands of the environment in which they are to be used, whether it be an oil-bearing formation or a pipeline.

Argabright, P.A.; Rhudy, J.S.

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

260

OPEC production: Untapped reserves, world demand spur production expansion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet projected world oil demand, almost all members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) have embarked on ambitious capacity expansion programs aimed at increasing oil production capabilities. These expansion programs are in both new and existing oil fields. In the latter case, the aim is either to maintain production or reduce the production decline rate. However, the recent price deterioration has led some major OPEC producers, such as Saudi Arabia and Iran, to revise downward their capacity plans. Capital required for capacity expansion is considerable. Therefore, because the primary source of funds will come from within each OPEC country, a reasonably stable and relatively high oil price is required to obtain enough revenue for investing in upstream projects. This first in a series of two articles discusses the present OPEC capacity and planned expansion in the Middle East. The concluding part will cover the expansion plans in the remaining OPEC countries, capital requirements, and environmental concerns.

Ismail, I.A.H. (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, Vienna (Austria))

1994-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Shock waves in thermal lensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review experimental investigation on spatial shock waves formed by the self-defocusing action of a laser beam propagation in a disordered thermal nonlinear media.

Gentilini, S; DeRe, E; Conti, C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

World oil use is projected to grow to 98 million b/d in 2015 and 118 million b/d in 2030. Total world natural gas consumption is projected to rise to 134 Tcf in 2015 and 182 Tcf in 2030. In an era of declining production and increasing demand, economically producing oil and gas from unconventional sources is a key challenge to maintaining global economic growth. Some unconventional hydrocarbon sources are already being developed, including gas shales, tight gas sands, heavy oil, oil sands, and coal bed methane. Roughly 20 years ago, gas production from tight sands, shales, and coals was considered uneconomic. Today, these resources provide 25% of the U.S. gas supply and that number is likely to increase. Venezuela has over 300 billion barrels of unproven extra-heavy oil reserves which would give it the largest reserves of any country in the world. It is currently producing over 550,000 b/d of heavy oil. Unconventional oil is also being produced in Canada from the Athabasca oil sands. 1.6 trillion barrels of oil are locked in the sands of which 175 billion barrels are proven reserves that can be recovered using current technology. Production from 29 companies now operating there exceeds 1 million barrels per day. The report provides an overview of continuous petroleum sources and gives a concise overview of the current status of varying types of unconventional oil and gas resources. Topics covered in the report include: an overview of the history of Oil and Natural Gas; an analysis of the Oil and Natural Gas industries, including current and future production, consumption, and reserves; a detailed description of the different types of unconventional oil and gas resources; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in unconventional resources; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the development of unconventional resources; profiles of key producing regions; and, profiles of key unconventional oil and gas producers.

none

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

The oil price and non-OPEC supplies  

SciTech Connect

The design of any effective oil pricing policy by producers depends on a knowledge of the nature and complexity of supply responses. This book examines the development of non-OPEX oil reserves on a field-by-filed basis to determine how much of the increase in non-OPEC production could be attributable to the price shocks and how much was unambiguously due to decisions and developments that preceded the price shocks. Results are presented in eighteen case-studies of non-OPEC producers. This study will be of interest to economists and planners specializing in the upstream and to policy makers both in oil producing and consuming countries.

Seymour, A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Late January Cold Impacted Both Supply & Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A brief cold spell occurred in the second half of January on top of A brief cold spell occurred in the second half of January on top of the low stocks. Cold weather increases demand, but it also can interfere with supply, as happened this past January. During the week ending January 22, temperatures in the New England and the Mid-Atlantic areas shifted from being15 percent and 17 percent warmer than normal, respectively, to 24 percent and 22 percent colder than normal. The weather change increased weekly heating requirements by about 40 percent. Temperature declines during the winter affect heating oil demand in a number of ways: Space heating demand increases; Electricity peaking demand increases and power generators must turn to distillate to meet the new peak needs; Fuel switching from natural gas to distillate occurs among large

265

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Floorspace Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Service Demand Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Equipment Choice Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Consumption Submodule The commercial demand module (CDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for eight marketed energy sources plus solar thermal energy. For the three major commercial sector fuels, electricity, natural gas and distillate oil, the CDM is a "structural" model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the commercial floorspace stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. For the remaining five marketed "minor fuels," simple econometric projections are made. The commercial sector encompasses business establishments that are not

266

In situ local shock speed and transit shock speed and T. Detman2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In situ local shock speed and transit shock speed S. Watari1 and T. Detman2 1 Communications shock observa- tions. This index is the ratio of the in situ local shock speed and the transit speed; it is 0.6±0.9 for most observed shocks. The local shock speed and the transit speed calculated

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

267

electricity demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords Electricity Consumption electricity demand energy use by sector New Zealand Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Electricity Consumption by Sector (1974 - 2009) (xls, 46.1 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Percentage of Consumers by Sector (2002 - 2009) (xls, 43.5 KiB)

268

The Puzzle of Asymmetric Effects of Oil: New Results from International Stock Markets ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous work has documented that oil price changes have nonlinear effects in the economy and in stock market returns. We show that the nonlinear effects are different depending on whether countries are energy dependent or not. While price soars seem to have a negative effect on the stock markets of oil energy dependent countries, they have a positive effect on the stock markets of oil exporting countries. Stock market returns are negatively affected by oil price volatility in energy dependent countries and positively in oil exporting countries. Moreover, we find bi-directional effects between oil price increases and some oil volatility measures that can be reinforced with volatility feedback. The asymmetric effects found in oil dependent and oil exporting countries seem to fit into the offset mechanism proposed in the literature where oil price shocks interact both with oil price volatility and the economy. The results are also consistent with the finding that oil exporting countries benefit economically from oil price hikes.

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Shocks in supersonic sand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure time-averaged velocity, density, and temperature fields for steady granular flow past a wedge and calculate a speed of granular pressure disturbances (sound speed) equal to 10% of the flow speed. The flow is supersonic, forming shocks nearly identical to those in a supersonic gas. Molecular dynamics simulations of Newton's laws and Monte Carlo simulations of the Boltzmann equation yield fields in quantitative agreement with experiment. A numerical solution of Navier-Stokes-like equations agrees with a molecular dynamics simulation for experimental conditions excluding wall friction.

E. Rericha; C. Bizon; M. D. Shattuck; H. L. Swinney

2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

270

SHOCK-EXCITED OSCILLATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S> A shock-excited quartz crystal oscillator is described. The circuit was specifically designed for application in micro-time measuring work to provide an oscillator which immediately goes into oscillation upon receipt of a trigger pulse and abruptly ceases oscillation when a second pulse is received. To achieve the instant action, the crystal has a prestressing voltage applied across it. A monostable multivibrator receives the on and off trigger pulses and discharges a pulse through the crystal to initiate or terminate oscillation instantly.

Creveling, R.

1957-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

271

National Microalgae Biofuel Production Potential and Resource Demand  

SciTech Connect

Microalgae continue to receive global attention as a potential sustainable "energy crop" for biofuel production. An important step to realizing the potential of algae is quantifying the demands commercial-scale algal biofuel production will place on water and land resources. We present a high-resolution national resource and oil production assessment that brings to bear fundamental research questions of where open pond microalgae production can occur, how much land and water resource is required, and how much energy is produced. Our study suggests under current technology microalgae have the potential to generate 220 billion liters/year of oil, equivalent to 48% of current U.S. petroleum imports for transportation fuels. However, this level of production would require 5.5% of the land area in the conterminous U.S., and nearly three times the volume of water currently used for irrigated agriculture, averaging 1,421 L water per L of oil. Optimizing the selection of locations for microalgae production based on water use efficiency can greatly reduce total water demand. For example, focusing on locations along the Gulf Coast, Southeastern Seaboard, and areas adjacent to the Great Lakes, shows a 75% reduction in water demand to 350 L per L of oil produced with a 67% reduction in land use. These optimized locations have the potential to generate an oil volume equivalent to 17% of imports for transportation fuels, equal to the Energy Independence and Security Act year 2022 "advanced biofuels" production target, and utilizing some 25% of the current irrigation consumptive water demand for the U. S. These results suggest that, with proper planning, adequate land and water are available to meet a significant portion of the U.S. renewable fuel goals.

Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard; Huesemann, Michael H.; Lane, Leonard J.

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

272

Analysis of low stress oil shale Hugoniots  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of low stress Hugoniot data on Anvil Points oil shale was accomplished through careful categorization of data depending upon density. Density is directly related to kerogen content and kerogen content is a strong variable in determining the Hugoniot. For a given density (kerogen content), the shock velocity-particle velocity data show a minimum in shock velocity believed related to yielding in the rock constituent of the oil shale. Low stress Hugoniot data blend smoothly with high pressure data. Further data selection permitted evaluation of the orientation dependence (approximately 15 percent in wave speed) of the shock velocity. Wave propagation speed in a direction normal to the bedding planes is less than that parallel to the bedding planes. A weak minimum in wave speed occurs between 0 and 45/sup 0/.

Munson, D.E.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lvi Southern California Edison filed its SmartConnectinfrastructure (e.g. , Edison Electric Institute, DemandSouthern California Edison Standard Practice Manual

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Commissioning Title Automated Demand Response and Commissioning Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-57384 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Piette, Mary...

275

Demand Uncertainty and Price Dispersion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Demand uncertainty has been recognized as one factor that may cause price dispersion in perfectly competitive markets with costly and perishable capacity. With the persistence… (more)

Li, Suxi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

1995 Demand-Side Managment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1995 January 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels

277

Oil and Oil Derivatives Compliance Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for international connection of oiled residues discharge ... C to + 163°C, fuels, lubricating oils and hydraulic ... fuel of gas turbine, crude oil, lubricating oil ...

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

278

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8 Figure 7: Maximum Demands Savings Intensity due toaddressed in this report. Maximum Demand Savings Intensity (Echelon Figure 7: Maximum Demands Savings Intensity due to

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy efficiency and demand response programs and tariffs.energy efficiency and demand response program and tariffenergy efficiency and demand response programs and tariffs.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency,”Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,technical support from the Demand Response Research Center (

Federspiel, Clifford

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT) The opportunities for demand reduction and cost saving with building demand responsive control vary tremendously with building type...

282

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 2.0 Demand ResponseFully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8.4 Demand Response Integration . . . . . . . . . . .for each day type for the demand response study - moderatefor each day type for the demand response study - moderate

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their partnership in demand response automation research andand Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities”of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 1. “Economic” demand response and real time pricing (Implications of Demand Response Programs in CompetitiveAdvanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Steroids in ... Cirrhosis, Septic Shock, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steroids in ... Cirrhosis, Septic Shock, and Adrenal in pathophysiology of septic shock in patients with and without cirrhosis 3. Justify the role of exogenous corticosteroids in patients with cirrhosis and septic shock 4

290

June 2003VOLATILITY IN NATURAL GAS AND OIL MARKETS * by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Using daily futures price data, I examine the behavior of natural gas and crude oil price volatility since 1990. I test whether there has been a significant trend in volatility, whether there was a short-term increase in volatility during the time of the Enron collapse, and whether natural gas and crude oil price volatilities are interrelated. I also measure the persistence of shocks to volatility and discuss its implications for gas- and oil-related contingent claims.

Robert S. Pindyck; Robert S. Pindyck

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

World Oil Refining Logistics Demand Model "World" Reference Manual  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This manual is intended primarily for use as a reference by analysts applying the WORLD model to regional studies. It also provides overview information on WORLD features of potential interest to managers and analysts.

Information Center

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Rising North Dakota oil production and demand spurs two new ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

One of two new refineries being built in North Dakota broke ground this week. The 20,000-barrel-per-day (bbl/d) Dakota Prairie facility is scheduled to be built in 20 ...

293

AEO Early Release 2013 - oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Growing U.S. oil output and rising vehicle fuel economy to cut Growing U.S. oil output and rising vehicle fuel economy to cut U.S. reliance on foreign oil The United States is expected to continue cutting its dependence on petroleum and liquid fuels imports over the rest of this decade because of growing domestic crude oil production and more fuel-efficient vehicles on America's highways. The new long-term outlook from the U.S. Energy Information Administration shows America's dependence on imported petroleum and liquid fuels will decline from 45 percent of domestic demand last year to 34 percent by 2019. U.S. dependence on imported oil had reached 60 percent as recently as 2005. EIA Administrator Adam Sieminski explains: "The United States will be able to meet more of its own energy needs because of two key

294

Running Out of and Into Oil: Analyzing Global Oil Depletion and Transition Through 2050  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

L. Greene, Janet L. Hopson, and Jia Li L. Greene, Janet L. Hopson, and Jia Li A risk analysis is presented of the peaking of world conventional oil pro- duction and the likely transition to unconventional oil resources such as oil sands, heavy oil, and shale oil. Estimates of world oil resources by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and C. J. Campbell provide alternative views of ultimate world oil resources. A global energy scenario created by the International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis and the World Energy Council provides the context for the risk analysis. A model of oil resource depletion and expansion for 12 world regions is combined with a market equilibrium model of conventional and unconventional oil sup- ply and demand. The model does not use Hubbert curves. Key variables

295

China, India demand cushions prices  

SciTech Connect

Despite the hopes of coal consumers, coal prices did not plummet in 2006 as demand stayed firm. China and India's growing economies, coupled with solid supply-demand fundamentals in North America and Europe, and highly volatile prices for alternatives are likely to keep physical coal prices from wide swings in the coming year.

Boyle, M.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Harnessing the power of demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response can provide a series of economic services to the market and also provide ''insurance value'' under low-likelihood, but high-impact circumstances in which grid reliablity is enhanced. Here is how ISOs and RTOs are fostering demand response within wholesale electricity markets. (author)

Sheffrin, Anjali; Yoshimura, Henry; LaPlante, David; Neenan, Bernard

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Demand Response for Ancillary Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the average and maximum peak demand savings. The electricity1: Average and Maximum Peak Electric Demand Savings during

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California Title Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California...

300

Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: EIA sees a tenuous supply/demand balance over the remainder of 2001 and into the beginning of 2002, as illustrated by the low OECD inventory levels. Global inventories remain low, and need to recover to more adequate levels in order to avoid continued price volatility. While we saw some stocking in April and May, typical third quarter stock builds may not occur. Even with Iraqi oil exports resuming in early July, OPEC was going to need to increase its oil production to account for demand increases over the 2nd half of the year to prevent stocks from falling further. However, they not only haven't agreed to increase production, but agreed to cut production quotas by 1 million barrels per day beginning on September 1! EIA's forecast of a continued low stock cushion implies we not only

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Combined cycle meets Thailand's growing power demands  

SciTech Connect

This article describes how an ample supply of natural gas led the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) to choose gas-fired combustion turbines. Thailand's rapid industrialization, which began in the late 1980's, placed a great strain on the country's electricity supply system. The demand for electricity grew at an astonishing 14% annually. To deal with diminishing reserve capacity margins, the EGAT announced, in 1988, a power development program emphasizing gas-fired combined cycle power plants. Plans included six 320-MW combined cycle blocks at three sites, and an additional 600-MW gas- and oil-fired thermal plant at Bang Pakong. As electricity demand continued to increase, EGAT expanded its plans to include two additional 320-MW combined cycle blocks, a 600-MW combined cycle block, and a 650-MW gas- and oil-fired thermal plant. All are currently in various stages of design and construction.

Sheets, B.A. (Black and Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States)); Takabut, K. (Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand, Nonthaburi (Thailand))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Oil prices in a new light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a clear picture of how oil prices develop, the author steps away from the price levels to which the world is accustomed, and evaluates scientifically. What makes prices jump from one notch to another The move results from a political or economic shock or the perception of a particular position by the futures market and the media. The shock could range from a war or an assassination to a promise of cooperation among OPEC members (when believed by the market) or to speculation about another failure at an OPEC meeting. In the oil market, only a couple of factual figures can provide a floor to the price of oil. The cost of production of oil in the Gulf is around $2 to $3/bbl, and the cost of production of oil (capital and operating costs) in key non-OPEC areas is well under $10/bbl. With some adjustments for transport and quality, a price range of $13/bbl to $16/bbl would correspond to a reasonable sustainable floor price. The reason for prices above the floor price has been a continuous fear of oil supply interruptions. That fear kept prices above the floor price for many years. The fear factor has now almost fully disappeared. The market has gone through the drama of the Iranian Revolution, the Iran-Iraq war, the tanker war, the invasion of Kuwait, and the expulsions of the Iraqis. And still the oil flowed -- all the time. It has become abundantly clear that fears above the oil market were unjustified. Everyone needs to export oil, and oil will flow under the worst circumstances. The demise of the fear factor means that oil prices tend toward the floor price for a prolonged period.

Fesharaki, F. (East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States))

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Higher oil prices: Can OPEC raise prices by cutting production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OPEC's ability to raise prices is evaluated with a model that projects the supply and demand. As part of the model, a new methodology to forecast for the rate of production by non-OPEC nations is developed. A literature review of techniques for estimating oil supply and annual rates of production indicates a new methodology is needed. The new technique incorporates the geological, engineering, and economic aspects of the oil industry by synthesizing curve fitting and econometric techniques. It is used to analyze data for eight regions for non-OPEC oil production: the lower 48 states, Alaska, Canada, Mexico, non-OPEC South America, Western Europe, non-OPEC Africa, and non-OPEC Asia. OPEC's ability to raise prices is examined by tracking the percentage oil US oil demand supplied by imports, the portion of oil demand in Western Europe supplied by local production, the percentage of WOCA oil demand supplied by OPEC and Real OPEC revenues. Results of the model indicate that OPEC can raise oil prices in the early 1990s. OPEC can raise and sustain oil prices near $25 (1982 dollars). Higher oil prices ($35) are not sustainable before 2000 because reduced demand and increased non-OPEC production shrink OPEC revenues below acceptable levels. After 2000, $35 prices are sustainable.

Kaufmann, R.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

global gasoline and diesel price and income elasticities.shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.Habits and Uncertain Relative Prices: Simulating Petrol Con-

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Clinical Effects of Electric Shock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ever-expanding use of electricity in everyday life has resulted in the creation of a sizable body of literature on electric shocks. People are potentially at risk of electric shock whether at home, at work, at school, or during recreation. The documented aftereffects vary in severity as well as body part affected. Thus, there is a need to catalog and understand the extent of the clinical effects of electric shock incidents that have been reported. This report characterizes and summarizes the findings...

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

306

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acknowledgments SUMMARY Electricity Demand ElectricityAdverse Impacts ELECTRICITY DEMAND . . . .Demand forElectricity Sales Electricity Demand by Major Utility

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

building demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

308

Demand Response Research in Spain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Research in Spain Demand Response Research in Spain Speaker(s): Iñigo Cobelo Date: August 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mary Ann Piette The Spanish power system is becoming increasingly difficult to operate. The peak load grows every year, and the permission to build new transmission and distribution infrastructures is difficult to obtain. In this scenario Demand Response can play an important role, and become a resource that could help network operators. The present deployment of demand response measures is small, but this situation however may change in the short term. The two main Spanish utilities and the transmission network operator are designing research projects in this field. All customer segments are targeted, and the research will lead to pilot installations and tests.

309

EIA - AEO2010 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Electricity Demand Figure 69. U.S. electricity demand growth 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 60. Average annual U.S. retail electricity prices in three cases, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel in three cases, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 62. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 63. Levelized electricity costs for new power plants, 2020 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 64. Electricity generating capacity at U.S. nuclear power plants in three cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035

310

Demand for money in China .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research investigates the long-run equilibrium relationship between money demand and its determinants in China over the period 1952-2004 for three definitions of money –… (more)

Zhang, Qing

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Thermal Mass and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Mass and Demand Response Speaker(s): Gregor Henze Phil C. Bomrad Date: November 2, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Janie Page The topic of...

312

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference on Building Commissioning: May 4-6, 2005 Motegi,National Conference on Building Commissioning: May 4-6, 2005Demand Response and Commissioning Mary Ann Piette, David S.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Distillate Demand Strong Last Winter  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Notes: Well, distillate fuel demand wasn't the reason that stocks increased in January 2001 and kept prices from going higher. As you will hear shortly, natural gas prices spiked...

314

Leslie Mancebo (7234) Transportation Demand &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Leslie Mancebo (7234) Transportation Demand & Marketing Coordinator 1 FTE, 1 HC Administrative Vice Chancellor Transportation and Parking Services Clifford A. Contreras (0245) Director 30.10 FTE Alternative Transportation & Marketing Reconciliation Lourdes Lupercio (4723) Michelle McArdle (7512) Parking

Hammock, Bruce D.

315

STEO December 2012 - coal demand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

coal demand seen below 1 billion tons in 2012 for fourth year in a row Coal consumption by U.S. power plants to generate electricity is expected to fall below 1 billion tons in...

316

Fuel oil and kerosene sales, 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite the rise in petroleum products prices, a colder-than-normal winter in the latter part of 1989 spurred an increase in demand for distillate fuel oils. The shipping and electric utilities industries contributed to a significant rise in demand for both distillate and residual fuels oils in 1989. A total of 72.9 billion gallons of fuel oil and kerosene were sold to consumers in 1989, an increase of 3.0 percent over 1988 sales volumes. Of all fuel oil sold during 1989, distillate fuel oil accounted for 68.3 percent, which was an increase over 1988 when distillate fuel oil accounted for 67.2 percent of all fuel oil products sold in the United States. Residual fuel oil's share of total fuel oil sold fell slightly to 29.9 percent from 30.7 percent in 1988. Kerosene followed with a 1.8 percent share, also falling from the previous year when it accounted for a 2.1 percent share of total fuel oil sold. 3 figs., 24 tabs.

Not Available

1991-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

317

UNDERCOMPRESSIVE SHOCK WAVES AND THE DAFERMOS REGULARIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNDERCOMPRESSIVE SHOCK WAVES AND THE DAFERMOS REGULARIZATION STEPHEN SCHECTER Abstract solutions that include only shock waves. Shock waves are required to satisfy the viscous profile criterion for a given viscosity (B(u)u x ) x . Undercompressive shock waves are allowed. We also show that all

318

"End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze...

319

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Oil reserves  

SciTech Connect

As of March 1988, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve inventory totaled 544.9 million barrels of oil. During the past 6 months the Department of Energy added 11.0 million barrels of crude oil to the SPR. During this period, DOE distributed $208 million from the SPR Petroleum Account. All of the oil was purchased from PEMEX--the Mexican national oil company. In FY 1988, $164 million was appropriated for facilities development and management and $439 million for oil purchases. For FY 1989, DOE proposes to obligate $173 million for facilities development and management and $236 million for oil purchases. DOE plans to postpone all further drawdown exercises involving crude oil movements until their effects on cavern integrity are evaluated. DOE and the Military Sealift Command have made progress in resolving the questions surrounding nearly $500,000 in payments for demurrage charges.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Numerical simulation of the shock wave / boundary layer interaction in a shock tube by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical simulation of the shock wave / boundary layer interaction in a shock tube by using a high in a shock tube after the shock wave has reflected at the end wall. When the fluid is viscous, a complex unsteady interaction takes place between the reflected shock wave and the incident boundary layer

322

Shock-compressible-vortex interactions: Computing approximate post-shock fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock-compressible-vortex interactions: Computing approximate post-shock fields G.K. O'Reilly and D of the passage of a planar shock through a steady compressible vortex is developed. To compute the approximate post-shock fields, the steady pre-shock vortex is decomposed into a sum of frozen sinusoidal modes

Barr, Al

323

Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) was introduced in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Part IV Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy #12;#12;Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) was introduced in the fundamentals of shock wave generation and delivery. That is, lithotriptors have changed in form and mode, an acoustic shock wave. This pressure pulse, or shock wave, is responsible for breaking stones. However

Cleveland, Robin

324

Oil Market Simulation model: model documentation report (Task 13). Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the Oil Market Simulation (OMS) model as used by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide forecasts of world oil prices. In addition, the OMS model is used to examine the market responses to changes in oil demand and supply. The current version of the model provides additional OMS simulation capabilities to its predecessor. It performs not only the price and production simulations as before, but also simulations that converge to a user-specified regional demand, supply, or import level. Free world countries are grouped into seven major oil demand regions and eight major oil supply regions. The OMS model consists of three parts: oil demand, non-OPEC oil supply, and OPEC pricing behavior. Regional oil demand in a given year is determined as a function of the average world oil price for the year, the regional level of economic activity for the year, and the oil demand in the previous year. Non-OPEC regional oil supply is specified as a function of world oil price and the regional oil supply in the previous period. OPEC pricing behavior is related to the OPEC capacity utilization rate; OPEC sets the oil price based on the percent utilization of its availabile production capacity and the world oil price in the previous time period. Besides the behavior rules of consumers, non-OPEC producers, and OPEC producers, the OMS model includes some regional demand and supply values that are determined exogenously. These user-determined demand and supply values include: (1) OPEC demand, (2) US Strategic Petroleum reserve fill rates, and (3) the net exports from Centrally Planned Economies. 19 refs., 7 figs., 10 tabs.

Not Available

1985-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

325

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Industrial Demand Module Table 17. Industry Categories Printer Friendly Version Energy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonenergy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonmanufacturing Industries Food and Kindred Products (NAICS 311) Metals-Based Durables (NAICS 332-336) Agricultural Production -Crops (NAICS 111) Paper and Allied Products (NAICS 322) Balance of Manufacturing (all remaining manufacturing NAICS) Other Agriculture Including Livestock (NAICS112- 115) Bulk Chemicals (NAICS 32B) Coal Mining (NAICS 2121) Glass and Glass Products (NAICS 3272) Oil and Gas Extraction (NAICS 211) Hydraulic Cement (NAICS 32731) Metal and Other Nonmetallic Mining (NAICS 2122- 2123) Blast Furnaces and Basic Steel (NAICS 331111) Construction (NAICS233-235)

326

Estimating disaggregated price elasticities in industrial energy demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Econometric energy models are used to evaluate past policy experiences, assess the impact of future policies and forecast energy demand. This paper estimates an industrial energy demand model for the province of Ontario using a linear-logit specification for fuel type equations which are embedded in an aggregate energy demand equation. Short-term, long-term, own- and cross-price elasticities are estimated for electricity, natural gas, oil and coal. Own- and cross-price elasticities are disaggregated to show that overall price elasticities and the energy-constant price elasticities when aggregate energy use is held unchanged. These disaggregations suggest that a substantial part of energy conservation comes from the higher aggregate price of energy and not from interfuel substitution. 13 refs., 2 tabs.

Elkhafif, M.A.T. (Ontario Ministry of Energy, Toronto (Canada))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Both Distillate Supply and Demand Reached Extraordinary Levels This Winter  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: This chart shows some critical differences in distillate supply and demand during this winter heating season, in comparison to the past two winters. Typically, distillate demand peaks during the winter months, but "new supply" (refinery production and net imports) cannot increase as much, so the remaining supply needed is drawn from inventories. This pattern is evident in each of the past two winter heating seasons. This winter, however, the pattern was very different, for several reasons: With inventories entering the season at extremely low levels, a "typical" winter stockdraw would have been nearly impossible, particularly in the Northeast, the region most dependent on heating oil. Demand reached near-record levels in December, as colder-than-normal

328

Why don't fuel prices change as quickly as crude oil prices ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fuel demand is affected mainly by economic conditions, and for heating oil, the weather. ... How do I calculate diesel fuel surcharges? How do I compare heating fuels?

329

Oil futures price curve has steepened over the past six months ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... the future can be used as an indicator of longer term supply and demand expectations. Costs to store oil, opportunity costs associated with long-term market ...

330

Shock compression of precompressed deuterium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Here we report quasi-isentropic dynamic compression and thermodynamic characterization of solid, precompressed deuterium over an ultrafast time scale (< 100 ps) and a microscopic length scale (< 1 {micro}m). We further report a fast transition in shock wave compressed solid deuterium that is consistent with the ramp to shock transition, with a time scale of less than 10 ps. These results suggest that high-density dynamic compression of hydrogen may be possible on microscopic length scales.

Armstrong, M R; Crowhurst, J C; Zaug, J M; Bastea, S; Goncharov, A F; Militzer, B

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil)...

332

National Action Plan on Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Response Response Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group November 18, 2008 November 18, 2008 Daniel Gore Daniel Gore Office of Energy Market Regulation Office of Energy Market Regulation Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The author's views do not necessarily represent the views of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Presentation Contents Presentation Contents Statutory Requirements Statutory Requirements National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response General Discussion on Demand Response and Energy Outlook

333

Updated Hubbert curves analyze world oil supply  

SciTech Connect

The question is not whether, but when, world crude oil production will start to decline, ushering in the permanent oil shock era. While global information for predicting this event is not so straightforward as the data M. King Hubbert used in creating his famous Hubbert Curve that predicted the US (Lower 48 states, or US/48) 1970 oil production peak, there are strong indications that most of the world`s large exploration targets have now been found. Meanwhile, the earth`s population is exploding along with the oil needs of Asia`s developing nations. This article reviews Hubbert`s original analyses on oil discovery and production curves for the US/48 and projects his proven methodology onto global oil discoveries and production as of 1992. The world`s oil discovery curve peaked in 1962, and thence declined, as a Hubbert Curve predicts. However, global production was restricted after the 1973 Arab oil embargo. Otherwise, world production would have peaked in the mid-1990s. Two graphs show alternate versions of future global oil production.

Ivanhoe, L.F. [Novum Corp., Ojai, CA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals. Presented atand Automated Demand Response in Industrial RefrigeratedActions for Industrial Demand Response in California. LBNL-

Mares, K.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Barat, D. Watson. 2006 Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby 2008. Demand Response Spinning ReserveReport 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communications

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Definition: Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Demand Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Demand The rate at which electric energy is delivered to or by a system or part of a system, generally expressed in kilowatts or megawatts, at a given instant or averaged over any designated interval of time., The rate at which energy is being used by the customer.[1] Related Terms energy, electricity generation References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Demand&oldid=480555"

337

Successful demand-side management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is a brief summary of a series of case studies of five publicly-owned utilities that are noted for their success with demand-side management. These utilities are: (1) city of Austin, Texas, (2) Burlington Electric Department in Vermont, (3) Sacramento Municipal Utility District in California, (4) Seattle City Light, and (5) Waverly Light and Power in Iowa. From these case studies, the authors identified a number of traits associated with a successful demand-side management program. These traits are: (1) high rates, (2) economic factors, (3) environmental awareness, (4) state emphasis on integrated resource planning/demand side management, (5) local political support, (6) large-sized utilities, and (7) presence of a champion.

Hadley, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Flanigan, T. [Results Center, Aspen, CO (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

TheU.S.DollarExchangeRateandtheDemandforOil ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using recent advances in panel data estimation techniques, we find that an appreciation of the US dollar exchange rate leads to a significant decline in oil demand for a sample of 65 oil-importing countries. The estimated effectturnsouttobemuch larger than the impact of a shift in the global crude oil price expressed in US dollar. Furthermore, the effect of the US dollar on oil demand tends to be declining over time and, for a subsample of OECD countries, stronger for an appreciation compared to a depreciation of the US dollar.

Selien De Schryder; Gert Peersman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential electricity consumption, the flattening of the demand curves (except Maximum demand) reflects decreasing population growth ratesresidential electricity demand are described in Table 11. For simplicity, end use-specific UEC and saturation rates

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

EIA projections of coal supply and demand  

SciTech Connect

Contents of this report include: EIA projections of coal supply and demand which covers forecasted coal supply and transportation, forecasted coal demand by consuming sector, and forecasted coal demand by the electric utility sector; and policy discussion.

Klein, D.E.

1989-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover,138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW” by 2030, or 14–

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential ofneed to reduce summer peak demand that is used to set demandcustomers and a system peak demand of over 43,000 MW. SPP’s

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with total Statewide peak demand and on peak days isto examine the electric peak demand related to lighting inDaily) - TOU Savings - Peak Demand Charges - Grid Peak -Low

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Tankless Demand Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Water Heaters Tankless Demand Water Heaters August 19, 2013 - 2:57pm Addthis Illustration of an electric demand water heater. At the top of the image, the heating unit is...

345

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand.Oglesby Executive Director #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product to the contributing authors listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad

346

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous California Energy previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare

347

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand Robert P. Oglesby Executive Director #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare the industrial forecast

348

Equilibrium Analysis of the Oil and Gas Field Services Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the response of employment and wages in the US oil and gas …eld services industry to changes in the price of crude petroleum using a time series of quarterly data spanning the period 1972-2002. I …nd that labor quickly reallocates across sectors in response to price shocks but that substantial wage premia are necessary to induce such reallocation. The timing of these premia is at odds with the predictions of standard models — wage premia emerge quite slowly, peaking only as labor adjustment ends and then slowly dissipating. After considering alternative explanations, I argue that a dynamic market clearing model with sluggish movements in industry wide labor demand is capable of rationalizing these …ndings. I proceed to structurally estimate the parameters of the model by minimum distance and …nd that simulated impulse responses match key features of the estimated dynamics. I also provide auxiliary evidence corroborating the implied dynamics of some important unobserved variables. I conclude with a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of the model and implications for future research. I am deeply indebted to Chris House for sharing with me the art of formulating and solving dynamic

Patrick Kline; Patrick Kline

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Description of the global petroleum supply and demand outlook updated for the 1993 edition of the GRI baseline projection of US energy supply and demand, December 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strategic planning of the research and development program carried out by Gas Research Institute (GRI) is supported by an annual GRI baseline projection of U.S. energy supply and demand. Because petroleum products compete in a wide variety of energy uses, oil prices serve as a market clearing force for the entire energy system. A significant portion of the U.S. petroleum supply is imported, and the price of crude oil to U.S. refiners is determined by the international oil trade. Any projection of the U.S. energy situation, therefore, requires the evaluation of the global oil market and the impact of oil price changes on the supply/demand balances of market participants. The 1992 edition of the projection completed in August 1991 assumed that in the aftermath of the war in the Middle East the fundamentals of oil trade would reassert their influence. This did indeed occur and with astonishing speed. In the face of this outlook, GRI has revised its 1993 oil price track downward.

Dreyfus, D.A.; Koklauner, A.B.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Income and Health Spending: Evidence from Oil Price Shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health expenditures as a share of GDP in the United States have more than tripled over the past half-century. A common conjecture is that this is a consequence of rising income. We investigate this hypothesis by instrumenting ...

Acemoglu, Daron

351

Oil-Price Shocks and Retail Energy Prices in Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The views expressed in this paper are those of the author. No responsibility for them should be attributed to the Bank of Canada. iii

Marwan Chacra Issn; Marwan Chacra

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997 Executive Summary Background Demand-side management (DSM) programs consist of the planning, implementing, and monitoring ...

353

Equity Capital Flows and Demand for REITs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the shape of the market demand curve for ... Our results do not support a downward demand curve for ... Charleston, IL 61920, USA e-mail: ...

354

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in...

355

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Long-term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan. B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response> B-4 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

al: Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand ResponseConference on Building Commissioning: April 22 – 24, 2008al: Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data Rate of Electricity Demand Growth Slows, Following the Historical Trend Electricity demand fluctuates in the short term in response to business cycles, weather conditions,...

358

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource Title Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Eto, Joseph H.,...

359

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oakland CA, December. PJM Demand Side Response WorkingPrice Response Program a PJM Economic Load Response ProgramLoad Response Statistics PJM Demand Response Working Group

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulatory Commission (FERC) 2006. “Assessment of DemandRegulatory Commission (FERC) 2007. “Assessment of DemandRegulatory Commission (FERC) 2008a. “Wholesale Competition

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

29 5.6. Peak and hourly demand43 6.6. Peak and seasonal demandthe average percent of peak demand) significantly impact the

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Water demand management in Kuwait  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kuwait is an arid country located in the Middle East, with limited access to water resources. Yet water demand per capita is much higher than in other countries in the world, estimated to be around 450 L/capita/day. There ...

Milutinovic, Milan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Demand-Side Management Glossary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, demand-side management (DSM) programs have grown in significance within the U.S. electric power industry. Such rapid growth has resulted in new terms, standards, and vocabulary used by DSM professionals. This report is a first attempt to provide a consistent set of definitions for the expanding DSM terminology.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Heading off the permanent oil crisis  

SciTech Connect

The 1996 spike in gasoline prices was not a signal of any fundamental worldwide shortage of crude oil. But based on a review of many studies of recoverable crude oil that have been published since the 1950s, it looks as though such a shortfall is now within sight. With world demand for oil growing at 2 percent per year, global production is likely to peak between the years 2007 and 2014. As this time approaches, we can expect prices to rise markedly and, most likely, permanently. Policy changes are needed now to ease the transition to high-priced oil. Oil production will continue, though at a declining rate, for many decades after its peak, and there are enormous amounts of coal, oil sands, heavy oil, and oil shales worldwide that could be used to produce liquid or gaseous substitutes for crude oil, albeit at higher prices. But the facilities for making such synthetic fuels are costly to build and environmentally damaging to operate, and their use would substantially increase carbon dioxide emissions (compared to emissions from products made from conventional crude oil). This paper examines ways of heading of the impending oil crisis. 8 refs., 3 figs.

MacKenzie, J.J. [World Resources Inst., Washington, DC (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Model documentation report: Short-term Integrated Forecasting System demand model 1985. [(STIFS)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) Demand Model consists of a set of energy demand and price models that are used to forecast monthly demand and prices of various energy products up to eight quarters in the future. The STIFS demand model is based on monthly data (unless otherwise noted), but the forecast is published on a quarterly basis. All of the forecasts are presented at the national level, and no regional detail is available. The model discussed in this report is the April 1985 version of the STIFS demand model. The relationships described by this model include: the specification of retail energy prices as a function of input prices, seasonal factors, and other significant variables; and the specification of energy demand by product as a function of price, a measure of economic activity, and other appropriate variables. The STIFS demand model is actually a collection of 18 individual models representing the demand for each type of fuel. The individual fuel models are listed below: motor gasoline; nonutility distillate fuel oil, (a) diesel, (b) nondiesel; nonutility residual fuel oil; jet fuel, kerosene-type and naphtha-type; liquefied petroleum gases; petrochemical feedstocks and ethane; kerosene; road oil and asphalt; still gas; petroleum coke; miscellaneous products; coking coal; electric utility coal; retail and general industry coal; electricity generation; nonutility natural gas; and utility petroleum. The demand estimates produced by these models are used in the STIFS integrating model to produce a full energy balance of energy supply, demand, and stock change. These forecasts are published quarterly in the Outlook. Details of the major changes in the forecasting methodology and an evaluation of previous forecast errors are presented once a year in Volume 2 of the Outlook, the Methodology publication.

Not Available

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Demand Dispatch — Intelligent Demand for a More Efficient Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed therein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. Demand Dispatch: Intelligent Demand for a More Efficient Grid

Keith Dodrill

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

The alchemy of demand response: turning demand into supply  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Paying customers to refrain from purchasing products they want seems to run counter to the normal operation of markets. Demand response should be interpreted not as a supply-side resource but as a secondary market that attempts to correct the misallocation of electricity among electric users caused by regulated average rate tariffs. In a world with costless metering, the DR solution results in inefficiency as measured by deadweight losses. (author)

Rochlin, Cliff

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

OPEC Middle East plans for rising world demand amid uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Middle Eastern members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries must plan for huge increases in oil production capacity yet wonder whether markets for the new output will develop as expected. With worldwide oil consumption rising and non-OPEC output likely to reach its resource limits soon, OPEC member countries face major gains in demand for their crude oil. To meet the demand growth, those with untapped resources will have to invest heavily in production capacity. Most OPEC members with such resources are in the Middle East. But financing the capacity investments remains a challenge. Some OPEC members have opened up to foreign equity participation in production projects, and others may eventually do so as financial pressures grow. That means additions to the opportunities now available to international companies in the Middle East. Uncertainties, however, hamper planning and worry OPEC. Chief among them are taxation and environmental policies of consuming-nation governments. This paper reviews these concerns and provides data on production, pricing, capital investment histories and revenues.

Ismail, I.A.H. [Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, Vienna (Austria)

1996-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

369

US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier Approach Massimo www.cepe.ethz.ch #12;US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier Approach Page 1 of 25 US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier

370

Policy implications of the GRI Baseline Projection of US Energy Supply and Demand to 2010; 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1991 edition of the GRI Baseline Projection of U.S. Energy Supply and Demand is summarized. Three broad implications for the future of the natural gas industry are highlighted: the impact of the Middle East turmoil on the expected price of crude oil and the potentional for increased interfuel price competition between natural gas and petroleum in the mid-1990s if world oil prices return to lower levels.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Microsoft Word - high-oil-price.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Short Term Energy Outlook Short Term Energy Outlook 1 STEO Supplement: Why are oil prices so high? During most of the 1990s, the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price averaged close to $20 per barrel, before plunging to almost $10 per barrel in late 1998 as a result of the Asian financial crisis slowing demand growth while extra supply from Iraq was entering the market for the first time since the Gulf War. Subsequently, as Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) producers more closely adhered to a coordinated production quota and reduced output, crude oil prices not only recovered, but increased to about $30 per barrel as demand grew as Asian economies recovered. The most recent increase in crude oil prices began in 2004, when they almost doubled from 2003 levels, rising from about $30 per barrel at the end

372

Surfactants based on monounsaturated fatty acids for enhanced oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent estimates for the amount of surfactant necessary to meet projected enhanced oil recovery demand indicate that this volume would rival the current use of surfactants in detergents. In part one of a series, Paul Berger details how monounsaturated fatt

373

High-Temperature Nuclear Reactors for In-Situ Recovery of Oil from Oil Shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The world is exhausting its supply of crude oil for the production of liquid fuels (gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel). However, the United States has sufficient oil shale deposits to meet our current oil demands for {approx}100 years. Shell Oil Corporation is developing a new potentially cost-effective in-situ process for oil recovery that involves drilling wells into oil shale, using electric heaters to raise the bulk temperature of the oil shale deposit to {approx}370 deg C to initiate chemical reactions that produce light crude oil, and then pumping the oil to the surface. The primary production cost is the cost of high-temperature electrical heating. Because of the low thermal conductivity of oil shale, high-temperature heat is required at the heater wells to obtain the required medium temperatures in the bulk oil shale within an economically practical two to three years. It is proposed to use high-temperature nuclear reactors to provide high-temperature heat to replace the electricity and avoid the factor-of-2 loss in converting high-temperature heat to electricity that is then used to heat oil shale. Nuclear heat is potentially viable because many oil shale deposits are thick (200 to 700 m) and can yield up to 2.5 million barrels of oil per acre, or about 125 million dollars/acre of oil at $50/barrel. The concentrated characteristics of oil-shale deposits make it practical to transfer high-temperature heat over limited distances from a reactor to the oil shale deposits. (author)

Forsberg, Charles W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6165 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Shock Dynamics in Layered Periodic Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solutions of constant-coefficient nonlinear hyperbolic PDEs generically develop shocks, even if the initial data is smooth. Solutions of hyperbolic PDEs with variable coefficients can behave very differently. We investigate formation and stability of shock waves in a one-dimensional periodic layered medium by computational study of time-reversibility and entropy evolution. We find that periodic layered media tend to inhibit shock formation. For small initial conditions and large impedance variation, no shock formation is detected even after times much greater than the time of shock formation in a homogeneous medium. Furthermore, weak shocks are observed to be dynamically unstable in the sense that they do not lead to significant long-term entropy decay. We propose a characteristic condition for admissibility of shocks in heterogeneous media that generalizes the classical Lax entropy condition and accurately predicts the formation or absence of shocks in these media.

David I Ketcheson; Randall J. LeVeque

2011-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

375

Quarterly oil report: Third quarter, 1987. [CA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The volumes of petroleum fuels supplied to California in the fourth quarter of 1987 increased 1.6 percent from year ago levels. The increase is the result of increased unleaded gasoline and residual fuel oil use. Other fourth quarter results show that all product imports remained higher than year ago levels, but most were below the previous quarter except unleaded gasoline. Unleaded gasoline imports were higher, exports were reduced and stocks drawn down in the fourth quarter compared to the previous quarter to meet increased demand for unleaded fuel. Demand for low sulfur fuel oil increased toward the end of the quarter because natural gas sales to electric utilities were curtailed.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Effect of Solder Microstructure on Mechanical and Thermal Shock ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical tests were designed to couple the corresponding microstructure with mechanical and thermal shock properties. For thermal shock resistance of ...

377

Probe measurements of the ionization of air behind strong shocks  

SciTech Connect

Detailed measurements of the ionization of air behind strong shocks over a broad range of shocks velocities are reported. (AIP)

Gorelov, V.A.; Kil' dyushova, L.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Focusing of weak shock waves and the von Neumann paradox of oblique shock reflection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Focusing of weak shock waves and the von Neumann paradox of oblique shock reflection Esteban G of weak shock waves at small angles are considered: the focusing of curved fronts at a&es, the transition between regular and irregular reflection of oblique shock waves on rigid walls and the diffraction

Tabak, Esteban G.

379

Contributions to the cross shock electric field at a quasiperpendicular collisionless shock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contributions to the cross shock electric field at a quasiperpendicular collisionless shock J. P of a supercritical (Mms = 5.2), quasiperpendicular (qBn = 70°) collisionless shock is examined using Cluster four-spacecraft observations of the terrestrial bow shock. Comparing the observed electric field with magnetic field and plasma

California at Berkeley, University of

380

Multi-Dimensional Adaptive Simulation of Shock-Induced Detonation in a Shock Tube  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-Dimensional Adaptive Simulation of Shock-Induced Detonation in a Shock Tube P. Ravindran applications, primarily in propulsion.1 Detonations use a reacting flow mechanism wherein a strong shock wave of intense chemical re- actions. The leading shock causes a compression of the combustible mixture, which

Texas at Arlington, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

INSTITUTE FOR SHOCK PHYSICSLaser-Shock Spall Experiments in Aluminum II: Interface Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INSTITUTE FOR SHOCK PHYSICSLaser-Shock Spall Experiments in Aluminum II: Interface Measurements Institute for Shock Physics Thomas M. Bersano,* Illinois Wesleyan University Objectives · Examine tensile evidence Laser-Shock Spall Experiments · Laser vaporizes the chromium layer, launching the flyer · Flyer

Collins, Gary S.

382

Further Studies of Mesh Refinement: Are Shock-Free Airfoils Truly Shock Free?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Further Studies of Mesh Refinement: Are Shock-Free Airfoils Truly Shock Free? Antony Jameson with a hodograph method to be shock-free at M = 0.750 and Cl = 0.629. However, computational fluid dynamics results show a double-shock pattern appear at this design point as the resolution of the grid is enhanced

Stanford University

383

NONSTEADY-STATE HEAT TRANSFER UPON SHOCK WAVE REFLECTION IN A SHOCK TUBE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NONSTEADY-STATE HEAT TRANSFER UPON SHOCK WAVE REFLECTION IN A SHOCK TUBE V. P. Provotorov and V. V. Ryabov UDC 533.6.011 In recent years shock tubes have become widely used to study thermo- and gas]ne thermal boundary layer near the shock tube face was studied to determine the dependence of thermal

Riabov, Vladimir V.

384

Electrochemical Shock of Lithium Battery Materials - Programmaster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Mesoscale Computational Materials Science of Energy Materials. Presentation Title, Electrochemical Shock of Lithium Battery Materials. Author(s) ...

385

Energy Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data Figure 55 From AEO2011 report . Market Trends Growth in energy use is linked to population growth through increases in housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, and goods and services. These changes affect not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels used. Energy consumption per capita declined from 337 million Btu in 2007 to 308 million Btu in 2009, the lowest level since 1967. In the AEO2011 Reference case, energy use per capita increases slightly through 2013, as the economy recovers from the 2008-2009 economic downturn. After 2013, energy use per capita declines by 0.3 percent per year on average, to 293 million Btu in 2035, as higher efficiency standards for vehicles and

386

World Oil Prices and Production Trends in AEO2010 (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In AEO2010, the price of light, low-sulfur (or sweet) crude oil delivered at Cushing, Oklahoma, is tracked to represent movements in world oil prices. EIA makes projections of future supply and demand for total liquids, which includes conventional petroleum liquidssuch as conventional crude oil, natural gas plant liquids, and refinery gainin addition to unconventional liquids, which include biofuels, bitumen, coal-to-liquids (CTL), gas-to-liquids (GTL), extra-heavy oils, and shale oil.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

387

Demand Response and Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For several decades, power companies have deployed various types of demand response (DR), such as interruptible contracts, and there is substantial ongoing research and development on sophisticated mechanisms for triggering DR. In this white paper, EPRI discusses the increasing use of electricity DR in the power industry and how this will affect the practice of energy risk management. This paper outlines 1) characteristics of a common approach to energy risk management, 2) the variety of types of DR impl...

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

388

Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Predictive Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on AddThis.com...

389

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MOSPI, 2008, a). quantities of fuel oil and diesel oil usequantity of transport activities (railways mostly). Oil is

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

On the shortterm influence of oil price changes on stock markets in GCC countries: linear and nonlinear analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the short-run relationships between oil prices and GCC stock markets. Since GCC countries are major world energy market players, their stock markets may be susceptible to oil price shocks. To account for the fact that stock markets may respond nonlinearly to oil price shocks, we have examined both linear and nonlinear relationships. Our findings show that there are significant links between the two variables in Qatar, Oman, and UAE. Thus, stock markets in these countries react positively to oil price

Mohamed El; Hedi Arouri; Julien Fouquau

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Shock waves in trombones A. Hirschberg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock waves in trombones A. Hirschberg Eindhoven University of Technology, W&S, P.O. Box 513, 5600 of the wave propagation in the pipe. At fortissimo levels this leads to shock wave formation observed in our and the band- width necessary in order to observe shock waves. Our ex- perimental results, shown in Figs. 2

Luo, Xiaoyu

392

Heat Shock Response Modulators as Therapeutic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Shock Response Modulators as Therapeutic Tools for Diseases of Protein Conformation* Published shock tran- scription factor 1 (HSF1), the master stress-inducible regulator, and our current understanding of pharmacologically active small molecule regu- lators of the heat shock response

Morimoto, Richard

393

SIMPLIFIED SHOCK CONDITIONS FOR LARGESTRAIN THERMOVISCOPLASTICITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SIMPLIFIED SHOCK CONDITIONS FOR LARGE­STRAIN THERMO­VISCO­PLASTICITY Bradley J. Plohr #3; and Jee Abstract. We consider shock loading of a thermo­visco­plastic material; the strain is not restricted to that used in fluid dynamics. Just as for fluids, the shock conditions can be separated into purely

394

DEREGULATION SHOCK IN PRODUCT MARKET AND UNEMPLOYMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEREGULATION SHOCK IN PRODUCT MARKET AND UNEMPLOYMENT Luisito BERTINELLI Olivier CARDI Partha SEN://www.economie.polytechnique.edu/ mailto:chantal.poujouly@polytechnique.edu hal-00589228,version1-28Apr2011 #12;DEREGULATION SHOCK [2010] analyze the effect of a deregulation shock within a dynamic general equilibrium model with entry

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

395

Shock Waves in Quasicrystals JOHANNES ROTH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock Waves in Quasicrystals JOHANNES ROTH Institut f�ur Theoretische und Angewandte Physik, Universit�at Stuttgart, D­70550 Stuttgart, Germany Abstract Shock waves in quasicrystals of the AlCuLi type: at low shock wave intensity the system reacts elastically, at high intensities it is turned amorphous

Roth, Johannes

396

Model for Shock Wave Chaos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose the following model equation, u[subscript t]+1/2(u[superscript 2]-uu[subscript s])[subscript x]=f(x,u[subscript s]) that predicts chaotic shock waves, similar to those in detonations in chemically reacting ...

Kasimov, Aslan R.

397

Oil recovery process and system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An on-site, in-line process and system for recovering oil from oil-bearing subterranean formations which involves the production, modification, dilution and injection of a polymer solution, preferably consisting essentially of an aqueous solution of a partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide, having injectivity and mobility properties capable of meeting the specific permeability requirements of substantially any subterranean formation to be achieved. The polymer solutions prepared by the process and system can be used as drive fluids for displacing oil (secondary polymer flood) in an oil-bearing formation, as mobility buffers to follow micellar dispersion floods in the conjoint presence of chemical reagents in other chemical floods (e.g., surfactant, caustic, etc.), or they can follow a water flood. The solutions can also be used to promote pipelining of high viscosity crude oil. Irrespective of the use to which the solutions are put, the process and system enable the polymer solutions to be customized, or tailor-made, so to speak, to meet the performance demands of the environment in which they are to be used, whether it be an oil-bearing formation or a pipeline.

Argabright, P. A.; Rhudy, J. S.

1985-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

398

Demand Trading: Measurement, Verification, and Settlement (MVS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With this report, EPRI's trilogy of publications on demand trading is complete. The first report (1006015), the "Demand Trading Toolkit," documented how to conduct demand trading based on price. The second report (1001635), "Demand Trading: Building Liquidity," focused on the problem of liquidity in the energy industry and developed the Demand Response Resource Bank concept for governing electricity markets based on reliability. The present report focuses on the emerging price/risk partnerships in electr...

2004-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

399

Groundwater and Wastewater Remediation Using Agricultural Oils  

agricultural oils to stimulate endogenous microbes which accelerates the cleanup.  The oils tested include canola oil, grapeseed oil, coconut oil, corn oil, cottonseed oil, olive oil, palm oil, palm kernel oil, peanut oil, ...

400

Distillate Supply/Demand Balance Reflected in Spreads  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: The price spike that initiated the flood of distillate imports last winter can be easily seen in this chart. The distillate supply/demand balance influences the spread between spot distillate and spot crude oil prices. For example, when stocks are higher than normal, the spread will be lower than usual. This spread is the price incentive that encourages or discourages changes in supply. The January/February 2000 price spike was shorter than the one last winter, largely due to the timing. Since last winter's price spike occurred early in the season, it took some time before prices receded substantially. Currently, the distillate fuel refining spread (the difference between the spot heating oil price and the WTI price) is more "typical". But as was

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

OIl Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investor Flows and the 2008 BoomBust in Oil Prices Kenneth J. Singleton 1 August 10, 2011 1 Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, kenneths@stanford.edu. This research...

402

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating...

403

Supply/Demand Forecasts Begin to Show Stock Rebuilding  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: During 1999, we saw stock draws during the summer months, when we normally see stock builds, and very large stock draws during the winter of 1999/2000. Normally, crude oil production exceeds product demand in the spring and summer, and stocks build. These stocks are subsequently drawn down during the fourth and first quarters (dark blue areas). When the market is in balance, the stock builds equal the draws. During 2000, stocks have gradually built, but following the large stock draws of 1999, inventories needed to have been built more to get back to normal levels. As we look ahead using EIA's base case assumptions for OPEC production, non-OPEC production, and demand, we expect a more seasonal pattern for the next 3 quarters. But since we are beginning the year with

404

Technical Change, Factor Demand and Interfactor/Interfuel Substitution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: With its rapid economic growth, China’s primary energy consumption has exceeded domestic energy production since 1994, leading to a substantial expansion in energy imports, particularly of oil. China’s energy demand has an increasingly significant impact on global energy markets. In this paper Allen partial elasticities of factor and energy substitution, and price elasticities of energy demand, are calculated for China using a two-stage translog cost function approach. The results suggest that energy is substitutable with both capital and labour. Coal is significantly substitutable with electricity and complementary with diesel while gasoline and electricity are substitutable with diesel. China’s energy intensity is increasing during the study period (1995-2004) and the major driver appears to be due to the increased use of energy intensive technology. Keywords: China; Interfactor/interfuel substitution; Technology; Energy intensity decomposition

Hengyun Ma; Les Oxley; John Gibson; Bongguen Kim; Hengyun Ma; Les Oxley; John Gibson; Bongguen Kim

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,study of automated demand response in wastewater treatmentopportunities for demand response control strategies in

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Techniques for Demand Response, report for theand Reliability Demand Response Programs: Final Report.Demand Response

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsand Techniques for Demand Response. California Energyand S. Kiliccote. Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts:

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEMAND . . . .Demand for Electricity and Power PeakDemand . . • . . ELECTRICITY REQUIREMENTS FOR AGRICULTUREResults . . Coriclusions ELECTRICITY SUPPLY Hydroelectric

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

14 Peak Demand Baselinewinter morning electric peak demand in commercial buildings.California to reduce peak demand during summer afternoons,

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Shock Waves in Weakly Compressed Granular Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We experimentally probe nonlinear wave propagation in weakly compressed granular media, and observe a crossover from quasi-linear sound waves at low impact, to shock waves at high impact. We show that this crossover grows with the confining pressure $P_0$, whereas the shock wave speed is independent of $P_0$ --- two hallmarks of granular shocks predicted recently. The shocks exhibit powerlaw attenuation, which we model with a logarithmic law implying that local dissipation is weak. We show that elastic and potential energy balance in the leading part of the shocks.

Siet van den Wildenberg; Rogier van Loo; Martin van Hecke

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

411

Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the amount of electricity demand that is settled forward.unresponsive demand side, electricity demand has to be metxed percentage of overall electricity demand. The ISO, thus,

Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Building Energy Software Tools Directory : Demand Response Quick...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Back to Tool Demand response quick assessment tool screenshot Demand response quick assessment tool screenshot Demand response quick...

413

Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building Controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Braun (Purdue). 2004. Peak demand reduction from pre-coolingthe average and maximum peak demand savings. The electricityuse charges, demand ratchets, peak demand charges, and other

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Shock waves in strongly coupled plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock waves are supersonic disturbances propagating in a fluid and giving rise to dissipation and drag. Weak shocks, i.e., those of small amplitude, can be well described within the hydrodynamic approximation. On the other hand, strong shocks are discontinuous within hydrodynamics and therefore probe the microscopics of the theory. In this paper we consider the case of the strongly coupled N=4 plasma whose microscopic description, applicable for scales smaller than the inverse temperature, is given in terms of gravity in an asymptotically $AdS_5$ space. In the gravity approximation, weak and strong shocks should be described by smooth metrics with no discontinuities. For weak shocks we find the dual metric in a derivative expansion and for strong shocks we use linearized gravity to find the exponential tail that determines the width of the shock. In particular we find that, when the velocity of the fluid relative to the shock approaches the speed of light $v\\to 1$ the penetration depth $\\ell$ scales as $\\ell\\sim (1-v^2)^{1/4}$. We compare the results with second order hydrodynamics and the Israel-Stewart approximation. Although they all agree in the hydrodynamic regime of weak shocks, we show that there is not even qualitative agreement for strong shocks. For the gravity side, the existence of shock waves implies that there are disturbances of constant shape propagating on the horizon of the dual black holes.

Sergei Khlebnikov; Martin Kruczenski; Georgios Michalogiorgakis

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

415

Shock waves in strongly coupled plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shock waves are supersonic disturbances propagating in a fluid and giving rise to dissipation and drag. Weak shocks, i.e., those of small amplitude, can be well described within the hydrodynamic approximation. On the other hand, strong shocks are discontinuous within hydrodynamics and therefore probe the microscopics of the theory. In this paper, we consider the case of the strongly coupled N=4 plasma whose microscopic description, applicable for scales smaller than the inverse temperature, is given in terms of gravity in an asymptotically AdS{sub 5} space. In the gravity approximation, weak and strong shocks should be described by smooth metrics with no discontinuities. For weak shocks, we find the dual metric in a derivative expansion, and for strong shocks we use linearized gravity to find the exponential tail that determines the width of the shock. In particular, we find that, when the velocity of the fluid relative to the shock approaches the speed of light v{yields}1 the penetration depth l scales as l{approx}(1-v{sup 2}){sup 1/4}. We compare the results with second-order hydrodynamics and the Israel-Stewart approximation. Although they all agree in the hydrodynamic regime of weak shocks, we show that there is not even qualitative agreement for strong shocks. For the gravity side, the existence of shock waves implies that there are disturbances of constant shape propagating on the horizon of the dual black holes.

Khlebnikov, Sergei; Kruczenski, Martin; Michalogiorgakis, Georgios [Department of Physics, Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Interplanetary shocks lacking type II radio bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the radio-emission characteristics of 222 interplanetary (IP) shocks. A surprisingly large fraction of the IP shocks (~34%) is radio quiet (i.e., the shocks lacked type II radio bursts). The CMEs associated with the RQ shocks are generally slow (average speed ~535 km/s) and only ~40% of the CMEs were halos. The corresponding numbers for CMEs associated with radio loud (RL) shocks are 1237 km/s and 72%, respectively. The RQ shocks are also accompanied by lower peak soft X-ray flux. CMEs associated with RQ (RL) shocks are generally accelerating (decelerating). The kinematics of CMEs associated with the km type II bursts is similar to those of RQ shocks, except that the former are slightly more energetic. Comparison of the shock The RQ shocks seem to be mostly subcritical and quasi-perpendicular. The radio-quietness is predominant in the rise phase and decreases through the maximum and declining phases of solar cycle 23. The solar sources of the shock-driving CMEs follow the sunspot butterfly diagra...

Gopalswamy, N; Makela, P; Akiyama, S; Yashiro, S; Kaiser, M L; Howard, R A; Bougeret, J -L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Hydraulic/Shock-Jumps in Protoplanetary Disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe the nonlinear outcome of spiral shocks in protoplanetary disks. Spiral shocks, for most protoplanetary disk conditions, create a loss of vertical force balance in the post-shock region and result in rapid expansion of the gas perpendicular to the disk midplane. This expansion has characteristics similar to hydraulic jumps, which occur in incompressible fluids. We present a theory to describe the behavior of these hybrids between shocks and hydraulic jumps (shock bores) and then compare the theory to three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations. We discuss the fully three-dimensional shock structures that shock bores produce and discuss possible consequences for disk mixing, turbulence, and evolution of solids.

A. C. Boley; R. H. Durisen

2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

418

Shock-induced chemistry in organic materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combined 'extreme' environments of high pressure, temperature, and strain rates, encountered under shock loading, offer enormous potential for the discovery of new paradigms in chemical reactivity not possible under more benign conditions. All organic materials are expected to react under these conditions, yet we currently understand very little about the first bond-breaking steps behind the shock front, such as in the shock initiation of explosives, or shock-induced reactivity of other relevant materials. Here, I will present recent experimental results of shock-induced chemistry in a variety of organic materials under sustained shock conditions. A comparison between the reactivity of different structures is given, and a perspective on the kinetics of reaction completion under shock drives.

Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheffield, Steve [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Engelke, Ray [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manner, Virginia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chellappa, Raja [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yoo, Choong - Shik [WASHINGTON STATE UNIV

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

419

Structural, energy and environmental aspects in Iranian oil refineries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum refineries extract and upgrade the valuable components of crude oil to produce a variety of marketable petroleum products. However Iranian refineries are old and their efficiency and structure do not satisfy demand of the country in which their ... Keywords: Iran, demand, energy, refinery

Sourena Sattari; Akram Avami

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Heavy Oil Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Select Reports from Heavy Oil Projects Project Number Performer Title Heavy Oil Recovery US (NIPERBDM-0225) BDM-Oklahoma, Inc. Feasibility Study of Heavy Oil Recovery in the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Crude Oil Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: Crude oil exports are restricted to: (1) crude oil derived from fields under the State waters of Alaska's Cook Inlet; (2) Alaskan North Slope crude oil; (3) ...

422

3. Crude Oil Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3. Crude Oil Statistics The United States had 21,371 million barrels of crude oil proved reserves as of December 31, 2004. Crude oil proved reserves ...

423

Too early to tell on $100 oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Presentation to: Presentation to: April 8, 2008 Lehman Brothers oil outlook: Stronger signals of weaker prices Adam Robinson What's driving oil markets today? u Not the short run: Oil prices go up every time the US economy gets worse u It's tempting to argue that the rise in oil prices now is simply a continuation of past trends - The cost of F&D continues to march up - Demand in China growing faster with no signs of slowdown - Upstream and downstream supply bottlenecks are permanent u We think current price may be rising despite improvements on these fronts u Yes, in the short run, weak dollar and inflation fears can push prices higher, but these are likely to dissipate by the end of the year u We may be on the verge of a turning point in prices - Possibly the peak oil price comes this summer at $110-$120

424

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While there is general agreement that demand response (DR) is a valued component in a utility resource plan, there is a lack of consensus regarding how to value DR. Establishing the value of DR is a prerequisite to determining how much and what types of DR should be implemented, to which customers DR should be targeted, and a key determinant that drives the development of economically viable DR consumer technology. Most approaches for quantifying the value of DR focus on changes in utility system revenue requirements based on resource plans with and without DR. This ''utility centric'' approach does not assign any value to DR impacts that lower energy and capacity prices, improve reliability, lower system and network operating costs, produce better air quality, and provide improved customer choice and control. Proper valuation of these benefits requires a different basis for monetization. The review concludes that no single methodology today adequately captures the wide range of benefits and value potentially attributed to DR. To provide a more comprehensive valuation approach, current methods such as the Standard Practice Method (SPM) will most likely have to be supplemented with one or more alternative benefit-valuation approaches. This report provides an updated perspective on the DR valuation framework. It includes an introduction and four chapters that address the key elements of demand response valuation, a comprehensive literature review, and specific research recommendations.

Heffner, Grayson

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Demand Side Bidding. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This document sets forth the final report for a financial assistance award for the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) to enhance coordination between the building operators and power system operators in terms of demand-side responses to Location Based Marginal Pricing (LBMP). Potential benefits of this project include improved power system reliability, enhanced environmental quality, mitigation of high locational prices within congested areas, and the reduction of market barriers for demand-side market participants. NARUC, led by its Committee on Energy Resources and the Environment (ERE), actively works to promote the development and use of energy efficiency and clean distributive energy policies within the framework of a dynamic regulatory environment. Electric industry restructuring, energy shortages in California, and energy market transformation intensifies the need for reliable information and strategies regarding electric reliability policy and practice. NARUC promotes clean distributive generation and increased energy efficiency in the context of the energy sector restructuring process. NARUC, through ERE's Subcommittee on Energy Efficiency, strives to improve energy efficiency by creating working markets. Market transformation seeks opportunities where small amounts of investment can create sustainable markets for more efficient products, services, and design practices.

Spahn, Andrew

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

BRENNAN --DSM UNDER COMPETITION: 1 Demand-Side Management Programs Under Retail  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BRENNAN -- DSM UNDER COMPETITION: 1 Demand-Side Management Programs Under Retail Electricity · An automotive analogy Not marketing of fuel-efficient cars Not exactly CAFE standards or EPA mileage stickers More like getting a check from oil companies if one buys a high mileage car · Conservation

California at Berkeley. University of

427

Econometric Analyses of Public Water Demand in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two broad surveys of community- level water consumption and pricing behavior are used to answer questions about water demand in a more flexible and dynamic context than is provided in the literature. Central themes of price representation, aggregation, and dynamic adjustment tie together three econometric demand analyses. The centerpiece of each analysis is an exogenous weighted price representation. A model in first-differences is estimated by ordinary least squares using data from a personally-conducted survey of Texas urban water suppliers. Annual price elasticity is found to vary with weather and income, with a value of -0.127 at the data mean. The dynamic model becomes a periodic error correction model when the residuals of 12 static monthly models are inserted into the difference model. Distinct residential, commercial, and industrial variables and historical climatic conditions are added to the integrated model, using new national data. Quantity demanded is found to be periodically integrated with a common stochastic root. Because of this, the structural monthly models must be cointegrated to be consistent, which they appear to be. The error correction coefficient is estimated at -0.187. Demand is found to be seasonal and slow to adjust to shocks, with little or no adjustment in a single year and 90% adjustment taking a decade or more. Residential and commercial demand parameters are found to be indistinguishable. The sources of price endogeneity and historical fixes are reviewed. Ideal properties of a weighted price index are identified. For schedules containing exactly two rates, weighting is equivalent to a distribution function in consumption. This property is exploited to derive empirical weights from the national data, using values from a nonparametric generalization of the structural demand model and a nonparametric cumulative density function. The result is a generalization of the price difference metric to a weighted level-price index. The validity of a uniform weighting is not rejected. The weighted price index is data intensive, but the payoff is increased depth and precision for the economist and accessibility for the practitioner.

Bell, David

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Oil Markets After the Hurricanes: Reversion to the Mean or Return to Recent Trend?  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This presentation focuses on the impacts Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma will have on oil markets (supply, demand, stocks, and imports) in the fourth quarter of 2005 and into 2006. The presentation looks examines whether oil markets are likely to return to much lower prices (the long term average) or continue the trend of high oil prices seen over the last couple of years.

Information Center

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

429

Agriculture - Noise and shocking investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents an investigation of noise and shocking from the telephone line at a horse farm. The investigation revealed that the noise was caused by an arching connection and vegetation along the fence. Also the charger's grounding system was not installed properly. Recommendations were made to the customer to reinstall the charger's ground system to manufacturer's specification and use an AM radio to find the loose connection along the fence.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Oil Dependence: The Value of R{ampersand}D  

SciTech Connect

Over the past quarter century the United States` dependence on oil has cost its economy on the order of $5 trillion. Oil dependence is defined as economically significant consumption of oil, given price inelastic demand in the short and long run and given the ability of the OPEC cartel to use market power to influence oil prices. Although oil prices have been lower and more stable over the past decade, OPEC still holds the majority of the world`s conventional oil resources according to the best available estimates. OPEC`s share of the world oil market is likely to grow significantly in the future,restoring much if not all of their former market power. Other than market share, the key determinants of OPEC`s market power are the long and short run price elasticities of world oil demand and supply. These elasticities depend critically on the technologies of oil supply and demand, especially the technology of energy use in transportation. Research and development can change these elasticities in fundamental ways, and given the nature of the problem,the government has an important role to play in supporting such research.

Greene, D.L.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Definition: Peak Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peak Demand Peak Demand Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Peak Demand The highest hourly integrated Net Energy For Load within a Balancing Authority Area occurring within a given period (e.g., day, month, season, or year)., The highest instantaneous demand within the Balancing Authority Area.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Peak demand is used to refer to a historically high point in the sales record of a particular product. In terms of energy use, peak demand describes a period of strong consumer demand. Related Terms Balancing Authority Area, energy, demand, balancing authority, smart grid References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inli LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ne Glossary Definition Retrieved from

432

Solar in Demand | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Demand Solar in Demand June 15, 2012 - 10:23am Addthis Kyle Travis, left and Jon Jackson, with Lighthouse Solar, install microcrystalline PV modules on top of Kevin Donovan's...

433

Demand Response - Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

over the last 11 years when interest in demand response increased. Demand response is an electricity tariff or program established to motivate changes in electric use by end-use...

434

Energy Basics: Tankless Demand Water Heaters  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

only as needed and without the use of a storage tank. They don't produce the standby energy losses associated with storage water heaters. How Demand Water Heaters Work Demand...

435

Propane Demand by Sector - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In order to understand markets you also have to look at supply and demand. First, demand or who uses propane. For the most part, the major components of propane ...

436

Specialty Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing provider for Specialty Oils. Samples tested include Walnut Oil, Pecan Oil, Pistachio Oil, Sesame Seed Oil, Flax Seed Oil, Neem Oil, Safflower Oil, Sunflower Oil. Specialty Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Pro

437

Travel Behavior and Demand Analysis and Prediction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Demand Analysis and Prediction Konstadinos G. Goulias University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, USA

Goulias, Konstadinos G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Forecasting the demand for commercial telecommunications satellites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the key elements of a forecast methodology for predicting demand for commercial satellite services and the resulting demand for satellite hardware and launches. The paper discusses the characterization of satellite services into more than a dozen applications (including emerging satellite Internet applications) used by Futron Corporation in its forecasts. The paper discusses the relationship between demand for satellite services and demand for satellite hardware

Carissa Bryce Christensen; Carie A. Mullins; Linda A. Williams

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Oil | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Oil Oil Prices, 2000-2008 For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. |...

440

Forecasting Uncertain Hotel Room Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic systems are characterized by increasing uncertainty in their dynamics. This increasing uncertainty is likely to incur bad decisions that can be costly in financial terms. This makes forecasting of uncertain economic variables an instrumental activity in any organization. This paper takes the hotel industry as a practical application of forecasting using the Holt-Winters method. The problem here is to forecast the uncertain demand for rooms at a hotel for each arrival day. Forecasting is part of hotel revenue management system whose objective is to maximize the revenue by making decisions regarding when to make rooms available for customers and at what price. The forecast approach discussed in this paper is based on quantitative models and does not incorporate management expertise. Even though, forecast results are found to be satisfactory for certain days, this is not the case for other arrival days. It is believed that human judgment is important when dealing with ...

Mihir Rajopadhye Mounir; Mounir Ben Ghaliay; Paul P. Wang; Timothy Baker; Craig V. Eister

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Second Price Component: Spread Impacted by Distillate Supply/Demand Balance  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: While crude oil prices will be a major factor impacting distillate prices this winter, another important factor is the U.S. distillate supply/demand balance, as measured by distillate stocks. The distillate supply/demand balance influences the spread between spot distillate and spot crude oil prices. For example, when stocks are higher than normal, the spread will be lower than usual. This spread is the price incentive that encourages or discourages changes in supply. While high stocks in the distillate market are good news for consumers, an excess is bad news for refiners. Distillate spreads during the winter of 1998-99 and throughout most of 1999 were well below average. Distillate stocks were very high during this period, partially as a result of warm weather keeping demand down.

442

of oil yields from enhanced oil recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO 2 storage capacity in depleted oil reservoirs. The primary goal of the project is to demonstrate that remaining oil can be economically produced using CO 2 -EOR technology in untested areas of the United States. The Citronelle Field appears to be an ideal site for concurrent CO 2 storage and EOR because the field is composed of sandstone reservoirs

443

Forecasting demand of commodities after natural disasters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand forecasting after natural disasters is especially important in emergency management. However, since the time series of commodities demand after natural disasters usually has a great deal of nonlinearity and irregularity, it has poor prediction ... Keywords: ARIMA, Demand forecasting, EMD, Emergency management, Natural disaster

Xiaoyan Xu; Yuqing Qi; Zhongsheng Hua

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Leveraging gamification in demand dispatch systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern demand-side management techniques are an integral part of the envisioned smart grid paradigm. They require an active involvement of the consumer for an optimization of the grid's efficiency and a better utilization of renewable energy sources. ... Keywords: demand response, demand side management, direct load control, gamification, smart grid, sustainability

Benjamin Gnauk; Lars Dannecker; Martin Hahmann

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work to the contributing authors listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad

446

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped

447

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 2: Electricity Demand by Utility ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The staff demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare

448

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The staff demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped

449

FINAL STAFF FORECAST OF 2008 PEAK DEMAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION FINAL STAFF FORECAST OF 2008 PEAK DEMAND STAFFREPORT June 2007 CEC-200 of the information in this paper. #12;Abstract This document describes staff's final forecast of 2008 peak demand demand forecasts for the respective territories of the state's three investor-owned utilities (IOUs

450

Ups and downs of demand limiting  

SciTech Connect

Electric power load management by limiting power demand can be used for energy conservation. Methods for affecting demand limiting, reducing peak usage in buildings, particularly usage for heating and ventilating systems, and power pricing to encourage demand limiting are discussed. (LCL)

Pannkoke, T.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

U.S. crude oil production expected to exceed oil imports later this year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

crude oil production expected to exceed oil imports later crude oil production expected to exceed oil imports later this year U.S. crude oil production is expected to surpass U.S. crude oil imports by the fourth quarter of this year. That would mark the first time since February 1995 that domestic crude oil output exceeds imports, according to the latest monthly energy outlook from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The United States will still need to import crude oil to help meet domestic demand. However, total crude oil imports this year are on track to fall to their lowest level since 1997. U.S. oil production is expected to continue to rise over the next two years as imports fall. As a result, the share of total U.S. petroleum consumption met by net imports is forecast to fall to 32 percent next year, the lowest level since 1985 and nearly half the peak level of 60 percent seen in

452

Remote shock sensing and notification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-power shock sensing system includes at least one shock sensor physically coupled to a chemical storage tank to be monitored for impacts, and an RF transmitter which is in a low-power idle state in the absence of a triggering signal. The system includes interface circuitry including or activated by the shock sensor, wherein an output of the interface circuitry is coupled to an input of the RF transmitter. The interface circuitry triggers the RF transmitter with the triggering signal to transmit an alarm message to at least one remote location when the sensor senses a shock greater than a predetermined threshold. In one embodiment the shock sensor is a shock switch which provides an open and a closed state, the open state being a low power idle state.

Muralidharan, Govindarajan (Knoxville, TN); Britton, Charles L. (Alcoa, TN); Pearce, James (Lenoir City, TN); Jagadish, Usha (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

453

Remote shock sensing and notification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-power shock sensing system includes at least one shock sensor physically coupled to a chemical storage tank to be monitored for impacts, and an RF transmitter which is in a low-power idle state in the absence of a triggering signal. The system includes interference circuitry including or activated by the shock sensor, wherein an output of the interface circuitry is coupled to an input of the RF transmitter. The interface circuitry triggers the RF transmitting with the triggering signal to transmit an alarm message to at least one remote location when the sensor senses a shock greater than a predetermined threshold. In one embodiment the shock sensor is a shock switch which provides an open and a closed state, the open state being a low power idle state.

Muralidharan, Govindarajan (Knoxville, TN); Britton, Charles L. (Alcoa, TN); Pearce, James (Lenoir City, TN); Jagadish, Usha (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

454

Relativistic Fermi acceleration with shock compressed turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents numerical simulations of test particle Fermi acceleration at relativistic shocks of Lorentz factor Gamma_sh = 2-60, using a realistic downstream magnetic structure obtained from the shock jump conditions. The upstream magnetic field is described as pure Kolmogorov turbulence; the corresponding downstream magnetic field lies predominantly in the plane tangential to the shock surface and the coherence length is smaller along the shock normal than in the tangential plane. Acceleration is nonetheless efficient and leads to powerlaw spectra with index s = 2.6-2.7 at large shock Lorentz factor Gamma_sh >> 1, markedly steeper than for isotropic scattering downstream. The acceleration timescale t_acc in the upstream rest frame becomes a fraction of Larmor time t_L in the ultra-relativistic limit, t_acc ~ 10 t_L/Gamma_sh. Astrophysical applications are discussed, in particular the acceleration in gamma-ray bursts internal and external shocks.

Martin Lemoine; Benoit Revenu

2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

455

RELATIVISTIC ELECTRON SHOCK DRIFT ACCELERATION IN LOW MACH NUMBER GALAXY CLUSTER SHOCKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extreme case of electron shock drift acceleration (SDA) in low Mach number collisionless shocks is investigated as a plausible mechanism for the initial acceleration of relativistic electrons in large-scale shocks in galaxy clusters, where the upstream plasma temperature is of the order of 10 keV and the degree of magnetization is not too small. One-dimensional electromagnetic full particle simulations reveal that, even when a shock is rather moderate, a part of the thermal incoming electrons are accelerated and reflected through relativistic SDA and form a local non-thermal population just upstream of the shock. The accelerated electrons can self-generate local coherent waves and further be back-scattered toward the shock by those waves. This may be a scenario for the first stage of the electron shock acceleration occurring at the large-scale shocks in galaxy clusters, such as CIZA J2242.8+5301, which have well-defined radio relics.

Matsukiyo, S. [Department of Earth System Science and Technology, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Ohira, Y. [High Energy Acceleration Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Yamazaki, R. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5258 (Japan); Umeda, T., E-mail: matsukiy@esst.kyushu-u.ac.jp, E-mail: ohira@post.kek.jp, E-mail: ryo@phys.aoyama.ac.jp, E-mail: umeda@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan)

2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

456

Potential of vegetable oils as a domestic heating fuel  

SciTech Connect

The dependence on imported oil for domestic heating has led to the examination of other potential fuel substitutes. One potential fuel is some form of vegetable oil, which could be a yearly-renewable fuel. In Western Canada, canola has become a major oilseed crop; in Eastern Canada, sunflowers increasingly are becoming a source for a similar oil; for this reason, the Canadian Combustion Research Laboratory (CCRL) has chosen these oils for experimentation. Trials have been conducted in a conventional warm air oil furnace, fitted with a flame retention head burner. Performance has been measured with pure vegetable oils as well as a series of blends with conventional No. 2 oil. The effects of increased fuel pressure and fuel preheating are established. Emissions of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, unburned hydrocarbons and particulates are given for both steady state and cyclic operation. Canola oil cannot be fired in cyclic operation above 50:50 blends with No. 2 oil. At any level above a 10% blend, canola is difficult to burn, even with significant increased pressure and temperature. Sunflower oil is much easier to burn and can be fired as a pure fuel, but with high emissions of incomplete combustion products. An optimum blend of 50:50 sunflower in No. 2 oil yields emissions and performance similar to No. 2 oil. This blend offers potential as a means of reducing demand of imported crude oil for domestic heating systems.

Hayden, A.C.S.; Begin, E.; Palmer, C.E.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolytes rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active. 2 figs.

Benedick, W.B.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.

1988-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

458

Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolytes rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active.

Benedick, William B. (Albuquerque, NM); Graham, Robert A. (Los Lunas, NM); Morosin, Bruno (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolyte rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active. 2 figs.

Benedick, W.B.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.

1987-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

460

Measurement and Verification for Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measurement and Verification for Measurement and Verification for Demand Response Prepared for the National Forum on the National Action Plan on Demand Response: Measurement and Verification Working Group AUTHORS: Miriam L. Goldberg & G. Kennedy Agnew-DNV KEMA Energy and Sustainability National Forum of the National Action Plan on Demand Response Measurement and Verification for Demand Response was developed to fulfill part of the Implementation Proposal for The National Action Plan on Demand Response, a report to Congress jointly issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) in June 2011. Part of that implementation proposal called for a "National Forum" on demand response to be conducted by DOE and FERC. Given that demand response has matured, DOE and FERC decided that a "virtual" project

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Are they equal yet. [Demand side management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand-side management (DSM) is considered an important tool in meeting the load growth of many utilities. Northwest regional and utility resource plans forecast demand-side resources to meet from one-half to two-thirds of additional electrical energy needs over the next 10 years. Numerous sources have stated that barriers, both regulatory and financial, exist to utility acquisition of demand-side resources. Regulatory actions are being implemented in Oregon to make demand-side investments competitive with supply-side investments. In 1989, the Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) took two actions regarding demand-side investments. The PUC's Order 89-1700 directed utilities to capitalize demand-side investments to properly match amortization expense with the multiyear benefits provided by DSM. The PUC also began an informal investigation concerning incentives for Oregon's regulated electric utilities to acquire demand-side resources.

Irwin, K.; Phillips-Israel, K.; Busch, E.

1994-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Fractography of Thermally Shocked Glass Cookware  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fractography of fractured glass cookware can be a time consuming process of putting ... to Conduct Thermal Shock Test on Refractories Using Steel Blocks.

463

Temperature Measurements in Radiative Shock Experiments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??At signifcantly large pressures, shock waves can be driven that are so energetic that radiation starts to play an important role in the dynamics of… (more)

Visco, Anthony John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Laser Shock Peening of In718 Superalloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LSP dramatically improves fatigue strength, life and crack propagation resistance with shock wave-induced generation of deep compressive residual stress and ...

465

Soviet Union oil sector outlook grows bleaker still  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the outlook for the U.S.S.R's oil sector which grows increasingly bleak and with it prospects for the Soviet economy. Plunging Soviet oil production and exports have analysts revising near term oil price outlooks, referring to the Soviet oil sector's self-destructing and Soviet oil production in a freefall. County NatWest, Washington, citing likely drops in Soviet oil production and exports (OGJ, Aug. 5, p. 16), has jumped its projected second half spot price for West Texas intermediate crude by about $2 to $22-23/bbl. Smith Barney, New York, forecasts WTI postings at $24-25/bbl this winter, largely because of seasonally strong world oil demand and the continued collapse in Soviet oil production. It estimates the call on oil from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries at more than 25 million b/d in first quarter 1992. That would be the highest level of demand for OPEC oil since 1980, Smith Barney noted.

Not Available

1991-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

466

Shock-unsteadiness model applied to oblique shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes prediction of shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions can yield significant error in terms of the size of the separation bubble. In many applications, this can alter the shock structure and the resulting surface ... Keywords: high-speed flows, separation bubble, shock-unsteadiness, turbulence modelling, turbulent boundary layer

Amjad Ali Pasha; Krishnendu Sinha

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

A Probabilistic Deformation Demand Model and Fragility Estimates for Asymmetric Offshore Jacket Platforms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interest in evaluating the performance and safety of offshore oil and gas platforms has been expanding due to the growing world energy supply and recent offshore catastrophes. In order to accurately assess the reliability of an offshore platform, all relevant uncertainties must be properly accounted for. This necessitates the development of a probabilistic demand model that accounts for the relevant uncertainties and model errors. In this study, a probabilistic demand model is developed to assess the deformation demand on asymmetric offshore jacket platforms subject to wave and current loadings. The probabilistic model is constructed by adding correction terms and a model error to an existing deterministic deformation demand model. The correction terms are developed to capture the bias inherent in the deterministic model. The model error is developed to capture the accuracy of the model. The correction terms and model errors are estimated through a Bayesian approach using simulation data obtained from detailed dynamic analyses of a set of representative asymmetric offshore platform configurations. The proposed demand model provides accurate and unbiased estimates of the deformation demand on offshore jacket platforms. The developed probabilistic demand model is then used to assess the reliability of a typical offshore platform considering serviceability and ultimate performance levels. In addition, a sensitivity analysis is conducted to assess the effect of key parameters on the results of the analyses. The proposed demand model can be used to assess the reliability of different design options and for the reliability-based optimal design of offshore jacket platforms.

Fallon, Michael

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Thermal Shock-resistant Cement  

SciTech Connect

We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved cement, causing its volume to expand.

Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy Headquaters Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy...

470

Vsd Oil Free Compressor, Vsd Oil Free Compressor Products, Vsd ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vsd Oil Free Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Vsd Oil Free Compressor Products from Global Vsd Oil Free Compressor Suppliers and Vsd Oil ...

471

On-Demand Generation of Monodisperse Femtoliter Droplets by Shape-Induced Shear  

SciTech Connect

We describe a method for creating discrete femtoliter-scale water-in-oil droplets on demand, based solely on a geometrically induced reduction in oil/water interfacial area at microfabricated junction orifices. This on-demand generation method is driven by self-shear of droplets due to interfacial tension induced forces resulting from a localized transition in microchannel height. The magnitudes of shear stresses involved appear to be significantly less than the shearing instabilities used to split off daughter droplets from aqueous mother plugs at microfabricated junctions in continuous water-in-oil segmented flows, which implies that this method may be better suited for studying biochemical reactions and reaction kinetics in droplets of decreased volume without loss of chemical reactivity due to redistribution of surfactant density used to passivate the oil/water interface. Predictable droplet generation rates under constant pressure conditions or the gated formation of one, two or more droplets at a time with fixed pressure pulses have been demonstrated in a similar manner to active on-demand droplet generation strategies, but with a simpler system not needing actuation and sensing equipment beyond a pressure regulator.

Collier, Pat [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Jung, Seung-Yong [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Shear shocks in fragile networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A minimal model for studying the mechanical properties of amorphous solids is a disordered network of point masses connected by unbreakable springs. At a critical value of its mean connectivity, such a network becomes fragile: it undergoes a rigidity transition signaled by a vanishing shear modulus and transverse sound speed. We investigate analytically and numerically the linear and non-linear visco-elastic response of these fragile solids by probing how shear fronts propagate through them. Our approach, that we tentatively label shear front rheology, provides an alternative route to standard oscillatory rheology. In the linear regime, we observe at late times a diffusive broadening of the fronts controlled by an effective shear viscosity that diverges at the critical point. No matter how small the microscopic coefficient of dissipation, strongly disordered networks behave as if they were over-damped because energy is irreversibly leaked into diverging non-affine fluctuations. Close to the transition, the regime of linear response becomes vanishingly small: the tiniest shear strains generate strongly non-linear shear shock waves qualitatively different from their compressional counterparts in granular media. The inherent non-linearities trigger an energy cascade from low to high frequency components that keep the network away from attaining the quasi-static limit. This mechanism, reminiscent of acoustic turbulence, causes a super-diffusive broadening of the shock width.

Stephan Ulrich; Nitin Upadhyaya; Bas van Opheusden; Vincenzo Vitelli

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

473

Emissions impacts of marginal electricity demand California hydrogen supply pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

charges, gasoline and motor oil, vehicle maintenance andcharges Gasoline and motor oil Vehicle maintenance andplanes). • Gasoline and motor oil. Gasoline, diesel fuel,

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based on the quantity of oil consumed to compensate forof fuel oil would reduce the quantity of air pollutants, thequantity of . air pollutants from power plants burning oil

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Definition: Demand Side Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Side Management Side Management Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Demand Side Management The term for all activities or programs undertaken by Load-Serving Entity or its customers to influence the amount or timing of electricity they use.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Energy demand management, also known as demand side management (DSM), is the modification of consumer demand for energy through various methods such as financial incentives and education. Usually, the goal of demand side management is to encourage the consumer to use less energy during peak hours, or to move the time of energy use to off-peak times such as nighttime and weekends. Peak demand management does not necessarily decrease total energy consumption, but could be expected to reduce the need

476

Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) Building  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) Building Management System Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) Building Management System The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into distributed intelligent-automated demand response (DIADR) building management systems. Project Description This project aims to develop a DIADR building management system with intelligent optimization and control algorithms for demand management, taking into account a multitude of factors affecting cost including: Comfort Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) Lighting Other building systems Climate Usage and occupancy patterns. The key challenge is to provide the demand response the ability to address more and more complex building systems that include a variety of loads,

477

Electricity Demand and Energy Consumption Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project describes the electricity demand and energy consumption management system and its application to the Smelter Plant of Southern Peru. It is composted of an hourly demand-forecasting module and of a simulation component for a plant electrical system. The first module was done using dynamic neural networks, with backpropagation training algorithm; it is used to predict the electric power demanded every hour, with an error percentage below of 1%. This information allows management the peak demand before this happen, distributing the raise of electric load to other hours or improving those equipments that increase the demand. The simulation module is based in advanced estimation techniques, such as: parametric estimation, neural network modeling, statistic regression and previously developed models, which simulates the electric behavior of the smelter plant. These modules allow the proper planning because it allows knowing the behavior of the hourly demand and the consumption patterns of the plant, in...

Sarmiento, Juan Ojeda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Policy Choice:Forest or Fuel? The demand for biofuels, driven by the desire to reduce fossil fuel use and CO2 emissions, has resulted in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy Choice:Forest or Fuel? The demand for biofuels, driven by the desire to reduce fossil fuel, combined with the expanded demand for biofuels, will result in higher food prices, since less land by using biofuels (vegetable oils). But the use of biofuels may not reduce CO2 emissions, even when

479

Nuclear battery shock-support system  

SciTech Connect

In a nuclear battery utilizing the Seebeck effect to produce an electric voltage, a shock support system is disclosed wherein thermally conductive spring means and alignment caps support a thermoelectric converter between a heat sink and an independently supported heat source so as to cushion the converter from vibration and shock.

Carney, H.C.

1977-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

480

Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Agency/Company /Organization: Victoria Transport Policy Institute Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.vtpi.org/tdm/tdm12.htm Cost: Free Language: English References: Victoria Transport Policy Institute[1] "The Online TDM Encyclopedia is the world's most comprehensive information resource concerning innovative transportation management strategies. It describes dozens of Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies and contains information on TDM planning, evaluation and implementation. It has thousands of hyperlinks that provide instant access

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand shock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies January 16, 2011 Maryanne Fuller (MF): Hi there. This is Maryanne Fuller from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory....

482

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

morning and summer afternoon peak electricity demand in commercial buildings the Seattle area. LBNL performed this demonstration for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)...

483

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable Energy Sources, and Energy Storages:...

484

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand side management (DSM) activities in the electric power industry. The report presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a ...

485

Capitalize on Existing Assets with Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial facilities universally struggle with escalating energy costs. EnerNOC will demonstrate how commercial, industrial, and institutional end-users can capitalize on their existing assets—at no cost and no risk. Demand response, the voluntary reduction of electric demand in response to grid instability, provides financial incentives to participating facilities that agree to conserve energy. With demand response, facilities also receive advance notice of potential blackouts and can proactively protect their equipment and machinery from sudden losses of power. A detailed case study, focusing on a sample industrial customer’s participation in demand response, will support the presentation.

Collins, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Optimization of Demand Response Through Peak Shaving  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jul 5, 2013 ... Optimization of Demand Response Through Peak Shaving. G. Zakeri(g.zakeri *** at*** auckland.ac.nz) D. Craigie(David.Craigie ***at*** ...

487

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings Title Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings...

488

Demand response participation in PJM wholesale markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of demand response resource participation in PJM wholesale ancillary service markets which include: Day Ahead Scheduling Reserves, Synchronized Reserves and Regulation.

Peter L. Langbein

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 3.0 Previous Experience with Demand Responsive Lighting11 4.3. Prevalence of Lighting13 4.4. Impact of Title 24 on Lighting

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the most natural gas usage (33% and 51% of total demanddependence in natural gas usage, and consequently, Januarygas demand exhibits a strong winter peak in residential usage

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response Controls for HVAC Systems Clifford Federspiel,tests. Figure 5: Specific HVAC electric power consumptioncontrol, demand response, HVAC, wireless Executive Summary

Federspiel, Clifford

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

networks_in_the_home_the_new_growth_market.htm [12] NationalHome Network Technologies and Automating Demand Responsethe University of California. Home Network Technologies and

McParland, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050 RyanResearch Program California Energy Commission November 7,Chris Kavalec. California Energy Commission. CEC (2003a)

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Discrete Choice Analysis: Hydrogen FCV Demand Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Choice Analysis: H 2 FCV Demand Potential Cory Welch H 2 Scenario Analysis Workshop Washington, D.C. , January 31, 2007 2 Overview * Motivation for work * Methodology * Relative...

495

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Maximum demand, year 2050 electricity consumption reachesefficiency, year 2050 electricity consumption is 357 TWh,capita electricity consumption increases from 7,421 kWh/year

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0589(97) Distribution Category UC-950 U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997 December 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal ...

497

Shock Timing Technique for the NIF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among the final shots at the Nova laser was a series testing the VISAR technique that will be the primary diagnostic for timing the shocks in a NIF ignition capsule. At Nova, the VISAR technique worked over the range of shock strengths and with the precision required for the NIF shock timing job--shock velocities in liquid D{sub 2} from 12 {micro}m/ns to 65 {micro}m/ns with better than 2% accuracy. VISAR images showed stronger shocks overtaking weaker ones, which is the basis of the plan for setting the pulse shape for the NIF ignition campaign. The technique is so precise that VISAR measurements may also play a role in certifying beam-to-beam and shot-to-shot repeatability of NIF laser pulses.

Munro, D.H.; Celliers, P.M.; Collins, G.W.; Gold, D.M.; DaSilva, L.B.; Haan, S.W.; Cauble, R.C.; Hammel, B.A.; Hsing, W.W.

2000-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

498

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

55. Sample distribution of vehicle electricity demand forand distribution facilities that supply electricity demand.55. Sample distribution of vehicle electricity demand for

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5. Average, minimum, and maximum demand reduction at eachshow the minimum and maximum demand reduction during the7. Average, minimum, and maximum demand reduction at each

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 16 Annual peak electricity demand by sector. Tableincludes an hourly electricity demand (i.e. power) profileof aggregating sectoral electricity demands into a statewide

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z