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1

EIA forecasts increased oil demand, need for additional supply ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

World oil demand is forecast to increase by 1.7 million barrels per day (bbl/d) ... Cooling demand in the Middle East is expected to rise to record levels this summer.

2

How Increased Crude Oil Demand by China and India Affects the International Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-WTI Spot Cushing US$/BBL Brent Crude Oil-Brent Dated FOB US$/BBL Dubai Crude Oil-Arab Gulf Dubai FOB US$/BBL Tapis Crude Oil-Malaysia Tapis FOB US$/BBL Urals Crude Oil-Urals FOB US$/BBL Bonny Crude Oil-Africa FOB1 How Increased Crude Oil Demand by China and India Affects the International Market

3

Annual World Oil Demand Growth  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Following relatively small increases of 1.3 million barrels per day in 1999 and 0.9 million barrels per day in 2000, EIA is estimating world demand may grow by 1.6 million barrels per day in 2001. Of this increase, about 3/5 comes from non-OECD countries, while U.S. oil demand growth represents more than half of the growth projected in OECD countries. Demand in Asia grew steadily during most of the 1990s, with 1991-1997 average growth per year at just above 0.8 million barrels per day. However, in 1998, demand dropped by 0.3 million barrels per day as a result of the Asian economic crisis that year. Since 1998, annual growth in oil demand has rebounded, but has not yet reached the average growth seen during 1991-1997. In the Former Soviet Union, oil demand plummeted during most of the

4

Supply and demand of lube oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lube oil consumption in the world has reached about 40 million tonnes per year, of which 24 million tonnes is used outside the communist areas. There are large regional differences in annual consumption per head from one kilogramme (kg) in India to 35 kg in North America. A statistical analysis of historical data over twenty years in about ninety countries has lead to the conclusion that national income, measured as GDP per head, is the key determinant of total lube oil consumption per head. The functional relationship, however, is different in different countries. Starting from GDP projections until the year 2000, regional forecasts of lube oil demand have been made which show that the share of developing nations outside the communist area in world demand will grow. This will increase the regional imbalance between base oil capacity and demand.

Vlemmings, J.M.L.M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Oil price; oil demand shocks; oil supply shocks; dynamic effects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Using a newly developed measure of global real economic activity, a structural decomposition of the real price of crude oil in four components is proposed: oil supply shocks driven by political events in OPEC countries; other oil supply shocks; aggregate shocks to the demand for industrial commodities; and demand shocks that are specific to the crude oil market. The latter shock is designed to capture shifts in the price of oil driven by higher precautionary demand associated with fears about future oil supplies. The paper quantifies the magnitude and timing of these shocks, their dynamic effects on the real price of oil and their relative importance in determining the real price of oil during 1975-2005. The analysis sheds light on the origin of the observed fluctuations in oil prices, in particular during oil price shocks. For example, it helps gauge the relative importance of these shocks in the build-up of the real price of crude oil since the late 1990s. Distinguishing between the sources of higher oil prices is shown to be crucial in assessing the effect of higher oil prices on U.S. real GDP and CPI inflation, suggesting that policies aimed at dealing with higher oil prices must take careful account of the origins of higher oil prices. The paper also quantifies the extent to which the macroeconomic performance of the U.S. since the mid-1970s has been driven by the external economic shocks driving the real price of oil as opposed to domestic economic factors and policies. Key words: JEL:

Lutz Kilian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Warm Winters Held Heating Oil Demand Down While Diesel Grew  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: To understand the inventory situation, we must look the balance between demand and supply that drives inventories up or down. First consider demand. Most of the remaining charts deal with total distillate demand. Total distillate demand includes both diesel and heating oil. These are similar products physically, and prior to the low sulfur requirements for on-road diesel fuel, were used interchangeably. But even today, low sulfur diesel can be used in the heating oil market, but low sulfur requirements keep heating oil from being used in the on-road transportation sector. The seasonal increases and decreases in stocks stem from the seasonal demand in heating oil shown as the bottom red line. Heating oil demand increases by more than 50 percent from its low point to its high

7

OECD Crude Oil v Product Demand Seasonal Patterns  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 Notes: The answer lies in separating crude oil demand from product demand. Crude oil demand should be a better indicator of pressures on crude oil price than product demand....

8

Production Will Meet Demand Increase This Summer  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Production must meet increases in demand this year. Last year, increased imports met most of the summer demand increase, and increases in stock draws met almost all of the remainder. Production did not increase much. But this year, inventories will not be available, and increased imports seem unlikely. Thus, increases in production will be needed to meet increased demand. Imports availability is uncertain this summer. Imports in 1999 were high, and with Phase II RFG product requirements, maintaining this level could be challenging since not all refineries exporting to the U.S. will be able to meet the new gasoline specifications. Stocks will also contribute little supply this summer. Last year's high gasoline stocks allowed for a stock draw that was 58 MB/D higher than

9

Rapid increases in electricity demand challenge both ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... on April 1 was the steepest so far this year in SPP. The rate of increase in electricity demand peaked at 12.4% between 6 a.m. and 7 a.m. ...

10

Chinese Oil Demand: Steep Incline Ahead  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chinese Oil Demand: Chinese Oil Demand: Steep Incline Ahead Malcolm Shealy Alacritas, Inc. April 7, 2008 Oil Demand: China, India, Japan, South Korea 0 2 4 6 8 1995 2000 2005 2010 Million Barrels/Day China South Korea Japan India IEA China Oil Forecast 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Million Barrels/Day WEO 2007 16.3 mbd 12.7 mbd IEA China Oil Forecasts 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Million Barrels/Day WEO 2007 WEO 2006 WEO 2004 WEO 2002 Vehicle Sales in China 0 2 4 6 8 10 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 Million Vehicles/Year Vehicle Registrations in China 0 10 20 30 40 50 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 Million Vehicles/Year Vehicle Density vs GDP per Capita 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 GDP per capita, 2005$ PPP Vehicles per thousand people Taiwan South Korea China Vehicle Density vs GDP per Capita

11

Increased demand spurs gas compression industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing demand for natural gas in the last five years has led to dynamic development in the gas compression industry as producers and transmission companies expand operations to supply gas. To handle the increase, for example, transmission companies have been steadily adding new lines to the pipeline infrastructure--3,437 miles in 1995 and an estimated 4,088 miles in 1997. New compression for pipelines has also increased from 212,637 horsepower added in 1989 to an estimated 311,685 horsepower to be added in 1997. Four key trends which influence the gas compression business have developed since the mid 1980s: first, a steady resurgence of demand for natural gas each year; second, a phenomenal number of mergers and buyouts among gas compression companies; third, an alarming drop in average daily gas production per well since 1972; and fourth, high drilling activity in the Gulf of Mexico.

Honea, M. [Weatherford Enterra, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Patterns of crude demand: Future patterns of demand for crude oil as a func-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the perspective of `peak oil', that is from the pers- pective of the supply of crude, and price#12;2 #12;Patterns of crude demand: Future patterns of demand for crude oil as a func- tion is given on the problems within the value chain, with an explanation of the reasons why the price of oil

Langendoen, Koen

13

Outlook for US lube oil supply and demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the domestic demand for automotive and industrial lubricants to the year 2000 and evaluates the ability of U.S. refiners to meet the associated demand for base stocks. Changes in the supply/demand picture over the past several years are also reviewed. In the late 1970's, lube base stocks had been in short supply as healthy increases in demand pushed U.S. refiners to near maximum operating levels. Imports were increased to what were then record high levels and exports were reduced. This situation began to reverse itself in mid-1980 as marketers began to feel the impact of recession here and abroad. U.S. base stock consumption has since declined dramatically, to a level in 1982 estimated to be 17.5% below that of 1979's peak. In the meantime, refiners had added another 7.0 MB/CD to manufacturing capacity. 1982 lube plant operations are estimated to have dropped as low as 62% of nameplate capacity. The outlook for recovery is conservative. Due to continued depressed demand in certain market segments, 1983's increase in base oil demand is projected to be held to only 2%. Gains in 1984 and 1985 will be more robust, in the area of 6% per year. Thereafter, the overall rate of growth will drop to under 1% per year. The outlooks for automotive and industrial lubricants demand are summarized. Due to a forecast of greater relative growth in synthetic and water-based lubricants, base stock consumption is forecast to increase at a slower pace than that of the total finished lubricants volume.

Brecht, F.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

U.S. Energy Demand, Offshore Oil Production and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Summary of Conclusions. . . The global rate of production of oil is peaking now, coal will peak in 2U.S. Energy Demand, Offshore Oil Production and BP's Macondo Well Spill Tad Patzek, Petroleum that run the U.S. Complexity, models, risks Gulf of Mexico's oil and gas production Conclusions ­ p.3/4 #12

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

15

Future world oil supply and demand-the impact on domestic exploration  

SciTech Connect

Current world oil consumption (demand) of about 68 million B/D will increase to over 81 million B/D in 10 years. World oil production capacity (supply), currently 6-8% over current demand, cannot meet this demand without adequate investments to boost capacity, particularly in the Middle East. Because of low oil prices these investments are not being made. In 10 years the Middle East needs to supply over 50% of the worlds oil; the Far East will by then surpass North America in demand. It is very possible that there will soon be a period of time when the supply/demand balance will be, or will perceived to be failing. This may cause rapid rises in crude oil prices until the balance is again achieved. Crude oil prices are actually quite volatile; the steadiness and abnormally low prices in recent years has been due to several factors that probably won`t be present in the period when the supply/demand situation is seen to be unbalanced. Domestic oil exploration is strongly affected by the price of crude oil and domestic producers should soon benefit by rising oil prices. Exploration will be stimulated, and small incremental amounts of new oil should be economically viable. Oil has been estimated to be only 2% of the total cost of producing all U.S. goods and services-if so, then oil price increase should not create any real problems in the total economic picture. Nevertheless, certain industries and life styles heavily dependent on cheap fuel will have problems, as the days of cheap oil will be gone. Future undiscovered oil in the Earth could be one trillion barrels or more, equal to the amount now considered as proved reserves. There will soon be more of a challenge to find and produce this oil in sufficient quantity and at a competitive cost with other sources of energy. This challenge should keep us busy.

Townes, H.L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Oil, gas tanker industry responding to demand, contract changes  

SciTech Connect

Steady if slower growth in demand for crude oil and natural gas, low levels of scrapping, and a moderate newbuilding pace bode well for the world`s petroleum and natural-gas shipping industries. At year-end 1997, several studies of worldwide demand patterns and shipping fleets expressed short and medium-term optimism for seaborne oil and gas trade and fleet growth. The paper discusses steady demand and shifting patterns, the aging fleet, the slowing products traffic, the world`s fleet, gas carriers, LPG demand, and LPG vessels.

True, W.R.

1998-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

17

Non-OPEC oil supply gains to outpace demand in 1997  

SciTech Connect

Rising oil supplies in 1997 will relax some of the market tightness that drove up crude prices last year. Worldwide demand for petroleum products in 1996 rose faster than anticipated and faster than supply from outside the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. This increased demand for OPEC oil and pushed up prices for crude. At year end, the world export price of crude was up more than 25% from the same period a year earlier. Market conditions will change in 1997. While worldwide economic growth will continue to boost demand for energy and petroleum, non-OPEC petroleum supply will grow even more. Increases in North Sea and Latin American production will help boost non-OPEC output by 1.9 million b/d. And revenues from 1996 production gains will make additional investment possible in exploration and production. The paper discusses world economic growth, world oil demand, worldwide supply, supply outlook, prices and international drilling.

Beck, R.J.

1997-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

18

Global crude oil supply disruptions and strong demand support high ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

While Brent crude oil spot prices have increased as much as $7 per barrel (6%) since the chemical weapons incident in Syria on August 21, 2013, market fundamentals ...

19

Enhanced oil recovery: major equipment and its projected demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After years of research and pilot tests, the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) industry is taking major leaps forward in 1981. With the launching of several hundred new EOR pilot tests, the announcement of major CO/sub 2/ pipelines into W. Texas, and a $3.6-billion purchase of South Belridge heavy oil by Shell, oil companies are showing their confidence in this technologically-emerging area. While much research remains to be done to make these processes more efficient and economic, the important commercial stage of the EOR industry's growth has clearly been reached. Along with the growth of the EOR industry will come a major demand for equipment and facilities. This demand will include traditional requirements for steam generators and compressors, although on a scale many times larger than at present, as well as new requirements for gas separation, chemical storage, and special tubulars.

Kuuskraa, V.A.; Hammershaimb, E.C.; Wicks, D.E.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Residential heating oil prices increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ago to 3.98 per gallon. That's up 6-tenths of a penny from a year ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Heating oil...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand increases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The asymmetric effects of changes in price and income on energy and oil demand.” Energy Journal 23(1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper estimates the effects on energy and oil demand of changes in income and oil prices, for 96 of the world’s largest countries, in per-capita terms. We examine three important issues: the asymmetric effects on demand of increases and decreases in oil prices; the asymmetric effects on demand of increases and decreases in income; and the different speeds of demand adjustment to changes in price and in income. Its main conclusions are the following: (1) OECD demand responds much more to increases in oil prices than to decreases; ignoring this asymmetric price response will bias downward the estimated response to income changes; (2) demand’s response to income decreases in many Non-OECD countries is not necessarily symmetric to its response to income increases; ignoring this asymmetric income response will bias the estimated response to income changes; (3) the speed of demand adjustment is faster to changes in income than to changes in price; ignoring this difference will bias upward the estimated response to income changes. Using correctly specified equations for energy and oil demand, the long-run response in demand for income growth is about 1.0 for Non-OECD Oil Exporters, Income Growers and perhaps all Non-OECD countries, and about 0.55 for OECD countries. These estimates for developing countries are significantly higher than current estimates used by the US Department of Energy. Our estimates for the OECD countries are also higher than those estimated recently by Schmalensee-Stoker-Judson (1998) and Holtz-Eakin and Selden (1995), who ignore the (asymmetric) effects of prices on demand. Higher responses to income changes, of course, will increase projections of energy and oil demand, and of carbon dioxide emissions.

Dermot Gately; Hillard G. Huntington; Dermot Gately; Hillard G. Huntington; Joyce Dargay; Lawrence Goulder; Mary Riddel; Shane Streifel

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

STEO January 2013 - oil production increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

oil production to increase in 2013 and 2014 oil production to increase in 2013 and 2014 U.S. crude oil production is expected to keep rising over the next two years. America's oil output will jump nearly 900,000 barrels per day in 2013 to an average 7.3 million barrels a day, according to the latest monthly forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This would mark the biggest one-year increase in output since U.S. commercial crude oil production began in 1859. U.S. daily oil production is expected to rise by another 600,000 barrels in 2014 to nearly 8 million barrels a day, the highest level since 1988. Most of America's oil production growth over the next two years will come from more drilling activity in tight shale rock formations located in North Dakota and Texas

23

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service on Northeast Heating Oil Demand  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Assesses the extent of interruptible natural gas contracts and their effect on heating oil demand in the Northeast.

Elizabeth E. Campbell

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Annual World Oil Demand Growth - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Following relatively small increases of 1.3 million barrels per day in 1999 and 0.8 million barrels per day in 2000, EIA is estimating world demand may grow by 1.5 ...

25

Import Demand of Crude Oil and Economic Growth in China: Evidence from the ARDL Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to quantify the demand elasticity of China's imported crude oil, a long-run stable relationship is estimated among the crude oil import, income and crude oil prices by the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) bound testing approach over the ... Keywords: ARDL bound test, price elasticity, income elasticity, crude oil demand

Wei Sun; Zhongying Qi; Niannian Jia

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Distillate Prices Increasing With Crude Oil  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 Notes: This slide shows the strong influence crude oil prices have on retail distillate prices. Distillate tracks the crude price increases seen in 1996 and the subsequent fall...

27

Rapid increases in electricity demand challenge both generating ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Because supply and demand for electricity must balance in real-time, rapid changes in demand create operational challenges for the electric system and generating unit ...

28

Increasing CO2 Storage in Oil Recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increasing CO Increasing CO 2 Storage in Oil Recovery Kristian Jessen (krisj@pangea.stanford.edu, 650-723-6348) Linda C. Sam-Olibale (chizoba@pangea.stanford.edu, 650-725-0831) Anthony R. Kovscek (kovscek@pangea.stanford.edu, 650-723-1218) Franklin M. Orr, Jr. (fmorr@pangea.stanford.edu, 650-723-2750) Department of Petroleum Engineering, Stanford University 65 Green Earth Sciences Building 367 Panama Street Stanford, CA 94305-2220 Introduction Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) injection has been used as a commercial process for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) since the 1970's. Because the cost of oil recovered is closely linked to the purchase cost of the CO 2 injected, considerable reservoir engineering design effort has gone into reducing the total amount of CO 2 required to recover each barrel of oil. If,

29

Factors that will influence oil and gas supply and demand in the 21st century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent report published by the National Petroleum Council (NPC) in the United States predicted a 50-60% growth in total global demand for energy by 2030. Because oil, gas, and coal will continue to be the primary energy sources during this time, the energy industry will have to continue increasing the supply of these fuels to meet this increasing demand. Achieving this goal will require the exploitation of both conventional and unconventional reservoirs of oil and gas in (including coalbed methane) an environmentally acceptable manner. Such efforts will, in turn, require advancements in materials science, particularly in the development of materials that can withstand high-pressure, high-temperature, and high-stress conditions.

Holditch, S.A.; Chianelli, R.R. [Texas A& amp; M University, College Station, TX (United States)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

New York, New York 10003-6687The Asymmetric Effects of Changes in Price and Income on Energy and Oil Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper estimates the effects on energy and oil demand of changes in income and oil prices, for 96 of the world’s largest countries, in per-capita terms. We examine three important issues: the asymmetric effects on demand of increases and decreases in oil prices; the asymmetric effects on demand of increases and decreases in income; and the different speeds of demand adjustment to changes in price and in income. Its main conclusions are the following: (1) OECD demand responds much more to increases in oil prices than to decreases; ignoring this asymmetric price response will bias downward the estimated income elasticity; (2) demand’s response to income decreases in many non-OECD countries is not necessarily symmetric to its response to income increases; ignoring this asymmetric income response will bias the estimated income elasticity; (3) the speed of demand adjustment is faster to changes in income than to changes in price; ignoring this difference will bias upward the estimated response to income changes. Using correctly specified equations for energy and oil demand, the long-run elasticity for increases in income is about 0.55 for OECD energy and oil, and 1.0 or higher for Non-OECD Oil Exporters, Income Growers and perhaps all Non-OECD countries. These income elasticity

Dermot Gately; Hillard G. Huntington; Dermot Gately; Hillard G. Huntington; Dermot Gately; Hillard G. Huntington

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Secretary of Energy Samuel W....

32

The Effect of CO2 Pricing on Conventional and Non- Conventional Oil Supply and Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assumes that nonconventional crude oil enters the market when conventional oil supply alone is unable to meet demand, and the social cost of CO2 is included in the calculation of the oil rent at that time. The results reveal the effect of a CO2 tax set...

Méjean, Aurélie; Hope, Chris

33

Warm Winters Held Heating Oil Demand Down While Diesel Grew  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 Notes: To understand the inventory situation, we must look the balance between demand and supply that drives inventories up or down. First consider demand. Most of the remaining...

34

System for increasing corona inception voltage of insulating oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The Corona Inception Voltage of insulating oils is increased by repetitive cycles of prestressing the oil with a voltage greater than the corona inception voltage, and either simultaneously or serially removing byproducts of corona by evacuation and heating the oil.

Rohwein, Gerald J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Rising North Dakota oil production and demand spurs two new ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Trenton Diesel Refinery, whose parent company is Dakota Oil Processing, is expected to cost $200 million to build and start-up.

36

Strong demand growth seen for oil and gas in 1997--99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides historical information on worldwide crude oil productions from 1984 to present and makes predictions on future demand and refinery capacities. It provides information on oil reserves on a world scale and the pricing of these commodities. It breaks reserves, production and capacities down into OPEC and non-OPEC countries. It then provides general energy demand for both developed and developing countries in all energy forms.

Beck, R.J.

1996-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

37

Supply and demand planning for crude oil procurement in refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The upstream petroleum supply chain is inefficient and uneconomical because of the independence of the four complex and fragmented functions which comprise it. Crude oil exploration, trading, transportation, and refining ...

Nnadili, Beatrice N. (Beatrice Nne)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

World's 1993 oil flow slips; demand to move up in 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

World crude oil production in 1993 was down slightly from the year before. Production averaged 59.752 million b/d, off 287,000 b/d from 1992, largely because of production declines in the Commonwealth of Independent States (C.I.S.) and US. Those declines were offset in part by increases among members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries as well as in regions such as the North Sea and other non-OPEC areas. International Energy Agency (IEA) figures show world demand for petroleum products fell 100,000 b/d in 1993 to average 67 million b/d for the year. This included a stock build estimated at 400,000 b/d. IEA expects world demand to move up this year. However, it is still doubtful whether OPEC production will have to expand to meet the higher level of consumption. That will depend on decisions about additions to stocks. The paper discusses OPEC production, OPEC quota, world liquids supply, world demand, and outlook for 1994.

Beck, R.J.

1994-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

39

Evidence is growing on demand side of an oil peak  

SciTech Connect

After years of continued growth, the number of miles driven by Americans started falling in December 2007. Not only are the number of miles driven falling, but as cars become more fuel efficient, they go further on fewer gallons - further reducing demand for gasoline. This trend is expected to accelerate. Drivers include, along with higher-efficiency cars, mass transit, reversal in urban sprawl, biofuels, and plug-in hybrid vehicles.

NONE

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Heating oil prices rise due to winter demand and crude oil prices ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand increases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

EPRG WORKING PAPER The Effect of CO2 Pricing on Conventional and Non-Conventional Oil Supply and Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What would be the effect of CO2 pricing on global oil supply and demand? This paper introduces a model describing the interaction between conventional and non-conventional oil supply in a Hotelling framework and under CO2 constraints. The model assumes that nonconventional crude oil enters the market when conventional oil supply alone is unable to meet demand, and the social cost of CO2 is included in the calculation of the oil rent at that time. The results reveal the effect of a CO2 tax set at the social cost of CO2 on oil price and demand and the uncertainty associated with the time when conventional oil production might become unable to meet demand. The results show that a tax on CO2 emissions associated with fuel use would reduce oil demand despite the effect of lower future rents, and would delay the time when conventional oil supply is unable to satisfy demand. More precisely, between 81 and 99 % of the CO2 tax is carried into the oil price despite the counter-balancing effect of the reduced rent. A CO2 tax on fuel use set at the social cost of CO2 would delay by 25 years the time when conventional oil production is unable to meet oil demand, from 2019 to 2044 (mean value). The results show that this date is very sensitive to the price elasticity of demand and the demand growth rate, which shows the great potential of demand-side measures to smooth the transition towards low-carbon liquid fuel alternatives. www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk EPRG WORKING PAPER Keywords JEL Classification Oil supply and demand; Conventional and non-conventional oil; CO2 pricing; Social cost of CO2.

Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope; Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

System for increasing corona inception voltage of insulating oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The Corona Inception Voltage of insulating oils is increased by repetitive cycles of prestressing the oil with a voltage greater than the corona inception voltage, and either simultaneously or serially removing byproducts of corona by evacuation and heating the oil. 5 figs.

Rohwein, G.J.

1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

43

Product Price Spreads Over Crude Oil Vary With Seasons and Supply/Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Of course, petroleum product prices don't move in lockstep to crude oil prices, for a number of reasons. We find it useful to look at variations in the spread between product and crude oil prices, in this case comparing spot market prices for each. The difference between heating oil and crude oil spot prices tends to vary seasonally; that is, it's generally higher in the winter, when demand for distillate fuels is higher due to heating requirements, and lower in the summer. (Gasoline, as we'll see later, generally does the opposite.) However, other factors affecting supply and demand, including the relative severity of winter weather, can greatly distort these "typical" seasonal trends. As seen on this chart, the winters of 1995-96 and 1996-97 featured

44

Muffled Price Signals: Household Water Demand Under Increasing-Block Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The distinction has been quite important in the electricity demand literature, in which long-run price elasticity and electricity pricing, and volume discounts in general. Under increasing blocks, the budget constraintMuffled Price Signals: Household Water Demand Under Increasing-Block Prices Sheila M. Cavanagh, W

Kammen, Daniel M.

45

Increases in oil prices affect broader measures of inflation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Over the past ten years, the Chained Consumer Price Index (C-CPI-U) ... oil price increases boost freight transportation costs—for example, ...

46

,"U.S. Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Revision Increases...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Revision Increases (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2011...

47

Estimating relative confidence of conditional world oil supply and demand equilibrium  

SciTech Connect

This paper draws from the survey by the National Petroleum Council (NPC) of industry representatives and consulting/forecasting organizations on the likely market configuration under two different world oil price scenarios. The pseudo-data approach treats the forecast price and quantity variables from the various forecasts as pooled time-series, cross-sectional data, and applies traditional econometric techniques to estimate supply and demand curves. We focus on estimating US domestic supply and demand curves and respondent-specific shift factors from a subsample of the NPC survey. We find that all respondents in the survey are more confident about demand than supply forecasts. The underlying differences in individual GNP forecasts account for much of the uncertainty in demand for most respondents, but are still 2 to 6 times more confident of demand than supply. 4 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Boyd, G.A.; Hanson, D.A.; Hochheiser, H.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Implications of Increasing U.S. Crude Oil Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Implications of Increasing U.S. Crude Implications of Increasing U.S. Crude Oil Production By John Powell June 18, 2013 U.S. crude oil production is up dramatically since 2010 and will continue to grow rapidly; this has implications for: John Powell June 18, 2013 2 * Refinery operations * Refinery investment * Logistics infrastructure investment * Exports of petroleum products * Exports of crude oil Increased U.S. crude oil production has resulted in: John Powell June 18, 2013 3 * Declines in U.S. crude imports * Changes to refinery operations * Logistical constraints in moving crude from production areas to refining areas * Discounted prices for domestic "landlocked" crude vs. international seaborne crude

49

An Investigation into the Derived Demand for Land in Palm Oil Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Over the years, the world industry of oil palm has been rapidly increasing in the tropical areas of Asia, Africa and America. One of the… (more)

Lau, Jia Li

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Oil demand continues to grow in the U.S. and worldwide  

SciTech Connect

Rising oil consumption is challenging the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries production quota--but not the group`s ability to meet demand. In the second half of 1995, the oil market will continue to need more oil from OPEC members than the group claims to be willing to produce with its quota at 24.52 million b/d. If the quota really limited supply, ingredients would be in place for a significant price hike. Growth in a non-OPEC production intensities temptations on OPEC members to cheat on quotas and has become a key factor in the market. OPEC producers have seen that if they don`t meet incremental demand at the current price, other producers will. OPEC eventually will have to raise its quota or acknowledge that the artificial production limit lacks meaning. At present, the only real limit to supply is production capacity, which remains in excess relative to demand and which has demonstrated its ability to grow both within and outside of OPEC when prices rise. The paper discusses worldwide trends, pressures on OPEC, world crude prices, US prices, natural gas prices, US energy demand, natural gas use, gas supply, US demand for petroleum products, imports, and inventories.

Tippee, B.; Beck, R.J.

1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Utah Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Revision Increases...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Million Barrels) Utah Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Revision Increases (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

52

U.S. Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Revision Increases...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Increases (Million Barrels) U.S. Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Revision Increases (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

53

RDI forecasts oil price increase impact on electric consumers  

SciTech Connect

According to a publication by Resource Data International, Inc. (RDI), Boulder, Colorado, the current oil price increases will effect electricity consumers nationwide. While the direct use of fuel oil and natural gas as boiler fuels is expected to decline with rising prices, the cost of alternative energy sources including coal, nuclear, and hydro are also expected to rise, RDI said.

Not Available

1990-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

54

Projection of Chinese motor vehicle growth, oil demand, and CO{sub 2}emissions through 2050.  

SciTech Connect

As the vehicle population in China increases, oil consumption and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions associated with on-road transportation are rising dramatically. During this study, we developed a methodology to project trends in the growth of the vehicle population, oil demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions associated with on-road transportation in China. By using this methodology, we projected--separately--the number of highway vehicles, motorcycles, and rural vehicles in China through 2050. We used three scenarios of highway vehicle growth (high-, mid-, and low-growth) to reflect patterns of motor vehicle growth that have occurred in different parts of the world (i.e., Europe and Asia). All are essentially business-as-usual scenarios in that almost none of the countries we examined has made concerted efforts to manage vehicle growth or to offer serious alternative transportation means to satisfy people's mobility needs. With this caveat, our projections showed that by 2030, China could have more highway vehicles than the United States has today, and by 2035, it could have the largest number of highway vehicles in the world. By 2050, China could have 486-662 million highway vehicles, 44 million motorcycles, and 28 million rural vehicles. These numbers, which assume essentially unmanaged vehicle growth, would result in potentially disastrous effects on the urban infrastructure, resources, and other social and ecological aspects of life in China. We designed three fuel economy scenarios, from conservative to aggressive, on the basis of current policy efforts and expectations of near-future policies in China and in developed countries. It should be noted that these current and near-future policies have not taken into consideration the significant potential for further fuel economy improvements offered by advanced technologies such as electric drive technologies (e.g., hybrid electric vehicles and fuel-cell vehicles). By using vehicle growth projections and potential vehicle fuel economy, we projected that China's on-road vehicles could consume approximately 614-1016 million metric tons of oil per year (12.4-20.6 million barrels per day) and could emit 1.9-3.2 billion metric tons of CO{sub 2} per year in 2050, which will put tremendous pressure on the balance of the Chinese and world oil supply and demand and could have significant implications on climate change. Our analysis shows that, while improvements in vehicle fuel economy are crucial for reducing transportation energy use, containing the growth of the vehicle population could have an even more profound effect on oil use and CO{sub 2} emissions. This benefit is in addition to other societal and environmental benefits--such as reduced congestion, land use, and urban air pollution--that will result from containing vehicle population growth. Developing public transportation systems for personal travel and rail and other modes for freight transportation will be important for containing the growth of motor vehicles in China. Although the population of passenger cars will far exceed that of all truck types in China in the future, our analysis shows that oil use by and CO{sub 2} emissions from the Chinese truck fleet will be far larger than those related to Chinese passenger cars because trucks are very use intensive (more vehicle miles traveled per year) and energy intensive (lower fuel economy). Unfortunately, the potential for improving fuel economy and reducing air pollutant emissions for trucks has not been fully explored; such efforts are needed. Considering the rapid depletion of the world's oil reserve, the heightened global interest in addressing greenhouse gas emissions, and the geopolitical complications of global oil supply and demand, the study results suggest that unmanaged vehicle growth and limited improvements in vehicle fuel efficiency will lead to an unsustainable and unstable transportation system in China. In other words, while our projections do not definitively indicate what will happen in the Chinese transportation sector by 2050, they do demonstrate

Wang, M.; Huo, H.; Johnson, L.; He, D.

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

55

Projection of Chinese motor vehicle growth, oil demand, and CO{sub 2}emissions through 2050.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the vehicle population in China increases, oil consumption and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions associated with on-road transportation are rising dramatically. During this study, we developed a methodology to project trends in the growth of the vehicle population, oil demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions associated with on-road transportation in China. By using this methodology, we projected--separately--the number of highway vehicles, motorcycles, and rural vehicles in China through 2050. We used three scenarios of highway vehicle growth (high-, mid-, and low-growth) to reflect patterns of motor vehicle growth that have occurred in different parts of the world (i.e., Europe and Asia). All are essentially business-as-usual scenarios in that almost none of the countries we examined has made concerted efforts to manage vehicle growth or to offer serious alternative transportation means to satisfy people's mobility needs. With this caveat, our projections showed that by 2030, China could have more highway vehicles than the United States has today, and by 2035, it could have the largest number of highway vehicles in the world. By 2050, China could have 486-662 million highway vehicles, 44 million motorcycles, and 28 million rural vehicles. These numbers, which assume essentially unmanaged vehicle growth, would result in potentially disastrous effects on the urban infrastructure, resources, and other social and ecological aspects of life in China. We designed three fuel economy scenarios, from conservative to aggressive, on the basis of current policy efforts and expectations of near-future policies in China and in developed countries. It should be noted that these current and near-future policies have not taken into consideration the significant potential for further fuel economy improvements offered by advanced technologies such as electric drive technologies (e.g., hybrid electric vehicles and fuel-cell vehicles). By using vehicle growth projections and potential vehicle fuel economy, we projected that China's on-road vehicles could consume approximately 614-1016 million metric tons of oil per year (12.4-20.6 million barrels per day) and could emit 1.9-3.2 billion metric tons of CO{sub 2} per year in 2050, which will put tremendous pressure on the balance of the Chinese and world oil supply and demand and could have significant implications on climate change. Our analysis shows that, while improvements in vehicle fuel economy are crucial for reducing transportation energy use, containing the growth of the vehicle population could have an even more profound effect on oil use and CO{sub 2} emissions. This benefit is in addition to other societal and environmental benefits--such as reduced congestion, land use, and urban air pollution--that will result from containing vehicle population growth. Developing public transportation systems for personal travel and rail and other modes for freight transportation will be important for containing the growth of motor vehicles in China. Although the population of passenger cars will far exceed that of all truck types in China in the future, our analysis shows that oil use by and CO{sub 2} emissions from the Chinese truck fleet will be far larger than those related to Chinese passenger cars because trucks are very use intensive (more vehicle miles traveled per year) and energy intensive (lower fuel economy). Unfortunately, the potential for improving fuel economy and reducing air pollutant emissions for trucks has not been fully explored; such efforts are needed. Considering the rapid depletion of the world's oil reserve, the heightened global interest in addressing greenhouse gas emissions, and the geopolitical complications of global oil supply and demand, the study results suggest that unmanaged vehicle growth and limited improvements in vehicle fuel efficiency will lead to an unsustainable and unstable transportation system in China. In other words, while our projections do not definitively indicate what will happen in the Chinese transportation sector by 2050, they do demonstrate

Wang, M.; Huo, H.; Johnson, L.; He, D.

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

56

A supply-demand model for OPEC oil-pricing policies  

SciTech Connect

OPEC and its pricing policies have been subjected to constant international attention as well as criticism since 1973. Consumers find OPEC behavior irrational, while OPEC tries to justify its policies as rational and in accordance with the realities of the international oil market. The focus of this study is to contribute toward an analytical and empirical work on OPEC pricing behavior, and highlight the various factors believed to affect the future oil policies of OPEC member countries. After a survey of literature on the theoretical framework of world oil models in general, and OPEC models in particular, a linear econometric model for pricing OPEC oil is formulated which is a supply-demand equilibrium model comprising of supply, demand, and inflation-rate functions. Estimation of the behavioral equations are carried out by Ordinary and Two-Stage Least Square estimators. Econometric results from the estimation and simulation of the model seem to indicate that OPEC's pricing behavior is market-responsive and may best be explained by employing the theoretical framework of market-equilibrium condition.

Heiat, N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The Di¤erential E¤ects of Oil Demand and Supply Shocks on the Global Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We employ a set of sign restrictions on the impulse responses of a Global VAR model, estimated for 38 countries/regions over the period 1979Q2–2011Q2, as well as bounds on impact price elasticities of oil supply and oil demand to discriminate between supply-driven and demand-driven oil-price shocks, and to study the time pro…le of their macroeconomic e¤ects across a wide range of countries and real/…nancial variables. We show that the above identi…cation scheme can greatly bene…t from the cross-sectional dimension of the GVAR — by providing a large number of additional cross-country sign restrictions and hence reducing the set of admissible models. The results indicate that the economic consequences of a supply-driven oil-price shock are very di¤erent from those of an oil-demand shock driven by global economic activity, and vary for oilimporting countries compared to energy exporters. While oil importers typically face a long-lived fall in economic activity in response to a supply-driven surge in oil prices, the impact is positive for energy-exporting countries that possess large proven oil/gas reserves. However, in response to an oil-demand disturbance, almost all countries in

Paul Cashin A; Kamiar Mohaddes B; Maziar Raissi C; Mehdi Raissi Ay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Intelligent Commercial Lighting: Demand-Responsive Conditioning and Increased User Satisfaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

algorithm. The preferred demand response strategy was foundimplements the specific demand response policy chosen by theload shedding and demand response, a literature review of

Agogino, Alice M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Intelligent Commercial Lighting: Demand-Responsive Conditioning and Increased User Satisfaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constraints on Occupant Lighting choices and Satisfaction: A007 "Intelligent Commercial Lighting: Demand-Responsivedirectly. Intelligent Commercial Lighting: Demand-Responsive

Agogino, Alice M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

OPEC and lower oil prices: Impacts on production capacity, export refining, domestic demand and trade balances  

SciTech Connect

The East-West Center received a research grant from the US Department of Energy's Office of Policy, Planning, and Analysis to study the impact of lower oil prices on OPEC production capacity, on export refineries, and the petroleum trade. The project was later expanded to include balance-of-payments scenarios and impacts on OPEC domestic demand. The Department of Energy requested that the study focus on the Persian Gulf countries, as these countries have the largest share of OPEC reserves and production. Since then, staff members from the East-West Center have visited Iran, the United Arab Emirates, and Saudi Arabia and obtained detailed information from other countries. In addition, the East-West Center received from a number of large international oil companies and national governments valuable information on OPEC production capabilities. In order to safeguard the confidential nature of this information, these data have been aggregated in this report. The East-West Center considers the results presented to be the most up-to-date information and analysis available today. This report also provides a major reassessment of the export refining and economic competitiveness of Middle East refineries. As pioneers of the research on OPEC export refineries, the East-West Center has fully reevaluated the performance and outlook of these refineries as of the present. 21 figs., 20 tabs.

Fesharaki, F.; Fridley, D.; Isaak, D.; Totto, L.; Wilson, T.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand increases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

5 World Oil Trends WORLD OIL TRENDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 World Oil Trends Chapter 1 WORLD OIL TRENDS INTRODUCTION In considering the outlook for California's petroleum supplies, it is important to give attention to expecta- tions of what the world oil market. Will world oil demand increase and, if so, by how much? How will world oil prices be affected

62

6.25 KHZ -MAXIMUM SPECTRUM EFFICIENCY The demand for wireless connectivity is increasing. Emerging technologies create  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6.25 KHZ - MAXIMUM SPECTRUM EFFICIENCY The demand for wireless connectivity is increasing. Emerging technologies create applications that require instant information. Wireless SCADA solutions demand RF channels is ready today to utilize the existing spectrum for maximum efficiency. Until now, 6.25 kHz bandwidth

Allen, Gale

63

Evaluation of EOR Potential by Gas and Water Flooding in Shale Oil Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The demand for oil and natural gas will continue to increase for the foreseeable future; unconventional resources such as tight oil, shale gas, shale oil… (more)

Chen, Ke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Experimental studies in a bottom-burning oil shale combustion retort.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As the domestic demand for oil continues to increase, it is expected that the enormous worldwide oil shale reserves will eventually be tapped. Oil from… (more)

Udell, Kent S.

1905-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

A number of western states increased oil production since 2010 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Onshore oil production, including crude oil and lease condensate, rose more than 2 million barrels per day (bbl/d), or 64%, in the Lower 48 states from February 2010 ...

66

Increases in oil prices affect broader measures of inflation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

While a barrel of light sweet crude oil may never make it onto the shopping list of the typical U.S. consumer, the effects of world oil price hikes on consumer prices ...

67

Weak oil prices seen hindrance to pace of increase in gas use  

SciTech Connect

World demand for gas is expected to rocket, yet future natural gas and liquefied natural gas projects remain threatened by the link of gas prices to crude oil prices. This is the main message that emerged from the 19th World Gas Conference in Milan last week. A number of reports predicted regional demand for gas. All foresaw a rise. International Gas Union (IGU), organizer of the conference, and said world natural gas production has continued to rise despite a significant downturn in industrial production. The paper discusses gas demand in Europe, the correlation between oil and gas prices, the natural gas industry in Indonesia, Russia, and southern Europe.

Not Available

1994-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

68

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It was hoped that the successful application of these technologies would result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

69

The relationship between crude oil and natural gas prices and its effect on demand.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The overall theme of the three chapters is the relationship between the prices of natural gas and crude oil, and the factors that cause short… (more)

Rosthal, Jennifer Elizabeth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

INCREASED OIL RECOVERY FROM MATURE OIL FIELDS USING GELLED POLYMER TREATMENTS  

SciTech Connect

Gelled polymer treatments are applied to oil reservoirs to increase oil production and to reduce water production by altering the fluid movement within the reservoir. This report describes the results of a three-year research program aimed at reducing barriers to the widespread use of gelled polymer treatments by (1) developing methods to predict gel behavior during placement in matrix rock and fractures, (2) determining the persistence of permeability reduction after gel placement, and (3) developing methods to design production well treatments to control water production. The work focused on the gel system composed of polyacrylamide and chromium acetate. The molar mass of the polymer was about six million. Chromium(III) acetate reacted and formed crosslinks between polymer molecules. The crosslinked polymer molecules, or pre-gel aggregates, combine and grow to eventually form a 3-dimensional gel. A fundamental study to characterize the formation and growth of pre-gel aggregates was conducted. Two methods, flow field-flow fractionation (FFFF) and multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) were used. Studies using FFFF were inconclusive. Data taken using MALLS showed that at the gel time the average molar mass of gel aggregates increased by a factor of about three while the average size increase was approximately 50%. Increased acetate concentration in the gelant increases the gel time. The in situ performance of an added-acetate system was investigated to determine the applicability for in-depth treatments. Increased acetate concentrations delayed the development of increased flow resistance during gelant injection in short sandpacks. The development of increased flow resistance (in situ gelation) was extended from 2 to 34 days by increasing the acetate-to-chromium ratio from 38 to 153. In situ gelation occurred at a time that was approximately 22% of the bulk gelation time. When carbonate rocks are treated with gel, chromium retention in the rock may limit in-depth treatment. Chromium retention due to precipitation was investigated by flowing chromium acetate solutions through carbonate rock. Chromium precipitated faster in the rocks than in beaker experiments at similar conditions. A mathematical model previously developed fit the precipitation data reasonably well. The stability of gels when subjected to stress was investigated by experiments with gels placed in tubes and in laboratory-scale fractures. Rupture pressures for gels placed in small diameter tubes were correlated with the ratio of tube length to tube ID. In fractures, fluid leakoff from the fracture to adjacent matrix rock affected gel formation and gel stability in a positive way. Disproportionate permeability reduction (DPR) was studied in unconsolidated sandpacks and in Berea sandstone cores. A conceptual model was developed to explain the presence of DPR. The effect of a pressure gradient, imposed by injection of oil or brine, on the permeability of gel-treated cores was investigated. DPR increased significantly as the pressure gradient was decreased. The magnitude of the pressure gradient had a much larger effect on water permeability than on oil permeability.

G.P. Willhite; D.W. Green; C.S. McCool

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

DEVELOPMENT OF AN EXPERT SYSTEM TO IDENTIFY PHASE EQUILIBRIA AND ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY CHARACTERISTICS OF CRUDE OILS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With the increasing demand of oil and gas in the past decades, great endeavors in the oil industry have been devoted to develop and incorporate… (more)

Hua, Luoyi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Propane Demand is Highly Seasonal, But Fresh Supply is Not  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Notes: Propane, like heating oil, has a highly seasonal demand pattern. Demand increases about 50% from its low point to its peak. Production and net imports, on the other hand,...

73

The demand for high performance computing research has been significantly increasing over the past few years. Various  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The demand for high performance computing research has been significantly increasing over the past to promote the effective use of High Performance Computing in the research environment. In addition facility has enabled cutting-edge computations material research, "Having a high-performance computing

Akhmedov, Azer

74

Quarterly update. [Oil supply and demand data for the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report presents detailed statistics on oil supply and demand in the countries of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. The information consists of complete balances of production, trade, refinery intake/output, final consumption, stock levels, and changes for crude oil, natural gas liquids, refinery feedstocks, and 9 product groups; separate trade data for main product groups, LPG, and naphtha; imports for 48 origins; exports for 31 destinations; international marine bunkers and deliveries by product group; aggregates of quarterly data to annual totals; and natural gas supply and consumption. The information supplied is for Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, UK, European Economic Community, Austria, Finland, Greece, Iceland, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, OECD Europe, Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, and the US.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The Differential Effects of Oil Demand and Supply Shocks on the Global Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.6 11.7 51 3.7 World 81.5 100.0 39.0 100.0 1365 100.0 Source: Oil reserve and production data is from the British Petroleum Statistical Review of World Energy and oil export data is from the OPEC Annual Statistical Bulletin. For country groupings see... .g. the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) member states). While the international business cycle is very important for the economic performance of commodity exporters, macroeconomic and political developments 1 in this group of countries also...

Cashin, Paul; Mohaddes, Kamiar; Raissi, Maziar; Raissi, Mehdi

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook 8/13/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance OPEC Production Likely To Remain Low U.S. Reflects World Market Crude Oil Outlook Conclusions Distillate Prices Increase With Crude Oil Distillate Stocks on the East Coast Were Very Low Entering Last Winter Distillate Demand Strong Last Winter More Supply Possible This Fall than Forecast Distillate Fuel Oil Imports Could Be Available - For A Price Distillate Supply/Demand Balance Reflected in Spreads Distillate Stocks Expected to Remain Low Winter Crude Oil and Distillate Price Outlook Heating Oil Outlook Conclusion Propane Prices Follow Crude Oil

77

Method for increasing the pressure in oil-bearing geological structures  

SciTech Connect

A method for increasing pressure in geological oil-bearing structures by gas production due to microbial activity comprising adding to a geological oil-bearing structure, an aneorobic microorganism (Methanobacterium termoautotroficum), a culture medium and formic acid. The formic acid is converted to carbon dioxide and methane gases resulting in increased pressure in the structures.

Hellman, B.G.; Ronnow, P.H.; Tengblad, P.F.; Wiberger, L.I.

1981-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

78

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies would result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

79

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California. This is realized through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It is hoped that the successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively insufficient because of several producability problems which are common in SBC reservoir; inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves.

City of Long Beach; David K.Davies and Associates; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California

1999-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

80

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies will result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs.

Scott Hara

2001-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand increases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Oil Recovery Increases by Low-Salinity Flooding: Minnelusa and Green River Formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waterflooding is by far the most widely used method in the world to increase oil recovery. Historically, little consideration has been given in reservoir engineering practice to the effect of injection brine composition on waterflood displacement efficiency or to the possibility of increased oil recovery through manipulation of the composition of the injected water. However, recent work has shown that oil recovery can be significantly increased by modifying the injection brine chemistry or by injecting diluted or low salinity brine. This paper reports on laboratory work done to increase the understanding of improved oil recovery by waterflooding with low salinity injection water. Porous media used in the studies included outcrop Berea sandstone (Ohio, U.S.A.) and reservoir cores from the Green River formation of the Uinta basin (Utah, U.S.A.). Crude oils used in the experimental protocols were taken from the Minnelusa formation of the Powder River basin (Wyoming, U.S.A.) and from the Green River formation, Monument Butte field in the Uinta basin. Laboratory corefloods using Berea sandstone, Minnelusa crude oil, and simulated Minnelusa formation water found a significant relationship between the temperature at which the oil- and water-saturated cores were aged and the oil recovery resulting from low salinity waterflooding. Lower aging temperatures resulted in very little to no additional oil recovery, while cores aged at higher temperatures resulted in significantly higher recoveries from dilute-water floods. Waterflood studies using reservoir cores and fluids from the Green River formation of the Monument Butte field also showed significantly higher oil recoveries from low salinity waterfloods with cores flooded with fresher water recovering 12.4% more oil on average than those flooded with undiluted formation brine.

Eric P. Robertson

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Assessment of opportunities to increase the recovery and recycling rates of waste oils  

SciTech Connect

Waste oil represents an important energy resource that, if properly managed and reused, would reduce US dependence on imported fuels. Literature and current practice regarding waste oil generation, regulations, collection, and reuse were reviewed to identify research needs and approaches to increase the recovery and recycling of this resource. The review revealed the need for research to address the following three waste oil challenges: (1) recover and recycle waste oil that is currently disposed of or misused; (2) identify and implement lubricating oil source and loss reduction opportunities; and (3) develop and foster an effective waste oil recycling infrastructure that is based on energy savings, reduced environment at impacts, and competitive economics. The United States could save an estimated 140 {times} 1012 Btu/yr in energy by meeting these challenges.

Graziano, D.J.; Daniels, E.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Statistical Information of the Increased Demand for Watch the VOD with the Increased Sophistication in the Mobile Devices,Communications and Internet Penetration in Asia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the rapid progress of the media streaming applications such as video streaming can be classified into two types of streaming, Live video streaming, Video on Demand (VoD). Live video streaming is a service which allows the clients to watch many TV channels over the internet and the clients able to use one operation to perform is to switch the channels. Video on Demand (VoD) is one of the most important applications for the internet of the future and has become an interactive multimedia service which allows the users to start watching the video of their choice at anytime and anywhere, especially after the rapid deployment of the wireless networks and mobile devices. In this paper provide statistical information about the Internet, communications and mobile devices etc. This has led to an increased demand for the development, communication and computational powers of many of the mobile wireless subscribers/mobile devices such as laptops, PDAs, smart phones and notebook. These techniques are utilized to obtain...

Alomari, Saleh Ali

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The hope is that successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs, including: (1) Development of three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic reservoir simulation models--thermal or otherwise--to aid in reservoir management of the steamflood and post-steamflood phases and subsequent development work. (2) Development of computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid reservoir surveillance and operations. (3) Perform detailed studies of the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (4) Testing and proposed application of a novel alkaline-steam well completion technique for the containment of the unconsolidated formation sands and control of fluid entry and injection profiles. (5) Installation of a 2100 ft, 14 inch insulated, steam line beneath a harbor channel to supply steam to an island location. (6) Testing and proposed application of thermal recovery technologies to increase oil production and reserves: (a) Performing pilot tests of cyclic steam injection and production on new horizontal wells. (b) Performing pilot tests of hot water-alternating-steam (WAS) drive in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Perform a pilot steamflood with the four horizontal injectors and producers using a pseudo steam-assisted gravity-drainage (SAGD) process. (8) Advanced reservoir management, through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring and evaluation.

Unknown

2001-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

85

Increasing Heavy Oil in the Wilmington Oil Fiel Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies. Annual Report, March 30, 1995--March 31, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in a portion of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, by implementing advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Based on the knowledge and experience gained with this project, these technologies are intended to be extended to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, and, through technology transfer, will be available to increase heavy oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

Allison, Edith

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels June 11, 2008 - 1:30pm Addthis Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Secretary of Agriculture Edward T. Schafer sent a letter on June 11, 2008 to Senator Jeff Bingaman addressing a number of questions related to biofuels, food, and gasoline and diesel prices. Read the letter. Without Biofuels, Gas Prices Would Increase $.20 to $.35 per Gallon. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that gasoline prices would be between 20 cents to 35 cents per gallon higher without ethanol1, a first-generation biofuel. For a typical household, that means saving about $150 to $300 per year. For the U.S. overall, this saves gas expenditures of $28 billion to

87

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels June 11, 2008 - 1:30pm Addthis Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Secretary of Agriculture Edward T. Schafer sent a letter on June 11, 2008 to Senator Jeff Bingaman addressing a number of questions related to biofuels, food, and gasoline and diesel prices. Read the letter. Without Biofuels, Gas Prices Would Increase $.20 to $.35 per Gallon. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that gasoline prices would be between 20 cents to 35 cents per gallon higher without ethanol1, a first-generation biofuel. For a typical household, that means saving about $150 to $300 per year. For the U.S. overall, this saves gas expenditures of $28 billion to

88

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Joint Model of the Global Crude Oil Market and the U.S.Noureddine. 2002. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandelasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline. Results

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Joint Model of the Global Crude Oil Market and the U.S.Noureddine. 2002. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandelasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline. Results

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model of the Global Crude Oil Market and the U.S. RetailNoureddine. 2002. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandanalysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. Energy

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2003-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

92

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2003-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

93

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2004-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

94

Industrial sector drives increase in North Dakota electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Increased oil and natural gas production in North Dakota has driven the state's growth in industrial demand for electricity. Rising economic activity and population ...

95

Turkey's energy demand and supply  

SciTech Connect

The aim of the present article is to investigate Turkey's energy demand and the contribution of domestic energy sources to energy consumption. Turkey, the 17th largest economy in the world, is an emerging country with a buoyant economy challenged by a growing demand for energy. Turkey's energy consumption has grown and will continue to grow along with its economy. Turkey's energy consumption is high, but its domestic primary energy sources are oil and natural gas reserves and their production is low. Total primary energy production met about 27% of the total primary energy demand in 2005. Oil has the biggest share in total primary energy consumption. Lignite has the biggest share in Turkey's primary energy production at 45%. Domestic production should be to be nearly doubled by 2010, mainly in coal (lignite), which, at present, accounts for almost half of the total energy production. The hydropower should also increase two-fold over the same period.

Balat, M. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Differential impact of gas shortages and fuel-price increases on demand: the case of the hotel industry in New York State  

SciTech Connect

The authors assess the impact of the energy crisis on the lodging industry in New York (excluding New York City) by estimating the effects of two related, but not necessarily correlated, variables: gas shortages and energy price increases. Strong evidence supports the conclusion that energy shortages dampen hotel demand while price increases encourage international, intrastate, and interstate shifts in distance distributions of travel destinations as well as changes in number of trips and length of stay, resulting in a slight aggregate increase in demand. Recent industry data relating to occupancy rates and profitability seem to support this conclusion. 16 references, 2 tables.

Arbel, A. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY); Ravid, A.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

98

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. Summary of Technical Progress

Scott Hara

1997-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

99

Increasing Heavy Oil Reservers in the Wilmington Oil field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) 11-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Hara, Scott [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)

1997-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

100

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China’s domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robertpeak will come around 2020, 24 and that by this point, China’s demand Oil

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand increases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

EIA Oil price timeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, ... Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions.

102

INCREASING WATERFLOOD RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH IMPROVED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project increased recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs. Transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington Field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project. This project used advanced reservoir characterization tools, including the pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool, geologic three-dimensional (3-D) modeling software, and commercially available reservoir management software to identify sands with remaining high oil saturation following waterflood. Production from the identified high oil saturated sands was stimulated by recompleting existing production and injection wells in these sands using conventional means as well as a short radius redrill candidate. Although these reservoirs have been waterflooded over 40 years, researchers have found areas of remaining oil saturation. Areas such as the top sand in the Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the western fault slivers of Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the bottom sands of the Tar Zone Fault Block V, and the eastern edge of Fault Block IV in both the Upper Terminal and Lower Terminal Zones all show significant remaining oil saturation. Each area of interest was uncovered emphasizing a different type of reservoir characterization technique or practice. This was not the original strategy but was necessitated by the different levels of progress in each of the project activities.

Scott Walker; Chris Phillips; Roy Koerner; Don Clarke; Dan Moos; Kwasi Tagbor

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

103

International Energy Outlook 2006 - World Oil Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Markets Oil Markets International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 3: World Oil Markets In the IEO2006 reference case, world oil demand increases by 47 percent from 2003 to 2030. Non-OECD Asia, including China and India, accounts for 43 percent of the increase. In the IEO2006 reference case, world oil demand grows from 80 million barrels per day in 2003 to 98 million barrels per day in 2015 and 118 million barrels per day in 2030. Demand increases strongly despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than in last yearÂ’s outlook. Much of the growth in oil consumption is projected for the nations of non-OECD Asia, where strong economic growth is expected. Non-OECD Asia (including China and India) accounts for 43 percent of the total increase in world oil use over the projection period.

104

Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Annual report, March 30, 1995--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in a portion of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, by implementing advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Based on the knowledge and experience gained with this project, these technologies are intended to be extended to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, and, through technology transfer, will be available to increase heavy oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The project involves implementing thermal recovery in the southern half of the Fault Block II-A Tar zone. The existing steamflood in Fault Block II-A has been relatively inefficient due to several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery efficiency and reduce operating costs.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through June 2002, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V post-steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the Third Quarter 2002, the project team essentially completed implementing the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project developed in March 2002 and is proceeding with additional related work. The project team has completed developing laboratory research procedures to analyze the sand consolidation well completion technique and will initiate work in the fourth quarter. The Tar V pilot steamflood project terminated hot water injection and converted to post-steamflood cold water injection on April 19, 2002. Proposals have been approved to repair two sand consolidated horizontal wells that sanded up, Tar II-A well UP-955 and Tar V well J-205, with gravel-packed inner liner jobs to be performed next quarter. Other well work to be performed next quarter is to convert well L-337 to a Tar V water injector and to recomplete vertical well A-194 as a Tar V interior steamflood pattern producer. Plans have been approved to drill and complete well A-605 in Tar V in the first quarter 2003. Plans have been approved to update the Tar II-A 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and run sensitivity cases to evaluate the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Well work related to the Tar II-A accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan began in March 2002 with oil production increasing from 1009 BOPD in the first quarter to 1145 BOPD in the third quarter. Reservoir pressures have been increased during the quarter from 88% to 91% hydrostatic levels in the ''T'' sands and from 91% to 94% hydrostatic levels in the ''D'' sands. Well work during the quarter is described in the Reservoir Management section. The post-steamflood production performance in the Tar V pilot project has been below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations and the loss of a horizontal producer a second time to sand inflow that are being addressed in the fourth quarter. As the fluid production temperatures exceeded 350 F, our self-imposed temperature limit, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001 and converted to cold water injection on April 19, 2002.

Scott Hara

2002-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

106

Price ratio of crude oil to natural gas continues to increase ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

107

Tight oil, Gulf of Mexico deepwater drive projected increases in U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... oil refers to oil produced from shale, or other very low-permeability rocks, with horizontal drilling and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing technologies.

108

Gasoline prices rise due to increased crude oil costs - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

109

Price ratio of crude oil to natural gas increasing - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

110

Distillate Demand Strong in December 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total distillate demand includes both diesel and heating oil. These are similar products. Physically, diesel can be used in the heating oil market, but low sulfur ...

111

Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

SciTech Connect

This project is intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs. Transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington Field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

1997-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

112

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through September 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Fourth Quarter 2001 performing routine well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood and Tar V pilot steamflood projects. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. The project team ramped up well work activity from October 2000 through November 2001 to increase production and injection. In December, water injection well FW-88 was plug and abandoned and replaced by new well FW-295 into the ''D'' sands to accommodate the Port of Long Beach at their expense. Well workovers are planned for 2002 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The steamflood operation in the Tar V pilot project is mature and profitable. Recent production performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that were being addressed in 2001. As the fluid production is hot, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001.

Scott Hara

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

113

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through June 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Third Quarter 2001 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. The project team ramped up well work activity from October 2000 to September 2001 to increase production and injection. This work will continue through 2001 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current steamflood operations in the Tar V pilot are economical, but recent performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that are being addressed in 2001.

Scott Hara

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

61. Nelson, D. C. Oil Shale: New Technologies Defining New Opportunities. Presented at the Platts Rockies Gas & Oil Conference, Denver, CO, April  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

61. Nelson, D. C. Oil Shale: New Technologies Defining New Opportunities. Presented at the Platts I, II Modeling of the In-Situ Production of Oil from .',1 l ',".1" Oil Shale ilil 'I' 'I~ :' l of conventional oil reserves amidst increasing liquid fuel demand in the world have renewed interest in oil shale

Kulp, Mark

115

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimum demand and Maximum demand incorporate assumptionslevels, or very minor Maximum demand household size, growthvehicles in Increasing Maximum demand 23 mpg truck share

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Microsoft Word - Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Immediate Release For Immediate Release June 11, 2008 202-586-4940 Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Secretary of Agriculture Edward T. Schafer sent a letter on June 11, 2008 to Senator Jeff Bingaman addressing a number of questions related to biofuels, food, and gasoline and diesel prices. The letter is available at http://www.energy.gov Without Biofuels, Gas Prices Would Increase $.20 to $.35 per Gallon. * The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that gasoline prices would be between 20 cents to 35 cents per gallon higher without ethanol 1 , a first-generation biofuel. * For a typical household, that means saving about $150 to $300 per year. * For the U.S. overall, this saves gas expenditures of $28 billion to $49 billion based on annual

117

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas, Heating Oil and Gasoline,” NBER Working Paper.2006. “China’s Growing Demand for Oil and Its Impact on U.S.and Income on Energy and Oil Demand,” Energy Journal 23(1),

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Effects of increasing filing fees for noncompetitive onshore oil and gas leases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Government Accounting Office (GAO) examined the impact of increasing the fee charged to applicants for noncompetitive onshore oil and gas leases from $25.00 to $75.00. Interior believes the increased filing fee will: (1) reduce casual speculation and multiple filings, thereby reducing fraud potential, development delays caused by assignments, and administrative burden; and (2) generate significant additional revenue. Interior's analysis is, of necessity, based largely on conjecture, but the possibility that the positive results foreseen may not materialize to the degree projected cannot be ruled out. For example, while it is likely that the $75 fee will generate additional revenue over what was obtainable under either the $10 or $25 rate, Interior's projections of at least a million filings annually and $150 million in revenues are far from certain. GAO was also unable in the time available to determine the degree to which the problems the Department desires to overcome exist, or that they will be resolved through a fee increase. Results suggest that: reducing the number of filings is not necessarily the total or only solution to reducing the administrative burden; the casual speculator is not having that great an adverse effect on development, and in fact has certain positive aspects; and the true extent of fraud in the SOG may not be as great as initially supposed. In addition, there are possible adverse effects that may not have been fully considered. For example, the increased filing fee, when coupled with the increased rental, could adversely affect industry's exploration activities, particularly that of the smaller independent. GAO suggests, now that the increase is in effect, that the Interior Department and the Congress closely watch the results, and be prepared to take remedial action if deemed necessary.

Not Available

1982-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

119

Non-OPEC supply to fill global 1996 demand gain  

SciTech Connect

Excess capacity brought on by rapidly rising oil production from outside the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, coupled with stabilization of output from the Commonwealth of Independent States, will hamper OPEC`s efforts to balance the oil market in 1996. World demand for oil is projected to move up sharply. But non-OPEC output will increase even more, challenging OPEC to reduce production quotas. This paper reviews data on supply, demand, and production from these non-OPEC countries and the overall effects it will have on OPEC operations and costs.

Beck, R.J.

1996-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

120

A functional magnetic resonance imaging study of overt letter verbal fluency using a clustered acquisition sequence: greater anterior cingulate activation with increased task demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional cerebral activation during a cognitive task can vary with task demand and task performance. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we examined the effect of manipulating task demand on activation during verbal fluency by using “easy ” and “hard ” letters. A “clustered ” image acquisition sequence allowed overt verbal responses to be made in the absence of scanner noise which facilitated “online” measurement of task performance. Eleven righthanded, healthy male volunteers participated. Twice as many errors were produced with hard as with easy letters (20.8 ? 13.6 and 10.1 ? 10.7 % errors, respectively). For both conditions, the distribution of regional activation was comparable to that reported in studies of covert verbal fluency, but with greater engagement of subcortical areas. The hard condition was associated with greater dorsal anterior cingulate activation than the easy condition. This may reflect the greater demands of the former, particularly in terms of arousal responses with increased task difficulty and the monitoring of potential response errors. © 2002 Elsevier Science (USA)

Cynthia H. Y. Fu; Kevin Morgan; John Suckling; Steve C. R. Williams; Chris Andrew; Goparlen N. Vythelingum; Philip K. Mcguire

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand increases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Tight oil, Gulf of Mexico deepwater drive projected increases in U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline ... and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas. Exploration and reserves ... EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2012 ...

122

Tight oil, Gulf of Mexico deepwater drive projected increases in U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... to oil produced from shale, or other very low-permeability rocks, with horizontal drilling and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing technologies.

123

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand Response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

124

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

125

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table of Contents. Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook. Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast . Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance

126

Ethanol Demand in United States Gasoline Production  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (OWL) Refinery Yield Model (RYM) has been used to estimate the demand for ethanol in U.S. gasoline production in year 2010. Study cases examine ethanol demand with variations in world oil price, cost of competing oxygenate, ethanol value, and gasoline specifications. For combined-regions outside California summer ethanol demand is dominated by conventional gasoline (CG) because the premised share of reformulated gasoline (RFG) production is relatively low and because CG offers greater flexibility for blending high vapor pressure components like ethanol. Vapor pressure advantages disappear for winter CG, but total ethanol used in winter RFG remains low because of the low RFG production share. In California, relatively less ethanol is used in CG because the RFG production share is very high. During the winter in California, there is a significant increase in use of ethanol in RFG, as ethanol displaces lower-vapor-pressure ethers. Estimated U.S. ethanol demand is a function of the refiner value of ethanol. For example, ethanol demand for reference conditions in year 2010 is 2 billion gallons per year (BGY) at a refiner value of $1.00 per gallon (1996 dollars), and 9 BGY at a refiner value of $0.60 per gallon. Ethanol demand could be increased with higher oil prices, or by changes in gasoline specifications for oxygen content, sulfur content, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS), and octane numbers.

Hadder, G.R.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

127

Futures oil market outlook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We expect the broader expansion of global economic activity in 1995 to more than offset the anticipated slowdown in the US economic growth. This should result in worldwide oil demand growth in excess of 1 million barrels per day and firmer oil prices. This comes on the heels of nearly identical growth in 1994 and should be followed by an even larger increase in 1996. This year`s demand growth comes against a backdrop of flat OPEC production and an increase in non-OPEC supplies that will fall short of the expected increase in consumption. Some degree of political upheaval in at least a half dozen important oil exporting nations could also have implication for crude supplies. One major wildcard that remains for global oil markets is the status of the United Nations` sanctions on Iraqi exports and the timing of when these sanctions are to be eased or lifted completely.

Saucer, J. [Smith Barney, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

United States lubricant demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines United States Lubricant Demand for Automotive and Industrial Lubricants by year from 1978 to 1992 and 1997. Projected total United States Lubricant Demand for 1988 is 2,725 million (or MM) gallons. Automotive oils are expected to account for 1,469MM gallons or (53.9%), greases 59MM gallons (or 2.2%), and Industrial oils will account for the remaining 1,197MM gallons (or 43.9%) in 1988. This proportional relationship between Automotive and Industrial is projected to remain relatively constant until 1992 and out to 1997. Projections for individual years between 1978 to 1992 and 1997 are summarized.

Solomon, L.K.; Pruitt, P.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

As the world economy continues to expand the demand for petroleum based fuel increases and the price of these fuels rises  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Structural Studies of Catalytically Stabilized Industrial Hydrotreating Catalysts Myriam Perez De la Rosa 1 , Gilles Berhault 2 , Apurva Mehta 3 , Russell R. Chianelli 1 1 University of Texas at El Paso, Materials Research Technology Institute, El Paso, TX 2 Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse, CNRS, Villeurbanne cedex, France 3 Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA Figure 1: MoS 2 layered structure. As the world economy continues to expand the demand for petroleum based fuel increases and the price of these fuels rises. The rising price of fuel has another consequence: refiners tend to purchase cheaper fuels of poorer quality. These poor quality fuels contain increasing amounts of sulfur and other pollutants leading to a decline

130

Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project used advanced reservoir characterization tools, including the pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool, geologic three-dimensional (3-D) modeling software, and commercially available reservoir management software to identify sands with remaining high oil saturation following waterflood. Production from the identified high oil saturated sands was stimulated by recompleting existing production and injection wells in these sands using conventional means as well as a short radius redrill candidate.

Clarke, D.; Koerner, R.; Moos D.; Nguyen, J.; Phillips, C.; Tagbor, K.; Walker, S.

1999-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

131

Increasing vehicle fuel efficiency and decreasing de-pendence on foreign oil are priorities of the U.S. De-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Increasing vehicle fuel efficiency and decreasing de- pendence on foreign oil are priorities manufacturing research facility in the DOE laboratory system. For more than ten years, it has worked with government and industry to address commercialization challeng- es, including cost and manufacturing

132

Demand Trading Toolkit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Download report 1006017 for FREE. The global movement toward competitive markets is paving the way for a variety of market mechanisms that promise to increase market efficiency and expand customer choice options. Demand trading offers customers, energy service providers, and other participants in power markets the opportunity to buy and sell demand-response resources, just as they now buy and sell blocks of power. EPRI's Demand Trading Toolkit (DTT) describes the principles and practice of demand trading...

2001-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

133

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and...

134

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices...

135

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through December 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the First Quarter 2002, the project team developed an accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and began implementing the associated well work in March. The Tar V pilot steamflood project will be converted to post-steamflood cold water injection in April 2002. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Most of the 2001 well work resulted in maintaining oil and gross fluid production and water injection rates. Reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are at 88% and 91% hydrostatic levels, respectively. Well work during the first quarter and plans for 2002 are described in the Reservoir Management section. The steamflood operation in the Tar V pilot project is mature and profitable. Recent production performance has been below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that have been addressed during this quarter. As the fluid production temperatures were beginning to exceed 350 F, our self-imposed temperature limit, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001 and will be converted to cold water injection next quarter.

Scott Hara

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

136

EIA model documentation: World oil refining logistics demand model,``WORLD`` reference manual. Version 1.1  

SciTech Connect

This manual is intended primarily for use as a reference by analysts applying the WORLD model to regional studies. It also provides overview information on WORLD features of potential interest to managers and analysts. Broadly, the manual covers WORLD model features in progressively increasing detail. Section 2 provides an overview of the WORLD model, how it has evolved, what its design goals are, what it produces, and where it can be taken with further enhancements. Section 3 reviews model management covering data sources, managing over-optimization, calibration and seasonality, check-points for case construction and common errors. Section 4 describes in detail the WORLD system, including: data and program systems in overview; details of mainframe and PC program control and files;model generation, size management, debugging and error analysis; use with different optimizers; and reporting and results analysis. Section 5 provides a detailed description of every WORLD model data table, covering model controls, case and technology data. Section 6 goes into the details of WORLD matrix structure. It provides an overview, describes how regional definitions are controlled and defines the naming conventions for-all model rows, columns, right-hand sides, and bounds. It also includes a discussion of the formulation of product blending and specifications in WORLD. Several Appendices supplement the main sections.

Not Available

1994-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

137

International Energy Outlook 1999 - World Oil Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil.gif (4669 bytes) oil.gif (4669 bytes) A moderate view of future oil market developments is reflected in IEO99. Sustained high levels of oil prices are not expected, whereas continued expansion of the oil resource base is anticipated. The crude oil market was wracked with turbulence during 1998, as prices fell by one-third on average from 1997 levels. Even without adjusting for inflation, the world oil price in 1998 was the lowest since 1973. The declining oil prices were influenced by an unexpected slowdown in the growth of energy demand worldwide—less than any year since 1990—and by increases in oil supply, particularly in 1997. Although the increase in world oil production in 1998 was smaller than in any year since 1993, efforts to bolster prices by imposing further limits on production were

138

Modification of chemical and physical factors in steamflood to increase heavy oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the work performed in the various physicochemical factors for the improvement of oil recovery efficiency. In this context the following general areas were studied: (1) The understanding of vapor-liquid flows in porous media, including processes in steam injection; (2) The effect of reservoir heterogeneity in a variety of foams, from pore scale to macroscopic scale; (3) The flow properties of additives for improvement of recovery efficiency, particularly foams and other non-Newtonian fluids; and (4) The development of optimization methods to maximize various measures of oil recovery.

Yortsos, Yanis C.

2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

139

Class III Mid-Term Project, "Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involved improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective has been to transfer technology that can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The first budget period addressed several producibility problems in the Tar II-A and Tar V thermal recovery operations that are common in SBC reservoirs. A few of the advanced technologies developed include a three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic geologic model, a 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulation model to aid in reservoir management and subsequent post-steamflood development work, and a detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rocks and fluids. State of the art operational work included drilling and performing a pilot steam injection and production project via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors), implementing a hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steamflood area to improve thermal efficiency, installing a 2400-foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location, testing a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems, and starting on an advanced reservoir management system through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. The second budget period phase (BP2) continued to implement state-of-the-art operational work to optimize thermal recovery processes, improve well drilling and completion practices, and evaluate the geomechanical characteristics of the producing formations. The objectives were to further improve reservoir characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, test the proficiency of the three-dimensional geologic and thermal reservoir simulation models, identify the high permeability thief zones to reduce water breakthrough and cycling, and analyze the nonuniform distribution of the remaining oil in place. This work resulted in the redevelopment of the Tar II-A and Tar V post-steamflood projects by drilling several new wells and converting idle wells to improve injection sweep efficiency and more effectively drain the remaining oil reserves. Reservoir management work included reducing water cuts, maintaining or increasing oil production, and evaluating and minimizing further thermal-related formation compaction. The BP2 project utilized all the tools and knowledge gained throughout the DOE project to maximize recovery of the oil in place.

Scott Hara

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

Winter Demand Impacted by Weather  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 Notes: Heating oil demand is strongly influenced by weather. The "normal" numbers are the expected values for winter 2000-2001 used in EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook. The chart...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand increases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The energy water nexus : increasing water supply by desalination integrated with renewable power and reducing water demand by corporate water footprinting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Growing populations and periodic drought conditions have exacerbated water stress in many areas worldwide. Consequently, it would be valuable to manage both supply and demand… (more)

Clayton, Mary Elizabeth

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Distillate Demand Strong in December 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5% higher than in the prior year, due mainly to diesel demand growth, since warm weather kept heating oil demand from growing much. Last December, when stocks dropped below...

143

Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period January - March 1998 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the "Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist". The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with cased-hole logging tools. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to translate measurements through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius lateral recompletions as well as other recompletion techniques such as the sand consolidation through steam injection.

Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

1998-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

144

Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period October - December 1997 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the "Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist". The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with cased-hole logging tools. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to translate measurements through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius lateral recompletions as well as other recompletion techniques such as the sand consolidation through steam injection.

Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

1998-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

145

Q:\asufinal_0107_demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

00 00 (AEO2000) Assumptions to the January 2000 With Projections to 2020 DOE/EIA-0554(2000) Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution

146

Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this quarterly report was to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period April - June 1998 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the ''Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist''. The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology.

Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott

1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

147

Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced- oil-recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m3) of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-(CO2-) miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

Jr., Chidsey, Thomas C.; Allison, M. Lee

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

148

INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES UTILIZING SECONDARY/TERTIARY RECOVERY TECHNIQUES ON SMALL RESERVOIRS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from shallow-shelf carbonate buildups or mounds within the Desert Creek zone of the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field at a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. Five fields in southeastern Utah were evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide (CO{sub 2})-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity as well as possible compartmentalization within each of the five project fields. The Desert Creek zone includes three generalized facies belts: (1) open-marine, (2) shallow-shelf and shelf-margin, and (3) intra-shelf, salinity-restricted facies. These deposits have modern analogs near the coasts of the Bahamas, Florida, and Australia, respectively, and outcrop analogs along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah. The analogs display reservoir heterogeneity, flow barriers and baffles, and lithofacies geometry observed in the fields; thus, these properties were incorporated in the reservoir simulation models. Productive carbonate buildups consist of three types: (1) phylloid algal, (2) coralline algal, and (3) bryozoan. Phylloid-algal buildups have a mound-core interval and a supra-mound interval. Hydrocarbons are stratigraphically trapped in porous and permeable lithotypes within the mound-core intervals of the lower part of the buildups and the more heterogeneous supramound intervals. To adequately represent the observed spatial heterogeneities in reservoir properties, the phylloid-algal bafflestones of the mound-core interval and the dolomites of the overlying supra-mound interval were subdivided into ten architecturally distinct lithotypes, each of which exhibits a characteristic set of reservoir properties obtained from outcrop analogs, cores, and geophysical logs. The Anasazi and Runway fields were selected for geostatistical modeling and reservoir compositional simulations. Models and simulations incorporated variations in carbonate lithotypes, porosity, and permeability to accurately predict reservoir responses. History matches tied previous production and reservoir pressure histories so that future reservoir performances could be confidently predicted. The simulation studies showed that despite most of the production being from the mound-core intervals, there were no corresponding decreases in the oil in place in these intervals. This behavior indicates gravity drainage of oil from the supra-mound intervals into the lower mound-core intervals from which the producing wells' major share of production arises. The key to increasing ultimate recovery from these fields (and similar fields in the basin) is to design either waterflood or CO{sub 2}-miscible flood projects capable of forcing oil from high-storage-capacity but low-recovery supra-mound units into the high-recovery mound-core units. Simulation of Anasazi field shows that a CO{sub 2} flood is technically superior to a waterflood and economically feasible. For Anasazi field, an optimized CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total 4.21 million barrels (0.67 million m3) of oil representing in excess of 89 percent of the original oil in place. For Runway field, the best CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total of 2.4 million barrels (0.38 million m3) of oil representing 71 percent of the original oil in place. If the CO{sub 2} flood performed as predicted, it is a financially robust process for increasing the reserves in the many small fields in the Paradox Basin. The results can be applied to other fields in the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent.

Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: Consistent with OECD inventories, U.S. inventories are low. They have been well below the normal range for over one year. Crude oil stocks in the United States, while tending to increase of late toward more normal levels, remain well below average. At the end of December, crude oil stocks were near 289 million barrels, about 4% below the 5-year average, and slightly higher than at the end of 1999. The latest weekly data, for the week ending January 19, show U.S. crude oil stocks at 286 million barrels, just about a million barrels above their level a year ago. Near-term tightness in U.S. crude oil markets have kept current prices above forward prices, reflecting current strength in crude oil demand relative to supply. Relatively strong U.S. oil demand next year should keep crude oil

150

Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington Oil field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Quarterly report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., California using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The technologies include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Hara, S.

1996-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

151

Increasing heavy oil reservers in the Wilmington oil Field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies, technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) 11-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Hara, S. [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)], Casteel, J. [USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States)

1997-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

152

Late January Cold Impacted Both Supply & Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A brief cold spell occurred in the second half of January on top of A brief cold spell occurred in the second half of January on top of the low stocks. Cold weather increases demand, but it also can interfere with supply, as happened this past January. During the week ending January 22, temperatures in the New England and the Mid-Atlantic areas shifted from being15 percent and 17 percent warmer than normal, respectively, to 24 percent and 22 percent colder than normal. The weather change increased weekly heating requirements by about 40 percent. Temperature declines during the winter affect heating oil demand in a number of ways: Space heating demand increases; Electricity peaking demand increases and power generators must turn to distillate to meet the new peak needs; Fuel switching from natural gas to distillate occurs among large

153

Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management, Class III  

SciTech Connect

This project was intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs, transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nguyen, John; Moos, Dan; Tagbor, Kwasi

2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

154

Quarterly oil report: Third quarter, 1987. [CA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The volumes of petroleum fuels supplied to California in the fourth quarter of 1987 increased 1.6 percent from year ago levels. The increase is the result of increased unleaded gasoline and residual fuel oil use. Other fourth quarter results show that all product imports remained higher than year ago levels, but most were below the previous quarter except unleaded gasoline. Unleaded gasoline imports were higher, exports were reduced and stocks drawn down in the fourth quarter compared to the previous quarter to meet increased demand for unleaded fuel. Demand for low sulfur fuel oil increased toward the end of the quarter because natural gas sales to electric utilities were curtailed.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

OIl Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investor Investor Flows and the 2008 Boom/Bust in Oil Prices Kenneth J. Singleton 1 August 10, 2011 1 Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, kenneths@stanford.edu. This research is the outgrowth of a survey paper I prepared for the Air Transport Association of America. I am grateful to Kristoffer Laursen for research assistance and to Kristoffer and Stefan Nagel for their comments. Abstract This paper explores the impact of investor flows and financial market conditions on returns in crude-oil futures markets. I begin by arguing that informational frictions and the associated speculative activity may induce prices to drift away from "fundamental" values and show increased volatility. This is followed by a discussion of the interplay between imperfect infor- mation about real economic activity, including supply, demand, and inventory accumulation, and speculative

156

Coal in transition 1980--2000 demand considerations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The usefulness of the Brookhaven model, TESOM, lies in its exploration of the demand side of the energy system. Sectors where coal may be substituted for other energy forms are identified, and attractive technologies are highlighted. The results of the runs accord well with intuitive expectations. The increasing prices of oil and natural gas usually imply that (a) coal synthetics become increasingly attractive technologies, except in the High Demand and CRUNCH Cases (b) nuclear and hydro-electric generation are preferred technologies, (c) coal steam electric, even with expensive scrubbers, becomes more attractive than oil or gas steam electric by year 1990, (d) fluidized bed combustion for electricity generation is cost effective (with relatively small environmental impacts) when compared to oil, gas and coal steam electric. FBC process steam exhibits similar behavior. In the High Demand and CRUNCH scenarios, technologies such as solar electric, which are usually not chosen on the basis of cost, enter the solution because meeting demands has become extremely difficult. As the allowed coal expansion rate becomes a limiting factor, coal synthetics manufacturing becomes an unattractive alternative. This is due both to the need for coal electric generation to meet high electricity demand levels, and to the inefficiencies in the manufacturing process. Due to preferred allocation of coal to electricity generation or synthetics, direct coal use is reduced, although this is normally a preferred option.

Kydes, A S; Cherniavsky, E A

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Higher oil prices: Can OPEC raise prices by cutting production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OPEC's ability to raise prices is evaluated with a model that projects the supply and demand. As part of the model, a new methodology to forecast for the rate of production by non-OPEC nations is developed. A literature review of techniques for estimating oil supply and annual rates of production indicates a new methodology is needed. The new technique incorporates the geological, engineering, and economic aspects of the oil industry by synthesizing curve fitting and econometric techniques. It is used to analyze data for eight regions for non-OPEC oil production: the lower 48 states, Alaska, Canada, Mexico, non-OPEC South America, Western Europe, non-OPEC Africa, and non-OPEC Asia. OPEC's ability to raise prices is examined by tracking the percentage oil US oil demand supplied by imports, the portion of oil demand in Western Europe supplied by local production, the percentage of WOCA oil demand supplied by OPEC and Real OPEC revenues. Results of the model indicate that OPEC can raise oil prices in the early 1990s. OPEC can raise and sustain oil prices near $25 (1982 dollars). Higher oil prices ($35) are not sustainable before 2000 because reduced demand and increased non-OPEC production shrink OPEC revenues below acceptable levels. After 2000, $35 prices are sustainable.

Kaufmann, R.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

The Utilization of the Microflora Indigenous to and Present in Oil-Bearing Formations to Selectively Plug the More Porous Zones Thereby Increasing Oil Recovery During Waterflooding  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to demonstrate the use of indigenous microbes as a method of profile control in waterfloods. It is expected that as the microbial population is induced to increase, that the expanded biomass will selectively block the more permeable zones of the reservoir thereby forcing injection water to flow through the less permeable zones which will result in improved sweep efficiency. This increase in microbial population will be accomplished by injecting a nutrient solution into four injectors. Four other injectors will act as control wells. During Phase I, two wells will be cored through the zone of interest. The core will be subjected to special core analyses in order to arrive at the optimum nutrient formulation. During Phase II, nutrient injection will begin, the results monitored, and adjustments to the nutrient composition made, if necessary. Phase II also will include the drilling of three wells for post-mortem core analysis. Phase III will focus on technology transfer of the results. It should be pointed out that one expected outcome of this new technology will be a prolongation of economical waterflooding operations, i.e. economical oil recovery should continue for much longer periods in the producing wells subjected to this selective plugging technique.

Brown, Lewis R.; Stephens, James O.; Vadie, Alex A.

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

159

The Utilization of the Microflora Indigenous to and Present in Oil-Bearing Formations to Selectively Plug the More Porous Zones Thereby Increasing Oil Recovery During Waterflooding  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to demonstrate the use of indigenous microbes as a method of profile control in waterfloods. It is expected that as the microbial population is induced to increase, that the expanded biomass will selectively block the more permeable zones of the reservoir thereby forcing injection water to flow through the less permeable zones which will result in improved sweep efficiency. This increase in microbial population will be accomplished by injecting a nutrient solution into four injectors. Four other injectors will act as control wells. During Phase I, two wells will be cored through the zone of interest. The core will be subjected to special core analyses in order to arrive at the optimum nutrient formulation. During Phase II, nutrient injection will begin, the results monitored, and adjustments to the nutrient composition made, if necessary. Phase II also will include the drilling of three wells for post-mortem core analysis. Phase III will focus on technology transfer of the results. It should be pointed out that one expected outcome of this new technology will be a prolongation of economical waterflooding operations, i.e. economical oil recovery should continue for much longer periods in the producing wells subjected to this selective plugging technique. Results from work under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-90BC14665 will be incorporated as appropriate.

Brown, Lewis R.; Vadie, Alex A.

1996-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

160

Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight and passenger rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous

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161

The European Electricity Grid System and Winter Peak Load Stress: For how long can the european grid system survive the ever increasing demand during cold winter days?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rich countries of Western Europe and its citizens benefited during at least the last 30 years from an extraordinary stable electricity grid. This stability was achieved by the european grid system and a large flexible and reliable spare power plant capacity. This system allowed a continuous demand growth during the past 10-20 years of up to a few % per year. However, partially due to this overcapacity, no new large power plants have been completed during the past 10-15 years. The obvious consequence is that the reliable spare capacity has been reduced and that a further yearly demand growth of 1-2% for electric energy can only be achieved if new power plants will be constructed soon. Data from various European countries, provided by the UCTE, indicate that the system stress during peak load times and especially during particular cold winter days is much larger than generally assumed. In fact, the latest UCTE data on reliable power capacity indicate that already during the Winter 2007/8 only a few very col...

Dittmar, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Fuel oil and kerosene sales, 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite the rise in petroleum products prices, a colder-than-normal winter in the latter part of 1989 spurred an increase in demand for distillate fuel oils. The shipping and electric utilities industries contributed to a significant rise in demand for both distillate and residual fuels oils in 1989. A total of 72.9 billion gallons of fuel oil and kerosene were sold to consumers in 1989, an increase of 3.0 percent over 1988 sales volumes. Of all fuel oil sold during 1989, distillate fuel oil accounted for 68.3 percent, which was an increase over 1988 when distillate fuel oil accounted for 67.2 percent of all fuel oil products sold in the United States. Residual fuel oil's share of total fuel oil sold fell slightly to 29.9 percent from 30.7 percent in 1988. Kerosene followed with a 1.8 percent share, also falling from the previous year when it accounted for a 2.1 percent share of total fuel oil sold. 3 figs., 24 tabs.

Not Available

1991-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

163

Dietary fish oil and butyrate increase apoptosis and decrease aberrant crypt foci in colon cancer by enhancing histone acetylation and p21waf1/cip1 expression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have previously shown that dietary fish oil and fiber, particularly the highly-fermentable pectin, are protective against colon cancer in a rat model of carcinogenesis. Therefore, based upon the current body of literature and our previous experimental findings, we hypothesized that one mechanism by which dietary fish oil+pectin suppress the promotion stage of colon cancer is through butyrate, the fermentation product of fiber, targeting (in particular) the p21Waf1/Cip1 gene and, via targeted histone hyperacetylation, inducing its expression. We found that dietary butyrate supplementation increased the concentration of fecal butyrate (mole %) in the distal colon, and that this increase corresponded to an increase in histone H4 acetylation. Similarly, diets supplemented with butyrate increased p21Waf1/Cip1 expression despite azoxymethane (AOM) treatment, which was not seen in non-butyrate supplemented diets. Furthermore, fish oil+butyrate diets resulted in the highest levels of apoptosis and the lowest levels of ACF, while corn oil+butyrate diets resulted in the lowest levels of apoptosis and the highest levels of ACF. Thus, it appears that the protective effect of fish oil+butyrate is due to the unique properties of fish oil, providing an environment in which butyrateÂ?s enhancement of histone acetylation and p21 expression are pro-apoptotic, thereby diminishing pre-neoplastic ACF development.

Covert, Kristy Lynn

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

World oil use is projected to grow to 98 million b/d in 2015 and 118 million b/d in 2030. Total world natural gas consumption is projected to rise to 134 Tcf in 2015 and 182 Tcf in 2030. In an era of declining production and increasing demand, economically producing oil and gas from unconventional sources is a key challenge to maintaining global economic growth. Some unconventional hydrocarbon sources are already being developed, including gas shales, tight gas sands, heavy oil, oil sands, and coal bed methane. Roughly 20 years ago, gas production from tight sands, shales, and coals was considered uneconomic. Today, these resources provide 25% of the U.S. gas supply and that number is likely to increase. Venezuela has over 300 billion barrels of unproven extra-heavy oil reserves which would give it the largest reserves of any country in the world. It is currently producing over 550,000 b/d of heavy oil. Unconventional oil is also being produced in Canada from the Athabasca oil sands. 1.6 trillion barrels of oil are locked in the sands of which 175 billion barrels are proven reserves that can be recovered using current technology. Production from 29 companies now operating there exceeds 1 million barrels per day. The report provides an overview of continuous petroleum sources and gives a concise overview of the current status of varying types of unconventional oil and gas resources. Topics covered in the report include: an overview of the history of Oil and Natural Gas; an analysis of the Oil and Natural Gas industries, including current and future production, consumption, and reserves; a detailed description of the different types of unconventional oil and gas resources; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in unconventional resources; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the development of unconventional resources; profiles of key producing regions; and, profiles of key unconventional oil and gas producers.

none

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: EIA sees a tenuous supply/demand balance over the remainder of 2001 and into the beginning of 2002, as illustrated by the low OECD inventory levels. Global inventories remain low, and need to recover to more adequate levels in order to avoid continued price volatility. While we saw some stocking in April and May, typical third quarter stock builds may not occur. Even with Iraqi oil exports resuming in early July, OPEC was going to need to increase its oil production to account for demand increases over the 2nd half of the year to prevent stocks from falling further. However, they not only haven't agreed to increase production, but agreed to cut production quotas by 1 million barrels per day beginning on September 1! EIA's forecast of a continued low stock cushion implies we not only

166

Total OECD Oil Stocks*  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low levels. EIA expects inventories to remain low through the coming year. This increases the potential for price volatility through the rest of the winter, and into the next gasoline season. Inventories are a good measure of the supply/demand balance that affects prices. A large over-supply (production greater than demand) will put downward pressure on prices, while under-supply will push prices upward. As global oil production changed relative to demand, the world moved from a period of over-supply in 1998 to one of under-supply in 1999 and 2000. OECD inventories illustrate the changes in the world petroleum balance. OECD inventories rose to high levels during 1997 and 1998 when production exceeded demand and prices dropped to around $10 per barrel in

167

Total OECD Oil Stocks*  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low levels. EIA expects inventories to remain low through the coming year. This increases the potential for price volatility through the winter, and even extending to the next gasoline season. Inventories are a good measure of the supply/demand balance that effects prices. A large over-supply (production greater than demand) will put downward pressure on prices, while under-supply will push prices upward. As global oil production changed relative to demand, the world moved from a period of over-supply in 1998 to one of under-supply in 1999 and 2000. OECD inventories illustrate the changes in the world petroleum balance. OECD inventories rose to high levels during 1997 and 1998 when production exceeded demand and prices dropped to around $10 per barrel in

168

Total OECD Oil Stocks*  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low levels. EIA expects inventories to remain low through the coming year. This increases the potential for price volatility through the winter, and even extending to the next gasoline season. Inventories are a good measure of the supply/demand balance that effects prices. A large over-supply (production greater than demand) will put downward pressure on prices, while under-supply will push prices upward. As global oil production changed relative to demand, the world moved from a period of over-supply in 1998 to one of under-supply in 1999 and 2000. OECD inventories illustrate the changes in the world petroleum balance. OECD inventories rose to high levels during 1997 and 1998 when production exceeded demand and prices dropped to around $10 per barrel in

169

OPEC production: Untapped reserves, world demand spur production expansion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet projected world oil demand, almost all members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) have embarked on ambitious capacity expansion programs aimed at increasing oil production capabilities. These expansion programs are in both new and existing oil fields. In the latter case, the aim is either to maintain production or reduce the production decline rate. However, the recent price deterioration has led some major OPEC producers, such as Saudi Arabia and Iran, to revise downward their capacity plans. Capital required for capacity expansion is considerable. Therefore, because the primary source of funds will come from within each OPEC country, a reasonably stable and relatively high oil price is required to obtain enough revenue for investing in upstream projects. This first in a series of two articles discusses the present OPEC capacity and planned expansion in the Middle East. The concluding part will cover the expansion plans in the remaining OPEC countries, capital requirements, and environmental concerns.

Ismail, I.A.H. (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, Vienna (Austria))

1994-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

170

Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment for Eastern Interconnection Youngsun Baek, Stanton W. Hadley, Rocio Martinez, Gbadebo Oladosu, Alexander M. Smith, Fran Li, Paul Leiby and Russell Lee Prepared for FY12 DOE-CERTS Transmission Reliability R&D Internal Program Review September 20, 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy DOE National Laboratory Studies Funded to Support FOA 63 * DOE set aside $20 million from transmission funding for national laboratory studies. * DOE identified four areas of interest: 1. Transmission Reliability 2. Demand Side Issues 3. Water and Energy 4. Other Topics * Argonne, NREL, and ORNL support for EIPC/SSC/EISPC and the EISPC Energy Zone is funded through Area 4. * Area 2 covers LBNL and NREL work in WECC and

171

Rising Asian demand drives global coal consumption growth ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Global coal demand has almost doubled since 1980, driven by increases in Asia, where demand is up over 400% from 1980-2010. In turn, Asian demand is ...

172

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Energy Source Demand Coal, Oil, Gas, Heat, Electricity Demography Japan’s population, an important factor in predicting residential energy demand as well

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes China's coal industry by focusing on four related areas. First, data are reviewed to identify the major drivers of historical and future coal demand. Second, resource constraints and transport bottlenecks are analyzed to evaluate demand and growth scenarios. The third area assesses the physical requirements of substituting coal demand growth with other primary energy forms. Finally, the study examines the carbon- and environmental implications of China's past and future coal consumption. There are three sections that address these areas by identifying particular characteristics of China's coal industry, quantifying factors driving demand, and analyzing supply scenarios: (1) reviews the range of Chinese and international estimates of remaining coal reserves and resources as well as key characteristics of China's coal industry including historical production, resource requirements, and prices; (2) quantifies the largest drivers of coal usage to produce a bottom-up reference projection of 2025 coal demand; and (3) analyzes coal supply constraints, substitution options, and environmental externalities. Finally, the last section presents conclusions on the role of coal in China's ongoing energy and economic development. China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. In 2007 Chinese coal production contained more energy than total Middle Eastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand after 2001 created supply strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about sustainability. Urbanization, heavy industrial growth, and increasing per-capita income are the primary interrelated drivers of rising coal usage. In 2007, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement production accounted for 66% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units would save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand for the power sector. A new wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. If coal to chemicals capacity reaches 70 million tonnes and coal-to-liquids capacity reaches 60 million tonnes, coal feedstock requirements would add an additional 450 million tonnes by 2025. Even with more efficient growth among these drivers, China's annual coal demand is expected to reach 3.9 to 4.3 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not reversed China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Substitution is a matter of scale: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth of 200 million tonnes would require 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas (compared to 2007 growth of 13 BCM), 48 GW of nuclear (compared to 2007 growth of 2 GW), or 86 GW of hydropower capacity (compared to 2007 growth of 16 GW). Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on a high growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China has a low proportion of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport capacity. Furthermore, transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transportation oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 million tonnes by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets.

Aden, Nathaniel; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry analysts and academics agree that China’s domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robert Ebel, China’s Energy

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Policy implications of the GRI Baseline Projection of US Energy Supply and Demand to 2010; 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1991 edition of the GRI Baseline Projection of U.S. Energy Supply and Demand is summarized. Three broad implications for the future of the natural gas industry are highlighted: the impact of the Middle East turmoil on the expected price of crude oil and the potentional for increased interfuel price competition between natural gas and petroleum in the mid-1990s if world oil prices return to lower levels.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Residual Fuel Demand - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In the 1986 to 1991 period, residual fuel oil demand declined only slightly both in absolute and as a percent of total product demand. While not shown, residual fuel ...

177

The utilization of the microflora indigenous to and present in oil-bearing formations to selectively plug the more porous zones thereby increasing oil recovery during waterflooding. Technical progress report, January 1, 1997--December 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

This project is a field demonstration of the ability of in-situ indigenous microorganisms in the North Blowhorn Creek Oil Field to reduce the flow of injection water in the more permeable zones of the reservoir, thereby diverting flow to other areas thus increasing the efficiency of the waterflood. The project is divided into three phases: Planning and Analysis (9 months), Implementation (45 months), and Technology Transfer (12 months). This report covers the fourth year of work on the project. Twenty-two months after the injection of nutrients into the reservoir began, three wells were drilled and cores taken therefrom were analyzed. Oil production volumes and water:oil ratios (WOR) of produced fluids have shown clearly that the MEOR treatment being demonstrated in this project is improving oil recovery. Of the 15 producer wells in the test patterns, seven have responded positively to the injection of microbial nutrients into the reservoir, while all eight of the producer wells only in control patterns have continued their natural decline in oil production, although one well did have some improvement in oil production due to increased water injection into a nearby injector well. In light of these positive findings and with DOE`s approval, the scope of the field demonstration was expanded in July 1997 to include six new injector wells. Of interest has been the performance of two wells in what was formerly a control pattern. Since the injector in this pattern (formerly Control Pattern 2) began receiving nutrients, two of the wells in the pattern have shown improved oil production for the last three months. While it would be premature to definitely characterize these two wells as yielding a positive response, these early results are certainly encouraging.

Stephens, J.O.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

D:\assumptions_2001\assumptions2002\currentassump\demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Petroleum Market Module. . . . . . . . . . . . .

179

Microsoft Word - high-oil-price.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Short Term Energy Outlook Short Term Energy Outlook 1 STEO Supplement: Why are oil prices so high? During most of the 1990s, the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price averaged close to $20 per barrel, before plunging to almost $10 per barrel in late 1998 as a result of the Asian financial crisis slowing demand growth while extra supply from Iraq was entering the market for the first time since the Gulf War. Subsequently, as Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) producers more closely adhered to a coordinated production quota and reduced output, crude oil prices not only recovered, but increased to about $30 per barrel as demand grew as Asian economies recovered. The most recent increase in crude oil prices began in 2004, when they almost doubled from 2003 levels, rising from about $30 per barrel at the end

180

Automated Demand Response Today  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) has progressed over recent years beyond manual and semi-automated DR to include growing implementation and experience with fully automated demand response (AutoDR). AutoDR has been shown to be of great value over manual and semi-automated DR because it reduces the need for human interactions and decisions, and it increases the speed and reliability of the response. AutoDR, in turn, has evolved into the specification known as OpenADR v1.0 (California Energy Commission, PIER Program, C...

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand increases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

182

Global Oil Geopolitics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 imported refiner acquisition cost of crude oil WTI crude ... World Crude Oil Supply and Demand Balance 14

183

Combined cycle meets Thailand's growing power demands  

SciTech Connect

This article describes how an ample supply of natural gas led the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) to choose gas-fired combustion turbines. Thailand's rapid industrialization, which began in the late 1980's, placed a great strain on the country's electricity supply system. The demand for electricity grew at an astonishing 14% annually. To deal with diminishing reserve capacity margins, the EGAT announced, in 1988, a power development program emphasizing gas-fired combined cycle power plants. Plans included six 320-MW combined cycle blocks at three sites, and an additional 600-MW gas- and oil-fired thermal plant at Bang Pakong. As electricity demand continued to increase, EGAT expanded its plans to include two additional 320-MW combined cycle blocks, a 600-MW combined cycle block, and a 650-MW gas- and oil-fired thermal plant. All are currently in various stages of design and construction.

Sheets, B.A. (Black and Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States)); Takabut, K. (Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand, Nonthaburi (Thailand))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Bachaquero-01 reservoir, Venezuela-increasing oil production by switching from cyclic steam injection to steamflooding using horizontal wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bachaquero-01 reservoir of the Lagunillas field is located in the eastern part of the Maracaibo Lake, Venezuela. The field is operated by the national oil company of Venezuela, PDVSA (Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A.). The Bachaquero-01 heavy oil reservoir lies at about 3,000 ft. ss. and contains 7.037 BSTB of 1 1.7 degrees API gravity oil with an in-situ viscosity of 635 cp. Cold production began in 1960, but since 1971 the reservoir was produced under a massive cyclic steam injection system. To-date some 370 cyclic-steam injection welts have produced from the reservoir, yielding a cumulative oil recovery of only about 5.6% of initial oil-in-place. The reservoir pressure has dropped from an initial 1,370 psia to its present value of about 700 psia. Maximum oil production peaked at 45.0 MSTB/D in 1991, and has since continued to decline. To arrest production decline, three horizontal cyclic-steam injection wells were drilled and completed in the reservoir in 1995-1997. The horizontal sections were from 1,280 to 1,560 ft long and were drilled in locations with existing vertical cyclic steam injection welts. Three-dimensional thermal-compositional simulation studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of the three horizontal welts under cyclic steam injection and steamflooding. The Cartesian model dimensions of the three horizontal welts were 11x22x4, 11x27x5, and 12x20x5. In the steamflooding scheme investigated, the existing horizontal welts were used as injectors while existing (and new) vertical welts surrounding the horizontal welts were used as producers. Simulation results indicate oil recovery under cyclic steam injection to be about 15% of initial oil-in-place, compared to about 25% under steamflooding with no new producers, and about 50% under steamflooding with additional producers. The main advantages of steamflooding over cyclic steam injection were in the re-pressurization and improved thermal efficiency for the Bachaquero-01 reservoir. Higher oil recovery with additional wells resulted from improved areal sweep efficiency. Further study is planned to investigate steamflooding for the rest of the reservoir.

Rodriguez, Manuel Gregorio

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

World Petroleum Supply/Demand Forecast - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... surplus supply over demand for spring and summer quarters compared with some other forecasters such as Oil Market Intelligence, ...

186

Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Price elasticity of demand for crude oil: estimates for 2327] Krichene, N. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandIn contrast to synthetic crude oils produced from the above

Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Potential of vegetable oils as a domestic heating fuel  

SciTech Connect

The dependence on imported oil for domestic heating has led to the examination of other potential fuel substitutes. One potential fuel is some form of vegetable oil, which could be a yearly-renewable fuel. In Western Canada, canola has become a major oilseed crop; in Eastern Canada, sunflowers increasingly are becoming a source for a similar oil; for this reason, the Canadian Combustion Research Laboratory (CCRL) has chosen these oils for experimentation. Trials have been conducted in a conventional warm air oil furnace, fitted with a flame retention head burner. Performance has been measured with pure vegetable oils as well as a series of blends with conventional No. 2 oil. The effects of increased fuel pressure and fuel preheating are established. Emissions of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, unburned hydrocarbons and particulates are given for both steady state and cyclic operation. Canola oil cannot be fired in cyclic operation above 50:50 blends with No. 2 oil. At any level above a 10% blend, canola is difficult to burn, even with significant increased pressure and temperature. Sunflower oil is much easier to burn and can be fired as a pure fuel, but with high emissions of incomplete combustion products. An optimum blend of 50:50 sunflower in No. 2 oil yields emissions and performance similar to No. 2 oil. This blend offers potential as a means of reducing demand of imported crude oil for domestic heating systems.

Hayden, A.C.S.; Begin, E.; Palmer, C.E.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Both Distillate Supply and Demand Reached Extraordinary Levels This Winter  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: This chart shows some critical differences in distillate supply and demand during this winter heating season, in comparison to the past two winters. Typically, distillate demand peaks during the winter months, but "new supply" (refinery production and net imports) cannot increase as much, so the remaining supply needed is drawn from inventories. This pattern is evident in each of the past two winter heating seasons. This winter, however, the pattern was very different, for several reasons: With inventories entering the season at extremely low levels, a "typical" winter stockdraw would have been nearly impossible, particularly in the Northeast, the region most dependent on heating oil. Demand reached near-record levels in December, as colder-than-normal

189

Reduce Demand Rather than Increase Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

floor area) 8. Annual cost per square foot for Eco Passes (square fe 6. Annual cost per square foot for cash ou $0.10parking cash out costs 10¢ a year per square foot of office

Shoup, Donald C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Is Real-Time Pricing Green?: The Environmental Impacts of Electricity Demand Variance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L) of demand. Oil Marginal Cost ($/MWh) Hydroelectricsince oil and gas have high marginal costs, their shares ofcost, fuel sources are gen- erally ordered hydroelectric, nuclear, coal, natural gas, and oil.

Holland, Stephen P.; Mansur, Erin T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Heading off the permanent oil crisis  

SciTech Connect

The 1996 spike in gasoline prices was not a signal of any fundamental worldwide shortage of crude oil. But based on a review of many studies of recoverable crude oil that have been published since the 1950s, it looks as though such a shortfall is now within sight. With world demand for oil growing at 2 percent per year, global production is likely to peak between the years 2007 and 2014. As this time approaches, we can expect prices to rise markedly and, most likely, permanently. Policy changes are needed now to ease the transition to high-priced oil. Oil production will continue, though at a declining rate, for many decades after its peak, and there are enormous amounts of coal, oil sands, heavy oil, and oil shales worldwide that could be used to produce liquid or gaseous substitutes for crude oil, albeit at higher prices. But the facilities for making such synthetic fuels are costly to build and environmentally damaging to operate, and their use would substantially increase carbon dioxide emissions (compared to emissions from products made from conventional crude oil). This paper examines ways of heading of the impending oil crisis. 8 refs., 3 figs.

MacKenzie, J.J. [World Resources Inst., Washington, DC (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Winter Demand Impacted by Weather  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: Heating oil demand is strongly influenced by weather. The "normal" numbers are the expected values for winter 2000-2001 used in EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook. The chart indicates the extent to which the last winter exhibited below-normal heating degree-days (and thus below-normal heating demand). Temperatures were consistently warmer than normal throughout the 1999-2000 heating season. This was particularly true in November 1999, February 2001 and March 2001. For the heating season as a whole (October through March), the 1999-2000 winter yielded total HDDs 10.7% below normal. Normal temperatures this coming winter would, then, be expected to bring about 11% higher heating demand than we saw last year. Relative to normal, the 1999-2000 heating season was the warmest in

193

Technical Change, Factor Demand and Interfactor/Interfuel Substitution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: With its rapid economic growth, China’s primary energy consumption has exceeded domestic energy production since 1994, leading to a substantial expansion in energy imports, particularly of oil. China’s energy demand has an increasingly significant impact on global energy markets. In this paper Allen partial elasticities of factor and energy substitution, and price elasticities of energy demand, are calculated for China using a two-stage translog cost function approach. The results suggest that energy is substitutable with both capital and labour. Coal is significantly substitutable with electricity and complementary with diesel while gasoline and electricity are substitutable with diesel. China’s energy intensity is increasing during the study period (1995-2004) and the major driver appears to be due to the increased use of energy intensive technology. Keywords: China; Interfactor/interfuel substitution; Technology; Energy intensity decomposition

Hengyun Ma; Les Oxley; John Gibson; Bongguen Kim; Hengyun Ma; Les Oxley; John Gibson; Bongguen Kim

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Distillate Demand Strong Last Winter  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Notes: Well, distillate fuel demand wasn't the reason that stocks increased in January 2001 and kept prices from going higher. As you will hear shortly, natural gas prices spiked...

195

Assessment of environmental problems associated with increased enhanced oil recovery in the United States: 1980-2000  

SciTech Connect

Water requirements and uncontrolled air emissions from well vents and steam generators were estimated for each technology based upon available literature. Estimates of best air emission control technologies were made using data for EOR steam generators actually in use, as well as control technologies presently available but used by other industries. Amounts of solid wastes were calculated for each air emission control technology. Estimates were also made of the heavy metal content of these solid wastes. The study also included environmental residuals which may be expected should coal be used instead of lean crude to produce steam for thermal EOR. It was concluded that from an environmental prospective tertiary oil is preferable in many respects to shale oil, coal and synfuels. Alternative sources of oil such as syncrude, new exploration, and primary production could cause far more environmental damage than incremental EOR. Future EOR in specific regions may be constrained because of environmental issues: air emissions, solid waste disposal, water availability, and aquifer contaminators. Competition for water and the scarcity of surface water or groundwater which are low in total diminutive solids will impede some EOR projects. Risks of groundwater contamination should be minimized particularly because of requirements of the Environmental Protection Agency's new underground injection control program. A quantitative environmental assessment will require a complete and consistent data base for all fields for which EOR is planned out in which tertiary production is taking place. This is particularly true for EOR which will occur in Alaska or in offshore areas, where environments are fragile and where operating conditions are severe. 147 references, 29 figures, 46 tables.

Kaplan, E.; Garrell, M.; Royce, B.; Riedel, E.F.; Sathaye, J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

California Crude Oil Prices - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

California Crude Oil Prices 6/2/98. Click here to start. Table of Contents. California Crude Oil Prices. CA Crude Oil Price History. World Petroleum Supply/Demand Balance

197

Demand Response - Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

over the last 11 years when interest in demand response increased. Demand response is an electricity tariff or program established to motivate changes in electric use by end-use...

198

The utilization of the microflora indigenous to and present in oil-bearing formations to selectively plug the more porous zones thereby increasing oil recovery during waterflooding, Class 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project were (1) to demonstrate the in situ microbial population in a fluvial dominated deltaic reservoir could be induced to proliferate to such an extent that they will selectively restrict flow in the more porous zones in the reservoir thereby forcing injection water to flow through previously unswept areas thus improving the sweep efficiency of the waterflood and (2) to obtain scientific validation that microorganisms are indeed responsible for the increased oil recovery. One expected outcome of this new technology was the prolongation of economical life of the reservoir, i.e. economical oil recovery should continue for much longer periods in areas of the reservoir subjected to the MPPM technology than it would if it followed its historic trend.

Stephens, James O.; Brown, Lewis R.; Vadie, A. Alex

2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

199

Analyzing the oil refining industry in developing countries: A comparative study of China and India  

SciTech Connect

The oil refining industry is a critical link in the energy chain in many developing and industrialized countries, transforming crude oil into transport fuels (gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel), residual fuel oil (widely used as a fuel in industry and the electric power sector), and other products such as kerosine, frequently for lighting an cooking usages. Three to four decades ago, the demand for oil products in most developing countries was centered to a few large cities; thus, few refineries were built in these regions. But because of the astonishing economic growth in many developing nations, demand for oil products has increased rapidly. As a result, the refining industry has expanded rapidly in such countries, even in cases were there is no domestic crude oil production. Oil product demand and refinery expansion in Asian developing countries in particular have experienced significant growth. Between 1976 and 1993, oil product demand and refinery capacity in that region (excluding Japan) increased annually an average of 5.2 percent and 4.3 percent, respectively, whereas the comparable figures for the world as a whole remained virtually unchanged during the same period. The substantial gains in Asia`s crude oil production in the 1970s is believed to have facilitated this refinery expansion.

Tang, F.C.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

200

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand increases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Demand Response Spinning Reserve  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Title Demand Response Spinning Reserve Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2007 Authors Eto, Joseph H., Janine Nelson-Hoffman, Carlos...

202

Transportation Demand This  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates...

203

Addressing Energy Demand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Bo Shen, Girish Ghatikar, Chun Chun Ni, and Junqiao Dudley Environmental Energy...

204

Propane Sector Demand Shares  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... agricultural demand does not impact regional propane markets except when unusually high and late demand for propane for crop drying combines with early cold ...

205

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... March 2003 Price Spike August 2003 Price Spike Quarterly World Oil Demand Growth from Previous Year Overview of Market Fundamentals Tight balance in global ...

206

Purvin and Gertz; Asia Pacific natural gas demand to take off  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on growing Asia Pacific gas demand through 2010 that will dramatically increase competition for imports and indigenous regional supplies, a Houston consulting firm says. Deregulation of Asia Pacific energy markets, increased environmental awareness, and greater emphasis on economics of interfuel competition are among major factors expected to affect Asia Pacific gas markets for the next two decades, says a study by Purvin and Gertz Inc. (P and G). Aside from government mandated constraints, future gas prices in each country studied generally will be related to costs of fuels with which gas competes in each end use sector, P and G says. With regional gas demand expected in 2010 to reach 9.2 tcf, P and G advises Asia Pacific consumers in all sectors to begin negotiating now for long term supplies. P and G says more than 50% of new regional gas demand through 2000 will come from increased gas usage in power generation. Most new thermal power generating plants planned in Asia Pacific countries will be either gas or coal fired. but other end use sectors also will play significant roles in future demand growth. P and G predicts liquefied natural gas demand through the end of the century will increase by 4.2%/year. During 2000-2010, Asia Pacific LNG demand will grow by about 3%/year. Regional LNG demand in 2010 will reach 80 million tons of oil equivalent (TOE), increasing from 67 million TOE in 2000 and 45 million TOE in 1990.

Not Available

1991-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

207

World oil and geopolitics to the year 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the interplay of market forces and politics in the world oil market projected to the year 2010. It argues that world oil demand will increase considerably, with Asian demand growing the fastest. Given that the growth of oil supply of producers outside the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) will be trivial, the call on OPEC oil will increase substantially. Yet, given their declining per-capita oil revenues, OPEC members may not be able to make timely investments in required upstream projects. If this happens, the supply constraint will lead to higher prices and intensified international competition for Arabian/Persian Gulf oil. Thus, foreign investment will be needed increasingly in OPEC states if prices are to remain stable. But geopolitical and institutional barriers to foreign investment in many OPEC members hinder foreign investment. It is imperative that major players in the world oil market cooperate to reduce such barriers in time to ensure that supply corresponds to rising demand. 22 refs., 8 figs., 10 tabs.

Amirahmadi, H.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

World Oil Refining Logistics Demand Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This manual is intended primarily for use as a reference by analysts applying the WORLD model to regional studies. It also provides overview information on WORLD features of potential interest to managers and analysts.

Information Center

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

WORLD OIL REFINING LOGISTICS DEMAND MODEL  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20585. ... OB1 Optimization with Barriers 1 OSL Optimization Subroutine Library

210

Impacts of Increased Access to Oil & Natural Gas Resources in the Lower 48 Federal Outer Continental Shelf (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This analysis was updated for AEO2009: Impact of Limitations on Access to Oil and Natural Gas Resources in the Federal Outer Continental ShelfThe OCS is estimated to contain substantial resources of crude oil and natural gas; however, some areas of the OCS are subject to drilling restrictions. With energy prices rising over the past several years, there has been increased interest in the development of more domestic oil and natural gas supply, including OCS resources. In the past, Federal efforts to encourage exploration and development activities in the deep waters of the OCS have been limited primarily to regulations that would reduce royalty payments by lease holders. More recently, the States of Alaska and Virginia have asked the Federal Government to consider leasing in areas off their coastlines that are off limits as a result of actions by the President or Congress. In response, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior has included in its proposed 5-year leasing plan for 2007-2012 sales of one lease in the Mid-Atlantic area off the coastline of Virginia and two leases in the North Aleutian Basin area of Alaska. Development in both areas still would require lifting of the current ban on drilling.

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

211

Soviet Union oil sector outlook grows bleaker still  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the outlook for the U.S.S.R's oil sector which grows increasingly bleak and with it prospects for the Soviet economy. Plunging Soviet oil production and exports have analysts revising near term oil price outlooks, referring to the Soviet oil sector's self-destructing and Soviet oil production in a freefall. County NatWest, Washington, citing likely drops in Soviet oil production and exports (OGJ, Aug. 5, p. 16), has jumped its projected second half spot price for West Texas intermediate crude by about $2 to $22-23/bbl. Smith Barney, New York, forecasts WTI postings at $24-25/bbl this winter, largely because of seasonally strong world oil demand and the continued collapse in Soviet oil production. It estimates the call on oil from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries at more than 25 million b/d in first quarter 1992. That would be the highest level of demand for OPEC oil since 1980, Smith Barney noted.

Not Available

1991-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

212

Non-OPEC oil production: The key to the future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dramatic increase in non-OPEC oil production that has occurred since the fuel crises of the seventies was accelerated by the subsequent increases in oil prices on world markets. Current moderate world prices are attributable to increased supply in the last decade from these countries. Among those nations whose production has more than doubled since 1973 are China, Mexico, the UK, Norway, Egypt, India, Oman, Brazil, Colombia, Angola, and Syria. In this context, non-OPEC nations include the Communist oil-producing countries, since their ability to meet their own domestic demand has forestalled the day when they will compete for supplies on world markets. The prospect for continued growth in non-OPEC oil production is good. Prospects for additions to reserves continue to be bright in virgin exploration areas and semimature oil-producing provinces. Non-OPEC oil production may reach peak levels in the 1995--2000 time frame. However, production will be increasingly countered by growing demand, especially in South and Central America and Asia. It is almost certain that by the mid-nineties, competition for oil supplies in world markets will elevate the price of oil available from the well endowed OPEC nations. Supply disruptions as well may be in the offing by the turn of the century as surpluses on world markets disappear. 92 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

Borg, I.Y.

1990-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

213

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers...

214

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Demand Trading: Building Liquidity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand trading holds substantial promise as a mechanism for efficiently integrating demand-response resources into regional power markets. However, regulatory uncertainty, the lack of proper price signals, limited progress toward standardization, problems in supply-side markets, and other factors have produced illiquidity in demand-trading markets and stalled the expansion of demand-response resources. This report shows how key obstacles to demand trading can be overcome, including how to remove the unce...

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

216

Crude oil and alternate energy production forecasts for the twenty-first century: The end of the hydrocarbon era  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predictions of production rates and ultimate recovery of crude oil are needed for intelligent planning and timely action to ensure the continuous flow of energy required by the world`s increasing population and expanding economies. Crude oil will be able to supply increasing demand until peak world production is reached. The energy gap caused by declining conventional oil production must then be filled by expanding production of coal, heavy oil and oil shales, nuclear and hydroelectric power, and renewable energy sources (solar, wind, and geothermal). Declining oil production forecasts are based on current estimated ultimate recoverable conventional crude oil resources of 329 billion barrels for the United States and close to 3 trillion barrels for the world. Peak world crude oil production is forecast to occur in 2020 at 90 million barrels per day. Conventional crude oil production in the United States is forecast to terminate by about 2090, and world production will be close to exhaustion by 2100.

Edwards, J.D. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs U.S. Petroleum Use, 1970-2010 Nearly 40% of the oil we use is imported, costing us roughly 300 billion annually. Increased domestic oil production from...

218

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supply and demand for US crude oil resources. A dichotomyEIA (2008b) “U.S. Crude Oil Supply and Disposition,”

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

INCREASING OIL RECOVERY THROUGH ADVANCED REPROCESSING OF 3D SEISMIC, GRANT CANYON AND BACON FLAT FIELDS, NYE COUNTY, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

Makoil, Inc., of Orange, California, with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy has reprocessed and reinterpreted the 3D seismic survey of the Grant Canyon area, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada. The project was supported by Dept. of Energy Grant DE-FG26-00BC15257. The Grant Canyon survey covers an area of 11 square miles, and includes Grant Canyon and Bacon Flat oil fields. These fields have produced over 20 million barrels of oil since 1981, from debris slides of Devonian rocks that are beneath 3,500 to 5,000 ft of Tertiary syntectonic deposits that fill the basin of Railroad Valley. High-angle and low-angle normal faults complicate the trap geometry of the fields, and there is great variability in the acoustic characteristics of the overlying valley fill. These factors combine to create an area that is challenging to interpret from seismic reflection data. A 3D seismic survey acquired in 1992-93 by the operator of the fields has been used to identify development and wildcat locations with mixed success. Makoil believed that improved techniques of processing seismic data and additional well control could enhance the interpretation enough to improve the chances of success in the survey area. The project involved the acquisition of hardware and software for survey interpretation, survey reprocessing, and reinterpretation of the survey. SeisX, published by Paradigm Geophysical Ltd., was chosen as the interpretation software, and it was installed on a Dell Precision 610 computer work station with the Windows NT operating system. The hardware and software were selected based on cost, possible addition of compatible modeling software in the future, and the experience of consulting geophysicists in the Billings area. Installation of the software and integration of the hardware into the local office network was difficult at times but was accomplished with some technical support from Paradigm and Hewlett Packard, manufacturer of some of the network equipment. A number of improvements in the processing of the survey were made compared to the original work. Pre-stack migration was employed, and some errors in muting in the original processing were found and corrected. In addition, improvements in computer hardware allowed interactive monitoring of the processing steps, so that parameters could be adjusted before completion of each step. The reprocessed survey was then loaded into SeisX, v. 3.5, for interpretation work. Interpretation was done on 2, 21-inch monitors connected to the work station. SeisX was prone to crashing, but little work was lost because of this. The program was developed for use under the Unix operating system, and some aspects of the design of the user interface betray that heritage. For example, printing is a 2-stage operation that involves creation of a graphic file using SeisX and printing the file with printer utility software. Because of problems inherent in using graphics files with different software, a significant amount of trial and error is introduced in getting printed output. Most of the interpretation work was done using vertical profiles. The interpretation tools used with time slices are limited and hard to use, but a number to tools and techniques are available to use with vertical profiles. Although this project encountered a number of delays and difficulties, some unavoidable and some self-inflicted, the result is an improved 3D survey and greater confidence in the interpretation. The experiences described in this report will be useful to those that are embarking on a 3D seismic interpretation project.

Eric H. Johnson; Don E. French

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

OPEC Middle East plans for rising world demand amid uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Middle Eastern members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries must plan for huge increases in oil production capacity yet wonder whether markets for the new output will develop as expected. With worldwide oil consumption rising and non-OPEC output likely to reach its resource limits soon, OPEC member countries face major gains in demand for their crude oil. To meet the demand growth, those with untapped resources will have to invest heavily in production capacity. Most OPEC members with such resources are in the Middle East. But financing the capacity investments remains a challenge. Some OPEC members have opened up to foreign equity participation in production projects, and others may eventually do so as financial pressures grow. That means additions to the opportunities now available to international companies in the Middle East. Uncertainties, however, hamper planning and worry OPEC. Chief among them are taxation and environmental policies of consuming-nation governments. This paper reviews these concerns and provides data on production, pricing, capital investment histories and revenues.

Ismail, I.A.H. [Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, Vienna (Austria)

1996-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand increases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-vehicle demand load factor Natural gas price Carbon tax89). They increase with demand (and gross natural gas-firedelectricity demand and by changing natural gas price and CO

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Demand Response Research in Spain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Research in Spain Demand Response Research in Spain Speaker(s): Iñigo Cobelo Date: August 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mary Ann Piette The Spanish power system is becoming increasingly difficult to operate. The peak load grows every year, and the permission to build new transmission and distribution infrastructures is difficult to obtain. In this scenario Demand Response can play an important role, and become a resource that could help network operators. The present deployment of demand response measures is small, but this situation however may change in the short term. The two main Spanish utilities and the transmission network operator are designing research projects in this field. All customer segments are targeted, and the research will lead to pilot installations and tests.

223

Demand Impacted by Weather  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

When you look at demand, it’s also interesting to note the weather. The weather has a big impact on the demand of heating fuels, if it’s cold, consumers will use ...

224

Mass Market Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

225

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Maximum demand, year 2050 electricity consumption reachesefficiency, year 2050 electricity consumption is 357 TWh,capita electricity consumption increases from 7,421 kWh/year

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins' heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas' liquid fuels needs.

Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins` heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas` liquid fuels needs.

Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

EIA - AEO2010 - Natural Gas Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Demand Gas Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Natural Gas Demand Figure 68. Regional growth in nonhydroelectric renewable electricity capacity including end-use capacity, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 69. Annual average lower 48 wellhead and Henry Hub spot market prices for natural gas, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 70. Ratio of low-sulfur light crude oil price to Henry Hub natural gas price on an energy equivalent basis, 1990-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 71. Annual average lower 48 wellhead prices for natural gas in three technology cases, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 72. Annual average lower 48 wellhead prices for natural gas in three oil price cases, 1990-2035

229

12th Annual Turkmenistan International Oil and Gas Exhibition | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2th Annual Turkmenistan International Oil and Gas Exhibition 2th Annual Turkmenistan International Oil and Gas Exhibition 12th Annual Turkmenistan International Oil and Gas Exhibition November 15, 2007 - 5:05pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Secretary Bodman Good morning ladies and gentlemen. I'm very pleased to be here with you today. Congratulations to our hosts on what appears to be the great success of this 12th annual Turkmenistan International Oil and Gas Exhibition. I understand that this year, for the first time ever, TIOGE is over-subscribed. This shouldn't surprise anyone. World demand for energy will increase by more than 50 percent over the next 25 years, requiring all of us to find significant new supplies and suppliers of energy. An astounding $22 trillion of new investment will be needed between now and 2030 to meet this expected demand.

230

Assessment of Summer 1997 motor gasoline price increase  

SciTech Connect

Gasoline markets in 1996 and 1997 provided several spectacular examples of petroleum market dynamics. The first occurred in spring 1996, when tight markets, following a long winter of high demand, resulted in rising crude oil prices just when gasoline prices exhibit their normal spring rise ahead of the summer driving season. Rising crude oil prices again pushed gasoline prices up at the end of 1996, but a warm winter and growing supplies weakened world crude oil markets, pushing down crude oil and gasoline prices during spring 1997. The 1996 and 1997 spring markets provided good examples of how crude oil prices can move gasoline prices both up and down, regardless of the state of the gasoline market in the United States. Both of these spring events were covered in prior Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports. As the summer of 1997 was coming to a close, consumers experienced yet another surge in gasoline prices. Unlike the previous increase in spring 1996, crude oil was not a factor. The late summer 1997 price increase was brought about by the supply/demand fundamentals in the gasoline markets, rather than the crude oil markets. The nature of the summer 1997 gasoline price increase raised questions regarding production and imports. Given very strong demand in July and August, the seemingly limited supply response required examination. In addition, the price increase that occurred on the West Coast during late summer exhibited behavior different than the increase east of the Rocky Mountains. Thus, the Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD) 5 region needed additional analysis (Appendix A). This report is a study of this late summer gasoline market and some of the important issues surrounding that event.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Fuel efficient lubricants and the effect of special base oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The demand for improved fuel economy is placing increasing pressure upon engine manufacturers world-wide. Lubricants that can provide additional fuel efficiency benefits are being vigorously sought. Such lubricants must achieve the current performance specifications that are also increasing in severity. To meet all of these requirements, passenger car lubricant formulations will need special base oils. This paper presents data on comparable 5W-30 formulations based on either hydrogenated mineral oil, or hydrocracked or poly alpha olefin basestocks. These blends clearly demonstrate the effect of improved volatility on oil consumption and oxidation stability in a range of bench engine tests. Equivalent engine test performance is observed for the hydrocracked and polyalphaolefin blends. Both exhibit performance superior to that attained by the hydrogenated mineral oil-based blend. Predicted Sequence VI fuel savings for these blends show additional fuel efficiency benefits for hydrocracked vs. hydrogenated mineral oil-based blends. 18 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Kiovsky, T.E. [BP Oil Company, Cleveland, OH (United States); Yates, N.C.; Bales, J.R. [BP Oil International Limited, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Publication Type...

233

Electrical Demand Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Demand Management Plan set forth in this paper has proven to be a viable action to reduce a 3 million per year electric bill at the Columbus Works location of Western Electric. Measures are outlined which have reduced the peak demand 5% below the previous year's level and yielded $150,000 annual savings. These measures include rescheduling of selected operations and demand limiting techniques such as fuel switching to alternate power sources during periods of high peak demand. For example, by rescheduling the startup of five heat treat annealing ovens to second shift, 950 kW of load was shifted off peak. Also, retired, non-productive steam turbine chillers and a diesel air compressor have been effectively operated to displaced 1330 kW during peak periods each day. Installed metering devices have enabled the recognition of critical demand periods. The paper concludes with a brief look at future plans and long range objectives of the Demand Management Plan.

Fetters, J. L.; Teets, S. J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources The United States has significant natural gas and oil reserves. But many of these resources are increasingly harder to...

235

Diminishing importance of Middle East oil: its future implications. [Monograph  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term structural changes in the oil and energy markets and the reduced dependence of oil importers on Middle East production are the result of better energy-use efficiency, fuel substitution, and an increase in OPEC production. The decision by western countries to lower their demand and reduce stockpiles has had a significant impact on oil-exporting countries in terms of their spending, their economic development, and their aid programs. Political events and disruptions have also affected the Middle East's political, strategic, and economic future. (DCK)

Kanovsky, E.

1982-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

236

Demand Dispatch-Intelligent  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and energy efficiency throughout the value chain resulting in the most economical price for electricity. Having adequate quantities and capacities of demand resources is a...

237

Shifting production trends point to more oil from OPEC  

SciTech Connect

Oil production from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and non-OPEC regions has undergone four major phases of change in relation to oil price since 1960. Patterns visible in those phases offer an indication of world-wide production trends in the future. These four phases are described. Overall, demand for oil during 1960--93 has increased from around 20 million b/d in 1960 to as high as 65 million b/d in 1993. The consensus among energy analysts and forecasters is that this demand growth will continue. This will encourage OPEC and non OPEC producers to invest in the oil industry to meet future demand growth. However, since the resource base is larger in OPEC than in non-OPEC areas, and since the cost of developing these resources is lower in OPEC than outside OPEC, the future call on OPEC oil to meet growth in demand will undoubtedly be substantiated as production from the non-OPEC region diminishes or at best stagnates. The paper discusses OPEC production trends, non-OPEC production, natural gas liquids, future production scenarios, and future constraints on production.

Ismail, I.A.H. (Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, Vienna (Austria))

1994-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

238

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully-Automated Demand Response Test in Large Facilities14in DR systems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercialof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response – SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response – Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response – Spinning Reserve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

U.S. Propane Demand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand is higher in 1999 due to higher petrochemical demand and a strong economy. We are also seeing strong demand in the first quarter of 2000; however, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand increases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

xxxv Option Value of Electricity Demand Response, Osmanelasticity in aggregate electricity demand. With these newii) reduction in electricity demand during peak periods (

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capita terms. When crude oil prices are used, these are theprices are driven by oil prices, moreover, and oil isby ‡uctuations in the crude oil price. The overall mean real

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

European Economic Review 18 11982)243-248. Norfh-Holle,nd Publishing Company THE OIL SHOCKS AND MACROECONOMIC ADJUSTMEN'F IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/38, USA Though 'supply-side economics' is politically ascendant in the United States, the relative importance of supply versus demand factors in r,x:ent U.S. macroeconomic history remains in strong dispute the oil price increases a~d pre-ta~: profitability remained strong throughout the 1970s. Demand factors

244

Residential heating oil prices increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

last week to 3.92 per gallon. That's down 11 cents from a year ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The price for...

245

Residential heating oil prices increase  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

last week to 3.96 per gallon. That's down 2.6 cents from a year ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The price for...

246

Federal Reserve Bank of DallasTime-Varying Oil Price Volatility and Macroeconomic Aggregates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We illustrate the theoretical relation among output, consumption, investment, and oil price volatility in a real business cycle model. The model incorporates demand for oil by a firm, as an intermediate input, and by a household, used in conjunction with a durable good. We estimate a stochastic volatility process for the real price of oil over the period 1986-2011 and utilize the estimated process in a non-linear approximation of the model. For realistic calibrations, an increase in oil price volatility produces a temporary decrease in durable spending, while precautionary savings motives lead investment and real GDP to rise. Irreversible capital and durable investment decisions do not overturn this result.

Michael Plante; Michael Plante; Nora Traum; We Thank Ron Alquist; Sebnem Kalemli-ozcan; Junghoon Lee; James Murray

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

CONSULTANT REPORT DEMAND FORECAST EXPERT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSULTANT REPORT DEMAND FORECAST EXPERT PANEL INITIAL forecast, end-use demand modeling, econometric modeling, hybrid demand modeling, energyMahon, Carl Linvill 2012. Demand Forecast Expert Panel Initial Assessment. California Energy

248

Oil's role in free trade agreement crux of Mexico's petroleum sector dilemma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mexico's president Salinas' efforts at privatization have not yet touched Mexico's most valuable industry, oil. That remains under control of state owned Petroleos Mexicanos. Pemex and Mexico's huge oil union have come under increasing criticism for alleged abuses of power. In addition, controversy rages as to the true extent of Mexican oil resources and whether Pemex has the wherewithal to meet domestic demand and sustain oil exports. Critics also contend opening Mexico's oil sector to foreign participation would introduce new efficiencies and cost cutting measures in the cash strapped state oil industry. This paper reports that at the center of the controversy is the proposed Free Trade Agreement among Mexico, the U.S., and Canada, pushed strongly by Salinas. Oil's role in the FTA may prove the pact's main sticking point.

Not Available

1992-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

249

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

internal conditions. Maximum Demand Saving Intensity [W/ft2]automated electric demand sheds. The maximum electric shed

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Running Out of and Into Oil: Analyzing Global Oil Depletion and Transition Through 2050  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a risk analysis of world conventional oil resource production, depletion, expansion, and a possible transition to unconventional oil resources such as oil sands, heavy oil and shale oil over the period 2000 to 2050. Risk analysis uses Monte Carlo simulation methods to produce a probability distribution of outcomes rather than a single value. Probability distributions are produced for the year in which conventional oil production peaks for the world as a whole and the year of peak production from regions outside the Middle East. Recent estimates of world oil resources by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), the World Energy Council (WEC) and Dr. C. Campbell provide alternative views of the extent of ultimate world oil resources. A model of oil resource depletion and expansion for twelve world regions is combined with a market equilibrium model of conventional and unconventional oil supply and demand to create a World Energy Scenarios Model (WESM). The model does not make use of Hubbert curves but instead relies on target reserve-to-production ratios to determine when regional output will begin to decline. The authors believe that their analysis has a bias toward optimism about oil resource availability because it does not attempt to incorporate political or environmental constraints on production, nor does it explicitly include geologic constraints on production rates. Global energy scenarios created by IIASA and WEC provide the context for the risk analysis. Key variables such as the quantity of undiscovered oil and rates of technological progress are treated as probability distributions, rather than constants. Analyses based on the USGS and IIASA resource assessments indicate that conventional oil production outside the Middle East is likely to peak sometime between 2010 and 2030. The most important determinants of the date are the quantity of undiscovered oil, the rate at which unconventional oil production can be expanded, and the rate of growth of reserves and enhanced recovery. Analysis based on data produced by Campbell indicates that the peak of non-Middle East production will occur before 2010. For total world conventional oil production, the results indicate a peak somewhere between 2020 and 2050. Key determinants of the peak in world oil production are the rate at which the Middle East region expands its output and the minimum reserves-to-production ratios producers will tolerate. Once world conventional oil production peaks, first oil sands and heavy oil from Canada, Venezuela and Russia, and later some other source such as shale oil from the United States must expand if total world oil consumption is to continue to increase. Alternative sources of liquid hydrocarbon fuels, such as coal or natural gas are also possible resources but not considered in this analysis nor is the possibility of transition to a hydrogen economy. These limitations were adopted to simplify the transition analysis. Inspection of the paths of conventional oil production indicates that even if world oil production does not peak before 2020, output of conventional oil is likely to increase at a substantially slower rate after that date. The implication is that there will have to be increased production of unconventional oil after that date if world petroleum consumption is to grow.

Greene, D.L.

2003-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

251

Materials for Oil and Gas Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 18, 2008 ... The demand on materials for transporting oil, natural gas, and other fluids, including hydrogen, ethanol, etc. is severe in terms of material ...

252

THE RIMINI PROTOCOL Oil Depletion Protocol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soaring oil prices have drawn attention to the issue of the relative supply and demand for crude oil. This fact alone tells us that oil is a finite resource, which in turn means that it is subject to depletion1 THE RIMINI PROTOCOL an Oil Depletion Protocol ~ Heading Off Economic Chaos and Political Conflict

Keeling, Stephen L.

253

Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market  

SciTech Connect

The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 ( OPA'') and an even more problematic array of State pollution laws have raised the cost, and risk, of carrying oil into and out of the US. This report, prepared under contract to the US Department of energy's Office of Domestic and International Policy, examines the impact of Federal and State oil spill legislation on the tanker market. It reviews the role of marine transportation in US oil supply, explores the OPA and State oil spill laws, studies reactions to OPA in the tanker and tank barge industries and in related industries such as insurance and ship finance, and finally, discusses the likely developments in the years ahead. US waterborne oil imports amounted to 6.5 million B/D in 1991, three-quarters of which was crude oil. Imports will rise by almost 3 million B/D by 2000 according to US Department of energy forecasts, with most of the crude oil growth after 1995. Tanker demand will grow even faster: most of the US imports and the increased traffic to other world consuming regions will be on long-haul trades. Both the number of US port calls by tankers and the volume of offshore lightering will grow. Every aspect of the tanker industry's behavior is affected by OPA and a variety of State pollution laws.

Rowland, P.J. (Rowland (P.) Associates (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Demand management : a cross-industry analysis of supply-demand planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Globalization increases product variety and shortens product life cycles. These lead to an increase in demand uncertainty and variability. Outsourcing to low-cost countries increases supply lead-time and supply uncertainty ...

Tan, Peng Kuan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Oil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil Oil Oil Oil Prices, 2000-2008 For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. Oil is used for heating and transportation -- most notably, as fuel for gas-powered vehicles. America's dependence on foreign oil has declined in recent years, but oil prices have increased. The Energy Department supports research and policy options to increase our domestic supply of oil while ensuring environmentally sustainable supplies domestically and abroad, and is investing in research, technology and

256

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA

257

The utilization of the microflora indigenous to and present in oil-bearing formations to selectively plug the more porous zones thereby increasing oil recovery during waterflooding. Sixteenth quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

There are ten injection wells receiving nutrients and twenty producing wells in test patterns are being monitoring for responses. Petrophysical studies of recovered core sample from the 3 newly drilled wells are still in progress. Monthly collection of produced fluids from the test and control wells in all patterns continued with the following tasks being performed: aliphatic profile (gas chromatographic analysis); API gravity and absolute viscosity under reservoir temperature; pH of produced water; surface tension (ST) of produced water (water-air); interfacial tension (IFT) for produced oil-water system; microbiological population; and inorganic analyses (nitrate, phosphate, sulfate, sulfide, chloride, potassium, and hardness). Production data on all wells in all patterns continues to be evaluated. Increased gas production that has been noted in some wells could be the result of microbial activity or from previous unswept areas of the reservoir. Samples of gas were collected from selected production wells and analyzed by gas chromatography using a Fisher Model No. 12 Gas Partitioner. The results of analyses from four sets of samples are given.

Brown, L.R.; Vadie, A.A. [Mississippi State Univ., MS (United States)

1998-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

258

What Do We Learn from the Price of Crude Oil Futures?” working paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Based on a two-country, multi-period general equilibrium model of the spot and futures markets for crude oil, we show that there is no theoretical support for the common view that oil futures prices are accurate predictors of the spot price in the mean-squared prediction error (MSPE) sense; yet under certain conditions there is support for the view that oil futures prices are unbiased predictors. Our empirical analysis documents that futures-based forecasts typically are less accurate than the no-change forecast and biased, although the bias is small. Much of the MSPE is driven by the variability of the futures price about the expected spot price, as captured by the basis. Empirically, the fluctuations in the oil futures basis are larger and more persistent than fluctuations in the basis of foreign exchange futures. Within the context of our theoretical model, this anomaly can be explained by the marginal convenience yield of oil inventories. We show that increased uncertainty about future oil supply shortfalls under plausible assumptions causes the basis to decline and precautionary demand for crude oil to increase, resulting in an immediate increase in the real spot price that is not necessarily associated with an accumulation of oil inventories. Our main result is that the negative of the basis may be viewed as an index of fluctuations in the price of crude oil driven by precautionary demand for oil. An empirical analysis of this index provides independent evidence of how shifts in market expectations about future oil supply shortfalls affect the spot price of crude oil. Such expectation shifts have been difficult to quantify, yet have been shown to play an important role in explaining oil price fluctuations. Our empirical results are consistent with related evidence in the literature obtained by alternative methodologies.

Ron Alquist; Lutz Kilian

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Designing presentations for on-demand viewing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasingly often, presentations are given before a live audience, while simultaneously being viewed remotely and recorded for subsequent viewing on-demand over the Web. How should video presentations be designed for web access? How is video accessed ... Keywords: digital library, streaming media, video on-demand

Liwei He; Jonathan Grudin; Anoop Gupta

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Demand Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Demand Module calculates energy consumption for the four Census Regions (see Figure 5) and disaggregates the energy consumption

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand increases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

262

Demand Response Database & Demo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Database & Demo Speaker(s): Mike Graveley William M. Smith Date: June 7, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Mary Ann Piette Infotility...

263

Tankless Demand Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Demand (tankless or instantaneous) water heaters have heating devices that are activated by the flow of water, so they provide hot water only as needed and without the use of a storage tank. They...

264

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

265

Industrial Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Kelly Perl

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

266

Industrial Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Kelly Perl

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

267

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

268

Transportation Demand This  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transportation Demand Transportation Demand This page inTenTionally lefT blank 75 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific and associated technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight

269

Electricity Demand and Energy Consumption Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project describes the electricity demand and energy consumption management system and its application to the Smelter Plant of Southern Peru. It is composted of an hourly demand-forecasting module and of a simulation component for a plant electrical system. The first module was done using dynamic neural networks, with backpropagation training algorithm; it is used to predict the electric power demanded every hour, with an error percentage below of 1%. This information allows management the peak demand before this happen, distributing the raise of electric load to other hours or improving those equipments that increase the demand. The simulation module is based in advanced estimation techniques, such as: parametric estimation, neural network modeling, statistic regression and previously developed models, which simulates the electric behavior of the smelter plant. These modules allow the proper planning because it allows knowing the behavior of the hourly demand and the consumption patterns of the plant, in...

Sarmiento, Juan Ojeda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Automated Demand Response Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes assessments and test results of four end-use technologies, representing products in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, each configured to automatically receive real-time pricing information and critical peak pricing (CPP) demand response (DR) event notifications. Four different vendors were asked to follow the interface requirements set forth in the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) standard that was introduced to the public in 2008 and currently used in two ...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

271

Automated Demand Response Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, which is an update to EPRI Report 1016082, includes assessments and test results of four end-use vendor technologies. These technologies represent products in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, each configured to automatically receive real-time pricing information and critical peak pricing (CPP) demand response (DR) event notifications. Four different vendors were asked to follow the interface requirements set forth in the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) Communicat...

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

272

Energy Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data Figure 55 From AEO2011 report . Market Trends Growth in energy use is linked to population growth through increases in housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, and goods and services. These changes affect not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels used. Energy consumption per capita declined from 337 million Btu in 2007 to 308 million Btu in 2009, the lowest level since 1967. In the AEO2011 Reference case, energy use per capita increases slightly through 2013, as the economy recovers from the 2008-2009 economic downturn. After 2013, energy use per capita declines by 0.3 percent per year on average, to 293 million Btu in 2035, as higher efficiency standards for vehicles and

273

Demand Response and Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For several decades, power companies have deployed various types of demand response (DR), such as interruptible contracts, and there is substantial ongoing research and development on sophisticated mechanisms for triggering DR. In this white paper, EPRI discusses the increasing use of electricity DR in the power industry and how this will affect the practice of energy risk management. This paper outlines 1) characteristics of a common approach to energy risk management, 2) the variety of types of DR impl...

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

274

Why don't fuel prices change as quickly as crude oil prices? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Prices are determined by demand and supply in our market economy. Fuel demand is affected mainly by economic conditions, and for heating oil, the weather.

275

Dynamic Controls for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: Framework Concepts and a New Construction Study Case in New York  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and J.E. Braun. 2004. “Peak Demand Reduction from Pre-contributor to summer peak demand, with large increases inin driving summer peak demands suggest that commercial

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Hughes, Glenn

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Micro and Nano-enabled Separation Technologies for the Oil and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Aspects of Corrosion and Fouling in Oil Refining and ... and cost effective separation technologies are in demand in diverse oil and gas ...

277

Outsourcing Logistics in the Oil and Gas Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The supply chain challenges that the Oil and Gas industry faces in material logistics have enlarged in the last few decades owing to an increased hydro-carbon demand. Many reasons justify the challenges, such as exploration activities which have moved to remote locations, not only increasing distances from supply houses and refineries but also escalating logistics costs. Mammoth costs of material unavailability drive the inefficiencies largely. The objectives of the study is to discover the logistics needs of oil and gas companies, the motivation, benefits and the requirements of outsourcing logistics. The study aims to identify the material supply chain inefficiencies in the industry and proposes solutions to solve them. In this study, Oil and Gas industry’s outsourcing practices in logistics are analyzed along with the trends of the third party logistics companies serving the industry. The participants of this study are from different companies in the Oil and Gas industry dealing with supply chain operations.

Herrera, Cristina 1988-

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Dominant Middle East oil reserves critically important to world supply  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that the location production, and transportation of the 60 million bbl of oil consumed in the world each day is of vital importance to relations between nations, as well as to their economic wellbeing. Oil has frequently been a decisive factor in the determination of foreign policy. The war in the Persian Gulf, while a dramatic example of the critical importance of oil, is just the latest of a long line of oil-influenced diplomatic/military incidents, which may be expected to continue. Assuming that the world's remaining oil was evenly distributed and demand did not grow, if exploration and development proceeded as efficiently as they have in the U.S., world oil production could be sustained at around current levels to about the middle of the next century. It then would begin a long decline in response to a depleting resource base. However, the world's remaining oil is very unevenly distributed. It is located primarily in the Eastern Hemisphere, mostly in the Persian Gulf, and much is controlled by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. Scientific resource assessments indicate that about half of the world's remaining conventionally recoverable crude oil resource occurs in the Persian Gulf area. In terms of proved reserves (known recoverable oil), the Persian Gulf portion increase to almost two-thirds.

Riva, J.P. Jr. (Library of Congress, Washington, DC (United States). Congressional Research Service)

1991-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

279

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.A meta-analysis of the price elasticity of gasoline demand.2007. Consumer demand un- der price uncertainty: Empirical

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

California Independent System Operator demand response & proxy demand resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response programs are designed to allow end use customers to contribute to energy load reduction individually or through a demand response provider. One form of demand response can occur when an end use customer reduces their electrical usage ...

John Goodin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand increases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time. 4 Reducing this peak demand through DR programs meansthat a 5% reduction in peak demand would have resulted insame 5% reduction in the peak demand of the US as a whole.

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capita terms. When crude oil prices are used, these are thedriven by the world crude oil price rather than by exchange-how consumers think about oil prices and price expectations,

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Energy and Emissions Long Term Outlook A Detailed Simulation of Energy Supply-Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper presents the results of a detailed, bottom-up modeling exercise of Mexico’s energy markets. The Energy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP), the Wien Automatic System Planning (WASP) and the Energy Demand Model (MODEMA) were used to develop forecasts to 2025. Primary energy supply is projected to grow from 9,313 PJ (1999) to 13,130 PJ (2025). Mexico’s crude oil production is expected to increase by 1 % annually to 8,230 PJ. As its domestic crude refining capacity becomes unable to meet the rising demand for petroleum products, imports of oil products will become increasingly important. The Mexican natural gas markets are driven by the strong demand for gas in the power generating and manufacturing industries which significantly outpaces projected domestic production. The result is a potential need for large natural gas imports that may reach approximately 46 % of total gas supplies by 2025. The long-term market outlook for Mexico’s electricity industry shows a heavy reliance on naturalgas based generating technologies. Gas-fired generation is forecast to increase 26-fold eventually accounting for over 80 % of total generation by 2025. Alternative results for a constrained-gas scenario show a substantial shift to coal-based generation and the associated effects on the natural gas market. A renewables scenario – investigates impacts of additional renewables for power generation (primarily wind plus some solar-photovoltaic). A nuclear scenario – analyzes the impacts of additional nuclear power

Juan Quintanilla Martínez; Autónoma México; Centro Mario Molina; Juan Quintanilla Martínez

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

U.S. crude oil production growth contributes to global oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

China accounted for almost one-third of growth in global demand and surpassed the United States to become the world's largest importer of crude oil.

285

A residential energy demand system for Spain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sharp price fluctuations and increasing environmental and distributional concerns, among other issues, have led to a renewed academic interest in energy demand. In this paper we estimate, for the first time in Spain, an ...

Labandeira Villot, Xavier

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Energy Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

demand for renewable fuels increasing the fastestincluding E85 and biodiesel fuels for light-duty vehicles, biomass for co-firing at coal-fired electric power plants, and...

287

The outlook for US oil dependence  

SciTech Connect

Market share OPEC lost in defending higher prices from 1979-1985 is being steadily regained and is projected to exceed 50% by 2000. World oil markets are likely to be as vulnerable to monopoly influence as they were 20 years ago, as OPEC regains lost market share. The U.S. economy appears to be as exposed as it was in the early 1970s to losses from monopoly oil pricing. A simulated 2-year supply reduction in 2005-6 boosts OPEC revenues by roughly half a trillion dollars and costs the U.S. economy an approximately equal amount. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve appears to be of little benefit against such a determined, multi-year supply curtailment either in reducing OPEC revenues or protecting the U.S. economy. Increasing the price elasticity of oil demand and supply in the U.S. and the rest of the world, however, would be an effective strategy.

Greene, D.L.; Jones, D.W.; Leiby, P.N.

1995-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

288

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power industry primarily to increase energy supply. Theenergy crisis rooted in supply concerns in the oil and natural gas industries.energy use by residents—drive growth in the heavy industries that supply

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

290

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS 27 data.

291

Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type

292

Heating Oil and Propane Update  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Weekly residential, wholesale, and spot prices; and production, demand, and stocks of heating fuels. (Weekly heating oil and propane prices are only collected during the heating season which extends from October through March. )

Information Center

293

Market assessment for shale oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study identified several key issues on the cost, timeliness, and ease with which shale oil can be introduced into the United States' refining system. The capacity of the existing refining industry to process raw shale oil is limited by the availability of surplus hydrogen for severe hydrotreating. The existing crude oil pipeline system will encounter difficulties in handling raw shale oil's high viscosity, pour point, and contaminant levels. The cost of processing raw shale oil as an alternate to petroleum crude oil is extremely variable and primarily dependent upon the percentage of shale oil run in the refinery, as well as the availability of excess hydrogen. A large fraction of any shale oil which is produced will be refined by the major oil companies who participate in the shale oil projects and who do not anticipate problems in processing the shale oil in their refineries. Shale oil produced for sale to independent refiners will initially be sold as boiler fuel. A federal shale oil storage program might be feasible to supplement the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Based on refinery configurations, hydrogen supply, transportation systems, and crude availability, eleven refineries in Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADDs) 2A and 2B have been identified as potential processors of shale oil. Based on refining technology and projected product demands to the year 2000, shale oil will be best suited to the production of diesel fuel and jet fuel. Tests of raw shale oil in boilers are needed to demonstrate nitrogen oxide emissions control.

Not Available

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Demand Response In California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency & Energy Efficiency & Demand Response Programs Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner California Public Utilities Commission California Public Utilities Commission FUPWG 2006 Fall Meeting November 2, 2006 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 1 Highest Priority Resource Energy Efficiency is California's highest priority resource to: Meet energy needs in a low cost manner Aggressively reduce GHG emissions November 2, 2006 2 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 3 http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/PUBLISHED/REPORT/51604.htm Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 4 Energy Action Plan II Loading order continued "Pursue all cost-effective energy efficiency, first." Strong demand response and advanced metering

295

Travel Demand Modeling  

SciTech Connect

This chapter describes the principal types of both passenger and freight demand models in use today, providing a brief history of model development supported by references to a number of popular texts on the subject, and directing the reader to papers covering some of the more recent technical developments in the area. Over the past half century a variety of methods have been used to estimate and forecast travel demands, drawing concepts from economic/utility maximization theory, transportation system optimization and spatial interaction theory, using and often combining solution techniques as varied as Box-Jenkins methods, non-linear multivariate regression, non-linear mathematical programming, and agent-based microsimulation.

Southworth, Frank [ORNL; Garrow, Dr. Laurie [Georgia Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Why solar oil shale retorting produces more oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solar oil shale retorting process may produce higher oil yield than conventional processing. High oil yield is obtained for three reasons: oil carbonization inside of the shale is reduced, oil cracking outside of the shale is reduced, and oil oxidation is essentially eliminated. Unique capabilities of focused solar energy produce these advantages. An increase in yield will reduce the cost of mining and shale transportation per barrel of oil produced. These cost reductions may justify the increased processing costs that will probably be associated with solar oil shale retorting.

Aiman, W.R.

1981-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

298

Oil Price Volatility  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Speculation and Oil Price Volatility Speculation and Oil Price Volatility Robert J. Weiner Robert J. Weiner Professor of International Business, Public Policy & Professor of International Business, Public Policy & Public Administration, and International Affairs Public Administration, and International Affairs George Washington University; George Washington University; Membre Associ Membre Associ é é , GREEN, Universit , GREEN, Universit é é Laval Laval EIA Annual Conference Washington Washington 7 April 2009 7 April 2009 1 FACTORS DRIVNG OIL PRICE VOLATILITY FACTORS DRIVNG OIL PRICE VOLATILITY ► ► Market fundamentals Market fundamentals . . Fluctuations in supply, Fluctuations in supply, demand, and market power demand, and market power Some fundamentals related to expectations of Some fundamentals related to expectations of

299

Impact of 1980 scheduled capacity additions on electric-utility oil consumption  

SciTech Connect

The electric-utility sector currently consumes approximately 8% of the total oil used in the Nation. This oil represented about 15% of total fuel consumed by electric utilities in 1979. Two important factors that affect the level of utility oil consumption in 1980 are the substantial increase in coal-fired generating capacity and the uncertainty surrounding nuclear-plant licensing. With particular emphasis on these considerations, this report analyzes the potential for changes in electric-utility oil consumption in 1980 relative to the 1979 level. Plant conversions, oil to coal, for example, that may occur in 1980 are not considered in this analysis. Only the potential reduction in oil consumption resulting from new generating-capacity additions is analyzed. Changes in electric-utility oil consumption depend on, among other factors, regional-electricity-demand growth and generating-plant mix. Five cases are presented using various electricity-demand-growth rate assumptions, fuel-displacement strategies, and nuclear-plant-licensing assumptions. In general, it is likely that there will be a reduction in electric-utility oil consumption in 1980. Using the two reference cases of the report, this reduction is projected to amount to a 2 to 5% decrease from the 1979 oil-consumption level; 7% reduction is the largest reduction projected.

Gielecki, M.; Clark, G.; Roberts, B.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Fuel Oil Prepared by Blending Heavy Oil and Coal Tar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of temperature, harmonic ration, surfactant and shearing to fuel oil prepared by blending heavy oil and coal tar were detailedly studied. The results show that the viscosity of the blended oil increases gradually with the increase of harmonic ... Keywords: coal tar, heavy oil, blending, surfactant

Guojie Zhang; Xiaojie Guo; Bo Tian; Yaling Sun; Yongfa Zhang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand increases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fuel choice and aggregate energy demand in the commercial sector  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a fuel choice and aggregate-demand model of energy use in the commercial sector of the United States. The model structure is dynamic with short-run fuel-price responses estimated to be close to those of the residential sector. Of the three fuels analyzed, electricity consumption exhibits a greater response to its own price than either natural gas or fuel oil. In addition, electricity price increases have the largest effect on end-use energy conservation in the commercial sector. An improved commercial energy-use data base is developed which removes the residential portion of electricity and natural gas use that traditional energy-consumption data sources assign to the commercial sector. In addition, household and commercial petroleum use is differentiated on a state-by-state basis.

Cohn, S.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

On Demand Guarantees in Iran.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??On Demand Guarantees in Iran This thesis examines on demand guarantees in Iran concentrating on bid bonds and performance guarantees. The main guarantee types and… (more)

Ahvenainen, Laura

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Transportation Demand Management Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Demand Management Plan FALL 2009 #12;T r a n s p o r t a t i o n D e m a n d M a n the transportation impacts the expanded enrollment will have. Purpose and Goal The primary goal of the TDM plan is to ensure that adequate measures are undertaken and maintained to minimize the transportation impacts

304

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

306

A High-Strength Ni-Cr-Mo Alloy for Severe Oil and Gas Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2012. Symposium, Development of Advanced Alloys and Coating Systems for Demanding Oil and ...

307

Peaking of world oil production: Impacts, mitigation, & risk management  

SciTech Connect

The peaking of world oil production presents the U.S. and the world with an unprecedented risk management problem. As peaking is approached, liquid fuel prices and price volatility will increase dramatically, and, without timely mitigation, the economic, social, and political costs will be unprecedented. Viable mitigation options exist on both the supply and demand sides, but to have substantial impact, they must be initiated more than a decade in advance of peaking.... The purpose of this analysis was to identify the critical issues surrounding the occurrence and mitigation of world oil production peaking. We simplified many of the complexities in an effort to provide a transparent analysis. Nevertheless, our study is neither simple nor brief. We recognize that when oil prices escalate dramatically, there will be demand and economic impacts that will alter our simplified assumptions. Consideration of those feedbacks will be a daunting task but one that should be undertaken. Our aim in this study is to-- • Summarize the difficulties of oil production forecasting; • Identify the fundamentals that show why world oil production peaking is such a unique challenge; • Show why mitigation will take a decade or more of intense effort; • Examine the potential economic effects of oil peaking; • Describe what might be accomplished under three example mitigation scenarios. • Stimulate serious discussion of the problem, suggest more definitive studies, and engender interest in timely action to mitigate its impacts.

Hirsch, R.L. (SAIC); Bezdek, Roger (MISI); Wendling, Robert (MISI)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Too early to tell on $100 oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Confidential Confidential Presentation to: April 7, 2008 Middle East oil demand and Lehman Brothers oil price outlook Adam Robinson Middle East oil demand u Three pillars of Middle East oil demand - Petrodollar reinvestment - Purchasing power rise - Power sector constraints u Natural gas shortages for power generation mean balance of risks to any Middle East oil demand forecast are firmly to the upside, adding to summer upside seasonality u Lehman Brothers has pegged 3Q08 as the tightest quarter of the current oil cycle, with a possible turning point coming by the end of the year 1 Putting the GCC economy in global context u GCC = Saudi Arabia, UAE, Kuwait, Qatar, Bahrain, Oman u GDP/capita in 2007: $19,000 - Nearly 3x China and 5x India u At $800 bn, GCC is a top 10 developing economy by size

309

Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand  

SciTech Connect

Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved water delivery and irrigation system efficiencies. These could potentially reduce demands substantially. However, overall demands remained high under our fossil-fuel-only tax policy. In contrast, when all carbon was priced, increases in agricultural water demands were smaller than under the fossil-fuel-only policy and were driven primarily by increased demands for water by non-biomass crops such as rice. Finally we estimate the geospatial pattern of water demands and find that regions such as China, India and other countries in south and east Asia might be expected to experience greatest increases in water demands.?

Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

310

Using Oils As Pesticides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum and plant-derived spray oils show increasing potential for use as part of Integrated Pest Management systems for control of soft-bodied pests on fruit trees, shade trees, woody ornamentals and household plants. Sources of oils, preparing oils for use, application and precautions are discussed.

Bogran, Carlos E.; Ludwig, Scott; Metz, Bradley

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

Biochemical upgrading of oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing in organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

312

Biochemical upgrading of oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed. 121 figs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

313

ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT Companion Report to the California Energy Demand 2006-2016 Staff Energy Demand Forecast Report STAFFREPORT June 2005 CEC-400 .......................................................................................................................................1-1 ENERGY DEMAND FORECASTING AT THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION: AN OVERVIEW

314

Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY A 20-year forecast of electricity demand is a required of any forecast of electricity demand and developing ways to reduce the risk of planning errors that could arise from this and other uncertainties in the planning process. Electricity demand is forecast

315

Low Total OECD Oil Stocks* Keep Market Balance Tight  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: This chart illustrates why EIA sees crude oil prices staying relatively high. It shows global inventories, as measured by OECD petroleum stocks. EIA sees a tenuous supply/demand balance over the remainder of 2001. Global inventories remain low, and need to recover to more adequate levels of forward demand coverage in order to avoid continued price volatility. The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low levels. Low inventories increase the potential for price volatility throughout 2001. Inventories are a good measure of the supply/demand balance that affects prices. A large over-supply (production greater than demand) will put downward pressure on prices, while under-supply will push prices upward. OECD inventories illustrate the changes in the world petroleum

316

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Module calculates

317

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 15 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 16 for eleven building categories 17 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

318

On Demand Paging Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The power consumption of the network interface plays a major role in determining the total operating lifetime of wireless handheld devices. On demand paging has been proposed earlier to reduce power consumption in cellular networks. In this scheme, a low power secondary radio is used to wake up the higher power radio, allowing the latter to sleep or remain off for longer periods of time. In this paper we present use of Bluetooth radios to serve as a paging channel for the 802.11 wireless LAN. We have implemented an on-demand paging scheme on a WLAN consisting of iPAQ PDAs equipped with Bluetooth radios and Cisco Aironet wireless networking cards. Our results show power saving ranging from 19% to 46% over the present 802.11b standard operating modes with negligible impact on performance.

Bluetooth Radios On; Yuvraj Agarwal; Rajesh K. Gupta

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects: Next Generation Surfactants for Improved  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology Last Reviewed 12/15/2012 Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology Last Reviewed 12/15/2012 DE-FE0003537 Goal The principle objective of the project is to characterize and test current and next generation high performance surfactants for improved chemical flooding technology, focusing on reservoirs in Pennsylvanian age (Penn) sands. Performer Oklahoma University Enhanced Oil Recovery Design Center, Norman, OK Background Primary and secondary methods have produced approximately one-third of the 401 billion barrels of original-oil-in-place in the United States. Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) methods have shown potential to recover a fraction of the remaining oil. Surfactant EOR has seen an increase in activity in recent years due to increased energy demand and higher oil prices. In

320

Net Demand3 Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contract Number: DE-FE0004002 (Subcontract: S013-JTH-PPM4002 MOD 00) Summary The US DOE has identified a number of materials that are both used by clean energy technologies and are at risk of supply disruptions in the short term. Several of these materials, especially the rare earth elements (REEs) yttrium, cerium, and lanthanum were identified by DOE as critical (USDOE 2010) and are crucial to the function and performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) 1. In addition, US DOE has issued a second Request For Information regarding uses of and markets for these critical materials (RFI;(USDOE 2011)). This report examines how critical materials demand for SOFC applications could impact markets for these materials and vice versa, addressing categories 1,2,5, and 6 in the RFI. Category 1 – REE Content of SOFC Yttria (yttrium oxide) is the only critical material (as defined for the timeframe of interest for SOFC) used in SOFC 2. Yttrium is used as a dopant in the SOFC’s core ceramic cells.. In addition, continuing developments in SOFC technology will likely further reduce REE demand for SOFC, providing credible scope for at least an additional 50 % reduction in REE use if desirable. Category 2 – Supply Chain and Market Demand SOFC developers expect to purchase

J. Thijssen Llc

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand increases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market. Draft final report  

SciTech Connect

The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (``OPA``) and an even more problematic array of State pollution laws have raised the cost, and risk, of carrying oil into and out of the US. This report, prepared under contract to the US Department of energy`s Office of Domestic and International Policy, examines the impact of Federal and State oil spill legislation on the tanker market. It reviews the role of marine transportation in US oil supply, explores the OPA and State oil spill laws, studies reactions to OPA in the tanker and tank barge industries and in related industries such as insurance and ship finance, and finally, discusses the likely developments in the years ahead. US waterborne oil imports amounted to 6.5 million B/D in 1991, three-quarters of which was crude oil. Imports will rise by almost 3 million B/D by 2000 according to US Department of energy forecasts, with most of the crude oil growth after 1995. Tanker demand will grow even faster: most of the US imports and the increased traffic to other world consuming regions will be on long-haul trades. Both the number of US port calls by tankers and the volume of offshore lightering will grow. Every aspect of the tanker industry`s behavior is affected by OPA and a variety of State pollution laws.

Rowland, P.J. [Rowland (P.) Associates (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

OECD Crude "Demand" Remains Flat Between 1st and 2nd Quarters  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: As we enter the year 2000, we can expect crude oil demand to follow the usual pattern and remain relatively flat in OECD countries between first and second quarters. Note that for OECD, product demand is greater than crude use. These areas import products from outside the region. While product demand falls during the second and third quarters, crude inputs to refineries remain high enough to allow for some product stock building Additionally, purchases of crude oil exceed inputs to refineries for a time, allowing crude oil stocks to build as well in order to cover the shortfall between crude oil production and demand during the fourth and first quarters. Price can strengthen during the "weak product demand" summer months when the market feels stock building is inadequate to meet the

323

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries - which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity - is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that 'the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW' by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

Goldman, Charles; Reid, Michael; Levy, Roger; Silverstein, Alison

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

324

Measuring the capacity impacts of demand response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical peak pricing and peak time rebate programs offer benefits by increasing system reliability, and therefore, reducing capacity needs of the electric power system. These benefits, however, decrease substantially as the size of the programs grows relative to the system size. More flexible schemes for deployment of demand response can help address the decreasing returns to scale in capacity value, but more flexible demand response has decreasing returns to scale as well. (author)

Earle, Robert; Kahn, Edward P.; Macan, Edo

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

CRUDE OIL PRICE FLUCTUATIONS AND SAUDI ARABIAN BEHAVIOUR by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The responsibility for the contents of the working paper rests with the author, not the Institute. Since working papers are of a preliminary nature, it may be useful to contact the author of a particular working paper about results or caveats before referring to, or quoting, a paper. Any comments on working papers should be sent directly to the author. CRUDE OIL PRICE FLUCTUATIONS AND SAUDI ARABIAN BEHAVIOUR* This study seeks to explain why crude oil prices fluctuate, the main cause being the quota regime, which characterises the OPEC agreements. Given that the Saudi oil supply is inelastic in the short term, a shock in the oil market is accommodated by an immediate price change. In contrast, a dominant firm behaviour in the long term causes an output change, which is accompanied by a smaller price change. This explains why oil prices overshoot. The results of a general equilibrium model applied to Saudi Arabia support this analysis. They also indicate that Saudi Arabia does not have any incentive in altering the crude oil market equilibrium with either positive or negative supply shocks; and that its behaviour is asymmetric in the presence of world demand shocks, having an incentive (disincentive) in intervening if a negative (positive) demand shock hits the crude oil market. A second set of simulations is designed to understand what might be a correct OECD policy to lower prices. A tax cut would worsen the situation, whereas policies which can increase the price elasticity of demand seem to be very effective. * I have benefited from discussions with Christiane Kasten, Bodo Steiner and Manfred Wiebelt. All errors are my responsibility.

Roberto A. De Santis; Roberto A. De Santis

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

The effect of oil price shocks on the macroeconomy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The traditional view of oil price movements is that they represent exogenous changes in the supply of oil. In that case, oil price increases will… (more)

Embergenov, Bakhitbay

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Peaking World Oil Production: Impacts, Mitigation and Risk Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The peaking of world oil production presents the U.S. and the world with an unprecedented risk management problem. As peaking is approached, liquid fuel prices and price volatility will increase dramatically, and, without timely mitigation, the economic, social, and political costs will be unprecedented. Viable mitigation options exist on both the supply and demand sides, but to have substantial impact, they must be initiated more than a decade in advance of peaking. In 2003, the world consumed nearly 80 million barrels per day (MM bpd) of oil. U.S. consumption was almost 20 MM bpd,

Robert L. Hirsch; Roger H. Bezdek; Robert M. Wendling

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Demands..xi Annual natural gas demand for each alternativeused in natural gas demand projections. 34

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Balancing oil and environment... responsibly.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Balancing Oil and Environment…Responsibly As the price of oil continues to skyrocket and global oil production nears the brink, pursuing unconventional oil supplies, such as oil shale, oil sands, heavy oils, and oils from biomass and coal has become increasingly attractive. Of particular significance to the American way is that our continent has significant quantities of these resources. Tapping into these new resources, however, requires cutting-edge technologies for identification, production, processing and environmental management. This job needs a super hero or two for a job of this size and proportion…

Weimer, Walter C.; Teske, Lisa

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

330

Crude Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barrels) Product: Crude Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases Distillate Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Oil Still Gas Petroleum Coke Marketable Petroleum Coke Catalyst Petroleum Coke Other...

331

OIL PRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OIL PRODUCTION Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) is a term applied to methods used for recovering oil from a petroleum reservoir beyond that recoverable by primary and secondary methods....

332

Policy Analysis of Water Availability and Use Issues for Domestic Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil shale and oil sands resources located within the intermountain west represent a vast, and as of yet, commercially untapped source of energy. Development will require water, and demand for scarce water resources stands at the front of a long list of barriers to commercialization. Water requirements and the consequences of commercial development will depend on the number, size, and location of facilities, as well as the technologies employed to develop these unconventional fuels. While the details remain unclear, the implication is not – unconventional fuel development will increase demand for water in an arid region where demand for water often exceeds supply. Water demands in excess of supplies have long been the norm in the west, and for more than a century water has been apportioned on a first-come, first-served basis. Unconventional fuel developers who have not already secured water rights stand at the back of a long line and will need to obtain water from willing water purveyors. However, uncertainty regarding the nature and extent of some senior water claims combine with indeterminate interstate river management to cast a cloud over water resource allocation and management. Quantitative and qualitative water requirements associated with Endangered Species protection also stand as barriers to significant water development, and complex water quality regulations will apply to unconventional fuel development. Legal and political decisions can give shape to an indeterminate landscape. Settlement of Northern Ute reserved rights claims would help clarify the worth of existing water rights and viability of alternative sources of supply. Interstate apportionment of the White River would go a long way towards resolving water availability in downstream Utah. And energy policy clarification will help determine the role oil shale and oil sands will play in our nation’s future.

Ruple, John; Keiter, Robert

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

Risk analysis in oil and gas projects : a case study in the Middle East  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global demand for energy is rising around the world. Middle East is a major supplier of oil and gas and remains an important region for any future oil and gas developments. Meanwhile, managing oil and gas projects are ...

Zand, Emad Dolatshahi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Tactile robotic mapping of unknown surfaces: An application to oil well exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World oil demand and advanced oil recovery techniques have made it economically attractive to rehabilitate previously abandoned oil wells. This requires relatively fast mapping of the shape and location of the down-hole ...

Mazzini, Francesco

335

US military expenditures to protect the use of Persian Gulf oil for motor vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on US dependence on foreign oil when he testi?ed that ‘‘US dependence on foreign oil is not to reduce militaryincrease in oil prices, at a minimum because foreign demand

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disruptions, and the peak in U.S. oil production account foroil increased 81.1% (logarithmically) between January 1979 and the peak

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Dividends with Demand Response  

SciTech Connect

To assist facility managers in assessing whether and to what extent they should participate in demand response programs offered by ISOs, we introduce a systematic process by which a curtailment supply curve can be developed that integrates costs and other program provisions and features. This curtailment supply curve functions as bid curve, which allows the facility manager to incrementally offer load to the market under terms and conditions acceptable to the customer. We applied this load curtailment assessment process to a stylized example of an office building, using programs offered by NYISO to provide detail and realism.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Goldman, Charles; Sezgen, O.; Pratt, D.

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

338

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Title Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2010 Authors Goldman, Charles A., Michael Reid, Roger Levy, and Alison Silverstein Pagination 74 Date Published 01/2010 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025.1 Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries-which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity-is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that "the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW" by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

339

Oil Speculation by Jussi Keppo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil Speculation by Jussi Keppo July 8, 2008 The increase in the oil spot price seems to be mainly, the surplus oil capacity decreased from 5 million barrels a day to 2 million barrels a day. There seems, i.e., they are long in these markets. Here I focus on oil and I have simple points

Keppo, Jussi

340

Forecasting Uncertain Hotel Room Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic systems are characterized by increasing uncertainty in their dynamics. This increasing uncertainty is likely to incur bad decisions that can be costly in financial terms. This makes forecasting of uncertain economic variables an instrumental activity in any organization. This paper takes the hotel industry as a practical application of forecasting using the Holt-Winters method. The problem here is to forecast the uncertain demand for rooms at a hotel for each arrival day. Forecasting is part of hotel revenue management system whose objective is to maximize the revenue by making decisions regarding when to make rooms available for customers and at what price. The forecast approach discussed in this paper is based on quantitative models and does not incorporate management expertise. Even though, forecast results are found to be satisfactory for certain days, this is not the case for other arrival days. It is believed that human judgment is important when dealing with ...

Mihir Rajopadhye Mounir; Mounir Ben Ghaliay; Paul P. Wang; Timothy Baker; Craig V. Eister

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand increases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

World Crude Production Not Keeping Pace with Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: The crude market is the major factor behind todayÂ’s low stocks. This graph shows the balance between world production and demand for petroleum. Normally, production exceeds demand in the summer, building stocks, and is less than demand in the winter months, drawing the stocks back down (dark blue areas). However, production exceeded demand through most of 1997 and 1998, building world stocks to very high levels and driving prices down. But the situation reversed in 1999. Recently, there has been more petroleum demand than supply, requiring the use of stocks to meet petroleum needs. Following the extremely low crude oil prices at the beginning of 1999, OPEC agreed to remove about 6% of world production from the market in order to work off excess inventories and bring prices back up.

342

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. nepdg_251_500.pdf. Demand for Fossil Fuels. Renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply sooner or later, as indeed it already has in the casc of United States domestic oil drilling. Recognition also is growing that our air and land can no longer absorb unlimited quantities of waste from fossil fuel extraction and combustion. As that day draws nearer, policymakers will have no realistic alternative but to turn to sources of power that today make up a viable but small part of America's energy picture. And they will be

343

Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation By Tansa Musa zones and do not respect size limits in their quest for maximum financial returns. "I lack words economy. China's demand for hardwood drives illegal logging says "Both illegal and authorized

344

Estimating a Demand System with Nonnegativity Constraints: Mexican Meat Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Properties of the AIDS Generalized Maximum Entropy Estimator 24 #12;Estimating a Demand SystemEstimating a Demand System with Nonnegativity Constraints: Mexican Meat Demand Amos Golan* Jeffrey with nonnegativity constraints is presented. This approach, called generalized maximum entropy (GME), is more

Perloff, Jeffrey M.

345

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST Demand Forecast report is the product of the efforts of many current and former California Energy Commission staff. Staff contributors to the current forecast are: Project Management and Technical Direction

346

China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling Speaker(s): Nan Zhou Date: October 8, 2009 (All day) Location: 90-3122 As a consequence of soaring energy demand due to the staggering pace of its economic growth, China overtook the United States in 2007 to become the world's biggest contributor to CO2 emissions (IEA, 2007). Since China is still in an early stage of industrialization and urbanization, economic development promises to keep China's energy demand growing strongly. Furthermore, China's reliance on fossil fuel is unlikely to change in the long term, and increased needs will only heighten concerns about energy security and climate change. In response, the Chinese government has developed a series of policies and targets aimed at improving energy efficiency, including both short-term targets and long-term strategic

347

National Action Plan on Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

David Kathan, Ph.D David Kathan, Ph.D Federal Energy Regulatory Commission U.S. DOE Electricity Advisory Committee October 29, 2010 Demand Response as Power System Resources The author's views do not necessarily represent the views of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission 2 Demand Response * FERC (Order 719) defines demand response as: - A reduction in the consumption of electric energy by customers from their expected consumption in response to an increase in the price of electric energy or to in incentive payments designed to induce lower consumption of electric energy. * The National Action Plan on Demand Response released by FERC staff broadens this definition to include - Consumer actions that can change any part of the load profile of a utility or region, not just the period of peak usage

348

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Electricity Demand Figure 60. Annual electricity sales by sector, 1980-2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel, 2006 and 2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Residential and Commercial Sectors Dominate Electricity Demand Growth Total electricity sales increase by 29 percent in the AEO2008 reference case, from 3,659 billion kilowatthours in 2006 to 4,705 billion in 2030, at an average rate of 1.1 percent per year. The relatively slow growth follows the historical trend, with the growth rate slowing in each succeeding

349

Oil export policy and economic development in OPEC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the 1970s, members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) increased the price of their oil exports by 2000% in nominal terms. The ability of OPEC countries to increase the economic and other benefits they drew from each barrel of oil was a familiar theme of that decade. However, recent developments in the world oil market may not be so encouraging for OPEC. From 1979 to 1983, demand for OPEC crude oil decreased by almost 45%, or from 30.9 to 17.5 million barrels per day (mbd). Despite this dramatic decrease, the news on the price front has not so far been that bad for OPEC. The average OPEC oil price, which had increased from $1.80/bbl (barrel) in 1970 to $36/bbl by 1980, declined to $29/bbl by 1983. OPEC has thus defied many experts by managing to avoid a price collapse. Not surprisingly, these developments have raised arguments about the nature of OPEC and how it operates. OPEC has been characterized variously as a very tight cartel and as a loose and ineffectual organization. This paper tries to shed some light on OPEC, and especially on how the economic development objectives of influential OPEC members affect their oil policies.

Aperjis, D.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the fourth project year (April 6 through October 5, 2003). The work included (1) analysis of well-test data and oil production from Cherokee and Bug fields, San Juan County, Utah, and (2) diagenetic evaluation of stable isotopes from the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Production ''sweet spots'' and potential horizontal drilling candidates were identified for Cherokee and Bug fields. In Cherokee field, the most productive wells are located in the thickest part of the mound facies of the upper Ismay zone, where microporosity is well developed. In Bug field, the most productive wells are located structurally downdip from the updip porosity pinch out in the dolomitized lower Desert Creek zone, where micro-box-work porosity is well developed. Microporosity and micro-box-work porosity have the greatest hydrocarbon storage and flow capacity, and potential horizontal drilling target in these fields. Diagenesis is the main control on the quality of Ismay and Desert Creek reservoirs. Most of the carbonates present within the lower Desert Creek and Ismay have retained a marine-influenced carbon isotope geochemistry throughout marine cementation as well as through post-burial recycling of marine carbonate components during dolomitization, stylolitization, dissolution, and late cementation. Meteoric waters do not appear to have had any effect on the composition of the dolomites in these zones. Light oxygen values obtained from reservoir samples for wells located along the margins or flanks of Bug field may be indicative of exposure to higher temperatures, to fluids depleted in {sup 18}O relative to sea water, or to hypersaline waters during burial diagenesis. The samples from Bug field with the lightest oxygen isotope compositions are from wells that have produced significantly greater amounts of hydrocarbons. There is no significant difference between the oxygen isotope compositions from lower Desert Creek dolomite samples in Bug field and the upper Ismay limestones and dolomites from Cherokee field. Carbon isotopic compositions for samples from Patterson Canyon field can be divided into two populations: isotopically heavier mound cement and isotopically lighter oolite and banded cement. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the annual national convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation, a core workshop, and publications. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

2003-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

351

Demand Response | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand response provides an opportunity for consumers to play a significant role in the operation of the electric grid by reducing or shifting their electricity usage during peak periods in response to time-based rates or other forms of financial incentives. Demand response programs are being used by electric system planners and operators as resource options for balancing supply and demand. Such programs can lower the cost of electricity in wholesale markets, and in turn, lead to lower retail rates. Methods of engaging customers in demand response efforts include offering time-based rates such as time-of-use pricing, critical peak pricing, variable peak pricing, real time pricing, and critical peak rebates. It also includes direct load control programs which provide the

352

Eastern Mediterranean Region Overview of oil and natural gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

demand. In Cyprus, Lebanon, and the Palestinian Territories oil exploration and development is still in its infancy, however each hopes to capitalize on successful ...

353

Energy and Financial Markets Overview: Crude Oil Price Formation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 ... oil demand growth, slow supply growth and tight spare capacity 22 Richard Newell, May 5, 2011

354

ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT STAFFREPORT June 2005 ..............................................................................3 Residential Forecast Comparison ..............................................................................................5 Nonresidential Forecast Comparisons

355

Demand Side Bidding. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This document sets forth the final report for a financial assistance award for the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) to enhance coordination between the building operators and power system operators in terms of demand-side responses to Location Based Marginal Pricing (LBMP). Potential benefits of this project include improved power system reliability, enhanced environmental quality, mitigation of high locational prices within congested areas, and the reduction of market barriers for demand-side market participants. NARUC, led by its Committee on Energy Resources and the Environment (ERE), actively works to promote the development and use of energy efficiency and clean distributive energy policies within the framework of a dynamic regulatory environment. Electric industry restructuring, energy shortages in California, and energy market transformation intensifies the need for reliable information and strategies regarding electric reliability policy and practice. NARUC promotes clean distributive generation and increased energy efficiency in the context of the energy sector restructuring process. NARUC, through ERE's Subcommittee on Energy Efficiency, strives to improve energy efficiency by creating working markets. Market transformation seeks opportunities where small amounts of investment can create sustainable markets for more efficient products, services, and design practices.

Spahn, Andrew

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

Overview of Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

08 PJM 08 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Overview of Demand Response PJM ©2008 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Growth, Statistics, and Current Footprint AEP, Dayton, ComEd, & DUQ Dominion Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Current PJM RTO Statistics Current PJM RTO Statistics PJM Mid-Atlantic Integrations completed as of May 1 st , 2005 ©2008 PJM

357

Patterns of residential energy demand by type of household: white, black, Hispanic, and low- and nonlow-income  

SciTech Connect

This report compares patterns of residential energy use by white, black, Hispanic, low-income, and nonlow-income households. The observed downward trend in residential energy demand over the period of this study can be attributed primarily to changes in space-heating energy demand. Demand for space-heating energy has experienced a greater decline than energy demand for other end uses for two reasons: (1) it is the largest end use of residential energy, causing public attention to focus on it and on strategies for conserving it; and (2) space-heating expenditures are large relative to other residential energy expenditures. The price elasticity of demand is thus greater, due to the income effect. The relative demand for space-heating energy, when controlled for the effect of climate, declined significantly over the 1978-1982 period for all fuels studied. Income classes do not differ significantly. In contrast, black households were found to use more energy for space heating than white households were found to use, although those observed differences are statistically significant only for houses heated with natural gas. As expected, the average expenditure for space-heating energy increased significantly for dwellings heated by natural gas and fuel oil. No statistically significant increases were found in electricity expenditures for space heating. Electric space heat is, in general, confined to milder regions of the country, where space heating is relatively less essential. As a consequence, we would expect the electricity demand for space heating to be more price-elastic than the demand for other fuels.

Klein, Y.; Anderson, J.; Kaganove, J.; Throgmorton, J.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Integrated Reservoir Characterization and Simulation Studies in Stripper Oil and Gas Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The demand for oil and gas is increasing yearly, whereas proven oil and gas reserves are being depleted. The potential of stripper oil and gas fields to supplement the national energy supply is large. In 2006, stripper wells accounted for 15% and 8% of US oil and gas production, respectively. With increasing energy demand and current high oil and gas prices, integrated reservoir studies, secondary and tertiary recovery methods, and infill drilling are becoming more common as operators strive to increase recovery from stripper oil and gas fields. The primary objective of this research was to support optimized production of oil and gas from stripper well fields by evaluating one stripper gas field and one stripper oil field. For the stripper gas field, I integrated geologic and engineering data to build a detailed reservoir characterization model of the Second White Specks (SSPK) reservoir in Garden Plains field, Alberta, Canada. The objectives of this model were to provide insights to controls on gas production and to validate a simulation-based method of infill drilling assessment. SSPK was subdivided into Units A ? D using well-log facies. Units A and B are the main producing units. Unit A has better reservoir quality and lateral continuity than Unit B. Gas production is related primarily to porosity-netthickness product and permeability and secondarily to structural position, minor structural features, and initial reservoir pressure. For the stripper oil field, I evaluated the Green River formation in the Wells Draw area of Monument Butte field, Utah, to determine interwell connectivity and to assess optimal recovery strategies. A 3D geostatistical model was built, and geological realizations were ranked using production history matching with streamline simulation. Interwell connectivity was demonstrated for only major sands and it increases as well spacing decreases. Overall connectivity is low for the 22 reservoir zones in the study area. A water-flood-only strategy provides more oil recovery than a primary-then-waterflood strategy over the life of the field. For new development areas, water flooding or converting producers to injectors should start within 6 months of initial production. Infill drilling may effectively produce unswept oil and double oil recovery. CO2 injection is much more efficient than N2 and CH4 injection. Water-alternating-CO2 injection is superior to continuous CO2 injection in oil recovery. The results of this study can be used to optimize production from Garden Plains and Monument Butte fields. Moreover, these results should be applicable to similar stripper gas and oil field fields. Together, the two studies demonstrate the utility of integrated reservoir studies (from geology to engineering) for improving oil and gas recovery.

Wang, Jianwei

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

HETEROGENEOUS SHALLOW-SHELF CARBONATE BUILDUPS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH AND COLORADO: TARGETS FOR INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES USING HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNIQUES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the second half of the third project year (October 6, 2002, through April 5, 2003). The primary work included describing and mapping regional facies of the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Regional cross sections show the development of ''clean carbonate'' packages that contain all of the productive reservoir facies. These clean carbonates abruptly change laterally into thick anhydrite packages that filled several small intra-shelf basins in the upper Ismay zone. Examination of upper Ismay cores identified seven depositional facies: open marine, middle shelf, inner shelf/tidal flat, bryozoan mounds, phylloid-algal mounds, quartz sand dunes, and anhydritic salinas. Lower Desert Creek facies include open marine, middle shelf, protomounds/collapse breccia, and phylloid-algal mounds. Mapping the upper Ismay zone facies delineates very prospective reservoir trends that contain porous, productive buildups around the anhydrite-filled intra-shelf basins. Facies and reservoir controls imposed by the anhydritic intra-shelf basins should be considered when selecting the optimal location and orientation of any horizontal drilling from known phylloidalgal reservoirs to undrained reserves, as well as identifying new exploration trends. Although intra-shelf basins are not present in the lower Desert Creek zone of the Blanding sub-basin, drilling horizontally along linear shoreline trends could also encounter previously undrilled, porous intervals and buildups. Technology transfer activities consisted of a technical presentation at a Class II Review conference sponsored by the National Energy Technology Laboratory at the Center for Energy and Economic Diversification in Odessa, Texas. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Retail Heating Oil and Diesel Fuel Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Because of the higher projected crude oil prices and because of increased tightening in the Northeast heating oil market since the last Outlook, we ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand increases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil stocks in the United States, while tending to increase of late toward more normal levels, remain well below average. Near-term tightness in crude oil ...

362

On demand responsiveness in additive cost sharing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We propose two new axioms of demand responsiveness for additive cost sharing with variable demands. Group Monotonicity requires that if a group of agents increase their demands, not all of them pay less. Solidarity says that if agent i demands more, j should not pay more if k pays less. Both axioms are compatible in the partial responsibility theory postulating Strong Ranking, i.e., the ranking of cost shares should never contradict that of demands. The combination of Strong Ranking, Solidarity and Monotonicity characterizes the quasi-proportional methods, under which cost shares are proportional to ‘rescaled ’ demands. The alternative full responsibility theory is based on Separability, ruling out cross-subsidization when costs are additively separable. Neither the Aumann-Shapley nor the Shapley-Shubik method is group monotonic. On the other hand, convex combinations of “nearby ” …xed-path methods are group-monotonic: the subsidy-free serial method is the main example. No separable method meets Solidarity, yet restricting the axiom to submodular (or supermodular) cost functions leads to a characterization of the …xed-‡ow methods, containing the Shapley-Shubik and serial methods. JEL Classi…cation numbers: C 71, D 63.

Hervé Moulin; Yves Sprumont

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model By Tancred C.M. Lidderdale This article first appeared in the Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995, Energy Information Administration, DOE/EIA-0202(95) (Washington, DC, July 1995), pp. 33-42, 83-85. The regression results and historical data for production, inventories, and imports have been updated in this presentation. Contents * Introduction o Table 1. Oxygenate production capacity and demand * Oxygenate demand o Table 2. Estimated RFG demand share - mandated RFG areas, January 1998 * Fuel ethanol supply and demand balance o Table 3. Fuel ethanol annual statistics * MTBE supply and demand balance o Table 4. EIA MTBE annual statistics * Refinery balances

364

Proceedings of the Chinese-American symposium on energy markets and the future of energy demand  

SciTech Connect

The Symposium was organized by the Energy Research Institute of the State Economic Commission of China, and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Johns Hopkins University from the United States. It was held at the Johns Hopkins University Nanjing Center in late June 1988. It was attended by about 15 Chinese and an equal number of US experts on various topics related to energy demand and supply. Each presenter is one of the best observers of the energy situation in their field. A Chinese and US speaker presented papers on each topic. In all, about 30 papers were presented over a period of two and one half days. Each paper was translated into English and Chinese. The Chinese papers provide an excellent overview of the emerging energy demand and supply situation in China and the obstacles the Chinese planners face in managing the expected increase in demand for energy. These are matched by papers that discuss the energy situation in the US and worldwide, and the implications of the changes in the world energy situation on both countries. The papers in Part 1 provide historical background and discuss future directions. The papers in Part 2 focus on the historical development of energy planning and policy in each country and the methodologies and tools used for projecting energy demand and supply. The papers in Part 3 examine the pattern of energy demand, the forces driving demand, and opportunities for energy conservation in each of the major sectors in China and the US. The papers in Part 4 deal with the outlook for global and Pacific region energy markets and the development of the oil and natural gas sector in China.

Meyers, S. (ed.)

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Increasing primary energy and electricity demand. Persistent energy deficit situation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 12 ~ 15, 2012 Westmark Hotel, Fairbanks, Alaska "50 Years... Honor the Past; Embrace the Present Meeting ~ Westmark Hotel Page 2 3/6/2012~ 11:23:30 AM If you need any assistance logging on, please of Directors Meeting ~ Westmark Hotel Page 3 3/6/2012~ 11:23:30 AM MONDAY, MARCH 12, 2012 ~ TRIBAL OVERVIEW

366

Demand Response Programs, 6. edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 EMCS EPACT ERCOT FCM FERC FRCC demand side managementEnergy Regulatory Commission (FERC). EPAct began the processin wholesale markets, which FERC Order 888 furthered by

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

The Politics of Mexico’s Oil Monopoly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based on the current oil reserves and oil production? 2) Forto either increase its oil reserves or decrease its oilthe world in terms of oil reserves by having 16,041 million

Huizar, Richard

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Increased oil production and reserves from improved completion techniques in the Bluebell Field, Unita Basin, Utah. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This project aspires to increase the productivity and reserves in the Uinta Basin by demonstration of improved completion techniques. Subsurface studies were performed this period.

Allison, M.L.

1995-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

370

Market assessment for shale oil  

SciTech Connect

This study identified several key issues on the cost, timeliness, and ease with which shale oil can be introduced into the United States' refining system. The capacity of the existing refining industry to process raw shale oil is limited by the availability of surplus hydrogen for severe hydrotreating. The existing crude oil pipeline system will encounter difficulties in handling raw shale oil's high viscosity, pour point, and contaminant levels. The cost of processing raw shale oil as an alternate to petroleum crude oil is extremely variable and primarily dependent upon the percentage of shale oil run in the refinery, as well as the availability of excess hydrogen. A large fraction of any shale oil which is produced will be refined by the major oil companies who participate in the shale oil projects and who do not anticipate problems in processing the shale oil in their refineries. Shale oil produced for sale to independent refiners will initially be sold as boiler fuel. A federal shale oil storage program might be feasible to supplement the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Based on refinery configurations, hydrogen supply, transportation systems, and crude availability, eleven refineries in Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADDs) 2A and 2B have been identified as potential processors of shale oil. Based on refining technology and projected product demands to the year 2000, shale oil will be best suited to the production of diesel fuel and jet fuel. Tests of raw shale oil in boilers are needed to demonstrate nitrogen oxide emissions control.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Tape storage solutions: meeting growing data demands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The exponential data growth caused by content-rich applications and new data compliance regulations has led to an increased demand for tape storage due to tape's low cost per GB and long shelf-life. However, tape technology suffers from several disadvantages: ...

Xianbo Zhang / David H. Du

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Energy Demand (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Growth in U.S. energy use is linked to population growth through increases in demand for housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, manufacturing, and services. This affects not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels and consumption by sector.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

373

Thailand gas prospects continue to increase  

SciTech Connect

This article describes Thailand's gas surplus that is occurring after years of energy importation. Between 1975 and 1983, energy consumption increased by 76.8%. At the end of 1983, petroleum accounted for 64% of all energy consumed. Demand was met in part by awarding 96,500 sq. miles offshore for petroleum exploration. As a result, Union Oil Thailand is preparing to produce 500 MMcfgd by the end of the year. Thai officials question whether the country can absorb that much gas. Local demand is expected to rise to over 700 MMcfd by 1990. The way to the development of even more offshore gas was opened when Thailand and Malaysia ended a five year dispute and decided to develop an area claimed by both countries together. The disputed area is thought to contain 14 tcfg, about as much as has been found by Union Oil and Texas Pacific so far. The article discusses other companies that have joined the offshore search as well.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

electricity demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords Electricity Consumption electricity demand energy use by sector New Zealand Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Electricity Consumption by Sector (1974 - 2009) (xls, 46.1 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Percentage of Consumers by Sector (2002 - 2009) (xls, 43.5 KiB)

375

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Floorspace Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Service Demand Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Equipment Choice Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Consumption Submodule The commercial demand module (CDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for eight marketed energy sources plus solar thermal energy. For the three major commercial sector fuels, electricity, natural gas and distillate oil, the CDM is a "structural" model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the commercial floorspace stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. For the remaining five marketed "minor fuels," simple econometric projections are made. The commercial sector encompasses business establishments that are not

376

GPRS Based Remote Monitoring and Controlling System for Oil Delivery Truck  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the oil retail market, to participate into the whole oil sale process is an urgent demand for oil retail company. As a respond to this situation, a GPRS based remote monitoring and controlling system for oil delivery truck is proposed in this paper. ... Keywords: GPRS, oil delivery, ATmega16

Yang Jia-zhi; Shen Xian-hao

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Commissioning Title Automated Demand Response and Commissioning Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-57384 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Piette, Mary...

378

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lvi Southern California Edison filed its SmartConnectinfrastructure (e.g. , Edison Electric Institute, DemandSouthern California Edison Standard Practice Manual

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Demand Uncertainty and Price Dispersion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Demand uncertainty has been recognized as one factor that may cause price dispersion in perfectly competitive markets with costly and perishable capacity. With the persistence… (more)

Li, Suxi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

1995 Demand-Side Managment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1995 January 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand increases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Drewry: Mideast in firm control of world oil supplies for 1990s  

SciTech Connect

Surging economic growth in the Far East will push up world crude oil demand steadily in the 1990s despite the current economic downturn. It will fall to members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries to meet that increased demand, given the expected decline in non-OPEC production. And because OPEC members in the Persian Gulf region are best positioned to meet the increase, the balance of power in oil markets will shift even more in favor of the Middle East. Seaborne oil exports from the Middle East will jump almost 30% by 1997 from 1991 levels. There will be a worldwide rise of 16% in the volume of seaborne crude oil trade, with a 29% hike in movements of refined products by tanker. Those are among the findings of a report by Drewry Shipping Consultants Ltd., London. Drewry said, It is expected that 1992 will be a low point in non-OPEC output and that production levels will recover steadily from 1993 onward, although not rapidly enough to match the anticipated rise in demand. Drewry estimates non-OPEC production in 1997 at 37.1 million b/d vs. 38.1 million b/d in 1991. With non-OPEC production falling by 2.6% between 1991 and 1997, OPEC producers will have the scope to increase their output by almost 32% over the same period.

Not Available

1993-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

382

The Outlook for U.S. Oil Dependence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Market share OPEC lost in defending higher prices from 1979-1985 is being steadily regained and is projected to exceed 50% by 2000. World oil markets are likely to be as vulnerable to monopoly influence as they were 20 years ago, as OPEC regains lost market share. The US economy appears to be as exposed as it was in the early 1970s to losses from monopoly oil pricing. A simulated 2-year supply reduction in 2005-6 boosts OPEC revenues by roughly half a trillion dollars and costs the US economy an approximately equal amount. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve appears to be of little benefit against such a determined, multi-year supply curtailment either in reducing OPEC revenues or protecting the US economy. Increasing the price elasticity of oil demand and supply in the US and the rest of the world, however, would be an effective strategy.

Greene, D.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy efficiency and demand response programs and tariffs.energy efficiency and demand response program and tariffenergy efficiency and demand response programs and tariffs.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency,”Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,technical support from the Demand Response Research Center (

Federspiel, Clifford

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT) The opportunities for demand reduction and cost saving with building demand responsive control vary tremendously with building type...

386

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 2.0 Demand ResponseFully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8.4 Demand Response Integration . . . . . . . . . . .for each day type for the demand response study - moderatefor each day type for the demand response study - moderate

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their partnership in demand response automation research andand Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities”of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 1. “Economic” demand response and real time pricing (Implications of Demand Response Programs in CompetitiveAdvanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8 Figure 7: Maximum Demands Savings Intensity due toaddressed in this report. Maximum Demand Savings Intensity (Echelon Figure 7: Maximum Demands Savings Intensity due to

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

National Microalgae Biofuel Production Potential and Resource Demand  

SciTech Connect

Microalgae continue to receive global attention as a potential sustainable "energy crop" for biofuel production. An important step to realizing the potential of algae is quantifying the demands commercial-scale algal biofuel production will place on water and land resources. We present a high-resolution national resource and oil production assessment that brings to bear fundamental research questions of where open pond microalgae production can occur, how much land and water resource is required, and how much energy is produced. Our study suggests under current technology microalgae have the potential to generate 220 billion liters/year of oil, equivalent to 48% of current U.S. petroleum imports for transportation fuels. However, this level of production would require 5.5% of the land area in the conterminous U.S., and nearly three times the volume of water currently used for irrigated agriculture, averaging 1,421 L water per L of oil. Optimizing the selection of locations for microalgae production based on water use efficiency can greatly reduce total water demand. For example, focusing on locations along the Gulf Coast, Southeastern Seaboard, and areas adjacent to the Great Lakes, shows a 75% reduction in water demand to 350 L per L of oil produced with a 67% reduction in land use. These optimized locations have the potential to generate an oil volume equivalent to 17% of imports for transportation fuels, equal to the Energy Independence and Security Act year 2022 "advanced biofuels" production target, and utilizing some 25% of the current irrigation consumptive water demand for the U. S. These results suggest that, with proper planning, adequate land and water are available to meet a significant portion of the U.S. renewable fuel goals.

Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard; Huesemann, Michael H.; Lane, Leonard J.

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

395

A new era for oil prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 2003 the international oil market has been moving away from the previous 20-year equilibrium in which prices fluctuated around $25/bbl (in today's dollars). The single most important reason is that growing demand has ...

Mitchell, John V.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Changing fuel formulations will boost hydrogen demand  

SciTech Connect

Refinery demand in the U.S. for on-purpose hydrogen will continue to increase by 5-10 %/year, depending on the extent of implementation of the 1990 U.S. Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) and other proposed environmental legislation. Although the debate on the economic wisdom of the legislation still rages, it is evident that refiners likely will see a large upswing in hydrogen demand while existing hydrogen production may decline. To better understand the potential impact various reformulation scenarios may have on the refining industry, and specifically, on the demand for hydrogen, Texaco analyzed the hydrogen supply/demand scenario in great detail. Two cases were studied in this analysis: mild and severe reformulation. The mild reformulation case is based on current CAAA legislation along with minor modifications to automobile hardware. The severe case is based on a nationwide implementation of Phase 2 of the CAAA and California's proposed reformulated fuels. The paper discusses the current capacity balance; growth in demand; reformulated gasoline; steam methane reforming; and partial oxidation technology.

Simonsen, K.A.; O' Keefe, L.F. (Texaco Inc., White Plains, N.Y. (United States)); Fong, W.F. (Texaco Development Corp., White Plains, N.Y. (United States))

1993-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

397

Water issues associated with heavy oil production.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

398

Market-based airport demand management : theory, model and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ever-increasing demand for access to the world's major commercial airports combined with capacity constraints at many of these airports have led to increasing air traffic congestion. In particular, the scarcity of ...

Fan, Terence P

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Shale oil: potential for electric power fuels. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the status of the oil shale industry and the impact it will have on the electric power industry in the years 1990 to 2000. The nontechnical problems are not addressed in detail as they have been suitably dealt with elsewhere. The available technologies for producing shale oil are reviewed. The major problem most processes face today is scale-up to commercial size. An industry of nearly 400,000 BPD is anticipated for 1990. The industry could grow to 1,000,000 BPD by the year 2000 with the introduction of second generation processes in the 1990s. The availability of shale oil may have a direct impact on the electric power industry initially. As the refineries improve their ability to handle shale oil, the availability of this fuel to the electric power industry for direct firing will decrease. The offgas from the oil shale industry could be of major importance to the electric power industry. One-quarter to one-third of the energy produced by the oil shale industry will be in the form of offgas (the gas produced in the retorting process). This will usually be a low Btu gas and therefore likely to be utilized on site to make electricity. The high yield of distillate fuels from shale oil could be important to the utility industry's demand for distillate fuels in peak shaving power generation. In addition to the potential supply implications, a shale oil industry and the people to support it will represent a substantial increase in power generation required in the shale oil region.

Gragg, M.; Lumpkin, R.E.; Guthrie, H.D.; Woinsky, S.G.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Gas utilities to increase outlays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite rising natural gas prices and falling consumer demand for gas, experts predict a 16% increase in US gas transmission and distribution expenditures for 1983. Production and storage outlays will probably decrease because of the current gas surplus. The demand for natural gas has been below production levels since 1981. Increases in residential and commercial requirements have been offset by a drop in industrial use, which represents 50% of total gas demand.

O'Donnell, J.P.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand increases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Harnessing the power of demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response can provide a series of economic services to the market and also provide ''insurance value'' under low-likelihood, but high-impact circumstances in which grid reliablity is enhanced. Here is how ISOs and RTOs are fostering demand response within wholesale electricity markets. (author)

Sheffrin, Anjali; Yoshimura, Henry; LaPlante, David; Neenan, Bernard

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

China, India demand cushions prices  

SciTech Connect

Despite the hopes of coal consumers, coal prices did not plummet in 2006 as demand stayed firm. China and India's growing economies, coupled with solid supply-demand fundamentals in North America and Europe, and highly volatile prices for alternatives are likely to keep physical coal prices from wide swings in the coming year.

Boyle, M.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Oil Crop Potential for Biodiesel Production: Summary of Three Years of Spring Mustard Research -- Methodologies, Results, and Recommendations; 2000-2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes a project whose goal was to support R&D to develop an oil-seed crop that has the potential to reduce the feedstock cost of biodiesel to between 7 and 8 cents per pound of oil and expand supplies of biodiesel as demand for biodiesel grows. The key to this goal is that the non-oil fraction of the oil crop (the seed meal) must have a high value outside of the animal feed markets and produce oil that is not suitable for human consumption. To that end, a spring breeding program was developed to increase diversity of glucosinolate and the concentration of glucosinolates in the meal and to optimize the oil composition for biodiesel fuels. This report presents the research on the spring planted hybrids.

Brown, J.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Economic Effects of High Oil Prices (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The AEO2006 projections of future energy market conditions reflect the effects of oil prices on the macroeconomic variables that affect oil demand, in particular, and energy demand in general. The variables include real GDP growth, inflation, employment, exports and imports, and interest rates.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Demand Response for Ancillary Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Shale oil cracking. 2. Effect on oil composition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results from spectroscopic investigations are presented that demonstrate the effect of oil cracking on shale oil composition. Techniques used include infrared spectroscopy, capillary column gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy and /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance. We show that cracking causes an increase in aromatic and alkene content of the oil. We compare our results for oils prepared in the laboratory with oils prepared in the TOSCO-II semi-works and in modified and true-in-situ combustion retorts. We demonstrate that the napthalene/2-methyl-naphthalene ratio is a good indicator of cracking conditions in an oil shale retort.

Burnham, A.K.; Sanborn, R.H.; Crawford, R.W.; Newton, J.C.; Happe, J.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Electric Demand Cost Versus Labor Cost: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric Utility companies charge industrial clients for two things: demand and usage. Depending on type of business and hours operation, demand cost could be very high. Most of the operations scheduling in a plant is achieved considering labor cost. For small plants, it is quite possible that a decrease in labor could result in an increase in electric demand and cost or vice versa. In this paper two cases are presented which highlight the dependence of one on other.

Agrawal, S.; Jensen, R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California Title Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California...

409

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the average and maximum peak demand savings. The electricity1: Average and Maximum Peak Electric Demand Savings during

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low-Dip Slope and Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California, Class III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is not just to produce oil from the Pru Fee property, but rather to test which operational strategies best optimize total oil recovery at economically acceptable rates of production and production costs.

Schamel, S.

2001-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

411

Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low-Dip Slope and Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California, Class III  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is not just to commercially produce oil from the Pru Fee property, but rather to test which operational strategies best optimize total oil recovery at economically acceptable rates of production volumes and costs.

Schamel, Steven; Deo, Milind; Deets, Mike

2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

412

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

413

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

414

Electric supply additions are not keeping pace with increased ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... potentially leading to increased calls on emergency demand response programs or even rolling blackouts. ...

415

Shale oil cracking. 1. Kinetics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments were conducted to determine kinetics for thermal cracking of shale oil vapor over shale. Cracking temperatures of 504 to 610/sup 0/C and residence times of 2 to 11 seconds were used. A first-order Arrhenius rate expression and stoichiometry were obtained. Also observed were changes in the oil quality. Cracking decreased the H/C ratio, increased the nitrogen content, and decreased the pour point of the oil. Gas-phase oil cracking is contrasted to liquid-phase oil coking as a loss mechanism in oil-shale retorting.

Burnham, A.K.; Taylor, J.R.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Oil recovery process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An on-site, in-line process and system is claimed for recovering oil from oil-bearing subterranean formations which involves the production, modification, dilution and injection of a polymer solution, preferably consisting essentially of an aqueous solution of a partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide, having injectivity and mobility properties capable of meeting the specific permeability requirements of substantially any subterranean formation to be achieved. The polymer solutions prepared by the process and system can be used as drive fluids for displacing oil (secondary polymer flood) in an oil-bearing formation, as mobility buffers to follow micellar dispersion floods in the conjoint presence of chemical reagents in other chemical floods (e.g., surfactant, caustic, etc.), or they can follow a water flood. The solutions can also be used to promote pipelining of high viscosity crude oil. Irrespective of the use to which the solutions are put, the process and system enable the polymer solutions to be customized, or tailor-made, so to speak, to meet the performance demands of the environment in which they are to be used, whether it be an oil-bearing formation or a pipeline.

Argabright, P.A.; Rhudy, J.S.

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

417

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

global gasoline and diesel price and income elasticities.shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.Habits and Uncertain Relative Prices: Simulating Petrol Con-

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Rising North Dakota oil production and demand spurs two new ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

One of two new refineries being built in North Dakota broke ground this week. The 20,000-barrel-per-day (bbl/d) Dakota Prairie facility is scheduled to be built in 20 ...

419

World Oil Refining Logistics Demand Model "World" Reference Manual  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This manual is intended primarily for use as a reference by analysts applying the WORLD model to regional studies. It also provides overview information on WORLD features of potential interest to managers and analysts.

Information Center

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Oil Price Shocks, Inventories, and Macroeconomic Dynamics,” mimeo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper employs disaggregated manufacturing data to investigate the causes of the time delay between an increase in oil prices and the following slowdown in economic activity. VAR results show that, unlike aggregate GDP, the effect of an oil price shock on new motor vehicles production shows up immediately and is statistically significantly. After one quarter, similar patterns are observed for industries that are oil-intensive or for which motor vehicles constitute a demand-shifter. The continuing fall in manufacturing production then leads the economy into a recession. The paper then estimates a modified linear-quadratic inventory model and shows that this description of the oil price dynamics is consistent with rational behavior by firms. An increase in oil prices leads to a decline in manufacturing sales; partly because the shock catches manufacturers by surprise and partly because of their desire to balance the accelerator and production smoothing motives, manufacturers deviate from the target level of inventories and spread the decline in production over various quarters. Moreover, the dynamics entailed by the structural estimates capture two stylized facts about inventory behavior: procyclicality and persistence.

Ana María Herrera

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand increases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Producing light cycle oil in the cat cracker  

SciTech Connect

The refining industry in the United States uses the catalytic-cracking process primarily to produce gasoline (generally defined as hydrocarbons in the 100-430/sup 0/F boiling range). When compared with other refinery processes, such as hydrocracking, coking, and thermal cracking, cat cracking provides an efficient, inexpensive means of upgrading gas oils and heavy residual oils into gasoline-range products. However, in many other areas of the world, light cycle oil (generally defined as hydrocarbons in the 430-650/sup 0/F boiling range) has a higher value because automobiles are less plentiful. And in the United States many refiners seek seasonal means of increasing light cycle oil (LCO) yields to meet higher wintertime fuel oil demands. The Davison planning group estimates one third of the LCO produced in the United States is derived from cat cracking. Because of the many questions and misunderstandings about light cycle yields and quality from the cat cracker, the aim in this paper is to (1) provide a general overview of ways the industry can change the cat-cracker operation to increase LCO yield, and (2) clear up some misunderstandings about yield and quality.

Ritter, R.E.; Creighton, J.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acknowledgments SUMMARY Electricity Demand ElectricityAdverse Impacts ELECTRICITY DEMAND . . . .Demand forElectricity Sales Electricity Demand by Major Utility

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

The Stock Market Reaction to Oil Price Changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I explore the reaction of the stock market as a whole and of different industries to daily oil price changes. I find that the direction and magnitude of the market?s reaction to oil price changes depend on the magnitude of the price changes. Oil price changes most likely caused by supply shocks have a negative impact while oil price changes most likely caused by shifts in aggregate demand have a positive impact on the same day market returns. In addition to the returns of oil-intensive industries, returns of industries that do not use oil to any significant extent are also sensitive to oil price changes. Finally, I show that both the cost-side dependence and demand-side dependence on oil are important in explaining the sensitivity of industry returns to oil price changes. I am indebted to Louis Ederington. I am grateful for the helpful comments received from Chitru Fernando,

Sridhar Gogineni

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Proceedings: International Workshop on Innovative DSM [Demand Side Management] Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand-side management (DSM) is becoming more important in the utility environment characterized by increasing competition and major uncertainties in demand and supply. EPRI and CIGRE, a leading international organization for the electric power industry, cosponsored this workshop to discuss strategies for designing and implementing DSM programs.

None

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Towards continuous policy-driven demand response in data centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) is a technique for balancing electricity supply and demand by regulating power consumption instead of generation. DR is a key technology for emerging smart electric grids that aim to increase grid efficiency, while incorporating ... Keywords: blink, power, renewable energy, storage

David Irwin; Navin Sharma; Prashant Shenoy

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Quantifying the Variable Effects of Systems with Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantifying the Variable Effects of Systems with Demand Response Resources Anupama Kowli and George, USA Abstract--The growing environmental concerns and increasing electricity prices have led to wider implementation of demand- side activities and created a new class of consumers, called de- mand response

Gross, George

427

EIA - AEO2010 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Electricity Demand Figure 69. U.S. electricity demand growth 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 60. Average annual U.S. retail electricity prices in three cases, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel in three cases, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 62. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 63. Levelized electricity costs for new power plants, 2020 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 64. Electricity generating capacity at U.S. nuclear power plants in three cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035

428

Demand for money in China .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research investigates the long-run equilibrium relationship between money demand and its determinants in China over the period 1952-2004 for three definitions of money –… (more)

Zhang, Qing

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

building demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

430

STEO December 2012 - coal demand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

coal demand seen below 1 billion tons in 2012 for fourth year in a row Coal consumption by U.S. power plants to generate electricity is expected to fall below 1 billion tons in...

431

Thermal Mass and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Mass and Demand Response Speaker(s): Gregor Henze Phil C. Bomrad Date: November 2, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Janie Page The topic of...

432

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference on Building Commissioning: May 4-6, 2005 Motegi,National Conference on Building Commissioning: May 4-6, 2005Demand Response and Commissioning Mary Ann Piette, David S.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Leslie Mancebo (7234) Transportation Demand &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Leslie Mancebo (7234) Transportation Demand & Marketing Coordinator 1 FTE, 1 HC Administrative Vice Chancellor Transportation and Parking Services Clifford A. Contreras (0245) Director 30.10 FTE Alternative Transportation & Marketing Reconciliation Lourdes Lupercio (4723) Michelle McArdle (7512) Parking

Hammock, Bruce D.

434

Dynamic analysis in productivity, oil shock, and recession  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Declining E?ects of Oil-price Shocks . . . . . . . . . . .of IRFs to a 10% Increase in the Oil Price: Case 3 and Caseof IRFs to a 10% Increase in the Oil Price: Before and After

Katayama, Munechika

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Increased oil production and reserves from improved completion techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah. Annual report, September 30, 1993--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Bluebell field produces from the Tertiary lower Green River and Wasatch Formations of the Uinta Basin, Utah. The productive interval consists of thousands of feet of interbedded fractured clastic and carbonate beds deposited in a fluvial-dominated deltaic lacustrine environment, sandstones deposited in fluvial-dominated deltas; and carbonates and some interbedded sandstones of the lower Wasatch transition deposited in mud flats. Bluebell project personnel are studying ways to improve completion techniques used in the field to increase primary production in both new wells and recompletions. The study includes detailed petrographic examination of the different lithologic reservoir types in both the outcrop and core. Outcrop, core, and geophysical logs are being used to identify and map important depositional cycles. Petrographic detail will be used to improve log calculation methods which are currently highly questionable due to varying water chemistry and clay content in the Green River and Wasatch Formations. Field mapping of fractures and their relationship to basin tectonics helps predict the orientation of open fractures in the subsurface. The project includes acquiring bore-hole imaging logs from new wells in the Bluebell field thereby obtaining detailed subsurface fracture data previously not available. Reservoir simulation models are being constructed to improve the understanding of pressure and fluid flow within the reservoir. A detailed database of well completion histories has been compiled and will be studied to determine which were the most and the least effective methods used in the past.

Allison, M.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Oil and Oil Derivatives Compliance Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for international connection of oiled residues discharge ... C to + 163°C, fuels, lubricating oils and hydraulic ... fuel of gas turbine, crude oil, lubricating oil ...

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

438

AEO Early Release 2013 - oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Growing U.S. oil output and rising vehicle fuel economy to cut Growing U.S. oil output and rising vehicle fuel economy to cut U.S. reliance on foreign oil The United States is expected to continue cutting its dependence on petroleum and liquid fuels imports over the rest of this decade because of growing domestic crude oil production and more fuel-efficient vehicles on America's highways. The new long-term outlook from the U.S. Energy Information Administration shows America's dependence on imported petroleum and liquid fuels will decline from 45 percent of domestic demand last year to 34 percent by 2019. U.S. dependence on imported oil had reached 60 percent as recently as 2005. EIA Administrator Adam Sieminski explains: "The United States will be able to meet more of its own energy needs because of two key

439

Running Out of and Into Oil: Analyzing Global Oil Depletion and Transition Through 2050  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

L. Greene, Janet L. Hopson, and Jia Li L. Greene, Janet L. Hopson, and Jia Li A risk analysis is presented of the peaking of world conventional oil pro- duction and the likely transition to unconventional oil resources such as oil sands, heavy oil, and shale oil. Estimates of world oil resources by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and C. J. Campbell provide alternative views of ultimate world oil resources. A global energy scenario created by the International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis and the World Energy Council provides the context for the risk analysis. A model of oil resource depletion and expansion for 12 world regions is combined with a market equilibrium model of conventional and unconventional oil sup- ply and demand. The model does not use Hubbert curves. Key variables

440

Foreign operators' oil and gas E and D action in Thailand gathering speed  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the pace of foreign operators' exploration and development campaigns in Thailand. A rapidly growing economy is spurring sharp growth in oil and gas demand in Thailand. Correspondingly the Thai government recently embarked on an ambitious energy program that focuses on increasing oil and gas production, expanding gas utilization, and building gas supply ties with neighboring countries. Key to the success of the domestic E D push has been the government's ability to attract foreign investment in Thai E D. although progress is sometimes slow in coming amid tough negotiations, efforts to improve contract terms are yielding green lights for key projects.

1991-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand increases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Industrial Demand Module Table 17. Industry Categories Printer Friendly Version Energy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonenergy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonmanufacturing Industries Food and Kindred Products (NAICS 311) Metals-Based Durables (NAICS 332-336) Agricultural Production -Crops (NAICS 111) Paper and Allied Products (NAICS 322) Balance of Manufacturing (all remaining manufacturing NAICS) Other Agriculture Including Livestock (NAICS112- 115) Bulk Chemicals (NAICS 32B) Coal Mining (NAICS 2121) Glass and Glass Products (NAICS 3272) Oil and Gas Extraction (NAICS 211) Hydraulic Cement (NAICS 32731) Metal and Other Nonmetallic Mining (NAICS 2122- 2123) Blast Furnaces and Basic Steel (NAICS 331111) Construction (NAICS233-235)

442

Estimating disaggregated price elasticities in industrial energy demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Econometric energy models are used to evaluate past policy experiences, assess the impact of future policies and forecast energy demand. This paper estimates an industrial energy demand model for the province of Ontario using a linear-logit specification for fuel type equations which are embedded in an aggregate energy demand equation. Short-term, long-term, own- and cross-price elasticities are estimated for electricity, natural gas, oil and coal. Own- and cross-price elasticities are disaggregated to show that overall price elasticities and the energy-constant price elasticities when aggregate energy use is held unchanged. These disaggregations suggest that a substantial part of energy conservation comes from the higher aggregate price of energy and not from interfuel substitution. 13 refs., 2 tabs.

Elkhafif, M.A.T. (Ontario Ministry of Energy, Toronto (Canada))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Spot Distillate & Crude Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Retail distillate prices follow the spot distillate markets, and crude oil prices have been the main driver behind distillate spot price increases until recently.

444

Coming revolution in world oil markets. [Abetted by conservation, fuel substitution, and better technologies  

SciTech Connect

Dr. Singer feels that a revolution will take place in the world oil market provided government does not enact counterproductive policies, but stands aside to let market forces achieve their inevitable results. He observes that by the end of this decade, and certainly in the 1990s, the free world may require less than half of the oil it uses today - some 20 million barrels per day (mbd) instead of 50 mbd. However, some 75% of this oil, instead of the current 25%, will be refined into gasoline and other motor fuels, while natural gas, nuclear energy and coal in different forms will substitute for most of the fuel oil to produce heat and steam - generally at much lower cost. Oil has become too expensive to burn, and a major adjustment in world-wide use patterns is overdue. Three factors will bring about these dramatic changes: First, new coal technologies: they make it convenient to replace heavy fuel oil in existing oil-fired boilers. Second, advances in refinery technology: they can produce more light products, gasoline and motor fuels, and less heavy fuel oil from a barrel of crude oil. Third, and above all, the laws of economics: higher oil prices, by themselves, encourage conservation and substitution. In addition, large price differentials between higher-quality light crudes and heavy crudes that normally yield less gasoline put a significant premium on refinery upgrading. And wholesale prices for gasoline are greater and are rising faster than those of residual fuel oil. Squeezing out more gasoline can increase the value of a barrel of crude substantially. Dr. Singer notes that the coming revolution is not generally recognized because many of the demand and supply trends are just emerging. He proceeds to discuss the staggering consequences of such a revolution.

Singer, S.F.

1981-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

445

National Action Plan on Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Response Response Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group November 18, 2008 November 18, 2008 Daniel Gore Daniel Gore Office of Energy Market Regulation Office of Energy Market Regulation Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The author's views do not necessarily represent the views of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Presentation Contents Presentation Contents Statutory Requirements Statutory Requirements National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response General Discussion on Demand Response and Energy Outlook

446

World oil flow steady in 1992; stable market ahead for 1993  

SciTech Connect

World crude oil production in 1992 was virtually unchanged from 1991. Production last year averaged 59.96 million b/d, up only 17,000 b/d from 1991. Substantial production declines in the C.I.S. and U.S. were offset by increases among members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and a number of other countries outside the OPEC sphere. Figures from the International Energy Agency (IEA) show world demand for petroleum products moved up 300,000 b/d to 66.9 million b/d. This included an addition to stocks of an estimated 1000,000 b/d. IEA predicts world demand will continue to rise in 1993 and OPEC output will advance to meet this higher level. Even though OPEC production is expected to be up for the year, seasonal swings in demand can cause price fluctuations. The paper describes OPEC production, non-OPEC production, oil prices, the world oil supply, Russian's decline, world demand, and the outlook for 1993.

Beck, R.J.

1993-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

447

STEO September 2012 - oil production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

oil production forecast to rise almost 700,000 bpd this oil production forecast to rise almost 700,000 bpd this year, help cut U.S. petroleum imports U.S. crude oil production is expected to average 6.3 million barrels per day in 2012. That's up nearly 700,000 barrels per day from last year and the highest annual oil output since 1997 says the U.S. Energy Information Administration in its new monthly short-term energy outlook for September. EIA analyst Sam Gorgen explains: "Higher oil supplies, especially from North Dakota and Texas, boosted U.S. oil production. The number of on-shore drilling rigs targeting oil nationwide has increased by around 200 so far this year to just under 1,400 rigs." Higher domestic oil production will help cut U.S. petroleum imports. The share of total U.S.

448

Effects of Microwave Radiation on Oil Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of oil recovery methods have been developed and applied to mature and depleted reservoirs in order to improve the efficiency. Microwave radiation oil recovery method is a relatively new method and has been of great interest in the recent years. Crude oil is typically co?mingled with suspended solids and water. To increase oil recovery

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

H. R. 4564: a bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 to provide a deduction and special net operating loss rules with respect to certain losses on domestic crude oil, to increase tariffs on petroleum and petroleum products, to require the Strategic Petroleum Reserve to be filled with stripper well oil, and to eliminate certain restrictions on the sale of natural gas and on the use of natural gas and oil. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, April 10, 1986  

SciTech Connect

The Secure Energy Supply Act of 1986 amends the Internal Revenue Code of 1954. Title I provides a deduction and special net operating loss treatment for certain losses on crude oil. Title II increases tariffs on petroleum and petroleum products, the revenues of which will cover authorized refunds. Title III provides that only stripper well oil or oil exchanged for stripper well oil will be used to fill the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Title IV removes wellhead price controls and repeals Natural Gas Act jurisdiction over certain first sales of natural gas. Later titles repeal certain restrictions on the use of natural gas and petroleum, repeal incremental pricing requirements, and promote flexibility in rescheduling or marking down troubled loans. The bill was referred to the House Committees on Ways and Means, Energy and Commerce, and Banking, Finance, and Urban Affairs.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals. Presented atand Automated Demand Response in Industrial RefrigeratedActions for Industrial Demand Response in California. LBNL-

Mares, K.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Barat, D. Watson. 2006 Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby 2008. Demand Response Spinning ReserveReport 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communications

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Electrical ship demand modeling for future generation warships  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of future warships will require increased reliance on accurate prediction of electrical demand as the shipboard consumption continues to rise. Current US Navy policy, codified in design standards, dictates methods ...

Sievenpiper, Bartholomew J. (Bartholomew Jay)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Successful demand-side management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is a brief summary of a series of case studies of five publicly-owned utilities that are noted for their success with demand-side management. These utilities are: (1) city of Austin, Texas, (2) Burlington Electric Department in Vermont, (3) Sacramento Municipal Utility District in California, (4) Seattle City Light, and (5) Waverly Light and Power in Iowa. From these case studies, the authors identified a number of traits associated with a successful demand-side management program. These traits are: (1) high rates, (2) economic factors, (3) environmental awareness, (4) state emphasis on integrated resource planning/demand side management, (5) local political support, (6) large-sized utilities, and (7) presence of a champion.

Hadley, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Flanigan, T. [Results Center, Aspen, CO (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Definition: Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Demand Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Demand The rate at which electric energy is delivered to or by a system or part of a system, generally expressed in kilowatts or megawatts, at a given instant or averaged over any designated interval of time., The rate at which energy is being used by the customer.[1] Related Terms energy, electricity generation References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Demand&oldid=480555"

455

"End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze...

456

Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Revision Increases  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3,270 3,900 5,096 2009-2011 3,270 3,900 5,096 2009-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 710 879 1,966 2009-2011 Pacific (California) 33 38 25 2009-2011 Louisiana & Alabama 616 790 1,861 2009-2011 Texas 61 51 80 2009-2011 Alaska 394 397 362 2009-2011 Lower 48 States 2,876 3,503 4,734 2009-2011 Alabama 9 9 2 2009-2011 Arkansas 5 12 31 2009-2011 California 427 276 394 2009-2011 Coastal Region Onshore 105 40 118 2009-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 98 22 23 2009-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 192 204 229 2009-2011 State Offshore 32 10 24 2009-2011 Colorado 28 52 71 2009-2011 Florida 8 10 9 2009-2011 Illinois 12 0 6 2009-2011 Indiana 1 0 1 2009-2011 Kansas 49 52 47 2009-2011 Kentucky 4 1 9 2009-2011 Louisiana 100 139 100 2009-2011 North 15 69 16 2009-2011 South Onshore

457

Increased tight oil production, vehicle efficiency reduce ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas overtakes coal as the largest fuel for U.S. electricity generation. ... Over the same period, pipeline imports from Canada fall by 30%, ...

458

Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009 Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009 Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009 Released: September 28, 2010 Next Release: Discontinued Excel Spreadsheet Model - 1994-2009 XLS (1,178 KB) Overview Oil and gas well equipment and operating costs, including coal bed methane costs, stopped their upward trend from the 1990s and fell sharply in 2009. The extremely high oil and gas prices during the first half of 2008 followed by an unprecedented drop to very low prices by the end of the year had a major impact on equipment demand. Operating costs tumbled also because fuel costs were reduced and well servicing rates fell in most areas. The exceptions were in California where electric rates continued to increase, causing a one (1) percent increase in annual operating costs for leases producing from 12,000 feet. Operating cost for coal bed methane wells in the Appalachian and Powder River areas increased because electric rates continued to climb. Due to the timing of the data collection, the cost reported here could be higher than the actual annual average for 2008. However, some production costs (labor and equipment) are not as volatile as drilling, pipe, and other well completion costs, so the effect of the oil and gas prices on collected data may be lessened. Annual average electric rates and natural gas prices are used, which also helps to dampen cost variances.

459

Is Demand-Side Management Economically Justified?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Is Demand-Side Management Economically Justified? With billions of dollars being spent on demand-side management programs in the U.S. every year, the rationale for and performance of these programs are coming under increasing scrutiny. Three projects in the Energy Analysis Program are making significant contributions to the DSM debate. *Total Resource Cost Test Ratio = ratio of utility avoided costs (i.e., benefits) divided by total cost of program (i.e., Administrative Cost + Incentive Cost + Consumer Cost) In May, Joe Eto, Ed Vine, Leslie Shown, Chris Payne, and I released the first in a series of reports we authored from the Database on Energy Efficiency Programs (DEEP) project. The objective of DEEP is to document the measured cost and performance of utility-sponsored energy-efficiency

460

Oil Market Simulation model: model documentation report (Task 13). Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the Oil Market Simulation (OMS) model as used by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide forecasts of world oil prices. In addition, the OMS model is used to examine the market responses to changes in oil demand and supply. The current version of the model provides additional OMS simulation capabilities to its predecessor. It performs not only the price and production simulations as before, but also simulations that converge to a user-specified regional demand, supply, or import level. Free world countries are grouped into seven major oil demand regions and eight major oil supply regions. The OMS model consists of three parts: oil demand, non-OPEC oil supply, and OPEC pricing behavior. Regional oil demand in a given year is determined as a function of the average world oil price for the year, the regional level of economic activity for the year, and the oil demand in the previous year. Non-OPEC regional oil supply is specified as a function of world oil price and the regional oil supply in the previous period. OPEC pricing behavior is related to the OPEC capacity utilization rate; OPEC sets the oil price based on the percent utilization of its availabile production capacity and the world oil price in the previous time period. Besides the behavior rules of consumers, non-OPEC producers, and OPEC producers, the OMS model includes some regional demand and supply values that are determined exogenously. These user-determined demand and supply values include: (1) OPEC demand, (2) US Strategic Petroleum reserve fill rates, and (3) the net exports from Centrally Planned Economies. 19 refs., 7 figs., 10 tabs.

Not Available

1985-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil demand increases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.