Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

2

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)"

3

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

4

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

5

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

6

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",,,," "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)",,"LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion",,"NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)"

7

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)"

8

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" 6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)"

9

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

10

Table 40. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code 0. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 40. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 NAICS Code June 30, 2013 March 31, 2013 June 30, 2012 Percent Change (June 30) 2013 versus 2012 311 Food Manufacturing 875 926 1,015 -13.9 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 26 17 19 35.8 313 Textile Mills 22 22 25 -13.9 315 Apparel Manufacturing w w w w 321 Wood Product Manufacturing w w w w 322 Paper Manufacturing 570 583

11

Table 35. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 35. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date NAICS Code April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change 311 Food Manufacturing 2,256 2,561 1,864 4,817 4,343 10.9 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 38 50 48 88 95 -7.7 313 Textile Mills 31 29 21 60 59 2.2 315 Apparel Manufacturing w w w w w w 321 Wood Product Manufacturing w w w

12

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

13

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

14

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million"

15

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"

16

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Row"

17

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Row"

18

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"

19

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

20

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Row"

22

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Factors"

23

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

24

Table 28. U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 28. U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date NAICS Code April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change 311 Food Manufacturing 2,214 2,356 1,994 4,570 4,353 5.0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 48 37 53 85 90 -5.6 313 Textile Mills 31 29 22 59 63 -6.1 315 Apparel Manufacturing w w w w w w 321 Wood Product Manufacturing w w w w w w 322 Paper Manufacturing

25

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Coal(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other(f)","Factors"

26

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

11 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 11 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Coal(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other(f)"

27

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)"

28

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

29

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Energy",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)","Factors"

30

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)","Factors"

31

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.4 Number of Establishments by Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" 2.4 Number of Establishments by Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any Combustible" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)"

32

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" 6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)"," Gas(c)","NGL(d)","(million","(million ","Other(e)","Row"

33

"Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

for Table 5.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"...

34

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " 7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Electricity Receipts(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Receipts(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)"," "

35

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE"

36

,,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,," Alternative...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Standard Errors for Table 10.5;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total","...

37

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

38

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

39

,,"Distillate Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Standard Errors for Table 10.9;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total","...

40

,,"Distillate Fuel Oil",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.8;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total","...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)","Row"

42

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

43

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)"

44

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" N4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

45

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

46

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

47

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)"

48

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)"

49

Table 29. Average Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 29. Average Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date NAICS Code April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change 311 Food Manufacturing 51.17 49.59 50.96 50.35 50.94 -1.2 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 111.56 115.95 113.47 113.49 117.55 -3.5 313 Textile Mills 115.95 118.96 127.41 117.40 128.07 -8.3 315 Apparel Manufacturing

50

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)",,"LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion",,"NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)",,"(million kWh)",,"(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)",,"(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

51

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)",,"NGL(e)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1186,,251,,26,16,635,,3,,147,1,107 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",317,,53,,2,1,118,,"*",,114,0,30

52

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

53

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1113,258,12,22,579,5,182,2,54 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",346,57,"*",1,121,"*",126,0,41

54

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,,,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)",,"NGL(e)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1124,,251,,26,16,635,,3,,147,1,45 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",316,,53,,2,1,118,,"*",,114,0,28

55

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"LPG(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)"

56

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"LPG(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

57

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Natural Gas(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Distillate","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)"

58

Gasification of Coal and Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... , said the Gas Council is spending £120,000 this year on research into coal gasification, and the National Coal Board and the Central Electricity Generating Board £680,000 and ... coal utilization. The Gas Council is spending about £230,000 on research into the gasification of oil under a programme intended to contribute also to the improvement of the economics ...

1960-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

59

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and usually coal derived.

Knudson, Curtis L. (Grand Forks, ND); Timpe, Ronald C. (Grand Forks, ND)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Coal-oil slurry preparation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pumpable slurry of pulverized coal in a coal-derived hydrocarbon oil carrier which slurry is useful as a low-ash, low-sulfur clean fuel, is produced from a high sulfur-containing coal. The initial pulverized coal is separated by gravity differentiation into (1) a high density refuse fraction containing the major portion of non-coal mineral products and sulfur, (2) a lowest density fraction of low sulfur content and (3) a middlings fraction of intermediate sulfur and ash content. The refuse fraction (1) is gasified by partial combustion producing a crude gas product from which a hydrogen stream is separated for use in hydrogenative liquefaction of the middlings fraction (3). The lowest density fraction (2) is mixed with the liquefied coal product to provide the desired fuel slurry. Preferably there is also separately recovered from the coal liquefaction LPG and pipeline gas.

Tao, John C. (Perkiomenville, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment...

62

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

0 Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy...

63

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment...

64

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 13,269 13,265 144 2,416 10,373 4,039 64 7 1,538 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 602 602 9 204 489 268 30 0 140 311221 Wet Corn Milling 59 59 W 28 50 36 15 0 29 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 73 73 3 36 67 12 W 7 14 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 987 987 17 207 839 503 W 0 210 3115 Dairy Products 998 998 12 217 908

65

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process is described. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and is usually coal-derived.

Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

66

Oil from Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... sources are not capable of indefinite expansion, since their industrial stability is dependent upon adequate markets for the main products—coke of various kinds or gas. They were, however, ... gallon and remain in operation until 1950, and that it should be extended to include diesel oil used in motor vehicles. It might be feared that this extension would involve ...

C. H. LANDER

1938-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

67

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;...

68

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit:...

69

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit:...

70

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;...

71

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit:...

72

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit:...

73

Too much coal, too little oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Our main message is that it is optimal to use less coal and more oil once one takes account of coal being a backstop which emits much more CO2 than oil. The way of achieving this is to have a steeply rising carbon tax during the initial oil-only phase, a less-steeply rising carbon tax during the intermediate phase where oil and coal are used alongside each other and the following coal-only phase, and a flat carbon tax during the final renewables-only phase. The “laissez-faire” outcome uses coal forever or starts with oil until it is no longer cost-effective to do so and then switches to coal. We also analyze the effects on the optimal transition times and carbon tax of a carbon-free, albeit expensive backstop (solar or wind energy). Subsidizing renewables to just below the cost of coal does not affect the oil-only phase. The gain in green welfare dominates the welfare cost of the subsidy if the subsidy gap is small and the global warming challenge is acute. Without a carbon tax a prohibitive coal tax leads to less oil left in situ and substantially delays introduction of renewables, but curbs global warming substantially as coal is never used. Finally, we characterize under general conditions what the optimal sequencing oil and coal looks like.

Frederick van der Ploeg; Cees Withagen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- -- 62 6 838 1 417 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487

75

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

76

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 7.1 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping Liquor Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Waste Gases Waste Oils Industrial Wood Byproducts and Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum Electricity from Local Other than Distillate Diesel Distillate Residual Blast Furnace Coke Oven (excluding or LPG and Natural Gas

77

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping Liquor Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Waste Gases Waste Oils Industrial Wood Byproducts and Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum Electricity from Local Other than Distillate Diesel Distillate Residual Blast Furnace

78

Chapter 2: BACKGROUND (I) Description of the coal Conversion and Oil Shale Retorting Fuel Cycles 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil shale 2.2 Coal and Oil Shale Resources energy systems retorting. Coal and oil shale resources are

unknown authors

79

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving...

80

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;" " Unit:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2002; " " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;" " Unit:...

82

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.3. Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of...

83

Process for heating coal-oil slurries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Controlling gas to slurry volume ratio to achieve a gas holdup of about 0.4 when heating a flowing coal-oil slurry and a hydrogen containing gas stream allows operation with virtually any coal to solvent ratio and permits operation with efficient heat transfer and satisfactory pressure drops. The critical minimum gas flow rate for any given coal-oil slurry will depend on numerous factors such as coal concentration, coal particle size distribution, composition of the solvent (including recycle slurries), and type of coal. Further system efficiency can be achieved by operating with multiple heating zones to provide a high heat flux when the apparent viscosity of the gas saturated slurry is highest. Operation with gas flow rates below the critical minimum results in system instability indicated by temperature excursions in the fluid and at the tube wall, by a rapid increase and then decrease in overall pressure drop with decreasing gas flow rate, and by increased temperature differences between the temperature of the bulk fluid and the tube wall. At the temperatures and pressures used in coal liquefaction preheaters the coal-oil slurry and hydrogen containing gas stream behaves essentially as a Newtonian fluid at shear rates in excess of 150 sec[sup [minus]1]. The gas to slurry volume ratio should also be controlled to assure that the flow regime does not shift from homogeneous flow to non-homogeneous flow. Stable operations have been observed with a maximum gas holdup as high as 0.72. 29 figs.

Braunlin, W.A.; Gorski, A.; Jaehnig, L.J.; Moskal, C.J.; Naylor, J.D.; Parimi, K.; Ward, J.V.

1984-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

84

Process for heating coal-oil slurries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Controlling gas to slurry volume ratio to achieve a gas holdup of about 0.4 when heating a flowing coal-oil slurry and a hydrogen containing gas stream allows operation with virtually any coal to solvent ratio and permits operation with efficient heat transfer and satisfactory pressure drops. The critical minimum gas flow rate for any given coal-oil slurry will depend on numerous factors such as coal concentration, coal particle size distribution, composition of the solvent (including recycle slurries), and type of coal. Further system efficiency can be achieved by operating with multiple heating zones to provide a high heat flux when the apparent viscosity of the gas saturated slurry is highest. Operation with gas flow rates below the critical minimum results in system instability indicated by temperature excursions in the fluid and at the tube wall, by a rapid increase and then decrease in overall pressure drop with decreasing gas flow rate, and by increased temperature differences between the temperature of the bulk fluid and the tube wall. At the temperatures and pressures used in coal liquefaction preheaters the coal-oil slurry and hydrogen containing gas stream behaves essentially as a Newtonian fluid at shear rates in excess of 150 sec.sup. -1. The gas to slurry volume ratio should also be controlled to assure that the flow regime does not shift from homogeneous flow to non-homogeneous flow. Stable operations have been observed with a maximum gas holdup as high as 0.72.

Braunlin, Walter A. (Spring, TX); Gorski, Alan (Lovington, NM); Jaehnig, Leo J. (New Orleans, LA); Moskal, Clifford J. (Oklahoma City, OK); Naylor, Joseph D. (Houston, TX); Parimi, Krishnia (Allison Park, PA); Ward, John V. (Arvada, CO)

1984-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

85

"Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.4;" 3.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)" ,,"Total United States"

86

"Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.4;" 2.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any Combustible" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",27.5,"X",42,39.5,62,"X",0,9.8

87

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

88

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3

89

Use of coal liquefaction catalysts for coal/oil coprocessing and heavy oil upgrading  

SciTech Connect

The catalytic hydrogenation of coal and model solvents using dispersed or supported catalysts at different pressures has been the focus of several recent studies at PETC. The effectiveness of these catalysts has been studied in coal liquefaction and coal-oil coprocessing. Coal-oil coprocessing involves the co-reaction of coal and petroleum-derived oil or resid. The results of these studies have indicated that both dispersed and supported catalysts are effective in these systems at elevated H{sub 2} pressures ({approximately}2,500 psig). Attempts to reduce pressure indicated that a combination of catalyst concentration and solvent quality could be used to compensate for reductions in H{sub 2} pressure. Comparison of the coal and coprocessing systems reveals many similarities in the catalytic requirements for both systems. Both hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis activities are required and the reactive environments are similar. Also, the use of catalysts in the two systems shares problems with similar types of inhibitors and poisons. The logical extension of this is that it may be reasonable to expect similar trends in catalyst activity for both systems. In fact, many of the catalysts selected for coal liquefaction were selected based on their effectiveness in petroleum systems. This study investigates the use of supported and dispersed coal liquefaction catalysts in coal-oil coprocessing and petroleum-only systems. The focus of the study was delineating the effects of coal concentration, pressure, and catalyst type.

Cugini, A.V.; Krastman, D.; Thompson, R.L. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Federal Energy Technology Center; Gardner, T.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ciocco, M.V.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006; 3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 14,128 14,113 326 1,462 11,395 2,920 67 13 1,240 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 580 15 174 445 269 35 0 148 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 47 W 17 44 19 18 0 18 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 78 78 11 43 61 35 26 13 45 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 1,125 1,125 13 112 961 325 W 0 127 3115 Dairy Product 1,044 1,044 25 88 941 147 W 0 104 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

91

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; 4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 13,269 13,265 144 2,413 10,373 4,039 64 W 1,496 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 602 602 9 201 489 268 30 0 137 311221 Wet Corn Milling 59 59 W 26 50 36 15 0 28 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 73 73 3 36 67 12 11 W 11 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 987 987 17 207 839 503 W 0 207 3115 Dairy Products 998 998 12 217 908 161 W 0 79 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

92

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable, 2006;" 2 Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;" " Unit: Million short tons." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","Coal Consumed ","Unswitchable","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, "

93

NAICS Search | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NAICS Search NAICS Search NAICS Search The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) is the standard used by Federal statistical agencies in classifying businesses. 10000 21000 22000 23000 31000 32000 33000 42000 44000 45000 48000 49000 51000 53000 54000 56000 61000 62000 81000 92000 NAICS uses six-digit codes at the most detailed level, with the first two digits representing the largest business sector, the third designating a subsector, the fourth designating the industry group, and the fifth showing the particular industry. Use the documents below, which are labeled by series, to see Department of Energy facilities that have historically procured goods/services in that

94

Geologic control of natural marine hydrocarbon seep emissions, Coal Oil Point seep field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar Lett (2010) 30:331–338 Fig. 3 Coal Oil Point seep field,hydrocarbon seeps near Coal Oil Point, California. Marhydrocarbon seep emissions, Coal Oil Point seep field,

Leifer, Ira; Kamerling, Marc J.; Luyendyk, Bruce P.; Wilson, Douglas S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Formation of seep bubble plumes in the Coal Oil Point seep field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrocarbon seeps near Coal Oil Point, California. Marof seep bubble plumes in the Coal Oil Point seep field Irameasurement system in the Coal Oil Point seep field in the

Leifer, Ira; Culling, Daniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

NAICS Codes Description:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Codes Codes Description: Filters: Date Signed only show values between '10/01/2006' and '09/30/2007', Contracting Agency ID show only ('8900'), Contracting Office ID show only ('00001') Contracting Agency ID: 8900, Contracting Office ID: 00001 NAICS Code NAICS Description Actions Action Obligation 541519 OTHER COMPUTER RELATED SERVICES 251 $164,546,671 541611 ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGEMENT AND GENERAL MANAGEMENT CONSULTING SERVICES 236 $52,396,806 514210 DATA PROCESSING SERVICES 195 $28,941,727 531210 OFFICES OF REAL ESTATE AGENTS AND BROKERS 190 $6,460,652 541330 ENGINEERING SERVICES 165 $33,006,079 163 $11,515,387 541690 OTHER SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL CONSULTING SERVICES 92 $40,527,088 531390 OTHER ACTIVITIES RELATED TO REAL ESTATE 79 -$659,654 337214 OFFICE FURNITURE (EXCEPT WOOD) MANUFACTURING 78 $1,651,732

97

Testing for market integration crude oil, coal, and natural gas  

SciTech Connect

Prompted by the contemporaneous spike in coal, oil, and natural gas prices, this paper evaluates the degree of market integration both within and between crude oil, coal, and natural gas markets. Our approach yields parameters that can be readily tested against a priori conjectures. Using daily price data for five very different crude oils, we conclude that the world oil market is a single, highly integrated economic market. On the other hand, coal prices at five trading locations across the United States are cointegrated, but the degree of market integration is much weaker, particularly between Western and Eastern coals. Finally, we show that crude oil, coal, and natural gas markets are only very weakly integrated. Our results indicate that there is not a primary energy market. Despite current price peaks, it is not useful to think of a primary energy market, except in a very long run context.

Bachmeier, L.J.; Griffin, J.M. [Texas A& amp; M Univ, College Station, TX (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Process for converting heavy oil deposited on coal to distillable oil in a low severity process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing oil from coal fines that have been agglomerated or blended with heavy oil comprises the steps of heating the coal fines to temperatures over 350.degree. C. up to 450.degree. C. in an inert atmosphere, such as steam or nitrogen, to convert some of the heavy oil to lighter, and distilling and collecting the lighter oils. The pressure at which the process is carried out can be from atmospheric to 100 atmospheres. A hydrogen donor can be added to the oil prior to deposition on the coal surface to increase the yield of distillable oil.

Ignasiak, Teresa (417 Heffernan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Strausz, Otto (13119 Grand View Drive, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Ignasiak, Boleslaw (417 heffernan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Janiak, Jerzy (17820 - 76 Ave., Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Pawlak, Wanda (3046 - 11465 - 41 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Szymocha, Kazimierz (3125 - 109 Street, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Turak, Ali A. (Edmonton, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

"Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.4;" 4.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",0.4,0.4,19.4,9,2,6.9,5.4,0,10.3

100

Production of Oil from Coal in Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... British Commonwealth there are cheaper supplies of coal than in Great Britain, as well as reserves of brown coal and ... of brown coal and lignite. Dr. Parker stated that bombing attacks between May and September 1944 caused a reduction ...

1947-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 14,128 14,109 326 1,462 11,395 2,920 67 13 1,149 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 580 15 174 445 269 35 0 144 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 47 W 17 44 19 18 0 17 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 78 78 11 43 61 35 26 13 35 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 1,125 1,125 13 112 961 325 W 0 127 3115 Dairy Product 1,044 1,044 25 88 941 147 W 0 95

102

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; 1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any Shipments NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and of Energy Sources Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal Breeze Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Total United States 311 Food 13,269 13,265 151 2,494 10,376 4,061 64 7 1,668 W 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 602 602 9 201 490 286 30 0 165 W 311221 Wet Corn Milling 59 59 W 26 50 36 15 0 29 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 73 73 3 36 67 13 11 7 15 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 987 987

103

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; 1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments Unit: Establishment Counts. Any Shipments NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and of Energy Sources Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal Breeze Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Total United States 311 Food 14,128 14,113 326 1,475 11,399 2,947 67 15 1,210 W 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 580 15 183 449 269 35 0 148 W 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 47 W 17 44 19 18 0 18 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 78 78 11 45 61 35 26 15 45 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 1,125

104

Good-Bye, SIC - Hello, NAICS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page. Welcome to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Manufacturing Web Site. If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page. Welcome to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Manufacturing Web Site. If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Home > Industrial > Manufacturing > Good-Bye, SIC - Hello, NAICS Good-Bye, SIC - Hello, NAICS The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) of the United States, Canada, and Mexico Featured topics are: What is NAICS? Why replace the SIC system? How is NAICS better than SIC? How can data series be adjusted from SIC to NAICS? How is NAICS structured? Is there a source for more information about NAICS? What is NAICS? A new classification system has arrived for manufacturing establishments, and the Energy Information Administration (EIA) has incorporated this new

105

Surface studies of coal, oil, and coal-oil-mixture ash using auger electron spectroscopy and solvent leaching techniques  

SciTech Connect

Fly ash produced by the combustion of coal, oil, and a coal-oil mixture have been studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and solvent leaching techniques. The Auger data indicate that the surface concentration of the metal ions Na, Fe, Mg, Ni, V, and Al as well as S and C increases on going from coal to coal-oil mixture and oil ash. The relative surface enrichments of oil and coal-oil-mixture ash are consistent with a simple model of the ash-formation process, and the results confirm that several toxic metals are significantly enriched on the surface of the ash particles. The Auger data are compared to HCl and tris buffer leachate composition analyses, and in neither case does the leachate give an accurate representation of the surface composition. HCl apparently dissolves large oxide deposits and thus overestimates the surface concentrations of Fe, Al, and V. Conversely, several metallic ions are essentially insoluble in neutral aqueous solutions, so their surface concentration is underestimated by the tris leachate.

Stinespring, C.D.; Harris, W.R.; Cook, J.M.; Casleton, K.H.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Oil shale and coal in intermontane basins of Thailand  

SciTech Connect

The Mae Tip intermontane basin contains Cenozoic oil shales in beds up to 1 m (3.3 ft) thick interbedded with coal and mudstone. The oil shales contain lamosite-type alginite, and give a maximum oil yield of 122 L/MT (29.3 gal/ton). The beds are laterally continuous for at least 1.5 km (1.0 mi), but pass into mudstones toward the basin margin. The oil shales originated when peat swamps close to a steep basin margin were flooded by shallow lakes, allowing algae to replace rooted vegetation. This distinctive oil shale-coal assemblage is known from many small intermontane basins in Thailand, where locally high geothermal gradients suggest potential for hydrocarbons.

Gibling, M.R.; Srisuk, S.; Ukakimaphan, Y.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ",,,"Fuel...

108

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-degradable, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.; Potas, T.A.; DeWall, R.A.; Musich, M.A.

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

109

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-decrepitating, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

Knudson, Curtis L. (Grand Forks, ND); Timpe, Ronald C. (Grand Forks, ND); Potas, Todd A. (Plymouth, MN); DeWall, Raymond A. (Grand Forks, ND); Musich, Mark A. (Grand Forks, ND)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Characterization of coal oil using three-dimensional excitation and emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three-dimensional (3D) excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy is applied to characterize the coal oil. The results show that the 3D fluorescence spectra of coal oil...

Xiao, Xue; Zhang, Yujun; Wang, Zhigang; Jin, Dan; Yin, Gaofang; Liu, Wenqing

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

RCW 79.14 Mineral, Coal, Oil and Gas Leases | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RCW 79.14 Mineral, Coal, Oil and Gas Leases Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: RCW 79.14 Mineral, Coal, Oil and Gas...

112

Beach tar accumulation, transport mechanisms, and sources of variability at Coal Oil Point, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quantification was used at Coal Oil Point (COP), California to study the mechanisms transporting oil/tar fromBeach tar accumulation, transport mechanisms, and sources of variability at Coal Oil Point 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Santa Barbara Channel; Tar; Seeps; Oil slick; Oil

Luyendyk, Bruce

113

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable, 2006;" 4 Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;" " Unit: Million barrels." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","Distillate Fuel Oil","Unswitchable Distillate","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, "

114

"Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)"," Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural","LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)"," Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,3,6,2,4,9

115

An assessment of the potential for coal/residual oil coprocessing  

SciTech Connect

Among the promising new techniques to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels from coal is coal/petroleum coprocessing based upon the use of heavy oil, tar sand bitumen and petroleum residua as ''solvents'' for the conversion of coal. Coprocessing is the simultaneous hydrogenation of coal and heavy oil fractions in specially designed reactors with coal contents by weight ranging from as low as 1% to potentially as high as 50-60% depending upon the technology employed. The results of a study on the potential for coal/residual oil coprocessing in the United States are addressed in this paper.

Huber, D.A.; Lee, Q.; Thomas, R.L.; Frye, K.; Rudins, G.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

NSF Astronomy Senior Review Recommendations for NAIC: NAIC Statement and Implementation Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 NSF Astronomy Senior Review Recommendations for NAIC: NAIC Statement and Implementation Plan for NAIC. These are: 1. Reduce NSF astronomy division support for Arecibo to $8M over the next 3 years; 2. Schedule the survey programs for 80% of the time used for astronomy on the telescope through 2010; 3

117

" Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

establishments using the North American" "Industry Classification System (NAICS). " " (b) Employment Size categories were supplied by the" "Bureau of the Census." " NFNo...

118

" Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" "...

119

" Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; " " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" "...

120

Study on reaction property of China Yangcun coal with heavy oils  

SciTech Connect

The reaction properties in coprocessing of China Yangcun coal with three heavy oils (coal tar, petroleum residua and mixed heavy oil) were investigated at different temperatures and 7.0 MPa cold-initial pressure (H{sub 2}) by using a GJ-02 resonance agitation tube reactor. The analyses of feedstock and reaction residua were conducted with GC-MS and FTIR. Experimental results showed: (1) A quantity of low molecular compounds were dissolved in Yangcun coal and these compounds mostly were preasphaltene. (2) The temperature of the highest conversion of Yangcun coal was 390 C. The highest conversion temperature mainly depended upon the coal property and not upon the categories of heavy oils. (3) Conversion order of coprocessing of Yangcun coal with three heavy oils: coal tar > mixed heavy oils > petroleum residua. Aromatic components in heavy oils were media which produced and transferred active hydrogen during reactions. (4) Ash in the coal had a self-catalytic effect. FeS in the coal was catalyst species during coprocessing of coal with heavy oils. (5) Conversion-time curves of coprocessing of Yangcun coal with petroleum residua at 390 C and 430 C were studied. It was discussed that the coprocessing process could be divided into three stages: beginning high reactivity stage, slower-rate hydrogenation stage and condensation polymerization stage. Reaction rate constant of each stage was also calculated. (6) The reaction mechanism of coprocessing was discussed.

Ling Kaicheng; Shen Jun; Zhou Gangming; Wang Zhizhong [Taiyuan Univ. of Technology (China)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Rock, Mineral, Coal, Oil, and Gas Resources on State Lands (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter authorizes and regulates prospecting permits and mining leases for the exploration and development of rock, mineral, oil, coal, and gas resources on state lands.

122

"Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.4;" 1.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.4;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Any",,,,,,,,,"Shipments" "NAICS",,"Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and",,"of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",0.4,0.4,19.4,8.9,2,6.9,5.4,0,10.1,9.1 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",0,0,21.1,14.7,8.4,13.3,7.9,"X",17.9,9.1

123

TEE-0067 - In the Matter of North Side Coal & Oil Co., Inc. | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 - In the Matter of North Side Coal & Oil Co., Inc. 7 - In the Matter of North Side Coal & Oil Co., Inc. TEE-0067 - In the Matter of North Side Coal & Oil Co., Inc. On December 2, 2009, North Side Coal & Oil Co., Inc. (North Side) filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). The firm requests that it be permanently relieved of the requirement to prepare and file the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form EIA-782B, entitled "Resellers'/Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report." As explained below, we have determined that the request should be denied. tee0067.pdf More Documents & Publications VEE-0081 - In the Matter of North Side Coal & Oil Co., Inc. TEE-0071 - In the Matter of Monroe Oil Company

124

Wetland regulations affecting coal mining and oil and gas operations  

SciTech Connect

Although the total acreage of wetlands in Appalachia is relatively small, the impact of wetlands on coal mining and the oil and gas industry can be significant. Wetlands are strongly protected from degradation and diminution under both federal and state regulatory programs, and both environmental protection groups and the public are concerned about the disturbance of natural wetlands. If an owner or operator of site is unable to obtain an appropriate permit, the presence of wetlands may completely preclude energy development. This article strives to provide an insight into the regulatory scheme surrounding wetlands and the risks of wetlands development.

Tokarz, A.P. [Bowles Rice McDavid Graff & Love, Charleston, WV (United States); Dulin, B.E. [Univ. Center for Environmental, Geotechnical, and Applied Sciences, Huntington, WV (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Gas(e) NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 1 1.2 1.8 1 1.6 0.8 0.9 1.2 0.4 311 Food 1,123 67,521 2 3 567 1 8 * 89 0 311221 Wet Corn Milling 217 6,851 * * 59 * 5 0 11 0 31131 Sugar 112 725 * * 22 * 2 * 46 0 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 1,960 * * 35 * 0 0 1 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 105 7,639 * * 45 * 1 0 11 0 3121 Beverages 85 6,426 * * 41 * * 0 10 0 3122 Tobacco 20 1,213 * * 4 * * 0 1 0 313 Textile Mills 207 25,271 1 * 73 * 1 0 15 0 314

126

Separation and Characterization of Olefin/Paraffin in Coal Tar and Petroleum Coker Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Separation and Characterization of Olefin/Paraffin in Coal Tar and Petroleum Coker Oil ... This technique has been applied to shale oils, tar sands, and petroleum in both the mid-distillate (400-680°F) and gas oil boiling ranges (680-1000°F). ... enables anal. of petroleum high ends, i.e., heavy oils, residua and asphaltenes. ...

Hongxing Ni; Chang Samuel Hsu; Chao Ma; Quan Shi; Chunming Xu

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

127

The spatial scales, distribution, and intensity of natural marine hydrocarbon seeps near Coal Oil Point, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

area) are not well established, either globally or within strong source areas such as near Coal OilThe spatial scales, distribution, and intensity of natural marine hydrocarbon seeps near Coal Oil hydrocarbon seepage from marine environments is an important source of methane and other gases

Washburn, Libe

128

Geologic control of natural marine hydrocarbon seep emissions, Coal Oil Point seep field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geology and gas-phase (methane) seepage for the Coal Oil Point (COP) seep field, one of the worldORIGINAL Geologic control of natural marine hydrocarbon seep emissions, Coal Oil Point seep field constructed from 3D seismic and well data allowed investigation of the relationship between the subsurface

Luyendyk, Bruce

129

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1. Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 1998;" 2.1. Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Floorspace and Buildings;" " Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts." ,,"Approximate",,,"Approximate","Average" ,,"Enclosed Floorspace",,"Average","Number","Number" ,,"of All Buildings",,"Enclosed Floorspace","of All Buildings","of Buildings Onsite","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Onsite","Establishments(b)","per Establishment","Onsite","per Establishment","Row"

130

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2002;" 1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Floorspace and Buildings;" " Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts." ,,"Approximate",,,"Approximate","Average" ,,"Enclosed Floorspace",,"Average","Number","Number" ,,"of All Buildings",,"Enclosed Floorspace","of All Buildings","of Buildings Onsite","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Onsite","Establishments(b)","per Establishment","Onsite","per Establishment","Row"

131

Solvent extraction of bituminous coals using light cycle oil: characterization of diaromatic products in liquids  

SciTech Connect

Many studies of the pyrolytic degradation of coal-derived and petroleum-derived aviation fuels have demonstrated that the coal-derived fuels show better thermal stability, both with respect to deposition of carbonaceous solids and cracking to gases. Much previous work at our institute has focused on the use of refined chemical oil (RCO), a distillate from the refining of coal tar, blended with light cycle oil (LCO) from catalytic cracking of vacuum gas oil. Hydroprocessing of this blend forms high concentrations of tetralin and decalin derivatives that confer particularly good thermal stability on the fuel. However, possible supply constraints for RCO make it important to consider alternative ways to produce an 'RCO-like' product from coal in an inexpensive process. This study shows the results of coal extraction using LCO as a solvent. At 350{sup o}C at a solvent-to-coal ratio of 10:1, the conversions were 30-50 wt % and extract yields 28-40 wt % when testing five different coals. When using lower LCO/coal ratios, conversions and extract yields were much smaller; lower LCO/coal ratios also caused mechanical issues. LCO is thought to behave similarly to a nonpolar, non-hydrogen donor solvent, which would facilitate heat-induced structural relaxation of the coal followed by solubilization. The main components contributed from the coal to the extract when using Pittsburgh coal are di- and triaromatic compounds. 41 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

Josefa M. Griffith; Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Leslie R. Rudnick; Harold H. Schobert [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). EMS Energy Institute

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

Decaking of coal or oil shale during pyrolysis in the presence of iron oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing a fuel from the pyrolysis of coal or oil shale in the presence of iron oxide in an inert gas atmosphere is described. The method includes the steps of pulverizing feed coal or oil shale, pulverizing iron oxide, mixing the pulverized feed and iron oxide, and heating the mixture in a gas atmosphere which is substantially inert to the mixture so as to form a product fuel, which may be gaseous, liquid and/or solid. The method of the invention reduces the swelling of coals, such as bituminous coal and the like, which are otherwise known to swell during pyrolysis. 4 figs., 8 tabs.

Rashid Khan, M.

1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

133

Decaking of coal or oil shale during pyrolysis in the presence of iron oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing a fuel from the pyrolysis of coal or oil shale in the presence of iron oxide in an inert gas atmosphere. The method includes the steps of pulverizing feed coal or oil shale, pulverizing iron oxide, mixing the pulverized feed and iron oxide, and heating the mixture in a gas atmosphere which is substantially inert to the mixture so as to form a product fuel, which may be gaseous, liquid and/or solid. The method of the invention reduces the swelling of coals, such as bituminous coal and the like, which are otherwise known to swell during pyrolysis.

Khan, M. Rashid (Morgantown, WV)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

,,"Distillate Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.9 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.9;" 0.9 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.9;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",8,15,9,21,19,18,0,27,0,41 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0

135

VEE-0081 - In the Matter of North Side Coal & Oil Co., Inc. | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 - In the Matter of North Side Coal & Oil Co., Inc. 1 - In the Matter of North Side Coal & Oil Co., Inc. VEE-0081 - In the Matter of North Side Coal & Oil Co., Inc. On February 25, 2002, North Side Coal & Oil Co., Inc. (North Side) of Milwaukee, Wisconsin filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). In its application, North Side requests that it be excused from filing the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) form entitled "Resellers'/ Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report" (Form EIA-782B). As explained below, we conclude that it is appropriate to excuse North Side from filing the Form EIA-782B from September 2002 until March 2003 because the firm is a "noncertainty firm" and has demonstrated that it will

136

Synthesis of super plasticizer NF-30 from coal coking by product washing oil and performance analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Super plasticizer was synthesized by using coal coking by product washing oil and industrial naphthalene....2 in exhaust (20%). Compared with NF, NF-30 have some advantages in lower cost, high water reducing rate...

Zifang Xu ???; Mingxu Zhang; Wenpei Hu

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Risk-Cost Tradeoff Analysis of Oil vs. Coal Fuels for Power Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examines the economic requirements and health consequences of converting an electrical power generating unit from oil to coal combustion at the West Springfield, MA Generating Station. Three alterna...

Lawrence B. Gratt; Gregory S. Kowalczyk

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 7, No. 2, 2014 115 Copyright 2014 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 7, No. 2, 2014 115 Copyright © 2014 Inderscience fields in Saudi Arabia', Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 7, No. 2, pp.115­131. Biographical economic recovery of oil and gas from a reservoir. The purpose of reservoir management is to control

Mohaghegh, Shahab

139

North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Search Tool |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Search Tool North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Search Tool North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Search Tool The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) is the standard used by Federal statistical agencies in classifying business establishments for the purpose of collecting, analyzing, and publishing statistical data related to the U.S. business economy. NAICS was developed under the auspices of the Office of Management and Budget, and adopted in 1997 to replace the Standard Industrial Classification system. Through our website, you can search for procurement opportunities using your company's NAICS code, and you can learn more about the history of purchasing for your NAICS code at the Department. Visit our Industry Information page to learn more about our procurements by

140

Delayed Coking of Decant Oil and Coal in a Laboratory-Scale Coking Unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fact that coke quality varies with the chemical composition of the precursor feedstock creates a significant incentive to examine the process of coking and how it relates to the composition of the feedstock. ... (7)?Derbyshire, F. J.; Odoerfer, G. A.; Rudnick, L. R.; Varghese, P.; Whitehurst, D. D. Fundamental studies in the conversion of coals to fuels of increased hydrogen content. ... Bituminous coal/petroleum co-cokes were produced by coking 4:1 blends of vacuum resid (VR)/coal and decant oil (DO)/coal at temperatures of 465 and 500 °C for reaction times of 12 and 18 h, under autogenous pressure in microautoclave reactors. ...

Ömer Gül; Leslie R. Rudnick; Harold H. Schobert

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 1998;" 2. Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Establishments" " "," ",,"with Any"," Steam Turbines","Supplied","by Either","Conventional","Combustion","Turbines"," "," "," ","Internal","Combustion","Engines"," Steam Turbines","Supplied","by Heat"," ",," "

142

Coal-oil mixture combustion program: injection into a blast furnace  

SciTech Connect

A chemically stabilized coal-oil mixture (COM) was made and used as an auxiliary fuel in a blast furnace for 44 days. Approximately 485,000 gallons of COM were produced at an on-site COM plant. Composition was 47.9% coal, 47.6% No. 6 oil, 4.0% water, and 0.5% emulsifier. Average injection rates were 3.8 to 13.0 gpm during different periods of the trial. Coal handling equipment, mixing and processing equipment, pumps, piping, fuel lances, and instrumentation are discussed. The blast furnace performance during the trial is compared to a Base Period of injecting No. 6 oil. Blast furnace performance was satisfactory, with one pound of COM replacing one pound of coke or 0.8 pound of No. 6 oil. The production of COM and its usage in a blast furnace is economical and feasible.

Jansto, S.G.; Mertdogan, A.; Marlin, L.A.; Beaucaire, V.D.

1982-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

143

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research  

SciTech Connect

Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Characterization of Liquids Derived From Laboratory Coking of Decant Oil and Co-Coking of Pittsburgh Seam Bituminous Coal with Decant Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(41-43) Co-coking of decant oil/coal blend produced higher coke and gas yields but less liquid product than those of coking. ... When the same decant oil was blended with the Pittsburgh Seam coal and then delayed co-coked, the overhead liquid contained 2.1% gasoline, 3.6% jet fuel, 4.6% diesel, and 88.8% fuel oil on average. ... It is also possible that catalytic cracking reactions may occur via the coal mineral matter (e.g., clays, which are abundant minerals in coals, can serve as cracking catalysts) (Table 1). ...

Ömer Gül; Caroline Clifford; Leslie R. Rudnick; Harold H. Schobert

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

145

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006;" 3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Establishments" ,,,"with Any"," Steam Turbines Supplied by Either Conventional or Fluidized Bed Boilers",,,"Conventional Combusion Turbines with Heat Recovery",,,"Combined-Cycle Combusion Turbines",,,"Internal Combusion Engines with Heat Recovery",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Heat Recovered from High-Temperature Processes",,,," "

146

A case history of a fixed bed, coal-derived oil hydrotreater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the apparent shrinkage in the worldwide supply of liquid hydrocarbon fuels, upgrading of coal-derived liquids to synthetic crude oils will eventually emerge as a commercial entity. Although the Char-Oil-Energy Development (COED) Project has been shelved in the short term, information about the reaction engineering of the upgrading of coal-derived liquids by hydrotreatment in the COED Process should be relevant to upgrading technologies for other coal liquefaction processes. The COED Process was developed by FMC Corporation and the Office of Coal Research (now DOE) in the late 1960's and early 1970's. The process produced a synthetic crude oil, medium Btu gas and char by multi-stage, fluidized bed pyrolysis of coal. The raw coal-tar produced by pyrolysis was upgraded to synthetic crude oil by catalytic, fixed-bed hydrotreatment. Raw coal-tar has different properties from petroleum-derived oils, and upgrading by hydrotreatment is not an off-the-shelf technology. A 30 barrel per day fixed-bed hydrotreater was constructed and operated at the COED pilot plant site. The pilot plant hydrotreater design was based on conventional petroleum residua hydrotreatment technology together with bench-scale hydrotreatment tests performed by ARCO in the 1960's utilizing coal-tars produced in a process development unit. The pilot plant hydrotreater did operate for about four years providing valuable information about the reaction engineering of the hydrotreatment process as well as providing numerous samples for applications studies performed by other DOE contractors and interested potential users of the COED syncrude. Of note, 50,000 gallons of COED syncrude were supplied to the U.S. Naval Ship Engineering Center for shipboard testing in the boilers of the U.S.S. Johnston on November 15–16th, 1973. This paper deals with the reaction engineering of the guard chamber and fixed-bed hydrotreatment reactors at the COED facility. Of major importance is the study of the role of the feedstock (pyrolysis coal-tar) properties and their effects on the catalysts utilized in the reactors. A working kinetic model has been derived that could allow a designer to optimize a particular set of design parameters and a plant operator to determine catalyst life. A quantitative comparison has been made of the effect of metals content of coal-derived oils and petroleum resids on catalyst deactivation.

Marvin I. Greene

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Superclean coal-water slurry combustion testing in an oil-fired boiler  

SciTech Connect

The Pennsylvania State University is conducting a superclean coal-water slurry (SCCWS) program with the objective of demonstrating the capability of effectively firing SCCWS in industrial boilers designed for oil. Penn State has entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to determine if SCCWS (a fuel containing coal with less than 3.0% ash and 0.9% sulfur) can effectively be burned in oil-designed industrial boilers without adverse impact on boiler rating, maintainability, reliability and availability. The project will provide information on the design of new systems specifically configured to fire these clean coal-based fuels. The project consists of three phases: (1) design, permitting, and test planning, (2) construction and start up, and (3) demonstration and evaluation. The boiler testing will determine if the SCCWS combustion characteristics, heat release rate, fouling and slagging behavior, corrosion and erosion limits, and fuel transport, storage, and handling characteristics can be accommodated in an oil-designed boiler system. In addition, the proof-of-concept demonstration will generate data to determine how the properties of SCCWS and its parent coal affect boiler performance. Economic factors associated with retrofitting and operating boilers will be identified to assess the viability of future oil-to-coal retrofits. Progress is reported. 7 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Miller, B.G.; Schobert, H.H.

1990-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

148

NAICS Codes @ Headquarters Description: NAICS Codes used at Headquarters Procurement Services  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Codes @ Headquarters Codes @ Headquarters Description: NAICS Codes used at Headquarters Procurement Services Filters: Signed Date only show values between , Contracting Agency ID show only ('8900'), Contracting Office ID show only ('00001'), Date Signed only show values between '05/01/2011' and '04/30/2012', Last Modified Date only show values between Contracting Agency ID: 8900, Contracting Office ID: 00001 NAICS Code NAICS Description Action Obligation 541519 OTHER COMPUTER RELATED SERVICES 341 $141,587,250.76 531210 OFFICES OF REAL ESTATE AGENTS AND BROKERS 286 $2,204,687.38 541330 ENGINEERING SERVICES 245 $80,827,391.54 611430 PROFESSIONAL AND MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT TRAINING 216 -$1,452,480.09 541611 ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGEMENT AND GENERAL MANAGEMENT CONSULTING SERVICES 206 $67,689,373.27 562910 REMEDIATION

149

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Btu. Wood Residues and Wood-Related Pulping Liquor Wood Byproducts and NAICS or Biomass Agricultural Harvested Directly from Mill Paper-Related Code(a) Subsector and...

150

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy...

151

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column:...

152

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column:...

153

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment...

154

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit:...

155

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment...

156

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit:...

157

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy...

158

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit:...

159

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy...

160

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Oil-soluble coal-liquefaction catalyst screening. [Octoic and naphthenic acids as organic ligands  

SciTech Connect

Experiments were performed to determine the effect of oil-soluble catalysts in direct coal liquefaction. Variables included the metal type (Mo, Co, Ni, Mn and Sn), metal loading (0.01 to 1.0 wt %) and organic ligand (octoic and naphthenic acids). All runs were carried out with Illinois No. 6 coal (Burning Star mine) and SRC-II heavy distillate solvent at 400/sup 0/C for 30 min. under 800 psig (cold) H/sub 2/. Statistical analysis showed that for Mo and Ni, hydrogen consumption and conversion to oil increased with increasing metal concentration. For example, conversion to oil increased from 15.7% without catalyst to 28.5% with addition of 0.1% Mo naphthenate and 26.0% with addition of 0.1% Ni naphthenate. The effect of ligand type on catalyst activity was insignificant, indicating tht neither of the organic acids were influential for coal liquefaction. Oil-soluble catalysts containing Co, Mn and Sn had no significant effect upon coal liquefaction, within the concentration range studied. 6 figures, 5 tables.

Kottenstette, R.J.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" 1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,,"Sales and","Net Demand","RSE" "NAICS"," ",,,"Total Onsite","Transfers","for","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","Transfers In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

163

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2002;" 1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand","RSE" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases"," In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

164

Optimization of experimental conditions for recovery of coking coal fines by oil agglomeration technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The significance of coking coal in the metallurgical sector as well as the meager coking coal reserves across the globe increase the necessity to recover coking coal fines from the fine coking coal slurries generated from coal preparation and utilization activities. Oil agglomeration studies were carried out by varying the experimental conditions for maximum recovery of coking coal fines i.e., yield of the agglomerates. The various operational parameters studied were oil dosage, agitation speed, agglomeration time and pulp density. By using Taguchi experimental design, oil dosage (20%), agitation speed (1100 rpm), agglomeration time (3 min) and pulp density (4.5%) were identified as the optimized conditions. A confirmation experiment has also been carried out at the optimized conditions. The percentage contribution of each parameter on agglomerate yield was analyzed by adopting analysis of variance (ANOVA) statistical method as well as multiple linear regression analysis. The order of influence of the parameters on the agglomerate yield is of the following order: pulp density > oil dosage > agitation speed > agglomeration time. A mathematical model was developed to fit the set of experimental conditions with the yield obtained at each test run and also at the optimized conditions. The experimentally obtained yield was compared with the predicted yield of the model and the results indicate a maximum error of 5% between the two. A maximum yield of 90.42% predicted at the optimized conditions appeared to be in close agreement with the experimental yield thus indicating the accuracy of the model in predicting the results.

G.H.V.C. Chary; M.G. Dastidar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 1, Nos. 1/2, 2008 65 Copyright 2008 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 1, Nos. 1/2, 2008 65 Copyright © 2008 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd. Building the foundation for Prudhoe Bay oil production optimisation using neural networks E-mail: siskd@Bp.com Abstract: Field data from the Prudhoe Bay oil field in Alaska was used

Mohaghegh, Shahab

166

2 Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 2, No. 1, 2009 Copyright 2009 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 2, No. 1, 2009 Copyright © 2009 Inderscience@yahoo.com Hafez Hafez ADCO-PDD, Abu Dhabi Company for Onshore Oil Operation (ADCO), P.O. Box 270, Abu Dhabi Dhabi Company for Onshore Oil Operation (ADCO), P.O. Box 270, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Email

Mohaghegh, Shahab

167

Superclean coal-water slurry combustion testing in an oil-fired boiler  

SciTech Connect

The Pennsylvania State University is conducting a superclean coal-water slurry (SCCWS) program for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania with the objective of determining the capability of effectively firing SCCWS in an industrial boiler designed for heavy fuel oil. Penn State has entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to determine if SCCWS (a fuel containing coal with 3.0 wt.% ash and 0.9 wt.% sulfur) can effectively be burned in a heavy fuel oil-designed industrial boiler without adverse impact on boiler rating, maintainability, reliability, and availability. The project will provide information on the design of new systems specifically configured to fire these clean coal-based fuels. The project consists of four phases: (1) design, permitting, and test planning, (2) construction and start up, (3) demonstration and evaluation (1,000-hour demonstration), and (4) program expansion (additional 1,000 hours of testing). The boiler testing wig determine if the SCCWS combustion characteristics, heat release rate, fouling and slagging behavior, corrosion and erosion limits, and fuel transport, storage, and handling characteristics can be accommodated in an oil-designed boiler system. In addition, the proof-of-concept demonstration will generate data to determine how the properties of SCCWS and its parent coal affect boiler performance. Economic factors associated with retrofitting boilers will be identified

Miller, B.G.; Pisupati, S.V.; Poe, R.L.; Morrison, J.L.; Xie, J.; Walsh, P.M.; Wincek, R.T.; Clark, D.A.; Scaroni, A.W.

1993-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

168

Petrochemicals from oil, natural gas, coal and biomass: Production costs in 2030–2050  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methane, coal and biomass are being considered as alternatives to crude oil for the production of basic petrochemicals, such as light olefins. This paper is a study on the production costs of 24 process routes utilizing these primary energy sources. A wide range of projected energy prices in 2030–2050 found in the open literature is used. The basis for comparison is the production cost per t of high value chemicals (HVCs or light olefin-value equivalent). A Monte Carlo method was used to estimate the ranking of production costs of all 24 routes with 10,000 trials of varying energy prices and CO2 emissions costs (assumed to be within $0–100/t CO2; the total CO2 emissions, or cradle-to-grave CO2 emissions, were considered). High energy prices in the first three quarter of 2008 were tested separately. The main findings are:• Production costs: while the production costs of crude oil- and natural gas-based routes are within $500–900/t HVCs, those of coal- and biomass-based routes are mostly within $400–800/t HVCs. Production costs of coal- and biomass-based routes are in general quite similar while in some cases the difference is significant. Among the top seven most expensive routes, six are oil- and gas-based routes. Among the top seven least expensive routes, six are coal and biomass routes. • CO2 emissions costs: the effect of CO2 emissions costs was found to be strong on the coal-based routes and also quite significant on the biomass-based routes. However, the effect on oil- and gas-based routes is found to be small or relatively moderate. • Energy prices in 2008: most of the coal-based routes and biomass-based routes (particularly sugar cane) still have much lower production costs than the oil- and gas-based routes (even if international freight costs are included). To ensure the reduction of CO2 emissions in the long-term, we suggest that policies for the petrochemicals industry focus on stimulating the use of biomass as well as carbon capture and storage features for coal-based routes.

Tao Ren; Bert Daniëls; Martin K. Patel; Kornelis Blok

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Method for controlling boiling point distribution of coal liquefaction oil product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The relative ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate produced in a coal liquefaction process is continuously controlled by automatically and continuously controlling the ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in a liquid solvent used to form the feed slurry to the coal liquefaction zone, and varying the weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the liquid solvent inversely with respect to the desired weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the distillate fuel oil product. The concentration of light distillate and heavy distillate in the liquid solvent is controlled by recycling predetermined amounts of light distillate and heavy distillate for admixture with feed coal to the process in accordance with the foregoing relationships. 3 figs.

Anderson, R.P.; Schmalzer, D.K.; Wright, C.H.

1982-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

170

Heavy oil (residuum) and heavy oil/coal coprocessing program provides good route to making acceptable fuels from heavy oil and coal  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses aspects and needs for the coprocessing of coal and petroleum residum. (CBS) 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Schulman, B.L.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;" 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",75652,21,5666,347,80993

172

" Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" 4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES"

173

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006;" 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",73242,309,4563,111,78003

174

" Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" 3. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

175

" Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" 4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

176

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

to other energy products" "(e.g., crude oil converted to residual and distillate fuel oils) are excluded." " NFNo applicable RSE rowcolumn factor." " * Estimate less...

177

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"to other energy products (e.g., crude oil converted to residual and distillate" "fuel oils) are excluded." " NFNo applicable RSE rowcolumn factor." " * Estimate less...

178

Delayed coking of decant oil and coal in a laboratory-scale coking unit  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we describe the development of a laboratory-scale delayed coker and present results of an investigation on the recovered liquid from the coking of decant oil and decant oil/coal mixtures. Using quantitative gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR, a study was made of the chemical composition of the distillate liquids isolated from the overheads collected during the coking and co-coking process. {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR analyses of combined liquids from coking and co-coking did not show any substantial differences. These NMR results of coking and co-coking liquids agree with those of GC/MS. In these studies, it was observed that co-coking with coal resulted in a decrease in the paraffins contents of the liquid. The percentage of cycloparaffins, indenes, naphthalenes, and tetralins did not change significantly. In contrast, alkyl benzenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the distillate were higher in the co-coking experiments which may have resulted from the distillation of thermally cracked coal macromolecules and the contribution of these molecules to the overall liquid composition. 40 refs., 3 figs., 13 tabs.

Oemer Guel; Leslie R. Rudnick; Harold H. Schobert [Pennsylvania State University Park, PA (United States). Energy Institute, C205 Coal Utilization Laboratory

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Cracking of simulated oil refinery off-gas over a coal char, petroleum coke, and quartz  

SciTech Connect

The cracking of oil refinery off-gas, simulated with a gas mixture containing methane (51%), ethylene (21.4%), ethane (21.1%), and propane (6.5%), over a coal char, petroleum coke, and quartz, respectively, has been studied in a fixed bed reactor. The experiments were performed at temperatures between 850 and 1000{sup o}C and at atmospheric pressure. The results show that the conversions of all species considered increased with increasing temperature. Ethane and propane completely decomposed over all three bed materials in the temperature range investigated. However, the higher initial conversion rates of methane and ethylene cracking at all temperatures were observed only over the coal char and not on the petroleum coke and quartz, indicating a significant catalytic effect of the coal char on methane and ethylene cracking. Methane and ethylene conversions decreased with reaction time due to deactivation of the coal char by carbon deposition on the char surface and, in the later stage of a cracking experiment, became negative, suggesting that methane and ethylene had been formed during the cracking of ethane and propane. 16 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

Yuan Zhang; Jin-hu Wu; Dong-ke Zhang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan (China). Institute of Coal Chemistry

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Selective enrichment of phenols from coal liquefaction oil by solid phase extraction method  

SciTech Connect

This study focuses on the solid phase extraction method for the enrichment and separation of phenol from coal liquefaction oil. The phenols' separation efficiency was compared on different solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridges, and the effect of solvents with different polarity and solubility parameter on amino-bonded silica was compared for selection of optimal elution solution. The result showed that amino-bonded silica has the highest selectivity and best extraction capability due to two factors, weak anion exchange adsorption and polar attraction adsorption.

Tian, M.; Feng, J. [Taiyuan University of Technoloy, Taiyuan (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Characterization of liquids derived from laboratory coking of decant oil and co-coking of Pittsburgh seam bituminous coal with decant oil  

SciTech Connect

In this study, decant oil and a blend of Pittsburgh seam bituminous coal with decant oil were subjected to coking and co-coking in a laboratory-scale delayed coker. Higher yields of coke and gas were obtained from co-coking than from coking. Coal addition into the feedstock resulted in lighter overhead liquid. GC/MS analyses of gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel show that co-coking of coal/decant oil gave higher quantity aromatic components than that of coking of decant oil alone. Simulated distillation gas chromatography analyses of overhead liquids and GC/MS analyses of vacuum fractions show that when coal was reacted with a decant oil, the coal constituents contributed to the distillable liquids. To address the reproducibility of the liquid products, overhead liquid samples collected at the first, third, and fifth hours of experiments of 6 h duration were evaluated using simulated distillation gas chromatography and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR. NMR analyses of the liquid products showed that, even though there were slight changes in the {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C spectra, the standard deviation was low for the time-dependent samples. Simulated distillation gas chromatography showed that the yields of refinery boiling range materials (i.e., gasoline, jet fuel, diesel, and fuel oil cuts) were reproducible between runs. Fractionation of the overhead liquids into refinery boiling range materials (gasoline, jet fuel, diesel, fuel oil fractions) showed that the boiling range materials and chemical compositions of fractions were found to be reproducible. 54 refs., 17 tabs.

Omer Gul; Caroline Clifford; Leslie R. Rudnick; Harold H. Schobert [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint- Sector: Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Iron and Steel Sector (NAICS 3311, 3312) with Total Energy Input

183

Survey of tar sand deposits, heavy oil fields, and shallow light oil fields of the United States for underground coal gasification applications  

SciTech Connect

A literature survey was conducted to identify areas of the United States where tar sand deposits, heavy oil fields, or shallow light oil fields might be suitably associated with coal deposits for production of oil by in situ thermal recovery methods using heat derived from underground coal gasification (UCG) processes. The survey is part of a Department of Energy-sponsored program to develop new applications for UCG technology in utilizing coal resources that are unattractive for mining. Results from the survey indicate tar sand deposits, heavy oil fields, or light oil fields are probably or possibly located within 5 miles of suitable coal in 17 states (Table 1). Especially promising areas are in the Uinta Basin of Utah; the North Slope of Alaska; the San Miguel deposit in southwest Texas; the Illinois-Eastern Interior Basin area of western Kentucky, southwestern Indiana and Illinois; the tri-state area of Missouri, Kansas and Oklahoma; and the northern Appalachian Basin in eastern Ohio and northwestern Pennsylvania. The deposits in these areas warrant further evaluation. 30 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Trudell, L.G.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Conventional Energy (Oil, Gas, and Coal) Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development Best Practices in Indian Country  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONVENTIONAL ENERGY (OIL, GAS & COAL) FORUM & CONVENTIONAL ENERGY (OIL, GAS & COAL) FORUM & ASSOCIATED VERTICAL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT BEST PRACTICES IN INDIAN COUNTRY March 1, 2012 MANDALAY BAY RESORT AND CASINO NORTH CONVENTION CENTER 3950 Las Vegas Blvd. South, Las Vegas, NV 89119 The dynamic world of conventional energy (focusing on oil, gas and coal energy) is a critical piece of the American energy portfolio. This strategic energy forum will focus on recent trends, existing successful partnerships, and perspectives on the future of conventional energy and how tribal business interests are evolving to meet the interests and needs of new tribal energy economies. The third of a series of planned DOE Office of Indian Energy-sponsored strategic energy development & investment forums, this forum will provide an opportunity for Tribal leaders, federal

185

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

raising transportation oil demand. Growing internationalcoal by wire could reduce oil demand by stemming coal roadEastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Wood Products and Equipment Codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Wood Products and Equipment Codes Louisiana contains NAICS codes and associated SIC codes for wood products and wood products equipment manufacturers, lathes, and routers to shape wood. NAICS SIC Corresponding Index Entries 321912 2426 Blanks, wood (e

187

Co-Firing Oil Shale with Coal and Other Fuels for Improved Efficiency and Multi-Pollutant Control  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale is an abundant, undeveloped natural resource which has natural sorbent properties, and its ash has natural cementitious properties. Oil shale may be blended with coal, biomass, municipal wastes, waste tires, or other waste feedstock materials to provide the joint benefit of adding energy content while adsorbing and removing sulfur, halides, and volatile metal pollutants, and while also reducing nitrogen oxide pollutants. Oil shale depolymerization-pyrolysis-devolatilization and sorption scoping studies indicate oil shale particle sorption rates and sorption capacity can be comparable to limestone sorbents for capture of SO2 and SO3. Additionally, kerogen released from the shale was shown to have the potential to reduce NOx emissions through the well established “reburning” chemistry similar to natural gas, fuel oil, and micronized coal. Productive mercury adsorption is also possible by the oil shale particles as a result of residual fixed-carbon and other observed mercury capture sorbent properties. Sorption properties were found to be a function particle heating rate, peak particle temperature, residence time, and gas-phase stoichmetry. High surface area sorbents with high calcium reactivity and with some adsorbent fixed/activated carbon can be produced in the corresponding reaction zones that exist in a standard pulverized-coal or in a fluidized-bed combustor.

Robert A. Carrington; William C. Hecker; Reed Clayson

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Techno-economic analysis of the coal-to-olefins process in comparison with the oil-to-olefins process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Olefins are one of the most important oil derivatives widely used in industry. To reduce the dependence of olefins industry on oil, China is increasing the production of olefins from alternative energy resources, especially from coal. This study is concerned with the opportunities and obstacles of coal-to-olefins development, and focuses on making an overall techno-economic analysis of a coal-to-olefins plant with the capacity of 0.7 Mt/a olefins. Comparison is made with a 1.5 Mt/a oil-to-olefins plant based on three criteria including energy efficiency, capital investment, and product cost. It was found that the coal-based olefins process show prominent advantage in product cost because of the low price of its feedstock. However, it suffers from the limitations of higher capital investment, lower energy efficiency, and higher emissions. The effects of production scale, raw material price, and carbon tax were varied for the two production routes, and thus the operational regions were found for the coal-to-olefins process to be competitive.

Dong Xiang; Yu Qian; Yi Man; Siyu Yang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

EIS-0083: Final Northeast Regional Environmental Impact Statement; The Potential Conversion of Forty-Two Powerplants From Oil to Coal or Alternate Fuels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Economic Regulatory Administration statement assesses the potential for cumulative and interactive environmental impacts resulting from conversion of up to 42 northeastern power plants from oil to coal and from an alternative “Voluntary Conversion” scenario for 27 power plants.

190

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2010; 9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings; Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts. Approximate Approximate Average Enclosed Floorspace Average Number Number of All Buildings Enclosed Floorspace of All Buildings of Buildings Onsite NAICS Onsite Establishments(b) per Establishment Onsite per Establishment Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million sq ft) (counts) (sq ft) (counts) (counts) Total United States 311 Food 1,115 13,271 107,293.7 32,953 3.1 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 126 602 443,178.6 5,207 24.8 311221 Wet Corn Milling 14 59 270,262.7 982 18.3 31131 Sugar Manufacturing

191

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Industrial Demand Module Table 17. Industry Categories Printer Friendly Version Energy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonenergy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonmanufacturing Industries Food and Kindred Products (NAICS 311) Metals-Based Durables (NAICS 332-336) Agricultural Production -Crops (NAICS 111) Paper and Allied Products (NAICS 322) Balance of Manufacturing (all remaining manufacturing NAICS) Other Agriculture Including Livestock (NAICS112- 115) Bulk Chemicals (NAICS 32B) Coal Mining (NAICS 2121) Glass and Glass Products (NAICS 3272) Oil and Gas Extraction (NAICS 211) Hydraulic Cement (NAICS 32731) Metal and Other Nonmetallic Mining (NAICS 2122- 2123) Blast Furnaces and Basic Steel (NAICS 331111) Construction (NAICS233-235)

192

High opacity white plumes from coal-fired and oil-fired sources  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, with the installation of high efficiency particulate emission control devices on utility and industrial boilers, high-opacity white plumes have become more of a problem because formerly the emissions of primary particulate matter obscured and/or served as a condensing surface for the condensable material. The problem common to some of these installations is the violation of opacity standards due to the presence of a high-opacity persistent plume that emits from the stack. Oil fired boilers violating opacity standards typically comply with mass emission standards while coal fired boilers typically violate visual emission standards when simultaneously violating mass emission standards. The investigation reported here focuses on the atypical case when in-situ transmissometer measurements show compliance but plume opacity as measured by Reference Method 9 or LIDAR exceeds opacity standards. This case comes about due to gas phase reactions that produce fine aerosols, vapor phase condensation and physical agglomeration of sub-micron sized clusters and particles. The plume opacity control technology applicable to these aerosols which are created and/or grown in white plume is discussed in this paper.

Lee, K.T. (National Cheng Kung Univ. (TW))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Reuse of Produced Water from CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery, Coal-Bed Methane, and Mine Pool Water by Coal-Based Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Power generation in the Illinois Basin is expected to increase by as much as 30% by the year 2030, and this would increase the cooling water consumption in the region by approximately 40%. This project investigated the potential use of produced water from CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (CO{sub 2}-EOR) operations; coal-bed methane (CBM) recovery; and active and abandoned underground coal mines for power plant cooling in the Illinois Basin. Specific objectives of this project were: (1) to characterize the quantity, quality, and geographic distribution of produced water in the Illinois Basin; (2) to evaluate treatment options so that produced water may be used beneficially at power plants; and (3) to perform a techno-economic analysis of the treatment and transportation of produced water to thermoelectric power plants in the Illinois Basin. Current produced water availability within the basin is not large, but potential flow rates up to 257 million liters per day (68 million gallons per day (MGD)) are possible if CO{sub 2}-enhanced oil recovery and coal bed methane recovery are implemented on a large scale. Produced water samples taken during the project tend to have dissolved solids concentrations between 10 and 100 g/L, and water from coal beds tends to have lower TDS values than water from oil fields. Current pretreatment and desalination technologies including filtration, adsorption, reverse osmosis (RO), and distillation can be used to treat produced water to a high quality level, with estimated costs ranging from $2.6 to $10.5 per cubic meter ($10 to $40 per 1000 gallons). Because of the distances between produced water sources and power plants, transportation costs tend to be greater than treatment costs. An optimization algorithm was developed to determine the lowest cost pipe network connecting sources and sinks. Total water costs increased with flow rate up to 26 million liters per day (7 MGD), and the range was from $4 to $16 per cubic meter ($15 to $60 per 1000 gallons), with treatment costs accounting for 13 â?? 23% of the overall cost. Results from this project suggest that produced water is a potential large source of cooling water, but treatment and transportation costs for this water are large.

Chad Knutson; Seyed Dastgheib; Yaning Yang; Ali Ashraf; Cole Duckworth; Priscilla Sinata; Ivan Sugiyono; Mark Shannon; Charles Werth

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

POC-SCALE TESTING OF OIL AGGLOMERATION TECHNIQUES AND EQUIPMENT FOR FINE COAL PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the technical progress achieved from July 01, 1997 to September 30, 1997 on the POC-Scale Testing Agglomeration Techniques and Equipment for Fine Coal Processing project. Experimental procedures and test data for recovery of fine coal from coal fines streams generated at a commercial coal preparation plant are described. Two coal fines streams, namely Sieve Bend Effluent and Cyclone Overflow were investigated. The test results showed that ash was reduced by more than 50% at combustible matter recovery levels exceeding 95%.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand...

196

DESULFURIZATION OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Credit Extra Fuel Oil Coal to gasifier Na cost· Na processoiL Replace res. with coal as gasifier feed. 543 ton/day @$

Wrathall, James Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

How important are NAICS and PSC to wining federal contracts? | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

important are NAICS and PSC to wining federal contracts? important are NAICS and PSC to wining federal contracts? BusinessUSA Data/Tools Apps Challenges Let's Talk BusinessUSA You are here Data.gov » Communities » BusinessUSA » Forums How important are NAICS and PSC to wining federal contracts? Submitted by Gregory James on Tue, 04/17/2012 - 12:39pm Log in to vote 3 Small business owners can improve their ability to get federal contracts if they understand the nature and use of the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and Product and Service Codes. The purposes of these codes are to collect, analyze and publish statistical data on economic activity in the United States, Mexico and Canada. The Federal Procurement Data System (FPDS) uses these codes to track federal procurement historyNAICS is a two through six-digit hierarchical

198

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1992  

SciTech Connect

Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

JV Task 5 - Evaluation of Residual Oil Fly Ash As A Mercury Sorbent For Coal Combustion Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

The mercury adsorption capacity of a residual oil fly ash (ROFA) sample collected form Florida Power and Light Company's Port Everglades Power Plant was evaluated using a bituminous coal combustion flue gas simulator and fixed-bed testing protocol. A size-segregated (>38 {micro}g) fraction of ROFA was ground to a fine powder and brominated to potentially enhance mercury capture. The ROFA and brominated-ROFA were ineffective in capturing or oxidizing the Hg{sup 0} present in a simulated bituminous coal combustion flue gas. In contrast, a commercially available DARCO{reg_sign} FGD initially adsorbed Hg{sup 0} for about an hour and then catalyzed Hg{sup 0} oxidation to produce Hg{sup 2+}. Apparently, the unburned carbon in ROFA needs to be more rigorously activated in order for it to effectively capture and/or oxidize Hg{sup 0}.

Robert Patton

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

200

Co-gasification of Biomass with Coal and Oil Sand Coke in a Drop Tube Furnace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From this work, a synergistic effect was observed for blends of coal with petcoke and an increase in the production of H2 and CO was obtained. ... Finally, blending biomass with coal?petcoke blends did not produce any significant change in H2 production, although slight variations were observed in the production of CO and CO2. ... In addn., co-gasification tests of binary blends of a bituminous coal with different types of biomass (up to 10%) and petroleum coke (up to 60%), as well as ternary blends of coal-petcoke-biomass (45-45-10%) were conducted to study the effect of blending on gas prodn. ...

Chen Gao; Farshid Vejahati; Hasan Katalambula; Rajender Gupta

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Co-gasification of biomass with coal and oil sands coke in a drop tube furnace.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Chars were obtained from individual fuels and blends with different blend ratios of coal, coke and biomass in Drop Tube Furnace at different temperatures. Based… (more)

Gao, Chen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Economic Characteristic(b) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 405.4 4.0 2.1 20-49 631.3 4.7 2.2 50-99 832.0 4.9 2.3 100-249 1,313.4 6.2 2.8 250-499 1,905.2 7.4 3.6 500 and Over 4,225.4 7.5 3.1 Total 1,449.6 6.4 2.8 311 FOOD Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 576.6 5.9

203

Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Economic Characteristic(b) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 330.6 3.6 2.0 20-49 550.0 4.5 2.2 50-99 830.1 5.9 2.7 100-249 1,130.0 6.7 3.1 250-499 1,961.4 7.6 3.6 500 and Over 3,861.9 9.0 3.6 Total 1,278.4 6.9 3.1 311 FOOD Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 979.3 10.3

204

Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; 4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Economic Characteristic(b) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Employment Size Under 50 562.6 4.7 2.4 50-99 673.1 5.1 2.4 100-249 1,072.8 6.5 3.0 250-499 1,564.3 7.7 3.6 500-999 2,328.9 10.6 4.5 1000 and Over 1,415.5 5.7 2.5 Total 1,278.4 6.9 3.1 311 FOOD Employment Size Under 50 1,266.8 8.3 3.2 50-99 1,587.4 9.3 3.6 100-249 931.9 3.6 1.5 250-499 1,313.1 6.3

205

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of natural gas, along with the coal reserve base of 326s Fossil Fuel Reserve Base, 2007 Oil Natural Gas Coal 233ensured reserves”) of coal, oil and natural gas published in

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Superclean coal-water slurry combustion testing in an oil-fired boiler. Quarterly technical progress report, November 15, 1989--February 15, 1990  

SciTech Connect

The Pennsylvania State University is conducting a superclean coal-water slurry (SCCWS) program for the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania with the objective of demonstrating the capability of effectively firing SCCWS in industrial boilers designed for oil. Penn State has entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to determine if SCCWS (a fuel containing coal with less than 3% ash and 0.9% sulfur) can effectively be burned in oil-designed industrial boilers without adverse impact on boiler rating, maintainability, reliability, and availability. The project will provide information on the design of new systems specifically configured to fire these clean coal-based fuels. The project consists of three phases: (1) design, permitting, and test planning, (2) construction and start up, and (3) operations and disposition. The boiler testing will determine if the SCCWS combustion characteristics, heat release rate, slagging and fouling factors, erosion and corrosion limits, and fuel transport, storage, and handling can be accommodated in an oil-designed boiler. In addition, the proof-of-concept demonstration will generate data to determine how the properties of SCCWS and its parent coal affect boiler performance. Economic factors associated with retrofitting and operating boilers will be identified to assess the viability of future oil-to-coal retrofits. Progress for this quarter is summarized.

Miller, B.G.; Walsh, P.M.; Elston, J.T.; Scaroni, A.W.

1990-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

207

Weathering and the Fallout Plume of Heavy Oil from Strong Petroleum Seeps Near Coal Oil Point, CA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Similarities in the distribution and relative abundance of hopane biomarkers between all sediment samples, reservoir material from the seep field, and seep oil strongly suggest that oils derived from the Monterey formation, such as those seeping from COP, serve as the primary source of petroleum to these sediments. ... Thus, it is likely that oily sediments resuspended in the bottom waters are transported to the west and settle in a pattern consistent with that observed. ...

Christopher Farwell; Christopher M. Reddy; Emily Peacock; Robert K. Nelson; Libe Washburn; David L. Valentine

2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

208

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United...

209

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" N7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

210

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" 1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

211

" Row: Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Number of Establishments by Participation in Energy-Management Activity, 2002;" 1 Number of Establishments by Participation in Energy-Management Activity, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Participation and Source of Financial Support for Activity;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",,,,," " " "," ",,," Source of Financial Support for Activity",,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","In-house","Other","Don't Know","Factors"

212

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.1. Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" .1. Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row"

213

Desulfurization and de-ashing of a mixture of subbituminous coal and gangue minerals by selective oil agglomeration  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this study was to investigate desulfurization and de-ashing of a mixture of subbituminous coal and gangue minerals by the agglomeration method. For this purpose, experimental studies were conducted on a mixture containing subbituminous coal, pyrite, quartz and calcite. The effects of some parameters that markedly influence the effectiveness of selective oil agglomeration, such as solid concentration, pH, bridging liquid type and concentration, and depressant type and amount, were investigated. Agglomeration results showed that the usage of various depressants (Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}, FeCl3, corn starch, wheat starch) in the agglomeration medium has a positive effect on the reduction of ash and total sulfur content of agglomerates. It was found that an agglomerate product containing 3.03% total sulfur and 25.01% ash with a total sulfur reduction of 56.71% was obtained from a feed that contained 7% total sulfur and 43.58% ash when FeCl{sub 3} was used in the agglomeration medium.

Ayhan, F.D. [Dicle University, Diyarbakir (Turkey). Dept. of Mining Engineering

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Superclean coal-water slurry combustion testing in an oil-fired boiler. Semiannual technical progress report, August 15, 1992--February 15, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Pennsylvania State University is conducting a superclean coal-water slurry (SCCWS) program for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania with the objective of determining the capability of effectively firing SCCWS in an industrial boiler designed for heavy fuel oil. Penn State has entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to determine if SCCWS (a fuel containing coal with 3.0 wt.% ash and 0.9 wt.% sulfur) can effectively be burned in a heavy fuel oil-designed industrial boiler without adverse impact on boiler rating, maintainability, reliability, and availability. The project will provide information on the design of new systems specifically configured to fire these clean coal-based fuels. The project consists of four phases: (1) design, permitting, and test planning, (2) construction and start up, (3) demonstration and evaluation (1,000-hour demonstration), and (4) program expansion (additional 1,000 hours of testing). The boiler testing wig determine if the SCCWS combustion characteristics, heat release rate, fouling and slagging behavior, corrosion and erosion limits, and fuel transport, storage, and handling characteristics can be accommodated in an oil-designed boiler system. In addition, the proof-of-concept demonstration will generate data to determine how the properties of SCCWS and its parent coal affect boiler performance. Economic factors associated with retrofitting boilers will be identified

Miller, B.G.; Pisupati, S.V.; Poe, R.L.; Morrison, J.L.; Xie, J.; Walsh, P.M.; Wincek, R.T.; Clark, D.A.; Scaroni, A.W.

1993-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

215

Reuse of Produced Water from CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery, Coal-Bed Methane, and Mine Pool Water by Coal-Based Power Plants: ProMIS/Project No.: DE-NT0005343  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

seyed Dastgheib seyed Dastgheib Principal Investigator Illinois State Geological Survey 615 E. Peabody Drive Champaign, Illinois 61820-6235 217-265-6274 dastgheib@isgs.uius.edu Reuse of PRoduced WateR fRom co 2 enhanced oil RecoveRy, coal-Bed methane, and mine Pool WateR By coal-Based PoWeR Plants: PRomis /PRoject no. : de-nt0005343 Background Coal-fired power plants are the second largest users of freshwater in the United States. In Illinois, the thermoelectric power sector accounts for approximately 84 percent of the estimated 14 billion gallons per day of freshwater withdrawals and one-third of the state's 1 billion gallons per day of freshwater consumption. Illinois electric power generation capacity is projected to expand 30 percent by 2030, increasing water consumption by

216

Low temperature pyrolysis of coal or oil shale in the presence of calcium compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coal pyrolysis technique or process is described in which particulate coal is pyrolyzed in the presence of about 5 to 21 wt. % of a calcium compound selected from calcium oxide, calcined (hydrate) dolomite, or calcined calcium hydrate to produce a high quality hydrocarbon liquid and a combustible product gas which are characterized by low sulfur content. The pyrolysis is achieved by heating the coal-calcium compound mixture at a relatively slow rate at a temperature of about 450.degree. to 700.degree. C. over a duration of about 10 to 60 minutes in a fixed or moving bed reactor. The gas exhibits an increased yield in hydrogen and C.sub.1 -C.sub.8 hydrocarbons and a reduction in H.sub.2 S over gas obtainable by pyrolyzing cola without the calcium compound. The liquid product obtained is of a sufficient quality to permit its use directly as a fuel and has a reduced sulfur and oxygen content which inhibits polymerization during storage.

Khan, M. Rashid (Morgantown, WV)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Characteristics of process oils from HTI coal/plastics co-liquefaction runs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to provide timely analytical support to DOE`s liquefaction development effort. Specific objectives of the work reported here are: (1) to determine the fate of the plastics feedstocks, relative to coal-only operation; (2) to determine the conversion of the feedstocks; (3) to determine the product streams to which the feedstocks are converted (bottoms vs. distillate); (4) to determine interactions of feedstocks; (5) to determine how use of plastics feedstocks affect product quality; and (6) to determine to what degree property differences reflect feedstock differences vs. other (process) condition changes, such as unit operations, space velocity, and catalyst age.

Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

Chemicals Sector (NAICS 325) Energy and GHG Combustion Emissions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

U.S. economy, converting raw materials such as petroleum, natural gas, minerals, coal, air, and water into more than 70,000 diverse products. Chemical products are critical...

219

The relationship among oil, natural gas and coal consumption and economic growth in BRICTS (Brazil, Russian, India, China, Turkey and South Africa) countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The causality relationship between economic growth and coal, natural gas and oil consumption was investigated using the ARDL (autoregressive distributed lag bounds) testing approach for the 1980–2011 period in Brazil, Russian, India, China, Turkey and South Africa. According to long-run and strong causality results, there is bi-directional causality between oil energy consumption and Y for all countries. The long-run causality and strong causality results between coal consumption and economic growth indicated that there is bi-directional causality for China and India. According to long-run causality results and a strong causality result, there are bi-directional causality relationships between NGC (natural gas energy consumption) and Y for Brazil, Russia and Turkey.

Melike E. Bildirici; Tahsin Bakirtas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" 1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",879.8,5,2.2 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",6416.6,17.5,5.7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

" Row: General Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Number of Establishments by Participation in General Energy-Management Activities, 2006;" 1 Number of Establishments by Participation in General Energy-Management Activities, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: General Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Participation and Source of Assistance;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,," Source of Assistance" "NAICS Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","In-house","Utlity/Energy Suppler","Product/Service Provider","Federal Program","State/Local Program","Don't Know" ,,"Total United States"

222

" Row: Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C9.1. Number of Establishments by Participation in Energy-Management Activity, 1998;" C9.1. Number of Establishments by Participation in Energy-Management Activity, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Participation and General Amounts of Establishment-Paid Activity Cost;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,"General","Amount of ","Establishment-Paid","Activity Cost","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,,,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","All","Some","None","Don't Know","Factors"

223

" Row: Industry-Specific Technologies within Selected NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Number of Establishments by Usage of Energy-Saving Technologies for Specific Industries, 1998;" 3. Number of Establishments by Usage of Energy-Saving Technologies for Specific Industries, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Industry-Specific Technologies within Selected NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ",,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry-Specific Technology","In Use(b)","Not in Use","Don't Know","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",1.3,0.5,1.5 , 311,"FOOD" ," Infrared Heating",762,13727,2064,1.8 ," Microwave Drying",270,14143,2140,2.5

224

Fluidised bed co-gasification of coal and olive oil industry wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Co-gasification of bagasse wastes mixed with coal is technically feasible, without major installation changes. The effect of experimental conditions on co-gasification process was analysed, to enhance gas production and improve its composition and energetic content. The rise of bagasse content increased tars and gaseous hydrocarbons contents, which can be reduced by increasing gasification temperature and/or air flow rate. The rise of temperature till 890 °C favoured hydrocarbons further reactions and allowed an increase of 45% in hydrogen release and a decrease in gaseous hydrocarbons of 55%. A reduction of around 30% in gaseous hydrocarbons was also achieved by rising O2/fuel ratio till 0.6 g/g daf, which decreased gas heating value, due to nitrogen diluting effect. Though no significant changes in gaseous hydrocarbons composition were obtained, the presence of dolomite in the fluidised bed had the benefit of decreasing tars content and rising gas yield, being the gas richer in hydrogen content.

Rui Neto André; Filomena Pinto; Carlos Franco; M. Dias; I. Gulyurtlu; M.A.A. Matos; I. Cabrita

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Coal-water slurry fuel combustion testing in an oil-fired industrial boiler. Semiannual technical progress report, February 15--August 15, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The project consists of four phases: (1) design, permitting, and test planning, (2) construction and start up, (3) demonstration and evaluation (1,000-hour demonstration), and (4) expanded demonstration and evaluation (installing a CWSF preparation circuit, performing baseline tests firing No. 6 fuel oil, and conducting additional CWSF testing). The boiler testing and evaluation will determine if the CWSF combustion characteristics, heat release rate, fouling and slagging behavior, corrosion and erosion tendencies, and fuel transport, storage, and handling characteristics can be accommodated in a boiler system designed to fire heavy fuel oil. In addition, the proof-of-concept demonstration will generate data to determine how the properties of a CWSF and its parent coal affect boiler performance. The economic factors associated with retrofitting boilers is also evaluated. The first three phases have been completed and the combustion performance of the burner that was provided with the boiler did not meet performance goals. A maximum coal combustion efficiency of 95% (compared to a target of 98%) was achieved and natural gas cofiring (15% of the total thermal input) was necessary to maintain a stable flame. Consequently, the first demonstration was terminated after 500 hours. The second CWSF demonstration (Phase 4) was conducted with a proven coal-designed burner. Prior to starting the second demonstration, a CWSF preparation circuit was constructed to provide flexibility in CWSF production. The circuit initially installed involved single-stage grinding. A regrind circuit was recently installed and was evaluated. A burner was installed from ABB Combustion Engineering (ABB/CE) and was used to generate baseline data firing No. 6 fuel oil and fire CWSF. A temporary storage system for No. 6 fuel oil was installed and modifications to the existing CWSF handling and preheating system were made to accommodate No. 6 oil.

Miller, B.G.; Scaroni, A.W.

1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

226

NSF Division of Astronomical Sciences Senior Review NAIC Senior Review Memo Series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sciences (AST) about its planning for a "Senior Review". The purpose of the Senior Review is to enable AST of the recent Decade Review of Astronomy and Astrophysics. This AST plan to assess and reallocate its facilitiesNSF Division of Astronomical Sciences Senior Review NAIC Senior Review Memo Series Memo #1

227

Coal: the new black  

SciTech Connect

Long eclipsed by oil and natural gas as a raw material for high-volume chemicals, coal is making a comeback, with oil priced at more than $100 per barrel. It is relatively cheap feedstock for chemicals such as methanol and China is building plants to convert coal to polyolefins on a large scale and interest is spreading worldwide. Over the years several companies in the US and China have made fertilizers via the gasification of coal. Eastman in Tennessee gasifies coal to make methanol which is then converted to acetic acid, acetic anhydride and acetate fiber. The future vision is to convert methanol to olefins. UOP and Lurgi are the major vendors of this technology. These companies are the respective chemical engineering arms of Honeywell and Air Liquide. The article reports developments in China, USA and India on coal-to-chemicals via coal gasification or coal liquefaction. 2 figs., 2 photo.

Tullo, A.H.; Tremblay, J.-F.

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Investigations into coal coprocessing and coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

The conversion of coal to liquid suitable as feedstock to a petroleum refinery is dependent upon several process variables. These variables include temperature, pressure, coal rank, catalyst type, nature of the feed to the reactor, type of process, etc. Western Research Institute (WRI) has initiated a research program in the area of coal liquefaction to address the impact of some of these variables upon the yield and quality of the coal-derived liquid. The principal goal of this research is to improve the efficiency of the coal liquefaction process. Two different approaches are currently being investigated. These include the coprocessing of a heavy liquid, such as crude oil, and coal using a dispersed catalyst and the direct liquefaction of coal using a supported catalyst. Another important consideration in coal liquefaction is the utilization of hydrogen, including both externally- and internally-supplied hydrogen. Because the incorporation of externally-supplied hydrogen during conversion of this very aromatic fossil fuel to, for example, transportation fuels is very expensive, improved utilization of internally-supplied hydrogen can lead to reducing processing costs. The objectives of this investigation, which is Task 3.3.4, Coal Coprocessing, of the 1991--1992 Annual Research Plan, are: (1) to evaluate coal/oil pretreatment conditions that are expected to improve the liquid yield through more efficient dispersion of an oil-soluble, iron-based catalyst, (2) to characterize the coke deposits on novel, supported catalysts after coal liquefaction experiments and to correlate the carbon skeletal structure parameters of the coke deposit with catalyst performance as measured by coal liquefaction product yield, and (3) to determine the modes of hydrogen utilization during coal liquefaction and coprocessing. Experimental results are discussed in this report.

Guffey, F.D.; Netzel, D.A.; Miknis, F.P.; Thomas, K.P. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States); Zhang, Tiejun; Haynes, H.W. Jr. [Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 1 -- Base program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993  

SciTech Connect

Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

Smith, V.E.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Coal - prices tumble as the glut continues  

SciTech Connect

The oil price collapse was the major event affecting coal markets around the world in 1986. The 8% expansion in international coal trade in 1985 was halted, and prices fell considerably. World coking coal trade declined and import and export prices fell due to a decrease in steel production and the use of oil, rather than pulverized coal, in blast furnaces. However steam coal trade increased by about 5 million mt because of various institutional constraints to utilities switching from coal burning to oil burning. The article covers coal trade and production in the following countries: Australia; Canada; China; Colombia; Western Europe; Japan; Poland; South Africa; and the USSR.

Lee, H.M.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2002;" 2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," ",,"Computer Control of Building Wide Evironment(c)",,,"Computer Control of Processes or Major Energy-Using Equipment(d)",,,"Waste Heat Recovery",,,"Adjustable - Speed Motors",,,"Oxy - Fuel Firing",,," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Row"

232

Solvent extraction of South African coal using a low volatile, coal-derived solvent / Eulouka Janse van Rensburg.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coal is an important fuel for countries with large coal reserves such as South Africa since it is expected that oil and natural gas prices… (more)

Van Rensburg, Eulouka Janse

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Asia-Pacific coal technology conference  

SciTech Connect

The Asia-Pacific coal technology conference was held in Honolulu, Hawaii, November 14--16, 1989. Topics discussed included the following: Expanded Horizons for US Coal Technology and Coal Trade; Future Coal-Fired Generation and Capacity Requirements of the Philippines; Taiwan Presentation; Korean Presentation; Hong Kong Future Coal Requirements; Indonesian Presentation; Electric Power System in Thailand; Coal in Malaysia -- A Position Paper; The US and Asia: Pacific Partners in Coal and Coal Technology; US Coal Production and Export; US Clean Coal Technologies; Developments in Coal Transport and Utilization; Alternative/Innovative Transport; Electricity Generation in Asia and the Pacific: Power Sector Demand for Coal, Oil and Natural Gas; Role of Clean Coal Technology in the Energy Future of the World; Global Climate Change: A Fossil Energy Perspective; Speaker: The Role of Coal in Meeting Hawaii's Power Needs; and Workshops on Critical Issues Associated with Coal Usage. Individual topics are processed separately for the data bases.

Not Available

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

HS_Coal_Studyguide.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coal Coal Fossil Energy Study Guide: Coal Coal is the most plentiful fuel in the fossil family. The United States has more coal reserves than any other country in the world. In fact, one-fourth of all known coal in the world is in the United States, with large deposits located in 38 states. The United States has almost as much energ y in coal that can be mined as the rest of the world has in oil that can be pumped from the ground. TYPES OF COAL Coal is a black rock made up of large amounts of carbon. Like all fossil fuels, coal can be burned to release energy. Coal contains elements such as hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen; has various amounts of minerals; and is itself considered to be a mineral of organic origin. Due to the variety of materials buried over time in the

235

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 6.1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 Food 871.7 4.3 1.8 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6,239.5 10.5 3.6 311221 Wet Corn Milling 28,965.0 27.1 12.6 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 7,755.9 32.6 13.4 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 861.3 4.8 2.2 3115 Dairy Products 854.8 3.5 1.1 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 442.9 3.5 1.2 312

236

Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium (NAIC). Volume 7. Automatic photointerpretation. Final report, Sep 84-Dec 89  

SciTech Connect

The Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium (NAIC) was created by the Air Force Systems Command, Rome Air Development Center, and the Office of Scientific Research. Its purpose was to conduct pertinent research in artificial intelligence and to perform activities ancillary to this research. This report describes progress during the existence of the NAIC on the technical research tasks undertaken at the member universities. The topics covered in general are: versatile expert system for equipment maintenance, distributed AI for communications system control, automatic photointerpretation, time-oriented problem solving, speech understanding systems, knowledge base maintenance, hardware architectures for very large systems, knowledge-based reasoning and planning, and a knowledge acquisition, assistance, and explanation system. The specific topics for this volume are the use of expert systems for automated photo interpretation and other AI techniques to image segmentation and region identification.

Modestino, J.; Sanderson, A.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 11.5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total of NAICS Sales and Utility Nonutility Code(a) Subsector and Industry Transfers Offsite Purchaser(b) Purchaser(c) Total United States 311 Food 111 86 25 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 72 51 21 311221 Wet Corn Milling 55 42 13 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 7 3 4 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 13 13 0 3115 Dairy Products 0 0 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products * * 0 3121 Beverages

238

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2006; 3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Renewable Energy (excluding Wood NAICS Total Onsite and Code(a) Subsector and Industry Generation Cogeneration(b) Other Biomass)(c) Other(d) Total United States 311 Food 4,563 4,249 * 313 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 2,845 2,819 0 27 311221 Wet Corn Milling 2,396 2,370 0 27 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 951 951 0 * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 268 268 0 * 3115 Dairy Products 44 31 * Q 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 17 0 0 17 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 659 623 Q * 3121 Beverages 587 551 Q * 3122 Tobacco 72

239

Coal to Liquids Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By the mid-1940s, natural gas and oil production had become more developed and cost-competitive with coal, and technology for production of synthetic transportation fuels was not considered economic after the Sec...

Marianna Asaro; Ronald M. Smith

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Coal to Liquids Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By the mid-1940s, natural gas and oil production had become more developed and cost-competitive with coal, and technology for production of synthetic transportation fuels was not considered economic after the Sec...

Marianna Asaro; Ronald M. Smith

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Hydrocarbon-oil encapsulated bubble flotation of fine coal using 3-in. ID flotation column. Technical progress report for the eleventh quarter, April 1--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

There are four modes of the collector dispersion techniques. They are (1) direct liquid additions and stirring, (2) ultrasonic energy collector dispersion, (3) atomized collector dispersion, and (4) gasified collector transported in air stream. Among those collector dispersion techniques, the technique using the gasified collector transported in air phase can be used to enhance the flotation performance with substantial reduction in collector usage and selectivity, compared to the flotation using direct liquid addition (and mechanical agitation) technique. In this phase of study, two modes of collector addition techniques including gasified collector transported in gas phase and direct collector addition techniques were applied in the column flotation to demonstrate the selectivity of utilizing the hydrocarbon-oil encapsulated air bubbles in the fine coal flotation process. The 1-in. ID flotation column was used to scale-up to 3-in. ID flotation column. The initial starting point to operate the 3-in ID flotation column were determined using both 1-in. and 3-in. flotation columns based on the three phases of work plans and experiment design. A 3-in. flotation column was used to evaluate two modes of collector dispersion and addition techniques on the recovery and grade of fine coals using various ranks of coal.

Peng, F.F.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Underground Gasification of Coal Reported  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Underground Gasification of Coal Reported ... RESULTS of a first step taken toward determining the feasibility of the underground gasification of coal were reported recently to the Interstate Oil Compact Commission by Milton H. Fies, manager of coal operations for the Alabama Power Co. ...

1947-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

243

MS_Coal_Studyguide.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COAL-OUR MOST ABUNDANT FUEL COAL-OUR MOST ABUNDANT FUEL America has more coal than any other fossil fuel resource. Th e United States also has more coal reserves than any other single country in the world. In fact, 1/4 of all the known coal in the world is in the United States. Th e United States has more energy in coal that can be mined than the rest of the world has in oil that can be pumped from the ground. Currently, coal is mined in 25 of the 50 states. Coal is used primarily in the United States to generate electricity. In fact, it is burned in power plants to produce nearly half of the electricity we use. A stove uses about half a ton of coal a year. A water heater uses about two tons of coal a year. And a refrigerator, that's another half-ton a year. Even though you

244

Oil from Coal*  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... as most reprehensible the present arrangements by which Imperial Chemical Industries Ltd., enjoying a rebate of over £1,000,000 a year from taxation, is required to disclose technical ...

C. H. LANDER

1938-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

245

At-sea test and demonstration of coal-oil mixture as a marine boiler fuel. part I: shoreside testing. Final report Nov 81-Mar 82  

SciTech Connect

This report documents laboratory and wear-loop experimental evaluations and a combustion test using a full-scale Marine burner and fuel-supply equipment using a coal/oil mixture (COM). Laboratory work led to selection of a fuel acceptable for use in a shipboard demonstration from six candidate COMs. Significant variations were discovered among these samples, and an appropriate final selection was made for the shipboard tests. This COM was further evaluated during a land-based combustion test using a Marine burner (30 million-Btu/hr scale) installed in an industrial package boiler. Comparative tests using No. 6 fuel oil and the selected COM were performed along with a general shakedown and test run of the pump and heating set designed for the at-sea demonstration. Combustion tests indicated that the replacement of No. 6 fuel oil with the proper COM is quite feasible. However, close attention must be given to the handling and atomization of this fuel. A modified T-jet atomizer performed with acceptable levels of wear, plugging, and ash disposition problems. It was concluded that an at-sea demonstration of the COM should be pursued.

Wagoner, C.L.; Eckhart, C.F.; Clark, G.A.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Bio-coal briquette  

SciTech Connect

Some of the developing nations aim to earn foreign currency by exporting oil and/or gas and to increase the domestic consumption of coal to ensure a secure energy supply. Therefore, it is very important to promote effective coal utilization in these nations. Currently, these countries experience problems associated with coal use for household cooking and household industries. For household cooking, coal creates too much smoke and smells unpleasant. In addition, illegally obtained firewood is almost free in local agricultural regions. Coal is also used in household industries; however, simple stoker boilers are inefficient, since unburned coal particles tend to drop through screens during the combustion process. The bio-coal briquette, on the other hand, is an effective and efficient fuel, since it utilizes coal, which is to be used extensively in households and in small and medium-scale industry sectors in some coal-producing countries, as a primary fuel and bamboos (agricultural waste) as a secondary fuel. In addition, the use of bio-coal briquettes will greatly help reduce unburned coal content.

Honda, Hiroshi

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

Division of Oil, Gas, and Mining Permitting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" or "Gas" does not include any gaseous or liquid substance processed from coal, oil shale, or tar sands

Utah, University of

248

Coal Gasification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE's Office of Fossil Energy supports activities to advance coal-to-hydrogen technologies, specifically via the process of coal gasification with sequestration. DOE anticipates that coal...

249

"Characteristic(a)","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.3;" 1.3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Characteristic(a)","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

250

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 6.1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 Food 879.8 5.0 2.2 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6,416.6 17.5 5.7 311221 Wet Corn Milling 21,552.1 43.6 18.2 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 6,629.2 31.3 12.2 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1,075.3 5.5 2.8 3115 Dairy Products 956.3 4.3 1.3 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 493.8 4.4 1.6 312

251

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006; 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total Sales and Net Demand NAICS Transfers Onsite Transfers for Code(a) Subsector and Industry Purchases In(b) Generation(c) Offsite Electricity(d) Total United States 311 Food 73,242 309 4,563 111 78,003 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 15,283 253 2,845 72 18,310 311221 Wet Corn Milling 6,753 48 2,396 55 9,142 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 920 54 951 7 1,919 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foo 9,720 1 268 13 9,976 3115 Dairy Products 10,079 0 44 0 10,123 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 17,545 0 17 0 17,562 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

252

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006; 3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies; Unit: Establishment Counts. Establishments with Any Cogeneration NAICS Technology Code(a) Subsector and Industry Establishments(b) in Use(c) In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know Total United States 311 Food 14,128 297 99 11,338 2,691 51 11,217 2,860 10 11,333 2,786 164 11,129 2,836 9 11,235 2,884 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 53 Q 499 38 5 532 42 W 533 W Q 533 44 5 530 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 11 W 35 W W 43 W W 39 W 0 44 3 0 41 6 31131 Sugar Manufacturing

253

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006; 2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies; Unit: Establishment Counts. NAICS Code(a) Subsector and Industry Establishments(b) In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know Total United States 311 Food 14,128 1,632 9,940 2,556 3,509 8,048 2,571 1,590 9,609 2,929 6,260 5,014 2,854 422 9,945 3,762 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 59 475 46 300 236 Q 154 398 28 446 95 Q 45 442 92 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 9 34 4 36 W W 27 15 6 38 3 6 8 24 16 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 77

254

Solvent–Coal–Mineral Interaction during Solvent Extraction of Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The solvent extraction of Poplar lignite coal was studied with three model solvents (tetralin, quinoline, and 1-naphtol) and one industrial coal liquid derived solvent. ... Thanks to its wide distribution and large reserves, coal is a feasible local substitute feed material for conventional crude oil in many countries. ... Physical dissolution dominates at lower temperature, around 200 °C and lower temperatures for lignites; the role of the solvent is to relax the coal matrix and drag soluble molecules from the coal into the bulk solvent phase. ...

Mariangel Rivolta Hernández; Carolina Figueroa Murcia; Rajender Gupta; Arno de Klerk

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

255

"Economic","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.4;" " Unit: Percents." " ",," "," ",," "," " ,,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and" "Economic","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal"...

256

Hydrotreating of oil from eastern oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale provides one of the major fossil energy reserves for the United States. The quantity of reserves in oil shale is less than the quantity in coal, but is much greater (by at least an order of magnitude) than the quantity of crude oil reserves. With so much oil potentially available from oil shale, efforts have been made to develop techniques for its utilization. In these efforts, hydrotreating has proved to be an acceptable technique for upgrading raw shale oil to make usuable products. The present work demonstrated the use of the hydrotreating technique for upgrading an oil from Indiana New Albany oil shale.

Scinta, J.; Garner, J.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Combined-Cycle Power Generation — A Promising Alternative for the Generation of Electric Power from Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The classic concept of generating electric power from a fossil energy source (coal, oil, gas) comprises the following essential process steps (Fig. 1): Combustion of coal and g...

Eberhard Nitschke

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

coking coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

coking coal [A caking coal suitable for the production of coke for metallurgical use] ? Kokskohle f, verkokbare Kohle

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Techno-economic assessment of hydrogen production from underground coal gasification (UCG) in Western Canada with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) for upgrading bitumen from oil sands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper examines the techno-economic viability of hydrogen production from underground coal gasification (UCG) in Western Canada, for the servicing of the oil sands bitumen upgrading industry. Hydrogen production for bitumen upgrading is predominantly achieved via steam methane reforming (SMR); which involves significant greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions along with considerable feedstock (natural gas) cost volatility. UCG is a formidable candidate for cost-competitive environmentally sustainable hydrogen production; given its negligible feedstock cost, the enormity of deep coal reserves in Western Canada and the favourable CO2 sequestration characteristics of potential UCG sites in the Western Canadian sedimentary basin (WCSB). Techno-economic models were developed for UCG and SMR with and without CCS, to estimate the cost of hydrogen production including delivery to a bitumen upgrader. In this paper, at base case conditions, a 5% internal rate of return (IRR) differential between UCG and SMR was considered so as to account for the increased investment risk associated with UCG. The cost of UCG hydrogen production without CCS is estimated to be $1.78/kg of H2. With CCS, this increases to range of $2.11–$2.70/kg of H2, depending on the distance of the site for CO2 sequestration from the UCG plant. The SMR hydrogen production cost without CCS is estimated to be $1.73/kg of H2. In similar fashion to UCG, this rises to a range of $2.14 to $2.41/kg of H2 with the consideration of CCS. Lastly, for hydrogen production without CCS, UCG has a superior cost competitiveness in comparison to SMR for an IRR differential less than 4.6%. This competitive threshold rises to 5.4% for hydrogen production with CCS.

Babatunde Olateju; Amit Kumar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 2010 DOE/EIA-0121 (2010/01Q) June 2010 DOE/EIA-0121 (2010/01Q) Revised: July 2012 Quarterly Coal Report January - March 2010 June 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply Statistics U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.gov/coal/production/quarterly/ _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted thermal oil Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that produced synthetic fuel from coal, oil... the CRS Web Order Code RL33359 Oil Shale: History, Incentives, and Policy April 13, 2006 Anthony Andrews... ;Oil Shale:...

262

Coal liquefaction process wherein jet fuel, diesel fuel and/or astm no. 2 fuel oil is recovered  

SciTech Connect

An improved process for the liquefaction of coal and similar solid carbonaceous materials wherein a hydrogen donor solvent or diluent derived from the solid carbonaceous material is used to form a slurry of the solid carbonaceous material and wherein the naphthenic components from the solvent or diluent fraction are separated and used as jet fuel components. The extraction increases the relative concentration of hydroaromatic (hydrogen donor) components and as a result reduces the gas yield during liquefaction and decreases hydrogen consumption during said liquefaction. The hydrogenation severity can be controlled to increase the yield of naphthenic components and hence the yield of jet fuel and in a preferred embodiment jet fuel yield is maximized while at the same time maintaining solvent balance.

Bauman, R.F.; Ryan, D.F.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Study of utility boilers for a coal-water-slurry demonstration test. Final report. [Selection of oil-fired boiler design for testing; CWS  

SciTech Connect

Commercialization of coal-water slurry (CWS) is within reach, but utilities still require evidence that they can fire CWS in full-scale boilers over the long term. This study lays the groundwork for a one-year CWS demonstration, outlining a test program and calculating retrofit and operating costs for seven typical oil-fired boilers. This report summarizes the work performed by Burns and Roe, Inc., with assistance from Combustion Engineering, Inc., Babcock and Wilcox Co., Foster Wheeler Corp., and Riley Stoker Corp., to assess the extent, performance effects, and costs of utility power plant modifications for a one-year CWS demonstration test. Eighteen utilities participated in this study. They offered 42 boilers ranging in size from 40 to 850 MW. The study was performed in two phases. In the first phase all boilers were preliminarily analyzed to determine the required derating for CWS firing. Seven case study units representative of the population of oil-design boilers were selected for detailed analysis in the second phase. For the seven case study units boilers performance analyses were conducted using common ground rules agreed to by the four major utility boiler manufacturers. Conceptual design for balance of plant systems were developed and the costs for plant modifications were estimated. An outline test plan and schedule was developed to identify test and fuel requirements. The total costs for conducting a one-year CWS utility boiler test at each of the seven case study units was calculated. Although specific boilers were used for the detailed cases studies, the study was directed to providing information in a generally applicable form that can be applied by all study participants or potential utility users. 62 tabs., 63 figs.

Kemeny, P.; Fontana, G.; Lagomarsino, J.; Pinson, M.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Coal: the cornerstone of America's energy future  

SciTech Connect

In April 2005, US Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman asked the National Coal Council to develop a 'report identifying the challenges and opportunities of more fully exploring our domestic coal resources to meet the nation's future energy needs'. The Council has responded with eight specific recommendations for developing and implementing advanced coal processing and combustion technologies to satisfy our unquenchable thirst for energy. These are: Use coal-to-liquids technologies to produce 2.6 million barrels/day; Use coal-to-natural gas technologies to produce 4 trillion ft{sup 3}/yr; Build 100 GW of clean coal plants by 2025; Produce ethanol from coal; Develop coal-to-hydrogen technologies; Use CO{sub 2} to enhance recovery of oil and coal-bed methane; Increase the capacity of US coal mines and railroads; and Invest in technology development and implementation. 1 ref.; 4 figs.; 1 tab.

Beck, R.A. [National Coal Council (United Kingdom)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Oil Shale: A Huge Resource of Low-Grade Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...barrel of oil. With coal, only about 0...the technology for coal liquefaction were...shale would require mining, transporting...same condition as Appalachia. There is no doubt...cornered for surface coal mining. One would think...

William D. Metz

1974-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

266

Classes of compounds responsible for mutagenic and cytotoxic activity in tars and oils formed during low BTU gasification of coal  

SciTech Connect

The Lovelace Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI), in cooperation with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), has completed toxicity screening of vapors, liquids and solids formed during operation of an experimental pressurized, stirred-bed, coal gasifier at METC. Vapors collected from the cooled process stream on Tenax resins had no mutagenic activity in the Ames Salmonella assay. Dichloromethane extracts of liquids and solids collected from the effluent or process streams were fractionated by gel chromatography into fractions containing mostly aliphatic compounds; neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); polar (PAH) and heterocyclic compounds; and salts. The polar fraction was partitioned into acids, bases, water soluble compounds and phenols. Bacterial mutagenic activity was highest in the basic fraction with additional activity in the neutral PAHs. Highest cytotoxicity toward both the bacteria and canine alveolar macrophages was in the phenolic fraction. Treatment of the gasifier tars by nitrosation or by acetylation to remove primary aromatic amines (PAA) reduced the bacterial mutagenicity by 50-60%, indicating that some, but not all, of the mutagenicity was due to PAA.

Henderson, R.F.; Bechtold, W.F.; Benson, J.M.; Newton, G.J.; Hanson, R.L.; Brooks, A.L.; Dutcher, J.S.; Royer, R.E.; Hobbs, C.H.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006;" 2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Computer Control of Building Wide Evironment(c)",,,"Computer Control of Processes or Major Energy-Using Equipment(d)",,,"Waste Heat Recovery",,,"Adjustable - Speed Motors",,,"Oxy - Fuel Firing",,,," " "NAICS" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Establishments(b)","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know"

268

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 1998;" 1. Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",,,"Computer","Control of","Processes"," "," "," ",,,," ",," " " "," ","Computer Control","of Building-Wide","Environment(b)","or Major","Energy-Using","Equipment(c)","Waste","Heat","Recovery","Adjustable -","Speed","Motors","RSE"

269

NETL: Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

use of our domestic energy resources and infrastructure. Gasification Systems | Advanced Combustion | Coal & Coal-Biomass to Liquids | Solid Oxide Fuel Cells | Turbines CO2...

270

Economic evaluations of direct, indirect and hybrid coal liquefaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The various geopolitical problems associated with oil have rekindled interest in coal, with many countries working on projects for ... liquefaction. This study established the feasibility of coal liquefaction thr...

Jong-Soo Bae; In Sung Hwang; Yeong-Jin Kweon…

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Operation of the Wilsonville solvent-refined coal pilot plant: startup, calibration, and initial operation of the H-oil ebullated-bed hydrotreater unit. Technical evaluation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents initial operating data and analyses for the H-Oil Ebullated-Bed Hydrotreater (HTR) unit at the Wilsonville Solvent Refined Coal Pilot Plant in Wilsonville, Alabama. The focus of the report is on the initial period when the HTR unit operated with catalyst (May to June 1981). Additional data relates to the problems and adjustments during pre-operational testing (December 1980 to April 1981), solvent-SRC circulation testing (April to May 1981), and equipment repairs (July 1981). During the first two runs with catalyst (American Cyanamid HDS-1442B), the R1235 Reactor was operated at 756/sup 0/F and 825/sup 0/F. Equal amounts of hydrotreater solvent and deashed SRC were blended to make up the HTR unit feed. At these conditions, SRC conversion was 30 and 53%, respectively, and 82 and 88% of the sulfur was removed from the SRC feed. The total solvent yield was 26 and 39% of the SRC for the two temperatures, 756 and 825/sup 0/F, respectively. Most of the preasphaltenes were converted (less than 0.5% in the solid product). Hydrogen consumption was estimated to be 3 to 4% of the feed SRC. The quality of the HTR solvent was evaluated in short and long microautoclave tests (80% and 80 to 88% THF conversion, respectively) and the values obtained were consistently higher than those for SRC unit solvent. It was noted that the HTR unit solvent gave higher results by the long test than the short test, whereas the opposite is true for SRC unit solvent.

Not Available

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Co-coking of Hydrotreated Decant Oil/Coal Blends: Effect of Hydrotreatment Severity on the Yield Distribution and Quality of Distillate Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coke yield from delayed co-coking of hydrotreated DOs and coal blends was observed to be in the range of 15.9–24.4%. ... The coal used in this study (EI-106) was a 50:50 blend of the Powellton and Eagle seams, both very similar coals of high-volatile A bituminous rank from West Virginia. ... One of the hydrotreated DOs (EI-133) was coked alone. ...

Ömer Gül; Leslie R. Rudnick; Harold H. Schobert

2013-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

273

ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ILLINOIS COAL ENTRY INTO THE TRANSPORTATION MARKET.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??High oil prices and nationalist desires to reduce foreign dependency create opportunities for Illinois bituminous coal to be involved in the transportation market. Using Illinois… (more)

Starkey, Darin Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A study of the interfacial chemistry of pyrite and coal in fine coal cleaning using flotation  

SciTech Connect

Surface oxidation, surface charge, and flotation properties have been systematically studied for coal, coal-pyrite and ore-pyrite. Electrochemical studies show that coal-pyrite exhibits much higher and more complex surface oxidation than ore-pyrite and its oxidation rate depends strongly on the carbon/coal content. Flotation studies indicate that pyrites have no self-induced floatability. Fuel oil significantly improves the floatability of coal and induces considerable flotation for coal-pyrite due to the hydrophobic interaction of fuel oil with the carbon/coal inclusions on the pyrite surface. Xanthate is a good collector for ore-pyrite but a poor collector for coal and coal-pyrite. The results from thermodynamic calculations, flotation and zeta potential measurements show that iron ions greatly affect the flotation of pyrite with xanthate and fuel oil. Various organic and inorganic chemicals have been examined for depressing coal-pyrite. It was found, for the first time, that sodium pyrophosphate is an effective depressant for coal-pyrite. Solution chemistry shows that pyrophosphate reacts with iron ions to form stable iron pyrophosphate complexes. Using pyrophosphate, the complete separation of pyrite from coal can be realized over a wide pH range at relatively low dosage.

Jiang, C.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Thermodynamic properties of materials derived from coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

Few measurements of the thermodynamic properties of materials obtained from the liquefaction of coal have been reported. Because several sets of well-defined fractions of coal-derived materials existed that had been separated and characterized by the Characterization Branch of the Division of Processing and Thermodynamics of this Center, the expertise of the Thermodynamics Research Branch was utilized to measure enthalpies of combustion and heat capacities of these materials. The sets of fractions came from five sources: a synthetic crude oil derived from western Kentucky coal by the char-oil-energy development (COED) process, a synthetic crude oil derived from Utah A-seam coal by the COED process, material derived from West Virginia Pittsburgh seam coal by the Synthoil process, material derived from Illinois No. 6 coal by the H-Coal process and materials derived from subbituminous coal by the Conoco Colstrip zinc chloride hydrocracking process.

Smith, N.K.; Lee-Bechtold, S.H.; Good, W.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " 6 Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." ,,"Electricity Receipts",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Receipts(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(d)"," "

277

Correlation of stability/rheology relationship with coal: Properties and chemical additives  

SciTech Connect

Coal-water slurries have the potential of a near term replacement for fuel oil. In order to gain the fundamental understanding of the preparation and handling of coal-water slurries, experiments were performed to identify the relationship between the coal content of a given coal-water slurry and its physical and chemical properties. The objectives of this program were: Investigate the relationship between the chemical and physical properties of coal and the rheology of coal-water slurry Define procedures for evaluating and preparing coal water slurries for a particular coal candidate, based on the characteristic coal properties Develop improved methods of screening surfactants used in coal-water slurry preparation Perform experiments designed to investigate the effect of characteristic coal properties on slurry quality, by examining the effect of the individual coal properties on slurry quality Develop a statistical formulation to predict the coal content of a given coal water slurry content based on the coal characteristic properties.

Ohene, F.

1992-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

278

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.1;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.1;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",3.8,4.3,4.1 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",8.2,5.8,5.6 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0 31131," Sugar Manufacturing",0,0,0 3114," Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods ",7.3,6.7,6.2

279

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" 8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,,"Natural","Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,"Electricity","Electricity",,,"Natural Gas","Natural Gas",,,"Steam","Steam" " "," ",,,"from Only","from Both",,,"from Only","from Both",,,"from Only","from Both"," ",," "

280

COAL & POWER SYSTEMS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COAL & POWER SYSTEMS COAL & POWER SYSTEMS STRATEGIC & MULTI-YEAR PROGRAM PLANS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY GREENER, SOONER... THROUGH TECHNOLOGY INTRODUCTION .......... i-1 STRATEGIC PLAN ........ 1-1 PROGRAM PLANS Vision 21 .......................... 2-1 Central Power Systems ...... 3-1 Distributed Generation ..... 4-1 Fuels ................................ 5-1 Carbon Sequestration ....... 6-1 Advanced Research ........... 7-1 TABLE OF CONTENTS STRATEGIC & MULTI-YEAR PROGRAM PLANS STRENGTH THROUGH SCIENCE... A "GREENER, SOONER" PHILOSOPHY Coal, natural gas, and oil fuel about 70 percent of the electricity generated in the United States. As promising as renewable and other alternative fuels are, it will be several decades before they can make significant energy contributions to the Nation's

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Coal pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for pressurizing pulverized coal and circulating a carrier gas is disclosed. This device has utility in a coal gasification process and eliminates the need for a separate collection hopper and eliminates the separate compressor.

Bonin, John H. (Sunnyvale, CA); Meyer, John W. (Palo Alto, CA); Daniel, Jr., Arnold D. (Alameda County, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Appalachia: the land of coal  

SciTech Connect

The Appalachian region of the United States is an area known worldwide for its long history as a source of coal. If any area of the Unted States is to gain from the projected growth of the coal industry, both domestic and international, it would surely be the coal mining areas of this region, including its biggest coal producing states - Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Kentucky and Ohio. An important facet of the region's coal industry is not only the presence of the giant coal companies but also the small, independent operator. These men are owner-operators and every dollar spent for their operations must bring a return. There is no room for error. WORLD COAL editors have recently traveled to areas in Appalachia and visited mines that are run by these independent operators. One such area was Harlan County, Kentucky. Virtually all mining done in Harlan is underground. Shaft mines are uncommon; most operations have access to exposed seams in the hillsides. Most of the small operations in this region use room and pillar mining and productivity is quite good. It is imperative that the transportation infrastructure be improved so that the expected increased movement of coal out of the region be handled efficiently. Potential domestic consumers of coal from Appalachia are numerous. New England, New York, the mid-Atlantic states, and the South are all looking to this nearby region to help reduce their dependence on oil. Other countries also are looking to the area.

Schneiderman, S.J. (ed.)

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Moderate or Intense Low-Oxygen Dilution Oxy-combustion Characteristics of Light Oil and Pulverized Coal in a Pilot-Scale Furnace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The primary and secondary oxidizer streams are preheated to 450 and 400 K with electrical heaters, respectively. ... on the heat transfer, the comparison of flameless oxyfuel and flameless air fuel combustion results of lab. ... processes that coal particles experience during combustion, the characteristics of oxy-fuel combustion are reviewed in the context of heat and mass transfer, fuel delivery and injection, coal particle heating and moisture evapn., devolatilization and ignition, char oxidn. ...

P. Li; F. Wang; Y. Tu; Z. Mei; J. Zhang; Y. Zheng; H. Liu; Z. Liu; J. Mi; C. Zheng

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

284

Balancing oil and environment... responsibly.  

SciTech Connect

Balancing Oil and Environment…Responsibly As the price of oil continues to skyrocket and global oil production nears the brink, pursuing unconventional oil supplies, such as oil shale, oil sands, heavy oils, and oils from biomass and coal has become increasingly attractive. Of particular significance to the American way is that our continent has significant quantities of these resources. Tapping into these new resources, however, requires cutting-edge technologies for identification, production, processing and environmental management. This job needs a super hero or two for a job of this size and proportion…

Weimer, Walter C.; Teske, Lisa

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

285

USE OF ZEEMAN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF MERCURY IN OIL SHALE GASES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minor Elements in Oil Shale and Oil-Shale Products. LERC RIChemistry of Tar Sands and Oil Shale, ACS, New Orleans.Constituent Analysis of Oil Shale and Solvent-Refined Coal

Girvin, D.G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Technical Session: Geologic Aspects of Coal Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...would prohibit strip mining in areas where the federal...rights. The National Coal Association maintains...the land surface where mining is planned), and where...users of oil convert to coal where possible, thereby...for rehabilitation in Appalachia requires some thought...

287

Catalytic coal liquefaction with treated solvent and SRC recycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the solvent refining of coal to distillable, pentane soluble products using a dephenolated and denitrogenated recycle solvent and a recycled, pentane-insoluble, solvent-refined coal material, which process provides enhanced oil-make in the conversion of coal.

Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Schweighardt, Frank K. (Allentown, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Catalytic coal liquefaction with treated solvent and SRC recycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for the solvent refining of coal to distillable, pentane soluble products using a dephenolated and denitrogenated recycle solvent and a recycled, pentane-insoluble, solvent-refined coal material, which process provides enhanced oil-make in the conversion of coal. 2 figs.

Garg, D.; Givens, E.N.; Schweighardt, F.K.

1986-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

289

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

SciTech Connect

This study analyzes China's coal industry by focusing on four related areas. First, data are reviewed to identify the major drivers of historical and future coal demand. Second, resource constraints and transport bottlenecks are analyzed to evaluate demand and growth scenarios. The third area assesses the physical requirements of substituting coal demand growth with other primary energy forms. Finally, the study examines the carbon- and environmental implications of China's past and future coal consumption. There are three sections that address these areas by identifying particular characteristics of China's coal industry, quantifying factors driving demand, and analyzing supply scenarios: (1) reviews the range of Chinese and international estimates of remaining coal reserves and resources as well as key characteristics of China's coal industry including historical production, resource requirements, and prices; (2) quantifies the largest drivers of coal usage to produce a bottom-up reference projection of 2025 coal demand; and (3) analyzes coal supply constraints, substitution options, and environmental externalities. Finally, the last section presents conclusions on the role of coal in China's ongoing energy and economic development. China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. In 2007 Chinese coal production contained more energy than total Middle Eastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand after 2001 created supply strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about sustainability. Urbanization, heavy industrial growth, and increasing per-capita income are the primary interrelated drivers of rising coal usage. In 2007, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement production accounted for 66% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units would save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand for the power sector. A new wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. If coal to chemicals capacity reaches 70 million tonnes and coal-to-liquids capacity reaches 60 million tonnes, coal feedstock requirements would add an additional 450 million tonnes by 2025. Even with more efficient growth among these drivers, China's annual coal demand is expected to reach 3.9 to 4.3 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not reversed China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Substitution is a matter of scale: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth of 200 million tonnes would require 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas (compared to 2007 growth of 13 BCM), 48 GW of nuclear (compared to 2007 growth of 2 GW), or 86 GW of hydropower capacity (compared to 2007 growth of 16 GW). Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on a high growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China has a low proportion of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport capacity. Furthermore, transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transportation oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 million tonnes by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets.

Aden, Nathaniel; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Materials science aspects of coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural organic materials are arrangements of linear aliphatic units and ring-like aromatic units arranged in a polymeric pattern. We show that fossilized organic materials such as coals and oil shale retain this polymeric character. We also show the polymeric nature of jet and amber fossilized organic matter used for centuries for ornamentation.

Charles Wert; Manfred Weller

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Clean Fuels from Coal Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...A. G. Horsler, Gas Counc. (Gt. Brit...England, 1962; Gas J. 312, 19 (1962...be-come overdependent on natural gas and oil to supply...gasifier at elevated pressure with a downward flow...operability on coals of high ash-fusion temperature...

Arthur M. Squires

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

292

Coal conversion. 1979 technical report  

SciTech Connect

Individual reports are made on research programs which are being conducted by various organizations and institutions for the commercial development of processes for converting coal into products that substitute for these derived from oil and natural gas. Gasification, liquefaction, and demonstration processes and plants are covered. (DLC)

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Section 5 - Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal has the longest history of use among the fossil fuels, with use as a fuel dating to 3000 BC in China and Wales. Marco Polo’s “Description of the World” (1298) comments on many novel customs and practices of China, including the use of “stones that burn like logs” (coal). By the thirteenth century the mining of coal was widespread in England in regions such as Durham, Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Staffordshire, and North and South Wales. By the early seventeenth century nearly half of England’s maritime trade consisted of coal exports. Coal was the fuel that launched the Industrial Revolution in Europe and then the United States. By the late 1890s, the U.S. assumed the lead in world coal production. Britain now ranked second, after having been the world leader since the beginnings of the formal industry in the 1500s. Germany was third, an indication of its growing industrial power relative to continental rival France. Coal’s leading role in energy use peaked in the early twentieth century, after which it was supplanted by oil and natural gas. By the late twentieth century China’s rapid economic expansion, surging demand for electricity, and prodigious coal resources combined to propel it to become the world leader in production. Continuous improvements in coal mining technology have produced lower costs, improved safety, and greater labor productivity. John Buddle introduced the first air pump to ventilate coal mines (1803), followed shortly by the miner’s safety lamps that were developed independently by Sir Humphry Davy, William Clanny, and George Stephenson (1813-1816). Coal mining underwent a rapid transition in the 1880s to mechanical coal cutting in mines in the United Kingdom, the United States, and Russia. The St. Joseph Lead Company of Missouri (1900) invented the first underground mine roof bolts that became a key safety feature in underground coal mines. The first commercially successful bucket wheel excavator was used at the Luise Mine in Braunkohlemwerke, Germany (1925), followed by the first successful continuous miners in U.S. underground coal mining (1948). The first mechanized U.S. longwall mining system appeared in 1951, and was followed by the self-advancing hydraulic longwall support system that provided greater support for the roof of the mine. LeTourneau Technologies, Inc. of Texas manufactured the largest rubber tired front-end wheel loader in the world, the L-2350, which would play an important role in loading coal in Wyoming’s large surface mines (2005). Coal mining has always been a very hazardous occupation, and has produced some of history’s worst industrial disasters. The Courrières mine disaster, Europe's worst mining accident, caused the death of 1,099 miners in Northern France (1906). An explosion in a coal mine in Liaoning province in northeastern China killed more than 1,500 Chinese miners (1942), as did other major accidents in Ky?sh?, Japan (1914), Wankie, Rhodesia (1972), Wales (1913), Bihar, India (1965), and West Virginia, U.S. (1907), to name just a few. Legislation such as the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act in the U.S. (1969) improved working conditions in many nations. The Great Smog of London (1952) occurred after an exceptionally cold winter forced homes and factories to burn large quantities of coal. A temperature inversion formed, trapping pollutants above the ground. More than 4,000 people died from respiratory ailments within the following week. The use of coal has been impacted by legislation to control the environmental impacts associated with its mining and combustion. The first known environmental regulation of coal dates to 1306 when King Edward II of England prohibited burning sea coal while Parliament was in session because of its offensive smoke. Sulfur dioxide from coal combustion was tied to acid rain in the 1960s, and carbon dioxide emissions became a concern beginning in the 1980s when climate change emerged as a critical environmental issue.

Cutler J. Cleveland; Christopher Morris

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

"Characteristic(a)","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," " "Characteristic(a)","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","Breeze","Other(e)" ,"Total United States" "Value...

295

Correlation of stability/rheology relationship with coal: Properties and chemical additives. Final technical report, September 1988--November 1991  

SciTech Connect

Coal-water slurries have the potential of a near term replacement for fuel oil. In order to gain the fundamental understanding of the preparation and handling of coal-water slurries, experiments were performed to identify the relationship between the coal content of a given coal-water slurry and its physical and chemical properties. The objectives of this program were: Investigate the relationship between the chemical and physical properties of coal and the rheology of coal-water slurry Define procedures for evaluating and preparing coal water slurries for a particular coal candidate, based on the characteristic coal properties Develop improved methods of screening surfactants used in coal-water slurry preparation Perform experiments designed to investigate the effect of characteristic coal properties on slurry quality, by examining the effect of the individual coal properties on slurry quality Develop a statistical formulation to predict the coal content of a given coal water slurry content based on the coal characteristic properties.

Ohene, F.

1992-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

296

Clean Coal Diesel Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

A Clean Coal Diesel project was undertaken to demonstrate a new Clean Coal Technology that offers technical, economic and environmental advantages over conventional power generating methods. This innovative technology (developed to the prototype stage in an earlier DOE project completed in 1992) enables utilization of pre-processed clean coal fuel in large-bore, medium-speed, diesel engines. The diesel engines are conventional modern engines in many respects, except they are specially fitted with hardened parts to be compatible with the traces of abrasive ash in the coal-slurry fuel. Industrial and Municipal power generating applications in the 10 to 100 megawatt size range are the target applications. There are hundreds of such reciprocating engine power-plants operating throughout the world today on natural gas and/or heavy fuel oil.

Robert Wilson

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Peaking of World Oil Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nonrenewable and renewable energy sources make up the two major energy categories of interest to our industrial civilization. Nonrenewable energy includes different fossil fuels (coal, oil, natural gas) th...

J. Edward Gates

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Co-processing of carbonaceous solids and petroleum oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process for producing distillates from coal by a first stage thermal liquefaction followed by a catalytic hydrogenation, liquefaction solvent is added at points spaced over the length of the thermal liquefaction heater. Coal may be co-processed with petroleum oil by adding pre-hydrogenated oil to the first stage or unhydrogenated oil to the second stage.

Gupta, Avinash (Bloomfield, NJ); Greene, Marvin I. (Oradell, NJ)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

The end of the age of oil David Goodstein  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1986 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 Non-OPEC OPEC bnbbls Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy 2003 Tired Saudi Fields By JEFF GERTH The New York Times, February 24, 2004 ...the country's oil fields now (99 Quads) #12;Fossil Fuels Oil Natural gas Shale oil Methane hydrate Coal #12;Coal Hundreds, maybe

Bertini, Robert L.

300

Coal extraction  

SciTech Connect

Coal is extracted using a mixed solvent which includes a substantially aromatic component and a substantially naphthenic component, at a temperature of 400/sup 0/ to 500/sup 0/C. Although neither component is an especially good solvent for coal by itself, the use of mixed solvent gives greater flexibility to the process and offers efficiency gains.

Clarke, J.W.; Kimber, G.M.; Rantell, T.D.; Snape, C.E.

1985-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Chapter 2 - Coal as Multiple Sources of Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal as multiple sources of energy is mined for its solid and gas-, oil-, and condensate-derived hydrocarbons as well as liquefied for synfuels. More than 50 countries mine coal as feedstock for power plants to generate electricity but only six of these countries monopolize 73% of the total recoverable coalbed gas resources of the world. Worldwide, about 30,000 coal mine explosions are caused by methane and carbon dioxide, and to prevent outbursts and emissions, underground, surface, and abandoned coalmine gases are exploited for industrial and commercial uses. Still, a large volume of unrecovered fugitive coalmine gases is released as global greenhouse gas emissions. An alternative source for foreign oil dependent countries is synfuels from coal liquefaction technology. Also, coal-derived hydrocarbons are a part of the conventional resources that is, gas, oil, and condensate sourced from coal but expelled into adjoining reservoirs, are attractive alternative energy sources.

Romeo M. Flores

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

TRW advanced slagging coal combustor utility demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The TRW Advanced Entrained Coal Combustor Demonstration Project consists of retrofitting Orange and Rockland (O R) Utility Corporation's Lovett Plant Unit No. 3 with four (4) slagging combustors which will allow the gas/oil unit to fire 2.5% sulfur coal. The slagging combustor process will provide NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions that meet NSPS and New York State Environmental Standards. The TRW-Utility Demonstration Unit (UDU) is responsible for the implementation of program policies and overall direction of the project. The following projects will be carried out: process and design development of clean coal technology CCT-1 the development and operation of the entrained coal combustor will enable the boiler to burn low and medium sulfur coal while meeting all the Federal/State emission requirements; demonstrate sulfur dioxide emissions control by pulverized limestone injection into the entrained coal combustor system.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

A fresh look at coal-derived liquid fuels  

SciTech Connect

35% of the world's energy comes from oil, and 96% of that oil is used for transportation. The current number of vehicles globally is estimated to be 700 million; that number is expected to double overall by 2030, and to triple in developing countries. Now consider that the US has 27% of the world's supply of coal yet only 2% of the oil. Coal-to-liquids technologies could bridge the gap between US fuel supply and demand. The advantages of coal-derived liquid fuels are discussed in this article compared to the challenges of alternative feedstocks of oil sands, oil shale and renewable sources. It is argued that pollutant emissions from coal-to-liquid facilities could be minimal because sulfur compounds will be removed, contaminants need to be removed for the FT process, and technologies are available for removing solid wastes and nitrogen oxides. If CO{sub 2} emissions for coal-derived liquid plants are captured and sequestered, overall emissions of CO{sub 2} would be equal or less than those from petroleum. Although coal liquefaction requires large volumes of water, most water used can be recycled. Converting coal to liquid fuels could, at least in the near term, bring a higher level of stability to world oil prices and the global economy and could serve as insurance for the US against price hikes from oil-producing countries. 7 figs.

Paul, A.D. [Benham Companies LLC (USA)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Coal: An energy bridge to the future  

SciTech Connect

For years, coal drove the transportation business in this country and it may be poised for a comeback when it comes to moving people and things. A hundred years ago, steam engines burned tons of coal as they pulled trains across the country. Now researchers are looking at converting that coal to liquid fuel that would fill up our gas tanks and move our cars and trucks. The technology already exists to transform coal into a liquid fuel. In fact, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists and engineers have researched forms of coal and hydrocarbon gasification on and off for more than 30 years. But oil has never sustained a high enough price to kick start a coal-to-liquid fuel industry. That may be changing now. In addition to high crude oil prices, experts agree worldwide petroleum resources won’t last forever, and hydrocarbon resources like coal may be the only resource available, at a large enough scale, to off-set oil consumption, in the near term.

Bauer, Susan J.

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

305

Effect of modifying host oil on coprocessing  

SciTech Connect

The world`s supply of petroleum crudes is becoming heavier in nature so that the amount of vacuum bottoms has been steadily increasing. Coprocessing of coal with these resids (1,000 F+) is an attractive way of obtaining useful distillates from these readily available cheap materials. The objective of this work is to pretreat the host oil in ways that would improve its performance in coprocessing with coal. The following are examples of some ways in which heavy oil could be made into a better host oil: converting aromatic structures to hydroaromatics capable of donating hydrogen to coal, cracking the heavy oil to lower molecular weight material that would be a better solvent, and removing metals, sulfur, and nitrogen. The work reported here used a Venezuelan oil obtained from the Corpus Christi refinery of Citgo. Two coals, Illinois No. 6 and Wyodak subbituminous, were coprocessed with host oils. The authors have found that mild pretreatment of a Citgo resid (1,000 F) using either Mo naphthenate or Mo/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SO{sub 4}, as well as a pretreatment using the homogeneous catalyst Co{sub 2}(CO){sub 8} under synthesis gas can increase the available (donatable) hydrogen content of the resid. When these pretreated oils were thermally (no added catalyst) coprocessed with an Illinois No. 6 coal, about 90 wt% of the coal (maf) was converted to soluble products. This high coal conversion was realized even at a high coal loading of 50 wt%. The products from coprocessing coal and oil were equally split between high boiling material, mostly asphaltenes, and distillate. Distillate yields appeared to be affected by the concentration of coal in the feed, with maximum yields at coal loadings below 50 wt%.

Hajdu, P.E.; Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Multisolvent successive extractive refining of coal  

SciTech Connect

A selected group of commercial solvents, namely, anthracene oil (AO), ethylenediamine (EDA), and liquid paraffin (LP), were used for successive extraction of Assam coal. Hot AO provided a wide range of mixed solvents that dissociate chemically and interact favorably with dissociated and undissociated coal macromolecules (like dissolves like). This resulted in the enhancement of the EDA extractability of the AO-pretreated residual coal. EDA is a good swelling solvent and results in physical dissociation of coal molecules. The residual coal obtained after EDA extraction was subjected to extraction with LP, an H-donor, high-boiling (330--360 C) solvent. LP thermally dissociates coal macromolecules and interacts with the coal at its plastic stage at the free radical pockets. The mechanism and molecular dynamics of the multisolvent successive extraction of Assam coal using AO-EDA-LP solvents are discussed. In early attempts, successive extractions did not modify the extraction yield in the single solvent showing the maximum extraction. However, the AO-EDA-LP extraction resulted in the extraction of 70% coal, more than for any of the individual solvents used. Therefore, AO-EDA-LP extraction of coal affords a process yielding a superclean, high-heating value fuel from coal under milder conditions. Several uses of superclean coal have been recommended. Present studies have revealed a new concept concerning the structure of coal having 30% polyaromatic condensed entangled rings and 70% triaromatic-heterocyclic-naphthenic-aliphatic structure. The insolubility of coal is due to the polyfunctional-heterocyclic-condensed structure having a polyaromatic core with intermacromolecular entanglements.

Sharma, D.K.; Singh, S.K. [Indian Inst. of Tech., New Delhi (India)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" 2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," ",," ",," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)",,"NGL(d)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)"

308

Table 2.2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002;" 2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

309

Released: March 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010;" 2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)"

310

Table 7.9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" 9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Million U.S. Dollars." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

311

Released: June 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2006;" 9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Million U.S. Dollars." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)"

312

Released: May 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" 9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Million U.S. Dollars." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)"

313

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-Table 5b. Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 5b. Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) per Ton of Steel, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Million Btu per ton) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1 331111) 19982 20022 20062 Total 3 17 16 13 Net Electricity 4 2 2 2 Natural Gas 5 5 4 Coal 7 6 4 Notes: 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. Denominators represent the entire steel industry, not those based mainly on electric, natural gas, residual fuel oil or coal.

314

E-Print Network 3.0 - abandoned underground coal Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Universitet, Department of Theoretical Physics Collection: Physics 4 Division of Oil, Gas, and Mining Permitting Summary: John R. Baza DirectorCoal Minerals Abandoned Mine...

315

Evaluation of factors that influence microbial communities and methane production in coal microcosms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Vast reserves of coal represent a largely untapped resource that can be used to produce methane gas, a cleaner energy alternative compared to burning oil… (more)

Gallagher, Lisa K.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Electricity from coal and utilization of coal combustion by-products  

SciTech Connect

Most electricity in the world is conventionally generated using coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear energy, or hydropower. Due to environmental concerns, there is a growing interest in alternative energy sources for heat and electricity production. The major by-products obtained from coal combustion are fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials. The solid wastes produced in coal-fired power plants create problems for both power-generating industries and environmentalists. The coal fly ash and bottom ash samples may be used as cementitious materials.

Demirbas, A. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Co-processing of agriculture and biomass waste with coal  

SciTech Connect

Biomass and bio-processed waste are potential candidates for co-liquefaction with coal. Specific materials used here include sawdust and poultry manure. Liquefaction experiments were run on each of these materials, separately and with coal, using tetralin as solvent at 350{degrees}C and 1000 psi(cold) hydrogen pressure for 1h. Total conversion was monitored, as well as conversion to asphaltenes, oils and gases. All the biomass samples are converted to oils and gases under the reaction conditions. Poultry manure seems to convert coal more completely, and to produce more oils and gases, than conventional liquefaction.

Stiller, A.H.; Dadyburjor, D.B.; Wann, J.P. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Deashing of coal liquids by sonically assisted filtration  

SciTech Connect

This project seeks to improve the effectiveness and reduce the cost of coal liquefaction by novel applications of sonic and ultrasonic energy. The specific purpose of this project is to develop and improve means for the economical removal of dispersed solid particles of ash, unreacted coal, and spent catalyst from direct and indirect coal liquefaction resids by using sonic or ultrasonic waves. Product streams containing solids are generated in both direct and indirect coal liquefaction processes. Direct coal liquefaction processes generate liquid products which contain solids including coal-originated mineral matter, unreacted coal, and spent dispersed catalyst. The removal of these solids from a product stream is one of the most difficult problems in direct coal liquefaction processes. On this report, results are discussed for sonically assisted crossflow filtration of V-1067 resid, diluted with No. 2 fuel oil, and sonically assisted batch filtrations of solids concentrates from continuous cross-flow filtration experiments.

Slomka, B.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Coal and Coal-Biomass to Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Coal-Biomass to Liquids News Gasifipedia Coal-Biomass Feed Advanced Fuels Synthesis Systems Analyses International Activity Project Information Project Portfolio Publications...

320

Underground Coal Thermal Treatment  

SciTech Connect

The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coalâ??s carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration. Efforts focused on: â?¢ Constructing a suite of three different coal pyrolysis reactors. These reactors offer the ability to gather heat transfer, mass transfer and kinetic data during coal pyrolysis under conditions that mimic in situ conditions (Subtask 6.1). â?¢ Studying the operational parameters for various underground thermal treatment processes for oil shale and coal and completing a design matrix analysis for the underground coal thermal treatment (UCTT). This analysis yielded recommendations for terms of targeted coal rank, well orientation, rubblization, presence of oxygen, temperature, pressure, and heating sources (Subtask 6.2). â?¢ Developing capabilities for simulating UCTT, including modifying the geometry as well as the solution algorithm to achieve long simulation times in a rubblized coal bed by resolving the convective channels occurring in the representative domain (Subtask 6.3). â?¢ Studying the reactive behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with limestone, sandstone, arkose (a more complex sandstone) and peridotite, including mineralogical changes and brine chemistry for the different initial rock compositions (Subtask 6.4). Arkose exhibited the highest tendency of participating in mineral reactions, which can be attributed to the geochemical complexity of its initial mineral assemblage. In experiments with limestone, continuous dissolution was observed with the release of CO{sub 2} gas, indicated by the increasing pressure in the reactor (formation of a gas chamber). This occurred due to the lack of any source of alkali to buffer the solution. Arkose has the geochemical complexity for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2} as carbonates and is also relatively abundant. The effect of including NH{sub 3} in the injected gas stream was also investigated in this study. Precipitation of calcite and trace amounts of ammonium zeolites was observed. A batch geochemical model was developed using Geochemists Workbench (GWB). Degassing effect in the experiments was corrected using the sliding fugacity model in GWB. Experimental and simulation results were compared and a reasonable agreement between the two was observed.

P. Smith; M. Deo; E. Eddings; A. Sarofim; K. Gueishen; M. Hradisky; K. Kelly; P. Mandalaparty; H. Zhang

2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Oil To Biofuels Case Study Objectives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil To Biofuels Case Study Objectives - Critically evaluate the nature of certain societal process and scientific solutions to problems. Inception. - Gulf Oil Spill case study. - Lawrence Livermore? - Estimate the amount of your biofuel required to replace a fossil fuel of your choice (coal, oil, etc

Auerbach, Scott M.

322

SustainableCoal_FC.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is a vital energy resource, is a vital energy resource, not only for the United States, but also for many developed and developing economies around the world. Finding ways to use coal cleanly and more efficiently at lower costs is a major research and development (R&D) challenge, and an ongoing focus of activities by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). According to a Congressional Research Service analysis, coal represents 93 percent of total U.S. - and over half of world - fossil fuel reserves (expressed in barrels of oil equivalent). Based on recent rates of domestic consumption (averaging 1 billion tons annually, 2000-2010), estimated U.S. recoverable coal reserves of nearly 261 billion short tons are sufficient to last more than 2½ centuries.

323

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " 8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)"

324

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"Residual Fuel Oil",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

325

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " 8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

326

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"Residual Fuel Oil",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)"

327

U.S. Coal Reserves  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol.

328

Coal gasification 2006: roadmap to commercialization  

SciTech Connect

Surging oil and gas prices, combined with supply security and environmental concerns, are prompting power generators and industrial firms to further develop coal gasification technologies. Coal gasification, the process of breaking down coal into its constituent chemical components prior to combustion, will permit the US to more effectively utilize its enormous, low cost coal reserves. The process facilitates lower environmental impact power generation and is becoming an increasingly attractive alternative to traditional generation techniques. The study is designed to inform the reader as to this rapidly evolving technology, its market penetration prospects and likely development. Contents include: Clear explanations of different coal gasification technologies; Emissions and efficiency comparisons with other fuels and technologies; Examples of US and global gasification projects - successes and failures; Commercial development and forecast data; Gasification projects by syngas output; Recommendations for greater market penetration and commercialization; Current and projected gasification technology market shares; and Recent developments including proposals for underground gasification process. 1 app.

NONE

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

DESULFURIZATION OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pollutants Associated With Coal Combustion. • E.P.A.Control Guidelines for Coal-Derived Pollutants .Forms of Sulfur in Coal • . . . . Coal Desulfurization

Wrathall, James Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Understanding the chemistry and physics of coal structure (A Review)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...element, and perhaps its most distinctive feature when compared to other solid fossil fuel sources like petroleum and oil shale, is an extensive network MICROPORES FIG. 1. Diagram of the major constituents in coal: organic mate- rial, fragments...

Duane G. Levine; Richard H. Schlosberg; Bernard G. Silbernagel

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Pulverized Coal-Fired Boilers and Pollution Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fossil fuels, such as coal, natural gas, and fuel oil, are used to generate electric power for industrial, commercial, and residential use. ... production and approximately 41% of the world power generation was s...

David K. Moyeda

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Coal liquefaction process using pretreatment with a binary solvent mixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for thermal solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a hydrogen donor solvent comprises pretreating the coal with a binary mixture of an aromatic hydrocarbon and an aliphatic alcohol at a temperature below 300 C before the hydroliquefaction step. This treatment generally increases both conversion of coal and yields of oil. 1 fig.

Miller, R.N.

1986-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

333

Symposium: Western Coal: Energy Crisis vs. Environmental Impact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...would prohibit strip mining in areas where the federal...rights. The National Coal Association maintains...the land surface where mining is planned), and where...users of oil convert to coal where possible, thereby...for rehabilitation in Appalachia requires some thought...

334

Coal preparation: The essential clean coal technology  

SciTech Connect

This chapter is a brief introduction to a broad topic which has many highly specialized areas. The aim is to summarize the essential elements of coal preparation and illustrate its important role in facilitating the clean use of coal. Conventional coal preparation is the essential first step in ensuring the economic and environmentally acceptable use of coal. The aim of coal preparation is to produce saleable products of consistent, specified quality which satisfy customer requirements while optimizing the utilization of the coal resource. Coal preparation covers all aspects of preparing coal for the market. It includes size reduction, blending and homogenization and, most importantly, the process of physical beneficiation or washing, which involves separation of undesirable mineral matter from the coal substance itself. Coal preparation can be performed at different levels of sophistication and cost. The degree of coal preparation required is decided by considering the quality of the raw coal, transport costs and, in particular, the coal quality specified by the consumer. However, the cost of coal beneficiation rises rapidly with the complexity of the process and some coal is lost with the waste matter because of process inefficiencies, therefore each situation requires individual study to determine the optimum coal preparation strategy. The necessary expertise is available within APEC countries such as Australia. Coals destined for iron making are almost always highly beneficiated. Physical beneficiation is mostly confined to the higher rank, hard coals, but all other aspects of coal preparation can be applied to subbituminous and lignitic coals to improve their utilization. Also, there are some interesting developments aimed specifically at reducing the water content of lower rank coals.

Cain, D.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Oil shale technology  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale is undoubtedly an excellent energy source that has great abundance and world-wide distribution. Oil shale industries have seen ups and downs over more than 100 years, depending on the availability and price of conventional petroleum crudes. Market forces as well as environmental factors will greatly affect the interest in development of oil shale. Besides competing with conventional crude oil and natural gas, shale oil will have to compete favorably with coal-derived fuels for similar markets. Crude shale oil is obtained from oil shale by a relatively simple process called retorting. However, the process economics are greatly affected by the thermal efficiencies, the richness of shale, the mass transfer effectiveness, the conversion efficiency, the design of retort, the environmental post-treatment, etc. A great many process ideas and patents related to the oil shale pyrolysis have been developed; however, relatively few field and engineering data have been published. Due to the vast heterogeneity of oil shale and to the complexities of physicochemical process mechanisms, scientific or technological generalization of oil shale retorting is difficult to achieve. Dwindling supplied of worldwide petroleum reserves, as well as the unprecedented appetite of mankind for clean liquid fuel, has made the public concern for future energy market grow rapidly. the clean coal technology and the alternate fuel technology are currently of great significance not only to policy makers, but also to process and chemical researchers. In this book, efforts have been made to make a comprehensive text for the science and technology of oil shale utilization. Therefore, subjects dealing with the terminological definitions, geology and petrology, chemistry, characterization, process engineering, mathematical modeling, chemical reaction engineering, experimental methods, and statistical experimental design, etc. are covered in detail.

Lee, S. (Akron Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Improving Process Performances in Coal Gasification for Power and Synfuel Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The basic idea is to thermally couple a gasifier, fed with coal and steam, and a combustor where coal is burnt with air, thus overcoming the need of expensive pure oxygen as a feedstock. ... Considering the world’s insatiable appetite for energy and oil, the only reasonable large-scale conventional source left in the medium term will have to be coal. ...

M. Sudiro; A. Bertucco; F. Ruggeri; M. Fontana

2008-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

337

The structural break and elasticity of coal demand in China: empirical findings from 1980-2006  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal is the principal primary energy source in China. Research on coal demand is vital for informing China's economic development. In this paper, the theoretical structural break of coal demand was tested using annual time series data from 1980 to 2006. Results indicate that coal demand underwent an intercept structural break during the period 1997-2000 (from ?0.536 breaking to ?0.702). Then long- and short-term relationships between coal demand, income variability, coal price and oil price were explored using a time series modelling technique. Simultaneously, the elasticities of coal demand were tested with respect to income, coal price and oil price. Evidence suggests that the long-run elasticities are 0.560, ?1.161 and 0.733 respectively; with short-term elasticities being 0.716, ?0.067 and 0.017. The conclusion is that there is an integrated relationship between coal demand, income variability, coal price and oil price. China's coal demand will be influenced by the relationship in future. However, the influence from the change in coal price and oil price in the short term are ?0.067 and 0.017, and are insignificant from zero in statistics. This may predicate the unreasonableness existing in the mechanism of China's primary energy pricing. That is, the price of primary energy cannot effectively develop the function of allocating resources.

Jian-Ling Jiao; Ying Fan; Yi-Ming Wei

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

339

Coal Ash and Clean Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... IT is the normal view that the incombustible part of coal is not only a useless but even objectionable diluent. At times in the past, ... , familiar with the theory of contact catalysis of gas reactions, have speculated that the ash constituents might well play an active role in the processes of carbonisation and combustion. ...

H. J. HODSMAN

1926-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

340

Coal Industry Annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 21 million short tons for 1995.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Microbial solubilization of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a cell-free preparation and process for the microbial solubilization of coal into solubilized coal products. More specifically, the present invention relates to bacterial solubilization of coal into solubilized coal products and a cell-free bacterial byproduct useful for solubilizing coal. 5 tabs.

Strandberg, G.W.; Lewis, S.N.

1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

342

Table A57. Capability to Switch from Coal to Alternative Energy Sources by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Capability to Switch from Coal to Alternative Energy Sources by" 7. Capability to Switch from Coal to Alternative Energy Sources by" " Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics, 1991 " " (Estimates in Thousand Short Tons)" " "," "," ", " "," "," Coal",,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" " "," ","-","-","-------------","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ,,"Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"Row" ,,"Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other","Factors"

343

Valuation of plug-in vehicle life-cycle air emissions and oil displacement benefits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...greenhouse gas and SO2 emissions...greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions...electricity generation, oil refining...from coal-fired power plants. Fig...electricity generation mixes as the...natural gas, coal, nuclear...hydroelectric power is assumed...

Jeremy J. Michalek; Mikhail Chester; Paulina Jaramillo; Constantine Samaras; Ching-Shin Norman Shiau; Lester B. Lave

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Clean coal  

SciTech Connect

The article describes the physics-based techniques that are helping in clean coal conversion processes. The major challenge is to find a cost- effective way to remove carbon dioxide from the flue gas of power plants. One industrially proven method is to dissolve CO{sub 2} in the solvent monoethanolamine (MEA) at a temperature of 38{sup o}C and then release it from the solvent in another unit when heated to 150{sup o}C. This produces CO{sub 2} ready for sequestration. Research is in progress with alternative solvents that require less energy. Another technique is to use enriched oxygen in place of air in the combustion process which produces CO{sub 2} ready for sequestration. A process that is more attractive from an energy management viewpoint is to gasify coal so that it is partially oxidized, producing a fuel while consuming significantly less oxygen. Several IGCC schemes are in operation which produce syngas for use as a feedstock, in addition to electricity and hydrogen. These schemes are costly as they require an air separation unit. Novel approaches to coal gasification based on 'membrane separation' or chemical looping could reduce the costs significantly while effectively capturing carbon dioxide. 1 ref., 2 figs., 1 photo.

Liang-Shih Fan; Fanxing Li [Ohio State University, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Oil shortages, climate change and collective action  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reality-such as market power and the difficulty of...of conventional oil, gas and coal reserves are...or 25- MW1 for coal-fired generation. Politicians might naively...carbon-efficient plant (e.g. gas fired) would have made more...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

An energy-economic oil production model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......such as natural gas, coal, hydro and nuclear power...perspective, this energy-economic model offers an opportunity...Testimony before the Joint Economic Committee of the US Congress...HOEOEK, M. (2010) Coal and oil: the dark monarchs...2001) Introduction to Economic Growth, 2nd edn. New......

Peter Berg; Paul Hanz; Ian Milton

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Coal liquefaction and hydrogenation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a coal liquefaction process using two stages. The first stage liquefies the coal and maximizes the product while the second stage hydrocracks the remainder of the coal liquid to produce solvent.

Schindler, Harvey D. (Fair Lawn, NJ); Chen, James M. (Edison, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Coal industry annual 1993  

SciTech Connect

Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

Not Available

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

349

High-Sulfur Coal for Generating Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-Sulfur...FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTORS, COMBUSTION...MAY FLUE GAS DES S E...1971 ). High-sulfur...was brief. Natural gas became...overdependent on natural gas and oil to...elevated pressure with a downward...coals of high ash-fusion...

James T. Dunham; Carl Rampacek; T. A. Henrie

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

350

Appalachian coal awareness conference: promoting Eastern coal  

SciTech Connect

Promoting the development and use of coal, especially coal from the Appalachian region, was the focus of introductory and keynote speeches and a discussion by representatives of the Virginia Coal Council, mining engineers, industry, and the Edison Electric Institute. Governor Dalton's keynote address noted that both producers and consumers attending the conference should work together to promote coal as a solution to the US energy future, and reported the impact that a commitment to coal has had on Virginia's economic growth. Participants in the coal consumers panel discussion raised various economic and regulatory issues.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Direct use of methane in coal liquefaction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a process for converting solid carbonaceous material, such as coal, to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons utilizing methane, generally at a residence time of about 20-120 minutes at a temperature of 250.degree.-750.degree. C., preferably 350.degree.-450.degree. C., pressurized up to 6000 psi, and preferably in the 1000-2500 psi range, preferably directly utilizing methane 50-100% by volume in a mix of methane and hydrogen. A hydrogen donor solvent or liquid vehicle such as tetralin, tetrahydroquinoline, piperidine, and pyrolidine may be used in a slurry mix where the solvent feed is 0-100% by weight of the coal or carbonaceous feed. Carbonaceous feed material can either be natural, such as coal, wood, oil shale, petroleum, tar sands, etc., or man-made residual oils, tars, and heavy hydrocarbon residues from other processing systems.

Sundaram, Muthu S. (Shoreham, NY); Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Direct use of methane in coal liquefaction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a process for converting solid carbonaceous material, such as coal, to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons utilizing methane, generally at a residence time of about 20 to 120 minutes at a temperature of 250 to 750/sup 0/C, preferably 350 to 450/sup 0/C, pressurized up to 6000 psi, and preferably in the 1000 to 2500 psi range, preferably directly utilizing methane 50 to 100% by volume in a mix of methane and hydrogen. A hydrogen donor solvent or liquid vehicle such as tetralin, tetrahydroquinoline, piperidine, and pyrolidine may be used in a slurry mix where the solvent feed is 0 to 100% by weight of the coal or carbonaceous feed. Carbonaceous feed material can either be natural, such as coal, wood, oil shale, petroleum, tar sands, etc., or man-made residual oils, tars, and heavy hydrocarbon residues from other processing systems. 1 fig.

Sundaram, M.S.; Steinberg, M.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

353

Process and apparatus for coal hydrogenation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a coal liquefaction process an aqueous slurry of coal is prepared containing a dissolved liquefaction catalyst. A small quantity of oil is added to the slurry and then coal-oil agglomerates are prepared by agitation of the slurry at atmospheric pressure. The resulting mixture of agglomerates, excess water, dissolved catalyst, and unagglomerated solids is pumped to reaction pressure and then passed through a drainage device where all but a small amount of surface water is removed from the agglomerates. Sufficient catalyst for the reaction is contained in surface water remaining on the agglomerates. The agglomerates fall into the liquefaction reactor countercurrently to a stream of hot gas which is utilized to dry and preheat the agglomerates as well as deposit catalyst on the agglomerates before they enter the reactor where they are converted to primarily liquid products under hydrogen pressure.

Ruether, John A. (McMurray, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Gasification of New Zealand Coals: A Comparative Simulation Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to conduct a preliminary feasibility assessment of gasification of New Zealand (NZ) lignite and sub-bituminous coals, using a commercial simulation tool. ... Coal is a nonrenewable resource; however, the world’s coal reserves amount to twice the combined oil and gas reserves. ... The reasons for the entrained flow gasifier selection include its high suitability to low rank coals (lignites) and the use of entrained flow gasifiers for an IGCC as the industrially preferred choice dictated through experience. ...

Smitha V. Nathen; Robert D. Kirkpatrick; Brent R. Young

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

355

Coal Distribution Database, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2009 Final February 2011 2 Overview of 2009 Coal Distribution Tables Introduction The Coal Distribution Report - Annual provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing State. This Final 2009 Coal Distribution Report - Annual, supersedes the data contained in the four Quarterly Coal Distribution Reports previously issued for 2009. This report relies on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. In addition, the report

356

Clean Coal Power Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"Clean coal technology" describes a new generation of energy processes that sharply reduce air emissions and other pollutants from coal-burning power plants.

357

Coal Mining (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These sections describe procedures for coal exploration and extraction, as well as permitting requirements relating to surface and underground coal mining. These sections also address land...

358

Two plants to put ‘clean coal' to test  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... — to oil company Cenovus Energy of Calgary, Canada, which will pipe the compressed gas deep underground to flush out stubborn oil reserves. The project — meant to launch ... Atlanta, Georgia. That plant, which will turn the low-grade coal lignite into burnable gases, is designed to capture 3.5 million tonnes of CO2 each year, or about ...

Richard Van Noorden

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

359

Super Models, Old King Coal II, & Civil Disobedience For fellow technocrats: "Climate simulations for 1880-2003 with GISS modelE", to appear soon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. There is enough CO2 in readily accessible oil and gas reserves to take atmospheric CO2 close to, and probably issues raised: 1. Coal-CO2 versus Oil-CO2 My statement that releasing a coal-CO2 molecule into the air is more harmful than setting free an oil-CO2 molecule caused puzzlement. Of course the molecules

Hansen, James E.

360

American Coal Council 2004 Spring Coal Forum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Coal Council American Coal Council 2004 Spring Coal Forum Dallas, Texas May 17-19, 2004 Thomas J. Feeley, III Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory ACC Spring Coal Forum, 2004 Presentation Outline * Background * Power plant-water issues * DOE/NETL R&D program * Conclusion/future plans ACC Spring Coal Forum, 2004 Global Water Availability Ocean 97% Fresh Water 2.5% 0 20 40 60 80 100 Ice Groundwater Lakes and Rivers ACC Spring Coal Forum, 2004 Three Things Power Plants Require 1) Access to transmission lines 2) Available fuel, e.g., coal or natural gas 3) Water ACC Spring Coal Forum, 2004 Freshwater Withdrawals and Consumption Mgal / Day Irrigation 81,300 Irrigation 81,300 Thermoelectric 3,310 Consumption Sources: "Estimated Use of Water in the United States in 1995," USGS Circular 1200, 1998

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Coal Characterization in Relation to Coal Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most coals are used worldwide for combustion today. Generally all kinds of coals are applicable for combustion. The major methods of burning are fixed bed firing, fluidized bed firing and suspension firing. Th...

Harald Jüntgen

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Coal 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Coal Technology Program Clean Coal Technology Program Clean Coal 101 Lesson 2: The Clean Coal Technology Program The Clean Coal Technology Program began in 1985 when the United States and Canada decided that something had to be done about the "acid rain" that was believed to be damaging rivers, lakes, forests, and buildings in both countries. Since many of the pollutants that formed "acid rain" were coming from big coal-burning power plants in the United States, the U.S. Government took the lead in finding a solution. One of the steps taken by the U.S. Department of Energy was to create a partnership program between the Government, several States, and private companies to test new methods developed by scientists to make coal burning much cleaner. This became the "Clean Coal Technology Program."

363

Coal-fired diesel generator  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the proposed project is to test the technical, environmental, and economic viability of a coal-fired diesel generator for producing electric power in small power generating markets. Coal for the diesel generator would be provided from existing supplies transported for use in the University`s power plant. A cleanup system would be installed for limiting gaseous and particulate emissions. Electricity and steam produced by the diesel generator would be used to supply the needs of the University. The proposed diesel generator and supporting facilities would occupy approximately 2 acres of land adjacent to existing coal- and oil-fired power plant and research laboratory buildings at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. The environmental analysis identified that the most notable changes to result from the proposed project would occur in the following areas: power plant configuration at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks; air emissions, water use and discharge, and the quantity of solid waste for disposal; noise levels at the power plant site; and transportation of coal to the power plant. No substantive adverse impacts or environmental concerns were identified in analyzing the effects of these changes.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Coal liquefaction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a two-stage liquefaction wherein coal, hydrogen and liquefaction solvent are contacted in a first thermal liquefaction zone, followed by recovery of an essentially ash free liquid and a pumpable stream of insoluble material, which includes 850.degree. F.+ liquid, with the essentially ash free liquid then being further upgraded in a second liquefaction zone, the liquefaction solvent for the first stage includes the pumpable stream of insoluble material from the first liquefaction stage, and 850.degree. F.+ liquid from the second liquefaction stage.

Schindler, Harvey D. (Fairlawn, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Combustion characteristics of coal fuels in adiabatic diesel engines  

SciTech Connect

An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the combustion characteristics of coal fuels in adiabatic diesel engines. For this purpose engine testing was carried out by the fumigation of fine coal powder to the intake of an insulated and uncooled single cylinder diesel engine. The engine tests conducted include three types of fuels - Diesel fuel No. 2 (DF-2), Dual fuel (DF-2 + Coal), and Coal fuel. Excellent combustion characteristics of coal fuels were obtained in the present work in an adiabatic engine operating at high temperatures. The ''thermal ignition'' concept uncovered in this investigation led to a hot ''ignition chamber'' which provided ignition of the coal fuel. The high temperature engine with the ''ignition chamber'' permitted engine operation on 100% coal fuel without any external ignition aids or compression ignition. With the addition of a glow plug, the coal fueled engine was successfully cold started. For the coal fueled engine tests, analysis of cylinder pressure data showed rapid heat release rates, shorter combustion duration and very fast burning of coal powder fuel. Preliminary results of the apparent indicated cycle efficiency calculated from the heat release data, indicate that 100% coal powder fueled engine has higher cycle efficiency than DF-2 fueled engine in an adiabatic configuration. The problems encountered during the engine tests include: variation in the engine speed and load due to non-uniform coal flow rate by the coal feed system, contamination of the lubricating oil with fine coal powder, and wear of conventional piston rings. However, these problems can be solved with an improved coal feed system and wear resistant ceramic materials for the piston rings. 33 refs.

Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Woods, M.E.; Valdmanis, E.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Methods of analysis modified size exchange chromatography method for analysis of heavy oil residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A modified size exchange chromatography method is used to obtain molecular weight distributions, average molecular weight, and other characteristics of heavy oil residues: coal asphalt, petroleum asphalt, vacu...

Changming Zhang; Adnan Alhajji…

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Mexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and Energy Options for the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to oil-, gas-, and coal-fired power generation. Given thegas-fired plants, the CFE is planning a more diversified approach to power generation.

Shields, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Experimental studies on hydrophobic flocculation of coal fines in aqueous solutions and flotation of flocculated coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrophobic flocculation of fine bituminous coal particles in aqueous solutions under mechanical conditioning and without any surfactants has been experimentally studied through the measurements of aggregative efficiency, zeta potential and contact angle in this work. The results have shown that the hydrophobic coal fines strongly aggregated in a wide pH range (3.5â??9.5), even though the particle surfaces were highly charged. This hydrophobic flocculation closely correlated with particle hydrophobicity, having a stronger aggregation for more hydrophobic coal fines. It reaches the maximum degree only if a sufficient kinetic energy is applied to the coal slurry. Also, it has been found that the hydrophobic flocculation could be greatly enhanced by adding a little amount of nonpolar oil. In addition, the flotation of flocculated coal fines was tested on the fine Prince coal for the deep elimination of ash and pyrite from coals in this work. An ultraclean coal with 1.3% ash remaining was produced with 87% combustible recovery. The ash rejection and pyritic sulfur rejection were about 93% and 66%, respectively.

Shaoxian Song

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Industrial Applications Advanced Cyclone Combustor with Internal Sulfur, Nitrogen, and Ash Control - Project Brief [PDF-302KB] Coal Tech Corp., Williamsport, PA PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Demonstration of an Advanced Cyclone Coal Combustor with Internal Sulfur Nitrogen, and Ash Control for the Conversion of a 23-MMBtu/Hour Oil Fired Boiler to Pulverized Coal (Aug 1991) Volume 1: Final Technical Report [PDF-5.9MB] Appendixes I through VI [PDF-8.9MB] CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports The Coal Tech Advanced Cyclone Combustor Demonstration Project -- A DOE Assessment [PDF-234KB] (May 1993) Environmental Reports Annual Environmental Report for The Demonstration of an Advanced Cyclone Coal Combustor, with Internal Sulfur, Nitrogen, and Ash Control for the Conversion of a 23 MMBtu/Hour Boiler to Coal [PDF-812KB] (Sept 1987)

370

Future Impacts of Coal Distribution Constraints on Coal Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transportation component of coal price should also increase;investment. Coal costs and prices are functions of a numberto forecast coal demand, supply, and prices from now to

McCollum, David L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Coal Market Module This  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

51 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2012, DOE/EIA-M060(2012) (Washington, DC, 2012). Key assumptions Coal production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty-one separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations

372

Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 153 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2011, DOE/EIA-M060(2011) (Washington, DC, 2011). Key assumptions Coal production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty-one separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations

373

EIA -Quarterly Coal Distribution  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Distribution Coal Distribution Home > Coal> Quarterly Coal Distribution Back Issues Quarterly Coal Distribution Archives Release Date: June 27, 2013 Next Release Date: September 2013 The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report (QCDR) provides detailed quarterly data on U.S. domestic coal distribution by coal origin, coal destination, mode of transportation and consuming sector. All data are preliminary and superseded by the final Coal Distribution - Annual Report. Year/Quarters By origin State By destination State Report Data File Report Data File 2009 January-March pdf xls pdf xls April-June pdf xls pdf xls July-September pdf xls pdf October-December pdf xls pdf 2010 January-March pdf xls pdf xls April-June pdf xls pdf xls July-September pdf xls pdf xls

374

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Coal 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A "Bed" for Burning Coal A "Bed" for Burning Coal Clean Coal 101 Lesson 4: A "Bed" for Burning Coal? It was a wet, chilly day in Washington DC in 1979 when a few scientists and engineers joined with government and college officials on the campus of Georgetown University to celebrate the completion of one of the world's most advanced coal combustors. It was a small coal burner by today's standards, but large enough to provide heat and steam for much of the university campus. But the new boiler built beside the campus tennis courts was unlike most other boilers in the world. A Fluidized Bed Boiler A Fluidized Bed Boiler In a fluidized bed boiler, upward blowing jets of air suspend burning coal, allowing it to mix with limestone that absorbs sulfur pollutants.

375

Improving the laboratory monitoring of absorbent oil  

SciTech Connect

The performance of absorbent coal tar oil is analyzed as a function of the constituent and group composition. The qualitative and quantitative composition of the oil that ensures the required absorbent properties is determined. Operative monitoring may be based on absorbent characteristics that permit regulation of the beginning and end of regeneration.

V.S. Shved; S.S. Sychev; I.V. Safina; S.A. Klykov [OAO Koks, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping Liquor Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Waste Gases Waste Oils Industrial Wood Byproducts and NAICS Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum Electricity from Local Other than Distillate Diesel Distillate Residual Blast Coke Oven (excluding or LPG and Natural Gas from Local

377

E-Print Network 3.0 - arab oil industry Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: in the exploration, coal and oil and gas industries 10. Fig. 3. SEM for oil shale showing different phases... The chemistry of minerals obtained from the combustion of...

378

Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves 2009 November 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply...

379

The status of coal briquetting technology in Korea  

SciTech Connect

Anthracite is the only indigenous fossil fuel resource produced in Korea and is an important main source of residential fuel. Due to its particular characteristics, the best way to use Korean coal is in the form of briquettes, called {open_quotes}Yontan.{close_quotes} The ability to use this coal as briquettes was a great discovery made nearly 50 years ago and since then, has made a great contribution to the energy consumption of low and middle income households. Korean anthracite in coal briquette form has been used widely for household heating purposes. Collieries in Korea produced no more than one million tons of anthracite annually in the 1960s. Production, however, increased substantially up to about 17 million tons per year in the mid-1970s. In 1986, Korea succeeded in raising its coal production to 24.2 million tons, which was the maximum production level achieved by the Korean coal industrial sector. Since then, anthracite production has fallen. In 1991, coal output dropped to 15.1 million tons, a decrease of 12.2 percent from the 17.2 million tons produced in 1990, due to falling coal demand and rising labor costs. The role of coal as an energy source will be more important in the future to meet projected economic growth in Korea. While the production of indigenous Korean anthracite is expected to decrease under a coal mining rationalization policy, imports of bituminous coal will increase rapidly and will be used as an oil substitute in industry and power generation. In this chapter, general aspects of the Korean coal industry and coal utilization for residential uses, especially the Yontan coal briquetting techniques, are discussed. In addition, coal briquetting technology applications suitable for the APEC region will be presented.

Choi, Woo-Zin

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " 2 Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"LPG",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Billion Cubic Feet." ,,"Natural Gas",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Distillate","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)"

382

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Billion Cubic Feet." ,,"Natural Gas",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Distillate","Residual",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

383

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " 2 Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"LPG",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(e)"

384

,,,,"Reasons that Made Residual Fuel Oil Unswitchable"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.25;" 5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.25;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Residual Fuel Oil Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","Residual Fuel Oil ","Unswitchable Residual","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed as a Fuel","Fuel Oil Fuel Use","Another Fuel","the Products","Fuel Supply","Restrictions(b)","in Place(c)","Alternative Fuels(d)","Reason","H, I, J, and K","Don't Know"

385

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41222 41222 Boat Dealers EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE Sally Leingang (504) 734-4362 sally.leingang@spr.doe.gov 441229 All Other Motor Vehicle Dealers CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE Roland Taylor roland.taylor@wipp.ws CHICAGO OPERATIONS Larry Thompson (630) 252-2711 larry.thompson@ch.doe.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE Karen Downs (720) 356-1269 karen.downs@go.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov KANSAS CITY PLANT C. J. Warrick (816) 997-2874 cwarrick@kcp.com LOS ALAMOS LAB

386

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

53210 53210 Office Supplies and Stationery Stores BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov KANSAS CITY PLANT C. J. Warrick (816) 997-2874 cwarrick@kcp.com NEVADA SITE OFFICE Anita Ross (702) 295-5690 rossal@nv.doe.gov NEVADA TEST SITE Trudy Rocha (702) 295-0557 rocha@nv.doe.gov NEW BRUNSWICK LAB NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov OHIO FIELD OFFICE Pam Thompson (859) 219-4056 pam.thompson@lex.doe.gov PANTEX PLANT Brad Beck (806) 477-6192 bbrack@pantex.com PORTSMOUTH PADUCAH OFFICE Pam Thompson (859) 219-4056 pam.thompson@lex.doe.gov PRINCETON PLASMA LAB Arlene White (609) 243-2080

387

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41219 41219 Other Accounting Services BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NEVADA SITE OFFICE Anita Ross (702) 295-5690 rossal@nv.doe.gov NEVADA TEST SITE Trudy Rocha (702) 295-0557 rocha@nv.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov OHIO FIELD OFFICE Pam Thompson (859) 219-4056 pam.thompson@lex.doe.gov PORTSMOUTH PADUCAH OFFICE Pam Thompson (859) 219-4056 pam.thompson@lex.doe.gov ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD CENTER Jenny Krom (307) 233-4818 jenny.krom@rmotc.doe.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN Gary Bridges (918) 595-6671

388

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11410 11410 Business and Secretarial Schools EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov 611420 Computer Training ARGONNE LAB Karl Duke (630) 252-8842 sblo@anl.gov BROOKHAVEN LAB Jill Clough-Johnston (631) 344-3173 clough@bnl.gov CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE Roland Taylor roland.taylor@wipp.ws CHICAGO OPERATIONS Larry Thompson (630) 252-2711 larry.thompson@ch.doe.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov FEMI LAB Joe Collins (630) 840-4169 jcollins@fnal.gov GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE Karen Downs (720) 356-1269 karen.downs@go.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov

389

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

621420 621420 Outpatient Mental Health and Substance Abuse Centers EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov KANSAS CITY PLANT C. J. Warrick (816) 997-2874 cwarrick@kcp.com NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov PANTEX PLANT Brad Beck (806) 477-6192 bbrack@pantex.com 621493 Freestanding Ambulatory Surgical and Emergency Centers EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov KANSAS CITY PLANT C. J. Warrick (816) 997-2874 cwarrick@kcp.com NEVADA SITE OFFICE Anita Ross (702) 295-5690 rossal@nv.doe.gov NEVADA TEST SITE Trudy Rocha (702) 295-0557 rocha@nv.doe.gov

390

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13312 13312 Textile and Fabric Finishing (except Broadwoven Fabric) Mills EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov Y-12 SITE Gloria Mencer (865) 576-2090 mencergd@y12.doe.gov 314991 Rope, Cordage, and Twine Mills EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov Y-12 SITE Gloria Mencer (865) 576-2090 mencergd@y12.doe.gov 314999 All Other Miscellaneous Textile Product Mills EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov

391

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21213 21213 Engineered Wood Member (except Truss) Manufacturing BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN Gary Bridges (918) 595-6671 gary.bridges@swpa.gov WESTERN POWER ADMIN Cheryl Drake (720) 962-7154 drake@wapa.gov 321920 Wood Container and Pallet manufacturing BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512

392

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21119 21119 Other Electric Power Generation Y-12 SITE Gloria Mencer (865) 576-2090 mencergd@y12.doe.gov 221121 Electric Bulk Power Transmission and Control BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN Gary Bridges (918) 595-6671 gary.bridges@swpa.gov WESTERN POWER ADMIN Cheryl Drake (720) 962-7154 drake@wapa.gov 221122 Electric Power Distribution BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB Larry Sullivan (412) 386-6115 larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB Larry Sullivan (412) 386-6115 larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN

393

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91110 91110 Postal Service EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov KANSAS CITY PLANT C. J. Warrick (816) 997-2874 cwarrick@kcp.com NEVADA SITE OFFICE Anita Ross (702) 295-5690 rossal@nv.doe.gov NEVADA TEST SITE Trudy Rocha (702) 295-0557 rocha@nv.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov PANTEX PLANT Brad Beck (806) 477-6192 bbrack@pantex.com RIVER PROTECTION Susan Johnson (509) 373-7914 susan_c_johnson@orp.doe.gov STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE Sally Leingang (504) 734-4362 sally.leingang@spr.doe.gov 492110 Couriers and Express Delivery Services EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen

394

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11110 11110 Newspaper Publishers EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov 511120 Periodical Publishers AMES LAB Lisa Rodgers (515) 294-4191 rodgers@ameslab.gov ARGONNE LAB Karl Duke (630) 252-8842 sblo@anl.gov BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov BROOKHAVEN LAB Jill Clough-Johnston (631) 344-3173 clough@bnl.gov CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE Roland Taylor roland.taylor@wipp.ws CHICAGO OPERATIONS Larry Thompson (630) 252-2711 larry.thompson@ch.doe.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov FEMI LAB Joe Collins (630) 840-4169 jcollins@fnal.gov GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE

395

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

23110 23110 Automobile and Other Motor Vehicle Merchant Wholesalers BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NEVADA SITE OFFICE Anita Ross (702) 295-5690 rossal@nv.doe.gov NEVADA TEST SITE Trudy Rocha (702) 295-0557 rocha@nv.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov RIVER PROTECTION Susan Johnson (509) 373-7914 susan_c_johnson@orp.doe.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN Gary Bridges (918) 595-6671 gary.bridges@swpa.gov WESTERN POWER ADMIN Cheryl Drake (720) 962-7154 drake@wapa.gov 423120 Motor Vehicle Supplies and New Parts Merchant Wholesalers

396

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31112 31112 Electrometallurgical Ferroalloy Product Manufacturing EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov PANTEX PLANT Brad Beck (806) 477-6192 bbrack@pantex.com 331210 Iron and Steel Pipe and Tube Manufacturing from Purchased Steel EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov PANTEX PLANT Brad Beck (806) 477-6192 bbrack@pantex.com RIVER PROTECTION Susan Johnson (509) 373-7914 susan_c_johnson@orp.doe.gov 331221 Rolled Steel Shape Manufacturing

397

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61110 61110 Office Administrative Services BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov KANSAS CITY PLANT C. J. Warrick (816) 997-2874 cwarrick@kcp.com NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov OHIO FIELD OFFICE Pam Thompson (859) 219-4056 pam.thompson@lex.doe.gov PORTSMOUTH PADUCAH OFFICE Pam Thompson (859) 219-4056 pam.thompson@lex.doe.gov RIVER PROTECTION Susan Johnson (509) 373-7914 susan_c_johnson@orp.doe.gov ROCKY FLATS ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD CENTER Jenny Krom (307) 233-4818 jenny.krom@rmotc.doe.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN

398

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31110 31110 Lessors of Residential Buildings and Dwellings CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE Roland Taylor roland.taylor@wipp.ws CHICAGO OPERATIONS Larry Thompson (630) 252-2711 larry.thompson@ch.doe.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE Karen Downs (720) 356-1269 karen.downs@go.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov IDAHO LAB Stacey Francis (208) 526-8564 stacey.francis@inl.gov IDAHO OPERATIONS Maria Mitchell (208) 526-8600 mitchemm@id.doe.gov LOS ALAMOS LAB Dennis Roybal (505) 667-4419 dr@lanl.gov NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB Larry Sullivan (412) 386-6115 larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB Larry Sullivan (412) 386-6115 larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER

399

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

113110 Timber tract operations 113110 Timber tract operations BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN Gary Bridges (918) 595-6671 gary.bridges@swpa.gov WESTERN POWER ADMIN Cheryl Drake (720) 962-7154 drake@wapa.gov 113310 Cutting and transporting timber BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN

400

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Establishment","Onsite","per Establishment" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million sq ft)","(counts)","(sq ft)","(counts)","(counts)" ,,"Total United...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

83111 83111 Deep Sea Freight Transportation EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov RIVER PROTECTION Susan Johnson (509) 373-7914 susan_c_johnson@orp.doe.gov 483211 Inland Water Freight Transportation EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov RIVER PROTECTION Susan Johnson (509) 373-7914 susan_c_johnson@orp.doe.gov 484110 General Freight Trucking, Local BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER

402

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

922120 922120 Police Protection CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE Roland Taylor roland.taylor@wipp.ws CHICAGO OPERATIONS Larry Thompson (630) 252-2711 larry.thompson@ch.doe.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE Karen Downs (720) 356-1269 karen.downs@go.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov LOS ALAMOS LAB Dennis Roybal (505) 667-4419 dr@lanl.gov NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB Larry Sullivan (412) 386-6115 larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB Larry Sullivan (412) 386-6115 larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov OAK RIDGE LAB Cassandra McGee Stu (865) 576-3560 mcgeecm@ornl.gov OAK RIDGE OPERATIONS Freda Hopper (856) 576-9430

403

Advances in pulverized coal combustion  

SciTech Connect

A combustion system has been developed to operate cost effectively in the difficult regulatory and economic climate of the 1980's. The system is designed to reduce auxiliary fuel oil comsumption by at least 30% while meeting all relevant emissions limits. This is achieved with the fewest components consistent with practical reliable design criteria. The Controlled Flow Split/Flame low NO/sub x/ burner, MBF pulverizer and Two-Stage ignition system are integrated into a mutually supporting system which is applicable to both new steam generators and, on a retrofit basis, to existing units. In the future, a pulverized coal ignition system will be available to eliminate fuel oil use within the boiler.

Vatsky, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Coal based fuels, fuel systems and alternative fuels  

SciTech Connect

The introduction of coal based fuel systems such as coal/air and coal water mixtures was an attempt to minimize the use of heavy fuel oils in large scale power generation processes. This need was based on forecasts of fuel reserves and future pricing of fuel oils, therefore economic considerations predominated over environmental benefits, if any, which could result from widespread use of these fuels. Coal continued as the major fuel used in the power generation industry and combustion systems were developed to minimize gaseous emissions, such as NOx. Increasing availability of natural gas led to consideration of its use in combination with coal in fuel systems involving combined cycle or topping cycle operations. Dual fuel coal natural gas operations also offered the possibility of improved performance in comparison to 100% coal based fuel systems. Economic considerations have more recently looked at emulsification of heavy residual liquid fuels for consumption in power generation boiler and Orimulsion has emerged as a prime example of this alternative fuel technology. The paper will discuss some aspects of the burner technology related to the application of these various coal based fuels, fuel systems and alternative fuels in the power generation industry.

Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Coal based fuels, fuel systems and alternative fuels  

SciTech Connect

The introduction of coal based fuel systems such as coal/air and coal water mixtures was an attempt to minimise the use of heavy fuel oils in large scale power generation processes. This need was based on forecasts of fuel reserves and future pricing of fuel oils, therefore economic considerations predominated over environmental benefits, if any, which could result from widespread use of these fuels. Coal continued as the major fuel used in the power generation industry and combustion systems were developed to minimise gaseous emissions, such as NO{sub x}. Increasing availability of natural gas led to consideration of its use in combination with coal in fuel systems involving combined cycle or topping cycle operations. Dual fuel coal natural gas operations also offered the possibility of improved performance in comparison to 100% coal based fuel systems. Economic considerations have more recently looked at emulsification of heavy residual liquid fuels for consumption in power generation boiler and Orimulsion has emerged as a prime example of this alternative fuel technology. The next sections of the paper will discuss some aspects of the burner technology related to the application of these various coal based fuels, fuel systems and alternative fuels in the power generation industry.

Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R. [ABB Combustion Services Limited, Derby (United Kingdom)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Lead contents of coal, coal ash and fly ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Flameless atomic absorption spectrometry is applied for the determination of Pb in coal, coal ash and fly ash. Lead concentrations in coal and coal ash ranging from respectively 7 to 110 µg...?1 and 120 to 450 µg...

C. Block; R. Dams

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

DESULFURIZATION OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal Cleaning Costs Process Clean Coal Produced, * T/D (DryMM$ Net Operating Cost, $/T (Clean Coal Basis) Net OperatingCost, $/T (Clean Coal Bases) Case NA Hazen KVB Battelle

Wrathall, James Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Planning for an Oil Cutoff  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of coal and nuclear electric plants. The first objective...and other es-sential vehicles were kept running on...rationing. The tax and rebate system would be phased...for oil. But even the electric utilities, which seem...director of the National Electric Reliability Council...

ELIOT MARSHALL

1980-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

409

Catalytic hydrogenation of HyperCoal (ashless coal) and reusability of catalyst  

SciTech Connect

HyperCoal (HPC) is ashless coal obtained by a mild thermal extraction of coal to remove unextractable, heavy compounds, and minerals. The temperature and duration of HPC hydrogenation was systematically varied with and without solvent in an autoclave under hydrogen pressure. Unlike raw coal, hydrogenation of HPC in the absence of solvent proceeded without coke formation when the reaction was performed for 60 min at 450{sup o}C in 10 MPa hydrogen (initial pressure). The hydrogenation catalyst was recycled five times with no detection of deactivation. Longer reactions at slightly higher temperatures (120 min at 460{sup o}C), with replenishing the hydrogen, afforded a 90 wt % oil (hexane-soluble fraction) yield. 27 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Koji Koyano; Toshimasa Takanohashi; Ikuo Saito [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan). Energy Technology Research Institute

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

International Energy Outlook - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2004 Coal Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2025. Coal continues to dominate fuel markets in developing Asia. Figure 52. World Coal Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 53. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2001 and 2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 54. Coal Share of Regional Energy Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data World coal consumption has been in a period of generally slow growth since

411

Coal Distribution Database, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State, Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation, 2009 Final February 2011 2 Overview of 2009 Coal Distribution Tables Introduction The Coal Distribution Report - Annual provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing State. This Final 2009 Coal Distribution Report - Annual, supersedes the data contained in the four Quarterly Coal Distribution Reports previously issued for 2009. This report relies on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys

412

Hydrogen from Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Coal Edward Schmetz Office of Sequestration, Hydrogen and Clean Coal Fuels U.S. Department of Energy DOE Workshop on Hydrogen Separations and Purification Technologies September 8, 2004 Presentation Outline ƒ Hydrogen Initiatives ƒ Hydrogen from Coal Central Production Goal ƒ Why Coal ƒ Why Hydrogen Separation Membranes ƒ Coal-based Synthesis Gas Characteristics ƒ Technical Barriers ƒ Targets ƒ Future Plans 2 3 Hydrogen from Coal Program Hydrogen from Coal Program FutureGen FutureGen Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Gasification Fuel Cells Turbines Gasification Fuel Cells Turbines Carbon Capture & Sequestration Carbon Capture & Sequestration The Hydrogen from Coal Program Supports the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative and FutureGen * The Hydrogen Fuel Initiative is a $1.2 billion RD&D program to develop hydrogen

413

METC research on coal-fired diesels  

SciTech Connect

The METC in-house Coal-Fueled Diesel Research project is part of the overall DOE effort to develop a technology base for diesel engines capable of operating on coal, shale oil or low-cost coal-derived fuels. The in-house effort started in 1985 as a test-bed for coal-derived liquid fuels and will end this fiscal year with the successful completion of METC`s diesel R&D program. Currently METC in-house research and development efforts focus on pilot chamber combustion in METC`s coal-water slurry (CWS) fueled diesel engine. A novel pilot chamber for a direct-injected, coal-fueled diesel engine has been designed and is being tested in METC`s single cylinder research diesel engine. The pilot chamber configuration allows for operation at extended load and speed conditions using 100 percent CWS and no other pilot fuel. The concept involves the use of a small volume chamber exterior to the main cylinder in which approximately 5 percent of the total fuel energy at full load conditions is injected. Lower NO{sub X} levels may be obtained due to leaner burning as well as broader stable performance using only CWS fuel.

McMillian, M.H. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Robey, E.H.; Addis, R.E. [EG and G Washington Analytical Services Center, Inc., Morgantown, WV (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Coal Severance Tax (North Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Coal Severance Tax is imposed on all coal severed for sale or industrial purposes, except coal used for heating buildings in the state, coal used by the state or any political subdivision of...

415

Upgraded Coal Interest Group  

SciTech Connect

The Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) is an EPRI 'users group' that focuses on clean, low-cost options for coal-based power generation. The UCIG covers topics that involve (1) pre-combustion processes, (2) co-firing systems and fuels, and (3) reburn using coal-derived or biomass-derived fuels. The UCIG mission is to preserve and expand the economic use of coal for energy. By reducing the fuel costs and environmental impacts of coal-fired power generation, existing units become more cost effective and thus new units utilizing advanced combustion technologies are more likely to be coal-fired.

Evan Hughes

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

416

Preconversion processing of bituminous coals: New directions to improved direct catalytic coal liquefaction. Final report, September 20, 1991--September 19, 1993  

SciTech Connect

One of the main goals for competitive coal liquefaction is to decrease gas yields to reduce hydrogen consumption. Complexing this element as methane and ethane decreases process efficiently and is less cost effective. To decrease the gas yield and increase the liquid yield, an effective preconversion process has been explored on the basis of the physically associated molecular nature of coal. Activities have been focused on two issues: (1) maximizing the dissolution of associated coal and (2) defining the different reactivity associated with a wide molecular weight distribution. Two-step soaking at 350{degrees}C and 400{degrees}C in a recycle oil was found to be very effective for coal solubilization. No additional chemicals, catalysts, and hydrogen are required for this preconversion process. High-volatile bituminous coals tested before liquefaction showed 80--90% conversion with 50--55% oil yields. New preconversion steps suggested are as follows: (1) dissolution of coal with two-step high-temperature soaking, (2) separation into oil and heavy fractions of dissolved coal with vacuum distillation, and (3) selective liquefaction of the separated heavy fractions under relatively mild conditions. Laboratory scale tests of the proposed procedure mode using a small autoclave showed a 30% increase in the oil yield with a 15--20% decrease in the gas yield. This batch operation projects a substantial reduction in the ultimate cost of coal liquefaction.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Kansas coal resources and their potential for utilization in the near future  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary evaluation of deep coal resources in Kansas indicates nearly 50 billion tons (45 billion MT) of coal in eastern Kansas. The Cherokee Group and Marmaton Groups of Middle Pennsylvanian age are the important coal-bearing geologic units. Most of the coal beds are thin, with only a limited amount (1.85 billion tons or 1.68 billion MT) from coal beds exceeding 42 in. (105 cm) in thickness. Most of these coal thicknesses were determined from geophysical logs run for oil and gas tests, and the potential for a much larger resource of thick coal exists in several areas of the state. Depths of this deep-coal resource range from 100 ft (30 m) down to approximately 3,000 ft (900 m) in the deeper parts of the western Cherokee basin.

Brady, L.L. (Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seyitömer, Himmeto?lu and Hat?lda? oil shale deposits. The results demonstrate that these oil shales are

Fields (in-situ Combustion Approach; M. V. Kök; G. Guner; S. Bagci?

419

Coal Combustion Science  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this activity is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This activity consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency Coal Combustion Science Project. Specific tasks for this activity include: (1) coal devolatilization - the objective of this risk is to characterize the physical and chemical processes that constitute the early devolatilization phase of coal combustion as a function of coal type, heating rate, particle size and temperature, and gas phase temperature and oxidizer concentration; (2) coal char combustion -the objective of this task is to characterize the physical and chemical processes involved during coal char combustion as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, and gas phase temperature and oxygen concentration; (3) fate of mineral matter during coal combustion - the objective of this task is to establish a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms and rates of transformation, fragmentation, and deposition of mineral matter in coal combustion environments as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, the initial forms and distribution of mineral species in the unreacted coal, and the local gas temperature and composition.

Hardesty, D.R. (ed.); Fletcher, T.H.; Hurt, R.H.; Baxter, L.L. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Coal-to-Liquids in the U S Status and Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to-Liquids in the United States to-Liquids in the United States Status and Roadmap CTLtec Americas 2008 June 23 - 24, 2008 Daniel C. Cicero, Technology Manager, Hydrogen and Syngas National Energy Technology Laboratory CTL Tec Americas 2008 / Daniel Cicero / U.S. DOE-NETL / June 2008 * 35% of world energy consumption is from oil 2 * 96% of all world oil used for transportation * World vehicle population at 700 million; - double by 2030 to 1.5 billion; - developing countries to triple * World oil consumption is 84 MMBPD - 20% higher than 1995 - expect 120 MMBPD by 2030 * World oil supplies could peak between 2016 and 2037 3 * Increasing competition with China, India, and other growing nations for oil resources * Oil resources not equitably distributed globally; coal more wide spread 2 Ref: World Coal Institute Report "Coal-to-Liquids"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Weathering and the Fallout Plume of Heavy Oil from Strong Petroleum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weathering and the Fallout Plume of Heavy Oil from Strong Petroleum Seeps Near Coal Oil Point, CA C pattern for heavy oil from the persistent surface slicks; average surface currents appear to modulate by the National Research Council (2). An important emerging issue is the fate of heavy oils introduced

Fabrikant, Sara Irina

422

Process for coal liquefaction in staged dissolvers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is described an improved liquefaction process by which coal is converted to a low ash and low sulfur carbonaceous material that can be used as a fuel in an environmentally acceptable manner without costly gas scrubbing equipment. In the process, coal is slurried with a pasting oil, passed through a preheater and at least two dissolvers in series in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures. Solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals, are separated from the condensed reactor effluent. In accordance with the improved process, the first dissolver is operated at a higher temperature than the second dissolver. This temperature sequence produces improved product selectivity and permits the incorporation of sufficient hydrogen in the solvent for adequate recycle operations.

Roberts, George W. (Emmaus, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Skinner, Ronald W. (Allentown, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

The First Coal Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Plants Coal Plants Nature Bulletin No. 329-A January 25, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE FIRST COAL PLANTS Coal has been called "the mainspring" of our civilization. You are probably familiar, in a general way, with the story of how it originated ages ago from beds of peat which were very slowly changed to coal; and how it became lignite or brown coal, sub-bituminous, bituminous, or anthracite coal, depending on bacterial and chemical changes in the peat, how much it was compressed under terrific pressure, and the amount of heat involved in the process. You also know that peat is formed by decaying vegetation in shallow clear fresh-water swamps or bogs, but it is difficult to find a simple description of the kinds of plants that, living and dying during different periods of the earth's history, created beds of peat which eventually became coal.

424

Coal gasification: Belgian first  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... hope for Europe's coal production came with the announcement this month that the first gasification of coal at depths of nearly 1,000 metres would take place this May in ... of energy.

Jasper Becker

1982-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

425

Microbial solubilization of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention deals with the solubilization of coal using species of Streptomyces. Also disclosed is an extracellular component from a species of Streptomyces, said component being able to solubilize coal.

Strandberg, Gerald W. (Farragut, TN); Lewis, Susan N. (Knoxville, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

“From Coal to Coke”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... IN the Sixth Coal Science Lecture, organized by the British ... Science Lecture, organized by the British Coal Utilization Research Association, and given at the Institution of Civil Engineers on October 16, ...

1957-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

427

Coal Production 1992  

SciTech Connect

Coal Production 1992 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In 1992, there were 3,439 active coal mining operations made up of all mines, preparation plants, and refuse operations. The data in Table 1 cover the 2,746 mines that produced coal, regardless of the amount of production, except for bituminous refuse mines. Tables 2 through 33 include data from the 2,852 mining operations that produced, processed, or prepared 10 thousand or more short tons of coal during the period, except for bituminous refuse, and includes preparation plants with 5 thousand or more employee hours. These mining operations accounted for over 99 percent of total US coal production and represented 83 percent of all US coal mining operations in 1992.

Not Available

1993-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

428

Chemicals from coal  

SciTech Connect

This chapter contains sections titled: Chemicals from Coke Oven Distillate; The Fischer-Tropsch Reaction; Coal Hydrogenation; Substitute Natural Gas (SNG); Synthesis Gas Technology; Calcium Carbide; Coal and the Environment; and Notes and References

Harold A. Wittcoff; Bryan G. Reuben; Jeffrey S. Plotkin

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Coal Distribution Database, 2008  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

4Q 2009 April 2010 Quarterly Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources 4Q 2009 In keeping with EIA's efforts to increase the timeliness of its reports, this Quarterly Coal...

430

Indonesian coal mining  

SciTech Connect

The article examines the opportunities and challenges facing the Indonesian coal mining industry and how the coal producers, government and wider Indonesian society are working to overcome them. 2 figs., 1 tab.

NONE

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

A Characterization and Evaluation of Coal Liquefaction Process Streams  

SciTech Connect

CONSOL characterized 38 process strea m samples from HTI Run PB- 04, in which Black Thunder Mine Coal, Hondo vacuum resid, autom obile shredder residue (ASR), and virgin plastics were used as liquefaction feedstocks with dispersed catalyst. A paper on kinetic modeling of resid reactivity was presented at the DOE Coal Lique -faction and Solid Fuels Contractors Review Conference, September 3- 4, 1997, i n Pittsburgh, PA. The paper, "The Reactivity of Direct Coal Liquefaction Resids", i s appended (Appendix 1). Three papers on characterization of samples from coal/ resid/ waste p lastics co- liquefaction were presented or submitted for presen tation at conferences. Because of their similarity, only one of the papers is appended to this report. The paper, "Characterization o f Process Samples From Co- Liquefaction of Coal and Waste Polymers", (Appendix 2) was presented at the DOE Coal Liquefaction and Solid Fuels C ontractors Review Conference, September 3- 4, 1997, in Pittsburgh, PA. The paper, "Characterization of Process Stream Samples From Bench- Scale Co -Liquefaction Runs That Utilized Waste Polymers as Feedstocks" was presented at the 214th National Meeting of the Ameri can Chemical Society, September 7- 11, 1997, in Las Vegas, NV. The paper, "Characterization of Process Oils from Coal/ Waste Co- Liquefaction" wa s submitted for presentation at the 14th Japan/ U. S. Joint Technical Meeting on Coa l Liquefaction and Materials for Coal Liquefaction on October 28, 1997, in Tokyo, Japan. A joint Burns and Roe Services Corp. and CONSOL pap er on crude oil assays of product oils from HTI Run PB- 03 was presented at the DOE Coal Liquefaction and Solid Fuel s Contractors Review Conference, September 3- 4, 1997, in Pittsburgh, PA. The paper , "Characterization of Liquid Products from All- Slurry Mode Liquefaction", is appende d (Appendix 3).

G. A. Robbins; R. A. Winschel; S. D. Brandes

1998-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

432

Coal gasification apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal hydrogenation vessel has hydrogen heating passages extending vertically through its wall and opening into its interior.

Nagy, Charles K. (Monaca, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

NETL: Coal Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Gasification Systems News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International Activity Program Plan...

434

Coal gasification development intensifies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal gasification development intensifies ... Three almost simultaneous developments in coal gasification, although widely divergent in purpose and geography, rapidly are accelerating the technology's movement into an era of commercial exploitation. ... A plant to be built in the California desert will be the first commercialsize coal gasification power plant in the U.S. In West Germany, synthesis gas from a coal gasification demonstration plant is now being used as a chemical feedstock, preliminary to scaleup of the process to commercial size. ...

1980-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

435

Ore components in coal  

SciTech Connect

The dependence of the mineral content in coal and concentrates on the degree of metamorphism is analyzed.

Kh.A. Ishhakov [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kemerovo (Russian Federation). Institute of Coal and Coal Chemistry, Siberian Branch

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

Coal within a revised energy perspective  

SciTech Connect

The author considers the use of coal within a revised energy perspective, focusing on the factors that will drive which fuels are used to generate electricity going forward. He looks at the world markets for fossil fuels and the difficulties of predicting oil and natural gas supply and prices, as demonstrated by the variability in projections from one year to another in the EIA's Annual Energy Outlook. 4 refs., 1 tab.

Darmstadter, J. [Resources for the Future (RFF), Washington, DC (United States)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Final report, May 1, 1992--April 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Research on sulfate and metal (Mo, Sn) promoted Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts in the current year focused on optimization of conditions. Parameters varied included temperature, solvent, solvent-to-coal ratio, and the effect of presulfiding versus in situ sulfiding. Oil yields were found to increase approximately proportionately with both temperature and solvent-to-coal ratio. The donor solvent, tetralin, proved to give better total conversion and oil yields than either 1-methylnaphthalene or Wilsonville recycle oil. A significant enhancement of both total liquefaction yields and oil yields from lignites and subbituminous coals has been achieved by incorporating iron into the coal matrix by cation exchange. A study has been conducted on the synthesis of iron, molybdenum, and tungsten catalysts using a laser pyrolysis technique.

Huffman, G.P. [ed.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Organic compounds in water extracts of coal: links to Balkan endemic nephropathy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most of the world’s energy is provided by fossil fuels, and coal is the world’s most abundant fossil fuel with reserves substantially greater than those of oil and...2008). “Lignite” ranks in between peat and sub...

S. V. M. Maharaj; W. H. Orem; C. A. Tatu…

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Coal Study Guide for Elementary School  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Focuses on the basics of coal, history of coal use, conversion of coal into electricity, and climate change concerns.

440

Hydrocarbon liquefaction: viability as a peak oil mitigation strategy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...directly usable in power generation or in petrochemical...of methane rich gas, which is piped...technologies/oil-gas/publications...assessment of coal-fired power production. Report...barrel: greenhouse gas emission consequences...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Deashing of coal liquids by sonically assisted filtration  

SciTech Connect

This project seeks to improve the effectiveness and reduce the cost of coal liquefaction by novel applications of sonic and ultrasonic energy. The specific purpose of this project is to develop and improve means for the economical removal of dispersed solid particles of ash, unreacted coal, and spent catalyst from direct and indirect coal liquefaction resids by using sonic or ultrasonic waves. Product streams containing solids are generated in both direct and indirect coal liquefaction processes. Direct coal liquefaction processes generate liquid products which contain solids including coal-originated mineral matter, unreacted coal, and spent dispersed catalyst. The removal of these solids from a product stream is one of the most difficult problems in direct coal liquefaction processes. Crossflow filtration is suitable for continuous flow operation and, when coupled with a sonic or ultrasonic field, may constitute a solution to operational problems of solids separation in coal liquefaction. However, for the efficient and trouble-free operation of crossflow filters the problems arising from dealing with highly viscous coal liquefaction resids need to be avoided. Either crossflow filters suitable for work at elevated temperatures at reduced resid viscosity should be used or the coal liquefaction process network should be modified to allow for dilution of resids using a distillate fraction, e.g., naphtha, diesel oil, etc., to reduce the viscosity of resids. As perhaps even a more practical alternative, field-assisted crossflow filtration of the reactor`s effluent stream prior to the distillation step should be considered. Such an approach will circumvent the more difficult separation of fine and ultrafine solids from highly viscous coal liquefaction resids.

Slomka, B.J. [Ames Laboratory, IA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Coal recovery process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the beneficiation of coal by selective agglomeration and the beneficiated coal product thereof is disclosed wherein coal, comprising impurities, is comminuted to a particle size sufficient to allow impurities contained therein to disperse in water, an aqueous slurry is formed with the comminuted coal particles, treated with a compound, such as a polysaccharide and/or disaccharide, to increase the relative hydrophilicity of hydrophilic components, and thereafter the slurry is treated with sufficient liquid agglomerant to form a coagulum comprising reduced impurity coal.

Good, Robert J. (Grand Island, NY); Badgujar, Mohan (Williamsville, NY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal Prices..AEO 2007 forecast for coal prices for PRB coal. Transmissionregimes. Sensitivity to Coal Prices Figure 9 is similar to

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Computational Modeling of Coal Water Slurry Combustion Processes in Industrial Heating Boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal water slurry (CWS) is typically composed of 60–70% coal, 30–40% water, and 1% chemical additives. It has been developed over the last 20 years as an alternative to fuel oil mainly in industrial and utility b...

L. J. Zhu; B. Q. Gu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Experimental Study on Microwave Pyrolysis of an Indonesian Low-Rank Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microwave pyrolysis of an Indonesian lignite is investigated in this study. ... About half of the world’s coal reserves are low-rank coals. ... Considerable amts. of 3,4-dihydro-1(2H)-naphthalenone (alpha-tetralone) were found in the oil fractions of lignites treated by microwave energy. ...

Nan Wang; Jianglong Yu; Arash Tahmasebi; Yanna Han; John Lucas; Terry Wall; Yu Jiang

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

446

Rail Coal Transportation Rates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Trends, 2001 - 2010 Trends, 2001 - 2010 Transportation infrastructure overview In 2010, railroads transported over 70 percent of coal delivered to electric power plants which are generally concentrated east of the Mississippi River and in Texas. The U.S. railroad market is dominated by four major rail companies that account for 99 percent of U.S. coal rail shipments by volume. Deliveries from major coal basins to power plants by mode Rail Barge Truck Figure 2. Deliveries from major coal basins to power plants by rail, 2010 figure data Figure 3. Deliveries from major coal basins to power plants by barge, 2010 figure data Figure 4. Deliveries from major coal basins to power plants by truck, 2010 figure data The Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana, where coal is extracted in

447

Coal | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coal Coal Coal Coal Coal is the largest domestically produced source of energy in America and is used to generate a significant chunk of our nation's electricity. The Energy Department is working to develop technologies that make coal cleaner, so we can ensure it plays a part in our clean energy future. The Department is also investing in development of carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies, also referred to as carbon capture, utilization and sequestration. Featured Energy Secretary Moniz Visits Clean Coal Facility in Mississippi On Friday, Nov. 8, 2013, Secretary Moniz and international energy officials toured Kemper, the nation's largest carbon capture and storage facility, in Liberty, Mississippi. A small Mississippi town is making history with the largest carbon capture

448

Chemical comminution of coal  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the present research is to study the chemical reactivity of a mixture of methyl alcohol and aqueous sodium hydroxide solution in the temperature range 298 to 363 K, and a caustic concentration of 0 to 10 wt. %, on an Iowa bituminous coal. The sample studied was collected from coal zone 4, equivalent to most historical references to Laddsdale coal. The coals in this zone are typical high-sulfur, high-ash middle Pennsylvania Cherokee group coals. The apparent rank is high-volatile C bituminous coal. The relatively high content of sulfur and 23 other elements in these coals is related to near neutral (6-8) pH conditions in the depositional and early diagenetic environments, and to postdepositional sphalerite/calcite/pyrite/kaolinite/barite mineralization.

Mamaghani, A.H.; Beddow, J.K.; Vetter, A.F.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Coal dust explosibility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports US Bureau of Mines (USBM) research on the explosibility of coal dusts. The purpose of this work is to improve safety in mining and other industries that process or use coal. Most of the tests were conducted in the USBM 20 litre laboratory explosibility chamber. The laboratory data show relatively good agreement with those from full-scale experimental mine tests. The parameters measured included minimum explosible concentrations, maximum explosion pressures, maximum rates of pressure rise, minimum oxygen concentrations, and amounts of limestone rock dust required to inert the coals. The effects of coal volatility and particle size were evaluated, and particle size was determined to be at least as important as volatility in determining the explosion hazard. For all coals tested, the finest sizes were the most hazardous. The coal dust explosibility data are compared to those of other hydrocarbons, such as polyethylene dust and methane gas, in an attempt to understand better the basics of coal combustion.

Kenneth L. Cashdollar

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

RSE Table 5.2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES"

451

Released: March 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million" "Code(a)","End Use","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons

452

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 2.2 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for All Purposes, 2006 (Trillion Btu ) NAICS 1 Code Manufacturing Group Coal Coal Coke and Breeze 2 Natural Gas Distillate Fuel Oil LPG 3 and NGL 4 Residual Fuel Oil Net Electricity 5 Other 6 Shipments of Energy Sources 7 Total 8 311 Food ................................................................................. 147 1 638 16 3 26 251 105 (s) 1,186 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products ..................................... 20 0 41 1 1 3 30 11 -0 107

453

RSE Table 5.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.4;" 4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,3,6,2,3,9

454

Coal Storage and Transportation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal preparation, storage, and transportation are essential to coal use. Preparation plants, located near to the mine, remove some inorganic minerals associated with raw coal. Coal is transported from the mines to the point of consumption, often an electric generating plant, by rail, barge and trucks. Railroads are the predominant form of coal transportation within a country. Global coal trade, movement by large ocean-going vessels, continues to increase. At the end use site, the coal is crushed, ground, and the moisture content reduced to the proper specifications for end use. Coal is stored at various points in the supply chain. Processed coal will weather and oxidize, changing its properties; it can self-ignite, unless precautions are taken. Technology in use today is similar to that used in previous decades. Performance improvements have come from improved software and instruments that deliver real-time data. These improve management of sub-processes in the coal supply chain and reduce costs along the supply chain.

J.M. Ekmann; P.H. Le

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Intensities, 1998 and 2002 > Energy Intensities, 1998 and 2002 > Table 6b Table 6b. End Uses of Energy per Ton of Steel, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (thousand Btu per ton) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS 1 331111) 1998 2 2002 2 2006 2 Total 3 16,957 15,884 17,796 Net Electricity 4 1,602 2,009 4,673 Natural Gas 4,625 4,236 5,969 Coal 487 393 214 Boiler Fuel -- -- -- Coal 81 W 10 Residual Fuel Oil 101 W 266 Natural Gas 527 426 276 Process Heating -- -- -- Net Electricity 751 862 830 Residual Fuel Oil 193 W 112 Natural Gas 3,742 3,592 2,776 Machine Drive -- -- -- Net Electricity 690 939 786 Notes: 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS

456

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS 1 331111) 1998 2002 2006 Total 2 1,672 1,455 1,147 Net Electricity 3 158 184 175 Natural Gas 456 388 326 Coal 48 36 14 Boiler Fuel -- -- -- Coal 8 W 1 Residual Fuel Oil 10 * 4 Natural Gas 52 39 27 Process Heating -- -- -- Net Electricity 74 79 76 Residual Fuel Oil 19 * 11 Natural Gas 369 329 272 Machine Drive -- -- -- Net Electricity 68 86 77 Notes 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. 'Total' is the sum of all energy sources listed below, including net steam (the sum of

457

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency, Table 6b-End Uses of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and 2002 > Table 6b and 2002 > Table 6b Table 6b. End Uses of Energy per Ton of Steel, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (thousand Btu per ton) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1 331111) 19982 20022 20062 Total3 16,957 15,884 17,796 Net Electricity 4 1,602 2,009 4,673 Natural Gas 4,625 4,236 5,969 Coal 487 393 214 Boiler Fuel -- -- -- Coal 81 W 10 Residual Fuel Oil 101 W 266 Natural Gas 527 426 276 Process Heating -- -- -- Net Electricity 751 862 830 Residual Fuel Oil 193 W 112 Natural Gas 3,742 3,592 2,776 Machine Drive -- -- -- Net Electricity 690 939 786 Notes: 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills.

458

Deep coal resources in the Cherokee Group (middle Pennsylvanian) in eastern Kansas  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of over 800 gamma-ray/density and gamma-ray/neutron logs run for oil and gas tests in eastern Kansas shows a wide distribution of coal in the Cherokee Group in this area. With nearly 300 million tons (270 million metric tons) of high-volatile bituminous coal produced in southeastern Kansas, this group was important for further evaluation. Studies of the coals in the Cherokee Group too deep to strip mine in the Cherokee basin and the Forest City basin indicate a coal resource of nearly 50 billion tons (45 billion metric tons). This figure represents coal from 27 different coal beds in the three reliability categories of measured, indicated, and inferred. Most of the coal is recognized as thin bedded (< 28 in. or < 70 cm) like most of the coal beds in the outcrop belt in southeastern Kansas. Six coals beds with a total of over 1.4 billion tons (1.3 billion metric tons) of resources are present where coal thicknesses exceed 42 in. (105 cm) in parts of 12 different counties. Resource quantities of the Cherokee Group coal beds were made using Pacer and Garnet software developed for the National Coal Resources Data System (NCRDS) of the US Geological Survey.

Brady, L.L.; Livingston, N.D.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Combustion characteristics of dry coal-powder-fueled adiabatic diesel engine: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the progress and findings of a research program aimed at investigating the combustion characteristics of dry coal powder fueled diesel engine. During this program, significant achievements were made in overcoming many problems facing the coal-powder-fueled engine. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept was used to enhance the combustion of coal powder fuel. The major coal-fueled engine test results and accomplishments are as follows: design, fabrication and engine testing of improved coal feed system for fumigation of coal powder to the intake air; design, fabrication and engine testing of the TICS chamber made from a superalloy material (Hastelloy X); design, fabrication and engine testing of wear resistant chrome oxide ceramic coated piston rings and cylinder liner; lubrication system was improved to separate coal particles from the contaminated lubricating oil; control of the ignition timing of fumigated coal powder by utilizing exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and variable TICS chamber temperature; coal-fueled engine testing was conducted in two configurations: dual fuel (with diesel pilot) and 100% coal-fueled engine without diesel pilot or heated intake air; cold starting of the 100% coal-powder-fueled engine with a glow plug; and coal-fueled-engine was operated from 800 to 1800 rpm speed and idle to full load engine conditions.

Kakwani, R.M.; Kamo, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

DESULFURIZATION OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fixation in slag or bottom ash, coal gasification, or coallimestone and coal that form little fly ash and trap sulfurSulfate Organic Ash (%) "Organic Sulfur", in Wheelock, Coal

Wrathall, James Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Industrial coking of coal batch without bituminous coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For many years, Kuznetsk-coal batch has always included bituminous coal. Depending on the content of such coal, the batch may be characterized as lean ... classification was adopted by specialists of the Eastern

P. V. Shtark; Yu. V. Stepanov; N. K. Popova; D. A. Koshkarov…

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Future Impacts of Coal Distribution Constraints on Coal Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a particular type of coal, each of which is inherentlyThere are four classes of coal: bituminous, sub-bituminous,minerals Metallic ores Coal Crude petroleum Gasoline Fuel

McCollum, David L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

„Peak Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wissenschaftliche Voraussagen deuten auf „Peak Oil“, das Maximum globaler Erdölförderung, in unserer ... der demokratischen Systeme führen. Psychoanalytische Betrachtung darf „Peak Oil“ für die Zivilisation als e...

Dr. Manuel Haus; Dr. med. Christoph Biermann

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Coal Distribution Database, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4Q 2009 4Q 2009 April 2010 Quarterly Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources 4Q 2009 In keeping with EIA's efforts to increase the timeliness of its reports, this Quarterly Coal Distribution Report is a preliminary report, based on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. The final report will rely on the receipt of annual data to replace the imputed monthly data for smaller electric generation plants that are excluded from the monthly filing requirement, and final data for all other respondents. The Coal Distribution Report traces coal from the origin State to the destination State by transportation mode. The data sources beginning with the 2008 Coal Distribution Report

465

WCI Case for Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Coal The role of as an energy source The role of coal as an energy source Key Messages * Energy demand has grown strongly and will continue to increase, particularly in developing countries where energy is needed for economic growth and poverty alleviation. * All energy sources will be needed to satisfy that demand by providing a diverse and balanced supply mix. * Coal is vital for global energy security. It is abundantly available, affordable, reliable and easy and safe to transport. * In an energy hungry world the challenge for coal, as for other fossil fuels, is to further substantially reduce its greenhouse gas and other emissions, while continuing to make a major contribution to economic and social development and energy security. * Coal is part way down a technology pathway that has already delivered major

466

Pulverized coal fuel injector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulverized coal fuel injector contains an acceleration section to improve the uniformity of a coal-air mixture to be burned. An integral splitter is provided which divides the coal-air mixture into a number separate streams or jets, and a center body directs the streams at a controlled angle into the primary zone of a burner. The injector provides for flame shaping and the control of NO/NO.sub.2 formation.

Rini, Michael J. (Hebron, CT); Towle, David P. (Windsor, CT)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Future Impacts of Coal Distribution Constraints on Coal Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal (PC) or integrated gasification combined cycle ( IGCC)coal (PC) or integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)will be integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) (Same

McCollum, David L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Clinkering properties of rammed coking coal and coal batches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The clinkering properties of rammed coking coal and coal batches are investigated. There is a close relation between the clinkering properties and coke quality.

V. M. Shmal’ko; M. A. Solov’ev

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Analysis of coal-derived synthetic crude from HRI CTSL Run CC-15 and HRI Run CMSL-2  

SciTech Connect

Under subcontract from CONSOL Inc. (US DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-89PC89883), IIT Research Institute, National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research applied a suite of petroleum inspection tests to two direct coal liquefactions net product oils produced in two direct coal liquefaction processing runs. Two technical reports, authored by NIPER, are presented here. The following assessment briefly describes the two coal liquefaction runs and highlights the major findings of the project. It generally is concluded that the methods used in these studies can help define the value of liquefaction products and the requirements for further processing. The application of these methods adds substantially to our understanding of the coal liquefaction process and the chemistry of coal-derived materials. These results will be incorporated by CONSOL into a general overview of the application of novel analytical techniques to coal-derived materials at the conclusion of this contract.

Sturm, G.P. Jr.; Kim, J.; Shay, J. [National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Catalytic steam gasification of coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Catalytic steam gasification of coals ... Steam–Coal Gasification Using CaO and KOH for in Situ Carbon and Sulfur Capture ... Steam–Coal Gasification Using CaO and KOH for in Situ Carbon and Sulfur Capture ...

P. Pereira; G. A. Somorjai; H. Heinemann

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Coal Mining Tax Credit (Arkansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Coal Mining Tax Credit provides an income or insurance premium tax credit of $2.00 per ton of coal mined, produced or extracted on each ton of coal mined in Arkansas in a tax year. An...

472

Illinois Coal Revival Program (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Illinois Coal Revival Program is a grants program providing partial funding to assist with the development of new, coal-fueled electric generation capacity and coal gasification or IGCC units...

473

Weekly Coal Production Estimation Methodology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weekly Coal Production Estimation Methodology Step 1 (Estimate total amount of weekly U.S. coal production) U.S. coal production for the current week is estimated using a ratio...

474

Sandia National Laboratories: Clean Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ManagementClean Coal Clean Coal The term clean coal refers to a number of initiatives that seek to reduce or eliminate the hazardous emission or byproducts that result from using...

475

COAL DESULFURIZATION PRIOR TO COMBUSTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corporation, 5-25~79. on Coal Liquefaction at ChevronHamersma, et a L, "Meyers Process for Coal Desulfurization,"in Wheelock, Coal Desulfurization, ACS Symp. Ser 64 (1977(.

Wrathall, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

The Hobbling of Coal: Policy and Regulatory Uncertainties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...power plants and new large industrial boilers SCIENCE, VOL. 200 must use coal and...electric utilities. Large indus-trial boiler fuel users of oil and gas also were subjected...report are the costs of a representative boiler, and these estimates are suspect. Considerably...

Richard L. Gordon

1978-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

477

Coal Liquefaction Product Gas Analysis with an Automated Gas Chromatograph  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......similar gas streams. For example, it has been easily extended for analyzing gases generated in coal gasification and oil shale retorting by other Gulf researchers. Conclusions It is clear from the above discussion that the Carle TCD/FID GC performed......

Ajay Sood; Richard B. Pannell

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

New petrochemical compositions for use in the coal industry  

SciTech Connect

Various aspects of the use of antifreezing agents in the coal industry are considered. It has been found that, unlike previously proposed compositions, these agents can be prepared based on the products of a single process, the vacuum distillation of fuel oil.

D.O. Safieva; E.V. Surov; O.G. Safiev [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

479

Coal extraction process  

SciTech Connect

Sub-divided coal is extracted under non-thermally destructive conditions with a solvent liquid containing a compound having the general formula:

Hammack, R. W.; Sears, J. T.; Stiller, A. H.

1981-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

480

Clean Coal Projects (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation directs the Virginia Air Pollution Control Board to facilitate the construction and implementation of clean coal projects by expediting the permitting process for such projects.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil coal naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Coal Development (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section provides for the development of newly-discovered coal veins in the state, and county aid for such development.

482

Clean coal technology applications  

SciTech Connect

{open_quotes}Coal is a stratified rock formed of the more or less altered remains of plants (together with associated mineral matter) which flourished in past ages{hor_ellipsis} The problem of the origin and maturing of coal is complicated by the fact that every coal contains, in addition to carbon, hydrogen and oxygen, variable proportions of nitrogen and sulfur which are combined in unknown ways in the organic molecules...{close_quotes}. The challenge with coal has always been the management of its mineral matter, sulfur and nitrogen contents during use. The carbon content of fuels, including coal, is a more recent concern. With clean coal technologies, there are opportunities for ensuring the sustained use of coal for a very long time. The clean coal technologies of today are already capable of reducing, if not eliminating, harmful emissions. The technologies of the future will allow coal to be burned with greatly reduced emissions, thus eliminating the necessity to treat them after they occur.

Bharucha, N.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

483

Spitsbergen Tertiary Coal Fossils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... grains and spores to be observed in coal deposits of Tertiary age in west Spitsbergen (Norsk Polarinstitutt, Med. 79, pp. 1-9; 1954; English summary).

1955-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

484

Coal Gasification Systems Solicitations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Cost Coal Conversion to High Hydrogen Syngas; FE0023577 Alstom's Limestone Chemical Looping Gasification Process for High Hydrogen Syngas Generation; FE0023497 OTM-Enhanced...

485

Coal liquefaction quenching process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is described an improved coal liquefaction quenching process which prevents the formation of coke with a minimum reduction of thermal efficiency of the coal liquefaction process. In the process, the rapid cooling of the liquid/solid products of the coal liquefaction reaction is performed without the cooling of the associated vapor stream to thereby prevent formation of coke and the occurrence of retrograde reactions. The rapid cooling is achieved by recycling a subcooled portion of the liquid/solid mixture to the lower section of a phase separator that separates the vapor from the liquid/solid products leaving the coal reactor.

Thorogood, Robert M. (Macungie, PA); Yeh, Chung-Liang (Bethlehem, PA); Donath, Ernest E. (St. Croix, VI)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Handbook of coal analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Handbook deals with the various aspects of coal analysis and provides a detailed explanation of the necessary standard tests and procedures that are applicable to coal in order to help define usage and behavior relative to environmental issues. It provides details of the meaning of various test results and how they might be applied to predict coal behavior during use. Emphasis is on ASTM standards and test methods but ISO and BSI standards methods are included. Chapter headings are: Coal analysis; Sampling and sample preparation; Proximate analysis; Ultimate analysis; Mineral matter; Physical and electrical properties; Thermal properties; Mechanical properties; Spectroscopic properties; Solvent properties; and Glossary.

James G. Speight

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

US coal market softens  

SciTech Connect

The operators table some near term expansion plans, meanwhile long-term fundamentals look strong. This is one of the findings of the Coal Age Forecast 2007 survey of readers predictions on production and consumption of coal and attitudes in the coal industry. 50% of respondents expected product levels in 2007 to be higher than in 2006 and 50% described the attitude in the coal industry to be more optimistic in 2007 than in 2006. Most expenditure is anticipated on going on new equipment but levels of expenditure will be less than in 2006. 7 figs.

Fiscor, S.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

488

Annual Coal Distribution Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Distribution Report Release Date: December 19, 2013 | Next Release Date: December 12, 2014 | full report | RevisionCorrection Revision to the Annual Coal Distribution Report...

489

Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

This Quarterly Report on coal liquefaction research includes discussion in the areas of (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

Huffman, G.P. (ed.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

Research continues on coal liquefaction in the following areas: (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

Huffman, G.P. (ed.)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)",,"LPG and",,"Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion",,"NGL(d)",,"(million","(million","Other(e)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)",,"(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)",,"(million bbl)",,"short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

492

EIS-0068: Development Policy Options for the Naval Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves prepared this programmatic statement to examine the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of development projects on the Naval Oil Shale Reserve 1, and examine select alternatives, such as encouraging production from other liquid fuel resources (coal liquefaction, biomass, offshore oil and enhanced oil recovery) or conserving petroleum in lieu of shale oil production.

493

Controlled short residence time coal liquefaction process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Normally solid dissolved coal product and a distillate liquid product are produced by continuously passing a feed slurry comprising raw feed coal and a recycle solvent oil and/or slurry together with hydrogen to a preheating-reaction zone (26, alone, or 26 together with 42), the hydrogen pressure in the preheating-reaction zone being at least 1500 psig (105 kg/cm.sup.2), reacting the slurry in the preheating-reaction zone (26, or 26 with 42) at a temperature in the range of between about 455.degree. and about 500.degree. C. to dissolve the coal to form normally liquid coal and normally solid dissolved coal. A total slurry residence time is maintained in the reaction zone ranging from a finite value from about 0 to about 0.2 hour, and reaction effluent is continuously and directly contacted with a quenching fluid (40, 68) to substantially immediately reduce the temperature of the reaction effluent to below 425.degree. C. to substantially inhibit polymerization so that the yield of insoluble organic matter comprises less than 9 weight percent of said feed coal on a moisture-free basis. The reaction is performed under conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure and residence time such that the quantity of distillate liquid boiling within the range C.sub.5 -455.degree. C. is an amount at least equal to that obtainable by performing the process under the same conditions except for a longer total slurry residence time, e.g., 0.3 hour. Solvent boiling range liquid is separated from the reaction effluent and recycled as process solvent.

Anderson, Raymond P. (Overland Park, KS); Schmalzer, David K. (Englewood, CO); Wright, Charles H. (Overland Park, KS)

1982-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

494

Exploratory Research on Novel Coal Liquefaction Concept.  

SciTech Connect

Microautoclave tests confirmed that first-stage subbituminous coal conversions were greater in a more aromatic first-stage solvent. First-stage liquefaction tests with hydride ion `E` showed that high coal conversions can be obtained with a number of different first-stage water-gas-shift catalysts. Eight one-liter autoclave tests were completed. All tests used Black Thunder Mine subbituminous coal and Reilly Industries anthracene oil. Differences among the tests were the hydride ion reagent used, the post-run flash of water, and the shift catalyst. Filtration tests were conducted with five one-liter autoclave products of subbituminous coal. The filtration rates were slower than those that had been obtained with North Dakota lignite products, but were still within a commercially acceptable range. The influence of the first-stage shift catalyst on filtration rates is being investigated. Second-stage hydrotreating of products of tests made to simulate the British coal LSE process and the Wilsonville pilot plant preheaters had lower resid conversion and higher hydrogen uptake than the products of the hydride ion liquefaction reaction. The 300 mL second-stage reactor system went on line this quarter. Refinements in the experimental procedures are under way. A conceptual commercial plant design for the hydride ion reagent `A` case was completed. Evaluations of hydride ion reagent `D` and `E` cases were initiated, and an integrated liquefaction system balance for the hydride ion reagent `E` case was begun. A preliminary review of the final technical and economic reports from the Alberta Research Council study of low-rank coal conversion using the CO-steam process generated a number of questions on the published reports; further analysis of the reports is planned.

Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.

1997-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

495

Coal rank trends in western Kentucky coal field and relationship to hydrocarbon occurrence  

SciTech Connect

Extensive oil and gas development has occurred in the high volatile C bituminous region north of the Rough Creek fault zone, but few pools are known within the Webster syncline south of the fault zone. The rank of the Middle Pennsylvanian coals can be used to estimate the level of maturation of the Devonian New Albany Shale, a likely source rock for much of the oil and gas in the coal field. Based on relatively few data points, previous studies on the maturation of the New Albany Shale, which lies about 1 km below the Springfield coal, indicate an equivalent medium volatile bituminous (1.0-1.2% R{sub max}) rank in the Fluorspar district. New Albany rank decreases to an equivalent high volatile B/C (0.6% R{sub max}) north of the Rough Creek fault zone. Whereas the shale in the latter region is situated within the oil generation window, the higher rank region is past the peak of the level of maturation of the New Albany Shale. The significance of the New Albany reflectancy is dependent on the suppression of vitrinite reflectance in organic-rich shales. The possibility of reflectance suppression would imply that the shales could be more mature than studies have indicated.

Hower, J.C.; Rimmer, S.M.; Williams, D.A.; Beard, J.G. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Laboratory-Scale Coking of Coal?Petroleum Mixtures in Sealed Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Further evidence for coal?petroleum interactions in this system is exhibited by the fact that (i) the product slates from the co-coking reactions are not linear combinations of the products from the feedstocks reacted individually and (ii) the fluidity profiles of the Powellton?resid mixtures are similar to those for two interacting coking coals. ... The boiling distribution of the oils from co-coking resembles that observed when the Powellton coal was coked in the absence of resid. ... In addition, the co-coking reactions show a “coke jump” that occurs at ?465 °C; this jump is not observed when the coal or petroleum feedstocks are reacted individually. ...

Anne E. Fickinger; Mark W. Badger; Gareth D. Mitchell; Harold H. Schobert

2004-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

497

Comparative study of the performance of conventional and column flotation when treating coking coal fines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigations were carried out on coking coal fines by conventional cell and column flotation techniques. The effects of different operating parameters were evaluated for both conventional and column flotation. The coal fines were collected from Bhojudih washery, India. These coal fines averaged 24.4% ash, 19.8% volatile matter and 53.8% fixed carbon on a dry basis. A commercial grade sodium silicate, light diesel oil and pine oil were used as depressant, collector and frother respectively. The flotation performance was compared with release analysis. The conventional flotation results indicated that a clean coal with 14.4% ash could be obtained at 78.0% yield with 88.4% combustible recovery. The ash of the clean coal could be further reduced to 10.1% at 72.0% yield with 85.6% combustible recovery by using column flotation. The column flotation results were close to those obtained by release analysis.

M.S. Jena; S.K. Biswal; S.P. Das; P.S.R. Reddy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Illinois Coal Development Program (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Illinois Coal Development Program seeks to advance promising clean coal technologies beyond research and towards commercialization. The program provides a 50/50 match with private industry...

499

Clean coal technologies market potential  

SciTech Connect

Looking at the growing popularity of these technologies and of this industry, the report presents an in-depth analysis of all the various technologies involved in cleaning coal and protecting the environment. It analyzes upcoming and present day technologies such as gasification, combustion, and others. It looks at the various technological aspects, economic aspects, and the various programs involved in promoting these emerging green technologies. Contents: Industry background; What is coal?; Historical background of coal; Composition of coal; Types of coal; Environmental effects of coal; Managing wastes from coal; Introduction to clean coal; What is clean coal?; Byproducts of clean coal; Uses of clean coal; Support and opposition; Price of clean coal; Examining clean coal technologies; Coal washing; Advanced pollution control systems; Advanced power generating systems; Pulverized coal combustion (PCC); Carbon capture and storage; Capture and separation of carbon dioxide; Storage and sequestration of carbon dioxide; Economics and research and development; Industry initiatives; Clean Coal Power Initiative; Clean Coal Technology Program; Coal21; Outlook; Case Studies.

Drazga, B. (ed.)

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

500

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Clean Coal Today Newsletter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Coal Today Newsletter Clean Coal Today Newsletter Clean Coal Demonstrations Clean Coal Today Newsletter Clean Coal Today is a quarterly newsletter of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy (FE), Office of Clean Coal. Among other things, Clean Coal Today highlights progress under the Clean Coal Power Initiative, the Power Plant Improvement Initiative, and the few remaining projects of the original Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. Reporting on coal R&D performed at government laboratories, as well as in conjunction with stakeholders, it provides key information on FE's coal-related activities, most of which are directed toward near-zero emissions, ultra-efficient technologies of the future. Subscriptions are free – to have your name placed on the mailing list, contact the Editor at Phoebe.Hamill@hq.doe.gov.