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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Explanation of Significant Difference (ESD) for the A-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (731-A/1A) and Rubble Pit (731-2A) (U)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The A-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (731-A/1A) and Rubble Pit (731-2A) (ABRP) operable unit (OU) is located in the northwest portion of Savannah River Site (SRS), approximately 2.4 kilometers (1.5 miles) south of the A/M Area operations. Between 1951 and 1973, Pits 731-A and 731-1A were used to burn paper, plastics, wood, rubber, rags, cardboard, oil, degreasers, and solvents. Combustible materials were burned monthly. After burning was discontinued in 1973, Pits 731-A and 731-1A were also converted to rubble pits and used to dispose of concrete rubble, bricks, tile, asphalt, plastics, metal, wood products, and rubber until about 1978. When the pits were filled to capacity, there were covered with compacted clay-rich native soils and vegetation was established. Pit 731-2A was only used as a rubble pit until 1983 after which the area was backfilled and seeded. Two other potential source areas within the OU were investigated and found to be clean. The water table aquifer (M-Area aquifer) was also investigated.

Morgan, Randall

2000-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

2

Particle and Gas Emissions from a Simulated Coal-Burning Household Fire Pit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particle and Gas Emissions from a Simulated Coal-Burning Household Fire Pit ... Chinese anthracite and bituminous coals produce different amounts of emissions when burned in a fire pit that simulates common rural household use of these fuels. ... Here we present emissions from burning 15 different fuels in a laboratory system designed to mimic the fire pits used in Xuan Wei County, China. ...

Linwei Tian; Donald Lucas; Susan L. Fischer; S. C. Lee; S. Katharine Hammond; Catherine P. Koshland

2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

3

Data Summary Report D-Area Burning/Rubble Pits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to verify that all analytical data collected at the D-Area Burning/Rubble Pits at the Savannah River Site for use in developing risk assessment and potential remediation procedures have been validated at the appropriate level. Any discrepancies or reasons why the data should be rejected for this purpose will be addressed. This report documents the data validation procedures used by Environmental Monitoring Section, Exploration Resources, and RUST Environment {ampersand} Infrastructure for Assigning qualifiers.

Palmer, E.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Recent Mid-Scale Research on Using Oil Herding Surfactants to Thicken Oil Slicks in Pack Ice for In-Situ Burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of burn tests at the scale of 50 m2 with herders and crude oil in a pit containing broken sea ice is planned for ... be presented and the plans for the November burn tests will be discussed.

I. Buist; S. Potter; L. Zabilansky; A. Guarino…

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): New Hanover County Airport Burn Pit Site, New Hanover County, Wilmington, NC. (First remedial action), September 1992. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Hanover site was located on Gardner Road approximately 500 feet west of the New Hanover County Airport terminal, New Hanover, North Carolina. From 1968 to 1979, the site was used for fire-fighter training purposes. During training exercises, jet fuel, gasoline, petroleum storage bottoms, fuel oil, kerosene, and sorbent materials from oil spill cleanup were burned in a pit. During its active years, water from the pit was allowed to flow onto land surfaces. Inspections conducted after the pit was abandoned showed that most of the standing liquid in the pit was water. In addition to the burn pit area, fire-fighting activities resulted in contamination at several other site areas, including an auto burn area; a railroad tank burn area; an aircraft mock-up area; a fuel tank and pipelines area; and two stained soil areas north of the burn pit. The ROD addressed restoration of the aquifer to drinking water quality as a final action for the site. The primary contaminants of concern that affect the soil and ground water were VOCs, including benzene; and metals, including chromium and lead.

Not Available

1992-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

6

Record of decision remedial alternative selection for the Central Shops burning/Rubble Pit (631-6G)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit is listed as a solid waste management unit at the Savannah River Plant. This report describes the remedial action alternative for the pit.

Palmer, E.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631-6G Additonal Sampling and Monitor Well Installation Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631-6G was constructed in 1951 as an unlined earthen pit in surficial sediments for disposal and incineration of potentially hazardous substances, such as metals and organic solvents.

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Health assessment for New Hanover County Burn Pit, Wilmington, New Hanover County, North Carolina, Region 4. CERCLIS No. NCD981021157. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Hanover County Burn Pit, Wilmington, New Hanover County, North Carolina, has been proposed for the National Priorities List by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The burn pit is part of an active airport and was used from 1968-1979 for fire-training exercises. Aviation fuel, waste oil, and petroleum tank bottoms were burned and extinguished with water, carbon dioxide, or dry chemicals. Samples from the pit and soil adjacent to the pit, where pit contents were drained, showed the presence of heavy metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Investigation of the site has been limited to the pit and surrounding soil. Groundwater is close to land surface in the area and may be affected. Groundwater is used for domestic purposes within a 3-mile radius of the site. Based on the available information, the site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances.

Not Available

1990-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

9

RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment for the Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit (631-6G), Volume 1 Final  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Burning/Rubble Pits at the Savannah River Site were usually shallow excavations approximately 3 to 4 meters in depth. Operations at the pits consisted of collecting waste on a continuous basis and burning on a monthly basis. The Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631- 6G (BRP6G) was constructed in 1951 as an unlined earthen pit in surficial sediments for disposal of paper, lumber, cans and empty galvanized steel drums. The unit may have received other materials such as plastics, rubber, rags, cardboard, oil, degreasers, or drummed solvents. The BRP6G was operated from 1951 until 1955. After disposal activities ceased, the area was covered with soil. Hazardous substances, if present, may have migrated into the surrounding soil and/or groundwater. Because of this possibility, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has designated the BRP6G as a Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) subject to the Resource Conservation Recovery Act/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (RCRA/CERCLA) process.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 3): H and H Burn Pit Superfund Site, Hanover County, VA, June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Record of Decision (ROD) presents the final remedial action selected for the HH Burn Pit Superfund Site, located in Hanover County, Virginia (Site). This remedy addresses contaminated soil, sediment, surface water, and ground water at the Site. The Site has been identified using different names in many of the documents in the Administrative Record and on the National Priorities List. This Record of Decision will refer to the Site as the `HH Burn Pit Superfund Site.`

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Investigation of soil contamination at the Riot Control Burning Pit area in J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A remedial investigation was conducted to identify soil contamination in the Riot Control Burning Pit area in J-field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The investigation included geophysical surveys to delineate the filled section of the pit, soil-gas surveys to locate the organic contamination area, field X-ray fluorescence measurements along the burning pit to identify the major metal contamination, and surface and subsurface soil analyses to investigate the nature and extent of contamination. This paper presents the results of this investigation

Wang, Ying-Ya; Yuen, C.R.; Martino, L.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Geophysical investigation of burn pit, 128-H-1, 100-H Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 128-H-1 burn pit is located in the northeast corner of 100-H Area. The objective of the survey was to delineate subsurface features in the 128-H-1 burn pit that may affect the emplacement of soil-gas probes. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and electromagnetic induction (EMI) were the two techniques used in the investigation. The methods were selected because they are non-intrusive, relatively fast, economical, and have been used successfully in other geophysical investigations on the Hanford Site. The GPR system used for this work utilized a 300-MHz antenna to transmit the Em energy into the ground. The transmitted energy is reflected back to a receiving antenna where variations in the return signal are recorded. Common reflectors include natural geologic conditions such as bedding, cementation, moisture, and clay, or man-made objects such as pipes, barrels, foundations, and buried wires. The studied depth, which varies from site to site, was 0--11 ft for this survey. The method is limited in depth by transmit power, receiver sensitivity, and attenuation of the transmitted energy. Depth of investigation is influenced by highly conductive material, such as metal drums, which reflect all the energy back to the receiver. Therefore, the method cannot ``see`` below such objects.

Szwartz, G.J.

1994-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

13

Remedial investigation of the High Explosives Burn Pit facility, Building 829 complex, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory site 300  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To assess any impact on the environment resulting from operations at the High Explosives (HE) Burn Pits at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300, we evaluated the soil, rock, and ground water beneath the burn pit facility. Between November 16, 1986, and January 12, 1987, we drilled eight exploratory holes; one was converted to a monitor well, and another was converted to a piezometer. Seven holes were drilled, geologically logged, and sampled to determine the concentration and extent of substances that may have infiltrated to the subsurface from the burn pits. The eighth hole was completed as a monitor well but was not sampled, and no detailed log was prepared. Electric logging was performed in one exploratory hole further evaluate the geologic conditions. 27 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Webster-Scholten, C.P.; Crow, N.B.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale Julien Ston Supervisors : Prof. Karen properties. SCMs can be by-products from various industries or of natural origin, such as shale. Oil shale correctly, give a material with some cementitious properties known as burned oil shale (BOS). This study

Dalang, Robert C.

15

Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R.; Burnham, A.K.; Chesnut, D.A.; Comfort, W.J. III; Guymon, L.G.; Henning, C.D.; Pedersen, K.B.; Sefcik, J.A.; Smith, J.A.; Strauch, M.S.

1993-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

16

Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait`s oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R. [and others

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

17

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 128-F-3 PNL Burn Pit, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-042  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 128-F-3 waste site is a former burn pit associated with the 100-F Area experimental animal farm. The site was overlain by coal ash associated with the 126-F-1 waste site and could not be located during confirmatory site evaluation. Therefore, a housekeeping action was performed to remove the coal ash potentially obscuring residual burn pit features. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

18

Burning Behaviour of Heavy Gas Oil from the Canadian Oil Sands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This work presents the first systematic investigation and characterisation of the burning behaviour of untreated heavy gas oil from the Canadian oil sands, an intermediate… (more)

Mulherin, Patrick

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 544: Cellars, Mud Pits, and Oil Spills, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 544: Cellars, Mud Pits, and Oil Spills, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The corrective action sites (CASs) within CAU 544 are located within Areas 2, 7, 9, 10, 12, 19, and 20 of the Nevada National Security Site. Corrective Action Unit 544 comprises the following CASs: • 02-37-08, Cellar & Mud Pit • 02-37-09, Cellar & Mud Pit • 07-09-01, Mud Pit • 09-09-46, U-9itsx20 PS #1A Mud Pit • 10-09-01, Mud Pit • 12-09-03, Mud Pit • 19-09-01, Mud Pits (2) • 19-09-03, Mud Pit • 19-09-04, Mud Pit • 19-25-01, Oil Spill • 19-99-06, Waste Spill • 20-09-01, Mud Pits (2) • 20-09-02, Mud Pit • 20-09-03, Mud Pit • 20-09-04, Mud Pits (2) • 20-09-06, Mud Pit • 20-09-07, Mud Pit • 20-09-10, Mud Pit • 20-25-04, Oil Spills • 20-25-05, Oil Spills The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and data confirming that the closure objectives for CASs within CAU 544 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 544 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection.

Mark Krauss and Catherine Birney

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Record of Technical Change for Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Record of Technical Change for Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, Burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (DOE/NV--963-Rev 2, dated November 2004).

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

2005-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Fire Test of Profile Plank for Transformer Pit Fire Protection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In general it is recommended to fill a transformer pit with rock ballast to extinguish the fire if there is a leakage of burning transformer oil. There is a lack of ... design of solutions for fire extinguishment...

Johan Lindström; Michael Försth

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

VOC identification and inter-comparison from laboratory biomass burning using PTR-MS and PIT-MS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from fires of biomass commonly found in the southeast and southwest U.S. were investigated with PTR-MS and PIT-MS, which are capable of fast measurements of a large number of VOCs. Both instruments were calibrated with gas standards and mass dependent calibration curves are determined. The sensitivity of the PIT-MS linearly increases with mass, because the ion trap mass spectrometer used in PIT-MS is more efficient for higher masses, whereas the quadrupole in PTR-MS is most efficient around 70 amu. The identification of \\{VOCs\\} in the complicated mix of the fire emissions was done by gas chromatographic pre separation and inter-comparison with other instrumentation: GC–MS, FTIR, and NI-PT-CIMS. With these state of the art identification methods only 50–75% of the mass detectable by PTR-MS or PIT-MS could be identified. The amount of identified material was dependent on the type of fuel used and the phase of the burns, more can be identified in the flaming stage of the fire. Compounds with masses above 100 amu contributed the largest fraction of the unidentified mass. Emission ratios with CO for all identified and unidentified compounds were determined. Small oxygenated \\{VOCs\\} had the highest emission ratios of the observed compounds.

C. Warneke; J.M. Roberts; P. Veres; J. Gilman; W.C. Kuster; I. Burling; R. Yokelson; J.A. de Gouw

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Single particle size and fluorescence spectra from emissions of burning materials in a tube furnace to simulate burn pits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A single-particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an aerodynamic particle sizer were used to measure the fluorescence spectra and particle size distribution from the particulate emissions of 12 different burning

Yong-Le Pan; Joshua D. T. Houck; Pamela A. Clark; Ronald G. Pinnick

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Burning Droplets Composed of Light Cycle Oil and Diesel Light Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Burning Droplets Composed of Light Cycle Oil and Diesel Light Oil ... 3. General Characteristics ... Now we are considering using LCO as well as its blend with LO in gas turbine (GT) or partially in the combined cycling gas turbine (CCGT),10 as to avoid the tight standards on oil compositions. ...

Guangwen Xu; Masiki Ikegami; Senji Honma; Khoji Ikeda; Hiroshi Nagaishi; Daniel L. Dietrich; Yasuhiro Takeshita

2002-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

25

An optimized groundwater extraction system for the toxic burning pits area of J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Testing and disposal of chemical warfare agents, munitions, and industrial chemicals at the J-Field area of the Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) have resulted in contamination of soil and groundwater. The discharge of contaminated groundwater to on-site marshes and adjacent estuaries poses a potential risk to ecological receptors. The Toxic Burning Pits (TBP) area is of special concern because of its disposal history. This report describes a groundwater modeling study conducted at J-Field that focused on the TBP area. The goal of this modeling effort was optimization of the groundwater extraction system at the TBP area by applying linear programming techniques. Initially, the flow field in the J-Field vicinity was characterized with a three-dimensional model that uses existing data and several numerical techniques. A user-specified border was set near the marsh and used as a constraint boundary in two modeled remediation scenarios: containment of the groundwater and containment of groundwater with an impermeable cap installed over the TBP area. In both cases, the objective was to extract the minimum amount of water necessary while satisfying the constraints. The smallest number of wells necessary was then determined for each case. This optimization approach provided two benefits: cost savings, in that the water to be treated and the well installation costs were minimized, and minimization of remediation impacts on the ecology of the marsh.

Quinn, J.J.; Johnson, R.L.; Patton, T.L.; Martino, L.E.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 128-F-2, 100-F Burning Pit Waste Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2008-031  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 128-F-2 waste site consisted of multiple burn and debris filled pits located directly east of the 107-F Retention Basin and approximately 30.5 m east of the northeast corner of the 100-F Area perimeter road that runs along the riverbank. The burn pits were used for incinerating nonradioactive, combustible materials from 1945 to 1965. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

J. M. Capron

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Record of Decision Remedial Alternative Selection for the D-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (431-D and 431-1D)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The D-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (DBRP) (431-D and 431-1D) Waste Unit is listed as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) 3004(U) Solid Waste Management Unit/Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) unit in Appendix C of the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for the Savannah River Site (SRS). This decision document presents the selected remedial alternative for the DBRP located at the SRS in Aiken, South Carolina.

Palmer, E.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Mason, J.T.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Statement of basis/proposed plan for the Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit (631-6G). Revision 1, Final  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this plan is to describe the preferred alternative for addressing the Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631-6G (BRP6G) located at SRS, in northwestern Barnwell County, South Carolina and to provide an opportunity for public input into the remedial action selection process. Arsenic, beryllium, iron, and octachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxin isomers (OCDD) concentrations in the pit soil are at levels consistent with those found in the background. Therefore, the only contamination attributable to actions in BRP6G is PCB-1254. After the risk contributions of these chemicals are eliminated, the only remaining risk attributable to the pit soil is from PCB-1254 (about 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} via ingestion of vegetables grown on-site). The maximum concentration of PCB-1254 detected in the pit was 0.115 mg/kg, approximately 10% of the residential action level for PCBs of 1 mg/kg. Based on the results of the remedial investigation and the BRA, it is proposed that No Action be performed for the BRP6G. Considering the low levels of residual contamination present principally below 1.2 meters (4 feet) within the pit and the associated risks (about 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}) within the lower level of EPA`s target risk range, action is not warranted for this unit.

Palmer, E.

1996-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

29

Focused feasibility study for surface soil at the main pits and pushout area, J-field toxic burning pits area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Management Division of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation and feasibility study of the J-Field area at APG pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCLA). J-Field is located within the Edgewood Area of APG in Harford County, Maryland. Since World War II, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, testing, and destruction of chemical agents and munitions. These materials were destroyed at J-Field by open burning/open detonation. Portions of J-Field continue to be used for the detonation and disposal of unexploded ordnance (UXO) by open burning/open detonation under authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

Patton, T.; Benioff, P.; Biang, C.; Butler, J. [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, Burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, July 2002, Rev. No. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 140 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 140 consists of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 05-08-01, Detonation Pits; 05-08-02, Debris Pits; 05-17-01, Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site (Buried); 05-19-01, Waste Disposal Site; 05-23-01, Gravel Gertie; 05-35-01, Burn Pit; 05-99-04, Burn Pit; 22-99-04, Radioactive Waste Dump; 23-17-01, Hazardous Waste Storage Area. All nine of these CASs are located within Areas 5, 22, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nevada, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. This CAU is being investigated because disposed waste may be present without appropriate controls (i.e., use restrictions, adequate cover) and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present or migrating at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The NTS has been used for various research and development projects including nuclear weapons testing. The CASs in CAU 140 were used for testing, material storage, waste storage, and waste disposal. A two-phase approach has been selected to collect information and generate data to satisfy needed resolution criteria and resolve the decision statements. Phase I will determine if contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) are present in concentrations exceeding preliminary action levels. This data will be evaluated at all CASs. Phase II will determine the extent of the contaminant(s) of concern (COCs). This data will only be evaluated for CASs with a COC identified during Phase I. Based on process knowledge, the COPCs for CAU 140 include volatile organics, semivolatile organics, petroleum hydrocarbons, explosive residues, herbicides, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and radionuclides. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

NNSA /NV

2002-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

31

Results of Water and Sediment Toxicity Tests and Chemical Analyses Conducted at the Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Waste Unit, January 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Operable Unit consists of two inactive rubble pits (631-1G and 631-3G) that have been capped, and one active burning rubble pit (631-2G), where wooden pallets and other non-hazardous debris are periodically burned. The inactive rubble pits may have received hazardous materials, such as asbestos, batteries, and paint cans, as well as non-hazardous materials, such as ash, paper, and glass. In an effort to determine if long term surface water flows of potentially contaminated water from the 631-1G, 631-3G, and 631-2G areas have resulted in an accumulation of chemical constituents at toxic levels in the vicinity of the settling basin and wetlands area, chemical analyses for significant ecological preliminary constituents of concern (pCOCs) were performed on aqueous and sediment samples. In addition, aquatic and sediment toxicity tests were performed in accordance with U.S. EPA methods (U.S. EPA 1989, 1994). Based on the results of the chemical analyses, unfiltered water samples collected from a wetland and settling basins located adjacent to the CSBRP Operable Unit exceed Toxicity Reference Values (TRVs) for aluminum, barium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, and vanadium at one or more of the four locations that were sampled. The water contained very high concentrations of clay particles that were present as suspended solids. A substantial portion of the metals were present as filterable particulates, bound to the clay particles, and were therefore not biologically available. Based on dissolved metal concentrations, the wetland and settling basin exceeded TRVs for aluminum and barium. However, the background reference location also exceeded the TRV for barium, which suggests that this value may be too low, based on local geochemistry. The detection limits for both total and dissolved mercury were higher than the TRV, so it was not possible to determine if the TRV for mercury was exceeded. Dissolved metal levels of chromium, copper, iron, lead and vanadium were below the TRVs. Metal concentrations in the sediment exceeded the TRVs for arsenic, chromium, copper, and mercury but not for antimony and lead. The results of the water toxicity tests indicated no evidence of acute toxicity in any of the samples. The results of the chronic toxicity tests indicated possible reproductive impairment at two locations. However, the results appear to be anomalous, since the toxicity was unrelated to concentration, and because the concentrations of pCOCs were similar in the toxic and the non-toxic samples. The results of the sediment toxicity tests indicated significant mortality in all but one sample, including the background reference sediment. When the results of the CSBRP sediment toxicity tests were statistically compared to the result from the background reference sediment, there was no significant mortality. These results suggest that the surface water and sediment at the CSBRP Operable Unit are not toxic to the biota that inhabit the wetland and the settling basin.

Specht, W.L.

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

32

Conceptual development of a continuous burning system for oil spill remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or ocean environment. During the period from 1974 to 1977, an average of four mil- lion gallons of crude oil per year were discharged into open waters and this trend is expected to increase (Buist 1987). The situation where combustion of oil employed... requirement of initiating the burning safely. This is done with a automatic valve which regulates the fuel supply. The valve is operated by a radio signal sway from the zone of burning. 45 C. CHEMISTRY OF LIQUID PETROLEUM GASES In a Liquefied Hydrocarbon...

Venkataramaiah, Ramesh H.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

33

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 128-B-3 Burn Pit Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-058  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 128-B-3 waste site is a former burn and disposal site for the 100-B/C Area, located adjacent to the Columbia River. The 128-B-3 waste site has been remediated to meet the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results of sampling at upland areas of the site also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

34

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, Burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision No. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 140: Waste Dumps, Burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Areas 5, 22, and 23 of the NTS, CAU 140 consists of nine corrective action sites (CASs). Investigation activities were performed from November 13 through December 11, 2002, with additional sampling to delineate the extent of contaminants of concern (COCs) conducted on February 4 and March 18 and 19, 2003. Results obtained from the investigation activities and sampling indicated that only 3 of the 9 CASs at CAU 140 had COCs identified. Following a review of existing data, future land use, and current operations at the NTS, the following preferred alternatives were developed for consideration: (1) No Further Action - six CASs (05-08-02, 05-17-01, 05-19-01, 05-35-01, 05-99-04, and 22-99-04); (2) Clean Closure - one CAS (05-08-01), and (3) Closure-in-Place - two CASs (05-23-01 and 23-17-01). These alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. Additionally, the alternatives meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated media at CAU 140.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2003-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

35

Work plan for focused feasibility study of the toxic burning pits area at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Management Division (EMD) of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) of the J-Field area at APG pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCIA). J-Field is within the Edgewood Area of APG in Harford County, Maryland. Since World War II, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, testing, and destruction of chemical agents and munitions. These materials were destroyed at J-Field by open burning and open detonation (OB/OD). Considerable archival information about J-Field exists as a result of efforts by APG staff to characterize the hazards associated with the site. Contamination of J-Field was first detected during an environmental survey of the Edgewood Area conducted in 1977 and 1978 by the US Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA)(predecessor to the US Army Environmental Center). As part of a subsequent USATHAMA environmental survey, 11 wells were installed and sampled at J-Field. Contamination at J-Field was also detected during a munitions disposal survey conducted by Princeton Aqua Science in 1983. The Princeton Aqua Science investigation involved the installation and sampling of nine wells and the collection and analysis of surficial and deep composite soil samples. In 1986, a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit (MD3-21-0021355) requiring a basewide RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) and a hydrogeologic assessment of J-Field was issued by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In 1987, the US Geological Survey (USGS) began a two-phased hydrogeologic assessment in which data were collected to model groundwater flow at J-Field. Soil gas investigations were conducted, several well clusters were installed, a groundwater flow model was developed, and groundwater and surface water monitoring programs were established that continue today-

Biang, C.; Benioff, P.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Corrosion pitting and environmentally assisted small crack growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of pit geometry and the local pit chemistry. In addition, the pit may have significant microtopographical...these can be found in the work of Burns et al. [29] in relation to...that cracks may initiate near the pit mouth, but the specific location...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Selected Abstracts & Bibliography of International Oil Spill Research, through 1998  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hanover County Airport Burn Pit Site, New Hanover County,was water. In addition to the burn pit area, fire-fightingareas north of the burn pit. The ROD addressed restoration

Louisiana Applied Oil Spill Research & Development Program Electronic Bibliography

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Potential for Sea Otter Exposure to Remnants of Buried Oil From the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Length of shoreline surveyed in each subdivision, number of sea otter pits identified, and the tide height of the highest pit are summarized. ... One of the formerly oiled non-SSO sites (Herring Bay, KN5000) and two unoiled reference sites (Lower Herring Bay, KN551A; KN551E) were surveyed in both 2005 and 2006 to provide a temporal overview of otter pitting in the study area. ... (4)?Page, D. S.; Boehm, P. D.; Brown, J. S.; Neff, J. M.; Burns, W. A.; Bence, A. E. Mussels document loss of bioavailable polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and the return to baseline conditions for oiled shorelines in Prince William Sound, Alaska. ...

Paul D. Boehm; David S. Page; Jerry M. Neff; Charles B. Johnson

2007-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

39

SRC burn test in 700-hp oil-designed boiler. Annex Volume C. Boiler emission report. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solvent-Refined Coal (SRC) test burn program was conducted at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) located in Bruceton, Pa. One of the objectives of the study was to determine the feasibility of burning SRC fuels in boilers set up for fuel oil firing and to characterize emissions. Testing was conducted on the 700-hp oil-fired boiler used for research projects. No. 6 fuel oil was used for baseline data comparison, and the following SRC fuels were tested: SRC Fuel (pulverized SRC), SRC Residual Oil, and SRC-Water Slurry. Uncontrolled particulate emission rates averaged 0.9243 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC Fuel, 0.1970 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC Residual Oil, and 0.9085 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC-Water Slurry. On a lb/10/sup 6/ Btu basis, emissions from SRC Residual Oil averaged 79 and 78%, respectively, lower than the SRC Fuel and SRC-Water Slurry. The lower SRC Residual Oil emissions were due, in part, to the lower ash content of the oil and more efficient combustion. The SRC Fuel had the highest emission rate, but only 2% higher than the SRC-Water Slurry. Each fuel type was tested under variable boiler operating parameters to determine its effect on boiler emissions. The program successfully demonstrated that the SRC fuels could be burned in fuel oil boilers modified to handle SRC fuels. This report details the particulate emission program and results from testing conducted at the boiler outlet located before the mobile precipitator take-off duct. The sampling method was EPA Method 17, which uses an in-stack filter.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Experimental studies in a bottom-burning oil shale combustion retort.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??As the domestic demand for oil continues to increase, it is expected that the enormous worldwide oil shale reserves will eventually be tapped. Oil from… (more)

Udell, Kent S.

1905-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Dynamical and radiative response to the massive injection of aerosol from Kuwait oil burning fires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of the injection of large amount of soot comparable to that produced in the burning of oil wells in Kuwait were studied using a 2-D mesoscale model. During the three day numerical simulation the ground-atmosphere system appears to be strongly perturbed. A surface cooling is produced in the first two days above and downwind of the sources. The cooling, between -10 C over the desert and -0.5 C over the sea is dependent on the surface characteristics. The temperature decrease at the ground results in a stratified troposphere which inhibits convection and perturbs the normal diurnal variability of the boundary layer while the upper levels are driven by the radiative warming of the aerosol layer. In this region after few hours the simulation produces a warming of 0.8 C reaching a maximum of 6 C is after 60 hours. During the last 2 days of simulation the long wave radiation emitted by the low altitude atmospheric layers contribute to mitigate the surface cooling. A detailed discussion of the radiative and the dynamical interactions is given and it is shown that beside the specific interest in the short term effects these results may be useful to parameterize the smoke source for a General Circulation Model (GCM) simulation.

Ferretti, R.; Visconti, G. [Univ. L`Aquila (Italy)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Identification of Envelope Determinants of Feline Leukemia Virus Subgroup B That Permit Infection and Gene Transfer to Cells Expressing Human Pit1 or Pit2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...M. Eiden, C. C. Burns, and J. Overbaugh...cells using either human Pit receptor, may be useful...Boomer M. Eiden C. C. Burns J. Overbaugh Three distinct...M. Eiden, C. C. Burns, and J. Overbaugh...cells using either human Pit receptor, may be useful...

James Sugai; Maribeth Eiden; Maria M. Anderson; Neal Van Hoeven; Christopher D. Meiering; Julie Overbaugh

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Record of decision remedial alternative selection for the F-area burning/rubble pits (231-F, 231-1F, and 231-2F)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This decision document presents the selected remedial alternative for the FBRP located at the SRS in Aiken, South Carolina. The selected alternative was developed in accordance with CERCLA, as amended, and to the extent practicable, the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan. This decision is based on the Administrative Record File for this specific RCRA/CERCLA unit.

Palmer, E.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Modulation of Phosphate Uptake and Amphotropic Murine Leukemia Virus Entry by Posttranslational Modifications of PIT-2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Stocking C. Lack of functional PiT-1 and PiT-2 expression on hematopoietic stem...Miyanohara A. LaPorte P. Bouic K. Burns J. C. Friedmann T. A general method...posttranslational modifications of PIT-2. | PIT-2 is a type III sodium...

Pierre Rodrigues; Jean Michel Heard

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

The Importance of Geological Features in Designing Open-Pit Lignite Exploitations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greece covers today 50 per cent of its electric power generation by burning low grade lignite extracted from open pits. Greece or more correctly the Greek Public ... year 1990. To achieve it, new open pits will b...

J. Tanakakis

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Feline Pit2 Functions as a Receptor for Subgroup B Feline Leukemia Viruses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...lines expressing human Pit receptors and for helpful...thank Jenny Riddell, Cara Burns, Jim Sugai, and Sarah...S. Lauring C. C. Burns J. Overbaugh Identification...G. Quigley C. C. Burns M. M. Anderson K. M...Roy-Burman Retrovirus receptor PiT-1 of the Felis catus...

Maria M. Anderson; Adam S. Lauring; Scott Robertson; Clarissa Dirks; Julie Overbaugh

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

An experimental investigation of the burning characteristics of water-oil emulsions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental investigation was conducted on the combustion characteristics of droplets of n-heptane, n-decane, n-dodecane, n-hexadecane and iso-octane emulsified with various amount of water and freely falling in a furnace of controlled temperature. Results demonstrate the intricate influences of water emulsification on the ignition, extinction and micro-explosion of the droplet response, and that the droplet burning time can be significantly reduced through judicious fuel blending so as to minimize the ignition delay and advance the onset of micro-explosion.

Wang, C.H.; Chen, J.T. [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering] [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Requirements: Date of Event: ___________ You must obtain a signed burn permit from Campus Fire Safety or Public Safety.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to obtain a permit. Open burning must be 50 feet away from nearest field, brush, or structure. The fire pit: Open burning - bonfires, camp fires, open pits, etc. Only an approved enclosed fire pit structure canRequirements: Date of Event: ___________ You must obtain a signed burn permit from Campus Fire

Royer, Dana

49

Emissions from Open Burning of Simulated Military Waste from Forward Operating Bases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions from two different burning scenarios, so-called “burn piles/pits” and an air curtain burner/“burn box”, were compared using simulated FOB waste from municipal and commercial sources. ... Aerial- and ground-sampled emissions from three prescribed forest burns in the southeastern U.S. were compared to emissions from laboratory open burn tests using biomass from the same locations. ...

Johanna Aurell; Brian K. Gullett; Dirk Yamamoto

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

50

Burns Prevention  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Burns Burns Burns can result from everyday things and activities in your home. The most common causes of burns are from scalds (steam, hot bath water, hot drinks and foods), fire, chemicals, electricity and overexposure to the sun. Some burns may be more serious than others. The severity of the burn is based on the depth of the burn. First degree burns are the least severe, and third degree burns are the most severe. Call 911 or seek medical attention if you are unsure of how severe your burn is. All burns are susceptible to tetanus (lockjaw). Get a tetanus shot every 10 years. If your last shot was 5 years ago, talk to your doctor - you may need a booster shot. Causes of Burns: Scalds Scalding injuries and burns are caused by hot tap water, hot beverages and food, and steam.

51

Postharvest Biology and Technology 32 (2004) 7987 Postharvest peel pitting at non-chilling temperatures in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Postharvest Biology and Technology 32 (2004) 79­87 Postharvest peel pitting at non Alférez, Jacqueline K. Burns Horticultural Sciences Department, IFAS, Citrus Research and Education Center; accepted 27 September 2003 Abstract `Marsh' white grapefruit are prone to develop postharvest peel pitting

Burns, Jacqueline K.

52

Transmembrane Topology of PiT-2, a Phosphate Transporter-Retrovirus Receptor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ASSEMBLY Transmembrane Topology of PiT-2, a Phosphate Transporter-Retrovirus...generous gift of rabbit anti-PiT-2 serum and to D. Kabat for...meliloti: identification of a pit-like gene. . J.-L. Battini...S. Boomer M. Eiden C. C. Burns J. Overbaugh Three distinct...

Christine Salaün; Pierre Rodrigues; Jean Michel Heard

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

PIT Coating Requirements Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study identifies the applicable requirements for procurement and installation of a coating intended for tank farm valve and pump pit interior surfaces. These requirements are intended to be incorporated into project specification documents and design media. This study also evaluates previously recommended coatings and identifies requirement-compliant coating products.

MINTEER, D.J.

2000-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

54

Pit disassembly motion control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Department of Energy (DOE) Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) is being designed for the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The facility will recover plutonium from excess nuclear weapon pits defined in START II and START III treaties. The plutonium will be stored and used to produce mixed oxide reactor fuel at another new DOE facility. Because of radiation dose issues, much of the pit disassembly work and material transfer will be automated. Automated material handling systems will interface with disassembly lathes, conversion reactors that produce oxide for storage, robotic container welding stations, vault retrieval systems, and nondestructive assay (NDA) instrumentation. The goal is to use common motion control hardware for material transfer and possibly common motion controllers for the unique PDCF systems. The latter is complicated by the different directions manufactures are considering for distributed control, such as Firewire, SERCOS, etc., and by the unique control requirements of machines such as lathes compared to controls for an integrated NDA system. The current design approach is to standardize where possible, use network cables to replace wire bundles where possible, but to first select hardware and motion controllers that meet specific machine or process requirements.

Christensen, L. (Lowell); Pittman, P. C. (Pete C.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Corrosion pitting and environmentally assisted small crack growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...strain in the remaining cross section...water oil and gas production...Reliable life prediction...2003 Natural Gas Pipeline Rupture...initiation life based on pit...pressure steam turbines. Power Plant...the fatigue life of a steam turbine blade steel...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Evaluation of candida precipitin and agglutinin tests for the diagnosis of systemic candidiasis in burn patients.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hospitals and did not include any burn patients. However, in a study on burn patients, the germ tube dispersion...disease entities are apparent pit- falls for this test. This...of systemic candidiasis in the burn patient. Our goal was to determine...

I A Holder; P J Kozinn; E J Law

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Arm Pit Bacteria  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arm Pit Bacteria Arm Pit Bacteria Name: Kayla Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am doing a science fair project on deodorants and anti-perspirants- to see which one hinders bacterial growth more effectively. Here's my problem, I cannot find what kind of bacteria (mainly) flourishes in the axilla (armpit) region. I have been on many different search engines- medical pages- and microbiology pages, and unfortuantely cannot come up with any answers. My school's science fair is March 3rd- so I am in desperate need of an answer!!! I need to be able to order the type of bacteria soon. Thank you. Replies: Try Staphylococcus epidermidis-it is a common organism that grows on the skin. It is not pathogenic (disease-causing) and can be used by students. You could try culturing your own armpit-use a sterile q-tip. Spread the q-tip on the agar plate and then take some of your antiperspirant or deodorant and make a dot in the middle of the plate. Incubate the plate and see if the bacteria are repelled or are resistant. I would measure the size of the zone so you can compare each type of deodorant, etc. You could also check if different people's bacteria are more or less resistant, ie if the same deodorant works for everyone. Each person's bacterial population are a little different. This would require volunteers who would be willing to stick a q-tip in their armpit! If you decide to do this, I would sample the armpit when it is moist, before a shower (dry, clean skin won't have as much bacteria). Good luck.

58

Corrective action plan for corrective action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mercury Fire Training Pit is a former fire training area located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Mercury Fire Training Pit was used from approximately 1965 to the early 1990s to train fire-fighting personnel at the NTS, and encompasses an area approximately 107 meters (m) (350 feet [ft]) by 137 m (450 ft). The Mercury Fire Training Pit formerly included a bermed burn pit with four small burn tanks, four large above ground storage tanks an overturned bus, a telephone pole storage area, and areas for burning sheds, pallets, and cables. Closure activities will include excavation of the impacted soil in the aboveground storage tank and burn pit areas to a depth of 1.5 m (5 ft), and excavation of the impacted surface soil downgradient of the former ASTs and burnpit areas to a depth of 0.3 m (1 ft). Excavated soil will be disposed in the Area 6 Hydrocarbon Landfill at the NTS.

Nacht, S.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Pit Pattern Classification in Colonoscopy using Wavelets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pit Pattern Classification in Colonoscopy using Wavelets Diplomarbeit zur Erlangung des classification method, namely the pit pattern classification scheme, developed some years ago delivers very on the pit pattern classifica- tion method and all methods are highly focused on different wavelet methods

Uhl, Andreas

60

Carbon Sequestration to Mitigate Climate Change Human activities, especially the burning of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and gas, have caused a substantial increase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Sequestration to Mitigate Climate Change Human activities, especially the burning of fossil-caused CO2 emissions and to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. 2.0 What is carbon sequestration? The term "carbon sequestration" is used to describe both natural and deliberate CARBON,INGIGATONSPERYEAR 1.5 Fossil

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Delineation of a coal burn edge with seismic refraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal seams in many areas of western United States have ignited and burned for considerable distances underground. The boundary between the coal and clinker needs to be defined for determination of reserves. Field tests of a seismic refraction method were conducted at Kerr-McGee Coal Corp's open pit Clovis Point mine near Gillette, Wyoming. Explosive sources were detonated in shot holes in the pit floor. Geophone lines, laid on the surface beyond the edge of the pit, crossed from an area of known coal to an area of clinker. Delays in arrival times correlated with the expected beginning of the clinker zone. Waves passing through the clinker also exhibit a significant attenuation. A magnetic survey concluded along the seismic lines showed anomalies in the regions where seismic data indicated the burn edge.

Sontag, K.D.; Wolfe, P.J.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Emissions from Small-Scale Burns of Simulated Deployed U.S. Military Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Piles of simulated military waste were constructed, burned, and emissions sampled at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Open Burn Testing Facility (OBTF), Research Triangle Park, NC. ... The lack of sufficient and safe off-base waste treatment methods in the deployed environment, combined with limited numbers of waste management devices such as incinerators, have forced continued reliance on open burning in “burn pits” as an expedient method of volume reduction and treatment for solid waste during the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. ... (4) In response, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) has published guidance regulating burn pit operations, including limiting their use and prohibiting the burning of recyclable plastics. ...

Brian D. Woodall; Dirk P. Yamamoto; Brian K. Gullett; Abderrahmane Touati

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

63

Global burned area and biomass burning emissions from small fires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as agricultural waste burning or prescribed burning infield agricultural waste burning [e.g. , Yevich and Logan,

Randerson, J. T; Chen, Y.; van der Werf, G. R; Rogers, B. M; Morton, D. C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

SRC burn test in 700-hp oil-designed boiler. Annex Volume B. DOE-Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center report. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) combustion tests were conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. Combustion and flue-gas treatment of three different physical forms of SRC, as well as a No. 6 fuel oil, were evaluated. The three SRC fuels were (1) pulverized SRC Fuel; (2) SRC Residual Fuel Oil; and (3) SRC/Water Slurry. The SRC Residual Fuel Oil was a solution of SRC Fuel dissolved in heated process solvent. Approximately 500 tons of pulverized SRC Fuel and 30,000 gallons of SRC Residual Fuel Oil were combusted in a 700 hp (30 x 130 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr fuel input) oil-designed watertube package boiler. Sixty four-hour ASME combustion tests with three different SRC fuels were successfully concluded. The principal parameters evaluated were excess air levels and combustion air preheat temperature levels. Extensive data were collected on flue-gas levels of O/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, CO, unburned hydrocarbons, SO/sub x/, NO/sub x/, uncontrolled particulates, uncontrolled opacity and carbon content of the flue-gas particulates. Boiler and combustion efficiencies were measured. The particulates were characterized via mass loadings, impactors, in-situ resistivity measurements, ultra-fine sampling, optical large particle sampling, five-stage cyclone sampling and chemical analysis of various cut sizes. A three-field pilot electrostatic precipitator (ESP) containing over 1000 square feet of plate collection area, a reverse air fabric filter pilot dust collector and a commercial pulse-jet fabric filter dust collector were operated at high collection efficiency. The results will be valuable in making recommendations for future tests and will provide a basis for conversion of industrial oil-fired boilers to SRC fuels. 11 references, 20 figures, 29 tables.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Treatment of a severe alkali burn  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The case history of a 20-year-old male patient who sustained an 85 per cent total body surface area alkali burn to his skin, after falling into a caustic lime pit, is reported. Considerable problems regarding the correct estimate of burn wound depth, predominant location of the deepest burn on the posterior half of the body, appropriate wound coverage, and lack of sufficient skin graft donor sites required a complex treatment plan. Excisions to fascia and intradermal debridement were required to achieve an appropriate bed for wound closure. Five per cent mafenide acetate solution (Sulfamylon) was applied to prevent burn wound sepsis. Human allografts and Biobrane were used extensively to achieve temporary wound closure, to provide mechanical protection of freshly autografted wounds, and to prevent desiccation following application of cultured epidermal autografts on to debrided wounds and split thickness skin grafted donor sites. The case illustrates a number of problems associated with the evaluation and treatment of patients suffering severe alkali burns, and demonstrates the implementation of both established and evolving technologies in the management of these injuries.

D. Erdmann; J. Hussmann; J.O. Kucan

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Rerefined Oil: An Option that Saves Oil, Minimizes Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of the annual oil consumption of the United States...desirably, burned as a fuel under carefully...percent of U.S. consumption of petroleum. About...oil was burned as fuel. Another 200 million...from gasoline and diesel fuel, carbon...me-tallic particles from engine wear, and metals...

THOMAS H. MAUGH II

1976-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

67

KINETICS OF PITTING CORROSION IN GELS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation has been carried out on stainless steel to determine the important parameters that related the changes in pH around pits to the current coming from the pits. Potentiodynamic measurements at 1 mV/s were made on Type 302 stainless steel in agar containing 1M NaCl and a wide range pH indicator. Many pits suddenly appeared at the pitting potential, as indicated by the red, low pH region around the pits. Simulations of the changes in pH were based on diffusion from a point current source. The results also were considered in terms of the effects of a minimum detectable thickness of pH change within the gel.

ISAACS, H.S.; ADZIC, G.

2000-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

68

CHerenkov detectors In mine PitS (CHIPS) Letter of Intent to FNAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This Letter of Intent outlines a proposal to build a large, yet cost-effective, 100 kton fiducial mass water Cherenkov detector that will initially run in the NuMI beam line. The CHIPS detector (CHerenkov detector In Mine PitS) will be deployed in a flooded mine pit, removing the necessity and expense of a substantial external structure capable of supporting a large detector mass. There are a number of mine pits in northern Minnesota along the NuMI beam that could be used to deploy such a detector. In particular, the Wentworth Pit 2W is at the ideal off-axis angle to contribute to the measurement of the CP violating phase. The detector is designed so that it can be moved to a mine pit in the LBNE beam line once that becomes operational.

Adamson, P; Davies, G S; Evans, J J; Guzowski, P; Habig, A; Hartnell, J; Holin, A; Huang, J; Kreymer, A; Kordosky, M; Lang, K; Marshak, M L; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J; Miller, W; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Nichol, R J; Patterson, R B; Perch, A; Pfutzner, M; Proga, M; Radovic, A; Sanchez, M C; Schreiner, S; Soldner-Rembold, S; Sousa, A; Thomas, J; Vahle, P; Wendt, C; Whitehead, L H; Wojcicki, S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

CHerenkov detectors In mine PitS (CHIPS) Letter of Intent to FNAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This Letter of Intent outlines a proposal to build a large, yet cost-effective, 100 kton fiducial mass water Cherenkov detector that will initially run in the NuMI beam line. The CHIPS detector (CHerenkov detector In Mine PitS) will be deployed in a flooded mine pit, removing the necessity and expense of a substantial external structure capable of supporting a large detector mass. There are a number of mine pits in northern Minnesota along the NuMI beam that could be used to deploy such a detector. In particular, the Wentworth Pit 2W is at the ideal off-axis angle to contribute to the measurement of the CP violating phase. The detector is designed so that it can be moved to a mine pit in the LBNE beam line once that becomes operational.

P. Adamson; S. V. Cao; J. A. B. Coelho; G. S. Davies; J. J. Evans; P. Guzowski; A. Habig; A. Holin; J. Huang; A. Kreymer; M. Kordosky; K. Lang; M. L. Marshak; R. Mehdiyev; J. Meier; W. Miller; D. Naples; J. K. Nelson; R. J. Nichol; V. Paolone; R. B. Patterson; G. Pawloski; A. Perch; M. Pfutzner; M. Proga; A. Radovic; M. C. Sanchez; S. Schreiner; S. Soldner-Rembold; A. Sousa; J. Thomas; P. Vahle; C. Wendt; L. H. Whitehead; S. Wojcicki

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

70

Project Development Specification for Valve Pit Manifold  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Establishes the performance, design development, and test requirements for the valve pit manifolds. The system engineering approach was used to develop this document in accordance with the guidelines laid out in the Systems Engineering Management Plan for Project W-314.

MCGREW, D.L.

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

71

Pit 9 project: A private sector initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the Pit 9 Comprehensive Demonstration which is intended to demonstrate a cost-effective approach to remediate an Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) waste disposal pit through a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Interim Action. The remediation will include additional requirements, if needed, to provide high confidence that only minor additional work would be necessary to accomplish the final closure as part of the overall final closure strategy for the INEL's Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA).

Macdonald, D.W. (USDOE Idaho Field Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Hughes, F.P.; Burton, B.N. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Pit 9 project: A private sector initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the Pit 9 Comprehensive Demonstration which is intended to demonstrate a cost-effective approach to remediate an Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) waste disposal pit through a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Interim Action. The remediation will include additional requirements, if needed, to provide high confidence that only minor additional work would be necessary to accomplish the final closure as part of the overall final closure strategy for the INEL`s Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA).

Macdonald, D.W. [USDOE Idaho Field Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hughes, F.P.; Burton, B.N. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

BNL | Biomass Burns  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) Aerosols from biomass burning are recognized to perturb Earth's climate through the direct effect (both scattering and absorption of incoming shortwave radiation), the semi-direct effect (evaporation of cloud drops due to absorbing aerosols), and indirect effects (by influencing cloud formation and precipitation. Biomass burning is an important aerosol source, providing an estimated 40% of anthropogenically influenced fine carbonaceous particles (Bond, et al., 2004; Andrea and Rosenfeld, 2008). Primary organic aerosol (POA) from open biomass burns and biofuel comprises the largest component of primary organic aerosol mass emissions at northern temperate latitudes (de Gouw and Jimenez, 2009). Data from the IMPROVE

74

Contributions of wood ash magnetism to archaeomagnetic properties of fire pits and hearths  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Magnetic studies were conducted on a variety of plant ash and ash material from fire pits to investigate the possible contribution of ash to the magnetic signature of hearths. The measurements included magnetic susceptibility, remanence acquisition to saturation (SIRM), alternating field demagnetization of SIRM and remanent coercivity (Brc). We conclude from these studies that wood ash produces fine-grained magnetic iron oxides. These oxides are probably magnetic that is concentrated enough to add to the magnetic signature of hearths and fire pits. At one site (Ellicottville, New York), the ash layer exhibits a magnetic susceptibility that is 22 times greater than a control soil sample from the site. We attribute this large enhancement to repeated burns at the site which continued to add ferromagnetic material to the fire pit. The source of the magnetic material is probably phytoferritin from plants. The variation in the intensity of magnetic anomalies over ancient hearths and fire pits may in part be caused by the magnetic contribution from ash.

Richard G. McClean; W.F. Kean

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Four years of continuous monitoring of the Meirama end-pit lake and its impact in the definition of future uses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Meirama mine (Fig. 1) is an open pit located in the province of A Coruña ... of LIMEISA, and this was used to burn in the 550 MW thermal power station...3 of clay, 50 hm3 of granite, 44 hm3 of schist, and 93 ...

J. Delgado-Martin; R. Juncosa-Rivera…

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

E-Print Network 3.0 - active plant oils Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plant 765 MW Narva Oil Plant 1,3 M bbl Narva Open Pit Mine Mines total annual... of oil shale fired capacity world largest ... Source: Utah, University of - Center for the...

77

EA-1207: Pit Disassembly and Conversion Demonstration Environmental  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

207: Pit Disassembly and Conversion Demonstration Environmental 207: Pit Disassembly and Conversion Demonstration Environmental Assessment and Research and Development Activities EA-1207: Pit Disassembly and Conversion Demonstration Environmental Assessment and Research and Development Activities SUMMARY This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts associated with a proposal to test an integrated pit disassembly and conversion process on a relatively small sample of pits and plutonium metal at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 14, 1998 EA-1207: Finding of No Significant Impact Pit Disassembly and Conversion Demonstration Environmental Assessment and Research and Development Activities August 14, 1998

78

Preparing limestone for burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Classification of limestone before burning can be done by the screening method ... enables us to use the heat of the waste gases from the calcination units.

V. I. Goncharov; T. P. Kirichenko

79

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Closure Report (CR) is to provide documentation of the completed corrective action and to provide data confirming the corrective action. The corrective action was performed following the approved Corrective Action Plan (CAP) (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE], 1999b) and consisted of closure-in-place with partial excavation, disposal, backfilling, administrative controls, and post-closure monitoring. Soil with petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations above the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) Action Level of 100 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) (Nevada Administrative Code, 1996) was removed to a depth of 1.5 meters (m) (5 feet [ft]). The excavations were backfilled with clean fill to restore the site and to prevent contact with deeper, closed-in-place soil that exceeded the NDEP Action Level. According to the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (DOE, 1998), the Mercury Fire Training Pit was used from approximately 1965 to the early 1990s to train fire-fighting and emergency response personnel at the NTS and encompasses an area approximately 85 by 115 m (280 by 380 ft). The location of the Mercury Fire Training Pit is shown in Figure 1 and a site plan is shown in Figure 2. The Mercury Fire Training Pit formerly included a bermed bum pit with four small bum tanks; four large above ground storage tanks (ASTS); an overturned bus, a telephone pole storage area; and several areas for burning sheds, pallets, and cables. During the active life of the Mercury Fire Training Pit, training events were conducted at least monthly and sometimes as often as weekly. Fuels burned during these events included off-specification or rust-contaminated gasoline, diesel, and aviation fuel (JP-4). Other items burned during these events included paint, tires, a pond liner, wood, paper, cloth, and copper cable. Approximately 570 liters (L) (150 gallons [gal]) of fuel were used for each training event resulting in an approximate total of 136,000 L (36,000 gal) of fuel used over the life of the Mercury Fire Training Pit. Unburned fuel was allowed to pool on the ground and was left to eventually volatilize or soak into the soil. In addition, fuels from the ASTS and fuels and fluids from the overturned bus leaked or spilled onto the ground. Approximately 19 L to 38 L (5 to 10 gal) of paint were also burned monthly until sometime in the 1970s.

C. M. Obi

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Corrosion, Design and Materials: General and Pitting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...effect would be negligible. The rate of penetration is governed by pit geometry...larger than its diameter and the rate of penetration may be directly proportional...uniform attack occurs with a penetration rate of up to 0.08 mm per year...

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Burn Wound Infections  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...described, noting areas of circumferential...of body surface area burned (252...protein-rich plasma into terminal...clinical effects of thermal inhalation injury...312). High-frequency ventilation may...standard of care for large thermal injuries...of the burned area is excised during...

Deirdre Church; Sameer Elsayed; Owen Reid; Brent Winston; Robert Lindsay

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Pit Shape Dependence of Super-RENS ROM Disc  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose a fabrication method of Super-RENS ROM disc using PtOx thermal decomposition. The pit shape dependence was also investigated by fabricating elliptical pits. It...

Kurihara, Kazuma; Shima, Takayuki; Nakano, Takashi; Kuwahara, Masashi; Tominaga, Junji

83

Sun tanning/burning  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sun tanning/burning Sun tanning/burning Name: Richardo Cossyleon Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why doesn't the sun affect or burn people with dark pigment in their skin? Replies: Good question! The pigment, melanin, is more toward the surface of the upper skin layer and absorbs ultraviolet rays from the Sun or artificial sources. This absorption protects the lower layers from damage and inflammation (burning). A very dark skinned person may have over a 1000X the protection from UV compared to a fair skinned person. Fair skinned people should use sun-block lotions especially early in the warm season AND keep exposure to the sun, particularly at midday, to less than 30 min. Even if a person gets a good tan, the sun's UV will age the skin over time. It will get wrinkled and develop age lines, etc. after many years of exposure. Moderation is the key!

84

Pit Disassembly and Conversion Demonstration Environmental Ass  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 1998 August 1998 i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1 Related National Environmental Policy Act Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR ACTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.1 Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.2 Purpose and Need for Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3.0 PROPOSED PIT DISASSEMBLY AND CONVERSION DEMONSTRATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 4.0 NO ACTION ALTERNATIVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 5.0 AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 5.1 History and Current Mission of Los Alamos National Laboratory

85

Used oil re-refining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Used oils, especially used lubricating oils which are normally considered waste and are discarded or burned, are reclaimed for reuse by a re-refining procedure involving the steps of: heat soaking the used oil; distilling the heat soaked oil; passing the distillate through a guard bed of activated material; hydrotreating the guard bed treated distillate under standard hydrotreating conditions. If the used oil to be re-refined contains a quantity of water and/or fuel fraction which the practioner considers sufficiently large to be detrimental, the used oil may be subjected to a dewatering/defueling step prior to being heat soaked.

Reid, L. E.; Ryan, D. G.; Yao, K. C.

1985-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

86

Wood would burn  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Absract In view of the world-wide problem of energy sustainability and greenhouse gas production (carbon dioxide), it is timely to review the issues involved in generating heat and power from all fuels and especially new (to the UK) solid fuels, including high moisture fuels such as wood, SRF, oil shale, tar sands and brown coal, which will become major international fuels as oil and gas become depleted. The combustion properties of some of these materials are significantly different from traditional coal, oil and gas fuels, however the technology proposed herein is also applicable to these conventional fuels. This paper presents some innovative combustion system options and the associated technical factors that must be considered for their implementation. For clarity of understanding, the novel concepts will be largely presented in terms of a currently developing solid fuel market; biomass wood chips. One of the most important characteristics of many solid fuels to be used in the future (including oil shale and brown coal) is their high moisture content of up to 60%. This could be removed by utilising low grade waste heat that is widely available in industry to dry the fuel and thus reduce transport costs. Burning such dried wood for power generation also increases the energy available from combustion and thus acts as a thermal transformer by upgrading the low grade heat to heat available at combustion temperatures. The alternative approach presented here is to recover the latent heat by condensing the extrinsic moisture and the water formed during combustion. For atmospheric combustion, the temperature of the condensed combustion products is below the dew point at about 55–65 °C and is only suitable for recovery in an efficient district heating system. However, in order to generate power from the latent heat, the condensation temperature must be increased to the level where the heat can be used in the thermodynamic power cycle. This can be achieved by increasing the combustion pressure to above 80 bar, resulting in the recovered latent heat being available at more than 200 °C. It can then be used to increase the cycle efficiency by about 15% by pre-heating the boiler water and/or combustion air etc. A further advantage is that the high pressure of the combustion gases also reduces the superheater tube stress since it can balance the steam pressure. The key advantage of this high pressure flue gas is that it is above the pressure at which carbon dioxide ‘condenses’ to a liquid or supercritical gas at atmospheric temperature. Thus when used with oxy-fuel combustion, the carbon dioxide flue gas from which the moisture has been condensed can be cooled to atmospheric temperature and the supercritical CO2 can be fed directly into the pipes leading to the sequestration site. An important consideration of these strategies is to ensure that non-condensable gases in the exhaust, including oxygen and nitrogen, do not adversely affect the ‘condensation’ processes. When oxy-fuel combustion is used, the flame temperature must be moderated by a cool diluent. Recycled carbon dioxide is often proposed for this duty. However, since the latent heat is recovered, the moisture or even additional water can fulfil this role. This latter option may be advantageous since it is more efficient to pump wood chip fuel in water into the high pressure zone rather than feed solid wood particles. Surplus water can be simply drained and the wet wood chips are a good fuel when the latent heat of the moisture in the fuel gases is recovered into the power cycle. Bearing in mind that it is much more efficient to pump a liquid to high pressure than to compress the same material as a gas, indicates that cryogenic oxygen is a suitable material to use for an efficient power station that generates energy from biomass (or other fuels such as coal etc). Finally, combustion of the hydrogen from the water–gas reaction with oxygen allows the steam temperature in the turbine to be increased to the “gas-turbine engine” range of 1000–1400 °C an

Jim Swithenbank; Qun Chen; Xiaohui Zhang; Vida Sharifi; Mohamed Pourkashanian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Combustion of oil on water: an experimental program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study determined how well crude and fuel oils burn on water. Objectives were: (1) to measure the burning rates for several oils; (2) to determine whether adding heat improves the oils' combustibility; (3) to identify the conditions necessary to ignite fuels known to be difficult to ignite on ocean waters (e.g., diesel and Bunker C fuel oils); and (4) to evaluate the accuracy of an oil-burning model proposed by Thompson, Dawson, and Goodier (1979). Observations were made about how weathering and the thickness of the oil layer affect the combustion of crude and fuel oils. Nine oils commonly transported on the world's major waterways were tested. Burns were first conducted in Oklahoma under warm-weather conditions (approx. 30/sup 0/C) and later in Ohio under cold-weather conditions (approx. 0/sup 0/C to 10/sup 0/C).

None

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Environmental Protection Problems Connected to the Disposal of Ammunition and Explosives by Open Pit Burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At the end of its functional life time, in service ammunition has to be disposed, as welt as the war time ammunition and explosives which are still beiing recovered. Formerly the conventional way of disposing amm...

Drs N. H. A. van Ham; A. Verweij

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Coordinate Measuring Machine Pit Artifact Inspection Procedure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this document is to outline a procedure for dimensional measurement of Los Alamos National Laboratory's CMM Pit Artifact. This procedure will be used by the Manufacturing Practice's Inspection Technology Subgroup of the Interagency Manufacturing Operations Group and Joint Operations Weapon Operations Group (IMOG/JOWOG 39) round robin participants. The intent is to assess the state of industry within the Nuclear Weapons Complex for measurements made on this type of part and find which current measurement strategies and techniques produce the best results.

Montano, Joshua D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

90

White phosphorus pits focused feasibility study final July 2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The White Phosphorus Burning Pits (WPP) Area of Concern (AOC) is a site of about 5.5 acres (2.2 ha) located in the J-Field Study Area, in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland (Figure 1.1). Considerable information about the WPP exists as a result of efforts to characterize the hazards associated with J-Field. Contamination in the J-Field Study Area was first detected during an environmental survey of the APG Edgewood Area conducted in 1977 and 1978 (Nemeth et al. 1983) by the U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA; predecessor to the U.S. Army Environmental Center). As part of a subsequent USATHAMA environmental survey, 11 wells were installed and sampled at J-Field (three of them at the WPP) (Nemeth 1989). Contamination was also detected in 1983 during a munitions disposal survey conducted by Princeton Aqua Science (1984). The Princeton Aqua Science investigation involved installing and sampling nine wells (four at the WPP) and collecting and analyzing surficial and deep composite soil samples (including samples from the WPP area). In 1986, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit (MD3-21-002-1355) requiring a post-wide RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) and a hydrogeologic assessment of J-Field. In 1987, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began a two-phase hydrogeologic assessment in which data were collected to model groundwater flow at J-Field. Soil-gas investigations were conducted, several well clusters were installed (four at the WPP), a groundwater flow model was developed, and groundwater and surface water monitoring programs were established that continue today. The results of the USGS study were published by Hughes (1993).

Davis, B.; Martino, L.

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

91

A Urinary Metabolite of Phenanthrene as a Biomarker of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Metabolic Activation in Workers Exposed to Residual Oil Fly Ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the boilers and accumulated in the ash pit. We studied the association between urinary...tubing of the boilers and repairing the ash pit. Most subjects did not consistently wear...New York (NY): Springer; 1997. 28 Burns DM. Cigarettes and cigarette smoking...

Jee Young Kim; Stephen S. Hecht; Sutapa Mukherjee; Steven G. Carmella; Ema G. Rodrigues; and David C. Christiani

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Oil/gas collector/separator for underwater oil leaks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oil/gas collector/separator for recovery of oil leaking, for example, from an offshore or underwater oil well. The separator is floated over the point of the leak and tethered in place so as to receive oil/gas floating, or forced under pressure, toward the water surface from either a broken or leaking oil well casing, line, or sunken ship. The separator is provided with a downwardly extending skirt to contain the oil/gas which floats or is forced upward into a dome wherein the gas is separated from the oil/water, with the gas being flared (burned) at the top of the dome, and the oil is separated from water and pumped to a point of use. Since the density of oil is less than that of water it can be easily separated from any water entering the dome.

Henning, Carl D. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Lessons Learned from Pit Viper System Deployment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tele-operated and robotic systems operated in unstructured field environments pose unique challenges for tool design. Since field tasks are not always well defined and the robot work area usually cannot be designed for ease of operation, the tools must be versatile. It's important to carefully consider the orientation of the grip the robot takes on the tool, as it's not easily changed in the field. The stiffness of the robot and the possibility of robot positioning errors encourages the use of non-contact or minimal-contact tooling. While normal hand tools can usually be modified for use by the robot, this is not always the most effective approach. It's desirable to have tooling that is relatively independent of the robot; in this case, the robot places the tool near the desired work location and the tool performs its task relatively independently. Here we consider the adaptation of a number of tools for cleanup of a radioactively contaminated piping junction and valve pit. The tasks to be considered are debris removal (small nuts and bolts and pipe up to 100 mm in diameter), size reduction, surface cleaning, and support of past practice crane-based methods for working in the pits.

Catalan, Michael A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Valdez, Patrick LJ; Bailey, Sharon A.; Baker, Carl P.

2002-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

94

Introduction to Pits and Weapons Systems (U)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Nuclear Explosive Package includes the Primary, Secondary, Radiation Case and related components. This is the part of the weapon that produces nuclear yield and it converts mechanical energy into nuclear energy. The pit is composed of materials that allow mechanical energy to be converted to electromagnetic energy. Fabrication processes used are typical of any metal fabrication facility: casting, forming, machining and welding. Some of the materials used in pits include: Plutonium, Uranium, Stainless Steel, Beryllium, Titanium, and Aluminum. Gloveboxes are used for three reasons: (1) Protect workers and public from easily transported, finely divided plutonium oxides - (a) Plutonium is very reactive and produces very fine particulate oxides, (b) While not the 'Most dangerous material in the world' of Manhattan Project lore, plutonium is hazardous to health of workers if not properly controlled; (2) Protect plutonium from reactive materials - (a) Plutonium is extremely reactive at ambient conditions with several components found in air: oxygen, water, hydrogen, (b) As with most reactive metals, reactions with these materials may be violent and difficult to control, (c) As with most fabricated metal products, corrosion may significantly affect the mechanical, chemical, and physical properties of the product; and (3) Provide shielding from radioactive decay products: {alpha}, {gamma}, and {eta} are commonly associated with plutonium decay, as well as highly radioactive materials such as {sup 241}Am and {sup 238}Pu.

Kautz, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

95

Prescribed Range Burning in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and implement a prescribed burn, including predicting fire and weather behavior, topography, fuel, firing techniques, fire containment, safety precautions and costs. A graph illustrates factors that influence prescribed burning and a table shows the relationship...

White, Larry D.; Hanselka, C. Wayne

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

96

13, 3226932289, 2013 Biomass burning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 13, 32269­32289, 2013 Biomass burning aerosol properties over the Northern Great Plains T (ACP). Please refer to the corresponding final paper in ACP if available. Biomass burning aerosol Geosciences Union. 32269 #12;ACPD 13, 32269­32289, 2013 Biomass burning aerosol properties over the Northern

Dong, Xiquan

97

7, 1733917366, 2007 Biomass burning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 7, 17339­17366, 2007 Biomass burning plumes during the AMMA wet season experiment C. H. Mari a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Tracing biomass burning plumes from. Mari (marc@aero.obs-mip.fr) 17339 #12;ACPD 7, 17339­17366, 2007 Biomass burning plumes during the AMMA

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

98

241-AY-102 Leak Detection Pit Drain Line Inspection Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a description of the design components, operational approach, and results from the Tank AY-102 leak detection pit drain piping visual inspection. To perform this inspection a custom robotic crawler with a deployment device was designed, built, and operated by IHI Southwest Technologies, Inc. for WRPS to inspect the 6-inch leak detection pit drain line.

Boomer, Kayle D. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Engeman, Jason K. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Gunter, Jason R. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Joslyn, Cameron C. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Vazquez, Brandon J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Venetz, Theodore J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Garfield, John S. [AEM Consulting (United States)

2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

99

INTERGRANULAR CORROSION OF SINGLE PHASE ALUMINIUM AS A PITTING PHENOMENON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERGRANULAR CORROSION OF SINGLE PHASE ALUMINIUM AS A PITTING PHENOMENON M. METZGER Department of pitting corrosion in sulfuric acid containing sodium chloride were described. Intergranular fissuring in producing this type of attack. The intergranular corrosion phenomena which are exhibited by high purity

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

100

Program TribPit Cohort Analysis of Juvenile Salmonid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-2509 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration Division of Fish and Wildlife P Power Administration (BPA), US Department of Energy, under Contract No. 55454, Project No. 1989-107- 00;#12;Program TribPit Page i TribPit User's Manual Acknowledgments This project is funded by the Bonneville

Washington at Seattle, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Torus-Margo Pits Help Conifers Compete with Angiosperms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The reduction in resistivity achieved by the torus-margo pit membrane is equivalent to a 7.7-fold increase the number of times water must flow through high-resistance pits that link conduits end-to-end. Accordingly, the tracheid-based wood of conifers should have much higher flow resistance per length (resistivity) than

Hacke, Uwe

102

SCFA LEAD LAB TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE REVIEW OF THE PIT 7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and methods to stabilize, contain, or control the tritium and uranium in the source areas at the Pits 3 and 5 of tritiated and uranium-contaminated groundwater. The approaches and needs for the systems surrounding assistance team with Pit 7 Complex issues, the project team gave a presentation outlining the site geology

Hazen, Terry

103

Crevice and pitting corrosion behavior of stainless steels in seawater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pitting and crevice corrosion tests in natural seawater were performed on a series of stainless steels (i.e., S31603, N08904, S32304, S31803, S32520, N08925 and S31266) in order to determine their resistance to these types of localized corrosion. Open circuit potential (OCP) measurements for these alloys show for short exposure times an ennoblement in the OCP. After a certain time, occasional fall and rise in the OCP values was observed, which can be related to nucleation and repassivation of pits and/or crevices on the metal surface. Analysis of the electrochemical behavior and microscopic observations shows that only S31603 and S32304 alloys were susceptible to crevice and pitting corrosion, whereas the remaining alloys exhibited good resistance. Pitting potentials determined by the potentiodynamic technique also show S3 1603 and S32304 are susceptible to pitting corrosion under the experimental conditions used in this work.

Zaragoza-Ayala, A.E.; Orozco-Cruz, R. [Univ. Autonoma de Campeche (Mexico). Programa de Corrosion del Golfo de Mexico

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Health assessment for H and H Incorporated Burn Site, Farrington, Virginia, Region 3. CERCLIS No. VAD980539878. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The H H Incorporated Burn Site, located in Hanover County, Virginia, contains a pit where dry printing ink residues were disposed of. Groundwater contaminants of concern (and maximum concentrations) include benzene (25 ppb), toluene (1180 ppb), chromium (110 ppb), barium (1,300 ppb), beryllium (20 ppb). Organics, including phthalates (131,000 ppb), vinyl chloride (3,600 ppb), toluene (82 ppb), and xylenes (45 ppb), were detected in leachate and/or runoff, presumably emanating from the pit area. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of human exposure to hazardous substances.

Not Available

1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

105

Data Compendium for the Logging Test Pits at the ERDA Grand Junction...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Data Compendium for the Logging Test Pits at the ERDA Grand Junction Compound (December 1975) Data Compendium for the Logging Test Pits at the ERDA Grand Junction Compound...

106

Integration of reclamation and tailings management in oil sands surface mine planning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The processing of oil sands generates large volumes of slurry, known as tailings, that is impounded in tailings ponds. Oil sands operators are committed to develop reclamation plans to ensure that the mine site is restored to a natural or economically ... Keywords: Integer programming, Mine planning, Oil sands, Open-pit mining, Reclamation planning, Strategic planning, Tailings management

Mohammad Mahdi Badiozamani; Hooman Askari-Nasab

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Planning a Prescribed Burn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

drinks are best used when it?s over) Water or fire retardant in the ? pumpers Gasoline for the pumpers ? Diesel fuel and gas for the drip ? torches Lunch for the crew (a cooler with ? sandwich makings is handy) First aid kit ? Keys or combinations... in April with picloram to knock out my prickly pear.? Now you are heading in the right direction. Other reading Prescribed Range Burning in Texas. Texas AgriLife Extension Service. E-37. Acknowledgment The original manuscript on which...

Hanselka, C. Wayne

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Symmetrical pitting edema resembling RS3PE in gout  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE) was first described in 1985 by McCarty [1], as an isolated syndrome. Subsequently, a similar picture was reported as a clinical manifestatio...

C. Palazzi; I. Olivieri; E. D’Amico; V. Pace-Palitti; A. Petricca

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Transforming Pits into Clean Energy | National Security Science...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thousands of Surplus Plutonium Pits. On September 1, 2000, the United States and Russia committed to each "permanently dispose" of "no less than or at least" 34 metric tons...

110

New focus on in-pit crushing systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With diesel fuel prices skyrocketing, producers are taking a close look at this alternative (in-pit semi-mobile crushing/conveying systems) to conventional haulage and crushing. 6 figs.

Casteel, K.

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Mastering the art of plutonium pit production to ensure national...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- and final - plutonium pit for replacement in existing W88 warheads. The W88 is a thermonuclear weapon designed by LANL in the late 1980s for the U.S. Navy and deployed on...

112

Use of Heavy Oil Fly Ash as a Color Ingredient in Cement Mortar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heavy oil fly ash (HOFA) is a byproduct generated by the burning of heavy fuel oil. Chemical analysis showed that HOFA is mainly composed of unburned carbon with a significant amount of heavy metals. Due to to...

Abdullah Mofarrah; Tahir Husain

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Biomass burning and global change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The burning of living and dead biomass including forests savanna grasslands and agricultural wastes is much more widespread and extensive than previously believed and may consume as much as 8700 teragrams of dry biomass matter per year. The burning of this much biomass releases about 3940 teragrams of total carbon or about 3550 teragrams of carbon in the form of CO2 which is about 40% of the total global annual production of CO2. Biomass burning may also produce about 32% of the world’s annual production of CO 24% of the nonmethane hydrocarbons 20% of the oxides of nitrogen and biomass burn combustion products may be responsible for producing about 38% of the ozone in the troposphere. Biomass burning has increased with time and today is overwhelmingly human?initiated.

Joel S. Levine; Wesley R. Cofer III; Donald R. Cahoon Jr.; Edward L. Winsted; Brian J. Stocks

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Environmental, resource conservation, and economic aspects of used oil recycling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to provide current and updated information, the case for burning used automotive lubricating oil versus re-refining it has been reevaluated based upon the 1980 American economy and energy conservation posture. In these comparisons, the environment is considered within four scenarios ranging from unrestricted burning of used oil without government constraints to complete prohibition of burning thereby funneling all used automotive lube oils to re-refining. Two other areas have been reevaluated in the context of burning versus re-refining of automotive lube oils in the US. These are the material and energy advantages to be realized in terms of resource conservation through either burning or re-refining and an estimation of the economics and profit potential currently available in the disposition of used lube oil. It was found that environmental concerns as presently regulated do not alone provide a persuasive case for re-refining over burning of used automotive lubricating oil. However, in view of the increased use of paraffinic crude oil for the manufacture of automotive lubricating oil, production costs will rise and product yields will be lower. In this context, this study shows that the energy required to produce. As a produce a gallon of lube oil from paraffinic crude oil is greater than that to produce a gallon of lube oil from used lubricating oil. As a result, the re-refining of collectible used automotive lube oil could conserve 43 to 76 trillion Btu's per year, equivalent to 7 to 12 million barrels of imported crude oil worth between a quarter and a half billion dollars. Additionally, this study indicates that new technology such as solvent/distillation re-refining would provide a 26 percent after-tax return on investment based upon 1980 markets and costs.

Brinkman, D.W.; Whisman, M.L.; Weinstein, N.J.; Emmerson, H.R.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

ARM - Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

March 2013 BNL BBOP Website Contacts Larry Kleinman, Lead Scientist Arthur Sedlacek Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) Biomass Burning Plants, trees, grass, brush, and...

116

Molecular Characterization of Biomass Burning Aerosols Using...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Molecular Characterization of Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Abstract: Chemical...

117

State Waste Discharge Permit application: 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations, the US Department and Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-E Powerhouse Ash Waste Water discharges to the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit via dedicated pipelines. The 200-E Ash Waste Water is the only discharge to the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-E Powerhouse is a steam generation facility consisting of a coal-handling and preparation section and boilers.

Atencio, B.P.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

State Waste Discharge Permit application: 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations; the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-W Powerhouse Ash Waste Water discharges to the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit via dedicated pipelines. The 200-W Powerhouse Ash Waste Water is the only discharge to the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-W Powerhouse is a steam generation facility consisting of a coal-handling and preparation section and boilers.

Atencio, B.P.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Pseudoplastic deformation pits on polished ceramics due to cavitation erosion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a previous study, pseudoplastic deformation pits created by cavitation exposure were reported in silicon nitride and zirconia. In this research, further comparison of the size and number of pits between several silicon nitride and zirconia materials is carried out. The pits are larger and much more numerous in silicon nitride than in zirconia although silicon nitride is harder than zirconia. An explanation of this phenomenon is given. Also, in the previous study it was reported that apparently a partially stabilized zirconia with yttria oxide developed a delay in the phase transformation from tetragonal to monoclinic after being exposed to cavitation. In this research, further experiments related with this phase transformation delay are carried out. Also, the phase transformation is verified with X-ray diffraction analysis. It is concluded that the “activation” of the partial stabilized zirconia happens regardless of the oxide used to stabilize it.

G. García-Atance Fatjó; M. Hadfield; K. Tabeshfar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Combustion heater for oil shale  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combustion heater for oil shale heats particles of spent oil shale containing unburned char by burning the char. A delayed fall is produced by flowing the shale particles down through a stack of downwardly sloped overlapping baffles alternately extending from opposite sides of a vertical column. The delayed fall and flow reversal occurring in passing from each baffle to the next increase the residence time and increase the contact of the oil shale particles with combustion supporting gas flowed across the column to heat the shale to about 650 to 700/sup 0/C for use as a process heat source.

Mallon, R.; Walton, O.; Lewis, A.E.; Braun, R.

1983-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Combustion heater for oil shale  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combustion heater for oil shale heats particles of spent oil shale containing unburned char by burning the char. A delayed fall is produced by flowing the shale particles down through a stack of downwardly sloped overlapping baffles alternately extending from opposite sides of a vertical column. The delayed fall and flow reversal occurring in passing from each baffle to the next increase the residence time and increase the contact of the oil shale particles with combustion supporting gas flowed across the column to heat the shale to about 650.degree.-700.degree. C. for use as a process heat source.

Mallon, Richard G. (Livermore, CA); Walton, Otis R. (Livermore, CA); Lewis, Arthur E. (Los Altos, CA); Braun, Robert L. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The Influence of Radiation on Pit Solution Chemistry as it Pertains to the Transition from Metastable to Stable Pitting in Steels.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous work relevant to current efforts is summarized. A description of an improved version of a new electrochemical probe, the ArtPit, is given. The distinct feature of the probe for investigating metastable pitting of carbon steels is specified and compared to other approaches. The electrochemical response of the ArtPit under the gamma irradiation and elevated temperature conditions that occur at high level waste (HLW) storage tanks is presented. In particular, the Tafel slope determinations and chemical analyses of the ArtPit confined volume electrolyte are described. Based on results a possible approach for reducing the corrosion rate of HLW tank walls is suggested. Additional statistical analysis of the occurrence of short duration (passivated pits) and long term (stable pitting) electrochemical pulses (current surges) during exposure confirm that radiation enhances the occurrence of both more and smaller sized pits due to increased likelihood of repassivation.

Galuszka-Muga, Barbara; Muga, Luis M.

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Deep sole burns in several participants in a traditional festival of the firewalking ceremony in Kee-lung, Taiwan—Clinical experiences and prevention strategies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose Firewalking is a common Taoist cleansing ceremony in Taiwan, but burns associated with the practice have rarely been reported. We analyzed the patients with plantar burns from one firewalking ceremony. Materials and methods In one firewalking ceremony, 12 Taoist disciples suffered from contact burns to the soles of their feet while walking over burning coals. Eight of them had at least second-degree burns over areas larger than 1% of their total body surface areas (TBSAs). The age, sex, medical history, date of injury, time taken to traverse the fire pit, depth and TBSA of the burns, treatment, length of stay, and outcome were recorded and analyzed. Results Deep, disseminated second- to third-degree burns were noted and healing took as long as three weeks in some patients. Because disseminated hypertrophic scars form after burns, the soles involved regain much of their tensile strength while walking. The patients experienced only a few difficulties in their daily lives three months after injury. Conclusion From our experience treating patients with deep disseminated second- to third-degree plantar burns caused by firewalking, we conclude that they should be treated conservatively, with secondary healing rather than a skin graft.

Shun-Cheng Chang; Chih-Kang Hsu; Yuan-Sheng Tzeng; Shou-Cheng Teng; Ju-Peng Fu; Niann-Tzyy Dai; Shyi-Gen Chen; Tim-Mo Chen; Chun-che Feng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Category:Burns, OR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burns, OR Burns, OR Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Burns, OR" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVFullServiceRestauran... 71 KB SVHospital Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVHospital Burns OR Pa... 74 KB SVLargeHotel Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVLargeHotel Burns OR ... 74 KB SVLargeOffice Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVLargeOffice Burns OR... 69 KB SVMediumOffice Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVMediumOffice Burns O... 71 KB SVMidriseApartment Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVMidriseApartment Bur... 72 KB SVOutPatient Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVOutPatient Burns OR ... 69 KB SVPrimarySchool Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png

125

Status of the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A planned new facility, the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) will be used to disassemble the nation`s inventory of surplus nuclear weapons pits and convert the plutonium recovered from those pits into a form suitable for storage, international inspection, and final disposition. Sized to handle 35 metric tons of plutonium from pits and other sources over its 10-year operating life, the PDCF will apply the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) technology. ARIES process technology has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and an integrated system is being demonstrated LANL. Four sites were considered for locating the PDCF: Pantex Plant, Savannah River Site (SRS), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), and Hanford Site. Each site offers a different opportunity for constructing the PDCF, ranging from a new building at Pantex Plant to using an existing building at Hanford Site or INEEL. The Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement was prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) to aid in site selection. This paper describes the initial scoping activities, preconceptual and conceptual design work, and the status of the PDCF.

Zygmunt, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Peko, D. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Fissile Materials Disposition

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

Global Methane Emissions from Pit Latrines Matthew C. Reid,*,,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information ABSTRACT: Pit latrines are an important form of decentral- ized wastewater management, providing focused on centralized treatment plants,4,5 it has become increasingly clear that on-site wastewater emissions from decentralized wastewater sources and reassess the appropriate actions for emissions

Mauzerall, Denise

127

Demonstration of In-Situ Stabilization of Buried Waste at Pit G-11 at the Brookhaven National laboratory Glass Pits Disposal Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1989 BNL was added to the EPAs National Priorities List. The site is divided into seven operable units (OU). OU-I includes the former landfill area. The field task site is noted as the AOC 2C Glass Holes location. Beginning in the 1960s and continuing into the 1980s, BNL disposed of laboratory waste (glassware, chemicals and animal carcasses) in numerous shallow pits. The drivers for remediating the pits are; historical records that indicate hazardous materials may have been disposed of in the pits; ground water contamination down gradient of the pits; a test excavation of one of the glass holes that unearthed laboratory glass bottles with unidentified liquids still contained; and the fact that BNL rests atop an EPA designated sole-source aquifer. The specific site chosen for this demonstration was pit G-11. The requirements that lead to choosing this pit were; a well characterized pit and a relatively isolated pit where our construction operations would not impact on adjacent pits. The glass holes area, including pit G-11, was comprehensively surveyed using a suite of geophysical techniques (e.g., EM-31, EM-61, GPR). Prior to stabilizing the waste form a subsurface barrier was constructed to contain the entire waste pit. The pit contents were then stabilized using a cement grout applied via jet grouting. The stabilization was performed to make removal of the waste from the pit easier and safer in terms of worker exposure. The grouting process would mix and masticate the waste and grout and form a single monolithic waste form. This large monolith would then be subdivided into smaller 4 foot by 4 foot by 10-12 foot block using a demolition grout. The smaller blocks would then be easily removed from the site and disposed of in a CERCLA waste site.

Dwyer, B.P.; Gilbert, J.; Heiser, J.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seyitömer, Himmeto?lu and Hat?lda? oil shale deposits. The results demonstrate that these oil shales are

Fields (in-situ Combustion Approach; M. V. Kök; G. Guner; S. Bagci?

129

Preparation of activated carbon from date pits: Effect of the activation agent and liquid phase oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two series of activated carbons have been prepared from date pits; series C, using carbon dioxide as activating agent, and series S, prepared by activation with steam under the same experimental conditions. The obtained samples were oxidized with nitric acid in order to introduce more oxygen surface groups. The surface area and porosity of the parent and oxidized activated carbons were studied by N2 adsorption at 77 K and CO2 adsorption at 273 K. The oxygen surface complexes were characterized by temperature-programmed decomposition (TPD). The results show that carbon dioxide and steam activations produce microporous carbons with an increasing amount of CO evolving groups when increasing the burn-off. On the other hand, oxidation with nitric acid increases the amount of CO and CO2 evolved by the decomposition of surface oxygen groups, this increase being related to the development of porosity in the carbon with the degree of activation and to the activating agent used (CO2 versus steam).

Meriem Belhachemi; Rachel V.R.A. Rios; Fatima Addoun; Joaquín Silvestre-Albero; Antonio Sepúlveda-Escribano; Francisco Rodríguez-Reinoso

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Biomass Burning Observation Project Specifically,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Burning Observation Project Burning Observation Project Specifically, the aircraft will obtain measurements of the microphysical, chemical, hygroscopic, and optical properties of aerosols. Data captured during BBOP will help scientists better understand how aerosols combine and change at a variety of distances and burn times. Locations Pasco, Washington. From July through September, the G-1 will be based out of its home base in Washington. From this location, it can intercept and measure smoke plumes from naturally occurring uncontrolled fires across Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Northern California, and Western Montana. Smoke plumes aged 0-5 hours are the primary targets for this phase of the campaign. Memphis, Tennessee. In October, the plane moves to Tennessee to sample prescribed

131

Recycling used palm oil and used engine oil to produce white bio oil, bio petroleum diesel and heavy fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recycling waste materials produced in our daily life is considered as an additional resource of a wide range of materials and it conserves the environment. Used engine oil and used cooking oil are two oils disposed off in large quantities as a by-product of our daily life. This study aims at providing white bio oil bio petroleum diesel and heavy fuel from the disposed oils. Toxic organic materials suspected to be present in the used engine oil were separated using vacuum column chromatography to reduce the time needed for the separation process and to avoid solvent usage. The compounds separated were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and found to contain toxic aromatic carboxylic acids. Used cooking oils (thermally cracked from usage) were collected and separated by vacuum column chromatography. White bio oil produced was examined by GC-MS. The white bio oil consists of non-toxic hydrocarbons and is found to be a good alternative to white mineral oil which is significantly used in food industry cosmetics and drugs with the risk of containing polycyclic aromatic compounds which are carcinogenic and toxic. Different portions of the used cooking oil and used engine were mixed to produce several blends for use as heavy oil fuels. White bio oil was used to produce bio petroleum diesel by blending it with petroleum diesel and kerosene. The bio petroleum diesel produced passed the PETRONAS flash point and viscosity specification test. The heat of combustion of the two blends of heavy fuel produced was measured and one of the blends was burned to demonstrate its burning ability. Higher heat of combustion was obtained from the blend containing greater proportion of used engine oil. This study has provided a successful recycled alternative for white bio oil bio petroleum fuel and diesel which can be an energy source.

Mustafa Hamid Al-abbas; Wan Aini Wan Ibrahim; Mohd. Marsin Sanagi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Open Burning (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Open Burning (New Mexico) Open Burning (New Mexico) Open Burning (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction General Public/Consumer Industrial Residential Program Info Start Date 2003 State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider New Mexico Environment Department The New Mexico Environment Department's Air Quality Bureau regulates the open burning rules established by the Environmental Improvement Board. These rules are established to protect public health and welfare by establishing controls on pollution produced by open burning. Open burning is allowed for recreational and ceremonial purposes, for barbecuing, for heating purposes in fireplaces, for the noncommercial cooking of food for human consumption and for warming by small wood fires at construction

133

Mercury Emissions from Biomass Burning in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because the burned area products from remote sensors with medium resolution often miss the crop burning in fields due to its small size, we used the official statistics data at the provincial level to estimate the mercury emissions from crop residues burning in fields and biofuel combustion in homes. ... Although the amount of crop residues burnt in fields in China could not be reflected accurately in burned area products (MCD45A1) because of their small size, they could be located by MODIS fire counts data. ... Frequently burning grasslands in Africa and Australia, and agricultural waste burning globally, contribute relatively little to the Hg budget. ...

Xin Huang; Mengmeng Li; Hans R. Friedli; Yu Song; Di Chang; Lei Zhu

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

134

In situ analysis of soil at an open burning/open detonation disposal facility: J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigators have used a field-portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analyzer to screen soils for a suite of metals indicative of the open burning and open detonation (OB/OD) activities that occurred at the J-Field site at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The field XRF results were incorporated into a multiphase investigation of contaminants at the Toxic Burning Pits Area of Concern at J-Field. The authors determined that the field-portable XRF unit used for the study and the general concept of field XRF screening are invaluable tools for investigating an OB/OD site where intrusive sampling techniques could present unacceptable hazards to site workers.

Martino, L.; Cho, E. [Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Wrobel, J. [US Army Directorate of Safety, Health, and the Environment, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Pitting resistance of Alloy 800 as a function of temperature and prefilming in high temperature water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pitting behavior of Alloy 800 was investigated as a function of temperature and prefilming in high temperature water. The pitting behavior was characterized in terms of the pitting potential and the pit density. The pitting potential decreases with increasing temperature and chloride activity. Prefilming of test coupons over a time period between 100 and 5,000 hours in ammoniated water at 300 C has no apparent influence on the pitting potential at room temperature, 180 C and 300 C. However, the number of pits in prefilmed coupons is much higher than in coupons covered with an air passive layer. The effect of prefilming on pit nucleation was investigated in more detail with regard to a model and test methods developed by Bianchi and co-workers. Density of pits in prefilmed coupons is at least one order of magnitude higher than in air passive coupons. Maximum pit density was measured after a prefilming period of 1 00 hours. The effect is discussed in terms of Bianchi`s model and in terms of features of passive films. It is outlined that the initially amorphous metastable passive film on Alloy 800 becomes crystalline at increased temperatures. Crystallization induces lattice defects, such as dislocations and grain boundaries, in the passive film. The film grows and slowly transforms into a thick oxide layer. The transformation process is associated with enhanced susceptibility to pit nucleation.

Stellwag, B. [Siemens Power Generation, Erlangen (Germany)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Amchitka Mud Pit Sites  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Amchitka Mud Pit Sites Amchitka Mud Pit Sites 2006 Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspection Report Amchitka Island, Alaska Revision No.: 0 September 2006 Environmental Restoration Project U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Cornrn&ce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22 1 6 1 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@,ntis. aov Online ordering: htt~://www. ntis. nov/orderinn. htm Available electronically at htt~://www. osti. godbridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information

137

Raymond Burns > Product Research Technologist - Exxon Mobile...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Raymond Burns Product Research Technologist - Exxon Mobile raymond.burns@gmail.com Formerly a member of the DiSalvo Group, Ray earned his PhD in August 2013...

138

Restoration of Secondary Containment in Double Shell Tank (DST) Pits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cracks found in many of the double-shell tank (DST) pump and valve pits bring into question the ability of the pits to provide secondary containment and remain in compliance with State and Federal regulations. This study was commissioned to identify viable options for maintain/restoring secondary containment capability in these pits. The basis for this study is the decision analysis process which identifies the requirements to be met and the desired goals (decision criteria) that each option will be weighed against. A facilitated workshop was convened with individuals knowledgeable of Tank Farms Operations, engineering practices, and safety/environmental requirements. The outcome of this workshop was the validation or identification of the critical requirements, definition of the current problem, identification and weighting of the desired goals, baselining of the current repair methods, and identification of potential alternate solutions. The workshop was followed up with further investigations into the potential solutions that were identified in the workshop and through other efforts. These solutions are identified in the body of this report. Each of the potential solutions were screened against the list of requirements and only those meeting the requirements were considered viable options. To expand the field of viable options, hybrid concepts that combine the strongest features of different individual approaches were also examined. Several were identified. The decision analysis process then ranked each of the viable options against the weighted decision criteria, which resulted in a recommended solution. The recommended approach is based upon installing a sprayed on coating system.

SHEN, E.J.

2000-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

139

Clean option: Berkeley Pit water treatment and resource recovery strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Technology Development, established the Resource Recovery Project (RRP) in 1992 as a five-year effort to evaluate and demonstrate multiple technologies for recovering water, metals, and other industrial resources from contaminated surface and groundwater. Natural water resources located throughout the DOE complex and the and western states have been rendered unusable because of contamination from heavy metals. The Berkeley Pit, a large, inactive, open pit copper mine located in Butte, Montana, along with its associated groundwater system, has been selected by the RRP for use as a feedstock for a test bed facility located there. The test bed facility provides the infrastructure needed to evaluate promising technologies at the pilot plant scale. Data obtained from testing these technologies was used to assess their applicability for similar mine drainage water applications throughout the western states and at DOE. The objective of the Clean Option project is to develop strategies that provides a comprehensive and integrated approach to resource recovery using the Berkeley Pit water as a feedstock. The strategies not only consider the immediate problem of resource recovery from the contaminated water, but also manage the subsequent treatment of all resulting process streams. The strategies also employ the philosophy of waste minimization to optimize reduction of the waste volume requiring disposal, and the recovery and reuse of processing materials.

Gerber, M.A.; Orth, R.J.; Elmore, M.R.; Monzyk, B.F.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

High-temperature rapid pyrometamorphism induced by a charcoal pit burning: The case of Ricetto, central Italy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bulk chemistry and mineralogy of the peculiar rock of Ricetto (Carseolani Mts., Central Apennines, Italy) was studied to resolve its controversial origin: igneous dyke or anthropic product. This hybrid rock co...

Flavio Capitanio; Francesco Larocca…

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Conversion Products of Explosives During Combustion - Analysis for Risk Assessment Studies of Open-Pit Burning Areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Compared to other hazardous chemicals and preparations, energetic materials (propellants and explosives) have explosive characteristics and the abilitiy of high-energetic reactions. To these energetic materialsbe...

G. Holl; M. Schneider

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

The burn bactericidal index: A bactericidal index specific for burn patients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The percentage of the body surface area burned together with the bactericidal capacity of polymorphs were found to have an influence on burned patients' resistance to infection. This new indicator of resistance to infection in burns, the Burn Bactericidal Index (BBI), was high in patients not susceptible to infection especially in patients vaccinated against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but low in patients with extensive burns and in patients with septicaemia and other acute clinical infections.

E.A. Roe

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

„Peak Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wissenschaftliche Voraussagen deuten auf „Peak Oil“, das Maximum globaler Erdölförderung, in unserer ... der demokratischen Systeme führen. Psychoanalytische Betrachtung darf „Peak Oil“ für die Zivilisation als e...

Dr. Manuel Haus; Dr. med. Christoph Biermann

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Potential of vegetable oils as a domestic heating fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dependence on imported oil for domestic heating has led to the examination of other potential fuel substitutes. One potential fuel is some form of vegetable oil, which could be a yearly-renewable fuel. In Western Canada, canola has become a major oilseed crop; in Eastern Canada, sunflowers increasingly are becoming a source for a similar oil; for this reason, the Canadian Combustion Research Laboratory (CCRL) has chosen these oils for experimentation. Trials have been conducted in a conventional warm air oil furnace, fitted with a flame retention head burner. Performance has been measured with pure vegetable oils as well as a series of blends with conventional No. 2 oil. The effects of increased fuel pressure and fuel preheating are established. Emissions of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, unburned hydrocarbons and particulates are given for both steady state and cyclic operation. Canola oil cannot be fired in cyclic operation above 50:50 blends with No. 2 oil. At any level above a 10% blend, canola is difficult to burn, even with significant increased pressure and temperature. Sunflower oil is much easier to burn and can be fired as a pure fuel, but with high emissions of incomplete combustion products. An optimum blend of 50:50 sunflower in No. 2 oil yields emissions and performance similar to No. 2 oil. This blend offers potential as a means of reducing demand of imported crude oil for domestic heating systems.

Hayden, A.C.S.; Begin, E.; Palmer, C.E.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Re: AVIRIS oil volumes, preliminary ~ Victor F Labson 0 Marcia K McNutt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

History: Marcia, Re: AVIRIS oil volumes, preliminary ~ t Victor F Labson 0 Marcia K McNutt Cc of the amount afthe sea-surface oil covered by AVIRIS on May 17 from 10% to 15% which would change your estimate based on numbers from the Coast Guard and Incident Command. The a mount of oil burned up t o May 17

Fleskes, Joe

146

Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces May 16, 2013 - 3:15pm Addthis Diagram of an oil boiler. New tanks are generally double-wall or have a spill container built underneath to reduce the chances of an oil spill. Typically, the tank drip pan shown here is required only for single-wall tanks and would extend the full width of the tank. | Photo courtesy State of Massachusetts. Diagram of an oil boiler. New tanks are generally double-wall or have a spill container built underneath to reduce the chances of an oil spill. Typically, the tank drip pan shown here is required only for single-wall tanks and would extend the full width of the tank. | Photo courtesy State of Massachusetts. What does this mean for me? If you have an oil furnace or boiler, you can now burn oil blended

147

Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces May 16, 2013 - 3:15pm Addthis Diagram of an oil boiler. New tanks are generally double-wall or have a spill container built underneath to reduce the chances of an oil spill. Typically, the tank drip pan shown here is required only for single-wall tanks and would extend the full width of the tank. | Photo courtesy State of Massachusetts. Diagram of an oil boiler. New tanks are generally double-wall or have a spill container built underneath to reduce the chances of an oil spill. Typically, the tank drip pan shown here is required only for single-wall tanks and would extend the full width of the tank. | Photo courtesy State of Massachusetts. What does this mean for me? If you have an oil furnace or boiler, you can now burn oil blended

148

The human skeletal remains of a skull pit at Colha, Belize  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, age at death, dental and honey pathology, and the cultural practices of cranial deformation and tooth filing. The study also examined the evidence for postmortem mutilation of the remains and explored the burial pattern. The analysis documented... observed on Colha Skull Pit adults, by sex and age classification. 3 Dental pathology observed in Colha Skull Pit adults. 4 Dental pathology in Colha Skull Pit children listed by caries rank. 39 43 45 5 Distribution of enamel hypoplasia and its...

Massey, Virginia Kehrer

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Dispersion model development for open burn/open detonation sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disposal of obsolete munitions, propellants, and manufacturing wastes is conducted at Department of Defense (DOD) and Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The most common disposal method is open burning (OB) and open detonation (OD) of the material, which occurs in an earthen pit or bermed area. OB/OD operations generate air pollutants and require predictions of pollutant concentrations. The pollutants include SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, particulates, volatile organic compounds and toxic materials such as metals, semivolatile organics, etc. Dispersion models are used to estimate pollutant concentrations given the source and meteorological conditions. However, there is currently no recommended EPA dispersion model to address OB/OD sources. Due to the constraints of existing models, a model development program was initiated under the DOD/DOE Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program. In Section 2, the authors give an overview of the model design which is divided into simple and research components. Sections 3 and 4 describe the simple component which includes Gaussian puff and analytic plume models.

Weil, J.C.; Templeman, B. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Banta, R.; Weber, R. [NOAA-ETL, Boulder, CO (United States). Environmental Research Labs.; Mitchell, W. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Burn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stream that meanders through the cavern. My guide tells me the brook was once a roaring river, two hundred million years ago this site was covered by an inland sea. He points out salamander and raccoon tracks in the mud as we hike past Mirror... While Painting a Red Canna: A Rhapsody 52 IV. New Poems Halloween 54 Alabaster Caverns 55 Subterranean Red 57 Ten Seconds After the Gun 58 Rock Wall 59 Following the Red Hills home 60...

Johnson, Vivian Kathleen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Mud Pit Risk-Based Closure Strategy Report, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of the human and ecological risk assessment for the NTS mud pits. The risk assessment utilizes data from 52 of the 270 NTS mud pits in conjunction with corroborative data from 87 other DOE mud pits associated with nuclear testing (at locations on the NTS, in the western United States, and Alaska) as well as relevant process knowledge. Based on the risk assessment findings, the report provides a strategy for further evaluation, characterization, and closure of all 270 NTS mud pit CASs using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER).

Brain Hoenes

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult pit-tag detection Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for adult... longer transmission ranges than PIT tags, so radio receivers can detect fish as they move over much... salmonid research and monitoring. Although both ... Source:...

153

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerated pitting corrosion Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Society, Inc. Summary: nature of pitting corrosion, replication of the foil penetration experiments is required. In order... of potentiostatic control. To accelerate...

154

Hydrogen sulfide spatial distribution and exposure in deep-pit swine housing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objectives of this research focus on investigating spatial distribution of hydrogen sulfide gas associated with manure removal and agitation events in deep-pit swine production… (more)

Swestka, Randy John

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Assessment of Concrete Repair Techniques for Radiologically Contaminated Tank Farm Pump and Valve Pits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the scope of Project W-314, ''Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations,'' the condition of pump and valve pit walls and floors is being assessed, and repairs made as needed, to support upgrading the infrastructure necessary to safely transfer tank waste for treatment. Flaws in the surfaces of the pits (e.g., concrete crack/faults, protective coating deterioration) must be repaired to ensure containment integrity and to facilitate future decontamination of the pits. This engineering study presents a cost/risk/benefit evaluation of concrete and protective coating repair methods in pump and valve pits using various manual and remote tool systems.

MINTEER, D.J.

2000-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

156

Checking the Pulse of PitCon '88  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...was unclear at the meeting. Zymark's price-tag for a core robot and its controller...both the sulfur and chlorine content of oil. This year's version of the company's...octane ofa gasoline, for example. But oil contains sulfur. "Sulfur actually embeds...

1988-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

157

Actinide Burning in CANDU Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Actinide burning in CANDU reactors has been studied as a method of reducing the actinide content of spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors, and thereby decreasing the associated long term decay heat load. In this work simulations were performed of actinides mixed with natural uranium to form a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, and also mixed with silicon carbide to form an inert matrix (IMF) fuel. Both of these fuels were taken to a higher burnup than has previously been studied. The total transuranic element destruction calculated was 40% for the MOX fuel and 71% for the IMF. (authors)

Hyland, B.; Dyck, G.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Price discovery in crude oil futures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study examines price discovery among the two most prominent price benchmarks in the market for crude oil, WTI sweet crude and Brent sweet crude. Using data on the most active futures contracts measured at the one-second frequency, we find that WTI maintains a dominant role in price discovery relative to Brent, with an estimated information share in excess of 80%, over a sample from 2007 to 2012. Our analysis is robust to different decompositions of the sample, over pit-trading sessions and non-pit trading sessions, segmentation of days associated with major economic news releases, and data measured to the millisecond. We find no evidence that the dominant role of WTI in price discovery is diminished by the price spread between Brent that emerged in 2008.

John Elder; Hong Miao; Sanjay Ramchander

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Excision and Skin Grafting of Thermal Burns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...such as loss of hand function or facial deformity. There are often psychological sequelae in burned patients, including post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. Pathophysiology and the Effect of Therapy. The pathophysiology of thermal injury is related to the initial distribution of heat within... A 45-year-old man presents with extensive burns after a house fire. Excision and grafting are recommended for management of his burns. Depending on the depth and extent of the burn, early excision and grafting promote wound healing, reduce the risk of infection, and shorten hospitalization but increase the need for blood transfusion, as compared with conservative management.

Orgill D.P.

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

160

Pollution by cereal waste burning in Spain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the amount of cereal waste burned in Spain, which represents the most important source of biomass burning in this country, is estimated. During the period between 1980 and 1998, an average mass of 8 Tg of cereal waste was burned annually, with remaining 1 Tg of ash on the cereal fields after combustion. By using emission factors previously calculated by Ortiz de Zárate et al. [Ortiz de Zárate, I., Ezcurra, A., Lacaux, J.P., Van Dihn, P., 2000. Emission factor estimates of cereal waste burning in Spain. Atmos. Environ. 34, 3183–3193.], it is deduced that pollutant emissions linked to cereal waste-burning process reach values of 11 Tg CO2, 80 Gg of TPM and 23 Gg of \\{NOx\\} year?1 during the cereal-burning period. These emissions represent 46% of total CO2 and 23% \\{NOx\\} emitted in Spain during the burning period that lasts 1 month after harvesting. Therefore, the relative importance of cereal waste burning as pollutant source in Spain almost during fire period becomes evident. Finally, our study allows to deduce that the production of 1 kg of cereal crop implies that 410 g of carbon and 3.3 g of nitrogen are going to be introduced into the atmosphere by this pollutant process. We estimate a total gaseous emission of 3.3 Tg of C and 25 Gg N as different pollutants by cereal waste burning.

I. Ortiz de Zárate; A. Ezcurra; J.P. Lacaux; P. Van Dinh; J. Díaz de Argandoña

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Burn site groundwater interim measures work plan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Work Plan identifies and outlines interim measures to address nitrate contamination in groundwater at the Burn Site, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. The New Mexico Environment Department has required implementation of interim measures for nitrate-contaminated groundwater at the Burn Site. The purpose of interim measures is to prevent human or environmental exposure to nitrate-contaminated groundwater originating from the Burn Site. This Work Plan details a summary of current information about the Burn Site, interim measures activities for stabilization, and project management responsibilities to accomplish this purpose.

Witt, Jonathan L. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Hall, Kevin A. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 335, Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 335 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs). The CAU is located in the Well 3 Yard in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site. Historical records indicate that the Drain Pit (CAS 06-23-03) received effluent from truck-washing; the Drums/Oil Waste/Spill (CAS 06-20-01) consisted of four 55-gallon drums containing material removed from the Cased Hole; and the Cased Hole (CAS 06-20-02) was used for disposal of used motor oil, wastewater, and debris. These drums were transported to the Area 5 Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site in July 1991; therefore, they are no longer on site and further investigation or remediation efforts are not required. Consequently, CAS 06-20-01 will be closed with no further action and details of this decision will be described in the Closure Report for this CAU. Any spills that may have been associated with this CAS will be investigated and addressed under CAS 06-20-02. Field investigation efforts will be focused on the two remaining CASs. The scope of the investigation will center around identifying any contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) and, if present, determining the vertical and lateral extent of contamination. The COPCs for the Drain Pit include: total volatile/ semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (gasoline-and diesel-range organics), ethylene glycol monobutyl ether, polychlorinated biphenyls, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and radionuclides. The COPCs for the Cased Hole include: total volatile/ semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel-range organics only), and total Resource Conservation an d Recovery Act metals. Both biased surface and subsurface soil sampling will be conducted, augmented by visual inspection, video surveys, and electromagnetic surveys. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

DOE/NV

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Uniform-burning matrix burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Computer simulation was used in the development of an inward-burning, radial matrix gas burner and heat pipe heat exchanger. The burner and exchanger can be used to heat a Stirling engine on cloudy days when a solar dish, the normal source of heat, cannot be used. Geometrical requirements of the application forced the use of the inward burning approach, which presents difficulty in achieving a good flow distribution and air/fuel mixing. The present invention solved the problem by providing a plenum with just the right properties, which include good flow distribution and good air/fuel mixing with minimum residence time. CFD simulations were also used to help design the primary heat exchanger needed for this application which includes a plurality of pins emanating from the heat pipe. The system uses multiple inlet ports, an extended distance from the fuel inlet to the burner matrix, flow divider vanes, and a ring-shaped, porous grid to obtain a high-temperature uniform-heat radial burner. Ideal applications include dish/Stirling engines, steam reforming of hydrocarbons, glass working, and any process requiring high temperature heating of the outside surface of a cylindrical surface.

Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Anselmo, Mark (Arvada, CO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

High Rate Laser Pitting Technique for Solar Cell Texturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High rate laser pitting technique for solar cell texturing Efficiency of crystalline silicon solar cells can be improved by creating a texture on the surface to increase optical absorption. Different techniques have been developed for texturing, with the current state-of-the-art (SOA) being wet chemical etching. The process has poor optical performance, produces surfaces that are difficult to passivate or contact and is relatively expensive due to the use of hazardous chemicals. This project shall develop an alternative process for texturing mc-Si using laser micromachining. It will have the following features compared to the current SOA texturing process: -Superior optical surfaces for reduced front-surface reflection and enhanced optical absorption in thin mc-Si substrates -Improved surface passivation -More easily integrated into advanced back-contact cell concepts -Reduced use of hazardous chemicals and waste treatment -Similar or lower cost The process is based on laser pitting. The objective is to develop and demonstrate a high rate laser pitting process which will exceed the rate of former laser texturing processes by a factor of ten. The laser and scanning technologies will be demonstrated on a laboratory scale, but will use inherently technologies that can easily be scaled to production rates. The drastic increase in process velocity is required for the process to be implemented as an in-line process in PV manufacturing. The project includes laser process development, development of advanced optical systems for beam manipulation and cell reflectivity and efficiency testing. An improvement of over 0.5% absolute in efficiency is anticipated after laser-based texturing. The surface textures will be characterized optically, and solar cells will be fabricated with the new laser texturing to ensure that the new process is compatible with high-efficiency cell processing. The result will be demonstration of a prototype process that is suitable for scale-up to a production tool and process. The developed technique will have an reducing impact on product pricing. As efficiency has a substantial impact on the economics of solar cell production due to the high material cost content; in essence, improved efficiency through cost-effective texturing reduces the material cost component since the product is priced in terms of $/W. The project is a collaboration between Fraunhofer USA, Inc. and a c-Si PV manufacturer.

Hans J. Herfurth; Henrikki Pantsar

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

165

Cleanup Verification Package for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit. This waste site received coal ash from the 100-F Area coal-fired steam plant. Leakage of process effluent from the 116-F-14 , 107-F Retention Basins flowed south into the ash pit, contaminating the northern portion.

S. W. Clark and H. M Sulloway

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Cleanup Verification Package for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit. This waste site received coal ash from the 100-F Area coal-fired steam plant. Leakage of process effluent from the 116-F-14 , 107-F Retention Basins flowed south into the ash pit, contaminating the northern portion.

S. W. Clark and H. M. Sulloway

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

167

Slope design and implementation in open pit mines; geological and geomechanical Jean-Alain FLEURISSON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stability, slope design, engineering geology, fault, open pit mines, SOMAIR uranium mine, OCP phosphate mine1 GHGT-9 Slope design and implementation in open pit mines; geological and geomechanical approach all natural geological and geomechanical features and the geological structures as well

Boyer, Edmond

168

Oil spills - increasing US dependence on oil imports heightens risks to environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calamitous oil spills in recent years have focused attention on the devastation the world`s leading energy source can wreak on the environment. In Alaska, the 1989 grounding of the supertanker Exxon Valdez in Prince William Sound caused the worst U.S. oil spill ever and promoted Congress to pass stringent oil-pollution legislation. In the Persian Gulf, {open_quotes}eco-terroism{close_quotes} committed by Iraqi forces during the gulf war left hundreds of wells burning and oil free-flowing out of Kuwait`s refineries and oil-shipping terminals. With the United States and much of the global community increasingly dependent on petroleum moved by supertankers, oil spills will continue to threaten the environment for the foreseeable future.

NONE

1992-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

169

Blood Wings: Feeling War in the Twenty-First Century  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Registry to Tally, Track Burn Pit Illnesses Among Vets. ”Mar. Dobbin, Sean. “Military Burn Pit Claims in Limbo. ” USAToxic Trash: The Burn Pits of Iraq and Afghanistan. ”

Sanfilippo, Brenda

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Peak Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At the start of the new millennium, the expression “Peak Oil” was unknown. Nevertheless, a discussion about when the world’s rate of oil production would reach its maximum had already ... . King Hubbert presented...

Kjell Aleklett

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Peak Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Between 2000 and 2010, world oil prices advanced from approximately $25 per barrel to more than $100 per barrel. The price appreciation of oil over the decade was around ten times the rate of inflation.

Robert Rapier

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

LANL Produces First Plutonium Pit in 14 Years | National Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Produces First Plutonium Pit in 14 Years | National Nuclear Security Produces First Plutonium Pit in 14 Years | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > LANL Produces First Plutonium Pit in 14 Years LANL Produces First Plutonium Pit in 14 Years April 22, 2003 Los Alamos, NM LANL Produces First Plutonium Pit in 14 Years

173

Annealing to Mitigate Pitting in Electropolished Niobium Coupons and SRF Cavities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ongoing studies at Fermilab investigate whether dislocations and other factors instigate pitting during cavity electropolishing (EP), despite careful processing controls and the inherent leveling mechanism of EP itself. Here, cold-worked niobium coupons, which exhibited increased tendencies for pitting in our past study, were annealed in a high vacuum furnace and subsequently processed by EP. Laser confocal scanning microscopy and special defect counting algorithms were used to assess the population of pits formed. Hardness measurements indicated that annealing for 2 hours at 800 C produced recovery, whereas annealing for 12 hours at 600 C did not, as is consistent with known changes for cavities annealed in a similar way. The 800 C anneal was effective in some cases but not others, and we discuss reasons why tendencies for pitting remain. We discuss implications for cavities and continued work to understand pitting.

Cooley, L.D.; Hahn, E.; Hicks, D.; Romanenko, A.; Schuessler, R.; Thompson, C.; /Fermilab

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

174

Nucleation Of Ge 3D-islands On Pit-patterned Si Substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Joint experimental and theoretical study of Ge nanoislands growth on pit-patterned Si substrate is carried out. Si substrates that have been templated by means of electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching have been used to grow Ge by molecular-beam epitaxy. Atomic-force-microscopy studies show that at Si(100) substrate temperature 550 deg. C, Ge nanoislands are formed at the pits' edges, rather than between the pits. The effect is interpreted in terms of energy barrier, that is formed near the edge of a pit and prevents Ge transport inside the pit. By molecular dynamics calculations the value of the energy barrier 0.9 eV was obtained.

Novikov, P. L.; Smagina, J. V.; Vlasov, D. Yu.; Deryabin, A. S.; Kozhukhov, A. S.; Dvurechenskii, A. V. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS, Pr. ac. Lavrent'eva, 13, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

175

PHYSICS OF BURNING PHYSICS INACCESSIBLE TO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICS OF BURNING PLASMAS: PHYSICS INACCESSIBLE TO PRESENT FACILITIES FIRE Physics Workshop May 2000 F. Perkins and N. Sauthoff Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FIRE Workshop 1 May 2000 #12;OUTLINE · Introduction · Three Classes of Burning Plasma Physics inaccessable to contemporary tokamak

176

Philadelphians protest ocean burning of waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Philadelphians protest ocean burning of waste ... A raucous, hostile crowd of Philadelphia residents shouted down Environmental Protection Agency officials last week at a public hearing on the agency's tentative decision to issue a research permit for an ocean burn of chemical wastes. ...

1986-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

177

The Energy Institute Live Green, Burn Clean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combustion in a Cummins ISB 5.9L MY2000 turbodiesel engine Sources of the "Biodiesel NOx" effect Fuel quality turbodiesel engine Sources of the "Biodiesel NOx" effect Fuel quality issues and blending level question: B2The Energy Institute Live Green, Burn Clean: Advancing Engines for Renewable Fuels Live Green, Burn

Lee, Dongwon

178

Fuel to Burn: Economics of Converting Forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel to Burn: Economics of Converting Forest Thinnings to Energy Using BioMax in Southern Oregon E a small-scale (100-kW) BioMax without a subsidy or tax credit, even if fuel were delivered to the plant; Christensen, Glenn. 2005. Fuel to burn: Economics of converting forest thinnings to energy using Bio

Fried, Jeremy S.

179

Remedial Action Work Plan Amchitka Island Mud Pit Closures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This remedial action work plan presents the project organization and construction procedures developed for the performance of the remedial actions at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE's) sites on Amchitka Island, Alaska. During the late1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (the predecessor agency to DOE) used Amchitka Island as a site for underground nuclear tests. A total of nine sites on the Island were considered for nuclear testing; however, tests were only conducted at three sites (i.e., Long Shot in 1965, Milrow in 1969, and Cannikin in 1971). In addition to these three sites, large diameter emplacement holes were drilled in two other locations (Sites D and F) and an exploratory hole was in a third location (Site E). It was estimated that approximately 195 acres were disturbed by drilling or preparation for drilling in conjunction with these activities. The disturbed areas include access roads, spoil-disposal areas, mud pits which have impacted the environment, and an underground storage tank at the hot mix plant which was used to support asphalt-paving operations on the island. The remedial action objective for Amchitka Island is to eliminate human and ecological exposure to contaminants by capping drilling mud pits, removing the tank contents, and closing the tank in place. The remedial actions will meet State of Alaska regulations, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuge management goals, address stakeholder concerns, and address the cultural beliefs and practices of the native people. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office will conduct work on Amchitka Island under the authority of the Comprehensive Emergency Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Field activities are scheduled to take place May through September 2001. The results of these activities will be presented in a subsequent Closure Report.

DOE/NV

2001-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

180

Radon release and dispersion from an open pit uranium mine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radon-222 flux from representative sections of the United Nuclear St. Anthony open-pit mine complex was measured. The collected radon was adsorbed on activated charcoal and the radon activity was measured by gamma spectroscopy. System design, calibration, and the procedure to determine radon flux density (pCi/m/sup 2/.s) are described. A continuous series of radon flux densities were measured over a 5-month period at a control point in the mine. The average flux density at the control point was 1.9 pCi/m/sup 2/.s. A close correlation between radon flux density variations and changes in barometric pressure was observed by a comparison of meteorological data and average daily radon flux density measured at the control point. The release rate from each section of the mine was calculated from the average radon flux density and the area of the section, as determined from enlarged aerial photographs. The average radon flux density for eight locations over the ore-bearing section was 7.3 pCi/m/sup 2/.s. The average flux density for four locations over undisturbed topsoil was 0.17 pCi/m/sup 2/.s. The average Ra-226 content of ten samples taken from the ore-bearing region was 102 pCi/g ore. The ratio of radon flux density to radium content (specific flux) was 0.072. The release rate from the entire St. Anthony open pit was determined to be 3.5 x 10/sup 5/ pCi/s. This rate is comparable to the natural release of radon from one square mile of undisturbed topsoil. 16 refs., 31 figs., 11 tabs.

Kisieleski, W.E.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Construction integrity assessment report (ETN-98-0005) S-Farm overground transfer (OGT) system valve pit 241-S-B to valve pit 241-S-D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The S-Farm overground transfer (OGT) line will bypass the existing line(s), between valve pits 241-S-B and 241-S-D that no longer meet system requirements. The new OGT line will provide a waste transfer pipeline between these valve pits in support of saltwell pumping activities. The length of the OGT line is approximately 180 ft from pit to pit. The primary pipe is nominal 1-in. diameter stainless steel (SST) braided Ethylene-propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM) hose. The encasement pipe is a nominal 3-in., flanged, SST pipe made up of several different length pipe spool pieces (drawing H-2-829564, sh. 1 and sh. 2). The OGT line slopes from valve pit 241-S-B toward valve pit 241-S-D. At each end, the primary and encasement pipe connect to a pit entry spool piece. The pit entry spool pieces are constructed of prefabricated SST materials. These spool pieces allow for the separation of the primary and encasement pipelines after the pipes have entered the valve pits (drawing H-2-818280, sh. 2). The pit entry spool pieces also allow for leak detection of the encasement pipe at each end (drawing H-2-829564, sh. 2). The OGT encasement pipeline is supported above ground by adjustable height unistrut brackets and precast concrete bases (drawing H-2-829654, sh. 1). The pipeline is heat-traced and insulated. The heat tracing and insulation supply and retain latent heat that prevents waste solidification during transfers and provides freeze protection. The total length of the pipeline is above ground, thereby negating the need for cathodic corrosion protection. This Construction Integrity Assessment Report (CIAR) is prepared by Fluor Daniel Northwest for Numatec Hanford Corporation/Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation, the operations contractor, and the U. S. Department of Energy, the system owner. The CIAR is intended to verify that construction was performed in accordance with the provisions of Washington Administrative Code, WAC-173-303-640 (3) (c), (e), (f) and (h).

HICKS, D.F.

1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

182

Reply to Hrudey: Tracking the extent of oil sands airborne pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and major open-pit mining areas show variable...laboratory performance standards in terms of blanks...of deuterated internal standards. Thus, we are confident...Oil Sands Monitoring Plan and will soon have...downstream impacts. Reviews of previous monitoring...

Joshua Kurek; Jane L. Kirk; Derek C. G. Muir; Xiaowa Wang; Marlene S. Evans; John P. Smol

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Kinetic and equilibrium adsorption of methylene blue and remazol dyes onto steam-activated carbons developed from date pits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Steam-activated carbons DS2 and DS5 were prepared by gasifying 600 °C-date pits carbonization products with steam at 950 °C to burn-off = 20 and 50%, respectively. The textural properties of these carbons were determined from the nitrogen adsorption at ?196 °C. The chemistry of the carbon surface was determined from the surface pH and from neutralization of the surface carbon–oxygen groups of basic and acidic type. The kinetic and equilibrium adsorption of MB and RY on DS2 and DS5 was determined at 27 and 37 °C and at initial sorption solution pH 3–7. DS2 and DS5 have expanded surface area, large total pore volume and contain both micro and mesoporosity. They have on their surface basic and acidic groups of different strength and functionality. This enhanced the sorption of the cationic dye (MB) and of the anionic dye (RY). The adsorption of MB and RY on DS2 and DS5 involves intraparticle diffusion and followed pseudo-second order kinetics. The adsorption isotherms were applicable to the Langmuir isotherm and high monolayer capacities for MB and RY dyes were evaluated indicating the high efficiencies of the carbons for dye adsorption.

Sheikha S. Ashour

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Characterized particulate emissions from U.S.-legal...

185

Reduction in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon humidificat...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon humidification: Roles of inorganically-induced hygroscopicity, Reduction in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon...

186

PREDICTIVE MODELS. Enhanced Oil Recovery Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREDICTIVE MODELS is a collection of five models - CFPM, CO2PM, ICPM, PFPM, and SFPM - used in the 1982-1984 National Petroleum Council study of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential. Each pertains to a specific EOR process designed to squeeze additional oil from aging or spent oil fields. The processes are: 1 chemical flooding, where soap-like surfactants are injected into the reservoir to wash out the oil; 2 carbon dioxide miscible flooding, where carbon dioxide mixes with the lighter hydrocarbons making the oil easier to displace; 3 in-situ combustion, which uses the heat from burning some of the underground oil to thin the product; 4 polymer flooding, where thick, cohesive material is pumped into a reservoir to push the oil through the underground rock; and 5 steamflood, where pressurized steam is injected underground to thin the oil. CFPM, the Chemical Flood Predictive Model, models micellar (surfactant)-polymer floods in reservoirs, which have been previously waterflooded to residual oil saturation. Thus, only true tertiary floods are considered. An option allows a rough estimate of oil recovery by caustic or caustic-polymer processes. CO2PM, the Carbon Dioxide miscible flooding Predictive Model, is applicable to both secondary (mobile oil) and tertiary (residual oil) floods, and to either continuous CO2 injection or water-alternating gas processes. ICPM, the In-situ Combustion Predictive Model, computes the recovery and profitability of an in-situ combustion project from generalized performance predictive algorithms. PFPM, the Polymer Flood Predictive Model, is switch-selectable for either polymer or waterflooding, and an option allows the calculation of the incremental oil recovery and economics of polymer relative to waterflooding. SFPM, the Steamflood Predictive Model, is applicable to the steam drive process, but not to cyclic steam injection (steam soak) processes.

Ray, R.M. [DOE Bartlesville Energy Technology Technology Center, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1992-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

187

In situ vitrification demonstration at Pit 1, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 2: Site characterization report of the Pit 1 area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A treatability study was initiated in October 1993, initially encompassing the application of in situ vitrification (ISV) to at least two segments of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) seepage Pit 1 by the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. This treatability study was to have supported a possible Interim Record of Decision (IROD) or removal action for closure of one or more of the seepage pits and trenches as early as FY 1997. The Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 7, which contains these seven seepage pits and trenches, will probably not begin until after the year 2000. This treatability study will establish the field-scale technical performance of ISV for (1) attaining the required depth, nominally 15 ft, to incorporate source contamination within and beneath the pits; (2) demonstrating field capability to overlap melt settings that are necessary to achieve fused, melted segments of the source contamination; (3) demonstrating off-gas handling technology for accommodating and minimizing the volatilization of {sup 137}Cs; (4) demonstrating adequate site characterization techniques to predict ISV melting kinetics, processing temperatures, and product durability; and (5) promoting public acceptance of ISV technology by demonstrating its safety, implementability, site impacts, and air emissions and by coordinating the treatability study within the regulatory closure process. This report summarizes the site characterization information gathered through the end of September 1996 which supports the planning and assessment of ISV for Pit 1 (objective 4 above).

Spalding, B.P.; Bogle, M.A.; Cline, S.R.; Naney, M.T.; Gu, B.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Geotechnical properties of oil-contaminated Kuwaiti sand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large quantities of oil-contaminated sands resulted from exploded oil wells, burning oil fires, the destruction of oil storage tanks, and the formation of oil lakes in Kuwait at the end of the Gulf War. An extensive laboratory testing program was carried out to determine the geotechnical characteristics of this material. Testing included basic properties, compaction and permeability tests, and triaxial and consolidation tests on clean and contaminated sand at the same relative density. Contaminated specimens were prepared by mixing the sand with oil in the amount of 6% by weight or less to match field conditions. The influence of the type of oil, and relative density was also investigated by direct shear tests. The results indicated a small reduction in strength and permeability and an increase in compressibility due to contamination. The preferred method of disposal of this material is to use it as a stabilizing material for other projects such as road construction.

Al-Sanad, H.A.; Eid, W.K.; Ismael, N.F. [Kuwait Univ., Safat (Kuwait). Dept. of Civil Engineering] [Kuwait Univ., Safat (Kuwait). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Study on Electro-Polishing Process by Niobium-Plate Sample With Artificial Pits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electro-polishing (EP) process is the best candidate of final surface-treatment for the production of ILC cavities. Nevertheless, the development of defects on the inner-surface of the Superconducting RF cavity during EP process has not been studied by experimental method. We made artificial pits on the surface of a Nb-plate sample and observed the development of the pit-shapes after each step of 30um-EP process where 120um was removed by EP in total. This article describes the results of this EP-test of Nb-sample with artificial pits.

T. Saeki, H. Hayano, S. Kato, M. Nishiwaki, M. Sawabe, W.A. Clemens, R.L. Geng, R. Manus, P.V. Tyagi

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

LOW COST BIOHEATING OIL APPLICATION.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report describes primarily the results of combustion tests carried out with a soy methyl ester (SME) that can be considered as a biofuel that does not quite meet the ASTM D 6751-02 specifications for biodiesel. The tests were performed in a residential boiler and a commercial boiler. Blends of the SME in distillate fuel (home heating fuel or equivalently, ASTM No.2 fuel oil) were tested in both the boilers. Similar tests had been conducted in a previous project with ASTM biodiesel blends and hence provided a comparison. Blends of the SME in ASTM No.6 oil (residual oil) were also tested in the commercial boiler using a different burner. Physical properties of the blends (in both the petroleum based fuels) were also measured. It was found that the SME blends in the distillate burned, not surprisingly, similarly to biodiesel blends. Reductions in NOx with blending of the SME were the most significant finding as before with biodiesel blends. The blends in No.6 oil also showed reductions in NOx in the commercial boiler combustion tests, though levels with No.6 blends are higher than with No.2 blends as expected. A significant conclusion from the physical property tests was that even the blending of 10% SME with the No.6 oil caused a significant reduction in viscosity, which suggests a potential direction of application of such blends.

KRISHNA,C.R.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Army urged to resume burning chemical arms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Army urged to resume burning chemical arms ... Under baseline, the weapon is disassembled into four components—the chemical agent, energetic materials, metal parts, and dunnage (waste)—with each incinerated separately. ...

1994-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

192

Wood-Burning Heating System Deduction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute allows individual taxpayers a deduction for the purchase and installation of a wood-burning heating system. The deduction is equal to the total cost of purchase and installation for...

193

Microsoft Word - LWO-PIT-2007-00062 R14.1_signed_.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4.1 October 2007 An Integrated System at the Savannah River Site LWO-PIT-2007-00062 L L ife-cycle Liquid Waste Disposition System Plan ife-cycle Liquid Waste Disposition System...

194

Mining production information management system in an open pit based on GIS/GPS/GPRS/RFID  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using GIS, GPS, GPRS and RFID, a dynamic information management system of digital mining in an open pit was designed and developed. A linear programming model was set up in a practical application. By the mode...

Qing-hua Gu; Cai-wu Lu; Fa-ben Li…

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Close Out Report for the Ash Pit Operable Unit I Area of Concern 2F  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..............................................................................................................1 2.2 Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study, shrubs, and grasses. 2.2 Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study The boundary of the Ash Pits ...................................................................................2 2.4 Remedial Activities

196

PIT 9: From "Black Eye" to Part of DOE Cleanup Success  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

tons of radioactive and hazardous waste, generated during nuclear bomb-making at the Rocky Flats Plant in Colorado, had been disposed in unlined pits and trenches from 1954 to...

197

Guidelines for Transportation, Handling, and Use of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-Oil. 1. Flammability and Toxicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The first bio-oil burner fuel standard in ASTM D7544 was approved in 2010. ... A technical specification for a quality specification for pyrolysis oil suitable for gasification feedstock for production of syngas and synthetic biofuels ... Because of the severity of the dermal changes (erythema/edema i.e., burns) and for ethical reasons, the eye irritation test was not run. ...

Anja Oasmaa; Anssi Källi; Christian Lindfors; Douglas C. Elliott; Dave Springer; Cordner Peacocke; David Chiaramonti

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

198

Ris Energy Report 2 Biodiesel is produced from vegetable oils that have been  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6.2 Risø Energy Report 2 Biodiesel is produced from vegetable oils that have been chemically (canola) oil with methanol. Biodiesel can be burned directly in diesel engines. Robert Diesel himself to producing low-cost biodiesel is to select clever blends of the cheapest feedstocks available, while main

199

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols Martin de Graaf KNMI #12; Outline · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Theory · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Reality · Biomass burning.6 Biomass burning over Angola, 09 Sep. 2004 Absorbing Aerosol Index PMD image #12;biomass burning ocean

Graaf, Martin de

200

The United States pit disassembly and conversion project -- Meeting the MOX fuel specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US is actively involved in demonstrating the disassembly of nuclear weapons pits to an unclassified form readied for disposition. The MOX option is the most likely path forward for plutonium that originated from nuclear weapon pits. The US demonstration line for pit disassembly and conversion is known as ARIES, the advanced recovery and integrated extraction system. The ARIES demonstration line is being used to gather data in an integrated fashion of the technologies needed for pit disassembly and conversion. These activities include the following modules: pit bisection, hydride-dehydride, oxide conversion, canning, electrolytic decontamination, and nondestructive assay (NDA). Pit bisection swages in a pit in half. Hydride-dehydride converts the pit plutonium metal to an unclassified metal button. To convert the plutonium metal to an oxide the US is investigating a number of options. The primary oxide conversion approach involves variations of combining plutonium hydriding and subsequent oxidation. Another approach is to simply oxidize the metal under controlled conditions-direct metal oxidation (DMO). To remove the gallium from the plutonium oxide, a thermal distillation approach is being used. These pyrochemical approaches will substantially reduce the wastes produced for oxide conversion of weapon plutonium, compared to traditional aqueous processing. The packaging of either the plutonium metal or oxide to long term storage criteria involves the canning and electrolytic decontamination modules. The NDA suite of instruments is then used to assay the material in the containers, which enables international verification without the need to open the containers and repackage them. All of these processes are described.

Nelson, T.O.; James, C.A.; Kolman, D.G.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Determination of useful performance parameters for the ALR8(SI) plutonium pit container system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DETERMINATION OF USEFUL PERFORMANCE PARAMETERS FOR THE ALRS(SI) PLUTONIUM PIT CONTAINER SYSTEM A Thesis by MARK ALAN PIERCE Submitted to the Office of Cnaduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2000 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene DETERMINATION OF USEFUL PERFORMANCE PARAMETERS FOR THE ALRS(SI) PLUTONIUM PIT CONTAINER SYSTEM A Thesis by MARK ALAN PIERCE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies...

Pierce, Mark Alan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Pit disassembly and conversion demonstration environmental assessment and research and development activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant portion of the surplus plutonium is in the form of pits, a nuclear weapons component. Pits are composed of plutonium which is sealed in a metallic shell. These pits would need to be safely disassembled and permanently converted to an unclassified form that would be suitable for long-term disposition and international inspection. To determine the feasibility of an integrated pit disassembly and conversion system, a Pit Disassembly and Conversion Demonstration is proposed to take place at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This demonstration would be done in existing buildings and facilities, and would involve the disassembly of up to 250 pits and conversion of the recovered plutonium to plutonium metal ingots and plutonium dioxide. This demonstration also includes the conversion of up to 80 kilograms of clean plutonium metal to plutonium dioxide because, as part of the disposition process, some surplus plutonium metal may be converted to plutonium dioxide in the same facility as the surplus pits. The equipment to be used for the proposed demonstration addressed in this EA would use some parts of the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) capability, other existing equipment/capacities, plus new equipment that was developed at other sites. In addition, small-scale R and D activities are currently underway as part of the overall surplus plutonium disposition program. These R and D activities are related to pit disassembly and conversion, MOX fuel fabrication, and immobilization (in glass and ceramic forms). They are described in Section 7.0. On May 16, 1997, the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) notified potentially affected states and tribes that this EA would be prepared in accordance with NEPA. This EA has been prepared to provide sufficient information for DOE to determine whether a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) is warranted or whether an EIS must be prepared.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Simplified configuration for the combustor of an oil burner using a low pressure, high flow air-atomizing nozzle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to clean burning of fuel oil with air. More specifically, to a fuel burning combustion head using a low-pressure, high air flow atomizing nozzle so that there will be a complete combustion of oil resulting in a minimum emission of pollutants. The improved fuel burner uses a low pressure air atomizing nozzle that does not result in the use of additional compressors or the introduction of pressurized gases downstream, nor does it require a complex design. Inventors:

Butcher, Thomas A. (Port Jefferson, NY); Celebi, Yusuf (Middle Island, NY); Fisher, Leonard (Colrain, MA)

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Design-only conceptual design report for pit disassembly and conversion facility. Rev 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This design-only conceptual design report (DOCDR) was prepared to support a funding request by the Department of Energy (DOE)-Office of Fissile Material Disposition (OFMD) for engineering design of the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) Project No. 99-D-141. The PDCF will be used to disassemble the nation`s inventory of surplus nuclear weapons pits and convert the plutonium recovered from those pits into a form suitable for storage, international inspection, and final disposition. The PDCF is a complex consisting of a hardened building that will contain the plutonium processes in a safe and secure manner, and conventional buildings and structures that will house support personnel, systems, and equipment. The PDCF uses the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES), a low waste, modular pyroprocessing system to convert pits to plutonium oxide. The PDCF project consists of engineering and design, and construction of the buildings and structures, and engineering and design, procurement, installation, testing and start-up of equipment to disassemble pits and convert plutonium in pits to oxide form. The facility is planned to operate for 10 years, averaging 3.5 metric tons (3.86 tons) of plutonium metal per year. On conclusion of operations, the PDCF will be decontaminated and decommissioned.

Zygmunt, S.; Christensen, L.; Richardson, C.

1997-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

205

Effect of Mo on pitting corrosion of ferritic steels in bromide and chloride solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model for pitting corrosion of stainless steels, independent of changes of passive film properties, was tested using Fe-18%Cr-x%Mo alloys in bromide and chlorine solutions. In 1M LiCl the pitting potential improved from {minus}50 mV{sub sce} to about 1200 mV{sub sce} on increasing Mo from 2% to 10%. In 1M LiBr the pitting potential increased from 125 to only 560 mV{sub sce}. Active dissolution kinetics of these steels in saturated solutions in a simulated pit were measured. Tafel lines for dissolution moved to more noble potentials with increases in Mo, indicating Mo inhibited dissolution rates. The potential increases were found to be equal to the increases in pitting potential for both halides. Agreement was interpreted in terms maintaining high halide concentrations in the pit by high rates of active metal dissolution. Bromide was less effective suggesting it interacted with Mo adsorbed on the dissolving surface.

Kaneko, M. [Nippon Steel Corp., Futtsu Chiba (Japan). Steel Research Lab; Isaacs, H.S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Mycorrhizal Species Dominate the Soil-Fungal Community in Estonian Oil Shale-Ash Hills Charles Cowden, Sam Willis, and Richard Shefferson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mycorrhizal Species Dominate the Soil-Fungal Community in Estonian Oil Shale-Ash Hills Charles 30602 Introduction Estonia relies on vast reserves of oil shale to produce electricity. The mining and burning of oil shale is extremely inefficient and produces large quantities of tailings and ash (Vallner

Shefferson, Richard P.

207

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 356: Mud Pits and Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Revision No. 0, August 2001)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions necessary for the characterization and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 356, Mud Pits and Disposal Sites, as identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). The CAU, located on the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 03-04-01, Area 3 Change House Septic System; CAS 03-09-01, Mud Pit Spill Over; CAS 03-09-03, Mud Pit; CAS 03-09-04, Mud Pit; CAS 03-09-05, Mud Pit; CAS 20-16-01, Landfill; CAS 20-22-21, Drums. Sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations are the basis for the development of the phased approach chosen to address the data collection activities prior to implementing the preferred closure alternative for each CAS. The Phase I investigation will determine through collection of environmental samples from targeted populations (i.e., mud/soil cuttings above textural discontinuity) if contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) are present in concentrations exceeding preliminary action levels (PALs) at each of the CASs. If COPCs are present above PALs, a Phase II investigation will be implemented to determine the extent of contamination to support the appropriate corrective action alternative to complete closure of the site. Groundwater impacts from potentially migrating contaminants are not expected due to the depths to groundwater and limiting hydrologic drivers of low precipitation and high evaporation rates. Future land-use scenarios limit future uses to industrial activities; therefore, future residential uses are not considered. Potential exposure routes to site workers from contaminants of concern in septage and soils include oral ingestion, inhalation, or dermal contact (absorption) through in-advertent disturbance of contaminated structures and/or soils. Diesel within drilling muds is expected to be the primary COPC based on process knowledge. Recirculation processes within the mud pits enhance volatilization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), thereby reducing the potential concentrations of any VOCs that may be present. A secondary source of contaminants from random truck dumping activities and leaking vehicle discharge may have released fuels, grease, motor oil, and hydraulic fluids into the mud pit effluent stream. Radionuclide contamination is not expected at these CASs based on historical information. The primary radioisotopes that could be expected, if present, are cesium-137, tritium, and strontium-90. The SAFER process ends with closure of the site based on the laboratory analytical results of the environmental samples. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 356 using the SAFER process. On completion of the field activities, a Closure Report will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for review and approval.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV)

2001-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

208

Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . . . .Oil Production and Productivity in Venezuela and

CAKIR, NIDA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Oil Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .in the Venezuelan Oil Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . .and Productivity: Evidence from the Oil Industry . .

CAKIR, NIDA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Technology Solutions for Mitigating Environmental Impacts of Oil and Gas E&P Activity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology Solutions for Mitigating Technology Solutions for Mitigating Environmental Impacts of Oil and Gas E&P Activity The mission of the Environmental Program is to promote a reliable, affordable, and secure supply of domestic oil and clean-burning natural gas, by providing cost-effective environmental regulatory compliance technologies, enhancing environmental protections during oil and gas E&P operations, and facilitating the development and use of scientific, risk-based environmental regulatory frameworks.

211

Electrochemical investigations of pitting corrosion in nitrogen-bearing type 316LN stainless steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrogen (N) alloying was found to inhibit active dissolution and to introduce a secondary loop with fluctuating currents in the anodic polarization curve of type 316LN stainless steel (SS) (UNS S31653) in 1 N hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution. Potentiostatic tests in this potential range confirmed the occurrence of current transients as a result of metastable pits, resulting in secondary loop formation. Higher minimum chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}) concentration and low acidic pH were shown to be required for stable pit formation in type 316LN SS compared to similar alloys without N alloying. Results showed no selective anodic dissolution of any of the alloying elements in actively growing pits in type 316LN SS. Although ammonium ions (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) were found within pits under suitable applied potentials in 1 N HCl and under natural corrosion in ferric chloride (FECl{sub 3}) solutions, the more anodic the potential, the less was its yield. The formation of NH{sup +}{sub 2} ions was found to be greater at more active potentials under uniformly dissolving conditions, and an apparent Tafel slope for the reduction reaction N + 4H{sup +} + 3e {r_arrow}NH{sub 4}{sup +} for the dissolution of N from the steel was estimated to be 0.125 V. Significant enrichments of N, chromium (CR), and nickel (Ni) to a marginal extent were observed by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) of the actively growing pitted surface. The iron (Fe) component, however, showed considerable depletion. The unattacked surface region surrounding the pit maintained normal passive film characteristic. Based on observations, a mechanism elaborating the beneficial effect of alloyed N on pitting corrosion resistance of SS was developed.

Palit, G.C.; Kain, V.; Gadiyar, H.S. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Metallurgy Div.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal" November 20, 2012 jlowe@bsu.edu 765.285.2805 Ball State University Ball State University Administration Building 1899 Ball State 1920s Ball State University Ball State University (4) Coal Fired Boilers Installed 1941/1955 (3) Natural Gas Fired Boilers Installed in the 1970s Heat and Chilled Water Plant Operations Heat Plant: 4 Coal Fired Boilers 3 Natural Gas Fired Boilers 320,000 Lbs/Hr nameplate 240,000 Lbs/Hr current 700,000,000 Lbs/Year Chilled Water Plant: 5 Electrical Centrifugal Chillers 9,300 ton capacity 25,000,000 Ton Hours/Year Pollutants Produced from Burning 36,000 tons of Coal * Carbon Dioxide 85,000 tons (Global Warming)

213

OIL IMPORTS: For and Against  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

OIL IMPORTS: For and Against ... The eight—Ashland Oil, Atlantic Richfield, Cities Service, Marathon Oil, Mobil Oil, Standard Oil (Ind.), ...

1969-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

214

Corrective action investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 342, the Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit (FTP), which is located in Area 23 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 88 km (55 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 342 is comprised of CAS 23-56-01. The FTP is an area approximately 100 m by 140 m (350 ft by 450 ft) located west of the town of Mercury, Nevada, which was used between approximately 1965 and 1990 to train fire-fighting personnel (REECo, 1991; Jacobson, 1991). The surface and subsurface soils in the FTP have likely been impacted by hydrocarbons and other contaminants of potential concern (COPC) associated with burn activities and training exercises in the area.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Final soil removal report for the remediation of contaminated soils at the Old Burn Area (site 11), Savannah Air National Guard Base, Savannah International Airport, Savannah, Georgia. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Partial Contents: Source removal requirements, remediation activities, general site activities, excavation and backfilling of pit, excavation and backfilling of PIT, 4.4 off-site soil treatment and disposal, site restoration activities, final site inspection, analytical laboratory results, PIT No. 1, perimeter Sampling - Pit No. 1, Pit Floor Sampling - Pit No. 1, Pit No. 2. Perimeter Sampling - Pit No. 2. Pit Floor Sampling - Pit No. 2. quality assurance/quality control samples.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Record of Decision Remedial Alternative Selection for the Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Operable Unit: Final Action (631-16G)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit is located within SRS and is approximately 305 meters west of South Carolina Highway 125.

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Microsoft Word - S03347_final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

quarter (high-water conditions) VOCs, U, nitrate see Figure 9 in Appendix D 33604 Oil Burn Pit 1 source area Biennial grabs; Second calendar quarter (high-water conditions)...

218

Microsoft Word - CHPRC-0900540.18_MSA%20Attachment%201[1].docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

exceeded the remedial action levels. The elevated levels were in areas that included a burn pit at the west end of the site and several locations where oil had previously...

219

Evaluating greenhouse gas emissions inventories for agricultural burning using satellite observations of active fires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regulation of agricultural waste burning occurs at multipleexample, agricultural waste burning is managed by individualalso take agricultural waste- burning emissions into

Lin, Hsiao-Wen; Jin, Yufang; Giglio, Louis; Foley, Jonathan A; Randerson, James T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Do biomass burning aerosols intensify drought in equatorial Asia during El Niño?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fication of drought-induced biomass burning in Indonesiavariability in global biomass burning emissions from 1997 toChemistry and Physics Do biomass burning aerosols intensify

Tosca, M. G; Randerson, J. T; Zender, C. S; Flanner, M. G; Rasch, P. J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Biomass burning contribution to black carbon in the Western United States Mountain Ranges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the atmosphere from biomass burning, Climatic Change, 2,Chemistry and Physics Biomass burning contribution to black2011 Y. H. Mao et al. : Biomass burning contribution to

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Biomass burning and urban air pollution over the Central Mexican Plateau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. D. Crounse et al. : Biomass burning pollution overChemistry and Physics Biomass burning and urban airprimary anthropogenic and biomass burning organic aerosols

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Bioconversion of Heavy oil.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??70 % of world?s oil reservoirs consist of heavy oil, and as the supply of conventional oil decreases, researchers are searching for new technologies to… (more)

Steinbakk, Sandra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

5 World Oil Trends WORLD OIL TRENDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5 World Oil Trends Chapter 1 WORLD OIL TRENDS INTRODUCTION In considering the outlook for California's petroleum supplies, it is important to give attention to expecta- tions of what the world oil market. Will world oil demand increase and, if so, by how much? How will world oil prices be affected

225

ASSESSMENTOF BURNING-PLASMA PHENOMENA COMPACTIGNITION TOKAMAK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report+ on ASSESSMENTOF BURNING-PLASMA PHENOMENA . in a COMPACTIGNITION TOKAMAK presented-coil tokamak configurations that would achieve ignition under presently accepted scaling laws. Studies the extent to which these compact tokamak ignition experiments can resolve the technical issue of under

226

First Sustained Burning Plasma. Starts in 2019.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-T fusion power density is approximated by: Plasma pressure in atmospheres We need >1MWm-3 for an economic system -- need a few Atmospheres of plasma pressure. Can we hold it with a magnetic field? MagneticITER JET (to scale) JET (to scale) First Sustained Burning Plasma. Starts in 2019. BASIC PARAMETERS

227

THE BURNING OF BIOMASS Economy, Environment, Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE BURNING OF BIOMASS Economy, Environment, Health Kees Kolff, MD, MPH April 21, 2012 #12;OUR TRUCKS OF BIOMASS/ DAY (Currently 82) #12;BAD FOR THE ECONOMY · Taxpayers will pay 50% - tax credits, etc · Not a cogen project so only 25% efficient · Biomass better for biofuels, not electricity · MILL JOBS

228

Attrition and abrasion models for oil shale process modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As oil shale is processed, fine particles, much smaller than the original shale are created. This process is called attrition or more accurately abrasion. In this paper, models of abrasion are presented for oil shale being processed in several unit operations. Two of these unit operations, a fluidized bed and a lift pipe are used in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hot-Recycle-Solid (HRS) process being developed for the above ground processing of oil shale. In two reports, studies were conducted on the attrition of oil shale in unit operations which are used in the HRS process. Carley reported results for attrition in a lift pipe for oil shale which had been pre-processed either by retorting or by retorting then burning. The second paper, by Taylor and Beavers, reported results for a fluidized bed processing of oil shale. Taylor and Beavers studied raw, retorted, and shale which had been retorted and then burned. In this paper, empirical models are derived, from the experimental studies conducted on oil shale for the process occurring in the HRS process. The derived models are presented along with comparisons with experimental results.

Aldis, D.F.

1991-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

229

Surplus weapons plutonium: Technologies for pit disassembly/conversion and MOX fuel fabrication  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will provide a description of the technologies involved in the disposition of plutonium from surplus nuclear weapon components (pits), based on pit disassembly and conversion and on fabrication of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for disposition through irradiation in nuclear reactors. The MOX/Reactor option is the baseline disposition plan for both the US and russian for plutonium from pits and other clean plutonium metal and oxide. In the US, impure plutonium in various forms will be converted to oxide and immobilized in glass or ceramic, surrounded by vitrified high level waste to provide a radiation barrier. A similar fate is expected for impure material in Russia as well. The immobilization technologies will not be discussed. Following technical descriptions, a discussion of options for monitoring the plutonium during these processes will be provided.

Toevs, J.W.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

230

Electrochemically controlled pitting corrosion in Ni film: A study of AFM and neutron reflectometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electrochemical behavior of pitting corrosion of a Ni film, grown on Si substrate by sputtering, prepassivated in a chloride-free sulfuric acid solution and subsequently exposed to chloride above the pitting potential is reported. Specular and off-specular unpolarized neutron reflectometry and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) techniques have been used to determine the depth profile of scattering length density and morphology of as-deposited as well as corroded sample. Specular neutron reflectometry measurement of the film after corrosion shows density degradation along the thickness of film. The density profile as a function of depth, maps the growth of pitting and void networks due to corrosion. The AFM and off-specular neutron reflectivity measurements has suggested that the morphology of the film remains same after exposure of the film in chloride solution.

Surendra Singh; Saibal Basu; A.K. Poswal; R.B. Tokas; S.K. Ghosh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

U S Burning Plasma Organization:U.S. Burning Plasma Organization: Supporting US Scientific Contributions to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Community (TTF,...) US Technology Community · USBPO mission is to coordinate US Burning Plasma related research to advance science USBPO Director, Jim Van Dam, also serves as US IPO Chief Scientist, assuring

232

Fuel switch could bring big savings for HECO Liquefied natural gas beats low-sulfur oil in cost and equipment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel switch could bring big savings for HECO Liquefied natural gas beats low-sulfur oil in cost gas instead of continuing to burn low-sulfur fuel oil, a report said. Switching to liquefied natural who switch from gasoline-powered vehicles to ones fueled by compressed natural gas could save as much

233

Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on Stockpile Stewardship and Management for a Modern Pit Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Modern Pit Facility Draft Environmental Impact Statement Modern Pit Facility Draft Environmental Impact Statement xii ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS AC/MC Analytical Chemistry and Materials Characterization ACHP Advisory Council on Historic Preservation ALARA as low as reasonably achievable ALOHA Aerial Location of Hazardous Atmospheres AQCR Air Quality Control Region ARF airborne release fraction Bison-m Biota Information System of New Mexico BLM Bureau of Land Management BLS Bureau of Labor Statistics BNM Bandelier National Monument CAA Clean Air Act CAIRS Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System CD-0 critical decision on mission need CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CFR Code of Federal Regulations CGTO Consolidated Group of Tribes and Organizations

234

Technology experience and economics of oil shale mining in Estonia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The exhaustion of fuel-energy resources became an evident problem of the European continent in the 1960s. Careful utilization of their own reserves of coal, oil, and gas (Germany, France, Spain) and assigned shares of imports of these resources make up the strategy of economic development of the European countries. The expansion of oil shale utilization is the most topical problem. The experience of mining oil shale deposits in Estonia and Russia, in terms of the practice and the economic results, is reviewed in this article. The room-and-pillar method of underground mining and the open-cut technology of clearing the ground ensure the fertility of a soil. The economics of underground and open pit oil shale mines is analyzed in terms of natural, organizational, and technical factors. These analyses are used in the planning and management of oil shale mining enterprises. The perspectives of the oil shale mining industry of Estonia and the economic expediency of multiproduction are examined. Recommendations and guidelines for future industrial utilization of oil shale are given in the summary.

Fraiman, J.; Kuzmiv, I. [Estonian Oil Shale State Co., Jyhvi (Estonia). Scientific Research Center

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

of oil yields from enhanced oil recovery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO 2 storage capacity in depleted oil reservoirs. The primary goal of the project is to demonstrate that remaining oil can be economically produced using CO 2 -EOR technology in untested areas of the United States. The Citronelle Field appears to be an ideal site for concurrent CO 2 storage and EOR because the field is composed of sandstone reservoirs

236

EPA aide wary about burning waste at sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

EPA aide wary about burning waste at sea ... An Environmental Protection Agency official has cautioned that a proposal by Chemical Waste Management (CWM) to perform a research burn of chemical wastes at sea should be permitted only if stringent conditions are met. ... During 19 days of burns, EPA would conduct research to determine the incinerator emissions' composition, transport, and effect on marine life. ...

1986-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

237

Plasma Materials Interaction Issues For Burning Plasma Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasma Materials Interaction Issues For Burning Plasma Experiments M. Ulrickson Presented · Introduction to Burning Plasmas · Plasma Materials Interaction Phenomena · Materials Issues · Summary #12;MAU 4 ­ Resistance to neutron damage #12;MAU 5 11/15/2001 The FIRE Burning Plasma Device · A compact high field

238

LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL P. Dirrenberger1 , P.A. Glaude*1 (2014) 162-169" DOI : 10.1016/j.fuel.2013.07.015 #12;2 LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES, Sweden Abstract The adiabatic laminar burning velocities of a commercial gasoline and of a model fuel (n

Boyer, Edmond

239

Hydrotreating of oil from eastern oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale provides one of the major fossil energy reserves for the United States. The quantity of reserves in oil shale is less than the quantity in coal, but is much greater (by at least an order of magnitude) than the quantity of crude oil reserves. With so much oil potentially available from oil shale, efforts have been made to develop techniques for its utilization. In these efforts, hydrotreating has proved to be an acceptable technique for upgrading raw shale oil to make usuable products. The present work demonstrated the use of the hydrotreating technique for upgrading an oil from Indiana New Albany oil shale.

Scinta, J.; Garner, J.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Pitting resistance of alloy 800 as a function of temperature and prefilming in high-temperature water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pitting behavior of alloy 800 was investigated as a function of temperature and prefilming in high-temperature water. The behavior was characterized in terms of pitting potential (U{sub p}) and pit density (n{sub p}). U{sub p} decreased with increasing temperature and chloride activity. Prefilming of test coupons over a period between 100 h and 5,000 h in ammoniated water at 300 C had no apparent influence on U{sub p} at room temperature, 180 C, and 300 C. However, the number of pits in prefilmed coupons was much higher than in coupons covered with an air passive layer. The effect of prefilming on pit nucleation was investigated in detail with regard to a model and test methods developed by Bianchi, et al. Density of pits in prefilmed coupons was at least 1 order of magnitude higher than in air passive coupons. Maximum pit density was measured after a prefilming period of 100 h. The effect was discussed in terms of Bianchi`s model and in terms of features of passive films. The initially amorphous metastable passive film on alloy 800 became crystalline at increased temperatures. Crystallization induced lattice defects, such as dislocations and grain boundaries, in the passive film. The film grew and slowly transformed into a thick oxide layer. The transformation process was associated with enhanced susceptibility to pit nucleation.

Stellwag, B. [Siemens Power Generation, Erlangen (Germany)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Selenium Bioaccumulation in Stocked Fish as an Indicator of Fishery Potential in Pit Lakes on Reclaimed Coal Mines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Reclaimed Coal Mines in Alberta, Canada L. L. Miller · J. B. Rasmussen · V. P. Palace · G. Sterling · A to selenium (Se) and other metals and metalloids in pit lakes formed by open pit coal mining in Tertiary (thermal coal) and in Cretaceous (metallurgical coal) bedrock. Juvenile hatchery rainbow trout

Hontela, Alice

242

Preparation of grout for stabilization of abandoned in-situ oil shale retorts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the preparation of grout from burned shale by treating the burned shale in steam at approximately 700.degree. C. to maximize the production of the materials alite and larnite. Oil shale removed to the surface during the preparation of an in-situ retort is first retorted on the surface and then the carbon is burned off, leaving burned shale. The burned shale is treated in steam at approximately 700.degree. C. for about 70 minutes. The treated shale is then ground and mixed with water to produce a grout which is pumped into an abandoned, processed in-situ retort, flowing into the void spaces and then bonding up to form a rigid, solidified mass which prevents surface subsidence and leaching of the spent shale by ground water.

Mallon, Richard G. (Livermore, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Physical and Chemical Characterization of Particulate and Gas phase Emissions from Biomass Burning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the pile as waste. Waste burning is not permitted in manyagricultural residue/waste burning, residential wood

Hosseini, Seyedehsan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Impact of Trash Burning on Air Quality in Mexico City  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

designed to simulate waste generated by a "recycling" and a "nonrecycling" family in a 208-L (55-gal) burn barrel at the EPA's Open Burning Test Facility. ... Four test burns were made in which the amt. of waste placed in the barrel varied from 6.4 to 13.6 kg and the amt. ... The results of this study indicate that backyard burning emits more PCDDs/PCDFs on a mass of refuse burned basis than various types of municipal waste combustors (MWCs). ...

A. Hodzic; C. Wiedinmyer; D. Salcedo; J. L. Jimenez

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

245

Potential Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Cask Drop in the K West Basin South Loadout Pit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this calculation note is to document the probabilistic calculation of a potential drop of a multi-canister overpack (MCO) cask or MCO cask and immersion pail on a per lift basis at the K West Basin south loadout pit. This calculation note supports both initial cask loading system alignment activities and normal operations. To perform normal operations in the basin, an MCO cask needs to be lifted four different times. A probabilistic calculation of the potential for a drop will be used for the MCO lifts required during operations. The point estimate value calculated for the probability of a potential drop in the south loadout pit is 1.5 x 10{sup -5} per lift. The probability of 1.5 x 10{sup -5} per lift is approximately a factor of two smaller than the midpoint of the crane load drop failure data provided in NUREG-0612, Control of Heavy Loads at Nuclear Power Plants. The point estimate value for the frequency of potential drops in the south loadout pit is 6.0 x 10{sup -5} per MCO, based on four lifts per MCO. With an MCO-drop accident frequency limit of 0.01 per year, the number of MCOs that can be handled in the south loadout pit must be limited to 165 MCOs per year.

RITTMANN, P.D.

2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

246

Modeling and Feedback Control for Air Flow Regulation in Deep Pits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Modeling and Feedback Control for Air Flow Regulation in Deep Pits Emmanuel WITRANT and Nicolas the air). It is clear that investigating automatic control solutions and minimizing the amount of pumped to the ground turbine control and distributed sensors within the shaft; 2. air quality regulation

Boyer, Edmond

247

Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-5 PNL Sawdust Pit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action, sampling activities, and compliance with cleanup criteria for the 118-F-5 Burial Ground, the PNL (Pacific Northwest Laboratory) Sawdust Pit. The 118-F-5 Burial Ground was an unlined trench that received radioactive sawdust from the floors of animal pens in the 100-F Experimental Animal Farm.

L. D. Habel

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

248

Pitting corrosion control using regenerative biolms on aluminium 2024 in articial seawater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pitting corrosion control using regenerative bio®lms on aluminium 2024 in arti®cial seawater D, CT 06269-3222, USA b Corrosion and Environment Eects Laboratory (CEEL), Department of Materials polyglutamate or polyaspartate, an additional small increase in corrosion inhibition occurred. Corrosion control

Wood, Thomas K.

249

Minimum Analytical Chemistry Requirements for Pit Manufacturing at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analytical chemistry is one of several capabilities necessary for executing the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Analytical chemistry capabilities reside in the Chemistry Metallurgy Research (CMR) Facility and Plutonium Facility (TA-55). These analytical capabilities support plutonium recovery operations, plutonium metallurgy, and waste management. Analytical chemistry capabilities at both nuclear facilities are currently being configured to support pit manufacturing. This document summarizes the minimum analytical chemistry capabilities required to sustain pit manufacturing at LANL. By the year 2004, approximately $16 million will be required to procure analytical instrumentation to support pit manufacturing. In addition, $8.5 million will be required to procure glovebox enclosures. An estimated 50% increase in costs has been included for installation of analytical instruments and glovebox enclosures. However, no general and administrative (G and A) taxes have been included. If an additional 42.5/0 G and A tax were to be incurred, approximately $35 million would be required over the next five years to prepare analytical chemistry to support a 50-pit-per-year manufacturing capability by the year 2004.

Moy, Ming M.; Leasure, Craig S.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Prediction and measurement of pitting damage functions for condensing heat exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pitting corrosion is a form of localized attack resulting in rapid penetration into a metal substrate. It is one of the most destructive and insidious forms of corrosion that occurs in industrial systems. Traditionally, the damage function (i.e., the number of pits vs the pit depth) is measured experimentally, and the development of damage has been described using empirical models. In general, the empirical models are successful because the distribution functions employed display great mathematical flexibility, but they require a significant database to achieve reliability. In fact, they really are successful only when the answer is known in advance. In this study, a deterministic method was developed to predict localized corrosion damage functions for condensing heat exchangers. The method incorporated calculations for the composition of the condensed environment and the electrochemical corrosion potential (E[sub corr]) of the alloy and included mechanistic treatments of pit nucleation and growth. The roles of important environmental parameters such as chloride concentration ([Cl[sup [minus

Macdonald, D.D.; Liu, C.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Center for Advanced Materials); Stickford, G.H.; Hindin, B.; Agrawal, A.K. (Battelle Columbus Labs., Columbus, OH (United States)); Krist, K. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States))

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Public exposure to hazards associated with natural radioactivity in open-pit mining in Ghana  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and Waste Safety in Mining and Mineral Procession...on the Kubi Forest Mining Project. Environmental...Anglogold Ashanti. Review of Operations. Annual...Community Development Plan, Iduapriem and Teberebe...International Basic Safety Standards (BSS) for protection...radioactivity in open-pit mining in Ghana. | The......

E. O. Darko; A. Faanu; A. R. Awudu; G. Emi-Reynolds; J. Yeboah; O. C. Oppon; E. H. K. Akaho

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Cleanup Verification Package for the 100-F-20, Pacific Northwest Laboratory Parallel Pits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 100-F-20, Pacific Northwest Laboratory Parallel Pits waste site. This waste site consisted of two earthen trenches thought to have received both radioactive and nonradioactive material related to the 100-F Experimental Animal Farm.

M. J. Appel

2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

253

PITTING CORROSION ON MAGNESIUM ALLOYS : A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF FIELD DATA USING EXTREME VALUE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PITTING CORROSION ON MAGNESIUM ALLOYS : A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF FIELD DATA USING EXTREME VALUE corrosion of the magnesium alloys AZ91D and AM60B combined with different coatings on steel bolts was investigated in field corrosion tests carried out by Volvo Car Corporation. Light metals like magnesium

Maume-Deschamps, Véronique

254

SCFA lead lab technical assistance review of the Pit 7 Complex source containment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On January 29-30, 2001 a technical assistance team (TAT) met with the Pit 7 project team at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to review technologies being evaluated for remediation in the Site 300 Pit 7 Complex and the process for selecting these technologies. Specifically, the project team presented the TAT with a core need to identify technically and economically practicable technologies and methods to stabilize, contain, or control the tritium and uranium in the source areas at the Pits 3 and 5 landfill area to prevent further releases of these contaminants to groundwater and the migration of tritiated and uranium-contaminated groundwater. The approaches and needs for the systems surrounding the landfills were also presented and discussed. With encouragement from the project team, the TAT expanded its focus to include additional site characterization, a water balance model, and computational models. The TAT was comprised of leading technical and regulatory experts from around the country and was assembled by SCFA's Lead Lab in response to a technical assistance request from John Ziagos, Project Manager for the Pit 7 Area (Technical Assistance Request: LLNL No.1). A list of the TAT members is included below and contact information the TAT members and site participants is in Appendix B. To familiarize the TAT assistance team with Pit 7 Complex issues, the project team gave a presentation outlining the site geology, contaminant hydrogeology, land-use issues, stakeholder concerns, regulatory requirements, groundwater flow and transport modeling efforts, pit source characterization efforts, and remedial options. Time for clarification and questions between the TAT and the site team was integrated into the presentation schedule. On the morning of the second day, the TAT reconvened with the site team and John Evans of the TAT presented information about a helium soil gas survey method that could potentially be used to locate and characterize tritium hot spots in Pits 3 and 5. Following the presentation, the TAT gathered independently to identify issues that are critical to remedy selection and to list questions or information gaps that the site is trying to resolve.

Eaton, D.; Janeday, D.; Woodward, D.; Imrich, J.; Evans, J.; Morris, M.; Reimus, P.; Hazen, T.

2001-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

255

Ecological disaster in Kuwait; A burning question  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Six million barrels of oil are going up in smoke each day in Kuwait, dumping 3.7 million pounds of toxic gases, soot, and smoke - including cancer-causing compounds - into the air each hour. This paper reports that the prognosis for the situation is dim. Even as specialized firefighting companies from the United States and Canada began arriving in Kuwait in March, oil officials there predicted dousing the fires would take at least two years and pumping up oil production to pre-war levels would take between five and 10 years. An oil well fire is a disaster. The effect on the ozone, the ecology, the marine life is massive. We aren't even breathing air here, we're just breathing smog.

Wray, T.K. (Waste Away Services, Perrysburg, OH (US))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Near Shore Submerged Oil Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, submerged oil refers to near shore oil which has picked up sediments You Should Know About Submerged Oil 1. Submerged oil is relatively uncommon: DWH oil is a light crude

257

Emissions of Polychlorinated Dibenzodioxins and Dibenzofurans and Polychlorinated Biphenyls from Uncontrolled Burning of Garden and Domestic Waste (Backyard Burning)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Straw and plastic (polyethylene) film used for wrapping silage were included, since burnings of these wastes on agricultural fields is considered to be one of the most common types of uncontrolled waste combustions in Sweden. ... To obtain fundamental information on dioxin emissions from an open burning 8 wastes which were likely amenable to be burnt wildly or suspected to generate high levels of dioxins were subjected to an open burning simulation in a special adapted furnace. ... designed to simulate waste generated by a "recycling" and a "nonrecycling" family in a 208-L (55-gal) burn barrel at the EPA's Open Burning Test Facility. ...

Björn Hedman; Morgan Näslund; Calle Nilsson; Stellan Marklund

2005-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

258

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in burning and non-burning coal waste piles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coal waste material that results from Douro Coalfield exploitation was analyzed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC–MS) for the identification and quantification of the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), defined as priority pollutants. It is expected that the organic fraction of the coal waste material contains \\{PAHs\\} from petrogenic origin, and also from pyrolytic origin in burning coal waste piles. The results demonstrate some similarity in the studied samples, being phenanthrene the most abundant PAH followed by fluoranthene and pyrene. A petrogenic contribution of \\{PAHs\\} in unburned samples and a mixture of \\{PAHs\\} from petrogenic and pyrolytic sources in the burning/burnt samples were identified. The lowest values of the sum of the 16 priority \\{PAHs\\} found in burning/burnt samples and the depletion LMW \\{PAHs\\} and greater abundance of HMW \\{PAHs\\} from the unburned coal waste material relatively to the burning/burnt material demonstrate the thermal transformation attributed to the burning process. The potential environmental impact associated with the coal waste piles are related with the release of petrogenic and pyrolytic \\{PAHs\\} in particulate and gaseous forms to soils, sediments, groundwater, surface water, and biodiversity.

Joana Ribeiro; Tais Silva; Joao Graciano Mendonca Filho; Deolinda Flores

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Modelling the costs of non-conventional oil: A case study of Canadian bitumen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

90% of world extra-heavy oil resources in place occur in Venezuela. Major oil shale resources are in China, Estonia, the United States, Australia, and Jordan, (UNDP, 2000 p141). World coal resources in place are estimated at over 20 trillion barrels... than those which would be produced by burning the total estimated resource base of conventional oil and gas: “It implies that even the more ambitious targets for stabilising the atmosphere are not necessarily inconsistent with using all the gas and oil...

Méjean, A; Hope, Chris

260

Physical properties of soils contaminated by oil lakes, Kuwait  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In preparation for a marine assault by the coalition forces, the Iraqi Army heavily mined Kuwait`s coastal zone and the oil fields. Over a million mines were placed on the Kuwait soil. Burning of 732 oil wells in the State of Kuwait due to the Iraqi invasion caused damages which had direct and indirect effect on environment. A total of 20-22 million barrels of spilled crude oil were collected in natural desert depressions and drainage network which formed more than 300 oil lakes. The total area covered with oil reached 49 km{sup 2}. More than 375 trenches revealed the existence of hard, massive caliche (CaCO{sub 3}) subsoil which prevent leached oil from reaching deeper horizons, and limited the maximum depth of penetration to 1.75 m. Total volume of soil contaminated reached 22,652,500 m{sup 3} is still causing environmental problems and needs an urgent cleaning and rehabilitation. Kuwait Oil Company has recovered approximately 21 million barrels from the oil lakes since the liberation of Kuwait. In our examined representative soil profiles the oil penetration was not deeper than 45 cm. Infiltration rate, soil permeability, grain size distribution, aggregates formation and water holding capacity were assessed. 15 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

Mohammad, A.S. [Kuwait Univ., Safat (Kuwait); Wahba, S.A.; Al-Khatieb, S.O. [Arabian Gulf Univ. (Bahrain)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

OIl Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investor Investor Flows and the 2008 Boom/Bust in Oil Prices Kenneth J. Singleton 1 August 10, 2011 1 Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, kenneths@stanford.edu. This research is the outgrowth of a survey paper I prepared for the Air Transport Association of America. I am grateful to Kristoffer Laursen for research assistance and to Kristoffer and Stefan Nagel for their comments. Abstract This paper explores the impact of investor flows and financial market conditions on returns in crude-oil futures markets. I begin by arguing that informational frictions and the associated speculative activity may induce prices to drift away from "fundamental" values and show increased volatility. This is followed by a discussion of the interplay between imperfect infor- mation about real economic activity, including supply, demand, and inventory accumulation, and speculative

262

Rana Novini ATOC 3500 Open-air pits are used to burn garbage and other wastes at bases in Iraq and Afghanistan that lack  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

found in the study: Acetone, Acrolein**, Benzene, Carbon Disulfide, Chlorodifluoromethane, Chloromethane, Toluene Acrolein and Hexachlorobutadiene were occasionally detected far above the MEG ratio--over 1800 percent above the MEG for Acrolein and over 500 percent above the MEG for Hexachlorobutadiene. Plaintiffs

Toohey, Darin W.

263

F-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (231-F, 231-1F, {ampersand} 231-2F) Corrective Measures Study/Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to evaluate various technologies that can be used to remediate the soil contamination attributed to the FBRP source unit.Section 1 of this report gives the background of this facility. Section 2 discusses the remedial action objectives and the general response actions for each medium of interest. The technology types and process options are identified and evaluated for each medium of interest. A selection and evaluation of representative technologies is included. Section 3 describes the rationale for combining technologies into alternatives. Section 4 gives a detailed analysis of each alternative as well as a comparative analysis of these alternatives.

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Evaluation of soy based heavy fuel oil emulsifiers for energy efficiency and environmental improvement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is known that the emulsification of water into heavy fuel oil (No. 6) can result in improved atomization of the fuel in a combustion chamber, which results in several benefits. In this study, two soybean lecithin based emulsifiers were evaluated. The emulsifiers were added to the No. 6 fuel at 0.5% and 1 % levels and emulsions of 10% and 15% water were prepared and burned in a pilot scale combustion chamber. The results showed a significant decrease in NO{sub x} emissions, and a reduction in carbon particulates, as well as a decrease in the excess oxygen requirement when the emulsions were burned when compared to fuel oil alone and a fuel oil/water mixture without the emulsifier. It was concluded that the use of a soybean lecithin based emulsifier may be used to increase the burning efficiency of heavy fuel oils, reduce emissions and particulates, and reduce down time for cleaning. This can be very important in utility plants which burn large volumes of heavy fuel oil and are located near urban areas.

Lee, P.K.; Szuhaj, B.F. [Central Soya Company, Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States); Diego, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

DOE Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks DOE Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks February 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today has awarded contracts to three companies who successfully bid for the purchase of 984,253 barrels of heating oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. Awardee Amount Morgan Stanley 500,000 barrels Shell Trading U.S. Company 250,000 barrels George E. Warren Corporation 234,253 barrels Today's sale was the first held as part of the Department's initiative to convert the current 1,984,253-barrel heating oil reserve to cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate. Contracts for the heating oil will be executed upon final payment to DOE; final payment is required no later than

266

Initial Estimates of Mercury Emissions to the Atmosphere from Global Biomass Burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Frequently burning grasslands in Africa and Australia, and agricultural waste burning globally, contribute relatively little to the mercury budget. ... Savannas burn frequently (intentionally or by accident), typically annually or biannually, while boreal forest burns at 50?200 year time scales, and wet tropical forests rarely burn at all. ... Total C emissions tracked burning in forested areas (including deforestation fires in the tropics), whereas burned area was largely controlled by savanna fires which responded to different environmental and human factors. ...

H.R. Friedli; A.F. Arellano; S. Cinnirella; N. Pirrone

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Schoenberg, Chang, Keeley, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Critical Assessment of the Burning Index in Los Angeles County, California Frederic Paik Schoenberg Research Center, Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Parks, Three Rivers, CA 93271. D Department of Ecology and wildfires in Los Angeles County, California from January 1976 to December 2000 reveals that although the BI

Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

268

Schoenberg, Chang, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of the Burning Index in Los Angeles County, California Frederic Paik SchoenbergA,E , Chien Research Center, Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Parks, Three Rivers, CA 93271. D Department of Ecology and wildfires in Los Angeles County, California from January 1976 to December 2000 reveals that although the BI

Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

269

Life Satisfaction Over the First Five Years Following Burn Injury  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......................................................................... 88 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION In the United States, approximately 500,000 individuals present annually for treatment of burns; about 40,000 of whom require hospitalization (Esselman, 2007). These individuals are typically men, ages 20... year after hospitalization is almost universally a time of high distress for individuals with burn injuries (Patterson & Ford, 2000). The psychological distress following burn injury is said to be the “most disabling of secondary complications...

Hoskins, Jessica Lynne

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

270

Veto likely on ocean burning of toxic wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Veto likely on ocean burning of toxic wastes ... Ocean incineration of toxic wastes has been under study for some time, and EPA has authorized test burns as far back as 1974. ... (where more than 6000 people showed up), and Mobile, Ala., where the issues of transporting the waste safely to the burn site and what advantages ocean incineration has over land incineration were hotly debated. ...

1984-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

271

Alkyl Amides and Nitriles as Novel Tracers for Biomass Burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ammonia emissions into the atmosphere have been reported for numerous sources, as for example natural decay in soils, sewage treatment plants, livestock waste, and ammonia-based fertilizers (42, 43). ... Anal. of emissions from the burning of dried tropical grasses and agricultural wastes in a small-scale app. ... under the smoldering conditions of residential wood combustion, as compared to the active burning of forest fires and slash burns, incomplete combustion resulted in the preservation of high levels of the natural products. ...

Bernd R. T. Simoneit; A. I. Rushdi; M. R. bin Abas; B. M. Didyk

2002-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

272

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capability to secure oil transport security. Additionally,international oil agreements: 1) ensuring energy security;security, and many argue that as the second-largest consumer of oil

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007”. comparison, Mexico used 6.6— Chinese oil consumption17. Oil production from the North Sea, Mexico’s Cantarell,Mexico, Italy, France, Canada, US, and UK. Figure 10. Historical Chinese oil

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),023 Understanding Crude Oil Prices James D. Hamilton Junedirectly. Understanding Crude Oil Prices* James D. Hamilton

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

business of having some oil in inventory, which is referredKnowledge of all the oil going into inventory today for salebe empty, because inventories of oil are essential for the

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),percent change in real oil price. Figure 3. Price of crude023 Understanding Crude Oil Prices James D. Hamilton June

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),percent change in real oil price. Figure 3. Price of crudein predicting quarterly real oil price change. variable real

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by this point, China’s demand Oil Demand vs. Domestic Supplycurrent pace of growth in oil demand as staying consistentand predictions of oil supply and demand affected foreign

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Income on Energy and Oil Demand,” Energy Journal 23(1),2006. “China’s Growing Demand for Oil and Its Impact on U.S.in the supply or demand for oil itself could be regarded as

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Microsoft Word - CBU-PIT-2004-00010_R1.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CBU-PIT-2004-00010 CBU-PIT-2004-00010 REVISION: 0 12/17/04 KEYWORDS Tank Closure, Tank 17, Tank 20, Modeling, Errata, Closure Module, General Closure Plan, Waste Characterization Report RETENTION: PERMANENT CLASSIFICATION: U Does not contain UCNI Tanks 17 and 20 Closure Errata B. A. Martin December 17, 2004 Westinghouse Savannah River Company Closure Business Unit Planning Integration & Technology Department Aiken, SC 29808 ________________________________________________________________________ Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Under Contract No. DE-AC09-96S APPROVED for Release for Unlimited (Release to Public) The information in the attached table, "Tanks 17 and 20 Closure Errata," was developed from a comparison of data within documents that support the tanks 17 and 20 closure

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Little Goose Dam Full Flow PIT-Tag Detection System Project Summary.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2006, the design phase of this project was kicked off and was for the most part modeled after the Full Flow PIT installation installed at Lower Monumental Dam during winter and spring of 2006 and 2007. As the Goose Full Flow design progressed and the project started to move towards construction, issues within contracting occurred and the project was put on delay for 1 year. Starting in mid December of 2008, Harcon Inc. was awarded the contract and construction of the new Goose Full Flow PIT-tag detection system began. The purpose of this document is to summarize the installation of the Little Goose Full Flow project from start to finish and to highlight the notable successes and challenges that the installation presented along with the final results and current status.

Warf, Don; Livingston, Scott [Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

282

Title I conceptual design for Pit 6 landfill closure at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this design project is to evaluate and prepare design and construction documents for a closure cover cap for the Pit 6 Landfill located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300. This submittal constitutes the Title I Design (Conceptual Design) for the closure cover of the Pit 6 Landfill. A Title I Design is generally 30 percent of the design effort. Title H Design takes the design to 100 percent complete. Comments and edits to this Title I Design will be addressed in the Title II design submittal. Contents of this report are as follows: project background; design issues and engineering approach; design drawings; calculation packages; construction specifications outline; and construction quality assurance plan outline.

MacDonnell, B.A.; Obenauf, K.S. [Golder Associates, Inc., Alameda, CA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Oil shale retorting and combustion system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to the extraction of energy values from l shale containing considerable concentrations of calcium carbonate in an efficient manner. The volatiles are separated from the oil shale in a retorting zone of a fluidized bed where the temperature and the concentration of oxygen are maintained at sufficiently low levels so that the volatiles are extracted from the oil shale with minimal combustion of the volatiles and with minimal calcination of the calcium carbonate. These gaseous volatiles and the calcium carbonate flow from the retorting zone into a freeboard combustion zone where the volatiles are burned in the presence of excess air. In this zone the calcination of the calcium carbonate occurs but at the expense of less BTU's than would be required by the calcination reaction in the event both the retorting and combustion steps took place simultaneously. The heat values in the products of combustion are satisfactorily recovered in a suitable heat exchange system.

Pitrolo, Augustine A. (Fairmont, WV); Mei, Joseph S. (Morgantown, WV); Shang, Jerry Y. (Fairfax, VA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Microsoft Word - Deep-Burn awards news release _2_.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Department of Energy announced it has selected teams led by Idaho National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory to advance the technology of nuclear fuel "Deep-Burn," in...

285

Geopolymeric Agent for Immobilization of Radioactive Ashes after Biomass Burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solidification of low-level radioactive wastes obtained after biomass burning was studied. Two solidification modes using Portland...- 6 g cm- 2 day- 1.... Thus, su...

A. D. Chervonnyi; N. A. Chervonnaya

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Reflective Terahertz Imaging for early diagnosis of skin burn severity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the brand area is also visualized in the THz images of thebrand shape is discernible as early as the post burn THz image.

TEWARI, PRIYAMVADA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Chemical composition of emissions from the Kuwait oil fires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Airborne measurements in the smoke from the Kuwait oil fires in May and June 1991 indicate that the combined oil and gas emissions were equivalent to the consumption of about 4.6 million barrels of oil per day. The combustion was relatively efficient, with about 96% of the fuel carbon burned emitted as CO{sub 2}. Particulate smoke emissions averaged 2% of the fuel burned, of which about 20% was soot. About two-thirds of the mass of the smoke was accounted for by salt, soot, and sulfate. The salt most likely originated from oil field brines, which were ejected from the wells along with the oil. The salt accounts for the fact that many of the plumes were white. SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} were removed from the smoke at rates of about 6 and 22% per hour, respectively. The high salt and sulfate contents explain why a large fraction of the particles in the smoke were efficient cloud condensation nuclei. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Ferek, R.J.; Hobbs, P.V.; Herring, J.A. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Laursen, K.K. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Weiss, R.E. [Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology, Beaverton, OR (United States); Rasmussen, R.A. [Radiance Research, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

1992-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

288

Project W-314 Specific Test and Evaluation Plan 241-AN-A Valve Pit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made to the 241-AN-A Valve Pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system's performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP).

HAMMERS, J.S.

1999-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

289

Evaluation of open pit incineration for the disposal of hydrocarbon wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hydrocarbon wastes using an open pit air curtain destructor (ACD) type incinerator was investigated. A prototype experi- mental incinerator was designed and constructed, and experiments were performed with it to determine the relationships among various... design and operational parameters (such as incinerator configuration, fuel flow- rate, and smoke emissions) and to further improve the design. The investigation was conducted in three phases. First air flow studies were performed using a full scale...

Bell, Stuart Ray

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007”. comparison, Mexico used 6.6— Chinese oil consumption17. Oil production from the North Sea, Mexico’s Cantarell,

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Desulfurization of heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Strategies for heavy oil desulfurization were evaluated by reviewing desulfurization literature and critically assessing the viability of the various methods for heavy oil. The desulfurization methods includin...

Rashad Javadli; Arno de Klerk

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

China’s domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robertpeak will come around 2020, 24 and that by this point, China’s demand Oil

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Tall oil pitch  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n....Undistilled residue from the distillation of crude tall oil. It is generally recognized that tall oil pitches contain some high-boiling esters and neutral...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysts agree that the Persian Gulf region will continue tos oil imports. 17 The Persian Gulf region is particularlyaccess to oil from the Persian Gulf because of conflict

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

oil1990.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Table 1. Consumption and Expenditures in U.S. Households that Use Fuel OilKerosene, 1990 Residential Buildings Average Fuel Oil...

296

Oil Sands Feedstocks  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Centre for Upgrading Technology 'a Canada-Alberta alliance for bitumen and heavy oil research' Oil Sands Feedstocks C Fairbridge, Z Ring, Y Briker, D Hager National Centre...

297

Crude Oil Domestic Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Crude Oil Domestic Production Refinery Crude Oil Inputs Refinery Gross Inputs Refinery Operable Capacity (Calendar Day) Refinery Percent Operable Utilization Net...

298

Construction quality assurance for Pit 6 landfill closure, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Golder Construction Services, Inc. (GCS), under contract to the Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), provided the construction quality assurance (CQA) observation and testing during the construction of the Site 300, Pit 6 landfill closure cover. The cap construction was performed as a CERCLA non-time-critical removal action from June 2 to August 29, 1997. the project site is located 18 miles east of Livermore on Tesla Road and approximately 10 miles southwest of Tracy on Corral Hollow Road in San Joaquin County, California. This report certifies that the LLNL, Site 300, Pit 6, Landfill Closure was constructed in accordance with the construction specifications and design drawings. This report documents construction activities and CQA monitoring and testing for construction of the Pit 6 Landfill Closure. Golder Associates, Inc. of Oakland, California was the design engineering firm responsible for preparation of the drawings and specifications. CQA services were provided by GCS, of Roseville, California, under supervision of a California registered civil Engineer.

NONE

1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Corrective action investigation plan: Area 2 Photo Skid 16 Wastewater Pit, Corrective Action Unit 332. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains a detailed description and plan for an environmental investigation of the Area 2 Photo Skid 16 Wastewater Pit. The site is located in Area 2 of the Nevada Test Site. The Photo Skid Wastewater Pit was used for disposal of photochemical process waste, and there is a concern that such disposal may have released photochemicals and metals to the soil beneath the pit and adjacent to it. The purpose of this investigation is to identify the presence and nature of contamination present in and adjacent to the wastewater pit and to determine the appropriate course of environmental response action for the site. The potential courses of action for the site are clean closure through remediation, closure in place (with or without remediation), or no further action.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Impact of Kuwait`s oil-fire smoke cloud on the sky of Bahrain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of the Kuwaiti oil well fires of 1991 on the atmospheric parameters of Bahrain (approximately 600 km southeast of Kuwait) were observed. Solar radiation, optical thickness, ultraviolet radiation, horizontal visibility, temperature, and solar spectral distribution were measured for 1991 and compared to the long-term values of 1985-1990. The relative monthly solar radiation in Bahrain was reduced by 8% (February) when 50 oil wells were burning and reduced further to 20% when 470 oil wells were on fire (April-July). In November 1991, when there were 12 oil wells burning, the recorded solar radiation became nearly equal to the long-term average. The monthly average daily optical thickness, {tau}, for the direct or beam solar radiation was calculated. The values of {tau} were found to be larger in 1991 than the average for the years 1985-1990 by nearly 58% during June and returned to normal in October (after nearly all the oil well fires were extinguished). The clear and smoked sky solar spectra distribution were detected before and during the burning of the Kuwait oil wells. Large absorption of the solar radiation was noticed on the 2nd and 3rd of March, 1991. The daily average infrared radiation during 1990 was found to be 6700.4 Whm{sup -2} and shifted to 9182.1 Whm{sup -2} in 1991. Comparison was also made between 1990 and 1991 data of the global solar radiation and the temperature. 13 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Alnaser, W.E. [Univ. of Bahrain (Bahrain)] [Univ. of Bahrain (Bahrain)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

FE Oil and Natural Gas News | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

January 4, 2012 January 4, 2012 DOE-Sponsored Online Mapping Portal Helps Oil and Gas Producers Comply with New Mexico Compliance Rules An online mapping portal to help oil and natural gas operators comply with a revised New Mexico waste pit rule has been developed by a team of New Mexico Tech researchers. December 21, 2011 DOE RFP Seeks Projects for Improving Environmental Performance of Unconventional Natural Gas Technologies Research projects to study ways for improving the environmental performance of unconventional gas development are being sought by the National Energy Technology Laboratory, a facility of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy. November 22, 2011 DOE Selects Projects Aimed at Reducing Drilling Risks in Ultra-Deepwater The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy has selected six

302

Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. 62 figures.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

303

Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow (Rocky Point, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Environmental Remediation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 Pit 7 Complex  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9 9 Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Environmental Remediation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 Pit 7 Complex January 2007 Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Livermore Site Office EA for the Proposed Environmental Remediation at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 Pit 7 Complex i CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION..................................................................................................................1 1.1 Background ......................................................................................................................1 1.2 Purpose and Need for the Action .....................................................................................5

305

Measurements of ultrafine particles from a gas-turbine burning biofuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of ultrafine particles have been performed at the exhaust of a low emission microturbine for power generation. This device has been fuelled with liquid fuels, including a commercial diesel oil, a mixture of the diesel oil with a biodiesel and kerosene, and tested under different loads. Primarily attention has been focused on the measurements of the size distribution functions of the particles emitted from the system by using particle differential mobility analysis. A bimodal size distribution function of the particle emitted has been found in all the examined conditions. Burning diesel oil, the first mode of the size distribution function of the combustion-formed particles is centered at around 2-3 nm, whereas the second mode is centered at about 20-30 nm. The increase of the turbine load and the addition of 50% of biodiesel has not caused changes in the shape of size distribution of the particles. A slightly decrease of the amount of particle formed has been found. By using kerosene the amount of emitted particles increases of more than one order of magnitude. Also the shape of the size distribution function changes with the first mode shifted towards larger particles of the order of 8-10 nm but with a lower emission of larger 20-30 nm particles. Overall, in this conditions, the mass concentration of particles is increased respect to the diesel oil operation. Particle sizes measured with the diesel oil have been compared with the results on a diesel engine operated in the same power conditions and with the same fuel. Measurements have showed that the mean sizes of the formed particles do not change in the two combustion systems. However, diesel engine emits a number concentration of particles more than two orders of magnitude higher in the same conditions of power and with the same fuel. By running the engine in more premixed-like conditions, the size distribution function of the particles approaches that measured by burning kerosene in the microturbine indicating that the distribution function of the sizes of the emitted particles can be strongly affected by combustion conditions. (author)

Allouis, C.; Beretta, F.; Minutolo, P.; Pagliara, R. [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione, CNR, Piazzale V. Tecchio, 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Sirignano, M.; Sgro, L.A.; D'Anna, A. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale V. Tecchio, 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Tropical biomass burning smoke plume size, shape, reflectance, and age based on 2001â??2009 MISR imagery of Borneo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C. S. Zender et al. : Tropical biomass burning smoke plumeslaboratory measurements of biomass-burning emis- sions: 1.aerosol optical depth biomass burning events: a comparison

Zender, C. S; Krolewski, A. G; Tosca, M. G; Randerson, J. T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Analysis of Tracer Dispersion During a Prescribed Forest Burn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

become a method to manage forest health, while preventing uncontrolled wild land fire. Low intensity, prescribed burns release less carbon dioxide than wildfires of the same size and may be used as a strategy. The ultimate goal of the project is to use the data from the burn, along with modeling techniques to improve

Collins, Gary S.

308

UNCORRECTED 2 Burning biodiversity: Woody biomass use by commercial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNCORRECTED PROOF 2 Burning biodiversity: Woody biomass use by commercial 3 and subsistence groups Biodiversity Science, Conservation International, 1919 M St., Washington, DC 20036, USA 7 c Energy as: Lisa Naughton-Treves et al., Burning biodiversity: Woody biomass use by commercial

Kammen, Daniel M.

309

Prioritizing Burn-Injured Patients During a Disaster  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The U.S. government has mandated that, in a catastrophic event, metropolitan areas need to be capable of caring for 50 burn-injured patients per million population. In New York City, this corresponds to 400 patients. There are currently 140 burn beds ... Keywords: disaster planning, healthcare, triage

Carri W. Chan; Linda V. Green; Yina Lu; Nicole Leahy; Roger Yurt

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Stellar Burning Falk Herwig, Alexander Heger, and Frank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

]. In these objects, a thermonuclear runaway of the helium shell on top of an electron-degenerate core (a young White implications for the production of neutron- rich elements. log Tlog Teffeff Figure 1-- A thermonuclear runaway stellar conditions. We will include a stellar equation of state as well as thermonuclear burning (TN burn

Herwig, Falk

311

Process May Reduce Pollution From Burning Coal Refuse Piles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Process May Reduce Pollution From Burning Coal Refuse Piles ... The process uses a heavy liquid to separate marketable high-ash coal from nonburnable waste rock. ... Nearly 500 mountains of coal refuse, waste material from coal cleaning operations, are burning uncontrollably in 15 states in the U.S., according to a Bureau of Mines survey. ...

1965-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

312

Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of premixed burners capable of stably burning ultra-lean hydrogen-air fuel mixtures. Such burners couldAnalyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames Peer-Timo Bremer, Member demonstrate our approach by analyzing three numerical simulations of lean hydrogen flames subject to different

Pascucci, Valerio

313

Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- bly burning ultra-lean hydrogen-air fuel mixtures. Such burners could, for example, be used as oneAnalyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames P.-T. Bremer1, G. Weber2 of the temporal behavior. We demonstrate our approach by analyzing three numerical simulations of lean hydrogen

314

In the OSTI Collections: Oil Shales | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Oil Shales Oil Shales Extraction Water Use History References Additional References Research Organizations Reports Available through OSTI's SciTech Connect Petroleum is commonly extracted from pores in rock formations below the earth's surface. Different kinds of rock have petroleum in their pores, but the petroleum is not part of the rock itself. Kerogen, another hydrocarbon material, is a constituent material of a type of rock called oil shale. While oil shales can be burned directly as a fuel, it's possible to extract a liquid substitute for petroleum from kerogen by heating the oil shale to a high temperature, thus producing a vapor, which is then cooled. Some of the cooled vapor remains gaseous (and is called "combustible oil-shale gas"), while the rest condenses

315

DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur Distillate DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur Distillate February 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The current inventory of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve will be converted to cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate to comply with new, more stringent fuel standards by some Northeastern states, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) said today. The State of New York and other Northeastern states are implementing more stringent fuel standards that require replacement of high sulfur (2,000 parts per million) heating oil to ultra low sulfur fuel (15 parts per million). As a result, DOE will sell the current inventory of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve, a total of approximately 2 million barrels, and

316

DOE Completes Sale of Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Completes Sale of Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks Completes Sale of Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks DOE Completes Sale of Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks February 10, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today has awarded contracts to four companies who successfully bid for the purchase of 1,000,000 barrels of heating oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve storage sites in Groton and New Haven, CT. Hess Groton Terminal, Groton, CT Shell Trading U.S. Company 150,000 barrels Sprague Energy Corp. 100,000 barrels Magellan New Haven Terminal, New Haven, CT Hess Corporation 300,000 barrels Morgan Stanley 450,000 barrels Today's sale was the second held as part of the Department's initiative to convert the 1,984,253 barrel heating oil reserve to cleaner burning

317

Microsoft PowerPoint - burns.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Low Evaluation of Low Tank Level Mixing Technologies for DOE High Level Waste Tank Retrieval (10516) Heather Burns Andrew Fellinger and Richard Minichan Savannah River National Laboratory March 7 - 11, 2010 Phoenix, Arizona Waste Management Symposia 2010 SRNL-STI-2010-00139 2 W A S T E M A N A G E M E N T S Y M P O S I A 2 0 1 0 Agenda Overview Background Why a retrieval knowledge center Initial objectives / goals Low Level Mixing Addressing a challenge through technology demonstration Evaluation criteria Instrumentation Test matrix HOW DID WE GET THERE? WHERE DID WE GO? "Building a Foundation" The challenges that lead to gaps in retrieval Development and mock-up of retrieval technologies 3 W A S T E M A N A G E M E N T S Y M P O S I A 2 0 1 0 Background -

318

High Pressure Burn Rate Measurements on an Ammonium Perchlorate Propellant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High pressure deflagration rate measurements of a unique ammonium perchlorate (AP) based propellant are required to design the base burn motor for a Raytheon weapon system. The results of these deflagration rate measurements will be key in assessing safety and performance of the system. In particular, the system may experience transient pressures on the order of 100's of MPa (10's kPSI). Previous studies on similar AP based materials demonstrate that low pressure (e.g. P < 10 MPa or 1500 PSI) burn rates can be quite different than the elevated pressure deflagration rate measurements (see References and HPP results discussed herein), hence elevated pressure measurements are necessary in order understand the deflagration behavior under relevant conditions. Previous work on explosives have shown that at 100's of MPa some explosives will transition from a laminar burn mechanism to a convective burn mechanism in a process termed deconsolidative burning. The resulting burn rates that are orders-of-magnitude faster than the laminar burn rates. Materials that transition to the deconsolidative-convective burn mechanism at elevated pressures have been shown to be considerably more violent in confined heating experiments (i.e. cook-off scenarios). The mechanisms of propellant and explosive deflagration are extremely complex and include both chemical, and mechanical processes, hence predicting the behavior and rate of a novel material or formulation is difficult if not impossible. In this work, the AP/HTPB based material, TAL-1503 (B-2049), was burned in a constant volume apparatus in argon up to 300 MPa (ca. 44 kPSI). The burn rate and pressure were measured in-situ and used to calculate a pressure dependent burn rate. In general, the material appears to burn in a laminar fashion at these elevated pressures. The experiment was reproduced multiple times and the burn rate law using the best data is B = (0.6 {+-} 0.1) x P{sup (1.05{+-}0.02)} where B is the burn rate in mm/s and P is the pressure in units of MPa. Details of the experimental method, results and data analysis are discussed herein and briefly compared to other AP based materials that have been measured in this apparatus.

Glascoe, E A; Tan, N

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

319

Method and apparatus to measure the depth of skin burns  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new device for measuring the depth of surface tissue burns based on the rate at which the skin temperature responds to a sudden differential temperature stimulus. This technique can be performed without physical contact with the burned tissue. In one implementation, time-dependent surface temperature data is taken from subsequent frames of a video signal from an infrared-sensitive video camera. When a thermal transient is created, e.g., by turning off a heat lamp directed at the skin surface, the following time-dependent surface temperature data can be used to determine the skin burn depth. Imaging and non-imaging versions of this device can be implemented, thereby enabling laboratory-quality skin burn depth imagers for hospitals as well as hand-held skin burn depth sensors the size of a small pocket flashlight for field use and triage.

Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Holswade, Scott C. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Ships After Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ships After Oil ... Special self-propelled tenders planned for offshore drilling operations in Gulf ...

1956-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

Mottram, Nigel

322

Oil | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oil Oil Oil Oil Prices, 2000-2008 For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. Oil is used for heating and transportation -- most notably, as fuel for gas-powered vehicles. America's dependence on foreign oil has declined in recent years, but oil prices have increased. The Energy Department supports research and policy options to increase our domestic supply of oil while ensuring environmentally sustainable supplies domestically and abroad, and is investing in research, technology and

323

Catalyst Design for Urea-less Passive Ammonia SCR Lean-Burn SIDI...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Design for Urea-less Passive Ammonia SCR Lean-Burn SIDI Aftertreatment System Catalyst Design for Urea-less Passive Ammonia SCR Lean-Burn SIDI Aftertreatment System Lean-burn SIDI...

324

MIPAS observations of organic tracers for biomass burning and intercontinental transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MIPAS observations of organic tracers for biomass burning and intercontinental transport observations of organic tracers for biomass burning and intercontinental transport Introduction Suite - Oxford - September 2009 #12;MIPAS observations of organic tracers for biomass burning

325

Atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and isomer ratios as tracers of biomass burning emissions in Northern India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emission from large-scale post-harvest agricultural-waste burning (paddy-residue burning during October–November and wheat-residue burning in April–May) is a conspicuous feature ... in northern India. The poor an...

Prashant Rajput; M. M. Sarin; Deepti Sharma…

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

E-Print Network 3.0 - american biomass burning Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

biomass burning Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: american biomass burning Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Recent biomass burning in the...

327

Emission characteristics of black carbon in anthropogenic and biomass burning plumes over California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel (FF) combustion and biomass burning (BB), respectively. The enhancements of BC and LSP in BBEmission characteristics of black carbon in anthropogenic and biomass burning plumes over. (2012), Emission characteristics of black carbon in anthropogenic and biomass burning plumes over

Jimenez, Jose-Luis

328

Oil Dependencies and Peak Oil's Effects on Oil Consumption.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? During the year of 2007, the world has experienced historically high oil prices both in nominal and in real terms, which has reopened discussions… (more)

Tekin, Josef

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Turbine cooling waxy oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for pipelining a waxy oil to essentially eliminate deposition of wax on the pipeline wall is described comprising: providing a pressurized mixture of the waxy oil and a gas; effecting a sudden pressure drop of the mixture of the oil and the gas through an expansion turbine, thereby expanding the gas and quickly cooling the oil to below its cloud point in the substantial absence of wax deposition and forming a slurry of wax particles and oil; and pipelining the slurry.

Geer, J.S.

1987-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

330

Pitting corrosion protection of stainless steel by sputter deposited hafnia, alumina, and hafnia-alumina nanolaminate films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

316L stainless steel coated with sputter deposited HfO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and HfO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanolaminate films were subjected to direct current cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (DCP) in Hanks' balanced salt solution electrolyte. Postexposure morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with in situ energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). SEM/EDS data show that bare steel and steel coated with single-layer HfO{sub 2} develop pits with perforated covers. These pits become autocatalytic, consistent with an observed positive DCP hysteresis. On the other hand, SEM/EDS data show that steel coated with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanolaminate films does not develop autocatalytic pits, consistent with an observed negative DCP hysteresis. However, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} splinters upon polarization whereas the HfO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanolaminate remains intact. The areas of worst damage in the nanolaminate correspond to pit cover rupture before autocatalysis, allowing pit and bulk electrolyte to mix and the newly exposed steel surface to repassivate. The films' diverse behavior is discussed in terms of a model for perforated pit growth that requires occlusion until an autocatalytic geometry is established. The authors conclude that the key property a film must have to arrest autocatalytic geometry development is the ability to rupture locally at an early stage of pit growth.

Almomani, M. A.; Aita, C. R. [Materials Department and the Advanced Coatings Experimental Laboratory, College of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 784, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 (United States)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Organic Rankine Cycle System Preliminary Design with Corn Cob Biomass Waste Burning as Heat Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The renewable energy source potencies in Indonesia are needed to be utilized to fulfill the electricity requirement in rural or remote area that not yet get electricity. One of the potency is biomass waste. Therefore, this paper discusses about the electricity generation preliminary design of Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) system with corn cob biomass waste burning as heat source, so it can be obtained the theoretic corn farm area requirement, electricity power, and thermal efficiency at heat source temperature and flow rate variations. Corn cob burning temperature can heat up the heating fluid that is heated by boiler with corn cob as the biomass fuel. Furthermore, that heating fluid is used as ORC electricity generation heat source. The independent variables in this study are the heating fluid temperature which varied between 110, 120, and 130oC, and the heating fluid flow rate that varied between 100, 150, and 200 liter/minute. \\{R141b\\} is selected to be the working fluid, palm oil is used for heating fluid and water as cooling fluid. The calculation results that the theoretic electricity power, thermal efficiency, and corn farm area requirement, respectively, are in the range of 3.5-8.5 kW, 9.2-10.3%, and 49.5-101.1 hectare/year. All of the highest range values are resulted at the highest temperature and flow rate, 130oC and 200 liter/minute. This result shows that corn cob burning heat is potential to be utilized as electricity generation heat source for rural society, particularly for some areas that have been studied.

Nur Rohmah; Ghalya Pikra; Agus Salim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute burn patients Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

: Burns & Plastic Surgery Care for Adults and Paediatrics 12;Studying Nursing & Health Care at Glasgow... Certificate in Burns & Plastic Surgery Care for Adults and...

333

Isothermal pyrolysis and char combustion of oil shales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yields and rates of hydrocarbons evolved during pyrolysis of oil shales have been measured with improved accuracy. Green River and New Albany oil shales were heated in a fluidized sand bed, and volatile pyrolysis products were transferred to a combustion tube and burned. Resulting H/sub 2/O and CO/sub 2 were detected in real time by mass spectrometry. Residual char was subsequently burned to allow complete C and H balances. Good closure was obtained. Proportions of organic C and H released as pyrolysis products and retained as char were determined. Shale oil loss due to the presence of oxidized shale in the fluidized bed was measured accurately. We find that all of the experimental apparatus that the pyrolysis gas contacts must be near pyrolysis temperature to avoid condensation of heavy oil which subsequently forms coke and secondary products. We observe a faster release of products with all transfer lines 450/degree/C than when they are at 300/degree/C. The current uncertainty in pyrolysis rates is due in part to such difficulties with experimental techniques. 12 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Coburn, T.T.; Taylor, R.W.; Morris, C.J.; Duval, V.

1988-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

334

Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment Work Plan Mud Pit Release Sites, Amchitka Island, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Work Plan describes the approach that will be used to conduct human health and ecological risk assessments for Amchitka Island, Alaska, which was utilized as an underground nuclear test site between 1965 and 1971. During this period, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (now the U.S. Department of Energy) conducted two nuclear tests (known as Long Shot and Milrow) and assisted the U.S. Department of Defense with a third test (known as Cannikin). Amchitka Island is approximately 42 miles long and located 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, in the western end of the Aleutian Island archipelago in a group of islands known as the Rat Islands. Historically including deep drilling operations required large volumes of drilling mud, a considerable amount of which was left on the island in exposed mud pits after testing was completed. Therefore, there is a need for drilling mud pit remediation and risk assessment of historical mud pit releases. The scope of this work plan is to document the environmental objectives and the proposed technical site investigation strategies that will be utilized for the site characterization of the constituents in soil, surface water, and sediment at these former testing sites. Its goal is the collection of data in sufficient quantity and quality to determine current site conditions, support a risk assessment for the site surfaces, and evaluate what further remedial action is required to achieve permanent closure of these three sites that will protect both human health and the environment. Suspected compounds of potential ecological concern for investigative analysis at these sites include diesel-range organics, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, volatile organic compounds, and chromium. The results of these characterizations and risk assessments will be used to evaluate corrective action alternatives to include no further action, the implementation of institutional controls, capping on site, or off-sit e disposal of contaminated waste. The results of this evaluation will be presented in a subsequent corrective action decision document.

DOE /NV

2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

335

RADIOACTIVE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK PITTING PREDICTIONS: AN INVESTIGATION INTO CRITICAL SOLUTION CONCENTRATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests was performed on samples of ASTM A537 carbon steel in support of a probability-based approach to evaluate the effect of chloride and sulfate on corrosion the steel?s susceptibility to pitting corrosion. Testing solutions were chosen to systemically evaluate the influence of the secondary aggressive species, chloride, and sulfate, in the nitrate based, high-level wastes. The results suggest that evaluating the combined effect of all aggressive species, nitrate, chloride, and sulfate, provides a consistent response for determining corrosion susceptibility. The results of this work emphasize the importance for not only nitrate concentration limits, but also chloride and sulfate concentration limits.

Hoffman, E.

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

336

Application of Metagenomics for Identification of Novel Petroleum Hydrocarbon Degrading Enzymes in Natural Asphalts from the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas, liquid crude oil, shale oil, tars and bitumen (Scragg,gas, liquid crude oil, shale oil, tars and bitumen (Scragg,

Baquiran, Jean-Paul Mendoza

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . . . .Venezuela with Mexico, another major oil pro- ducing countryOil Production and Productivity in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . .

CAKIR, NIDA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . . . .Oil Production and Productivity in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . .2.6: Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico 350 Productivity

CAKIR, NIDA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

AN ENGINE OIL LIFE ALGORITHM.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An oil-life algorithm to calculate the remaining percentage of oil life is presented as a means to determine the right time to change the oil… (more)

Bommareddi, Anveshan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Economics of Peak Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract ‘Peak oil’ refers to the future decline in world production of crude oil and the accompanying potentially calamitous effects. The peak oil literature typically rejects economic analysis. This article argues that economic analysis is indeed appropriate for analyzing oil scarcity because standard economic models can replicate the observed peaks in oil production. Moreover, the emphasis on peak oil is misplaced as peaking is not a good indicator of scarcity, peak oil techniques are overly simplistic, the catastrophes predicted by the peak oil literature are unlikely, and the literature does not contribute to correcting identified market failures. Efficiency of oil markets could be improved by instead focusing on remedying market failures such as excessive private discount rates, environmental externalities, market power, insufficient innovation incentives, incomplete futures markets, and insecure property rights.

S.P. Holland

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Stochastic simulation of pitting degradation of multi-barrier waste container in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed stochastic waste package degradation simulation model was developed incorporating the humid-air and aqueous general and pitting corrosion models for the carbon steel corrosion-allowance outer barrier and aqueous pitting corrosion model for the Alloy 825 corrosion-resistant inner barrier. The uncertainties in the individual corrosion models were also incorporated to capture the variability in the corrosion degradation among waste packages and among pits in the same waste package. Within the scope of assumptions employed in the simulations, the corrosion modes considered, and the near-field conditions from the drift-scale thermohydrologic model, the results of the waste package performance analyses show that the current waste package design appears to meet the `controlled design assumption` requirement of waste package performance, which is currently defined as having less than 1% of waste packages breached at 1,000 years. It was shown that, except for the waste packages that fail early, pitting corrosion of the corrosion-resistant inner barrier has a greater control on the failure of waste packages and their subsequent degradation than the outer barrier. Further improvement and substantiation of the inner barrier pitting model (currently based on an elicitation) is necessary in future waste package performance simulation model.

Lee, J.H.; Atkins, J.E.; Andrews, R.W.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Burning hazardous waste in cement kilns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cement manufacturing process is one of the oldest in the world, having been in practice for over 2000 years. It is also one of the most energy intensive, with up to 65 percent of the cost of the product attributable to energy consumption. In addition to high energy demand, the process conditions include extremely high temperatures. Cement clinker forms when the correct mixture of raw materials is heated to 2650/sup 0/ F. This requires combustion temperatures exceeding 3000/sup 0/ F. under oxidizing conditions. To accomplish this, gas temperatures above 2000/sup 0/ F. occur for several seconds (typically five seconds), which is much longer than residence times in permitted hazardous waste incinerators. These conditions are extremely favorable to the destruction of organic compounds and have led to extensive investigation into the potential for burning hazardous waste in cement kilns. Cement kilns consuming hazardous wastes have been tested for air emissions under various operating conditions. The substantial body of information on the emissions and handling of hazardous wastes from these studies has demonstrated that effective destruction of wastes can be accomplished with the added benefits of energy conservation and no significant change in air emissions.

Chadbourne, J.F.; Helmsteller, A.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Spectral hole burning for stopping light  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a protocol for storage and retrieval of photon wave packets in a {lambda}-type atomic medium. This protocol derives from spectral hole burning and takes advantages of the specific properties of solid-state systems at low temperature, such as rare-earth ion-doped crystals. The signal pulse is tuned to the center of the hole that has been burnt previously within the inhomogeneously broadened absorption band. The group velocity is strongly reduced, being proportional to the hole width. This way the optically carried information and energy are carried over to the off-resonance optical dipoles. Storage and retrieval are performed by conversion to and from ground-state Raman coherence by using brief {pi} pulses. The protocol exhibits some resemblance with the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency process. It also presents distinctive features such as the absence of coupling beam. In this paper we detail the various steps of the protocol, summarize the critical parameters, and theoretically examine the recovery efficiency.

Lauro, R.; Chaneliere, T.; Le Goueet, J.-L. [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS UPR3321, Universite Paris Sud, Batiment 505, Campus Universitaire, 91405 Orsay (France)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale comprises: a vertical type distilling furnace which is divided by two vertical partitions each provided with a plurality of vent apertures into an oil shale treating chamber and two gas chambers, said oil shale treating chamber being located between said two gas chambers in said vertical type distilling furnace, said vertical type distilling furnace being further divided by at least one horizontal partition into an oil shale distilling chamber in the lower part thereof and at least one oil shale preheating chamber in the upper part thereof, said oil shale distilling chamber and said oil shale preheating chamber communication with each other through a gap provided at an end of said horizontal partition, an oil shale supplied continuously from an oil shale supply port provided in said oil shale treating chamber at the top thereof into said oil shale treating chamber continuously moving from the oil shale preheating chamber to the oil shale distilling chamber, a high-temperature gas blown into an oil shale distilling chamber passing horizontally through said oil shale in said oil shale treating chamber, thereby said oil shale is preheated in said oil shale preheating chamber, and a gaseous shale oil is distilled from said preheated oil shale in said oil shale distilling chamber; and a separator for separating by liquefaction a gaseous shale oil from a gas containing the gaseous shale oil discharged from the oil shale preheating chamber.

Shishido, T.; Sato, Y.

1984-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

345

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule1, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description...

346

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of...

347

ARM - Field Campaign - Biomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBiomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP govCampaignsBiomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP Campaign Links BNL BBOP Website ARM Aerial Facility Payload Science Plan Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Biomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP 2013.07.01 - 2013.10.24 Website : http://campaign.arm.gov/bbop/ Lead Scientist : Larry Kleinman For data sets, see below. Description This field campaign will address multiple uncertainties in aerosol intensive properties, which are poorly represented in climate models, by means of aircraft measurements in biomass burning plumes. Key topics to be investigated are: Aerosol mixing state and morphology Mass absorption coefficients (MACs) Chemical composition of non-refractory material associated with

348

ARM - News from the Biomass Burn Observation Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project (BBOP)News from the Biomass Burn Observation Project Related Links BBOP Home Outreach News & Press Backgrounder (PDF, 2.1MB) Images ARM flickr site ARM Data Discovery...

349

Reversal of Catabolism by Beta-Blockade after Severe Burns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...-isotope methods and serial body-composition scanning to determine that beta-blockade with propranolol diminishes wasting of skeletal-muscle protein after severe burns. Thirteen severely burned children were given propranolol for up to four weeks and had a decrease in resting energy expenditure, without... Patients with severe burns have catecholamine-mediated hypermetabolism, including pronounced muscle-protein catabolism, that adversely affects recovery. In a prospective, randomized study, 13 children with severe burns were given oral propranolol for up to four weeks in an attempt to interrupt this process, and 12 served as controls. Beta-blockade decreased resting energy expenditure and increased net muscle-protein balance by 82 percent, as compared with a 27 percent decrease in net muscle-protein balance in the control group.

Herndon D.N.Hart D.W.Wolf S.E.Chinkes D.L.Wolfe R.R.

2001-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

350

Purifying rotary kiln waste gases in chamotte burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study of the operation of electric filters connected to rotary kilns for burning clay into chamotte showed that to increase the dust extraction efficiency it is necessary: with dust concentrations in the gas...

Yu. I. Chander; S. Z. Belinskii; L. G. Borisovskii

351

Nonphotochemical hole burning and dispersive kinetics in amorphous solids.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Results of an extensive study, covering burn intensities in the nW to {dollar}?{dollar}W/cm{dollar}2{dollar} range, of dispersive hole growth kinetics are reported for Oxazine 720 in… (more)

Kenney, Michael Joseph

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Issues to be Addressed Next Step MFE Burning Plasma Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of risk into burning plasma initiatives. The level of acceptable risk is clearly a matter of personal with Acceptably Small Elms ALL of these Issues are the subject of active research at ALL major experimental

353

Presented at UFA Burning Plasma Science Workshop II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Massachusetts Institute, Madison, WI · Charge for First and Second meetings Scientific value of a Burning Plasma experiment Scientific readiness to proceed with such an experiment Is the FIRE mission scientifically appropriate

354

A nuclear wind/solar oil-shale system for variable electricity and liquid fuels production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recoverable reserves of oil shale in the United States exceed the total quantity of oil produced to date worldwide. Oil shale contains no oil, rather it contains kerogen which when heated decomposes into oil, gases, and a carbon char. The energy required to heat the kerogen-containing rock to produce the oil is about a quarter of the energy value of the recovered products. If fossil fuels are burned to supply this energy, the greenhouse gas releases are large relative to producing gasoline and diesel from crude oil. The oil shale can be heated underground with steam from nuclear reactors leaving the carbon char underground - a form of carbon sequestration. Because the thermal conductivity of the oil shale is low, the heating process takes months to years. This process characteristic in a system where the reactor dominates the capital costs creates the option to operate the nuclear reactor at base load while providing variable electricity to meet peak electricity demand and heat for the shale oil at times of low electricity demand. This, in turn, may enable the large scale use of renewables such as wind and solar for electricity production because the base-load nuclear plants can provide lower-cost variable backup electricity. Nuclear shale oil may reduce the greenhouse gas releases from using gasoline and diesel in half relative to gasoline and diesel produced from conventional oil. The variable electricity replaces electricity that would have been produced by fossil plants. The carbon credits from replacing fossil fuels for variable electricity production, if assigned to shale oil production, results in a carbon footprint from burning gasoline or diesel from shale oil that may half that of conventional crude oil. The U.S. imports about 10 million barrels of oil per day at a cost of a billion dollars per day. It would require about 200 GW of high-temperature nuclear heat to recover this quantity of shale oil - about two-thirds the thermal output of existing nuclear reactors in the United States. With the added variable electricity production to enable renewables, additional nuclear capacity would be required. (authors)

Forsberg, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 012139 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

356

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

21, 2008. Ying, Wang. “ China, Venezuela firms to co-developApril 21, “China and Venezuela sign oil agreements. ” Chinaaccessed April 21, “Venezuela and China sign oil deal. ” BBC

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Using Oils As Pesticides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Petroleum and plant-derived spray oils show increasing potential for use as part of Integrated Pest Management systems for control of soft-bodied pests on fruit trees, shade trees, woody ornamentals and household plants. Sources of oils, preparing...

Bogran, Carlos E.; Ludwig, Scott; Metz, Bradley

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

358

Residential heating oil price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 6.3 cents from a week ago to 2.91 per gallon. That's down 1.10 from a year ago, based on the...

359

Residential heating oil price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 7.5 cents from a week ago to 2.84 per gallon. That's down 1.22 from a year ago, based on the...

360

Residential heating oil price  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 7.6 cents from a week ago to 2.97 per gallon. That's down 1.05 from a year ago, based on the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Residential heating oil price  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 3.6 cents from a week ago to 3.04 per gallon. That's down 99.4 cents from a year ago, based on the...

362

US Crude oil exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2014 EIA Energy Conference U.S. Crude Oil Exports July 14, 2014 By Lynn D. Westfall U.S. Energy Information Administration U.S. crude oil production has grown by almost 50% since...

363

Oil shale ash-layer thickness and char combustion kinetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Hot-Recycled-Solids (HRS) oil shale retort is being studied at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In the HRS process, raw shale is heated by mixing it with burnt retorted shale. Retorted shale is oil shale which has been heated in an oxygen deficient atmosphere to pyrolyze organic carbon, as kerogen into oil, gas, and a nonvolatile carbon rich residue, char. In the HRS retort process, the char in the spent shale is subsequently exposed to an oxygen environment. Some of the char, starting on the outer surface of the shale particle, is burned, liberating heat. In the HRS retort, the endothermic pyrolysis step is supported by heat from the exothermic char combustion step. The rate of char combustion is controlled by three resistances; the resistance of oxygen mass transfer through the gas film surrounding the solid particle, resistance to mass transfer through a ash layer which forms on the outside of the solid particles as the char is oxidized and the resistance due to the intrinsic chemical reaction rate of char and oxygen. In order to estimate the rate of combustion of the char in a typical oil shale particle, each of these resistances must be accurately estimated. We begin by modeling the influence of ash layer thickness on the over all combustion rate of oil shale char. We then present our experimental measurements of the ash layer thickness of oil shale which has been processed in the HRS retort.

Aldis, D.F.; Singleton, M.F.; Watkins, B.E.; Thorsness, C.B.; Cena, R.J.

1992-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur Distillate DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur Distillate February 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The current inventory of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve will be converted to cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate to comply with new, more stringent fuel standards by some Northeastern states, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) said today. The State of New York and other Northeastern states are implementing more stringent fuel standards that require replacement of high sulfur (2,000 parts per million) heating oil to ultra low sulfur fuel (15 parts per million). As a result, DOE will sell the current inventory of the Northeast

365

Actinide burning in the integral fast reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past few years, Argonne National Laboratory has been developing the integral fast reactor (IFR), an advanced liquid-metal reactor concept. In the IFR, the inherent properties of liquid-metal cooling are combined with a new metallic fuel and a radically different refining process to allow breakthroughs in passive safety, fuel cycle economics, and waste management. A key feature of the IFR concept is its unique pyroprocessing. Pyroprocessing has the potential to radically improve long-term waste management strategies by exploiting the following attributes: 1. Minor actinides accompany plutonium product stream; therefore, actinide recycling occurs naturally. Actinides, the primary source of long-term radiological toxicity, are removed from the waste stream and returned to the reactor for in situ burning, generating useful energy. 2. High-level waste volume from pyroprocessing call be reduced substantially as compared with direct disposal of spent fuel. 3. Decay heat loading in the repository can be reduced by a large factor, especially for the long-term burden. 4. Low-level waste generation is minimal. 5. Troublesome fission products, such as [sup 99]Tc, [sup 129]I, and [sup 14]C, are contained and immobilized. Singly or in combination, the foregoing attributes provide important improvements in long-term waste management in terms of the ease in meeting technical performance requirements (perhaps even the feasibility of demonstrating that technical performance requirements can be met) and perhaps also in ultimate public acceptance. Actinide recycling, if successfully developed, could well help the current repository program by providing an opportunity to enhance capacity utilization and by deferring the need for future repositories. It also represents a viable technical backup option in the event unforeseen difficulties arise in the repository licensing process.

Chang, Y.I. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Oil shale retorted underground  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oil shale retorted underground ... Low-temperature underground retorting of oil shale produces a crude oil with many attractive properties, Dr. George R. Hill of the University of Utah told a meeting of the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers last week in Los Angeles. ... Typical above-ground retorting of oil shale uses temperatures of 900° to 1100° F. because of the economic need ... ...

1967-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

367

Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps.

Corletti, Michael M. (New Kensington, PA); Lau, Louis K. (Monroeville, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville Boro, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Biochemical upgrading of oils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed. 121 figs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

369

Exploiting heavy oil reserves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

North Sea investment potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Beneath the waves in 3D Aberdeen the potential of heavy oil 8/9 Taking the legal lessons learned in the north Sea to a global audience 10 potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Aberdeen: A community of science AT WORK FOR THE ENERGY SECTOR ISSUE

Levi, Ran

370

Excavating Chinese America in the Delta: Race and the historical archaeology of the Isleton Chinese American community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

two stratigraphic layers: a burn pit layer (Layer 2) and thesouth of STP 6 uncovered a burn pit feature at about 15 cmsurface (Layer 2). This burn pit layer stretches from about

Fong, Kelly Nicole

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Clean-Burning Wood Stove Grant Program (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Clean-Burning Wood Stove Grant Program (Maryland) Clean-Burning Wood Stove Grant Program (Maryland) Clean-Burning Wood Stove Grant Program (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Program Info Start Date 09/07/2012 State Maryland Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Stick Burning Stove: $500 Pellet Burning Stove: $700 The Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) now offers the Clean Burning Wood Stove Grant program as part of its Residential Clean Energy Grant Program. The Clean Burning Wood Stove Grant program offers a flat grant award of $500 for stick burning wood stoves and $700 for pellet burning wood stoves that meet program eligibility requirements. Basic requirements for grant funding include: *The property must serve as primary residence *Clean burning wood stove must replace existing electric or non-natural gas

372

Utah Heavy Oil Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

373

RENFORCEMENT ET CONTROLE DE PAREMENTS DANS UNE MINE A CffiL OUVERT DE CHARBON REINFORCEMENT AND CONTROL OF FOOTWALL SLOPES IN AN OPEN PIT COAL MINE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND CONTROL OF FOOTWALL SLOPES IN AN OPEN PIT COAL MINE VERSTÃ?RKUNG UND KONTROLLE VON STOSSER IM KOHLETAGEBAU to exploit the stephanian coal.TheNorth West area ofthis open pit is composed of an overthrust fold. The coal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

374

Decision Document for the Storm Water Outfalls/Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant, Pesticide Rinse Area, Old Fire Fighting Training Pit, Illicit PCB Dump Site, and the Battery Acid Pit Fort Lewis, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PNNL conducted independent site evaluations for four sites at Fort Lewis, Washington, to determine their suitability for closure on behalf of the installation. These sites were recommended for "No Further Action" by previous invesitgators and included the Storm Water Outfalls/Industrial Waste Water Treatment Plant (IWTP), the Pesticide Rinse Area, the Old Fire Fighting Training Pit, and the Illicit PCB Dump Site.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Liikala, Terry L.; Strenge, Dennis L.; Taira, Randal Y.

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

375

Manufacture of refrigeration oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lubricating oils suitable for use in refrigeration equipment in admixture with fluorinated hydrocarbon refrigerants are produced by solvent extraction of naphthenic lubricating oil base stocks, cooling the resulting extract mixture, optionally with the addition of a solvent modifier, to form a secondary raffinate and a secondary extract, and recovering a dewaxed oil fraction of lowered pour point from the secondary raffinate as a refrigeration oil product. The process of the invention obviates the need for a separate dewaxing operation, such as dewaxing with urea, as conventionally employed for the production of refrigeration oils.

Chesluk, R.P.; Platte, H.J.; Sequeira, A.J.

1981-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

376

Potential health impacts of burning coal beds and waste banks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uncontrolled release of pollutants from burning coal beds and waste banks presents potential environmental and human health hazards. On a global scale, the emissions of large volumes of greenhouse gases from burning coal beds may contribute to climate change that alters ecosystems and patterns of disease occurrence. On regional and local scales, the emissions from burning coal beds and waste banks of acidic gases, particulates, organic compounds, and trace elements can contribute to a range of respiratory and other human health problems. Although there are few published reports of health problems caused by these emissions, the potential for problems can be significant. In India, large numbers of people have been displaced from their homes because of health problems caused by emissions from burning coal beds. Volatile elements such as arsenic, fluorine, mercury, and selenium are commonly enriched in coal deposits. Burning coal beds can volatilize these elements, which then can be inhaled, or adsorbed on crops and foods, taken up by livestock or bioaccumulated in birds and fish. Some of these elements can condense on dust particles that can be inhaled or ingested. In addition, selenium, arsenic, lead, tin, bismuth, fluorine, and other elements condense where the hot gaseous emissions come in contact with ambient air, forming mats of concentrated efflorescent minerals on the surface of the ground. These mats can be leached by rainwater and washed into local water bodies providing other potential routes of exposure. Although there are little data linking burning coal beds and waste banks to known health problems, a possibly analogous situation exists in rural China where mineralized coal burned in a residential environment has caused widespread and severe health problems such as fluorosis and arseniasis.

Robert B Finkelman

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Type B Investigation Report for 241-SY-101 Pump Start and 241-C-106 Pit Cleanout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with the direction of the Department of Energy (DOE) Manager, Richland Operations Office, a Type ``B`` investigation in accordance with the DOE Order 5484.1, Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Information Reporting Requirements, has been conducted. The scope of the investigation included two events: The ``Inadvertent Mixer Pump Operation at 241-SY-101`` (RL-WHC-TANK FARM-1993-069); ``Inadequate Work Control Results in Personnel Skin Contamination at 241-C-106, Pit B`` (RL-WHC-TANK FARM-1993-071) events. Additionally, at the request of the President of the WHC, a broader investigation into Waste Tank Farm ``safety practices`` and ``Conduct of Operations`` was also conducted. The review was focused on (1) WHC organizations performing operations, maintenance, and radiological safety tasks; and (2) KEH organizations performing major maintenance tasks.

Ewalt, J.R.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Removal Action Plan for the Accelerated Retrieval Project for a Described Area within Pit 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Removal Action Plan documents the plan for implementation of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compenstion, and Liability Act non-time-critical removal action to be performed by the Accelerated Retrieval Project. The focus of the action is the limited excavation and retrieval of selected waste streams from a designated portion of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Subsurface Disposal Area that are contaminated with volatile organic compounds, isotopes of uranium, or transuranic radionuclides. The selected retrieval area is approximately 0.2 ha (1/2 acre) and is located in the eastern portion of Pit 4. The proposed project is referred to as the Accelerated Retrieval Project. This Removal Action Plan details the major work elements, operations approach, and schedule, and summarizes the environmental, safety and health, and waste management considerations associated with the project.

A. M. Tyson

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY STATION DEVELOPMENT FOR THE PIT DISASSEMBLY AND CONVERSION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed prototype equipment to demonstrate remote surveying of Inner and Outer DOE Standard 3013 containers for fixed and transferable contamination in accordance with DOE Standard 3013 and 10 CFR 835 Appendix B. When fully developed the equipment will be part of a larger suite of equipment used to package material in accordance with DOE Standard 3013 at the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Project slated for installation at the Savannah River Site. The prototype system consists of a small six-axis industrial robot with an end effector consisting of a force sensor, vacuum gripper and a three fingered pneumatic gripper. The work cell also contains two alpha survey instruments, swipes, swipe dispenser, and other ancillary equipment. An external controller interfaces with the robot controller, survey instruments and other ancillary equipment to control the overall process. SRNL is developing automated equipment for the Pit Disassembly and Conversion (PDC) Project that is slated for the Savannah River Site (SRS). The equipment being developed is automated packaging equipment for packaging plutonium bearing materials in accordance with DOE-STD-3013-2004. The subject of this paper is the development of a prototype Radiological Survey Station (RSS). Other automated equipment being developed for the PDC includes the Bagless transfer System, Outer Can Welder, Gantry Robot System (GRS) and Leak Test Station. The purpose of the RSS is to perform a frisk and swipe of the DOE Standard 3013 Container (either inner can or outer can) to check for fixed and transferable contamination. This is required to verify that the contamination levels are within the limits specified in DOE-STD-3013-2004 and 10 CFR 835, Appendix D. The surface contamination limit for the 3013 Outer Can (OC) is 500 dpm/100 cm2 (total) and 20 dpm/100 cm2 (transferable). This paper will concentrate on the RSS developments for the 3013 OC but the system for the 3013 Inner Can (IC) is nearly identical.

Dalmaso, M.; Gibbs, K.; Gregory, D.

2011-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

380

Characterization of the Burma Road Rubble Pit at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Burma Road Rubble Pit (BRRP) is located at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The BRRP unit consists of two unlined earthen pits dug into surficial soil and filled with various waste materials. It was used from 1973--1983 for the disposal of dry inert rubble such as metal, concrete, lumber, poles, light fixtures, and glass. No record of the disposal of hazardous substances at the BRRP has been found. In 1983, the BRRP was closed by covering it with soil. In September 1988, a Ground Penetrating Radar survey detected three disturbed areas of soil near the BRRP, and a detailed and combined RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation was conducted from November 1993 to February 1994 to determine whether hazardous substances were present in the subsurface, to evaluate the nature and extent of contamination, and to evaluate the risks posed to the SRS facility due to activities conducted at the BRRP site. Metals, semi-volatile organic compounds, volatile organic compounds, radionuclides and one pesticide (Aldrin) were detected in soil and groundwater samples collected from seventeen BRRP locations. A baseline risk assessment (BRA) was performed quantitatively to evaluate whether chemical and radionuclide concentrations detected in soil and groundwater at the BRRP posed an unacceptable threat to human health and the environment. The exposure scenarios identifiable for the BRRP were for environmental researchers, future residential and occupational land use. The total site noncancer hazard indices were below unity, and cancer risk levels were below 1.0E-06 for the existing and future case environmental researcher scenario. The future case residential and occupational scenarios showed total hazard and risk levels which exceeded US EPA criterion values relative to groundwater scenarios. For the most part, the total carcinogenic risks were within the 1.0E-04 to 1.0E-06 risk range. Only the future adult residential scenario was associated with risks exceeding 1.0E-04.

Ward, K.G.; Frazier, W.L.; McAdams, T.D.; McFalls, S.L.; Rabin, M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Voss, L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)]|[Neptune and Co., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Toxicological effects of Kuwaiti oil fires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The possibility of long-term smoke emissions (from 1 to 3 years) from burning Kuwaiti oil wells has increased concerns regarding personnel exposure and acute and chronic health effects. This document, which is the result of work done in the spring of 1991, addresses those concerns. Part 1 of this document describes follow-on efforts to the pre-war modeling studies of the toxicological hazards to exposed Kuwaiti populations. Part 2 describes a pollutant monitoring program that could be carried out in the summer of 1991 to measure real-time exposure levels and to obtain more detailed information about the pollutant source terms and meteorological conditions that are necessary inputs to model computations.

Engi, D.; Boozer, D.D.; Church, H.W.; Einfeld, W.; Gotway, C.A.; Spencer, F.W.; Zak, B.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moore, P.W. [Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

EIS-0236-SA6; Draft Supplemental Analysis: Pit Manufacturing Facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Stockpile, Stewardship  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6/25/99 6/25/99 DRAFT SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS: PIT MANUFACTURING FACILITIES AT LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY, STOCKPILE STEWARDSHIP AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT June 1999 SUMMARY ............................................................................................................................... 3 INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 3 Purpose of this Document .................................................................................................................................. 3 Background - SSM PEIS ...................................................................................................................................

383

Abstract Pitting corrosion of aluminum 2024 in Luria Bertani medium was reduced by the secretion of anionic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Pitting corrosion of aluminum 2024 in Luria Bertani medium was reduced by the secretion Bacillus subtilis WB600/pBE92- Asp biofilm slightly reduced the corrosion rate of the pas- sive aluminum the corrosion rate by 90% (compared to the B. sub- tilis WB600/pBE92 biofilm which did not secrete polyas

Wood, Thomas K.

384

EIS-0236-S2: Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Stockpile Stewardship and Management for a Modern Pit Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE's NNSA is responsible for the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile, including production readiness required to maintain that stockpile. Pursuant to National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, NNSA has prepared a Supplement to the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on: (1) whether to proceed with a Modern Pit Facility (MPF); and (2) if so, where to locate a MPF.

385

Formation of etch pits during carbon doping of gallium arsenide with carbon tetrachloride by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formation of etch pits during carbon doping of gallium arsenide with carbon tetrachloride to examine the effects of carbon tetrachloride concentration and temperature on the morphology of carbon with increasing carbon tetrachloride concentration. Step bunching and pinning was observed at a IV/III ratio

Li, Lian

386

Carcinogenicity Studies of Estonian Oil Shale Soots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

determine the carcinogenicity of Estonian oil shale soot as well as the soot from oil shale fuel oil. All

A. Vosamae

387

Nonphotochemical hole burning and dispersive kinetics in amorphous solids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results covering burn intensities in the nW to {mu}W/cm{sup 2} range, of dispersive hole growth kinetics are reported for Oxazine 720 in glycerol glasses and polyvinyl alcohol polymer films and their deuterated analogues. A theoretical model which employs a distribution function for the hole burning rate constant based upon a Gaussian distribution for the tunnel parameter is shown to accurately describe the kinetic data. This model incorporates the linear electron-phonon coupling. A method for calculating the nonphotochemical quantum yield is presented which utilizes the Gaussian distribution of tunnel parameters. The quantum yield calculation can be extended to determine a quantum yield as a function of hole depth. The effect of spontaneous hole filling is shown to be insignificant over the burn intensity range studied. Average relaxation rates for hole burning are {approximately}8 orders of magnitude greater than for hole filling. The dispersive kinetics of hole burning are observed to be independent over the temperature range of these experiments, 1.6 to 7.0 K. 6 refs., 20 figs., 1 tab.

Kenney, M.J.

1990-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

388

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook 8/13/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance OPEC Production Likely To Remain Low U.S. Reflects World Market Crude Oil Outlook Conclusions Distillate Prices Increase With Crude Oil Distillate Stocks on the East Coast Were Very Low Entering Last Winter Distillate Demand Strong Last Winter More Supply Possible This Fall than Forecast Distillate Fuel Oil Imports Could Be Available - For A Price Distillate Supply/Demand Balance Reflected in Spreads Distillate Stocks Expected to Remain Low Winter Crude Oil and Distillate Price Outlook Heating Oil Outlook Conclusion Propane Prices Follow Crude Oil

389

Crude Oil Analysis Database  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The composition and physical properties of crude oil vary widely from one reservoir to another within an oil field, as well as from one field or region to another. Although all oils consist of hydrocarbons and their derivatives, the proportions of various types of compounds differ greatly. This makes some oils more suitable than others for specific refining processes and uses. To take advantage of this diversity, one needs access to information in a large database of crude oil analyses. The Crude Oil Analysis Database (COADB) currently satisfies this need by offering 9,056 crude oil analyses. Of these, 8,500 are United States domestic oils. The database contains results of analysis of the general properties and chemical composition, as well as the field, formation, and geographic location of the crude oil sample. [Taken from the Introduction to COAMDATA_DESC.pdf, part of the zipped software and database file at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain PDF documents and a large Excel spreadsheet. It will also contain the database in Microsoft Access 2002.

Shay, Johanna Y.

390

Sulfur capture by oil shale ashes under atmospheric and pressurized FBC conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When oil shale contains large quantities of limestone, a significant auto-absorption of sulfur is possible under suitable conditions. The sulfur capture by oil shale ashes has been studied using a pressurized thermogravimetric apparatus. The chosen experimental conditions were typical for atmospheric and pressurized fluidized bed combustion. The Ca/S molar ratios in the two oil shales studied were 8 (Estonian) and 10 (Israeli). The samples were first burned in a gas atmosphere containing O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} (and CO{sub 2} if pressurized). After the combustion step, SO{sub 2} was added and sulfation started. The results with the oil shales were compared to those obtained with an oil shale cyclone ash from the Narva power plant in Estonia. In general, the results from the sulfur capture experiments under both atmospheric and pressurized conditions showed that the oil shale cannot only capture its own sulfur but also significant amounts of additional sulfur of another fuel if the fuels are mixed together. For example from the runs at atmospheric pressure, the conversion of CaO to CaSO{sub 4} was about 70% for Israeli oil shale and about 55% for Estonian oil shale (850 C). For the cyclone ash the corresponding conversion was about 20%. In comparison it could be mentioned that under the same conditions the conversions of natural limestones are about 30%. The reason the cyclone ash was a poor sulfur absorbent was probably due to its temperature history. In Narva the oil shale was burned at a significantly higher temperature (1,400 C) than was used in the experiments (750 C and 850 C). This caused the ash to sinter and the reactive surface area of the cyclone ash was therefore decreased.

Yrjas, K.P.; Hupa, M. [Aabo Akademi Univ., Turku (Finland). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Kuelaots, I.; Ots, A. [Tallinn Technical Univ. (Estonia). Thermal Engineering Dept.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

Analysis of Aquifer Response, Groundwater Flow, and Plume Evolution at Site OU 1, Former Fort Ord, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solvents were placed in the burn pit and combusted for fireareas as well as the burn pit. The depiction shown is based

Jordan, Preston D.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Su, Grace W.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Experiments related to the resuspension of aerosols during hydrogen burns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have performed seven ''add-on'' experiments in two large combustion facilities to investigate the capability of hydrogen burns to remove simulated structural and fission product aerosols previously deposited on small metal discs that have surfaces prototypical of those found in nuclear reactor containments. Our results suggest that hydrogen combustion provides an especially effective mechanism for removal (and, presumably, resuspension) of sedimented aerosols produced in a hypothetical nuclear reactor core-degradation or core-melting accident. The presence of condensing steam does not seem to assure adhesion of sedimented aerosols during hydrogen burns. Differences are exhibited between different surfaces as well as between types of aerosol. In-depth studies will be required to assess the impact exposure of sedimented aerosols to hydrogen burns might have on the radiological source term.

Nelson, L.S.; Guay, K.P.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

World Oil: Market or Mayhem?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The world oil market is regarded by many as a puzzle. Why are oil prices so volatile? What is OPEC and what does OPEC do? Where are oil prices headed in the long run? Is “peak oil” a genuine concern? Why did oil prices ...

Smith, James L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Theory of Antineutrino Monitoring of Burning MOX Plutonium Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This letter presents the physics and feasibility of reactor antineutrino monitoring to verify the burnup of plutonium loaded in the reactor as a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel. It examines the magnitude and temporal variation in the antineutrino signals expected for different MOX fuels, for the purposes of nuclear accountability and safeguards. The antineutrino signals from reactor-grade and weapons-grade MOX are shown to be distinct from those from burning low enriched uranium. Thus, antineutrino monitoring could be used to verify the destruction of plutonium in reactors, though verifying the grade of the plutonium being burned is found to be more challenging.

Hayes, A C; Nieto, Michael Martin; WIlson, W B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Theory of Antineutrino Monitoring of Burning MOX Plutonium Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This letter presents the physics and feasibility of reactor antineutrino monitoring to verify the burnup of plutonium loaded in the reactor as a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel. It examines the magnitude and temporal variation in the antineutrino signals expected for different MOX fuels, for the purposes of nuclear accountability and safeguards. The antineutrino signals from reactor-grade and weapons-grade MOX are shown to be distinct from those from burning low enriched uranium. Thus, antineutrino monitoring could be used to verify the destruction of plutonium in reactors, though verifying the grade of the plutonium being burned is found to be more challenging.

A. C. Hayes; H. R. Trellue; Michael Martin Nieto; W. B. WIlson

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

396

Completion of the INEEL's WERF Incinerator Trial Burn  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the successes and challenges associated with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitting of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's (INEEL) Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) hazardous and mixed waste incinerator. Topics to be discussed include facility modifications and problems, trial burn results and lessons learned in each of these areas. In addition, a number of challenges remain including completion and final issue of RCRA Permit and implementation of all the permit requirements. Results from the trial burn demonstrated that the operating conditions and procedures will result in emissions that are satisfactorily protective of human health, the environment, and are in compliance with Federal and State regulations.

Branter, Curtis Keith; Conley, Dennis Allen; Corrigan, Shannon James; Moser, David Roy

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Completion of the INEEL's WERF Incinerator Trial Burn  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the successes and challenges associated with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitting of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's (INEEL) Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) hazardous and mixed waste incinerator. Topics to be discussed include facility modifications and problems, trial burn results and lessons learned in each of these areas. In addition, a number of challenges remain including completion and final issue of the RCRA Permit and implementation of all the permit requirements. Results from the trial burn demonstrated that the operating conditions and procedures will result in emissions that are satisfactorily protective of human health, the environment, and are in compliance with Federal and State regulations.

C. K. Branter; D. A. Conley; D. R. Moser; S. J. Corrigan

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Burning for Improvement of Macartney Rose-Infested Coastal Prairie.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for ~u:nd,mt white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus lIO~lUlatlO?n. The pasture in which the experimental are located is usually grazed by cattle from late to late fall . Experimental Burns were installed as headfires at 2- to 3-month in February... for ~u:nd,mt white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus lIO~lUlatlO?n. The pasture in which the experimental are located is usually grazed by cattle from late to late fall . Experimental Burns were installed as headfires at 2- to 3-month in February...

Gordon, R.A.; Scifres, C.J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Vegetable oil fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this article, the future role of renewable agricultural resources in providing fuel is discussed. it was only during this century that U.S. farmers began to use petroleum as a fuel for tractors as opposed to forage crop as fuel for work animals. Now farmers may again turn to crops as fuel for agricultural production - the possible use of sunflower oil, soybean oil and rapeseed oil as substitutes for diesel fuel is discussed.

Bartholomew, D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

US oil consumption, oil prices, and the macroeconomy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since the oil price shock of 1973–74, researchers have waged ... national income. Studies examining the relationship between oil prices, oil consumption, and real output have produced remarkably ... to dramatical...

Ali F. Darrat; Otis W. Gilley; Don J. Meyer

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Lower oil prices also cutting winter heating oil and propane...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lower oil prices also cutting winter heating oil and propane bills Lower oil prices are not only driving down gasoline costs, but U.S. consumers will also see a bigger savings in...

402

Effects of Oil and Oil Dispersants on the Marine Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

13 April 1971 research-article Effects of Oil and Oil Dispersants on the Marine Environment R. G. J. Shelton In the context of marine pollution, the term 'oil' can cover a very wide range of substances and usually...

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Enhanced Oil Recovery to Fuel Future Oil Demands | GE Global...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to Fuel Future Oil Demands Enhanced Oil Recovery to Fuel Future Oil Demands Trevor Kirsten 2013.10.02 I'm Trevor Kirsten and I lead a team of GE researchers that investigate a...

404

Oil and Gas (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This division of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources provides information on the regulation of oil and gas exploration, wells and well spacings, drilling, plugging and abandonment, and...

405

Waste oil reduction: GKN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the steps required to establish a waste oil management program. Such a program can reduce operational costs, cut wastewater treatment costs and produce a better quality wastewater effluent through such means as: reducing the volume of oils used; segregating oils at the source of generation for recovery and reuse; and reducing the quality of oily wastewater generated. It discusses the metal-working fluid recovery options available for such a program, namely settling, filtration, hydrocyclone, and centrifugation. Included are source lists for vendors of oil skimmer equipment and coolant recovery systems.

Hunt, G.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

disruptions, and the peak in U.S. oil production account foroil increased 81.1% (logarithmically) between January 1979 and the peak

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

What substitutes for oil?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... bagasse, ethyl alcohol, vegetable oils, methane and hydrogen; as well as hydro and nuclear power generation, conservation methods, and solar, wind and tidal energy.

David Spurgeon

1978-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

408

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2001 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

409

Crude Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2002 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

410

Crude Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2000 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

411

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

412

Crude Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

413

NETL: Oil & Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oil & Gas Publications KMD Contacts Project Summaries EPAct 2005 Arctic Energy Office Announcements Software Stripper Wells Efficient recovery of our nation's fossil fuel resources...

414

Effect of bicarbonate ion additives on pitting corrosion of type 316L stainless steel in aqueous 0.5 M sodium chloride solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of bicarbonate ions (HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) on pitting corrosion of type 316L stainless steel (SS, UNS S3 1603) was investigated in aqueous 0.5 M sodium chloride (NaCl) solution using potentiodynamic polarization, the abrading electrode technique, alternating current (AC) impedance spectroscopy combined with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Addition of HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ions to NaCl solutions extended the passive potential region in width and, at the same time, raised the pitting potential in value on the potentiodynamic polarization curve. Potentiostatic current transients obtained from the moment just after interrupting the abrading action showed the repassivation rate of propagating pits increased and that the pit growth rate decreased with increasing HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ion concentration. Over the whole applied potential, the oxide film resistance was higher in the presence of HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ions. The pit number density decreased with increasing HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ion concentration. Moreover, addition of HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ions to NaCl solutions retarded lateral pit growth, while promoting downward pit growth from the surface. The bare surface of the specimen repassivated preferentially along the pit mouth and walls, compared to the pit bottom, as a result of formation of a surface film with a high content of protective mixed ferrous-chromous carbonate ([Fe,Cr]CO{sub 3}) that formed from preferential adsorption of HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ions.

Park, J.J.; Pyun, S.I.; Lee, W.J. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Kim, H.P. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

DOE Seeks Commercial Storage to Complete Fill of Northeast Home Heating Oil  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to Complete Fill of Northeast Home to Complete Fill of Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE Seeks Commercial Storage to Complete Fill of Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve August 26, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE), through its agent DLA Energy, has issued a solicitation seeking commercial storage contracts for the remaining 350,000 barrels of ultra low sulfur distillate needed to complete the fill of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. Offers are due no later than 9:00 a.m., August 31, 2011. Earlier this year, DOE sold its entire inventory of heating oil stocks with plans to replace it with cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate. New storage contracts were awarded in August 2011 for 650,000 barrels, and awards from this solicitation will complete the fill of the one million

416

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) More Documents & Publications PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application PIA - GovTrip (DOE data) PIA - WEB Unclassified...

417

Lead Corrosion and Oil Oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... tests the horn was AISI 304, the balls were variously high purity Al, Cu, SAE 52100 steel, and Pb. The oil was a refined paraffinic mineral oil into which ... oil Bearing

J. K. APPELDOORN; P. PACOR; V. RIDDEI

1972-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

418

Controlling coal fires using the three-phase foam and water mist techniques in the Anjialing Open Pit Mine, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal fires are a serious environment, health, and safety hazard throughout the world. They damage the environment, threaten the health of people living nearby, burn away non-renewable coal, and result in ... to c...

Zhenlu Shao; Deming Wang; Yanming Wang; Xiaoxing Zhong; Xiaofei Tang…

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Oil shale technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale is undoubtedly an excellent energy source that has great abundance and world-wide distribution. Oil shale industries have seen ups and downs over more than 100 years, depending on the availability and price of conventional petroleum crudes. Market forces as well as environmental factors will greatly affect the interest in development of oil shale. Besides competing with conventional crude oil and natural gas, shale oil will have to compete favorably with coal-derived fuels for similar markets. Crude shale oil is obtained from oil shale by a relatively simple process called retorting. However, the process economics are greatly affected by the thermal efficiencies, the richness of shale, the mass transfer effectiveness, the conversion efficiency, the design of retort, the environmental post-treatment, etc. A great many process ideas and patents related to the oil shale pyrolysis have been developed; however, relatively few field and engineering data have been published. Due to the vast heterogeneity of oil shale and to the complexities of physicochemical process mechanisms, scientific or technological generalization of oil shale retorting is difficult to achieve. Dwindling supplied of worldwide petroleum reserves, as well as the unprecedented appetite of mankind for clean liquid fuel, has made the public concern for future energy market grow rapidly. the clean coal technology and the alternate fuel technology are currently of great significance not only to policy makers, but also to process and chemical researchers. In this book, efforts have been made to make a comprehensive text for the science and technology of oil shale utilization. Therefore, subjects dealing with the terminological definitions, geology and petrology, chemistry, characterization, process engineering, mathematical modeling, chemical reaction engineering, experimental methods, and statistical experimental design, etc. are covered in detail.

Lee, S. (Akron Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

System for utilizing oil shale fines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is provided for utilizing fines of carbonaceous materials such as particles or pieces of oil shale of about one-half inch or less diameter which are rejected for use in some conventional or prior surface retorting process, which obtains maximum utilization of the energy content of the fines and which produces a waste which is relatively inert and of a size to facilitate disposal. The system includes a cyclone retort (20) which pyrolyzes the fines in the presence of heated gaseous combustion products, the cyclone retort having a first outlet (30) through which vapors can exit that can be cooled to provide oil, and having a second outlet (32) through which spent shale fines are removed. A burner (36) connected to the spent shale outlet of the cyclone retort, burns the spent shale with air, to provide hot combustion products (24) that are carried back to the cyclone retort to supply gaseous combustion products utilized therein. The burner heats the spent shale to a temperature which forms a molten slag, and the molten slag is removed from the burner into a quencher (48) that suddenly cools the molten slag to form granules that are relatively inert and of a size that is convenient to handle for disposal in the ground or in industrial processes.

Harak, Arnold E. (Laramie, WY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Case Study of the Emissions from a Heavy-Oil-Fueled Hungarian Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Case Study of the Emissions from a Heavy-Oil-Fueled Hungarian Power Plant ... More than 50% of the electric power in Hungary is produced by fossil-fuel-burning power plants. ... 15 The concentration of the pollutant at a location is described by an explicit function in Descartes coordinate system, where the origin is the source; the direction of the abscissa is the same as the wind direction. ...

János Osán; Szabina Török; Jenõ Fekete; Anders Rindby

2000-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

422

Ignition and Burn in a Small Magnetized Fuel Target  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LASNEX calculations of a small magnetized target show high gain at a velocity significantly lower than needed for unmagnetized targets. Its cryogenic fuel layer appears to be raised to an equilibrium ignition temperature of about 2 keV by the radiation from the burning magnetized fuel.

Kirkpatrick, Ronald C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

BURNING BURIED SUNSHINE: HUMAN CONSUMPTION OF ANCIENT SOLAR ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BURNING BURIED SUNSHINE: HUMAN CONSUMPTION OF ANCIENT SOLAR ENERGY JEFFREY S. DUKES Department of as a vast store of solar energy from which society meets >80% of its current energy needs. Here, using of ancient solar energy decline, humans are likely to use an increasing share of modern solar resources. I

Dukes, Jeffrey

424

LIBERTY TOLERANT COTTON: WEED CONTROL AND CROP TOLERANCE Brent Burns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIBERTY TOLERANT COTTON: WEED CONTROL AND CROP TOLERANCE Brent Burns Texas Tech University Lubbock Acres planted with herbicide-tolerant cotton varieties have steadily increased since their introduction in 1995. Recently, the bar gene was introduced into Coker 312 cotton plants for tolerance to Liberty

Mukhtar, Saqib

425

More than words : a biography of Daniel Francis Burns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Daniel Francis Burns was born in Ireland in 1888 and immigrated to the United States in 1912. He married Mary O'Neill in 1923 and had a family of seven children. He worked as a police officer in the Boston Police Department ...

Burns, Matthew R. (Matthew Robert)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

PRESENTATION TO NRC BURNING PLASMA PANEL DR. STEPHEN O. DEAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PRESENTATION TO NRC BURNING PLASMA PANEL DR. STEPHEN O. DEAN PRESIDENT FUSION POWER ASSOCIATES REACTORS ! FISSION PRODUCT DEACTIVATION ! HAZARDOUS WASTE PROCESSING ! RECYCLING OF MATERIALS ! FUSION ! UNRESOLVED WASTE DISPOSAL ISSUE EPRI DID PREPARE TWO REPORTS ON FUSION, IN 1992 AND 1994 ! Report of the 1992

427

Firm sues to hasten burning of waste at sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In an effort to force a decision on its bid to perform a research burn of chemical wastes at sea, Chemical Waste Management is suing both the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration. The company wants the U.S. ...

1986-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

428

A New Type Heat Exchanger for Coal Burning Boilers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To make the best of heat energy in the flue gas exhausted from a coal burning boiler, the design proposal for a new type of heat exchanger was put forward in the paper. Via the new type of heat exchanger, temperature of the flue gas can be decreased ... Keywords: waste heat utilization, energy conservation, special heat exchanger, economizer

Bingwen Zhang; Yingjin Zhang

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Paediatric medical trauma: The impact on parents of burn survivors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to identify parents at risk of developing ongoing psychological distress after their child has sustained a burn a greater understanding of paediatric medical trauma is required. Aim To investigate the impact of exposure to paediatric trauma on parents of children with a burn and to identify risk factors and relationships between psychological distress and resilience. Methods Sixty-three parents were recruited. Parents completed standardised assessments measuring symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety, stress, and resilience within one week of the burn occurring. Statistical analysis included t-tests, Kruskal–Wallis one way ANOVA and Spearman's Roe. Results Parents experienced significantly more symptoms of PTSD (p = 0.001) than a comparative community population. Factors including having a daughter, witnessing the event, feeling helpless or having past traumatic experiences significantly influenced symptoms of psychological distress and resilience (p = 0.05). Conclusion Parents of burn survivors experience significant psychological distress with low levels of resilience. As part of standard routine care health professionals should screen parents to identify those at greatest risk and provide effective evidence based interventions aimed at improving resilience and reducing stress.

Sarah McGarry; Sonya Girdler; Ann McDonald; Jane Valentine; Fiona Wood; Catherine Elliott

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

CONGRESS BLASTS OIL INDUSTRY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

IN PACKED HEARINGS last week before angry members of Congress, the heads of BP, ExxonMobil, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, and Shell Oil defended their industry in light of the April 20 BP oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico, which has led to the worst ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

431

Oil Quantity : The histori  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model for Prudhoe Bay. Figure 11: Historical Prudhoe Bay oil production data, modeled economically Production (million bbl per Month) Historical Production Best Fit (Hist. Tax w/ELF, Ref. P) High Price 120 140 160 19 Oil Quantity Con Wel N E A N N ng Results e Bay : The histori Bay over tim : Prudhoe Ba

Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

432

The Geopolitics of Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reduce their production by a similar...barrels ofoil a day. Although the...barrels of oil per day. It is likely...Virtually all the OPEC producers, particularly...their oil. In 1973, 90 percent...increase indigenous production, and ac-celerate...

1980-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

433

Balancing oil and environment... responsibly.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Balancing Oil and Environment…Responsibly As the price of oil continues to skyrocket and global oil production nears the brink, pursuing unconventional oil supplies, such as oil shale, oil sands, heavy oils, and oils from biomass and coal has become increasingly attractive. Of particular significance to the American way is that our continent has significant quantities of these resources. Tapping into these new resources, however, requires cutting-edge technologies for identification, production, processing and environmental management. This job needs a super hero or two for a job of this size and proportion…

Weimer, Walter C.; Teske, Lisa

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

434

Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . . . .and Productivity in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . . OilEllner, ”Organized Labor in Venezuela 1958-1991: Behavior

CAKIR, NIDA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Chinaâs Oil Diplomacy with Russia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In Chinaâs view, it is necessary to get crude oil and oil pipeline. Under Russia and China strategic partnership, China tries to obtain âlong term… (more)

Chao, Jiun-chuan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Peak oil: diverging discursive pipelines.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Peak oil is the claimed moment in time when global oil production reaches its maximum rate and henceforth forever declines. It is highly controversial as… (more)

Doctor, Jeff

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

The impact of infield biomass burning on PM levels and its chemical composition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the South of Italy, it is common for farmers to burn pruning waste from olive trees in spring. In order to evaluate the impact of the biomass burning source on the physical and chemical characteristics ... ope...

P. Dambruoso; G. de Gennaro; A. Di Gilio…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Burning of Hydrocarbon Fuels Directly in a Water-Based Heat Carrier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A principal possibility of burning hydrocarbon fuels directly in a water-based heat carrier is demonstrated. The first experimental results are presented by an example of burning acetylene in water with initia...

V. S. Teslenko; V. I. Manzhalei; R. N. Medvedev…

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Physical and Chemical Characterization of Particulate and Gas phase Emissions from Biomass Burning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

during the open combustion of biomass in the laboratory, J.J. R. , and Veres, P. : Biomass burning in Siberia andOpen burning of agricultural biomass: Physical and chemical

Hosseini, Seyedehsan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Recovery Boiler Modeling: An Improved Char Burning Model Including Sulfate Reduction and Carbon Removal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gasification, reactions between oxygen and combustibles in the boundary layer, and integration of sulfate reduction and sulfide reoxidation into the char burning process. Simulations using the model show that for typical recovery boiler conditions, char burning...

Grace, T. M.; Wag, K. J.; Horton, R. R.; Frederick, W. J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The Challenge Human activities, such as the burning of fossil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil is a multinational independent exploration and production company with interests in the North Sea oil, gas fields or saline aquifers. Emissions from fossil fuel power stations could then be reduced, is the process of the capture and long-term storage of atmospheric CO2 and will play a vital role in future

Crowther, Paul

442

oil | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

oil oil Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 134, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into Crude oil, dry natural gas. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA end-of-year reserves gas oil Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Oil and Gas End-of-Year Reserves and Annual Reserve Additions- Reference Case (xls, 58.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset

443

Chapter 5 - Crude Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Oil has been the number one source of energy in the world since the middle of the twentieth century. The world is very dependent on petroleum for transportation fuels, petrochemicals and asphalt. But ever increasing demand has caused the price of oil to spike in recent years, and only the world economic crisis has been able to temper demand and bring the price down to more reasonable levels. However, the demand and price are likely to shoot up again when the economy recovers. At the same time, the peak oil theory of M. King Hubbert predicts that world oil production is likely to peak soon. This prediction raises questions about what source of energy will come to the fore when oil is not able to keep up.

Brian F. Towler

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Environmental Assessment for the Construction, Operation, and Closure of the Burma Road II Borrow Pit at the Savannah River Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

i This page is intentionally left blank ii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1 1.1 Background 1 1.2 Purpose and Need for Action 3 2.0 PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 3 2.1 Proposed Action 3 2.2 Alternatives to the Proposed Action 7 2.2.1 No Action, Continue to Use Existing SRS Borrow Pits 7 2.2.2 Build the Proposed Borrow Pit at Another Onsite Location 7 2.2.3 Use Offsite Commercial Sources of Structural Fill Material 8 3.0 AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT 8 3.1 Land Use 8 3.2 Meteorology and Climatology 8 3.3 Geology and Seismology 8 3.4 Hydrology 9 3.5 Ecological and Cultural Resources 10 3.6 Radiation Environment 12 4.0 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 12 4.1 Facility Construction 12

445

Environmental Assessment for the Construction, Operation, and Closure of the Burma Road II Borrow Pit at the Savannah River Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Construction, Operation, and Closure of the Construction, Operation, and Closure of the Burma Road II Borrow Pit at the Savannah River Site Agency: U.S. Department of Energy Action: Finding of No Significant Impact Summary: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1501) to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a new borrow pit, and its alternatives, at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that this action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not

446

RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit (631-16G) - March 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit is located on the west side of SRS. In the early to mid 1980`s, while work was being performed in this area, nine empty, partially buried drums, labeled `du Pont Freon 11`, were found. As a result, Gunsite 720 became one of the original waste units specified in the SRS RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA). The drums were excavated on July 30, 1987 and placed on a pallet at the unit. Both the drums and pallet were removed and disposed of in October 1989. The area around the drums was screened during the excavation and the liquid (rainwater) that collected in the excavated drums was sampled prior to disposal. No evidence of hazardous materials was found. Based on the review of the analytical data and screening techniques used to evaluate all the chemicals of potential concern at Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit, it is recommended that no further remedial action be performed at this unit.

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

GPS-based slope monitoring systems and their applications in transition mining from open-pit to underground  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combining methods of open-pit and underground mining can yield maximum economic outcomes, while they may also cause large-scaled geological hazards, such as landslides. Failure to prevent landslides in mining areas could result in losses and damages to equipment, surrounding environments, and even human lives. In this paper, we report the application of global positioning system (GPS) for monitoring the Anjialing Coal Mine, the first mine in China that employs the combining methods of open-pit and underground mining. Mine slopes with different inclined angles were monitored and precise data of ground movements were obtained. Mathematic modelling of the subsidence rate over time has successfully detected the occurrence of terminal subsidence rate and a corresponding a landslide. The equipment and persons involved were evacuated and kept safe before the medium landslide occurred. In conclusion, the GPS monitoring system is proved to be effective in mitigating the geological hazards in mining areas.

Gang Chen; Xingwen Cheng; Weitao Chen; Xianju Li; Liangbiao Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Implications of mining practices in an open-pit gold mine for monitoring of a comprehensive test-ban treaty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of an experiment at the Gold Quarry pit, operated by the Newmont Gold Company at Carlin, NV The purpose of the experiment was to obtain local and regional seismic data, together with ``ground truth``, from conventional surface blasting activity and to use these data to help determine the effectiveness with which conventional mining blasts can be discriminated from underground nuclear explosions.

Jarpe, S.P.; Moran, B.; Goldstein, P.; Glenn, L.A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Environmental assessment for the expansion and operation of the Central Shops Borrow Pit at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed expansion and operation of an existing borrow pit at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. A borrow pit is defined as an excavated area where material has been dug for use as fill at another location. The proposed action would entail the areal enlargement, continued operation, and eventual close-out of the established facility known as the Central Shops Borrow Pit. Operations at SRS supporting waste site closure and the construction and maintenance of site facilities and infrastructure require readily available suitable soil for use as fill material. With the recent depletion of the other existing on-site sources for such material, DOE proposes to expand the existing facility. The National Environmental Policy Act requires the assessment of environmental consequences of Federal actions that may affect the quality of the human environment. Based on the potential for impacts described herein, DOE will either publish a Finding of No Significant Impact or prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS).

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Flood and gully erosion problems at the Pasir open pit coal mine, Indonesia: a case study of the hydrology using GIS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper considers the flood and gully erosion problems at the Pasir open pit coal mine located in a humid region in Indonesia. Using the geographic information systems (GIS), quantitative information on the hy...

Yosoon Choi; Hyeong-Dong Park; Choon Sunwoo

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

US Burning Plasma Workshop Oak Ridge National Laboratory US Contributions to ITER Project (US ITER)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

US Burning Plasma Workshop Oak Ridge National Laboratory US Contributions to ITER Project (US ITER Plasma Workshop Oak Ridge, TN December 7, 2005 #12;US Burning Plasma Workshop Oak Ridge National '06 Expectations · Summary #12;US Burning Plasma Workshop Oak Ridge National Laboratory Highlights

452

Direct and semi-direct aerosol effects of Southern African1 biomass burning aerosol2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Direct and semi-direct aerosol effects of Southern African1 biomass burning aerosol2 Naoko effects of biomass burning aerosols from Southern African fires9 during July-October are investigated region the overall TOA radiative effect from the23 biomass burning aerosols is almost zero due

Wood, Robert

453

Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of southern African biomass burning aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of southern African biomass burning aerosol Naoko Sakaeda,1 2011; published 21 June 2011. [1] Direct and semidirect radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols static stability. Over the entire region the overall TOA radiative effect from the biomass burning

Wood, Robert

454

Biomass burning emission inventory with daily resolution: Application to aircraft observations of Asian outflow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass burning emission inventory with daily resolution: Application to aircraft observations for biomass burning using AVHRR satellite observations of fire activity corrected for data gaps and scan angle biomass burning in SE Asia was a major contributor to the outflow of Asian pollution observed in TRACE

Palmer, Paul

455

Evolution of biomass burning aerosol properties from an agricultural fire in southern Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolution of biomass burning aerosol properties from an agricultural fire in southern Africa Steven Met Office C-130 within a distinct biomass burning plume during the Southern AFricAn Regional science, and P. R. Buseck, Evolution of biomass burning aerosol properties from an agricultural fire in southern

Highwood, Ellie

456

Selected Abstracts & Bibliography of International Oil Spill Research, through 1998  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kuwait, Middle East, oil and gas fields, oil refinery, oil waste, oil well,Equipment Kuwait Oil Co. 1991. Mideast well fire, oil spillKuwait, Persian Gulf, Saudia Arabia, Oil spill, cleanup, oil spills, crude, oil spill incidents, oil spills-pipeline, warfare, oil skimmers, oil wells,

Louisiana Applied Oil Spill Research & Development Program Electronic Bibliography

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Survival of Seaward-Migrating PIT and Acoustic-Tagged Juvenile Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Columbia Rivers: An Evaluation of Length-Specific Tagging Effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies examining the survival of juvenile salmon as they emigrate to the ocean provide important information regarding the management of regulated river systems. Acoustic telemetry is a widely used tool for evaluating the behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids in the Columbia River basin. Thus, it is important to understand how the surgical tagging process and the presence of a transmitter affect survival so any biases can be accounted for or eliminated. This study evaluated the effects of fish length and tag type on the survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon during their seaward migrations through the Snake and Columbia rivers during 2006, 2007, and 2008. Fish were collected at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River (river kilometer 695) and implanted with either only a passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag (PIT fish) or both a PIT tag and an acoustic transmitter (AT fish). Survival was estimated from release at Lower Granite Dam to multiple downstream locations (dams) using the Cormack–Jolly–Seber single release model, and analysis of variance was used to test for differences among length-classes and between tag types. No length-specific tag effect was detected between PIT and AT fish (i.e., length affected the survival of PIT fish in a manner similar to which it affected the survival of AT fish). Survival among the smallest length class (i.e., 80–89 mm) of both PIT and AT subyearling Chinook salmon was markedly low (i.e., 4%). Fish length was positively correlated with the survival of both PIT and AT fish. Significant differences in survival were detected between tag types; the survival of PIT fish was generally greater than that of AT fish. However, confounding variables warrant caution in making strong inferences regarding this factor. Further, results suggest that tag effects may be due to the process of surgically implanting the transmitter rather than the presence of the transmitter.

Brown, Richard S.; Oldenburg, Eric W.; Seaburg, Adam; Cook, Katrina V.; Skalski, John R.; Eppard, M. B.; Deters, Katherine A.

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

458

Technical assessment of an oil-fired residential cogeneration system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The definition of cogeneration, within the context of this project, is the simultaneous production of electricity and heat energy from a single machine. This report will present the results of an engineering analysis of the efficiency and energy-conservation potential associated with a unique residential oil-fired cogeneration system that provides both heat and electric power. The system operates whenever a thermostat signals a call for heat in the home, just as a conventional heating system. However, this system has the added benefit of cogenerating electricity whenever it is running to provide space heating comfort. The system is designed to burn No. 2 heating oil, which is consumed in an 11-horsepower, two cylinder, 56.75-cubic-inch, 1850-RPM diesel engine. This unit is the only pre-production prototype residential No. 2 oil-fired cogeneration system known to exist in the world. As such, it is considered a landmark development in the field of oil-heat technology.

McDonald, R.J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Inhibition of coated pit formation in Hep2 cells blocks the cytotoxicity of diphtheria toxin but not that of ricin toxin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a K÷-free medium, human fibroblasts arrest their coated pit formation and therefore arrest receptor-mediated endocytosis of low density lipoprotein. We have used this technique to study the endocytosis of transferrin, diphtheria toxin, and ricin toxin by three cell lines (Vero, Wi38/SV40, and Hep2 cells). Only Hep2 cells totally arrested internalization of [12Sl]transferrin, a ligand transported by coated pits and coated vesicles, after intracellular K ÷ depletion. Immunofluorescence studies using anti-clathrin antibodies showed that clathrin associated with the plasma membrane disappeared in Hep2 cells when the level of intracellular K ÷ was low. In the absence of functional coated pits, diphtheria toxin was unable to intoxicate Hep2 cells but the activity of ricin toxin was unaffected by this treatment. By measuring the rate of internalization of [l~51]ricin toxin by Hep2 cells, with and without functional coated pits, we have shown that this labeled ligand was transported in both cases inside the cells. Hep2 cells with active coated pits internalized twice as much [12Sl]ricin toxin as Hep2 cells without coated pits. Entry of ricin toxin inside the cells was a slow process (8 % of the bound toxin per 10 min at 37°C) when compared to transferrin internalization (50 % of the bound transferrin per 10 min at 37°C). Using the indirect immunofluorescence technique on permeabilized cells, we

Maryse Moya; Alice Dautry-varsat; Bruno Goud; Daniel Louvard; Patrice Boquet

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

OpenEI - oil  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

/0 en AEO2011: Oil and Gas /0 en AEO2011: Oil and Gas End-of-Year Reserves and Annual Reserve Additions http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/805 This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 134, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into Crude oil, dry natural gas. 

License
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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Time-dependent inversion estimates of global biomass-burning CO emissions using Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel/biofuel combustion (FFBF), biomass burning (BIOM) andsource from fuel combustion as well as biomass burning of

Arellano, Avelino F; Kasibhatla, Prasad S; Giglio, Louis; van der Werf, Guido R; Randerson, James T; Collatz, G. James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

HS_Oil_Studyguide.indd  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oil Oil Fossil Energy Study Guide: Oil Pet roleum-or cr ude oil-is a fossil fuel that is found in large quantities beneath the Earth's sur face and is often used as a fuel or raw material in the chemical indust r y. It is a smelly, yellow-to-black liquid and is usually found in underg round areas called reser voirs. If you could look down an oil well and see oil where Nature created it, you might be surprised. You wouldn't see a big underground lake, as a lot of people think. Oil doesn't exist in deep, black pools. In fact, an underground oil formation-an "oil reservoir"-looks very much like any other rock formation. Oil exists in this underground formation as tiny droplets trapped inside the open spaces, called "pores," inside rocks. Th

463

MS_Oil_Studyguide.indd  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

LOOKING DOWN AN OIL WELL LOOKING DOWN AN OIL WELL Ever wonder what oil looks like underground, down deep, hundreds or thousands of feet below the surface, buried under millions of tons of rock and dirt? If you could look down an oil well and see oil where nature created it, you might be surprised. You wouldn't see a big underground lake, as a lot of people think. Oil doesn't exist in deep, black pools. In fact, an underground oil formation-called an "oil reservoir" -looks very much like any other rock formation. It looks a lot like...well, rock. Oil exists underground as tiny droplets trapped inside the open spaces, called "pores," inside rocks. Th e "pores" and the oil droplets can be seen only through a microscope. Th e droplets cling to the rock, like drops of water cling

464

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 119 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze crude oil and natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 8). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule[1], and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2011), (Washington, DC, 2011). The OGSM provides

465

Kleinman 2013 Biomass Burn Plan B.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

if There are Few Fires? if There are Few Fires? Fire Plan Major focus is to sample fires in near-field where there are rapid changes, with a particular emphasis on soot, brown carbon, and SOA This includes sampling other sources for contrast Urban, Long range transport Plan B Same instruments can be used for multiple purposes Year to Year Burn Variability Fire Data from FINN version 1.0, courtesy of Christine Wiedinmyer Areas are ~ 1000 km by 1000 km centered on Pasco, WA and Little Rock, AK Year to year variability in Monthly Fire Emissions ~ factor of 10. Year to Year Burn Variability Fire Data from FINN version 1.0, courtesy of Christine Wiedinmyer Large year to year variability in Fire Counts Sometimes, 2 week periods between fire activity Other Soot/Brown Carbon Sources

466

NETL: News Release - Combustion Optimization Systems - Cleaner Coal Burning  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

"Combustion Optimization System" - Cleaner Coal Burning at Lower Costs "Combustion Optimization System" - Cleaner Coal Burning at Lower Costs DOE Joins with Sunflower Electric to Outfit Kansas Coal Plant with Lower Cost System to Cut Air Emissions FINNEY COUNTY, KS - A unique combination of high-tech combustion modifications and sophisticated control systems will be tested on a Kansas coal-fired power plant as part of the federal government's efforts to show how new technology can reduce air emissions and save costs for ratepayers. - Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station - Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station will be outfitted with a combination of innovative hardware and software to further reduce air emissions. - The U.S. Department of Energy and Sunflower Electric Power Corporation have signed an agreement to use the utility's Holcomb Station power plant in

467

New Computer Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Codes Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal New Computer Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal March 29, 2012 | Tags: Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), Combustion, Franklin, Hopper Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 The Polk Power Station near Mulberry, Florida, is an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle gasification plant. It is capable of generating 313 megawatts of electricity - 250 megawatts of which are supplied to the electric grid. The plant's gas cleaning technology removes more than 98 percent of the sulfur in coal, converting it to a commercial product. Nitrogen oxide emissions are reduced by more than 90 percent. (Photo courtesy of DOE-NETL) Approximately half of all electricity used in the United States comes from

468

Type Ia Supernova: Burning and Detonation in the Distributed Regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple, semi-analytic representation is developed for nuclear burning in Type Ia supernovae in the special case where turbulent eddies completely disrupt the flame. The speed and width of the ``distributed'' flame front are derived. For the conditions considered, the burning front can be considered as a turbulent flame brush composed of corrugated sheets of well-mixed flames. These flames are assumed to have a quasi-steady-state structure similar to the laminar flame structure, but controlled by turbulent diffusion. Detonations cannot appear in the system as long as distributed flames are still quasi-steady-state, but this condition is violated when the distributed flame width becomes comparable to the size of largest turbulent eddies. When this happens, a transition to detonation may occur. For current best estimates of the turbulent energy, the most likely density for the transition to detonation is in the range 0.5 - 1.5 x 10^7 g cm^{-3}.

S. E. Woosley

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

469

Oil Price Volatility  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Speculation and Oil Price Volatility Speculation and Oil Price Volatility Robert J. Weiner Robert J. Weiner Professor of International Business, Public Policy & Professor of International Business, Public Policy & Public Administration, and International Affairs Public Administration, and International Affairs George Washington University; George Washington University; Membre Associ Membre Associ é é , GREEN, Universit , GREEN, Universit é é Laval Laval EIA Annual Conference Washington Washington 7 April 2009 7 April 2009 1 FACTORS DRIVNG OIL PRICE VOLATILITY FACTORS DRIVNG OIL PRICE VOLATILITY ► ► Market fundamentals Market fundamentals . . Fluctuations in supply, Fluctuations in supply, demand, and market power demand, and market power Some fundamentals related to expectations of Some fundamentals related to expectations of

470

Winter Crude Oil and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: While the relatively low stock forecast (although not as low as last winter) adds some extra pressure to prices, the price of crude oil could be the major factor affecting heating oil prices this winter. The current EIA forecast shows residential prices averaging $1.29 this winter, assuming no volatility. The average retail price is about 7 cents less than last winter, but last winter included the price spike in November 2000, December 2000, and January 2001. Underlying crude oil prices are currently expected to be at or below those seen last winter. WTI averaged over $30 per barrel last winter, and is currently forecast to average about $27.50 per barrel this winter. As those of you who watch the markets know, there is tremendous uncertainty in the amount of crude oil supply that will be available this winter. Less

471

Oil Market Assessment  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Logo Oil Market Assessment - September Logo Oil Market Assessment - September 12, 2001 EIA Home Page Based on Energy Information Administration (EIA) contacts and trade press reports, overall U.S. and global oil supplies appear to have been minimally impacted by yesterday's terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Rumors of scattered closures of U.S. refineries, pipelines, and terminals were reported, and Louisiana Offshore Oil Port operations were partially suspended. While the NYMEX and New York Harbor were temporarily closed, operations are expected to resume soon. Most, if not all petroleum industry infrastructure is expected to resume normal operations today or in the very near term. Prices at all levels (where markets were open) posted increases yesterday, but many prices fell today, as initial reactions

472

Residential Heating Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This chart highlights residential heating oil prices for the current and This chart highlights residential heating oil prices for the current and past heating season. As you can see, prices have started the heating season, about 40 to 50 cents per gallon higher than last year at this time. The data presented are from EIA's State Heating Oil and Propane Program. We normally collect and publish this data twice a month, but given the low stocks and high prices, we started tracking the prices weekly. These data will also be used to determine the price trigger mechanism for the Northeast Heating Oil Reserve. The data are published at a State and regional level on our web site. The slide is to give you some perspective of what is happening in these markets, since you probably will get a number of calls from local residents about their heating fuels bills

473

India: Becoming well oiled  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... been stirred into vigorous action and its redoubled efforts to find more oil onshore and offshore are beginning to yield results. From onshore fields in Assam and Gujarat, production this ... figure will go up to 11 million tonnes.

Correspondent

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Production of Shale Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intensive pre-project feasibility and engineering studies begun in 1979 have produced an outline plan for development of a major project for production of shale oil from private lands in the Piceance Basin in western Colorado. This outline plan...

Loper, R. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Steadying of oil prices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oil prices have fallen below the 30 dollar mark ... in the lower half of OPEC’s target price band. Will OPEC manage to maintain high prices and revenues by restricting production?

Klaus Matthies

476

Imbibition assisted oil recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analyzed in detail to investigate oil recovery during spontaneous imbibition with different types of boundary conditions. The results of these studies have been upscaled to the field dimensions. The validity of the new definition of characteristic length...

Pashayev, Orkhan H.

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

Sound Oil Company  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sound Oil Company Sound Oil Company file:///C|/Documents%20and%20Settings/blackard/Desktop/EIA/LEE0152.HTM[11/29/2012 2:30:44 PM] DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Application for Exception Name of Petitioner: Sound Oil Company Date of Filing: August 16, 1994 Case Number: LEE-0152 On August 16, 1994, Sound Oil Company (Sound) of Seattle Washington, filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals of the Department of Energy. In its Application, Sound requests that it be relieved of the requirement that it file the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) form entitled "Resellers'/Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report" (Form EIA-782B). As explained below, we have determined that the Application for Exception should be denied.

478

Oil Reserves and Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Oil Reserves and Production Eric Drake The growth of world energy requirements over the last...remaining proved recoverable reserves will probably decline continuously...to grow. The declining reserves will be insufficient to...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Crude Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

20.86 20.67 20.47 20.24 20.32 19.57 See footnotes at end of table. 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual...

480

Crude Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

19.11 18.73 18.63 17.97 18.75 18.10 See footnotes at end of table. 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oil burn pit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Oil shale research in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There have been continued efforts and new emergence in oil shale research in Chine since 1980. In this paper, the studies carried out in universities, academic, research and industrial laboratories in recent years are summarized. The research areas cover the chemical structure of kerogen; thermal behavior of oil shale; drying, pyrolysis and combustion of oil shale; shale oil upgrading; chemical utilization of oil shale; retorting waste water treatment and economic assessment.

Jianqiu, W.; Jialin, Q. (Beijing Graduate School, Petroleum Univ., Beijing (CN))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Biocatalysis in Oil Refining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biocatalysis in Oil Refining focuses on petroleum refining bioprocesses, establishing a connection between science and technology. The micro organisms and biomolecules examined for biocatalytic purposes for oil refining processes are thoroughly detailed. Terminology used by biologists, chemists and engineers is brought into a common language, aiding the understanding of complex biological-chemical-engineering issues. Problems to be addressed by the future R&D activities and by new technologies are described and summarized in the last chapter.

Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL; Ramirez-Corredores, M. M. [BP Global Fuels Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Oil spill response resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from Marathon Oil Company for their encouragement and support. Last, but not least, I would like to thank Lynette Schlandt for her help during my stay at this University. vu TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT. . . . . nl DEDICATION... tool for control. The State of Texas passed and implemented OSPRA (Oil Spill Prevention and Response Act) of 1991. The most significant requirement for both these laws was the need for a Facility Response Plan for the companies. This would help a...

Muthukrishnan, Shankar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

484

Emission factor estimates of cereal waste burning in Spain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Every year more than 5 million ha of cereal fields are affected by fires in order to eliminate cereal waste in Spain. The characteristics of this type of fire with intense flames are similar to those of the African dry savanna heading fires. This paper surveys the atmospheric emission caused by this process by combining results of field and combustion chamber experiments. Combustion chamber experiments show that during the flaming phase 88% of the fire exposed carbon is converted into CO2 and during the smoldering phase this percentage changes to 74%. These combustion chamber experiments also show that the soluble part of the aerosols emitted during the course of fires only represent 3% of the total particulate matter (TPM) produced, being the ions K+ and CI? the predominant ones. The cereal waste fire process can be represented by an arithmetic combination that takes into account the amounts of mass burned during the two phases of the fire: 0.90 flaming +0.10 smoldering. Emission factor estimates from field burning experiment are 13±7 g TPM kg?1(dm) and 2.8±0.2 g NOx kg?1 (dm). Finally, we obtain average emissions of 80–130 Gg TPM, 17–28 Gg NOx, 210–350 Gg CO and 8–14 Tg CO2 in Spain. These emissions represent nearly 25% of the total \\{NOx\\} and 50% of the total CO2 emissions by other pollution sources during the burning period in Spain.

I. Ortiz de Zárate; A. Ezcurra; J.P. Lacaux; Pham Van Dinh

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Optimising the Use of Spent Oil Shale.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Worldwide deposits of oil shales are thought to represent ~3 trillion barrels of oil. Jordanian oil shale deposits are extensive and high quality, and could… (more)

FOSTER, HELEN,JANE

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

during oil shale retorting: retort water and gas condensate.commercial oil shale plant, retort water and gas condensateunique to an oil shale retort water, gas condensate, and

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Enhanced Oil Recovery | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Enhanced Oil Recovery Enhanced Oil Recovery Cross-section illustrating how carbon dioxide and water can be used to flush residual oil from a subsurface rock formation between...

488

Oil Prices and Long-Run Risk.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??I show that relative levels of aggregate consumption and personal oil consumption provide anexcellent proxy for oil prices, and that high oil prices predict low… (more)

READY, ROBERT

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

heavy_oil | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Heavy Oil Publications KMD Contacts Project Summaries EPAct 2005 Arctic Energy Office Announcements Software Stripper Wells Heavy oil is a vast U.S. oil resource that is...

490

Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources The United States has significant natural gas and oil reserves. But many of these resources are increasingly harder to...

491

BIOMASS BURNING IN THE AMAZON: LINKS BETWEEN BURNING, SCIAMACHY TRACE GASES, AND AEROSOL AND SURFACE PROPERTIES FROM THE ORAC-AATSR RETRIEVAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOMASS BURNING IN THE AMAZON: LINKS BETWEEN BURNING, SCIAMACHY TRACE GASES, AND AEROSOL, OX1 3PU, UK 2: Science and Technology Facilities Council Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell://www.iup.uni-bremen.de/sciamachy/ · ESA (A)ATSR World Fire Atlas: http://dup.esrin.esa.it/ionia/wfa/index.asp · MODIS Fire and Thermal

Oxford, University of

492

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze crude oil and natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 8). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule[1], and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2011), (Washington, DC, 2011). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum

493

Economic effects of peak oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assuming that global oil production peaked, this paper uses scenario analysis to show the economic effects of a possible supply shortage and corresponding rise in oil prices in the next decade on different sectors in Germany and other major economies such as the US, Japan, China, the OPEC or Russia. Due to the price-inelasticity of oil demand the supply shortage leads to a sharp increase in oil prices in the second scenario, with high effects on GDP comparable to the magnitude of the global financial crises in 2008/09. Oil exporting countries benefit from high oil prices, whereas oil importing countries are negatively affected. Generally, the effects in the third scenario are significantly smaller than in the second, showing that energy efficiency measures and the switch to renewable energy sources decreases the countries' dependence on oil imports and hence reduces their vulnerability to oil price shocks on the world market.

Christian Lutz; Ulrike Lehr; Kirsten S. Wiebe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Site Release Reports for C-Well Pipeline, UE-25 Large Rocks Test Site, and 29 GSF Test Pits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has implemented a program to reclaim lands disturbed by site characterization at Yucca Mountain. Long term goals of the program are to re-establish processes on disturbed sites that will lead to self-sustaining plant communities. The Biological Opinion for Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Studies required that the U.S. Department of Energy develop a Reclamation Standards and Monitoring Plan to evaluate the success of reclamation efforts. According to the Reclamation Standards and Monitoring Plan, reclaimed sites will be monitored periodically, remediated if necessary, and eventually compared to an appropriate reference area to determine whether reclamation goals have been achieved and the site can be released from further monitoring. Plant cover, density, and species richness (success parameters) on reclaimed sites are compared to 60 percent of the values (success criteria) for the same parameters on the reference area. Small sites (less than 0.1 ha) are evaluated for release using qualitative methods while large sites (greater than 0.1 ha) are evaluated using quantitative methods. In the summer of 2000, 31 small sites reclaimed in 1993 and 1994 were evaluated for reclamation success and potential release from further monitoring. Plant density, cover, and species richness were estimated on the C-Well Pipeline, UE-25 Large Rocks test site, and 29 ground surface facility test pits. Evidence of erosion, reproduction and natural recruitment, exotic species abundance, and animal use (key attributes) also were recorded for each site and used in success evaluations. The C-Well Pipeline and ground surface facility test pits were located in a ''Larrea tridentata - Ephedra nevadensis'' vegetation association while the UE-25 Large Rocks test site was located in an area dominated by ''Coleogyne ramosissima and Ephedra nevadensis''. Reference areas in the same vegetation associations with similar slope and aspect were chosen for comparison to the reclaimed sites. Sixty percent of the reference area means for density, cover, and species richness were compared to the estimated means for the reclaimed sites. Plant density, cover, and species richness at the C-Well Pipeline and UE-25 Large Rocks test site were greater than the success criteria and all key attributes indicated the sites were in acceptable condition. Therefore, these two sites were recommended for release from further monitoring. Of the 29 ground surface facility test pits, 26 met the criterion for density, 21 for cover, and 23 for species richness. When key attributes and conditions of the plant community near each pit were taken into account, 27 of these pits were recommended for release. Success parameters and key attributes at ground surface facility test pits 19 and 20 were inadequate for site release. Transplants of native species were added to these two sites in 2001 to improve density, cover, and species richness.

K.E. Rasmuson

2002-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

495

Photo Gallery - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

burn pit Archeological Excavation Archeological Excavation Archeological Excavation Archeological Excavation Archeological Excavation Archeological Excavation Archeological...

496

Economic Impacts of Losing the Fruit Fly Trapping Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

increase the cost of production, result in price discounts due to chemically burned and pitted fruit

497

Rice University Public Assembly/Special Event  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for cooking or other uses) Open burning (barbecue pits, bonfires) Pyrotechnical special effects materials

Natelson, Douglas

498

Risk assessment of drain valve failure in the K-West basin south loadout pit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The drain valve located in the bottom of the K-West Basin South Loadout Pit (SLOP) could provide an additional leak path from the K Basins if the drain valve were damaged during construction, installation, or operation of the cask loading system. For the K-West Basin SLOP the immersion pail support structure (IPSS) has already been installed, but the immersion pail has not been installed in the IPSS. The objective of this analysis is to evaluate the risk of damaging the drain valve during the remaining installation activities or operation of the cask loading system. Valve damage, as used in this analysis, does not necessarily imply large amounts of the water will be released quickly from the basin, rather valve damage implies that the valve's integrity has been compromised. The analysis process is a risk-based uncertainty analysis where best engineering judgement is used to represent each variable in the analysis. The uncertainty associated with each variable is represented by a probability distribution. The uncertainty is propagated through the analysis by Monte Carlo convolution techniques. The corresponding results are developed as a probability distribution and the risk is expressed in terms of the corresponding complementary cumulative distribution function (''risk curve''). The total risk is the area under the ''risk curve''. The risk of potentially dropping a cask into or on the IPSS and damaging the drain valve is approximately 1 x 10{sup -4} to 2 x 10{sup -5} per year. The risk of objects falling behind the IPSS and damaging the valve is 3 x 10{sup -2} to 6 x 10{sup -3} per year. Both risks are expressed as drain value failure frequencies. The risk of objects falling behind the IPSS and damaging the valve can be significantly reduced by an impact limiter and/or installing a gating or plate over the area bounded by the back of the IPSS and the wall of the SLOP. With either of these actions there is a 90 percent confidence that the frequency of drain valve failure would be less than 1 x 10{sup -6} per year.

MORGAN, R.G.

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

499

Particulate matter characteristics during agricultural waste burning in Taichung City, Taiwan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Agricultural waste burning is performed after harvest periods in June and November in Taiwan. Typically, farmers use open burning to dispose of excess rice straw. PM2.5 and PM2.5–10 measurements were conducted at National Chung Hsing University in Taichung City using a dichotomous sampler. The sampling times were during straw burning periods after rice harvest during 2002–2005. Ionic species including SO42?, NO3?, NH4+, K+, Ca2+, Cl? and Na+ and carbonaceous species (EC and OC) in PM2.5 and PM2.5–10 were analyzed. The results showed that the average PM2.5 and PM2.5–10 concentrations were 123.6 and 31.5 ?g m?3 during agricultural waste burning periods and 32.6 and 21.4 ?g m?3 during non-waste burning periods, respectively. The fine aerosol ionic species including Cl?, K+ and NO3? increased 11.0, 6.7 and 5.5 times during agricultural burning periods compared with periods when agricultural waste burning is not performed. K+ was found mainly in the fine mode during agricultural burning. High nitrogen oxidation ratio was found during agricultural waste burning periods which might be caused by the conversion of Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) to NO3?. It is concluded that agricultural waste burning with low dispersion often causes high PM2.5 and gases pollutant events.

Man-Ting Cheng; Chuen-Liang Horng; Yi-Ru Su; Li-Kai Lin; Yu-Chi Lin; Charles C.-K. Chou

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Fire-resistant pits: Reducing the probability of accidental plutonium dispersal from fuel fires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reductions in risk of Pu dispersal from hydrocarbon fuel fires were estimated using pool and spill fire data. Improvements in FRP temperature capabilities, on a system-independent basis, lead to the following estimated reductions in risk, using three probabilistic temperature distributions normalized to a temperature capability of 640[degree]C (the melting point of plutonium): 1OOO[degree]C - factor of 3 to 5; 11OO[degree]C - factor of 10 to 13; and 1200[degree]C - factor of 120 to 300. The above values would, of course, vary for a different normalization temperature. These values were derived to be as system-independent as possible. Incorporation of fuel fire durations or of longer time-averaging (than the two minutes employed in this study) would tend to increase these FRP improvement factors. Incorporation of propellant fires, burning metal or of combined impact/fire accidents would tend to decrease them. Further studies of fuel fire durations, particularly of a fuel fire duration model, is recommended, as is an uncertainty analysis of the temperature distributions.

Stephens, D.R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z